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Sample records for stimulated human neutrophils

  1. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G; Enghild, Jan J; Praetorius, Jeppe; Borregaard, Niels; Petersen, Steen V

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and increasing evidence supports a role for EC-SOD in the development of an inflammatory response. Here we show that human EC-SOD is present at the cell surface of isolated neutrophils as well as stored within secretory vesicles. Interestingly, we find that EC-SOD mRNA is absent throughout neutrophil maturation indicating that the protein is synthesized by other cells and subsequently endocytosed by the neutrophil. When secretory vesicles were mobilized by neutrophil stimulation using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide in the extracellular space, but does not affect the capacity to generate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Consequently, our data signifies that EC-SOD released from activated neutrophils affects the redox conditions of the extracellular space and may offer protection against highly reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals otherwise generated as a result of respiratory burst activity of activated neutrophils.

  2. Stimulation of human neutrophil leukocyte aerobic glucose metabolism by purified chemotactic factors.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E J; Austen, K F

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of human neutrophils adherent to plastic petri dishes with the purified chemotactic factors C5a and kallikrein increased their rate of aerobic glycolysis 25-120% and the activity of their hexose monophosphate shunt (HMPS) 100-600%, reaching a plateau after 2 hr at 37 degrees C. The stimulation of either pathway required a chemotactically active stimulus since neither C5 nor prekallikrein or inactivated kallikrein could enhance metabolic activity. Marked suppression of the neutrophil chemotactic response by preincubation with a chemotactic factor to achieve deactivation, 5 x 10(-7) M diisopropyl fluorophosphate, or the neutrophil immobilizing factor (NIF) did not prevent the stimulation of HMPS activity or glycolysis by chemotactic factors. The metabolic inhibitors iodoacetate and 6-aminonicotinamide at concentrations which blocked enhancement of glycolysis or HMPS activity, respectively, partially suppressed the chemotactic response of neutrophils to the chemotactic factors. The capacity of a chemotactic factor to stimulate glucose metabolism of human neutrophils is associated with a maximal chemotactic response, but this stimulation is not alone sufficient for chemotaxis. Images PMID:11344574

  3. Human milk effects on neutrophil calcium metabolism: blockade of calcium influx after agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cruz, E; Oelberg, D G; Buescher, E S

    1999-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant cellular mediators of acute inflammation, and human milk suppresses multiple neutrophil functions. We sought to determine whether these effects were mediated through disruption of normal intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Exposure of human neutrophils to human milk, followed by washing, resulted in altered Ca2+ transient responses to formyl-peptide stimulation in which the peak cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([free Ca]) was the same as in unexposed cells, but the postpeak decline in [free Ca] was more rapid. This effect was observed after human milk exposures as brief as 10 s, persisted for up to 4 h after human milk removal, and was concentration dependent. On the basis of experiments examining Ca2+-free conditions followed by Ca2+ supplementation, and experiments examining spontaneous and stimulated manganese and barium influx into neutrophils, the human milk effect was due to blockade of Ca2+ influx. Decreased Ca2+ transient responses to other physiologic stimuli (IL-8, opsonized Staphylococcus aureus, and immune complexes) were observed after human milk exposures. Rat intestinal epithelial cells and HL-60 cells failed to show these effects, suggesting a selective effect on mature inflammatory cells. Characterization of the Ca2+-blocking activity showed it was heat and acid stable in human milk with a molecular mass between 30-100 kD. Commercial human milk lactoferrin exhibited Ca2+ influx blockade activity, but recombinant human lactoferrin showed none. Separation of the activity by heparin affinity chromatography showed that it was distinct from lactoferrin. Human milk-induced blockade of Ca2+ influx provides a potential mechanism for broad suppression of neutrophil functions that may contribute to the antiinflammatory properties of human milk.

  4. Regulation of VASP serine 157 phosphorylation in human neutrophils after stimulation by a chemoattractant.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Rachael E; Jones, Samuel L

    2007-11-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) substrate, which links cellular signaling to cytoskeletal organization and cellular movement. VASP is phosphorylated by PKA on serine 157 (Ser 157), which is required for VASP function in platelet adhesion and fibroblast motility. Our hypothesis is that PKA regulates neutrophil migration through VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to characterize VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation in chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils. fMLF, IL-8, leukotriene B(4), or platelet-activating factor stimulation resulted in an initial increase in VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation, which was maximal by 30 s and was followed by a return to baseline Ser 157 phosphorylation by 10 min. In contrast, stimulation with the nonchemoattractant, proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha did not affect Ser 157 phosphorylation. The kinetics of fMLF-induced VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation levels closely matched the kinetics of the fold-change in F-actin levels in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils. fMLF-induced Ser 157 phosphorylation was abolished by pretreatment with the PKA inhibitor H89 and the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536. In contrast, fMLF-induced Ser 157 phosphorylation was unaffected by the PKC inhibitors calphostin and staurosporine, the PKG inhibitors Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP and KT5823, and the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN-62. Inhibition of adhesion with EDTA or the anti-beta2-integrin antibody IB4 did not alter fMLF-induced VASP phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. These data show that chemoattractant stimulation of human neutrophils induces a rapid and transient PKA-dependent VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation. Adhesion does not appear to be an important regulator of the state of VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation in chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils.

  5. Controlled pseudopod extension of human neutrophils stimulated with different chemoattractants.

    PubMed

    Zhelev, Doncho V; Alteraifi, Abdullatif M; Chodniewicz, David

    2004-07-01

    The formation of pseudopods and lamellae after ligation of chemoattractant sensitive G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for chemotaxis. Here, pseudopod extension was stimulated with chemoattractant delivered from a micropipet. The chemoattractant diffusion and convection mass transport were considered, and it is shown that when the delivery of chemoattractant was limited by diffusion there was a strong chemoattractant gradient along the cell surface. The diffusion-limited delivery of chemoattractant from a micropipet allowed for maintaining an almost constant chemoattractant concentration at the leading edge of single pseudopods during their growth. In these conditions, the rate of pseudopod extension was dependent on the concentration of chemoattractant in the pipet delivering chemoattractant. The pseudopod extension induced using micropipets was oscillatory even in the presence of a constant delivery of chemoattractant. This oscillatory pseudopod extension was controlled by activated RhoA and its downstream effector kinase ROCK and was abolished after the inhibition of RhoA activation with Clostridium botulinium C3 exoenzyme (C3) or the blocking of ROCK activation with Y-27632. The ability of the micropipet assay to establish a well-defined chemoattractant distribution around the activated cell over a wide range of molecular weights of the used chemoattractants allowed for comparison of the effect of chemoattractant stimulation on the dynamics of pseudopod growth. Pseudopod growth was stimulated using N-formylated peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)), platelet activating factor (PAF), leukotriene B4 (LTB(4)), C5a anaphylotoxin (C5a), and interleukin-8 (IL-8), which represent the typical ligands for G-protein coupled chemotactic receptors. The dependence of the rate of pseudopod extension on the concentration of these chemoattractants and their equimolar mixture was measured and shown to be similar for all chemoattractants. The

  6. Controlled Pseudopod Extension of Human Neutrophils Stimulated with Different Chemoattractants

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, Doncho V.; Alteraifi, Abdullatif M.; Chodniewicz, David

    2004-01-01

    The formation of pseudopods and lamellae after ligation of chemoattractant sensitive G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for chemotaxis. Here, pseudopod extension was stimulated with chemoattractant delivered from a micropipet. The chemoattractant diffusion and convection mass transport were considered, and it is shown that when the delivery of chemoattractant was limited by diffusion there was a strong chemoattractant gradient along the cell surface. The diffusion-limited delivery of chemoattractant from a micropipet allowed for maintaining an almost constant chemoattractant concentration at the leading edge of single pseudopods during their growth. In these conditions, the rate of pseudopod extension was dependent on the concentration of chemoattractant in the pipet delivering chemoattractant. The pseudopod extension induced using micropipets was oscillatory even in the presence of a constant delivery of chemoattractant. This oscillatory pseudopod extension was controlled by activated RhoA and its downstream effector kinase ROCK and was abolished after the inhibition of RhoA activation with Clostridium botulinium C3 exoenzyme (C3) or the blocking of ROCK activation with Y-27632. The ability of the micropipet assay to establish a well-defined chemoattractant distribution around the activated cell over a wide range of molecular weights of the used chemoattractants allowed for comparison of the effect of chemoattractant stimulation on the dynamics of pseudopod growth. Pseudopod growth was stimulated using N-formylated peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)), platelet activating factor (PAF), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), C5a anaphylotoxin (C5a), and interleukin-8 (IL-8), which represent the typical ligands for G-protein coupled chemotactic receptors. The dependence of the rate of pseudopod extension on the concentration of these chemoattractants and their equimolar mixture was measured and shown to be similar for all chemoattractants. The

  7. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  8. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  9. Enterococcus faecium stimulates human neutrophils via the formyl-peptide receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Bloes, Dominik Alexander; Otto, Michael; Peschel, Andreas; Kretschmer, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    The human formyl-peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX) senses phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins produced by pathogenic staphylococcal species and plays a crucial role in directing neutrophil influx during staphylococcal infection. However, it has remained unclear if FPR2 responds also to molecules from other bacterial pathogens. Here we analyzed a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens and found that apart from staphylococci only certain enterococcal strains have the capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX. Most of the analyzed Enterococcus faecium but only sporadic Enterococcus faecalis strains released FPR2/ALX-stimulating molecules leading to neutrophil calcium ion fluxes, chemotaxis, and complement receptor upregulation. Among ten test strains vancomycin-resistant E. faecium had a significantly higher capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX than vancomycin-susceptible strains, suggesting an association of strong FPR2/ALX activation with health-care associated strains. The enterococcal FPR2/ALX agonists were found to be peptides or proteins, which appear, however, to be unrelated to staphylococcal PSMs in sequence and physicochemical properties. Enterococci are among the most frequent invasive bacterial pathogens but the basis of enterococcal virulence and immune activation has remained incompletely understood. Our study indicates that previously unrecognized proteinaceous agonists contribute to Enterococcus-host interaction and underscores the importance of FPR2/ALX in host defense against major endogenous bacterial pathogens.

  10. Iron-chelating agent desferrioxamine stimulates formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in human blood-derived neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Völlger, Lena; Akong-Moore, Kathryn; Cox, Linda; Goldmann, Oliver; Wang, Yanming; Schäfer, Simon T.; Naim, Hassan Y.; Nizet, Victor; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a significant innate immune defense mechanism against microbial infection that complements other neutrophil functions including phagocytosis and degranulation of antimicrobial peptides. NETs are decondensed chromatin structures in which antimicrobial components (histones, antimicrobial peptides and proteases) are deployed and mediate immobilization of microbes. Here we describe an effect of iron chelation on the phenotype of NET formation. Iron-chelating agent desferrioxamine (DFO) showed a modest but significant induction of NETs by freshly isolated human neutrophils as visualized and quantified by immunocytochemistry against histone–DNA complexes. Further analyses revealed that NET induction by iron chelation required NADPH-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as protease and peptidyl-arginine-deiminase 4 (PAD4) activities, three key mechanistic pathways previously linked to NET formation. Our results demonstrate that iron chelation by DFO contributes to the formation of NETs and suggest a target for pharmacological manipulation of NET activity. PMID:27129288

  11. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  12. The flavonols quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, and galangin inhibit the net oxygen consumption by immune complex-stimulated human and rabbit neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Santos, Everton O L; Kabeya, Luciana M; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Simões-Ambrosio, Livia M C; Lucisano-Valim, Yara M

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated human neutrophils exhibit increased net oxygen consumption (NOC) due to the conversion of O2 into the superoxide anion by the NADPH oxidase enzymatic complex during the respiratory burst. In several inflammatory diseases, overproduction of these oxidants causes tissue damage. The present study aims to: (a) optimize the experimental conditions used to measure the NOC in serum-opsonized zymosan (OZ)- and insoluble immune complex (i-IC)-stimulated human and rabbit neutrophils; and (b) compare the effect of four flavonols (quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, and galangin) on this activity. We used a Clark-type oxygen electrode to measure the NOC of stimulated neutrophils. Eliciting the neutrophil respiratory burst with OZ and i-IC yielded similar maximum O2 uptake levels within the same species, but the human neutrophil NOC was almost four times higher than the rabbit neutrophil NOC. The optimal experimental conditions established for both cell types were 4 x 10(6) neutrophils mL(-1), 2 mg mL(-1) OZ, and 240 microg mL(-1) i-IC. Upon stimulation with OZ or i-IC, the tested flavonols reduced the human and rabbit neutrophil NOC in the same order of potency--quercetin and galangin were the most and the least potent, respectively. These compounds were around four times more effective in inhibiting the rabbit as compared to the human neutrophil NOC, respectively. The four flavonols were not toxic to human or rabbit neutrophils. The experimental conditions used are suitable for both the determination of human and rabbit neutrophil NOC and for the assessment of the modulatory effects of natural compounds on these activities. The relationship between the level of NOC and the inhibitory potency of the flavonols suggests that rabbit neutrophils can be useful experimental models to predict the effect of drugs on immune complex-stimulated human neutrophils.

  13. Pharmacological analysis for mechanisms of GPI-80 release from tumour necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Araki, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-10-01

    1 GPI-80, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein initially identified on human neutrophils, plays a role(s) in the regulation of beta2 integrin function. Previous studies have shown that GPI-80 is sublocated in secretory vesicles. It is also found in soluble form in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and in the culture supernatant of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils. To understand the behaviour of GPI-80 under conditions of stimulation, we investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on its expression and release. We also probed the mechanism of its release with various pharmacologic tools. 2 TNF-alpha induced the release of GPI-80 from human neutrophils in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (in the range of 1-100 u ml(-1) and 30-120 min, respectively), but did not affect surface GPI-80 levels. 3 Cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 but not PD98059 inhibited TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release and neutrophil adherence at the same concentration. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced GPI-80 release was inhibited by blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to components of Mac-1 (CD11b and CD18). 4 Antioxidants (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine) inhibited GPI-80 release by TNF-alpha stimulation, but superoxide dismutase did not. Antioxidants but not superoxide dismutase reduced an intracellular oxidation state. 5 These findings indicate that TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release from human neutrophils depends upon adherence via beta2 integrins. They also suggest that cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 inhibit GPI-80 release by suppressing signals for cell adherence, rather than by a direct effect on its secretion. Finally, we suggest that GPI-80 release involves an intracellular change in a redox state.

  14. SC-41930: An inhibitor of leukotriene B4-stimulated human neutrophil functions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, B.S.; Villani-Price, D.; Keith, R.H.; Zemaitis, J.M.; Bauer, R.F.; Leonard, R.; Djuric, S.W.; Shone, R.L. )

    1989-12-01

    SC-41930 was evaluated for effects on human neutrophil chemotaxis and degranulation. At concentrations up to 100 microM, SC-41930 alone exhibited no effect on neutrophil migration, but dose-dependently inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis induced by leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in a modified Boyden chamber. Concentrations of SC-41930 from 0.3 microM to 3 microM competitively inhibited LTB4-induced chemotaxis with a pA2 value of 6.35. While inactive at 10 microM against C5a-induced chemotaxis, SC-41930 inhibited N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced chemotaxis, with 10 times less potency than against LTB4-induced chemotaxis. SC-41930 inhibited (3H)LTB4 and (3H)fMLP binding to their receptor sites on human neutrophils with KD values of 0.2 microM and 2 microM, respectively. SC-41930 also inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis induced by 20-OH LTB or 12(R)-HETE. At concentrations up to 10 microM, SC-41930 alone did not cause neutrophil degranulation, but inhibited LTB4-induced degranulation in a noncompetitive manner. SC-41930 also inhibited fMLP- or C5a-induced degranulation, but was about 8 and 10 times less effective for fMLP and C5a, respectively. The results indicate that SC-41930 is a human neutrophil LTB4 receptor antagonist with greater specificity for LTB4 than for fMLP or C5a receptors.

  15. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  16. Trans-basement membrane migration of eosinophils induced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils from human peripheral blood in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Fuyumi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Noguchi, Toru; Araki, Ryuichiro; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Soma, Tomoyuki; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the airways of severe asthmatics, an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils is often observed despite high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We previously reported that interleukin-8-stimulated neutrophils induced trans-basement membrane migration (TBM) of eosinophils, suggesting the link between neutrophils and eosinophils. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the airway increase in severe asthma. As neutrophils express Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and can release chemoattractants for eosinophils, we investigated whether LPS-stimulated neutrophils modify eosinophil TBM. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and severe asthmatics. Eosinophil TBM was examined using a modified Boyden's chamber technique. Eosinophils were added to the upper compartment, and neutrophils and LPS were added to the lower compartment. Migrated eosinophils were measured by eosinophil peroxidase assays. LPS-stimulated neutrophils induced eosinophil TBM (about 10-fold increase), although LPS or neutrophils alone did not. A leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist, a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist or an anti-TLR4 antibody decreased eosinophil TBM enhanced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils by almost half. Neutrophils from severe asthmatics induced eosinophil TBM and lower concentrations of LPS augmented neutrophil-induced eosinophil TBM. These results suggest that the combination of neutrophils and LPS leads eosinophils to accumulate in the airways, possibly involved the pathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:27730145

  17. Extracellular proton release by stimulated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    van Zwieten, R.; Wever, R.; Hamers, M.N.; Weening, R.S.; Roos, D.

    1981-07-01

    We have tried to elucidate the mechanism of phagosome acidification in human neutrophils. Assuming that phenomena occurring at the plasma membrane reflect reactions in the phagocytic vacuoles, we have stimulated human neutrophils with agents that induce a ''respiratory burst,'' and we have measured the release of protons into the extracellular medium. Phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and serum-opsonized zymosan particles each caused a rapid release of protons, concomitant with the increase in oxygen consumption. The stimulated release of protons was strictly coupled to the increase respiration of the cells, because inhibition of the respiration of either anaerobiosis, chlorpromazine, or glycolytic inhibitors also inhibited the release of protons. Also, in the presence of the above-mentioned stimulating agents, neutrophils from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease enhanced neither respiration not proton release. In normal cells, the ratio of deltaH+/-deltaO2 was 1.04 +/- 0.19 (mean +/ SD, n . 13). The mechanism of this proton release is not clear. The amount of lactic and carbonic acid produced by stimulated neutrophils was inadequate to explain the amount of protons released. Perhydroxyl radicals were also ruled out as the source of the protons. Because the cells did not release measurable amounts of phosphate ions, a phosphate-hydroxyl-ion antiport was also excluded. Finally, the lack of any effect of uncouplers renders it unlikely that a respiration-driven proton gradient is built up across the plasma membrane.

  18. Involvement of a Botulinum Toxin-Sensitive 22-kDa G Protein in Stimulated Exocytosis of Human Neutrophils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS ]involvement -of -a Botulinun toxin -sesftUv&2_2At6-d -- Protein in stinulated exocytosis of humnan neutrophi1s. WICD I. AUTHOR(S) Nath...Botulinum Toxin -Sensitive 22-kDa G Protein in Stimulated Exocytosis of Human Neutrophils jaymaree Nath,’ Annette Powledge, and Daniel G. Wright2...observed. Although both peslussis toxin and ST-O Inhibited excocytosis In FlMvLP-stimvulated PMNs, the inhibitory effects o( the two toxins were found to be

  19. Mobilization of sialidase from intracellular stores to the surface of human neutrophils and its role in stimulated adhesion responses of these cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, A S; Wright, D G

    1991-01-01

    Desialation of cell surfaces has been associated with the initiation or modification of diverse cellular functions. In these studies we have examined the subcellular distribution of sialidase (SE) in human neutrophils as well as the mobilization of this enzyme following neutrophil activation. Separation of subcellular fractions by density gradient centrifugation showed that SE is present not only in neutrophil primary and secondary granule populations, like lysozyme, but also in plasma membrane fractions. Neutrophil activation was associated with a redistribution of SE from secondary granule-enriched fractions to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, SE activity detected on the surface of intact neutrophils with a fluorescent SE substrate increased rapidly after activation with kinetics that matched both the loss of total cell-associated sialic acid and release of free sialic acid from the cells. These activation-dependent events were in each case blocked by incubation of neutrophils with the SE inhibitor, 2-deoxy-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid. Aggregation responses of neutrophils as well as adhesion responses to nylon and plastic surfaces were also inhibited by 2-deoxyNANA. Our findings indicate that the activation-dependent desialation of the neutrophil surface is associated with mobilization of an endogenous SE to the plasma membrane and has a role in stimulated adhesion responses of these cells. Images PMID:1721626

  20. Sulfur mustard primes human neutrophils for increased degranulation and stimulates cytokine release via TRPM2/p38 MAPK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Hwa-Yong; Hong, Chang-Won; Lee, Si-Nae; Kwon, Min-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Song, Dong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2′-bis-chloroethyl-sulfide; SM) has been a military threat since the World War I. The emerging threat of bioterrorism makes SM a major threat not only to military but also to civilian world. SM injury elicits an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils. Although SM was reported to prime neutrophils, the mechanism has not been identified yet. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of SM-induced priming in human neutrophils. SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent fashion. Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 2 inhibitors (clotrimazole, econazole and flufenamic acid) and silencing of TRPM2 by shRNA attenuated SM-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase. SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules in response to activation by fMLP as previously reported. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, inhibited SM-induced priming. Neither PD98057, an ERK inhibitor, nor SP600215, a JNK inhibitor, inhibited SM-induced priming. In addition, SM enhanced phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 and release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. SB203580 inhibited SM-induced NF-kB phosphorylation and cytokine release. These results suggest the involvement of TRPM2/p38 MAPK pathway in SM-induced priming and cytokines release in neutrophils. -- Highlights: ► SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils through TPRM2-mediated calcium influx. ► SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules. ► SM enhanced p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. ► SM enhanced release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from human neutrophils. ► SB203580 inhibited SM-induced priming, NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and cytokine release.

  1. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  2. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  3. Lipoxin A4 and lipoxin B4 stimulate the release but not the oxygenation of arachidonic acid in human neutrophils: Dissociation between lipid remodeling and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.; Fiore, S.; Luscinskas, F.W.; Serhan, C.N. )

    1990-06-01

    The profiles of actions of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and lipoxin B4 (LXB4), two lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids, were examined with human neutrophils. At nanomolar concentrations, LXA4 and LXB4 each stimulated the release of (1-14C)arachidonic acid from esterified sources in neutrophils. Lipoxin-induced release of (1-14C)arachidonic acid was both dose- and time-dependent and was comparable to that induced by the chemotactic peptide f-met-leu-phe. Time-course studies revealed that lipoxin A4 and lipoxin B4 each induced a biphasic release of (1-14C)arachidonic acid, which was evident within seconds (5-15 sec) in its initial phase and minutes (greater than 30 sec) in the second phase. In contrast, the all-trans isomers of LXA4 and LXB4 did not provoke (1-14C)AA release. Lipoxin-induced release of arachidonic acid was inhibited by prior treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin but not by its beta-oligomers, suggesting the involvement of guaninine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in this event. Dual radiolabeling of neutrophil phospholipid classes with (1-14C)arachidonic acid and (3H)palmitic acid showed that phosphatidylcholine was a major source of lipoxin-induced release of (1-14C)arachidonic acid. They also demonstrated that lipoxins rapidly stimulate both formation of phosphatidic acid as well as phospholipid remodeling. Although both LXA4 and LXB4 (10(-8)-10(-6) M) stimulated the release of (1-14C)arachidonic acid, neither compound evoked its oxygenation by either the 5- or 15-lipoxygenase pathways (including the formation of LTB4, 20-COOH-LTB4, 5-HETE, or 15-HETE). LXA4 and LXB4 (10(-7) M) each stimulated the elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ as monitored with Fura 2-loaded cells, albeit to a lesser extent than equimolar concentrations of FMLP. Neither lipoxin altered the binding of (3H)LTB4 to its receptor on neutrophils.

  4. IL-4 induces neutrophilic maturation of HL-60 cells and activation of human peripheral blood neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Bober, L A; Waters, T A; Pugliese-Sivo, C C; Sullivan, L M; Narula, S K; Grace, M J

    1995-01-01

    IL-4 is a T-helper cell derived cytokine that has effects on myelomonocytic cell maturation and activation. We have studied the effect of IL-4 on neutrophilic maturation using the cell line HL-60 and found that it has a profound effect on the maturation and activation of the cell line. The treatment of HL-60 cells with recombinant hu IL-4 (0.15 to 15.0 ng/ml) induced a shift in the percentage of HL-60 cells staining positive for chloroacetate esterase enzyme activity (indicating commitment to the neutrophilic lineage). IL-4 increased surface expression of the neutrophil-lineage antigen WEM G11, the complement receptors CR3 (CD11b) and CR1 (CD35), but not for the monocyte differentiation antigen CD14. IL-4 treated HL-60 cells demonstrated enhanced Fc- and complement-mediated phagocytic capacity and increased hexose-monophosphate shunt activity. In addition, IL-4 was capable of sustaining the neutrophil maturation of HL-60 cells that had been pre-treated for 24 h with DMSO. To investigate the effect of IL-4 on the mature neutrophil, we studied freshly isolated and rested human peripheral blood neutrophils. In the absence of other stimuli, neutrophils were induced by IL-4 to have significantly elevated phagocytic responses. The response was specific since treatment with anti-human IL-4 abolished phagocytic stimulation. Finally, IL-4 treatment also stimulated resting neutrophils to migrate toward zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and human IL-5. The results demonstrate that IL-4 is a potent maturation factor for myelocytes to become neutrophils and that IL-4 can stimulate resting mature neutrophils. PMID:7529148

  5. Isolation and Functional Analysis of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Douglas B; Long Priel, Debra A; Chu, Jessica; Zarember, Kol A

    2015-11-02

    This unit describes the isolation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from blood using dextran sedimentation and Percoll or Ficoll-Paque density gradients. Assays of neutrophil functions including respiratory burst activation, phagocytosis, and microbial killing are also described.

  6. Isolation and Functional Analysis of Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Douglas B.; Long Priel, Debra A.; Chu, Jessica; Zarember, Kol A.

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes the isolation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from blood using dextran sedimentation and Percoll or Ficoll-Paque density gradients. Assays of neutrophil functions including respiratory burst activation, phagocytosis, and microbial killing are also described. PMID:26528633

  7. Granulophysin is located in the membrane of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils and mobilizes to the plasma membrane following cell stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cham, B. P.; Gerrard, J. M.; Bainton, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Granulophysin, a protein described in platelet dense granule membranes, has been shown to be similar or identical to CD63, a lysosomal membrane protein. We have previously shown granulophysin to be present in neutrophils using immunofluorescence. We now localize granulophysin to the neutrophil azurophilic granules by fine structural immunocytochemistry. Granulophysin expression on the surface membrane of the neutrophil is increased following stimulation of the cells, demonstrated by flow cytometry and fine structural immunocytochemistry. A similar pattern is shown for an anti-CD63 antibody. Incubation of activated neutrophils with D545, a monoclonal antibody to granulophysin, blocks subsequent binding of anti-CD63 antibodies to the cell surface, and anti-CD63 antibodies prevent subsequent binding of D545 as assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Our results support the homology of CD63 and granulophysin previously demonstrated in platelets and confirm CD63 as an activation marker in neutrophils and the first azurophilic granule membrane marker of neutrophils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8203473

  8. Surfactant modulates calcium response of neutrophils to physiologic stimulation via cell membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cruz, E; Buescher, E S; Oelberg, D G

    2000-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) reduces inflammation in the lung by poorly understood mechanisms. We have observed that surfactant-associated proteins (SAP) insert monovalent cation channels in artificial membranes. Neutrophils are primary mediators of acute pulmonary inflammation, and their functions are activated by increases in cytosolic ionized calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) and by changes in membrane potential. We hypothesize that PS inserts SAP-dependent cation channels in neutrophils, causing membrane depolarization, altered [Ca2+] response, and depressed activation. Human neutrophils were isolated, exposed to PS+SAP (1% Survanta), PS-SAP (1% Exosurf), or buffer, and washed before activating with selected stimulants. PS+SAP reduced phorbol ester- and formyl peptide-stimulated adherence and aggregation by 38% (p < 0.05) and 54% (p < 0.02), respectively. PS+SAP also inhibited the formyl peptide-induced [Ca2+] response of neutrophils (p < 0.01), but only in the presence of external Ca2+. Further characterization of this inhibition demonstrated that PS+SAP blocked formyl peptide-induced influx of both Ca2+ and Mn2+, and that this inhibition was present during activation by other neutrophil stimulants (IL-8, immune complexes). Prior depolarization of neutrophils with gramicidin-D similarly inhibited the [Ca2+] response of neutrophils to formyl peptide, and analysis of neutrophil membrane potential by 3,3'-dipentyloxaearbocyanine iodide (diOC5(3)) fluorescence revealed that PS+SAP induced rapid neutrophil depolarization. In contrast, PS-SAP exhibited little effect on neutrophil function, [Ca2+], or membrane potential. We conclude that PS+SAP decreases neutrophil adherence and aggregation responses, blocks Ca2+ influx after physiologic stimulation, and decreases membrane potential. We speculate that these effects are caused by membrane depolarization via SAP-dependent cation channel insertion, and that all of these effects contribute to the antiinflammatory properties of

  9. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  10. Dissociation between the translocation and the activation of Akt in fMLP-stimulated human neutrophils--effect of prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Burelout, Chantal; Naccache, Paul H; Bourgoin, Sylvain G

    2007-06-01

    PGE(2) and other cAMP-elevating agents are known to down-regulate most functions stimulated by fMLP in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We reported previously that the inhibitory potential of PGE(2) resides in its capacity to suppress fMLP-stimulated PI-3Kgamma activation via the PGE(2) receptor EP(2) and hence, to decrease phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P(3)] formation. Akt activity is stimulated by fMLP through phosphorylation on threonine 308 (Thr308) and serine 473 (Ser473) by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and MAPK-AP kinase (APK)-APK-2 (MAPKAPK-2), respectively, in a PI-3K-dependent manner. Despite the suppression of fMLP-induced PI-3Kgamma activation observed in the presence of PGE(2), we show that Akt is fully phosphorylated on Thr308 and Ser473. However, fMLP-induced Akt translocation is decreased markedly in this context. PGE(2) does not affect the phosphorylation of MAPKAPK-2 but decreases the translocation of PDK1 induced by fMLP. Other cAMP-elevating agents such as adenosine (Ado) similarly block the fMLP-induced PI-3Kgamma activation process but do not inhibit Akt phosphorylation. However, Akt activity stimulated by fMLP is down-regulated slightly by agonists that elevate cAMP levels. Whereas protein kinase A is not involved in the maintenance of Akt phosphorylation, it is required for the inhibition of Akt translocation by PGE(2). Moreover, inhibition of fMLP-stimulated PI-3Kdelta activity by the selective inhibitor IC87114 only partially affects the late phase of Akt phosphorylation in the presence of PGE(2). Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP-elevating agents, such as PGE(2) or Ado, are able to induce an alternative mechanism of Akt activation by fMLP in which the translocation of Akt to PI(3,4,5)P(3)-enriched membranes is not required prior to its phosphorylation.

  11. Structural divergence of GPI-80 in activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Takeda, Yuji; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2007-07-27

    GPI-80 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that is mainly expressed in human neutrophils. Previous studies using 3H9, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against GPI-80, suggested that GPI-80 regulates leukocyte adherence and migration through Mac-1. GPI-80, which is anchored at the plasma membrane in resting neutrophils, moves into the pseudopodia and is released from activated human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophil activation affects GPI-80 dynamics using a new anti-GPI-80 mAb, designated 4D4, which is directed against the form of GPI-80 found on resting human neutrophils. Similar to 3H9, 4D4 influences Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion. Treatment of purified GPI-80 with periodic acid and trypsin indicated that 3H9 and 4D4 recognize peptide and carbohydrate moieties, respectively. Stimulation with fMLP decreased the binding of 4D4 to GPI-80 on the neutrophil surface but increased the overall expression of GPI-80, as visualized by the 3H9 signal. Confocal laser microscopy revealed the 4D4 signal mainly on cell bodies and at a low level on pseudopodia during migration toward increasing concentrations of fMLP, whereas the 3H9 signal was observed in both areas. In addition, soluble GPI-80 released from activated neutrophils did not bind 4D4. These results suggest that there are two populations of GPI-80 that differ in the ability to bind 4D4. The 4D4-recognized form may regulate Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion, and may subsequently be converted to a 4D4-unrecognized form during neutrophil activation.

  12. Potentiation and inhibition of migration of human neutrophils by auranofin.

    PubMed Central

    Elferink, J G; de Koster, B M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--As auranofin resembles some neutrophil activating sulphur containing compounds, it was decided to investigate whether it had activating effects on neutrophil migration in addition to the published inhibitory effects. METHODS--The Boyden chamber assay was used to determine the migration velocity of human neutrophils. The difference between chemotaxis and chemokinesis was established with a chequerboard assay. RESULTS--Low concentrations of auranofin stimulated human neutrophil migration; concentrations of auranofin higher than 1 mumol/l were inhibitory. Inhibitors of leukotriene formation, or of protein kinase C, had the same effect on auranofin induced potentiation of migration as on fMLP activated migration. Auranofin, at a concentration of 100 nmol/l, caused a transient increase in the cGMP level of neutrophils. The auranofin induced increase in migration was strongly inhibited by methylene blue and by LY83583, two inhibitors of cGMP accumulation. CONCLUSIONS--The auranofin induced enhancement of migration is partly due to a chemokinetic effect, but mainly due to a chemotactic effect. The potentiating effect of auranofin on migration is not specifically due to the ability of the drug to inhibit protein kinase C activity or to generate leukotrienes. These results suggest that the enhancement of neutrophil migration by low levels of auranofin is related to the enhancement of cGMP levels in neutrophils. PMID:8215623

  13. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil.

  14. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil. PMID:27034964

  15. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity.

  16. Photothermal image cytometry of human neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitry

    2001-07-01

    Photothermal imaging, when being applied to the study of living cells, provides morpho-functional information about the cell populations. In technical terms, the method is complementary to optical microscopy. The photothermal method was used for cell imaging and quantitative studies. Preliminary results of the studies on living human neutrophils are presented. Differences between normal and pathological neutrophil populations from blood of healthy donors and patients with saracoidosis and pleuritis are demonstrated.

  17. IL-17 stimulates differentiation of human anti-inflammatory macrophages and phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils in response to IL-10 and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Zizzo, Gaetano; Cohen, Philip L

    2013-05-15

    Exposure of human monocytes/macrophages to anti-inflammatory agents, such as IL-10 or glucocorticoids, can lead to two separate fates: either Fas/CD95-mediated apoptosis or differentiation into regulatory and efferocytic M2c (CD14(bright)CD16(+)CD163(+)Mer tyrosine kinase(+)) macrophages. We found that the prevalent effect depends on the type of Th cytokine environment and on the stage of monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. In particular, the presence of IFN-γ (Th1 inflammation) or the prolonged exposure to IL-4 (chronic Th2 inflammation) promotes apoptosis of monocytes/macrophages and causes resistance to M2c differentiation, thus provoking impaired clearance of apoptotic neutrophils, uncontrolled accumulation of apoptotic cells, and persistent inflammation. In contrast, the presence of IL-17 (Th17 environment) prevents monocyte/macrophage apoptosis and elicits intense M2c differentiation, thus ensuring efficient clearance of apoptotic neutrophils and restoration of anti-inflammatory conditions. Additionally, the Th environment affects the expression of two distinct Mer tyrosine kinase isoforms: IL-4 downregulates the membrane isoform but induces an intracellular and Gas6-dependent isoform, whereas IFN-γ downregulates both and IL-17 upregulates both. Our data support an unexpected role for IL-17 in orchestrating resolution of innate inflammation, whereas IFN-γ and IL-4 emerge as major determinants of IL-10 and glucocorticoid resistance.

  18. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  19. Human neutrophils produce extracellular traps against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Mejía, Susana P; Cano, Luz E; López, Juan A; Hernandez, Orville; González, Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Neutrophils play an important role as effector cells and contribute to the resistance of the host against microbial pathogens. Neutrophils are able to produce extracellular traps (NETs) in response to medically important fungi, including Aspergillus spp., Candida albicans and Cryptococcus gattii. However, NET production in response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has yet to be studied. We have demonstrated that human neutrophils produce NETs against both conidia and yeasts of P. brasiliensis. Although the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) did not alter NET production against conidia, it partially suppressed NET formation against P. brasiliensis yeasts. Cytochalasin D or IFN-γ did not affect the production of NETs against the fungus. Additionally, a mutant strain of P. brasiliensis with reduced expression of an alternative oxidase induced significantly higher levels of NETs in comparison with the WT strain. Finally, c.f.u. quantification of P. brasiliensis showed no significant differences when neutrophils were treated with DPI, DNase I or cytochalasin D as compared with untreated cells. These data establish that NET formation by human neutrophils appears to be either dependent or independent of reactive oxygen species production, correlating with the fungal morphotype used for stimulation. However, this mechanism was ineffective in killing the fungus.

  20. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  1. Cationic liposomes evoke proinflammatory mediator release and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) toward human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hsu, Ching-Yun; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chen, Chun-Han; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-04-01

    Cationic liposomes are widely used as nanocarriers for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. The cationic components of liposomes can induce inflammatory responses. This study examined the effect of cationic liposomes on human neutrophil activation. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate (SME) was incorporated into liposomes as the cationic additive. The liposomes' cytotoxicity and their induction of proinflammatory mediators, intracellular calcium, and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were investigated. The interaction of the liposomes with the plasma membrane triggered the stimulation of neutrophils. CTAB liposomes induced complete leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at all concentrations tested, whereas SME liposomes released LDH in a concentration-dependent manner. CTAB liposomes proved to more effectively activate neutrophils compared with SME liposomes, as indicated by increased superoxide anion and elastase levels. Calcium influx increased 9-fold after treatment with CTAB liposomes. This influx was not changed by SME liposomes compared with the untreated control. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence images indicated the presence of NETs after treatment with cationic liposomes. NETs could be quickly formed, within minutes, after CTAB liposomal treatment. In contrast to this result, NET formation was slowly and gradually increased by SME liposomes, within 4h. Based on the data presented here, it is important to consider the toxicity of cationic liposomes during administration in the body. This is the first report providing evidence of NET production induced by cationic liposomes.

  2. Effect of L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodosthoma snake venom on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adriana S; da S Setúbal, Sulamita; Xavier, Caroline V; Lacouth-Silva, Fabianne; Kayano, Anderson M; Pires, Weverson L; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; Boeri de Castro, Onassis; da Silva, Silvana D; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2014-03-01

    The in vitro effects of LAAO, an l-amino acid oxidase isolated from Calloselasma rhodosthoma snake venom, on isolated human neutrophil function were investigated. LAAO showed no toxicity on neutrophils. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, LAAO induced the superoxide anion production by isolated human neutrophil. This toxin, in its native form, is also able to stimulate the production of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils, suggesting that its primary structure is essential for stimulation the cell. Moreover, the incubation of LAAO and phenol red medium did not induce the production of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, LAAO was able to stimulate neutrophils to release proinflammatory mediators such as IL-8 and TNF-α as well as NETs liberation. Together, the data showed that the LAAO triggers relevant proinflammatory events. Particular regions of the molecule distinct from the LAAO catalytic site may be involved in the onset of inflammatory events.

  3. Donor dependent, interferon-γ induced HLA-DR expression on human neutrophils in vivo

    PubMed Central

    REINISCH, W; LICHTENBERGER, C; STEGER, G; TILLINGER, W; SCHEINER, O; GANGL, A; MAURER, D; WILLHEIM, M

    2003-01-01

    Neutrophils are effector cells of innate immune responses. Stimulated by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) to express HLA-DR, neutrophils acquire accessory cell functions for superantigen-mediated T cell activation. In vitro HLA-DR induction on neutrophils varies in a functionally relevant way as levels of MHC class II expression and magnitude of neutrophil induced T cell responses are correlated functions. The aim of this study was to assess whether IFN-γ induces HLA-DR on human neutrophils in a donor dependent fashion in vivo and to define regulatory events operative in MHC class II expression of neutrophils. In vivo administration of rhIFN-γ in 55 patients with renal cell carcinoma resulted in a varying increase of HLA-DR on neutrophils. By setting a cut-off for response at>10% HLA-DR positive neutrophils, HLA-DR responders (51%) were as frequent as nonresponders (49%). In vivo kinetic studies revealed a peak expression of HLA-DR on neutrophils 48 h after rhIFN-γ application, while nonresponders remained HLA-DR negative over a 72-h period. In vitro IFN-γ stimulated neutrophils recapitulated the response profiles observed in vivo. No differences in IFN-γ dependent CD64 and invariant chain expression, and IFN-γ serum levels were observed among the response subgroups. HLA-DR mRNA was detected in neutrophils from rhIFN-γ treated responders and nonresponders, HLA-DR protein solely in lysates of responder neutrophils. IFN-γ stimulated HLA-DR expression on neutrophils is subject to donor dependent variations in vivo, which result from rather post-transcriptional than transcriptional regulation. Due to their abundance in inflammatory reactions heterogeneous HLA-DR expression by neutrophils could determine the outcome of superantigen-driven diseases. PMID:12930377

  4. Hypochlorous acid regulates neutrophil extracellular trap release in humans.

    PubMed

    Palmer, L J; Cooper, P R; Ling, M R; Wright, H J; Huissoon, A; Chapple, I L C

    2012-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) comprise extracellular chromatin and granule protein complexes that immobilize and kill bacteria. NET release represents a recently discovered, novel anti-microbial strategy regulated non-exclusively by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), particularly hydrogen peroxide. This study aimed to characterize the role of ROIs in the process of NET release and to identify the dominant ROI trigger. We employed various enzymes, inhibitors and ROIs to record their effect fluorometrically on in vitro NET release by human peripheral blood neutrophils. Treatment with exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) supported the established link between hydrogen peroxide and NET production. However, treatment with myeloperoxidase inhibitors and direct addition of hypochlorous acid (HOCl; generated in situ from sodium hypochlorite) established that HOCl was a necessary and sufficient ROI for NET release. This was confirmed by the ability of HOCl to stimulate NET release in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patient neutrophils which, due to the lack of a functional NADPH oxidase, also lack the capacity for NET release in response to classical stimuli. Moreover, the exogenous addition of taurine, abundantly present within the neutrophil cytosol, abrogated NET production stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and HOCl, providing a novel mode of cytoprotection by taurine against oxidative stress by taurine.

  5. Synergy between RU 28965 (roxithromycin) and human neutrophils for bactericidal activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Labro, M T; Amit, N; Babin-Chevaye, C; Hakim, J

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro effects of RU 28965 (roxithromycin), a new semisynthetic macrolide, on human neutrophil activity were compared with those of erythromycin. RU 28965, at a concentration as low as 0.1 microgram/ml, significantly enhanced the phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by neutrophils. Erythromycin displayed a less stimulating effect in a dose-dependent manner. Phagocytosis of Klebsiella pneumoniae was also increased after incubation of neutrophils with RU 28965, but killing was not altered. Neutrophil chemotaxis, myeloperoxidase activity, and O2 consumption were unchanged in the presence of RU 28965. PMID:3019233

  6. The beetroot component betanin modulates ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Kostrzewa, Artur; Łuczak, Michał; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of betanin, one of the beetroot major components, on ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human resting and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate polymorphonuclear neutrophils, one of the key elements of the inflammatory response. Incubation of neutrophils with betanin in the concentration range 2-500 µM resulted in significant inhibition of ROS production (by 15-46%, depending on the ROS detection assay). The antioxidant capacity of betanin was most prominently expressed in the chemiluminescence measurements. This compound decreased also the percentage of DNA in comet tails in stimulated neutrophils, but only at the 24 h time point. In resting neutrophils an increased level of DNA in comet tails was observed. Betanin did not affect the activity of caspase-3, in resting neutrophils, but significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in stimulated neutrophils. The western blot analysis showed, however, an increased level of caspase-3 cleavage products as a result of betanin treatment both in resting and stimulated neutrophils. The results indicate that betanin may be responsible for the effect of beetroot products on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and its consequences, DNA damage and apoptosis. The dose and time dependent effects on these processes require further studies.

  7. Motility and Adhesiveness in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. Wayne; Hollers, James C.; Patrick, Richard A.; Hassett, Clare

    1979-01-01

    Human peripheral blood neutrophils (PMN) obtained from healthy adults were examined in vitro with techniques adapted to assess the effects of chemotactic factors (CF) on cellular configuration and adhesiveness. The results were compared with those that use certain conventional techniques for assessing chemotaxis and chemokinesis. Exposure of PMN to N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-phenylalanine (f-Met-Phe), zymosan-activated serum, bacterial chemotactic factor, or a low molecular weight chemotactic factor from activated serum (C5a) in the absence of a gradient resulted in a change in cellular shape from a spherical to a polarized configuration in a high percentage of cells. This occurred rapidly in suspension, under conditions designed to exclude a role for cell adhesiveness, and was reversible upon removal of the CF. Restimulation of cells with the CF resulted in reappearance of the polarized configuration to the same extent as on initial stimulation with one exception: f-Met-Phe pretreated cells failed to respond to f-Met-Phe, though they responded fully to the other CF. Each CF caused a significant increase in PMN attachment to protein-coated glass. This enhanced adhesiveness was not reversible upon removal of the CF when the cells were treated under conditions shown to produce chemotactic deactivation. Cells treated under these conditions also exhibited significantly reduced motility on glass and in micropore filters in the absence of a gradient of CF. Bacterial chemotactic factor, even at high concentrations, failed to produce deactivation and did not cause a sustained enhancement of adhesiveness. Images PMID:372238

  8. Leukotriene B4 binding to human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, A.H.; Ruppel, P.L.; Gorman, R.R.

    1984-12-01

    (/sup 3/H) Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) binds concentration dependently to intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's). The binding is saturable, reaches equilibrium in 10 min at 4 degrees C, and is readily reversible. Mathematical modeling analysis reveals biphasic binding of (/sup 3/H) LTB4 indicating two discrete populations of binding sites. The high affinity binding sites have a dissociation constant of 0.46 X 10(-9)M and Bmax of 1.96 X 10(4) sites per neutrophil; the low affinity binding sites have a dissociation constant of 541 X 10(-9)M and a Bmax of 45.16 X 10(4) sites per neutrophil. Competitive binding experiments with structural analogues of LTB4 demonstrate that the interaction between LTB4 and the binding site is stereospecific, and correlates with the relative biological activity of the analogs. At 25 degrees C (/sup 3/H) LTB4 is rapidly dissociated from the binding site and metabolized to 20-OH and 20-COOH-LTB4. Purification of neutrophils in the presence of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors significantly increases specific (/sup 3/H) LTB4 binding, suggesting that LTB4 is biosynthesized during the purification procedure. These data suggest that stereospecific binding and metabolism of LTB4 in neutrophils are tightly coupled processes.

  9. The interactions of human neutrophils with the constituents of an experimental dental biofilm.

    PubMed

    Shapira, L; Tepper, P; Steinberg, D

    2000-10-01

    Despite the antibacterial properties of neutrophils, their ability to prevent colonization of the dental biofilm by pathogenic bacteria is limited. The present study examined the ability of human neutrophils to attach to an experimental dental biofilm and tested their antibacterial functions following adhesion. Neutrophil adhesion was greatest to hydroxyapatite (HA) in the absence of biofilm. Among the biofilms, glucosyltransferase or fructosyltransferase adsorbed onto saliva-coated HA showed the highest adhesion of cells. The adhesion of neutrophils was directly related to their initial concentration in the solution and to the duration of incubation. Plasma was found to reduce neutrophil attachment significantly, while stimulation of the cells had no effect. Stimulation of attached neutrophils induced superoxide secretion with levels significantly lower than that secreted by suspended cells. The presence of neutrophils on the biofilm reduced the number and the viability of Streptococcus mutans attached to the beads. The present findings suggest that neutrophils are able to attach to dental biofilms and that the attached neutrophils retained their antibacterial activity.

  10. Basal neutrophil function in human aging: Implications in endothelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Neto, Joes; Cardoso, André S C; Monteiro, Hugo P; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Junqueira, Virginia B C; Simon, Karin A

    2016-07-01

    Much attention has been drawn to the pro-inflammatory condition that accompanies aging. This study compared parameters from non-stimulated neutrophils, obtained from young (18-30 years old [y.o.]) and elderly (65-80 y.o.) human volunteers. Measured as an inflammatory marker, plasmatic concentration of hs-CRP was found higher in elderly individuals. Non-stimulated neutrophil production of ROS and NO was, respectively, 38 and 29% higher for the aged group. From the adhesion molecules evaluated, only CD11b expression was elevated in neutrophils from the aged group, whereas no differences were found for CD11a, CD18, or CD62. A 69% higher non-stimulated in vitro neutrophil/endothelial cell adhesion was observed for neutrophils isolated from elderly donors. Our results suggest that with aging, neutrophils may be constitutively producing more reactive species in closer proximity to endothelial cells of vessel walls, which may both contribute to vascular damage and reflect a neutrophil intracellular disrupted redox balance, altering neutrophil function in aging.

  11. Analysis of Human and Mouse Neutrophil Phagocytosis by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fine, Noah; Barzilay, Oriyah; Glogauer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are primary phagocytes that recognize their targets through surface chemistry, either through Pattern Recognition Receptor (PPR) interaction with Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) or through immunoglobulin (Ig) or complement mediated recognition. Opsonization can be important for target recognition, and phagocytosis by neutrophils in whole blood can be greatly enhanced due to the presence of blood serum components and platelets. Powerful and sensitive flow cytometry based methods are presented to measure phagocytosis by human blood neutrophils and mouse peritoneal neutrophils.

  12. Mycobacterium bovis BCG-infected neutrophils and dendritic cells cooperate to induce specific T cell responses in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Morel, Céline; Badell, Edgar; Abadie, Valérie; Robledo, Macarena; Setterblad, Niclas; Gluckman, Jean Claude; Gicquel, Brigitte; Boudaly, Sarah; Winter, Nathalie

    2008-02-01

    Neutrophils are increasingly thought to modulate dendritic cell (DC) functions. We investigated the role of the neutrophil-DC partnership in the response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG-the vaccine used against tuberculosis. We compared neutrophil-DC crosstalk in humans and mice, searching for functional differences. In both species, neutrophils captured fluorescent BCG-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were more phagocytic than DC. Non-apoptotic BCG-infected neutrophils clustered with immature DC, establishing intimate contacts with dendrites, at which fluorescent intact bacilli were observed. Physical interactions between neutrophils and DC were required for DC activation. Human BCG-infected DC produced interleukin (IL)-10, an inhibitory cytokine, whereas DC exposed to BCG-infected neutrophils produced low to undetectable amounts of the cytokine. Mouse BCG-infected neutrophils induced sustained IL-2 production by DC. Human DC exposed to BCG-infected neutrophils stimulated recall T cell reactivity from vaccinated donors. Mouse DC infected with recombinant ovalbumin (OVA)-producing BCG (rBCG(ova)) elicited proliferation of TCR-OVA-transgenic CD4 and CD8 T cells. Moreover, exposing DC to rBCG(ova)-infected neutrophils enhanced OVA presentation. Thus, in mice and humans, neutrophils help DC to cross-present BCG antigens to T cells. Our results suggest that this "ménage à trois" involving neutrophils, DC and T cells plays a major role in the immune response to BCG.

  13. Human neutrophil elastase in RSV bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Emboriadou, M; Hatzistilianou, Maria; Magnisali, Ch; Sakelaropoulou, A; Exintari, M; Conti, Pio; Aivazis, V

    2007-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in young children and may be life-threatening in those with underlying cardiac or respiratory conditions. We evaluated the nasal and serum levels of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) in patients with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and investigated the correlation of these levels with illness severity. Fifty-one patients (28 boys, 23 girls) with acute bronchiolitis positive for RSV by direct immunoenzyme assay in nasal secretions (Group A) were studied. Thirty healthy children (17 boys, 13 girls) constituted the control group (Group B). Subjects in both groups were matched for age and gender. The ages (mean+/-SE) in Groups A and B were 4.5+/-0.41 and 5.0+/-0.65 mo, respectively. Venous blood and nasal secretions were taken from patients in group A on 1, 5, and 15 days after admission and once from controls (Group B) for determinations of HNE in nasal lavage and serum, as well as white blood counts (WBC). The peripheral blood eosinophil and neutrophil counts were elevated in 22/51 patients (43.1%) and 15/51 patients (29.4%), respectively. In nasal lavage specimens, neutrophils represented>or=75% and eosinophils>2% of all cells in 42/51 (82.0%) patients and 11/51 (21.5%) patients, respectively. There was strong correlation between the level of HNE and the percentage of neutrophils in nasal lavage (r=0.92). The mean nasal HNE concentrations of the patients on 1, 5, and 15 days after admission were higher than those of Group B (p<0.0001, p<0.001, p<0.001, respectively). Mean serum HNE concentrations on 1, 5, and 15 days after admission were higher in Group A than in Group B (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p<0.0001, respectively). Nasal and serum HNE concentrations showed no correlations with the clinical score of disease severity (r=0.28 and r=0.29, respectively). This study shows that (a) serum and nasal HNE concentrations were significantly higher in RSV bronchiolitis patients than in

  14. Energy Metabolism of Human Neutrophils during Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, Niels; Herlin, Troels

    1982-01-01

    Detailed quantitative studies were performed on the generation and utilization of energy by resting and phagocytosing human neutrophils. The ATP content was 1.9 fmol/cell, was constant during rest, and was not influenced by the presence or absence of glucose in the medium. The intracellular content of phosphocreatine was less than 0.2 fmol/cell. In the presence of glucose, ATP was generated almost exclusively from lactate produced from glucose taken up from the surrounding medium. The amount of lactate produced could account for 85% of the glucose taken up by the cells, and the intracellular glycosyl store, glycogen, was not drawn upon. The rate of ATP generation as calculated from the rate of lactate production was 1.3 fmol/cell/min. During phagocytosis, there was no measurable increase in glucose consumption or lactate production, and the ATP content fell rapidly to 0.8 fmol/cell. This disappearance of ATP was apparently irreversible since no corresponding increase in ADP or AMP was observed. It therefore appears that this phagocytosis-induced fall in ATP concentration represents all the extra energy utilized in human neutrophils in the presence of glucose. In the absence of glucose, the rate of ATP generation in the resting cell was considerably smaller, 0.75 fmol/cell per min, as calculated from the rate of glycolysis, which is sustained exclusively by glycogenolysis. Under this condition, however, phagocytosis induces significant enhancement of glycogenolysis and the rate of lactate production is increased by 60%, raising the rate of ATP generation to 1.2 fmol/cell per min. Nonetheless, the ATP content drops significantly from 1.9 to 1.0 fmol/cell. Neutrophils from patients with chronic granulomatous disease have the same rate of glycolysis and the same ATP content as normal cells, thus confirming that the defective respiration of these cells does not affect their energy metabolism. PMID:7107894

  15. Commensal microbiota stimulate systemic neutrophil migration through induction of Serum amyloid A

    PubMed Central

    Kanther, Michelle; Tomkovich, Sarah; Sun, Xiaolun; Grosser, Melinda R.; Koo, Jaseol; Flynn, Edward J.; Jobin, Christian; Rawls, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neutrophils serve critical roles in inflammatory responses to infection and injury, and mechanisms governing their activity represent attractive targets for controlling inflammation. The commensal microbiota is known to regulate the activity of neutrophils and other leucocytes in the intestine, but the systemic impact of the microbiota on neutrophils remains unknown. Here we utilized in vivo imaging in gnotobiotic zebrafish to reveal diverse effects of microbiota colonization on systemic neutrophil development and function. The presence of a microbiota resulted in increased neutrophil number and myeloperoxidase expression, and altered neutrophil localization and migratory behaviours. These effects of the microbiota on neutrophil homeostasis were accompanied by an increased recruitment of neutrophils to injury. Genetic analysis identified the microbiota-induced acute phase protein serum amyloid A (Saa) as a host factor mediating microbial stimulation of tissue-specific neutrophil migratory behaviours. In vitro studies revealed that zebrafish cells respond to Saa exposure by activating NF-κB, and that Saa-dependent neutrophil migration requires NF-κB-dependent gene expression. These results implicate the commensal microbiota as an important environmental factor regulating diverse aspects of systemic neutrophil development and function, and reveal a critical role for a Saa-NF-κB signalling axis in mediating neutrophil migratory responses. PMID:24373309

  16. Neutrophil Interactions Stimulate Evasive Hyphal Branching by Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Julianne; Frydman, Galit H.; Jones, Caroline N.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA), primarily caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, is an opportunistic fungal infection predominantly affecting immunocompromised and neutropenic patients that is difficult to treat and results in high mortality. Investigations of neutrophil-hypha interaction in vitro and in animal models of IA are limited by lack of temporal and spatial control over interactions. This study presents a new approach for studying neutrophil-hypha interaction at single cell resolution over time, which revealed an evasive fungal behavior triggered by interaction with neutrophils: Interacting hyphae performed de novo tip formation to generate new hyphal branches, allowing the fungi to avoid the interaction point and continue invasive growth. Induction of this mechanism was independent of neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, but could be phenocopied by iron chelation and mechanical or physiological stalling of hyphal tip extension. The consequence of branch induction upon interaction outcome depends on the number and activity of neutrophils available: In the presence of sufficient neutrophils branching makes hyphae more vulnerable to destruction, while in the presence of limited neutrophils the interaction increases the number of hyphal tips, potentially making the infection more aggressive. This has direct implications for infections in neutrophil-deficient patients and opens new avenues for treatments targeting fungal branching. PMID:28076396

  17. [Human serum albumin modified under oxidative/halogenative stress enhances luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of human neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Mikhal'chik, E V; Smolina, N V; Astamirova, T C; Gorudko, I V; Grigor'eva, D V; Ivanov, V A; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that human serum albumin, previously treated with HOCl (HSA-Cl), enhances luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of neutrophils activated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that addition of HSA-Cl to neutrophils promotes exocytosis of myeloperoxidase. Inhibitor of myeloperoxidase--4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, without any effect on lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence of neutrophils stimulated with PMA, effectively suppressed luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (IC50 = 20 microM) under the same conditions. The transfer of the cells from medium with HSA-Cl and myeloperoxidase to fresh medium abolished an increase in PMA-induced luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, but not the ability of neutrophils to respond to re-addition of HSA-Cl. A direct and significant (r = 0.75, p) correlation was observed between the intensity of PMA stimulated neutrophil chemiluminescence response and myeloperoxidase activity in the cell-free media after chemiluminescence measurements. These results suggest the involvement of myeloperoxidase in the increase of neutrophil PMA-stimulated chemiluminescence response in the presence of HSA-Cl. A significant positive correlation was found between myeloperoxidase activity in blood plasma of children with severe burns and the enhancing effects of albumin fraction of the same plasma on luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of PMA-stimulated donor neutrophils. These results support a hypothesis that proteins modified in reactions involving myeloperoxidase under oxidative/halogenative stress, stimulate neutrophils, leading to exocytosis of myeloperoxidase, a key element of halogenative stress, and to closing a "vicious circle" of neutrophil activation at the inflammatory site.

  18. Exercise-induced extracellular 72 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72) stimulates neutrophil phagocytic and fungicidal capacities via TLR-2.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Esther; Martin-Cordero, Leticia; Garcia, Juan Jose; Gehrmann, Mathias; Gerhmann, Mathias; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ortega, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2) in the interaction of 72 kDa extracellular heat shock protein (Hsp72, a stress-inducible protein) with neutrophils and the participation on TLR-2 in the stimulation of neutrophil phagocytic and fungicidal capacities by post-exercise physiological concentrations of Hsp72. Human peripheral blood neutrophils were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Hsp72, and were analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Both methods revealed an interaction of Hsp72 with neutrophils. In addition, when neutrophils were pre-incubated with an anti-TLR-2 antibody this interaction was clearly decreased. Post-exercise circulating concentration of Hsp72 (8.6 ng/ml) stimulated the phagocytic and fungicidal capacities of neutrophils and this effect could be also blocked using an antibody against TLR-2. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the nuclear transcription factor kappa beta (NF-kappabeta) were found to be involved in the signaling process, confirming the participation of TLR-2 in the stimulation of neutrophil function by Hsp72. In conclusion, TLR-2 is involved at least in part, in the stimulation of neutrophil phagocytic and fungicidal capacities induced by post-exercise physiological concentrations of Hsp72.

  19. A Simple and Efficient Method to Detect Nuclear Factor Activation in Human Neutrophils by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Erick; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood. These cells are the first to appear at sites of inflammation and infection, thus becoming the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils possess important antimicrobial functions such as phagocytosis, release of lytic enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species. In addition to these important defense functions, neutrophils perform other tasks in response to infection such as production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibition of apoptosis. Cytokines recruit other leukocytes that help clear the infection, and inhibition of apoptosis allows the neutrophil to live longer at the site of infection. These functions are regulated at the level of transcription. However, because neutrophils are short-lived cells, the study of transcriptionally regulated responses in these cells cannot be performed with conventional reporter gene methods since there are no efficient techniques for neutrophil transfection. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that allows detection and quantification of nuclear factors in isolated and immunolabeled nuclei by flow cytometry. We describe techniques to isolate pure neutrophils from human peripheral blood, stimulate these cells with anti-receptor antibodies, isolate and immunolabel nuclei, and analyze nuclei by flow cytometry. The method has been successfully used to detect NF-κB and Elk-1 nuclear factors in nuclei from neutrophils and other cell types. Thus, this method represents an option for analyzing activation of transcription factors in isolated nuclei from a variety of cell types. PMID:23603868

  20. Functional relationship of the cytochrome b to the superoxide-generating oxidase of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Schervish, E W; Santinga, J T

    1982-04-25

    A subcellular particulate fraction containing the NADPH-dependent O2.--generating oxidase from stimulated human neutrophils was prepared. This fraction was depleted of certain enzyme markers of primary and secondary granules and was devoid of measurable myeloperoxidase, both enzymatically and spectrally. When prepared from neutrophils which had been previously stimulated with phorbal myristate acetate, this fraction contained cyanide-insensitive, pyridine nucleotide-dependent O2.--generating activity with a specific activity of 260 nmol min-1 mg-1. O2.--generating activity is completely ablated by p-chloromercuribenzoate exposure. Preparations from normal unstimulated neutrophils or stimulated neutrophils from a male patient with chronic granulomatous disease had negligible amounts of this O2.--generating enzymatic activity. The dominant chromophore in this preparation was a b-type cytochrome, the spectral and functional characteristics of which are further described herein. Pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of the intrinsic cytochrome b closely parallels O2.- generation in this preparation. Specifically, reduction occurs in preparations from phorbal myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils and is absent in unstimulated or stimulated p-chloromercuribenzoate-inactivated preparations.

  1. Effect of tannic acid, resveratrol and its derivatives, on oxidative damage and apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2015-10-01

    In this study we compared the antioxidant and DNA protective activity of tannic acid and stilbene derivatives, resveratrol, 3,5,4(')-trimethoxystilbene (TMS) and pterostilbene in human neutrophils stimulated to oxidative burst by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in relation to apoptosis induction. All polyphenols within the concentration range 1-100 μM reduced the intracellular ROS and H2O2 production in the TPA-stimulated cells. Tannic acid was the most effective polyphenol in protection against DNA damage induced by TPA. In the resting neutrophils resveratrol and to lesser extent other polyphenols increased DNA damage and increased the level of p53. Pretreatment of the TPA-stimulated cells with tannic acid or stilbenes led to the induction of apoptosis. The most significant effect was observed as a result of treatment with TMS and resveratrol. These compounds appeared the most effective inducers of p53 in the TPA-challenged neutrophils, what may suggest that pro-apoptotic activity of these stilbenes might be related to p53 activation. Overall, the results of our present study demonstrate that tannic acid and stilbenes modulate the ROS production, ultimately leading to cell apoptosis in human neutrophils stimulated to oxidative burst. In resting neutrophils they exhibit pro-oxidant activity, which is accompanied by p53 induction.

  2. p38 MAPK is involved in human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodosthoma.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adriana S; Setúbal, Sulamita da S; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; da Silva, Francisquinha Souza; da Silva, Silvana D; Fernandes, Carla F C; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2016-09-01

    The action of LAAO, an L-amino acid oxidase isolated from Calloselasma rhodosthoma snake venom, on isolated human neutrophil function was investigated. Cr-LAAO showed no toxicity on neutrophils. Cr-LAAO in its native form induced the neutrophil chemotaxis, suggesting that its primary structure is essential for stimulation the cell. p38 MAPK and PI3K have a role as signaling pathways of CR-LAAO induced chemotaxis. This toxin also induced the production of hydrogen peroxide and stimulated phagocytosis in neutrophils. Furthermore, Cr-LAAO was able to stimulate neutrophils to release IL-6, IL-8, MPO, LTB4 and PGE2. Together, the data showed that the Cr-LAAO triggers relevant proinflammatory events.

  3. Activation of the human neutrophil respiratory burst with zymosan-activated serum.

    PubMed

    Smith, R J; Iden, S S; Bowman, B J

    1984-06-15

    Zymosan-activated serum ( ZAS ) stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent generation of superoxide anion (O-2) by human neutrophils. O-2 production was rapid with maximum generation occurring 2 minutes after cell exposure to ZAS . O-2 generation is markedly reduced if cells are not preincubated with cytochalasin B prior to contact with ZAS . The amount of O-2 produced by ZAS stimulated neutrophils was enhanced in the presence of extra-cellular calcium. However, the intracellular calcium antagonist, 8-(N,N-diethylamino)-octyl-(3,4,5-trimethoxy) benzoate hydrochloride (TMB-8), caused a dose-related inhibition of ZAS -elicited O-2 production. Neutrophils pretreated with ZAS were desensitized to the subsequent exposure to this stimulus. The fact that pretreatment of neutrophils with ZAS did not diminish the capacity of these cells to generate O-2 in response to 1-O-hexadecyl/octadecyl-2-O-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine (AGEPC),N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) or 5(5),12(R)-dihydroxy-6,14-cis-8,10-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (LTB4), demonstrates the stimulus specific nature of ZAS -induced desensitization. Thus, ZAS , which contains the complement-derived neutrophil activator, C5a, a naturally occurring phlogistic mediator, represents a relevant probe for investigating neutrophil function.

  4. Priming by grepafloxacin on respiratory burst of human neutrophils: its possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Masayuki; Kanamori, Yutaka; Hotta, Koichi; Matsuno, Hiroyuki; Kozawa, Osamu; Fujimoto, Sadaki; Uematsu, Toshihiko

    2002-10-01

    Grepafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone derivative that has good tissue penetration. We demonstrated that grepafloxacin showed a priming effect on neutrophil respiratory burst, triggered by either a chemotactic factor N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or leukotriene B4 (LTB4), but not by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The priming effect of grepafloxacin on fMLP-stimulated superoxide generation by human neutrophils correlated with the penetration of grepafloxacin into cells. Removal of extracellular grepafloxacin did not inhibit the priming effect on fMLP-stimulated superoxide generation. Furthermore, grepafloxacin induced the translocation of p47-phox and p67-phox to the membrane fraction of neutrophils, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation was hardly observed in neutrophils exposed to grepafloxacin. The priming effect of grepafloxacin on superoxide generation from neutrophils was not inhibited by treatment with pertussis toxin, a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ST-638) or a protein kinase C inhibitor (calphostin C), or chelation of extracellular calcium. Grepafloxacin did not change the fMLP receptor-binding properties. Taken together, these findings suggest that grepafloxacin evokes a priming effect on neutrophil superoxide generation intracellularly through the translocation of p47-phox and even p67-phox protein to the membrane fractions. GTP binding protein, protein-tyrosine phosphorylation and protein kinase C activation are not involved in the priming effect.

  5. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  6. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-01-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing. Images PMID:3771800

  7. The subcellular particulate NADPH-dependent O2.(-)-generating oxidase from human blood monocytes: comparison to the neutrophil system.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, A N; Santinga, J T; Gabig, T G

    1982-10-01

    Highly purified preparations of normal human monocytes obtained from peripheral blood were shown to contain a subcellular particulate O2.(-)-generating oxidase system. This O2.(-)-generating activity was present in particulate preparations from monocytes that had been previously stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate but was low or absent in control preparations from unstimulated monocytes or stimulated monocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. In the stimulated preparations from normal monocytes, O2.(-)-generation was linearly proportional to cell protein concentration, insensitive to inhibition by azide, and dependent on NADPH as substrate. These characteristics are similar to the O2.(-)-generating oxidase system from human neutrophils. A significant difference in the apparent Km for NADPH was shown between preparations from stimulated monocytes and neutrophils (monocyte 83 +/- 16 microM, neutrophil 31 +/- 5 microM, mean +/- SE). Additionally, affinity of the stimulated monocyte particulate preparation for NADH was unmeasurably low.

  8. Cutting Edge: Helicobacter pylori Induces Nuclear Hypersegmentation and Subtype Differentiation of Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Laura C; Weems, Megan N; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human stomach and causes a spectrum of disease that includes gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma. A chronic, neutrophil-rich inflammatory response characterizes this infection. It is established that H. pylori stimulates neutrophil chemotaxis and a robust respiratory burst, but other aspects of this interaction are incompletely defined. We demonstrate here that H. pylori induces N1-like subtype differentiation of human neutrophils as indicated by profound nuclear hypersegmentation, a CD62L(dim), CD16(bright), CD11b(bright), CD66b(bright), CD63(bright) surface phenotype, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and cytotoxicity. Hypersegmentation requires direct neutrophil-H. pylori contact as well as transcription and both host and bacterial protein synthesis, but not urease, NapA, VacA, CagA, or CagT. The concept of neutrophil plasticity is new and, to our knowledge, these data are the first evidence that neutrophils can undergo subtype differentiation in vitro in response to bacterial pathogen infection. We hypothesize that these changes favor H. pylori persistence and disease.

  9. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  10. Expression and bioregulation of the kallikrein-related peptidases family in the human neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Lizama, Alejandro J; Andrade, Yessica; Colivoro, Patricio; Sarmiento, Jose; Matus, Carola E; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Bhoola, Kanti D; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2015-08-01

    The family of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) has been identified in a variety of immunolabeled human tissue sections, but no previous study has experimentally confirmed their presence in the human neutrophil. We have investigated the expression and bioregulation of particular KLKs in the human neutrophil and, in addition, examined whether stimulation by a kinin B(1) receptor (B1R) agonist or fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) induces their secretion. Western blot analysis of neutrophil homogenates indicated that the MM of the KLKs ranged from 27 to 50 kDa. RT-PCR showed that blood neutrophils expressed only KLK1, KLK4, KLK10, KLK13, KLK14 and KLK15 mRNAs, whereas the non-differentiated HL-60 cells expressed most of them, with exception of KLK3 and KLK7. Nevertheless, mRNAs for KLK2, KLK5, KLK6 and KLK9 that were previously undetectable appeared after challenging with a mixture of cytokines. Both kinin B(1)R agonist and fMLP induced secretion of KLK1, KLK6, KLK10, KLK13 and KLK14 into the culture medium in similar amounts, whereas the B(1)R agonist caused the release of lower amounts of KLK2, KLK4 and KLK5. When secreted, the differing proteolytic activity of KLKs provides the human neutrophil with a multifunctional enzymatic capacity supporting a new dimension for its role in human disorders of diverse etiology.

  11. Wolbachia endosymbionts induce neutrophil extracellular trap formation in human onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Turner, Joseph D.; Pionnier, Nicolas; Midgley, Angela; Guimaraes, Ana F.; Johnston, Kelly L.; Edwards, Steven W.; Taylor, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The endosymbiotic bacteria, Wolbachia, induce neutrophilic responses to the human helminth pathogen Onchocerca volvulus. The formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), has been implicated in anti-microbial defence, but has not been identified in human helminth infection. Here, we demonstrate NETs formation in human onchocerciasis. Extracellular NETs and neutrophils were visualised around O. volvulus in nodules excised from untreated patients but not in nodules from patients treated with the anti-Wolbachia drug, doxycycline. Whole Wolbachia or microspheres coated with a synthetic Wolbachia lipopeptide (WoLP) of the major nematode Wolbachia TLR2/6 ligand, peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein, induced NETosis in human neutrophils in vitro. TLR6 dependency of Wolbachia and WoLP NETosis was demonstrated using purified neutrophils from TLR6 deficient mice. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that NETosis occurs during natural human helminth infection and demonstrate a mechanism of NETosis induction via Wolbachia endobacteria and direct ligation of Wolbachia lipoprotein by neutrophil TLR2/6. PMID:27752109

  12. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-03-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface.

  13. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface. Images PMID:46842

  14. Characterization of the inhibitory prostanoid receptors on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeldon, A.; Vardey, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have evaluated the effects of various prostanoid agonists on the release of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and superoxide anions (O2-) from human neutrophils stimulated with opsonized zymosan (OZ) and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), respectively. 2. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGD2 inhibited both OZ-induced LTB4 release (EC50 0.72 microM and 0.91 microM respectively), and FMLP-induced O2- release (EC50 0.42 microM and 0.50 microM respectively). PGF2 alpha, the TP-receptor agonist, U46619, and the IP-receptor agonist, iloprost, were also active, but were all at least an order of magnitude less potent than PGE2 and PGD2. 3. The EP2/EP3-receptor agonist, misoprostol, and the selective EP2-agonist, AH13205, were both effective inhibitors of LTB4 release, being approximately equipotent with and 16-times less potent than PGE2, respectively. In contrast, the EP1/EP3-receptor agonist, sulprostone, had no inhibitory activity at concentrations of up to 10 microM. 4. The selective DP-receptor agonist, BW245C, inhibited LTB4 release, (EC50 0.006 microM) being approximately 50 times more potent than PGD2. BW245C also inhibited O2- release, and this inhibition was antagonized competitively by the DP-receptor blocking drug, AH6809 (pA2 6.6). 5. These data indicate the presence of both inhibitory EP- and DP-receptors on the human neutrophil. The rank order of potency of EP-receptor agonists suggest that the EP-receptors are of the EP2-subtype. PMID:8387383

  15. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Macallan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. PMID:27136946

  16. Selective inhibition of leukotriene C/sub 4/ synthesis in human neutrophils by ethacrynic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.H.

    1986-05-29

    Addition of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors, ethyacrynic acid (ET), caffeic acid (CA), and ferulic acid (FA) to human neutrophils led to inhibition of leukotriene C/sub 4/ (LTC/sub 4/) synthesis induced by calcium ionophore A23187. ET is the most specific of these inhibitors for it had little effect on LTB/sub 4/, PGE/sub 2/, and 5-HETE synthesis. The inhibition of LTC/sub 4/ was irreversible and time dependent. ET also had little effect on /sup 3/H-AA release from A23187-stimulated neutrophils.

  17. The Interactions of Human Neutrophils with Shiga Toxins and Related Plant Toxins: Danger or Safety?

    PubMed Central

    Brigotti, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxins and ricin are well characterized similar toxins belonging to quite different biological kingdoms. Plant and bacteria have evolved the ability to produce these powerful toxins in parallel, while humans have evolved a defense system that recognizes molecular patterns common to foreign molecules through specific receptors expressed on the surface of the main actors of innate immunity, namely monocytes and neutrophils. The interactions between these toxins and neutrophils have been widely described and have stimulated intense debate. This paper is aimed at reviewing the topic, focusing particularly on implications for the pathogenesis and diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:22741061

  18. ADAM17 cleaves CD16b (FcγRIIIb) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wu, Jianming; Newton, Robert; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Long, Chunmei; Walcheck, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    CD16b (FcγRIIIb) is exclusively expressed by human neutrophils and binds IgG in immune complexes. Cell surface CD16b undergoes efficient ectodomain shedding upon neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Indeed, soluble CD16b is present at high levels in the plasma of healthy individuals, which appears to be maintained by the daily turnover of apoptotic neutrophils. At this time, the principal protease responsible for CD16b shedding is not known. We show that CD16b plasma levels were significantly decreased in patients administered a selective inhibitor targeting the metalloproteases ADAM10 and ADAM17. Additional analysis with inhibitors selective for ADAM10 or ADAM17 revealed that only inhibition of ADAM17 significantly blocked the cleavage of CD16b following neutrophil activation and apoptosis. CD16b shedding by ADAM17 was further demonstrated using a unique ADAM17 function-blocking mAb and a cell-based ADAM17 reconstitution assay. Unlike human CD16, however, mouse CD16 did not undergo efficient ectodomain shedding upon neutrophil stimulation or apoptosis, indicating that this mechanism cannot be modeled in normal mice. Taken together, our findings are the first to directly demonstrate that ADAM17 cleaves CD16 in human leukocytes. PMID:23228566

  19. Differentiation of cellular processes involved in the induction and maintenance of stimulated neutrophil adherence.

    PubMed

    English, D; Gabig, T G

    1986-05-01

    Neutrophil adherence stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was investigated by quantitating the attachment of 51Cr-labeled neutrophils to plastic surfaces and to the endothelium of umbilical veins mounted in compartmentalized Lucite chambers. PMA-induced adherence could be functionally separated into an induction phase requiring cellular metabolism and a Mg++ dependent maintenance phase that was independent of cellular metabolism. Thus, metabolic inhibitors (N-ethylmaleimide, 2-deoxyglucose) blocked adherence when added to neutrophils prior to PMA, but did not cause detachment of cells adhering as a consequence of prior exposure to PMA. PMA failed to induce adherence of neutrophils incubated at low (0.4 degree C) temperature, but temperature reduction, even for prolonged periods, did not cause detachment of adherent cells. Thus, the attractive forces that mediate stimulated adherence persist independently of any sustained metabolic response to the inducing stimulus. However, removal of Mg++ from the media above adherent cells resulted in immediate detachment, indicating that the cation was required for the persistent expression or maintenance of the attractive forces involved. The extent of stimulated adherence correlated well with the extent of degranulation when rates were varied by limiting the incubation time or stimulus concentration. This correlation was not absolute; in the absence of Mg++, PMA induced degranulation normally but failed to enhance adherence. To explain these findings, we investigated the possibility that PMA-stimulated adherence was maintained by Mg++-dependent cellular adherence molecules released during exocytosis. Supernatants of stimulated neutrophils were devoid of adherence-promoting activity, and only weak activity was recovered in supernatants of mechanically disrupted neutrophils. PMA effectively stimulated the tight adherence of degranulated neutrophil cytoplasts to plastic surfaces and did so in the absence of stimulated

  20. Impaired surface expression of PAF receptors on human neutrophils is dependent upon cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Javors, M A; Olson, M S

    1994-02-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils to bind PAF was rapidly diminished upon cell stimulation with both physiological agonists (N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), leukotriene B4 (LTB4)) and pharmacologic agonists (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), A23187). As a consequence, PAF responses in neutrophils were blunted, as monitored by an inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Downregulation of the PAF receptor in neutrophils by diverse agonists was temperature-sensitive and required intact cells. Scatchard analysis of binding data revealed that PAF binding sites were lost without an appreciable change in the affinity of the ligand for the receptor. The binding of the PAF receptor antagonist WEB2086 to neutrophils decreased in parallel with PAF binding. PMA-induced PAF receptor downregulation was staurosporine-sensitive while PAF receptor downregulation by A23187, FMLP, or LTB4 was staurosporine-resistant. Both neutrophil aggregation (a form of intercellular adhesion) and PAF receptor downregulation occurred only at high concentrations of agonists while other signaling processes such as the increase in [Ca2+]i, PKC activation, and PAF synthesis were stimulated at low concentrations of agonists. Furthermore, agonist-induced PAF receptor downregulation was observed only under conditions in which the activated neutrophils were stirred (or shaken) and were allowed to aggregate. Additionally, chelation of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA minimized cell aggregation and also inhibited PAF receptor downregulation. While the nature of the biochemical signal or the physical changes in the plasma membrane associated with aggregation or that follow aggregation remain to be elucidated it is clear that full expression of cell activation (i.e., neutrophil aggregation) is required for PAF receptor downregulation.

  1. Galectin-1 promotes human neutrophil migration.

    PubMed

    Auvynet, Constance; Moreno, Samadhi; Melchy, Erika; Coronado-Martínez, Iris; Montiel, Jose Luis; Aguilar-Delfin, Irma; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    An important step of innate immune response is the recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to injured tissues through chemotactic molecules. Galectins, a family of endogenous lectins, participate in numerous functions such as lymphoid cell migration, homing, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Particularly, galectin-3 (Gal-3) and -9 have been implicated in the modulation of acute and chronic inflammation by inducing the directional migration of monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils, whereas Gal-1 is considered to function as an anti-inflammatory molecule, capable of inhibiting the influx of PMN to the site of injury. In this study, we assessed the effect of Gal-1 on neutrophil recruitment, in the absence of additional inflammatory insults. Contrasting with its capacity to inhibit cell trafficking and modulate the release of mediators described in models of acute inflammation and autoimmunity, we evidenced that Gal-1 has the capacity to induce neutrophil migration both in vitro and in vivo. This effect is not mediated through a G-protein-coupled receptor but potentially through the sialoglycoprotein CD43, via carbohydrate binding and through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These results suggest a novel biological function for CD43 on neutrophils and highlight that depending on the environment, Gal-1 can act either as chemoattractant or, as a molecule that negatively regulates migration under acute inflammatory conditions, underscoring the potential of Gal-1 as a target for innovative drug development.

  2. Subcellular localization and translocation of the receptor for N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sengeløv, H; Boulay, F; Kjeldsen, L; Borregaard, N

    1994-01-01

    The subcellular localization of N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) receptors in human neutrophils was investigated. The fMLP receptor was detected with a high-affinity, photoactivatable, radioiodinated derivative of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanyl-lysine (fMLFK). Neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and fractionated on Percoll density gradients. fMLP receptors were located in the beta-band containing gelatinase and specific granules, and in the gamma-band containing plasma membrane and secretory vesicles. Plasma membranes and secretory vesicles were separated by high-voltage free-flow electrophoresis, and secretory vesicles were demonstrated to be highly enriched in fMLP receptors. The receptors found in secretory vesicles translocated fully to the plasma membrane upon stimulation with inflammatory mediators. The receptor translocation from the beta-band indicated that the receptor present there was mainly located in gelatinase granules. A 25 kDa fMLP-binding protein was found in the beta-band. Immunoprecipitation revealed that this protein was identical with NGAL (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin), a novel protein found in specific granules. In summary, we demonstrate that the compartment in human neutrophils that is mobilized most easily and fastest, the secretory vesicle, is a major reservoir of fMLP receptors. This explains the prompt and extensive upregulation of fMLP receptors on the neutrophil surface in response to inflammatory stimuli. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8172608

  3. Cutting Edge: Helicobacter pylori Induces Nuclear Hypersegmentation and Subtype Differentiation of Human Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Laura C.; Weems, Megan N.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human stomach and causes a spectrum of disease that includes gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma. A chronic, neutrophil-rich inflammatory response characterizes this infection. It is established that H. pylori stimulates neutrophil chemotaxis and a robust respiratory burst, but other aspects of this interaction are incompletely defined. We demonstrate here that H. pylori induces N1-like subtype differentiation of human neutrophils as indicated by profound nuclear hypersegmentation, a CD62Ldim, CD16bright, CD11bbright, CD66bbright, CD63bright surface phenotype, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and cytotoxicity. Hypersegmentation requires direct neutrophil–H. pylori contact as well as transcription and both host and bacterial protein synthesis, but not urease, NapA, VacA, CagA, or CagT. The concept of neutrophil plasticity is new and, to our knowledge, these data are the first evidence that neutrophils can undergo subtype differentiation in vitro in response to bacterial pathogen infection. We hypothesize that these changes favor H. pylori persistence and disease. PMID:28148734

  4. Passive mechanical behavior of human neutrophils: power-law fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M A; Frank, R S; Waugh, R E

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of the neutrophil plays an important role in both the microcirculation and the immune system. Several laboratories in the past have developed mechanical models to describe different aspects of neutrophil deformability. In this study, the passive mechanical properties of normal human neutrophils have been further characterized. The cellular mechanical properties were assessed by single cell micropipette aspiration at fixed aspiration pressures. A numerical simulation was developed to interpret the experiments in terms of cell mechanical properties based on the Newtonian liquid drop model (Yeung and Evans, Biophys. J., 56: 139-149, 1989). The cytoplasmic viscosity was determined as a function of the ratio of the initial cell size to the pipette radius, the cortical tension, aspiration pressure, and the whole cell aspiration time. The cortical tension of passive neutrophils was measured to be about 2.7 x 10(-5) N/m. The apparent viscosity of neutrophil cytoplasm was found to depend on aspiration pressure, and ranged from approximately 500 Pa.s at an aspiration pressure of 98 Pa (1.0 cm H2O) to approximately 50 Pa.s at 882 Pa (9.0 cm H2O) when tested with a 4.0-micron pipette. These data provide the first documentation that the neutrophil cytoplasm exhibits non-Newtonian behavior. To further characterize the non-Newtonian behavior of human neutrophils, a mean shear rate gamma m was estimated based on the numerical simulation. The apparent cytoplasmic viscosity appears to decrease as the mean shear rate increases. The dependence of cytoplasmic viscosity on the mean shear rate can be approximated as a power-law relationship described by mu = mu c(gamma m/gamma c)-b, where mu is the cytoplasmic viscosity, gamma m is the mean shear rate, mu c is the characteristic viscosity at characteristic shear rate gamma c, and b is a material coefficient. When gamma c was set to 1 s-1, the material coefficients for passive neutrophils were determined to be mu c

  5. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  6. Effect of stilbene derivative on superoxide generation and enzyme release from human neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pečivová, Jana; Harmatha, Juraj; Sviteková, Klára; Nosáľ, Radomír

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the body′s primary line of defense against invading pathogens. They most rapidly reach the site of injury or infection, liberate antimicrobial proteins, proteases and produce reactive oxygen species. Prolonged or excessive liberation of these very effective and toxic substances could intensify the inflammatory process and enhance tissue damage in many diseases, such as allergies, infections and rheumatoid arthritis. Pterostilbene belongs to stilbenoids, structural analogues of resveratrol, which act as natural protective agents in defending the plant against viral and microbial attack. It possesses anticancerous, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory properties. The study provides new information on the effect of pterostilbene [0.01–100 µmol/l] on superoxide generation in and myeloperoxidase (MPO) release from azurophil granules of isolated human neutrophils. PMA [1µmol/l], which activates NADPH-oxidase via protein kinase C, was used for stimulation of neutrophils Unstimulated cells showed neither superoxide generation nor myelopereoxidase release after preincubation with the drug studied. Pterostilbene dose dependently decreased superoxide generation in and MPO release from stimulated human neutrophils, however a significant decrease was recorded only in the concentration 100 µmol/l. The effect of pterostilbene was more pronounced on superoxide generation in comparison to MPO release. Our results suggest that the effect of pterostilbene may prove beneficial in controlling inflammation. PMID:23118590

  7. Bioactivation of myelotoxic xenobiotics by human neutrophil myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants and drugs are toxic to the bone marrow. Some of these xenobiotics may initiate toxicity after undergoing bioactivation to free radicals and/or other reactive electrophiles. Peroxidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the one-electron oxidative bioactivation of a variety of xenobiotics in vitro. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidative enzyme found in very high concentration in the neutrophils of human bone marrow. In this study, human MPO was evaluated to determine its ability to catalyze the in vitro bioactivation of known bone marrow toxicants that contain the aromatic hydroxyl (Ar-OH), aromatic amine (Ar-N-R{sub 2}), or heterocyclic tertiary amine ({double bond}N-R) moieties. The formation of free radical metabolites during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of hydroquinone and catechol (benzene metabolites), mitoxantrone and ametantrone (antitumor drugs), and chlorpromazine and promazine (antipsychotic drugs) was demonstrated by EPR spectroscopy. The reactivity of the products formed during the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of ({sup 14}C)hydroquinone and ({sup 14}C)catechol was shown by their covalent binding to protein and DNA in vitro. The covalently binding metabolite in each case is postulated to be the quinone form of the xenobiotic. In addition, both GSH and NADH were oxidized by the reactive intermediate(s) formed during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of many of the bone marrow toxicants tested. It was also shown that p,p-biphenol stimulated the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of both hydroquinone and catechol, while p-cresol stimulated the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of catechol.

  8. Isolation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells and Their Use in the Study of Neutrophil Transmigration Under Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Zhang, Hong; Sharma, Ritu; Parsons, Sean; Patel, Kamala D.

    2012-01-01

    chambers and each have advantages and disadvantages. If fluorescent imaging is needed, glass or an optically similar polymer needs to be used. Endothelial cells do not grow well on glass. Here we present an easy and rapid method for phase-contrast, DIC and fluorescent imaging of neutrophil transmigration using a low volume ibidi channel slide made of a polymer that supports the rapid adhesion and growth of human endothelial cells and has optical qualities that are comparable to glass. In this method, endothelial cells were grown and stimulated in an ibidi μslide. Neutrophils were introduced under flow conditions and transmigration was assessed. Fluorescent imaging of the junctions enabled real-time determination of the extent of paracellular versus transcellular transmigration. PMID:22895248

  9. A Comparison of Human Neutrophils Acquired from Four Experimental Models of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Madhur P.; Day, Richard M.; Gilroy, Derek W.; O’Brien, Alastair J.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in neutrophil function have been implicated in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. Several models are employed to study activated human neutrophils akin to those found at a site of inflammation. These include whole blood (WB) ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and in vivo techniques: cantharidin blister, skin windows and intra-dermal injection of UV-killed E.coli (UVKEc). Neutrophils obtained from these have never been compared. We compared the activation status of neutrophils from each technique in order to inform the optimal model for use in human studies. Healthy male volunteers were randomised to undergo one of the four techniques (n = 5/group). LPS: WB stimulated with 1ng/ml of LPS for 4 hours. Cantharidin: 12.5μl of 0.1% cantharidin elicited a single blister, aspirated at 24 hours. Skin windows: four 6mm mechanical-suction blisters created, de-roofed and an exudate-collection chamber placed over the windows for 4 hours before aspiration. UVKEc: 1.5 x 107 UVKEc injected intra-dermally. A single 10mm mechanical-suction blister formed and aspirated at 4 hours. Unstimulated WB used as the control. Flow cytometry was used to determine activation status using CD16, CD11b, CD54, CD62L and CD88. Functional status was assessed with a phagocytosis assay. The pattern of neutrophil activation was similar in all models. Neutrophil CD11b was elevated in all models, most markedly in UVKEc (p<0.0001), and CD54 was also elevated but only significant in the LPS model (p = 0.001). CD62L was significantly reduced in all 4 models (p<0.0001) and CD88 was also suppressed in all. There were no changes in CD16 in any model, neither was there any significant difference in the phagocytic capacity of the neutrophils. In summary, there are no significant differences in activation marker expression or phagocytic capacity in the neutrophils obtained from each technique. Therefore we believe whole blood stimulation is the best model in experimentally challenging

  10. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the

  11. The impact of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles on human neutrophil activation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Hung, Chi-Feng; Chen, Chun-Han; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-06-25

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLNs) are extensively employed as the nanocarriers for drug/gene targeting to tumors and the brain. Investigation into the possible immune response of cSLNs is still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cSLNs upon the activation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells (PMNs). The cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory mediators, Ca(2+) mobilization, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as the indicators of PMN stimulation were examined in this work. The cSLNs presented a diameter of 195 nm with a zeta potential of 44 mV. The cSLNs could interact with the cell membrane to produce a direct membrane lysis and the subsequent cytotoxicity according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) elevation. The interaction of cSLNs with the membrane also triggered a Ca(2+) influx, followed by the induction of oxidative stress and degranulation. The cationic nanoparticles elevated the levels of superoxide anion and elastase by 24- and 9-fold, respectively. The PMN activation by cSLNs promoted the phosphorylation of p38 and Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The imaging of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence demonstrated the production of NETs by cSLNs. This phenomenon was not significant for the neutral SLNs (nSLNs), although histones in NETs also increased after treatment of nSLNs. Our results suggest an important role of cSLNs in governing the activation of human neutrophils.

  12. Lectinlike interactions of Fusobacterium nucleatum with human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, D F; Novak, M J; Vora, S A; Mourad, J; Kriger, P S

    1989-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum expresses lectinlike adherence factors which mediate binding to a variety of human tissue cells. Adherence is selectively inhibited by galactose, lactose, and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. In this study, adherence of F. nucleatum to human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was investigated. The results indicated that the fusobacteria adhered to live and metabolically inactivated or fixed PMNs. Adherence of F. nucleatum resulted in activation of PMNs as determined by PMN aggregation, membrane depolarization, increased intracellular free Ca2+, superoxide anion production, and lysozyme release. Transmission electron micrographs showed that F. nucleatum was phagocytized by the PMNs. Microbicidal assays indicated that greater than 98% of F. nucleatum organisms were killed by PMNs within 60 min. Adherence to and activation of PMNs by F. nucleatum were inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine or lactose greater than galactose, whereas equal concentrations of glucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, mannose, and fucose had little or no effect on F. nucleatum-PMN interactions. Pretreatment of the fusobacteria with heat (80 degrees C, 20 min) or proteases inhibited adherence to and activation of PMNs, but superoxide production was also stimulated by heated bacteria. The results indicate that interaction of F. nucleatum with PMNs is lectinlike and is probably mediated by fusobacterial proteins which bind to other human tissue cells. Adherence of F. nucleatum to PMNs in the absence of serum opsonins, such as antibodies and complement, may play an important role in PMN recognition and killing of F. nucleatum in the gingival sulcus and in the subsequent release of PMN factors associated with tissue destruction. Images PMID:2553609

  13. Effect of exhaustive exercise on human neutrophils in athletes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Suzuki, K; Kudo, S; Totsuka, M; Simoyama, T; Nakaji, S; Sugawara, K

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of exercise on the capacity of neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), eight male cross-country skiers underwent maximal exercise. Peripheral blood samples were taken pre-exercise, 0 h, 1 h, and 2 h after finishing maximal exercise. Leukocyte counts significantly increased (p < 0. 05), particularly lymphocytes (p < 0.05), just after the exercise period (0 h) and significantly increased again (p < 0.05), particularly neutrophils (p < 0.05), 2 h after the exercise compared with pre-exercise values. The capacity of isolated neutrophils to produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin (Lg)-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) and luminol (Lm)-dependent CL on stimulation with opsonized zymosan (OZ) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Just after exercise, the LgCL response was not affected, while the response of LmCL mixed with sodium azide, which inhibits catalase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05). In addition, just after exercise, the level of serum growth hormone increased significantly (p < 0.05). The serum cortisol level also increased significantly just after and 1 h after exercise (p < 0.05). These data indicated that maximal exercise not only mobilized neutrophils from marginated pools into the circulation, but also caused increased ROS generation.

  14. In Vitro Oxidation of Collagen Promotes the Formation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and the Activation of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; de Campos, Luízi Prestes; Sangoi, Manuela Borges; Fernandes, Natieli Flores; Gomes, Patrícia; Moretto, Maria Beatriz; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) has been linked to several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated collagen as a potential source for AOPP formation and determined the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-treated collagen (collagen-AOPPs) on human neutrophil activity. We also assessed whether alpha-tocopherol could counteract these effects. Exposure to HOCl increased the levels of collagen-AOPPs. Collagen-AOPPs also stimulated the production of AOPPs, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide radicals (O2(-)), and HOCl by neutrophils. Collagen-AOPPs induced apoptosis and decreased the number of viable cells. Alpha-tocopherol prevented the formation of collagen-AOPPs, strongly inhibited the collagen-AOPP-induced production of O2(-) and HOCl, and increased the viability of neutrophils. Our results suggest that collagen is an important protein that interacts with HOCl to form AOPPs, and consequently, collagen-AOPP formation is related to human neutrophil activation and cell death.

  15. Regulation of the autophagic machinery in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Mitroulis, Ioannis; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kambas, Konstantinos; Rafail, Stavros; Chrysanthopoulou, Akrivi; Speletas, Matthaios; Ritis, Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    The induction of the autophagy machinery, a process for the catabolism of cytosolic proteins and organelles, constitutes a crucial mechanism in innate immunity. However, the involvement of autophagy in human neutrophils and the possible inducers of this process have not been completely elucidated. In this study, the induction of autophagy was examined in human neutrophils treated with various activators and detected by the formation of acidified autophagosomes through monodansylcadaverine staining and via LC-3B conversion screened by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. In addition, the expression of the ATG genes was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. We provide evidence that autophagy is implicated in human neutrophils in both a phagocytosis-independent (rapamycin, TLR agonists, PMA) and phagocytosis (Escherichia coli)-dependent initiation manner. ROS activation is a positive mechanism for autophagy induction in the case of PMA, TLR activation and phagocytosis. Furthermore, LC3B gene expression was uniformly upregulated, indicating a transcriptional level of regulation for the autophagic machinery. This study provides a stepping stone toward further investigation of autophagy in neutrophil-driven inflammatory disorders.

  16. [Lymphocyte transformation test following stimulation with a protein factor from neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNL) in psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    Ruszczak, Z; Ciborska, L; Kaszuba, A

    1988-12-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was given to 20 healthy subjects and 43 patients with generalized psoriasis vulgaris: it was given right after stimulation with PHA (spontaneous) and after stimulation with allogenic and autogenic protein factor (NPF). NPF was isolated from secondary lysosome granules of peripheral blood neutrophils. The results were analyzed using computer statistic tests. No distinct differences were noticed between the spontaneous transformation test in psoriatic patients compared to the controls. After stimulation with PHA, the percentage of blast cells was significantly lower in patients with psoriasis. When allogenic and autogenic NPF was used for stimulation, the LTT values were significantly higher in the psoriasis group than in the control subjects. This fact points out the increase in sensitivity of lymphocytes to NPF in active psoriasis and the possibility of abnormal neutrophil-lymphocyte interactions in vivo. This phenomenon may be intensified when under the influence of bacterial or viral agents, or medicaments; the degranulation of secondary lysosome granules of neutrophils occurs, causing the release of NPF. These investigations support our opinion that psoriasis is a systemic disease and that NPF plays a considerable role in the psoriatic reaction.

  17. Modulatory activities of Agelanthus dodoneifolius (Loranthaceae) extracts on stimulated equine neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Boly, Raïnatou; Dessy, Stéphanie; Kohnen, Stephan; Kini, Félix; Lompo, Marius; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Dubois, Jacques; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Serteyn, Didier; Franck, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Agelanthus dodoneifolius DC Danser (Loranthaceae) is used for the treatment of various diseases including asthma. The aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts have been reported to have anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic and bronchorelaxant activities. The present study investigates the effects of the aqueous decoction and the diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and butanolic fractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius DC Danser (Loranthaceae) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and myeloperoxidase (MPO) release by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated equine neutrophils and on purified equine MPO activity. ROS production and MPO release by the PMA-stimulated neutrophils were measured by the lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and ELISA assays, respectively. Specific immunological extraction followed by enzymatic detection (SIEFED) was used to specifically measure the equine MPO activity. Identification and quantification of the individual and total phenolic and flavonoid compounds were performed using UPLC-MS/MS equipment and colorimetric methods involving Folin-Ciocalteu and AlCl₃, respectively. All the tested extracts displayed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on the oxidant activities of neutrophils; a stronger effect was observed with the organic fractions than the aqueous decoction. These findings could be correlated with a high content of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. The results confirm the previously shown anti-inflammatory effect of Agelanthus dodoneifolius and its potential use for the treatment of neutrophil-dependent inflammatory diseases.

  18. JAK/STAT regulation of Aspergillus fumigatus corneal infections and IL-6/23-stimulated neutrophil, IL-17, elastase, and MMP9 activity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patricia R; Roy, Sanhita; Meszaros, Evan C; Sun, Yan; Howell, Scott J; Malemud, Charles J; Pearlman, Eric

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 and IL-23 (IL-6/23) induce IL-17A (IL-17) production by a subpopulation of murine and human neutrophils, resulting in autocrine IL-17 activation, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, and increased fungal killing. As IL-6 and IL-23 receptors trigger JAK1, -3/STAT3 and JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation, respectively, we examined the role of this pathway in a murine model of fungal keratitis and also examined neutrophil elastase and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9) activity by IL-6/23-stimulated human neutrophils in vitro. We found that STAT3 phosphorylation of neutrophils in Aspergillus fumigatus-infected corne as was inhibited by the JAK/STAT inhibitor Ruxolitinib, resulting in impaired fungal killing and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity. In vitro, we showed that fungal killing by IL-6/23-stimulated human peripheral blood neutrophils was impaired by JAK/STAT inhibitors Ruxolitinib and Stattic, and by the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt inhibitor SR1001. This was also associated with decreased reactive oxygen species, IL-17A production, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt translocation to the nucleus. We also demonstrate that IL-6/23-activated neutrophils exhibit increased elastase and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9) activity, which is inhibited by Ruxolitinib and Stattic but not by SR1001. Taken together, these observations indicate that the regulation of activity of IL-17-producing neutrophils by JAK/STAT inhibitors impairs reactive oxygen species production and fungal killing activity but also blocks elastase and gelatinase activity that can cause tissue damage.

  19. Effect of low frequency electromagnetic fields on A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Iannotta, Valeria; Cattabriga, Elena; Spisani, Susanna; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The present study describes the effect of low frequency, low energy, pulsing electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophils.Saturation experiments performed using a high affinity adenosine antagonist [3H]-ZM 241385 revealed a single class of binding sites in control and in PEMF-treated human neutrophils with similar affinity (KD=1.05±0.10 and 1.08±0.12 nM, respectively). Furthermore, after 1 h of exposure to PEMFs the receptor density was statistically increased (P<0.01) (Bmax =126±10 and 215±15 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively).The effect of PEMFs was specific to the A2A adenosine receptors. This effect was also intensity, time and temperature dependent.In the adenylyl cyclase assays the A2A receptor agonists, HE-NECA and NECA, increased cyclic AMP accumulation in untreated human neutrophils with an EC50 value of 43 (40 – 47) and 255 (228 – 284) nM, respectively. The capability of HE-NECA and NECA to stimulate cyclic AMP levels in human neutrophils was increased (P<0.01) after exposure to PEMFs with an EC50 value of 10(8 – 13) and 61(52 – 71) nM, respectively.In the superoxide anion (O2−) production assays HE-NECA and NECA inhibited the generation of O2− in untreated human neutrophils, with an EC50 value of 3.6(3.1 – 4.2) and of 23(20 – 27) nM, respectively. Moreover, in PEMF-treated human neutrophils, the same compounds show an EC50 value of 1.6(1.2 – 2.1) and of 6.0(4.7 – 7.5) nM respectively.These results indicate the presence of significant alterations in the expression and in the functionality of adenosine A2A receptors in human neutrophils treated with PEMFs. PMID:11976268

  20. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate activates calcium mobilization in human phagocytic leukocytes and neutrophil/monocyte progenitor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, D S; Lazarus, H M; Shurin, S B; Stoll, S E; Dubyak, G R

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the ability of extracellular ATP to elicit intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in a broad range of human leukocytes at particular stages of hematopoietic differentiation. The average cytosolic [Ca2+] in various leukocyte populations was measured in Fura 2-loaded cell suspensions while the cytosolic [Ca2+] in individual, Indo 1-loaded leukocytes was assayed by flow cytometric methods. Utilizing normal blood- and marrow-derived cells, human leukemic cell lines, and mononuclear cell fractions derived from the blood of patients with various leukemias, we have found that ATP-induced Ca2+ mobilization appears restricted to leukocytes of neutrophil/monocyte ontogeny. Significant ATP-induced increases in cytosolic [Ca2+] were observed in neutrophils, monocytes, and myeloid progenitor cells as immature as myeloblasts, but not in lymphocytes. Extensive characterization of the ATP-induced changes in [Ca2+] observed in the HL-60 promyelocytic cell line have indicated these Ca2+-mobilizing effects of ATP can be correlated with an activation of inositol phospholipid breakdown via the occupation of P2-purinergic receptors Significantly, of the various agonists (FMLP, platelet-activating factor, LTB4, and ATP) which elicit equivalent and maximal Ca2+ mobilization in mature neutrophils and monocytes, ATP was the most efficacious stimulant of Ca2+ mobilization in immature neutrophil/monocyte precursors. Thus, expression of putative P2-purinergic receptors for ATP appears to precede expression of other receptor types known to activate the inositol phospholipid signaling cascades in terminally differentiated phagocytes. PMID:2708526

  1. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  2. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  3. Isolation of two polypeptides comprising the neutrophil-immobilizing factor of human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, K W; Brightman, I L; Goetzl, E J

    1983-01-01

    Human leucocyte lysosomal polypeptides of mol. wt 4000-5000, which constitute the neutrophil-immobolizing factor (NIF), were isolated from the 22,000 g supernate of sonicates of human neutrophils by filtration on Sephadex G-75. The larger (NIF-1) and smaller (NIF-2) of the polypeptides were resolved by filtration on Bio-Gel P6 and purified to homogeneity by sequential reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and paper electrophoresis. The results of analyses of amino acid composition indicated that NIF-1 and NIF-2 are distinct polypeptides composed of an apparent total of 41 and 38 amino acids, respectively. Both NIF polypeptides contain one cysteine and one methionine, lack isoleucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine, and are rich in histidine and proline. The sequence of 20 of the amino-terminal amino acids of both NIF polypeptides is identical, but NIF-2 possesses an additional alanine at the amino-terminus. Highly purified NIF-1 and NIF-2 inhibited human neutrophil random migration and chemotaxis to diverse stimuli in a concentration-dependent manner, with 50% inhibition of chemotaxis by 0.31-1 x 10(-8) M NIF-1 and 1-3 x 10(-7) M NIF-2. Neither NIF polypeptide was cytotoxic for neutrophils, altered neutrophil phagocytosis or release of lysosomal enzymes, or inhibited mononuclear leucocyte chemotaxis. The leucocyte and functional specificity of the NIF polypeptides and the quantitites released upon stimulation of the human leucocytes suggest that the transition to a mononuclear leucocyte population in chronic inflammation may be attributable in part to the NIF derived from the leucocyte infiltrates of acute responses. PMID:6848456

  4. Is there a relationship between phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate and F-actin polymerization in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, M.; Traynor-Kaplan, A.E.; Sklar, L.A.; Norgauer, J. )

    1990-10-05

    Stimulation of human neutrophils with the chemoattractant N-formyl peptide caused rapid polymerization of F-actin as detected by right angle light scatter and 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol (NBD)-phallacidin staining of F-actin. After labeling neutrophils with 32P, exposure to N-formyl peptide induced a fast decrease of phosphatidylinositol 4-bisphosphate (PIP)2, a slow increase of phosphatidic acid, and a rapid rise of phosphatidylinositol 4-trisphosphate (PIP3). Formation of PIP3 as well as actin polymerization was near maximal at 10 s after stimulation. Half-maximal response and PIP3 formation at early time points resulted from stimulation of neutrophils with 0.01 nM N-formyl peptide or occupation of about 200 receptors. Sustained elevation of PIP3, prolonged right angle light scatter response, and F-actin formation required higher concentrations of N-formyl peptide, occupation of thousands of receptors, and high binding rates. When ligand binding was interrupted with an antagonist, F-actin rapidly depolymerized, transient light scatter response recovered immediately, and elevated (32P)PIP3 levels decayed toward initial values. However, recovery of (32P)PIP2 was not influenced by the antagonist. Based on the parallel time courses and dose response of (32P) PIP3, the right angle light scatter response, and F-actin polymerization, PIP3 is more likely than PIP2 to be involved in modulation of actin polymerization and depolymerization in vivo.

  5. Interaction between arsenic trioxide (ATO) and human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2011-05-01

    The cytotoxic effect of arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known to be mediated by its ability to induce cell apoptosis in a variety of cells, including neutrophils. More recently, we demonstrated that ATO induced several parameters involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced neutrophil apoptosis but that caspase-4 was not involved. The aim of this study was to better understand how neutrophils are activated by ATO and to further demonstrate that ATO is an ER stressor. Human neutrophils were isolated from healthy blood donors and incubated in vitro in the presence or absence of ATO and several parameters were investigated. We found that ATO induced the expression of the proapoptotic GADD153 protein, a key player involved in ER stress-induced apoptosis, activated nuclear nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activities, and increased prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) production. Using an antibody array approach, we found that ATO increased the production of several cytokines, with interleukin 8 (IL-8) being the predominant one. We confirmed that ATO increased the production of IL-8 by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not inhibit IL-8 production. The results of the present study further support the notion that ATO is an ER stressor and that, although its toxic effect is mediated by induction of apoptosis, this chemical also induced, in parallel, NF-κB activation, the production of PGE2 and several cytokines probably involved in other cell functions. Also, we conclude that the production of IL-8 is not induced by a caspase-4-dependent mechanism, suggesting that ATO-induced caspase-4 activation is involved in other as yet unidentified functions in human neutrophils.

  6. Luminol-dependent photoemission from single neutrophil stimulated by phorbol ester and calcium ionophore--role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Suematsu, M.; Oshio, C.; Miura, S.; Suzuki, M.; Houzawa, S.; Tsuchiya, M.

    1988-08-30

    Luminol-dependent photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated single neutrophil was visually investigated by using an ultrasensitive photonic image intensifier microscope. Neutrophils stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (0.1 microgram/ml) alone produced a negligible level of photonic activities in the presence of luminol (10 micrograms/ml). The additional application of 0.1 microM Ca2+ ionophore A23187 induced explosive changes of photonic burst corresponding to the distribution of neutrophils, and these photonic activities were gradually spread to extracellular space. Sodium azide, which prevents myeloperoxidase activity, inhibited Ca2+ ionophore-induced photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated neutrophil. These findings suggest a prerequisite role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase release in luminol-dependent photoemission from stimulated neutrophils.

  7. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae Exhibits Reduced Survival in Human Neutrophils Via Src Family Kinase-Mediated Bacterial Trafficking Into Mature Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Ball, Louise M.; Daily, Kylene P.; Martin, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During gonorrheal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial content. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signaling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signaling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils’ full antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:25346239

  8. NADPH oxidase derived reactive oxygen species are involved in human neutrophil IL-1β secretion but not in inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Gabelloni, María Laura; Sabbione, Florencia; Jancic, Carolina; Fuxman Bass, Juan; Keitelman, Irene; Iula, Leonardo; Oleastro, Matías; Geffner, Jorge R; Trevani, Analía S

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are essential players in acute inflammatory responses. Upon stimulation, neutrophils activate NADPH oxidase, generating an array of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a major proinflammatory cytokine synthesized as a precursor that has to be proteolytically processed to become biologically active. The role of ROS in IL-1β processing is still controversial and has not been previously studied in neutrophils. We report here that IL-1β processing in human neutrophils is dependent on caspase-1 and on the serine proteases elastase and/or proteinase 3. NADPH oxidase deficient neutrophils activated caspase-1 and did not exhibit differences in NALP3 expression, indicating that ROS are neither required for inflammasome activation nor for its priming, as has been reported for macrophages. Strikingly, ROS exerted opposite effects on the processing and secretion of IL-1β; whereas ROS negatively controlled caspase-1 activity, as reported in mononuclear phagocytes, ROS were found to be necessary for the exportation of mature IL-1β out of the cell, a role never previously described. The complex ROS-mediated regulation of neutrophil IL-1β secretion might constitute a physiological mechanism to control IL-1β-dependent inflammatory processes where neutrophils play a crucial role.

  9. IFNα enhances the production of IL-6 by human neutrophils activated via TLR8

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Maili; Arruda-Silva, Fabio; Bianchetto-Aguilera, Francisco; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Scapini, Patrizia; Lunardi, Claudio; Cassatella, Marco A.; Tamassia, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported that human neutrophils produce biologically active amounts of IL-6 when incubated with agonists activating TLR8, a receptor recognizing viral single strand RNA. In this study, we demonstrate that IFNα, a cytokine that modulates the early innate immune responses toward viral and bacterial infections, potently enhances the production of IL-6 in neutrophils stimulated with R848, a TLR8 agonist. We also show that such an effect is not caused by an IFNα-dependent induction of TLR7 and its consequent co-activation with TLR8 in response to R848, but, rather, it is substantially mediated by an increased production and release of endogenous TNFα. The latter cytokine, in an autocrine manner, leads to an augmented synthesis of the IkBζ co-activator and an enhanced recruitment of the C/EBPβ transcription factor to the IL-6 promoter. Moreover, we show that neutrophils from SLE patients with active disease state, hence displaying an IFN-induced gene expression signature, produce increased amounts of both IL-6 and TNFα in response to R848 as compared to healthy donors. Altogether, data uncover novel effects that type I IFN exerts in TLR8-activated neutrophils, which therefore enlarge our knowledge on the various biological actions which type I IFN orchestrates during infectious and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26790609

  10. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V.; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A.; Kotukhov, Yuriy A.; Danilova, Alevtina N.; Özek, Temel; Başer, K. Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEOf+l and AKEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyl eugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEOstm, but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEOstm composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). We found that one component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca2+ flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca2+ flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by an inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production. PMID:25959257

  11. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Kotukhov, Yuriy A; Danilova, Alevtina N; Özek, Temel; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-05-27

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEO(f+l) and AKEO(stm), respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyleugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy-four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEO(stm), but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEO(stm) composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). One component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production.

  12. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  13. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid*

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Warner, Timothy D.; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W.; Murphy, Robert C.; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  14. Ascorbic acid transport and accumulation in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Washko, P.; Rotrosen, D.; Levine, M. )

    1989-11-15

    The transport, accumulation, and distribution of ascorbic acid were investigated in isolated human neutrophils utilizing a new ascorbic acid assay, which combined the techniques of high performance liquid chromatography and coulometric electrochemical detection. Freshly isolated human neutrophils contained 1.0-1.4 mM ascorbic acid, which was localized greater than or equal to 94% to the cytosol, was not protein bound, and was present only as ascorbic acid and not as dehydroascorbic acid. Upon addition of ascorbic acid to the extracellular medium in physiologic amounts, ascorbic acid was accumulated in neutrophils in millimolar concentrations. Accumulation was mediated by a high affinity and a low affinity transporter; both transporters were responsible for maintenance of concentration gradients as large as 50-fold. The high affinity transporter had an apparent Km of 2-5 microns by Lineweaver-Burk and Eadie-Hofstee analyses, and the low affinity transporter had an apparent Km of 6-7 mM by similar analyses. Each transporter was saturable and temperature dependent. In normal human blood the high affinity transporter should be saturated, whereas the low affinity transporter should be in its linear phase of uptake.

  15. The effect of stress-inducible extracellular Hsp72 on human neutrophil chemotaxis: a role during acute intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eduardo; Hinchado, M D; Martín-Cordero, L; Asea, A

    2009-05-01

    We studied the physiological role of the 72 kDa extracellular heat shock protein (Hsp72, a stress-inducible protein) in modulating neutrophil chemotaxis during a single bout of intense exercise performed by sedentary women, together with various cell mechanisms potentially involved in the modulation. For each volunteer, we evaluated neutrophil chemotaxis and serum Hsp72 concentration before and immediately after a single bout of exercise (1 h on a cycle ergometer at 70% VO(2) max), and 24 h later. Both parameters were found to be stimulated by the exercise, and had returned to basal values 24 h later. In vitro, there was a dose-dependent increase in chemotaxis when neutrophils were incubated both with physiological Hsp72 concentrations and with a 100 x greater concentration. The chemotaxis was greater when the neutrophils were incubated with the post-exercise Hsp72 concentration than with the basal concentration, suggesting a physiological role for this protein in the context of the stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis by intense exercise. The 100 x Hsp72 concentration stimulated chemotaxis even more strongly. In addition, Hsp72 was found to have chemoattractant and chemokinetic effects on the neutrophils at physiological concentrations, with these effects being significantly greater with the post-exercise than with the basal Hsp72 concentration. The Hsp72-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis disappeared when the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) was blocked, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) were also found to be involved in the signaling process. No changes were observed, however, in neutrophil intracellular calcium levels in response to Hsp72. In conclusion, physiological concentrations of the stress protein Hsp72 stimulate human neutrophil chemotaxis through TLR-2 with its cofactor CD14, involving ERK, NF-kappaB, and PI3K, but not iCa(2 + ), as

  16. Effect of magnetic resonance imaging on human respiratory burst of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Heine, J; Scheinichen, D; Jaeger, K; Herzog, T; Sümpelmann, R; Leuwer, M

    1999-03-05

    It is known that low intensity magnetic fields increase superoxide anion production during the respiratory burst of rat peritoneal neutrophils in vitro. We investigated whether the high intensity magnetic fields (1.5 T) during magnetic resonance imaging can influence the human neutrophil function under in vivo conditions. Blood samples were obtained from 12 patients immediately before and after magnetic resonance imaging (mean time 27.6(+/-11.4 min)). The induced respiratory burst was investigated by the intracellular oxidative transformation of dihydrorhodamine 123 to the fluorescent dye rhodamine 123 via flow cytometry. The respiratory burst was induced either with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, Escherichia coli, N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine or priming with tumor necrosis factor followed by FMLP stimulation. There was no significant difference between the respiratory burst before and after magnetic resonance imaging, irrespective of the stimulating agent. Short time exposure to a high intensity magnetic field during magnetic resonance imaging seems not to influence the production of radical species in living neutrophils.

  17. Expression and regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Giambelluca, Miriam S; Cloutier, Nathalie; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Boilard, Eric; Pouliot, Marc

    2013-11-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase involved in the regulation of cellular processes ranging from glycogen metabolism to cell cycle regulation. Its two known isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues throughout the body and exert distinct but often overlapping functions. GSK-3 is typically active in resting cells, inhibition by phosphorylation of Ser21 (GSK-3α) or Ser9 (GSK-3β) being the most common regulatory mechanism. GSK-3 activity has been linked recently with immune system function, yet little is known about the role of this enzyme in neutrophils, the most abundant leukocyte type. In the present study, we examined GSK-3 expression and regulation in human neutrophils. GSK-3α was found to be the predominant isoform, it was constitutively expressed and cell stimulation with different agonists did not alter its expression. Stimulation by fMLP, LPS, GM-CSF, Fcγ receptor engagement, or adenosine A2A receptor engagement all resulted in phosphorylation of Ser21. The use of metabolic inhibitors revealed that combinations of Src kinase, PKC, PI3K/AKT, ERK/RSK and PKA signaling pathways could mediate phosphorylation, depending on the agonist. Neither PLC nor p38 were involved. We conclude that GSK-3α is the main isoform expressed in neutrophils and that many different pathways can converge to inhibit GSK-3α activity via Ser21-phosphorylation. GSK-3α thus might be a hub of cellular regulation.

  18. Effect of cellulose acetate materials on the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Moore, M A; Kaplan, D S; Picciolo, G L; Wallis, R R; Kowolik, M J

    2001-06-05

    Following adverse clinical events involving seven patients undergoing renal dialysis using 12-year-old cellulose acetate hemodialyzers, this in vitro study was proposed in an effort to characterize the inflammatory response to the constituent cellulose acetate (CA) fiber materials. Chemiluminescence (CL) and apoptosis assays were used to determine whether human neutrophils were activated by CA fiber materials and/or are sensitive to degradation/alteration of these fibers over time. Furthermore, the study examined in vitro assays with human neutrophils using a CA film, the solvents used in the film preparation and CA resin. The film could be cut to identical sized pieces in an effort to compare hemodialysis material effects in standardized amounts. For the CL assays, 60-min exposure was followed by secondary stimulation with n-formyl-met-leu-phe (fMLP) or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Short-term exposure (60-min postintroduction to CA materials) increased the inflammatory response as measured by the respiratory burst of neutrophils (p < or =.05), with CA fiber exposure significantly compared with cells alone. There was a trend toward an increased response with exposure to older fibers with secondary PMA stimulation. Apoptosis was increased 12% with exposure to the more aged fibers versus 2% with the new fibers. The fiber storage component, glycerol, significantly inhibited the oxidative response (p < or =.001; > or =80% suppression with concentrations of 5-20%). The solvents used in film preparation, N,N-dimethylacetamide and tetrahydrofuran, produced greater than a 70% and 60% suppression, respectively, of CL activity for all concentrations > or =1%. More work is needed to determine the specific nature of the interaction of inflammatory cells with CA materials, but early evidence suggests that neutrophils are activated by CA and display an altered response to more aged fibers.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton’s tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca2+]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26659126

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-12-14

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton's tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca(2+)]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+).

  1. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  2. Biological effects of asbestos fibers on human cells in vitro--especially on lymphocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ueki, A

    2001-04-01

    Biological effects of asbestos fibers were reviewed in relation to the polyclonal activation of human lymphocytes and to the release of free radicals from human neutrophils in vitro. Chrysotile, crocidolite, and amosite asbestos activate CD4+ T lymphocytes polyclonally, followed by activation-induced cell death (a type of apoptosis). The activation is HLA class II dependent, and certain Vbeta repertoire, e.g. Vbeta 5.3, are detected among the fractionated T cells with a high Ca++ level that had been stimulated by asbestos fibers. These observations support the possibility that asbestos acts as a superantigen, and that asbestos stimulate lymphocytes repeatedly in vivo. It has been reported that asbestos-induced cytotoxicity can be suppressed by the scavengers of superoxide or hydroxyl radical. Some of these scavengers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or retinoic acid are known as inducers of cell differentiation. The biological functions of DMSO for cell differentiation of HL-60 cells to neutrophils are suppressed by co-culturing of crocidolite asbestos, because DMSO reacts with the hydroxyl radical released after the stimulation with crocidolite and spent itself. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibited the effects of crocidolite, reacting rapidly with *O2- before the secondary release of *OH. It seems to be probable that asbestos fibers, especially crocidolite, suppress the tissue cell differentiation by releasing free radicals and by wasting inducers of cell differentiation as radical scavengers.

  3. Oxidative and nonoxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Brunetti, A J; Genco, R J

    1986-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative microorganism which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in localized juvenile periodontitis and in subacute bacterial endocarditis and abscesses. Although resistant to serum bactericidal action and to oxidant injury mediated by superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), this organism is sensitive to killing by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system (K.T. Miyasaki, M.E. Wilson, and R.J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 53:161-165, 1986). In this study, we examined the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans to killing by intact neutrophils under aerobic conditions, under anaerobic conditions, and under aerobic conditions in the presence of the heme-protein inhibitor sodium cyanide. Intact neutrophils killed opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the kinetics of these reactions indicated that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. Oxidative mechanisms contributed significantly, and most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms was inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggested that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system participated in the oxidative process. We conclude that human neutrophils are capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent pathways, and that most oxygen-dependent killing requires myeloperoxidase activity. PMID:3013778

  4. Identification of a novel splice variant isoform of TREM-1 in human neutrophil granules1

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Sankar; Keck, Kathy; Vrenios, Michelle; Pope, Marshall; Pearl, Merideth; Doerschug, Kevin; Klesney-Tait, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is critical for inflammatory signal amplification. Humans have two forms of TREM-1: a membrane receptor (mbTREM-1), associated with the adaptor DAP12, and a soluble receptor detected at times of infection. The membrane receptor isoform acts synergistically with the TLR pathway to promote cytokine secretion and neutrophil migration while the soluble receptor functions as a counter regulatory molecule. In multiple models of sepsis, exogenous administration of soluble forms of TREM-1 attenuates inflammation and markedly improves survival. Despite intense interest in soluble TREM-1 both as a clinical predictor of survival and as a therapeutic tool, the origin of native soluble TREM-1 remains controversial. Utilizing human neutrophils, we identified a 15 kDa TREM-1 isoform in primary (azurophilic) and secondary (specific) granules. Mass spectrometric analysis, ELISA, and immunoblot confirm that the 15 kD protein is a novel splice variant of TREM-1 (TREM-1sv). Neutrophil stimulation with P. aeruginosa, LPS, or PAM(3)Cys4 resulted in degranulation and release of TREM-1sv. The addition of exogenous TREM-1sv inhibited TREM-1 receptor mediated proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus these data reveal that TREM-1 isoforms simultaneously activate and inhibit inflammation via the canonical membrane TREM-1 molecule and this newly discovered granular isoform, TREM-1sv. PMID:26561551

  5. Proton stoichiometry associated with human neutrophil respiratory-burst reactions.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Lefker, B A; Ossanna, P J; Weiss, S J

    1984-11-10

    Control of the intraphagosomal pH in neutrophils may be of importance in creating a microbicidal environment by regulating the activity of the O2-.-generating NADPH oxidase and the lysosomal enzymes discharged into this compartment. In this study, we examined the proton stoichiometry associated with the primary enzymatic reaction underlying the respiratory burst. A preparation of the neutrophil-derived, membrane oxidase consumed NADPH and generated O2-. with a stoichiometry of 1 NADPH:2 O2-. When the enzymatically produced O2-. was prevented from undergoing dismutation, net protons were released in an approximate 1:2 stoichiometry with O2-. generated. In contrast, when O2-. was allowed to dismutate to H2O2, net protons were consumed in a 1:1 stoichiometry with the accumulated H2O2. Thus, the delta pH associated with the NADPH oxidase-dependent production of O2-. was dictated by the fate of the generated radical. The consumption of the oxidase-generated H2O2 by the lysosomal enzyme myeloperoxidase resulted in the formation of HOCl which was trapped in the presence of taurine as the N-chloro derivative. The ratio of chlorinated product formed to H+ consumed was 1:1. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the known intraphagosomal pH changes that occur following neutrophil stimulation. We conclude that the O2-.-generating oxidase plays a dual role in the phagosome by simultaneously creating an oxidizing environment that optimizes pH-dependent microbicidal processes.

  6. Roles of superoxide and myeloperoxidase in ascorbate oxidation in stimulated neutrophils and H2O2-treated HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Amber; Cuddihy, Sarah L; Son, Tae G; Vissers, Margreet C M; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2011-10-01

    Ascorbate is present at high concentrations in neutrophils and becomes oxidized when the cells are stimulated. We have investigated the mechanism of oxidation by studying cultured HL60 cells and isolated neutrophils. Addition of H(2)O(2) to ascorbate-loaded HL60 cells resulted in substantial oxidation of intracellular ascorbate. Oxidation was myeloperoxidase-dependent, but not attributable to hypochlorous acid, and can be explained by myeloperoxidase (MPO) exhibiting direct ascorbate peroxidase activity. When neutrophils were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate, about 40% of their intracellular ascorbate was oxidized over 20 min. Ascorbate loss required NADPH oxidase activity but in contrast to the HL60 cells did not involve myeloperoxidase. It did not occur when exogenous H(2)O(2) was added, was not inhibited by myeloperoxidase inhibitors, and was the same for normal and myeloperoxidase-deficient cells. Neutrophil ascorbate loss was enhanced when endogenous superoxide dismutase was inhibited by cyanide or diethyldithiocarbamate and appears to be due to oxidation by superoxide. We propose that in HL60 cells, MPO-dependent ascorbate oxidation occurs because cellular ascorbate can access newly synthesized MPO before it becomes packaged in granules: a mechanism not possible in neutrophils. In neutrophils, we estimate that ascorbate is capable of competing with superoxide dismutase for a small fraction of the superoxide they generate and propose that the superoxide responsible is likely to come from previously identified sites of intracellular NADPH oxidase activity. We speculate that ascorbate might protect the neutrophil against intracellular effects of superoxide generated at these sites.

  7. Influence of FcγRIIIb polymorphism on its ability to cooperate with FcγRIIa and CR3 in mediating the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Toller-Kawahisa, Juliana Escher; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Costa, Paulo Inácio; Faria, Carolina Maria Quinello Gomes; Azzolini, Ana Elisa Caleiro Seixas; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria; Marzocchi-Machado, Cleni Mara

    2014-08-01

    Considering that human neutrophil FcγRIIa and FcγRIIIb receptors interact synergistically with CR3 in triggering neutrophil functional responses, allelic polymorphisms in these receptors might influence such interactions. We assessed whether FcγRIIIb polymorphisms affect FcγR/CR cooperation in mediating the neutrophil oxidative burst (OB), in particular the FcγRIIIb/CR3 cooperation that occurs via lectin-saccharide-like interactions. The OB of human neutrophil antigen (HNA)-1a-, HNA-1b-, and HNA-1a/-1b-neutrophils stimulated with immune complexes, opsonized or not with serum complement, was measured by the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. Compared with HNA-1a-neutrophils, HNA-1b-neutrophils exhibited reduced FcγR-stimulated OB, but increased FcγR/CR-stimulated OB. It suggests that (i) FcγR and CR cooperate more effectively in HNA-1b-neutrophils, and (ii) the HNA-1b allotype influences the FcγRIIIb cooperation with FcγRIIa, but not with CR3. HNA-1a- and HNA-1b-neutrophils exhibited similar OB responses elicited via CR3 alone or via FcγR/CR-independent pathways. In addition, the level of FcγRIIIb, FcγRIIa, and CR3 expression did not differ significantly among the neutrophil groups studied. Together, these results demonstrate that the HNA-1b allotype influences the functional cooperation between FcγRIIIb and FcγRIIa, and suggest that the difference in the glycosylation pattern between HNA-1a and HNA-1b does not affect the FcγRIIIb cooperation with CR3.

  8. Temporal adaptation of neutrophil oxidative responsiveness to n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Acceleration by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    English, D; Broxmeyer, H E; Gabig, T G; Akard, L P; Williams, D E; Hoffman, R

    1988-10-01

    This investigation was undertaken to clarify the mechanism by which purified recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) potentiates neutrophil oxidative responses triggered by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. Previous studies have shown that GM-CSF priming of neutrophil responses to FMLP is induced relatively slowly, requiring 90 to 120 min of incubation in vitro, is not associated with increased levels of cytoplasmic free Ca2+, but is associated with up-regulation of cell-surface FMLP receptors. We have confirmed these findings and further characterized the process of GM-CSF priming. We found that the effect of GM-CSF on neutrophil oxidative responsiveness was induced in a temperature-dependent manner and was not reversed when the cells were washed extensively to remove the growth factor before stimulation with FMLP. Extracellular Ca2+ was not required for functional enhancement by GM-CSF and GM-CSF alone effected no detectable alteration in the 32P-labeled phospholipid content of neutrophils during incubation in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF exerts its influence on neutrophils by accelerating a process that occurs spontaneously and results in up-regulation of both cell-surface FMLP receptors and oxidative responsiveness to FMLP. Thus, the results demonstrate that, with respect to oxidative activation, circulating endstage polymorphonuclear leukocytes are nonresponsive or hyporesponsive to FMLP; functional responsiveness increases dramatically as surface FMLP receptors are gradually deployed after the cells leave the circulation. Thus, as neutrophils mature, their responsiveness to FMLP changes in a manner which may be crucial for efficient host defense. At 37 degrees C, this process is markedly potentiated by GM-CSF. We conclude that endogenous GM-CSF, released systemically or at sites of infection and inflammation, potentially plays an important role in host defense by accelerating functional maturation of responding

  9. Differential stimulation of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and arachidonic acid metabolism in rat peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Cullinan, C.A.; Berkenkopf, J.W.; Weichman, B.M.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) induced the production of radical oxygen species (ROS) from rat peritoneal neutrophils as assessed by CL. ROS generation occurred in a time- (maximum at 13.5 min) and dose- (concentration range of 1.7-498 nM) related fashion. However, 166 nM PMA did not induce either cyclooxygenase (CO) or lipoxygenase (LPO) product formation by 20 min post-stimulation. Conversely, A23187, at concentrations between 0.1 and 10 ..mu..M, stimulated both pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, but had little or no effect upon ROS production. When suboptimal concentrations of PMA (5.5 nM) and A23187 (0.1-1 ..mu..M) were coincubated with the neutrophils, a synergistic ROS response was elicited. However, arachidonic acid metabolism in the presence of PMA was unchanged relative to A12187 alone. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited both PMA-induced CL (IC/sub 50/ = 0.9 ..mu..M) and A23187-induced arachidonic acid metabolism (IC/sub 50/ = 1.7 ..mu..M and 6.0 ..mu..M for LPO and CO, respectively). The mixed LPO-CO inhibitor, BW755C, behaved in a qualitatively similar manner to NDGA, whereas the CO inhibitors, indomethacin, piroxicam and naproxen had no inhibitory effect on ROS generation at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NDGA and BW755C may inhibit CL and arachidonic acid metabolism by distinct mechanisms in rat neutrophils.

  10. Chemiluminescence of neutrophiles stimulated by opsonized Zymosan in children with bronchial asthma and pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowicz-Uszynska, A.; Jankowski, A.

    2004-08-01

    Oxygen metabolism of neutrophils after stimulation with opsonized zymosan was examined using chemiluminescence test (in the presence of the patient serum or pooled serum). Into the study 37 children aged from 2 to 12 years were enrolled (20 girls and 17 boys). 10 healthy volunteers comprised the control group (group III). Two groups of patients were established: group I -- children with bronchial asthma (without infection), group II -- children with pneumonia. The examination in both groups was performed twice -- in acute phase and in remission period. The group I in acute phase comprised 16 children and in remission phase 9 children, group II - 21 children in acute phase and 9 children in remission phase, respectively. The following parameters of CL were estimated average value of so called spontaneous CL, maximal excitation of neutrophils after stimulation by zymogen (CLmax), time of zymosan opsonization. The following results were obtained: increased spontaneous CL and CLmax (at the presence of both sera) in acute phase of bronchial asthma and pneumonia in comparison to the control group. In the period of remission both these parameters were insignificantly decreased. The longest time of zymosan opsonization in acute period of disease was observed in children with pneumonia (18 min.). This time did not change during remission phase. Only slightly longer time of opsonization was observed in the patients from group I (in exacerbation) (15 min) than in the control group (13,1 min). This time was prolonged in the clinical remission (20 min).

  11. Stimulus-specific induction of phospholipid and arachidonic acid metabolism in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, R.W.; Manzi, R.M.; Clark, M.A.; Hoffstein, S.T.

    1987-04-01

    Phospholipid remodeling resulting in arachidonic acid (AA) release and metabolism in human neutrophils stimulated by calcium ionophore A23187 has been extensively studied, while data obtained using physiologically relevant stimuli is limited. Opsonized zymosan and immune complexes induced stimulus-specific alterations in lipid metabolism that were different from those induced by A23187. (/sup 3/H)AA release correlated with activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) but not with cellular activation as indicated by superoxide generation. The latter correlated more with calcium-dependent phospholipase C (PLC) activation and elevation of cellular diacylglycerol (DAG) levels. When cells that had been allowed to incorporate (/sup 3/H)AA were stimulated with A23187, large amounts of labeled AA was released, most of which was metabolized to 5-HETE and leukotriene B4. Stimulation with immune complexes also resulted in the release of (/sup 3/H)AA but this released radiolabeled AA was not metabolized. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan induced no detectable release of (/sup 3/H)AA. Analysis of (/sup 3/H)AA-labeled lipids in resting cells indicated that the greatest amount of label was incorporated into the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pool, followed closely by phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, while little (/sup 3/H)AA was detected in the phosphatidylethanolamine pool. During stimulation with A23187, a significant decrease in labeled PI occurred and labeled free fatty acid in the pellet increased. With immune complexes, only a small decrease was seen in labeled PI while the free fatty acid in the pellets was unchanged. In contrast, opsonized zymosan decreased labeled PI, and increased labeled DAG. Phospholipase activity in homogenates from human neutrophils was also assayed. A23187 and immune complexes, but not zymosan, significantly enhanced PLA2 activity in the cell homogenates. On the other hand, PLC activity was enhanced by zymosan and immune complexes

  12. Differential uptake of grepafloxacin by human circulating blood neutrophils and those exudated into tissues.

    PubMed

    Niwa, M; Hotta, K; Kanamori, Y; Matsuno, H; Kozawa, O; Hirota, M; Uematsu, T

    2001-09-28

    The uptake of the antimicrobial quinolone agent, grepafloxacin, both by human circulating blood neutrophils and by those exudated into tissues, was evaluated in vitro by comparing the intracellular drug concentrations. In circulating blood neutrophils, the uptake of grepafloxacin was rapid and saturable at 37 degrees C. The uptake of grepafloxacin into circulating blood neutrophils was reduced by lowering the environmental temperature or by the presence of metabolic inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of an active transport mechanism. Furthermore, the uptake of grepafloxacin by tissue (salivary) neutrophils was also partially temperature-dependent and was significantly greater than that by circulating blood neutrophils, i.e. exudation of neutrophils into tissue results in a markedly enhanced transport mechanism for grepafloxacin. This phenomenon may be related to the higher defense activity against infection seen in exudated tissue neutrophils.

  13. Chloride transport in functionally active phagosomes isolated from Human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Martha L.; Painter, Richard G.; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Guoshun

    2012-01-01

    Chloride anion is critical for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and microbial killing in neutrophil phagosomes. However, the molecular mechanism by which this anion is transported to the organelle is poorly understood. In this report, membrane-enclosed and functionally active phagosomes were isolated from human neutrophils by using opsonized paramagnetic latex microspheres and a rapid magnetic separation method. The phagosomes recovered were highly enriched for specific protein markers associated with this organelle such as lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoferrin, and NADPH oxidase. When FITC–dextran was included in the phagocytosis medium, the majority of the isolated phagosomes retained the fluorescent label after isolation, indicative of intact membrane structure. Flow cytometric measurement of acridine orange, a fluorescent pH indicator, in the purified phagosomes demonstrated that the organelle in its isolated state was capable of transporting protons to the phagosomal lumen via the vacuolar-type ATPase proton pump (V-ATPase). When NADPH was supplied, the isolated phagosomes constitutively oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123, indicating their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. The preparations also showed a robust production of HOCl within the phagosomal lumen when assayed with the HOCl-specific fluorescent probe R19-S by flow cytometry. MPO-mediated iodination of the proteins covalently conjugated to the phagocytosed beads was quantitatively measured. Phagosomal uptake of iodide and protein iodination were significantly blocked by chloride channel inhibitors, including CFTRinh-172 and NPPB. Further experiments determined that the V-ATPase-driving proton flux into the isolated phagosomes required chloride cotransport, and the cAMP-activated CFTR chloride channel was a major contributor to the chloride transport. Taken together, the data suggest that the phagosomal preparation described herein retains ion transport

  14. Flavonols modulate the effector functions of healthy individuals' immune complex-stimulated neutrophils: a therapeutic perspective for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Everton O L; Kabeya, Luciana M; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Marchi, Larissa F; Andrade, Micássio F; Piatesi, Fabiana; Paoliello-Paschoalato, Adriana B; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Lucisano-Valim, Yara M

    2014-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients usually exhibit immune complex (IC) deposition and increased neutrophil activation in the joint. In this study, we assessed how four flavonols (galangin, kaempferol, quercetin, and myricetin) modulate the effector functions of healthy individuals' and active RA patients' IC-stimulated neutrophils. We measured superoxide anion and total reactive oxygen species production using lucigenin (CL-luc)- and luminol (CL-lum)-enhanced chemiluminescence assays, respectively. Galangin, kaempferol, and quercetin inhibited CL-lum to the same degree (mean IC50=2.5 μM). At 2.5 μM, quercetin and galangin suppressed nearly 65% CL-lum of active RA patients' neutrophils. Quercetin inhibited CL-luc the most effectively (IC50=1.71±0.36 μM). The four flavonols diminished myeloperoxidase activity, but they did not decrease NADPH oxidase activity, phagocytosis, microbial killing, or cell viability of neutrophils. The ability of the flavonols to scavenge hypochlorous acid and chloramines, but not H2O2, depended on the hydroxylation degree of the flavonol B-ring. Therefore, at physiologically relevant concentrations, the flavonols partially inhibited the oxidative metabolism of IC-stimulated neutrophils without affecting the other investigated effector functions. Using these compounds to modulate IC-mediated neutrophil activation is a promising safe therapeutic strategy to control inflammation in active RA patients.

  15. A Lipid Mediator Hepoxilin A3 Is a Natural Inducer of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Douda, David N.; Grasemann, Hartmut; Pace-Asciak, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis airways are accompanied by inflammation, neutrophilia, and mucous thickening. Cystic fibrosis sputum contains a large amount of uncleared DNA contributed by neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation from neutrophils. The exact mechanisms of the induction of NETosis in cystic fibrosis airways remain unclear, especially in uninfected lungs of patients with early cystic fibrosis lung disease. Here we show that Hepoxilin A3, a proinflammatory eicosanoid, and the synthetic analog of Hepoxilin B3, PBT-3, directly induce NETosis in human neutrophils. Furthermore, we show that Hepoxilin A3-mediated NETosis is NADPH-oxidase-dependent at lower doses of Hepoxilin A3, while it is NADPH-oxidase-independent at higher doses. Together, these results demonstrate that Hepoxilin A3 is a previously unrecognized inducer of NETosis in cystic fibrosis lungs and may represent a new therapeutic target for treating cystic fibrosis and other inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:25784781

  16. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-06-18

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils.

  17. Effects of budlein A on human neutrophils and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    KNOB, Carollinie Dias; SILVA, Milena; GASPAROTO, Thaís Helena; OLIVEIRA, Carine Ervolino; AMÔR, Nádia Ghinelli; ARAKAWA, Nilton Syogo; COSTA, Fernando Batista; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and other ailments. Objective In this study, we evaluated whether budlein A modulates the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes. Material and Methods Our research group has investigated several plant species and several compounds have been isolated, identified, and their medical potential evaluated. Budlein A is a SL isolated from the species Aldama buddlejiformis and A. robusta (Asteraceae) and shows anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Advances in understanding how plant-derived substances modulate the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have led to the development of new therapies for human diseases. Results Budlein A inhibited MPO activity, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and IL-12 production and induces neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, budlein A inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, and IFN-γ production, but it did not lead to cell death. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that budlein A shows distinct immunomodulatory effects on immune cells. PMID:27383709

  18. Neutrophil recruitment to the brain in mouse and human ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Perez-de-Puig, Isabel; Miró-Mur, Francesc; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Gelpi, Ellen; Pedragosa, Jordi; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2015-02-01

    Neutrophils are rapidly recruited in response to local tissue infection or inflammation. Stroke triggers a strong inflammatory reaction but the relevance of neutrophils in the ischemic brain is not fully understood, particularly in the absence of reperfusion. We investigated brain neutrophil recruitment in two murine models of permanent ischemia induced by either cauterization of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery (c-MCAo) or intraluminal MCA occlusion (il-MCAo), and three fatal cases of human ischemic stroke. Flow cytometry analyses revealed progressive neutrophil recruitment after c-MCAo, lesser neutrophil recruitment following il-MCAo, and absence of neutrophils after sham operation. Confocal microscopy identified neutrophils in the leptomeninges from 6 h after the occlusion, in the cortical basal lamina and cortical Virchow-Robin spaces from 15 h, and also in the cortical brain parenchyma at 24 h. Neutrophils showed signs of activation including histone-3 citrullination, chromatin decondensation, and extracellular projection of DNA and histones suggestive of extracellular trap formation. Perivascular neutrophils were identified within the entire cortical infarction following c-MCAo. After il-MCAo, neutrophils prevailed in the margins but not the center of the cortical infarct, and were intraluminal and less abundant in the striatum. The lack of collaterals to the striatum and a collapsed pial anastomotic network due to brain edema in large hemispheric infarctions could impair neutrophil trafficking in this model. Neutrophil extravasation at the leptomeninges was also detected in the human tissue. We concluded that neutrophils extravasate from the leptomeningeal vessels and can eventually reach the brain in experimental animal models and humans with prolonged arterial occlusion.

  19. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  20. EGCG reverses human neutrophil elastase-induced migration in A549 cells by directly binding to HNE and by regulating α1-AT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Wu, Haoming; Chen, Ya; Yang, Haopeng; Duan, Jianhui; Li, Xin; Pan, Yan; Tie, Lu; Zhang, Liangren; Li, Xuejun

    2015-07-01

    Lung carcinogenesis is a complex process that occurs in unregulated inflammatory environment. EGCG has been extensively investigated as a multi-targeting anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory compound. In this study, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which EGCG reverses the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. We found that neutrophil elastase directly triggered human adenocarcinoma A549 cell migration and that EGCG suppressed the elevation of tumor cell migration induced by neutrophil elastase. We observed that EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity based on the CDOCKER algorithm, MD stimulation by GROMACS, SPR assay and elastase enzymatic activity assay. As the natural inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, α1-antitrypsin is synthesized in tumor cells. We further demonstrated that the expression of α1-antitrypsin was up-regulated after EGCG treatment in neutrophil elastase-treated A549 cells. We preliminarily discovered that the EGCG-mediated induction of α1-antitrypsin expression might be correlated with the regulatory effect of EGCG on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Overall, our results suggest that EGCG ameliorates the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. The mechanism underlying this effect may include two processes: EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity; EGCG enhances the expression of α1-antitrypsin by regulating the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  1. New insights into the mechanisms of nuclear segmentation in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J A; Wangh, L J

    1999-04-01

    During human neutrophil differentiation, large portions of the genome condense and associate with the nuclear envelope to form filament-like structures. As a result, the nucleus of the mature neutrophil typically consists of a linear array of three or four lobes joined by thin, DNA-containing filaments. Despite the medical significance of neutrophil nuclear morphology, little is known about the events regulating neutrophil nuclear differentiation and its pathological states. This work presents a new model of the mechanisms governing nuclear filament formation in human neutrophils. This model is based on recent chromosome mapping studies in human neutrophils and on studies of genetic and pathological conditions affecting neutrophil nuclear shape. According to this model, filament assembly is initiated by factors that interact with specific regions of the genome in a hierarchical and dose-dependent manner. In this regard, the strategies governing the molecular interactions responsible for filament formation appear to resemble those involved in transcriptional silencing, a phenomenon that also affects the properties of extended chromosomal regions. According to the silencing paradigm, bound filament control Factors must recruit additional Filament Foehn factors which spread along adjacent DNA to mediate filament formation. A better understanding of the factors that shape the neutrophil nucleus may lead to new clinical tools for the diagnosis and manipulation of abnormal neutrophil differentiation.

  2. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E; Scordo, Julia M; Sasindran, Smitha J; Moliva, Juan I; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2015-09-15

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage.

  3. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E.; Scordo, Julia M.; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Moliva, Juan I.; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage. PMID:25748325

  4. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C.; Wilson, Mary E.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-01-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects. PMID:27167379

  5. Neutrophil-Derived MMP-8 Drives AMPK-Dependent Matrix Destruction in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ong, Catherine W M; Elkington, Paul T; Brilha, Sara; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Tome-Esteban, Maite T; Tezera, Liku B; Pabisiak, Przemyslaw J; Moores, Rachel C; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Patel, Vimal; Gilman, Robert H; Porter, Joanna C; Friedland, Jon S

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary cavities, the hallmark of tuberculosis (TB), are characterized by high mycobacterial load and perpetuate the spread of M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of matrix destruction resulting in cavitation is not well defined. Neutrophils are emerging as key mediators of TB immunopathology and their influx are associated with poor outcomes. We investigated neutrophil-dependent mechanisms involved in TB-associated matrix destruction using a cellular model, a cohort of 108 patients, and in separate patient lung biopsies. Neutrophil-derived NF-kB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) secretion was up-regulated in TB and caused matrix destruction both in vitro and in respiratory samples of TB patients. Collagen destruction induced by TB infection was abolished by doxycycline, a licensed MMP inhibitor. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contain MMP-8 and are increased in samples from TB patients. Neutrophils lined the circumference of human pulmonary TB cavities and sputum MMP-8 concentrations reflected TB radiological and clinical disease severity. AMPK, a central regulator of catabolism, drove neutrophil MMP-8 secretion and neutrophils from AMPK-deficient patients secrete lower MMP-8 concentrations. AMPK-expressing neutrophils are present in human TB lung biopsies with phospho-AMPK detected in nuclei. These data demonstrate that neutrophil-derived MMP-8 has a key role in the immunopathology of TB and is a potential target for host-directed therapy in this infectious disease.

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) is constitutive in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, Jan; Follin, Per; Forslund, Tony; Lindmark, Maria; Sundqvist, Tommy; Skogh, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    The objective was to study the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) in and NO production by human blood neutrophils and in in vivo exudated neutrophils. Cellular expression of NOS II was evaluated by flow cytometry in whole blood, in isolated blood neutrophils, and in neutrophils obtained by exudation in vivo into skin chambers. Neutrophil NOS II was also demonstrated by Western blotting. Uptake of 3H-labelled L-arginine was studied in vitro and NOS activity measured in a whole cell assay by the conversion of 3H-arginine to 3H-citrulline. In contrast to unseparated blood cells, NOS II was demonstrable both in isolated blood neutrophils and exudated cells. The failure to detect NOS II by flow cytometry in whole blood cells thus proved to be due to the quenching effect of hemoglobin. Western blotting revealed a 130 kD band corresponding to NOS II in isolated blood neutrophils, but detection was dependent on diisopropylfluorophosphate for proteinase inhibition. L-arginine was taken up by neutrophils, but enzymatic activity could not be demonstrated. We conclude that human neutrophils constitutively express NOS II, but that its demonstration by FITC-labelling is inhibited by hemoglobin-mediated quenching in whole blood samples.

  7. Downregulation of human platelet reactivity by neutrophils. Participation of lipoxygenase derivatives and adhesive proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Valles, J; Santos, M T; Marcus, A J; Safier, L B; Broekman, M J; Islam, N; Ullman, H L; Aznar, J

    1993-01-01

    Unstimulated neutrophils inhibited activation and recruitment of thrombin- or collagen-stimulated platelets in an agonist-specific manner. This occurred under conditions of close physical cell-cell contact, although biochemical adhesion between the cells as mediated by P-selectin was not required. Moreover, in the presence of monoclonal P-selectin antibodies that blocked biochemical platelet-neutrophil adhesion, thrombin-stimulated platelets were more efficiently downregulated by neutrophils. This suggested a prothrombotic role for P-selectin under these circumstances. The neutrophil downregulatory effect on thrombin-stimulated platelets was amplified by lipoxygenase inhibition with 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid. In contrast, the neutrophil inhibitory effect on platelets was markedly reduced by platelet-derived 12S-hydroxy-5,8-cis, 10-trans, 14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (12S-HETE), as well as by the platelet-neutrophil transcellular product, 12S,20-dihydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12S,20-DiHETE), but not by another comparable metabolite, 5S,12S-dihydroxy-6-trans, 8-cis, 10-trans, 14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (5S,12S-DiHETE), or the neutrophil-derived hydroxy acid leukotriene B4. The neutrophil downregulatory effect on thrombin-induced platelet reactivity was enhanced by aspirin treatment. This may represent a novel action of aspirin as an inhibitor of platelet function. These results provide in vitro biochemical and functional evidence for the thromboregulatory role of neutrophils and emphasize the multicellular aspect of hemostasis and thrombosis. Images PMID:7690778

  8. Effect of some xenobiotics on oxidative metabolism of human blood neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Mushtakova, V M; Fomina, V A; Rogovin, V V

    2007-03-01

    The effect of SO3(2-), S(2-), NOs(-), and NH4(+) on activity of the peroxidase-hydrogen peroxide system in human peripheral blood neutrophils was studied by the cytochemical method. We showed that the effect of these xenobiotics on neutrophils is similar to that on plants.

  9. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  10. Exogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4) inhibits human neutrophil generation of LTB4 from endogenous arachidonic acid during opsonized zymosan phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, J; Wheelan, P; Henson, P M; Murphy, R C

    1998-10-01

    The effect of exogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4) on opsonized zymosan-stimulated human neutrophil formation of 5-lipoxygenase products and arachidonic acid release was directly assessed using reverse-phase HPLC/tandem mass spectrometric methods for quantitation. Stable isotopically labeled LTB4, [1,2-13C2]LTB4, caused a dose-dependent inhibition of LTB4 production in isolated human neutrophils with significant inhibition (60 +/- 7% of control levels) when 0.12 nM [13C2]LTB4 was present. Production of 5-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid and release of free arachidonic acid were also dose-dependently inhibited by exogenous LTB4. Metabolites of LTB4, 20-hydroxy-LTB4 and 3(S)-hydroxy-LTB4, also significantly reduced LTB4 production to levels as low as 10 +/- 6% and 10 +/- 7% of control levels, respectively, when present exogenously at 10 nM. Exogenous 5-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid at concentrations as high as 10 nM produced no significant reduction in LTB4 biosynthesis during zymosan-stimulated human neutrophil production of LTB4. The inhibitory effect of LTB4 could be partially reversed by the LTB4 receptor antagonist U 75302. Furthermore, an alternative stimulus, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (100 nM), did not inhibit the production of LTB4 in opsonized zymosan-stimulated human neutrophils. These results suggest that activation of the LTB4 receptor on the human neutrophil during phagocytosis limits the ultimate biosynthesis of LTB4. This autocrine effect is opposite to that observed when neutrophils have much of the signal transduction pathways bypassed when stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187 or treated with exogenous free arachidonic acid.

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein Promotes TLR-4–Dependent Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Funchal, Giselle A.; Jaeger, Natália; Czepielewski, Rafael S.; Machado, Mileni S.; Muraro, Stéfanie P.; Stein, Renato T.; Bonorino, Cristina B. C.; Porto, Bárbara N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis. PMID:25856628

  12. Fucoidan delays apoptosis and induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-O; Yu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although some immune modulatory effects of fucoidan have been elucidated, the effects of fucoidan on the apoptosis and activation of human neutrophils have not been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan purified from the brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifilda delays spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils and induces their activation. Fucoidan treatment inhibited apoptotic nuclei changes and phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure on neutrophils cultured in vitro for 24h. The delay in neutrophil apoptosis mediated by fucoidan was associated with increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and decreased levels of activated caspase-3. Screening of the signaling pathways by specific inhibitors indicated that fucoidan-induced delay in neutrophil apoptosis was dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, whereas MAPK signaling pathway was not critical. In addition, fucoidan enhanced the production of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α from neutrophils in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrated that fucoidan delays human neutrophil apoptosis and induces their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This knowledge could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases and neutropenia by controlling neutrophil homeostasis and function with fucoidan.

  13. Proteomic analysis of secretagogue-stimulated neutrophils implicates a role for actin and actin-interacting proteins in Rac2-mediated granule exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are abundant leukocytes that play a primary role in defence against pathogens. Neutrophils enter sites of infection where they eliminate pathogens via phagocytosis and the release of antimicrobial mediators via degranulation. Rho GTPases, particularly Rac2, play a key role in neutrophil degranulation. The purpose of this study was to identify Rac2-dependent changes in protein abundance in stimulated neutrophils. Methods We performed a proteomic analysis on secretagogue-stimulated bone marrow neutrophils that were isolated from wild-type and Rac2-/- mice. Protein abundance was analyzed by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE of fluorescently labelled samples which allowed the detection ~3500 proteins. Results We identified 22 proteins that showed significant changes in abundance after secretagogue-stimulation of wild-type neutrophils, which did not occur in neutrophils isolated from Rac2-/- mice. As expected, the abundance of several granule proteins was reduced in wild-type cells; this did not occur in Rac2-/- neutrophils which confirms the requirement for Rac2 in degranulation. We also found changes in abundance of many actin remodelling proteins including coronin-1A, β-actin and the F-actin capping protein, (CapZ-β). Coronin-1A showed elevated levels of several isoforms after stimulation of neutrophils from wild-type, but not from Rac2-/- mice. These isoforms were immunoreactive with anti-phospho-threonine antibodies, suggesting that neutrophil stimulation triggers a Rac2-dependent kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of coronin-1A. Conclusion The control of Rac2-mediated degranulation in neutrophils likely functions through actin remodelling via activation of several actin-binding proteins. We found coronin-1A to be a novel downstream effector protein of this pathway that is threonine phosphorylated in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:22081935

  14. Delay in Human Neutrophil Constitutive Apoptosis after Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae Serotype K1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Tai, Wei-Chen; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Fang-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae serotype K1 is a major cause of invasive syndrome defined by liver abscess with metastatic infections at other body sites. This culprit is known to be resistant to neutrophil phagocytosis and bactericidal activity. We hypothesized that K. pneumoniae serotype K1 might regulate neutrophil apoptosis and enhance the survival of the infected neutrophils that might serve as a vector for dissemination of the bacteria. Two serotypes of K. pneumoniae, KP-M1 isolated from a patient with liver abscess and DT-X (an acapsular mutant strain of KP-M1), were used to infect human neutrophils. The infected neutrophils were examined for their cytotoxicity, annexin V staining, proteins, DNA fragmentation, cytokine production, and viability that are involved in apoptosis. We found that KP-M1 was not destroyed and the ingested bacteria survived within neutrophils. While the uninfected neutrophils became apoptotic within 10 h, the neutrophils infected with KP-M1 could survive up to 24 h post infection. Constitutive apoptosis of KP-M1-infected neutrophils was significantly delayed compared to that of DT-X-infected or uninfected neutrophils (p < 0.01). KP-M1 modulated the anti-apoptotic effects by down-regulating the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, and then delayed caspase-3 activation in the neutrophils, which was accompanied by inducing the anti-apoptotic cytokine, IL-8. These data suggest that K. pneumoniae serotype K1 can prolong the lifespan of infected neutrophils by delaying constitutive apoptosis within the first several hours of infection.

  15. The in vitro effects of Newcastle disease virus on the metabolic and antibacterial functions of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faden, H.; Humbert, J.; Lee, J.; Sutyla, P.; Ogra, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    Live Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was used to investigate the in vitro effects of a viral infection on phagocytosis, chemiluminescence generation, superoxide production, oxygen consumption, NADPH-oxidase activity, and intracellular killing of bacteria by Ficoll-Hypaque separated human neutrophils. Phagocytosis of oil red O particles by NDV-treated PMN was inhibited by 50%. Chemiluminescence by PMN was inhibited 79% after zymosan stimulation and 86% after tetradeconyl phorbol acetate stimulation. Superoxide generation was inhibited by 68%. Oxygen consumption was inhibited in the presence of NDV by 37% after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate, while membrane-associated NADPH-enzyme activity was decreased by 19%. The percent of surviving intracellular S. aureus was significantly elevated in NDV-treated PMN after 60 and 120 min of incubation. Purified bacterial neuraminidase markedly suppressed chemiluminescence, while neuraminic acid blocked the effects of the virus. These observations suggest that infections with myxoviruses may suppress a number of vital neutrophil functions. It appears that the effects may be partly mediated by the interaction of viral neuraminidase with the external neutrophil membrane.

  16. Phagocytosis and Killing of Carbapenem-Resistant ST258 Klebsiella pneumoniae by Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Porter, Adeline R; Dorward, David W; Brinkworth, Amanda J; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; DeLeo, Frank R

    2016-05-15

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains classified as multilocus sequence type 258 (ST258) are among the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens. Treatment of infections caused by these organisms is difficult, and mortality is high. The basis for the success of ST258, outside of antibiotic resistance, remains incompletely determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that ST258K. pneumoniae has enhanced capacity to circumvent killing by human neutrophils, the primary cellular defense against bacterial infections. There was limited binding and uptake of ST258 by human neutrophils, and correspondingly, there was limited killing of bacteria. On the other hand, transmission electron microscopy revealed that any ingested organisms were degraded readily within neutrophil phagosomes, thus indicating that survival in the neutrophil assays is due to limited phagocytosis, rather than to microbicide resistance after uptake. Our findings suggest that enhancing neutrophil phagocytosis is a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of infection caused by carbapenem-resistant ST258K. pneumoniae.

  17. Image-based analysis of primary human neutrophil chemotaxis in an automated direct-viewing assay

    PubMed Central

    Meyvantsson, Ivar; Vu, Elizabeth; Lamers, Casey; Echeverria, Daniella; Worzella, Tracy; Echeverria, Victoria; Skoien, Allyson; Hayes, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Multi-well assays based on the Boyden chamber have enabled highly parallel studies of chemotaxis – the directional migration of cells in response to molecular gradients – while direct-viewing approaches have allowed more detailed questions to be asked at low throughput. Boyden-based plates provide a count of cells that pass through a membrane, but no information about cell appearance. In contrast, direct viewing devices enable the observation of cells during chemotaxis, which allows measurement of many parameters including area, shape, and location. Here we show automated chemotaxis and cell morphology assays in a 96-unit direct-viewing plate. Using only 12,000 primary human neutrophils per datum, we measured dose-dependent stimulation and inhibition of chemotaxis and quantified the effects of inhibitors on cell area and elongation. With 60 parallel conditions we demonstrated 5-fold increase in throughput compared to previously reported direct viewing approaches. PMID:21215269

  18. Regulation of isocyanate-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation in cultured human neutrophils: isocyanate-induced neutrophils apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P K; Khan, S; Bhargava, A; Panwar, H; Banerjee, S; Jain, S K; Maudar, K K

    2010-06-01

    Implications of environmental toxins on the regulation of neutrophil function are being significantly appraised. Such effects can be varied and markedly different depending on the type and extent of chemical exposure, which results in direct damage to the immune system. Isocyanates with functional group (-NCO), are considered as highly reactive molecules with diverse industrial applications. However, patho-physiological implications resulting from their occupational and accidental exposures have not been well delineated. The present study was carried out to assess the immunotoxic response of isocyanates and their mode of action at a molecular level on cultured human neutrophils isolated from healthy human volunteers. Studies were conducted to evaluate both dose- and time-dependent (n = 3) response using N-succinimidyl N-methylcarbamate, a chemical entity that mimics the effects of methyl isocyanate in vitro. Measure of apoptosis through annexin-V-FITC/PI assay, active caspase-3, apoptotic DNA ladder assay and mitochondrial depolarization; induction of oxidative stress by CM-H(2)DCFDA and formation of 8'-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine; and levels of antioxidant defense system enzyme glutathione reductase, multiplex cytometric bead array analysis to quantify the secreted cytokine levels (interleukin-8, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-12p70) parameters were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that isocyanates induce neutrophil apoptosis via activation of mitochondrial-mediated pathway along with reactive oxygen species production; depletion in antioxidant defense states; and elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

  19. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  20. Human Neutrophil-Mediated Nonoxidative Antifungal Activity against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Mambula, Salamatu S.; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Hastey, Ryan; Selsted, Michael E.; Levitz, Stuart M.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) kill Cryptococcus neoformans, at least in part via generation of fungicidal oxidants. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of nonoxidative mechanisms to the inhibition and killing of C. neoformans. Treatment of human PMN with inhibitors and scavengers of respiratory burst oxidants only partially reversed anticryptococcal activity, suggesting that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. To define the mediators of nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity, PMN were fractionated into cytoplasmic, primary (azurophil) granule, and secondary (specific) granule fractions. Incubation of C. neoformans with these fractions for 18 h resulted in percents inhibition of growth of 67.4 ± 3.4, 84.6 ± 4.4, and 29.2 ± 10.5 (mean ± standard error, n = 3), respectively. Anticryptococcal activity of the cytoplasmic fraction was abrogated by zinc and depletion of calprotectin. Antifungal activity of the primary granules was significantly reduced by pronase treatment, boiling, high ionic strength, and magnesium but not calcium. Fractionation of the primary granules by reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography on a C4 column over an acetonitrile gradient revealed multiple peaks with anticryptococcal activity. Of these, peaks 1 and 6 had substantial fungistatic and fungicidal activity. Peak 1 was identified by acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and mass spectroscopy as human neutrophil proteins (defensins) 1 to 3. Analysis of peak 6 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE revealed multiple bands. Thus, human PMN have nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity residing principally in their cytoplasmic and primary granule fractions. Calprotectin mediates the cytoplasmic activity, whereas multiple proteins, including defensins, are responsible for activity of the primary granules. PMID:11035733

  1. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Ávila, Eva E.; Rodríguez, Mayra C.; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P.; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica. PMID:27415627

  2. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Elastase by Pentacyclic Triterpenes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Weiliang; Guo, Fujiang; YingchunWu; Wang, Rui; Chen, Kaixian; Huang, Cheng; Li, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Scope Inhibiting human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a promising strategy for treating inflammatory lung diseases, such as H1N1 and SARS virus infections. The use of sivelestat, the only clinically registered synthesized HNE inhibitor, is largely limited by its risk of organ toxicity because it irreversibly inhibits HNE. Therefore, potent reversible HNE inhibitors are promising alternatives to sivelestat. Methods and Results An in vitro HNE inhibition assay was employed to screen a series of triterpenes. Six pentacyclic triterpenes, but not tetracyclic triterpenes, significantly inhibited HNE. Of these pentacyclic triterpenes, ursolic acid exhibited the highest inhibitory potency (IC50 = 5.51 µM). The HNE inhibitory activity of ursolic acid was further verified using a mouse model of acute smoke-induced lung inflammation. The results of nuclear magnetic resonance and HNE inhibition kinetic analysis showed that the pentacyclic triterpenes competitively and reversibly inhibited HNE. Molecular docking experiments indicated that the molecular scaffold, 28-COOH, and a double bond at an appropriate location in the pentacyclic triterpenes are important for their inhibitory activity. Conclusion Our results provide insights into the effects of pentacyclic triterpenes on lung inflammatory actions through reversible inhibition of HNE activity. PMID:24376583

  3. Genomic modulators of gene expression in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Makino, Seiko; Humburg, Peter; Wong, Daniel; Ng, Esther; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Knight, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils form the most abundant leukocyte subset and are central to many disease processes. Technical challenges in transcriptomic profiling have prohibited genomic approaches to date. Here we map expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in peripheral blood CD16+ neutrophils from 101 healthy European adults. We identify cis-eQTL for 3281 neutrophil-expressed genes including many implicated in neutrophil function, with 450 of these not previously observed in myeloid or lymphoid cells. Paired comparison with monocyte eQTL demonstrates nuanced conditioning of genetic regulation of gene expression by cellular context, which relates to cell-type-specific DNA methylation and histone modifications. Neutrophil eQTL are markedly enriched for trait-associated variants particularly autoimmune, allergy and infectious disease. We further demonstrate how eQTL in PADI4 and NOD2 delineate risk variant function in rheumatoid arthritis, leprosy and Crohn's disease. Taken together, these data help advance understanding of the genetics of gene expression, neutrophil biology and immune-related diseases. PMID:26151758

  4. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  5. Effects of areca nut extracts on the functions of human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hung, S L; Chen, Y L; Wan, H C; Liu, T Y; Chen, Y T; Ling, L J

    2000-08-01

    Aqueous extracts of ripe areca nut without husk (ripe ANE) and fresh and tender areca nut with husk (tender ANE) were examined for their effects on the defensive functions of human neutrophils. Exposure of peripheral blood neutrophils to ripe ANE and tender ANE inhibited their bactericidal activity against oral pathogens, including Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans, in a dose-dependent manner. At the concentrations tested, ripe and tender ANEs did not significantly affect the viability of neutrophils as verified by their ability to exclude trypan blue dye. However, both ANEs inhibited the production of bactericidal superoxide anion by neutrophils as measured by cytochrome c reduction. Moreover, the ripe ANE inhibited neutrophils more effectively than did tender ANE. Arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca nut, only exhibited an inhibitory effect on the functions of neutrophils when high concentrations were used. Therefore, arecoline could not be used to explain the inhibitory effects observed for ANEs. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ripe and tender ANEs reduced the antibacterial activity and the superoxide anion production of neutrophils. This effect may contribute to a less efficient elimination of bacteria from the periodontal environment. Inhibition of the antimicrobial functions of neutrophils may alter the microbial ecology of the oral cavity, and this may be one possible mechanism by which areca nut compromises the oral health of users of areca nut products.

  6. Vitamin D Promotes Pneumococcal Killing and Modulates Inflammatory Responses in Primary Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Karthik; Bergman, Peter; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2017-02-28

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen and a leading cause of pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis worldwide. Despite clinical studies linking vitamin D deficiency and pneumonia, molecular mechanisms behind these observations remain unclear. In particular, the effects of vitamin D on neutrophil responses remain unknown. Using pneumococcal strains, primary neutrophils isolated from human blood, and sera from patients with frequent respiratory tract infections (RTIs), we investigated the effects of vitamin D on neutrophil bactericidal and inflammatory responses, including pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides, and cytokine regulation. We found that vitamin D upregulated pattern recognition receptors, TLR2, and NOD2, and induced the antimicrobial human neutrophil peptides (HNP1-3) and LL-37, resulting in increased killing of pneumococci in a vitamin D receptor-dependent manner. Antibodies targeting HNP1-3 inhibited bacterial killing. Vitamin D supplementation of serum from patients with bacterial RTIs enhanced neutrophil killing. Moreover, vitamin D lowered inflammatory cytokine production by infected neutrophils via IL-4 production and the induction of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins SOCS-1 and SOCS-3, leading to the suppression of NF-κB signaling. Thus, vitamin D enhances neutrophil killing of S. pneumoniae while dampening excessive inflammatory responses and apoptosis, suggesting that vitamin D could be used alongside antibiotics when treating pneumococcal infections.

  7. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  8. Subcellular location and properties of bactericidal factors from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabay, J E; Heiple, J M; Cohn, Z A; Nathan, C F

    1986-11-01

    We examined the subcellular location of bactericidal factors (BF) in human neutrophils, using an efficient fractionation scheme. Nitrogen bomb cavitates of DIFP-treated PMN were centrifuged through discontinuous Percoll gradients, each fraction extracted with 0.05 M glycine, pH 2.0, and tested for the killing of Escherichia coli. greater than 90% of BF coisolated with the azurophil granules. After lysis of azurophils, 98% of azurophil-derived BF (ADBF) sedimented with the membrane. ADBF activity was solubilized from azurophil membrane with either acid or nonionic detergent (Triton X-100, Triton X-114). Bactericidal activity was linear with respect to protein concentration over the range 0.3-30 micrograms/ml. 0.1-0.3 microgram/ml ADBF killed 10(5) E. coli within 30 min at 37 degrees C. At 1.4 micrograms/ml, 50% of 2 X 10(5) bacteria were killed within 5 min. ADBF was effective between pH 5-8, with peak activity at pH 5.5. Glucose (20 mM), EDTA (1-25 mM), and physiologic concentrations of NaCl or KCl had little or no inhibitory effect on ADBF. ADBF killed both Gram-positive and Gram-negative virulent clinical isolates, including listeria, staphylococci, beta-hemolytic streptococci, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, under these conditions of cell disruption, fractionation, extraction, and assay, almost all BF in human PMN appeared to be localized to the membrane of azurophilic granules as a highly potent, broad-spectrum, rapidly acting protein(s) effective in physiologic medium. Some of these properties appear to distinguish ADBF from previously described PMN bactericidal proteins.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the behaviour of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils in direct contact with chitosan-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Santos, T C; Marques, A P; Silva, S S; Oliveira, J M; Mano, J F; Castro, A G; Reis, R L

    2007-10-31

    Several novel biodegradable materials have been proposed for wound healing applications in the past few years. Taking into consideration the biocompatibility of chitosan-based biomaterials, and that they promote adequate cell adhesion, this work aims at investigating the effect of chitosan-based membranes, over the activation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). The recruitment and activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) reflects a primary reaction to foreign bodies. Activation of neutrophils results in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O(2)(-) and HO(-) and the release of hydrolytic enzymes which are determinant factors in the inflammatory process, playing an essential role in the healing mechanisms. PMNs isolated from human peripheral blood of healthy volunteers were cultured in the presence of chitosan or chitosan/soy newly developed membranes. The effect of the biomaterials on the activation of PMNs was assessed by the quantification of lysozyme and ROS. The results showed that PMNs, in the presence of the chitosan-based membranes secrete similar lysozyme amounts, as compared to controls (PMNs without materials) and also showed that the materials do not stimulate the production of either O(2)(-) or HO(-). Moreover, PMNs incubated with the biomaterials when stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) showed a chemiluminescence profile with a slightly lower intensity, to that observed for positive controls (cells without materials and stimulated with PMA), which reflects the maintenance of their stimulation capacity. Our data suggests that the new biomaterials studied herein do not elicit activation of PMNs, as assessed by the low lysozyme activity and by the minor detection of ROS by chemiluminescence. These findings reinforce previous statements supporting the suitability of chitosan-based materials for wound healing applications.

  10. Detection of Human Neutrophil Elastase with Fluorescent Peptide Sensors Conjugated to Nanocellulosic Solid Supports Targeting Wound Care Diagnostics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a biomarker for chronic wounds and a therapeutic target for certain diseases. An unchecked influx of neutrophils, which contain about one pictogram of elastase per neutrophil, is responsible for degrading growth factors and collagen formation, indefinitely delaying...

  11. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Khalaf F.; Thomas, Mark R.; Judge, Heather M.; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R.; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C.; Storey, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7% ± 4.4 vs. control 22.6% ± 2.4; p < 0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6 ± 6.6 vs. 28.0 ± 6.6; p = 0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  12. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Khalaf F; Thomas, Mark R; Judge, Heather M; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C; Storey, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7%±4.4 vs. control 22.6%±2.4; p<0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6±6.6 vs. 28.0±6.6; p=0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection.

  13. Macrophages cultured in vitro release leukotriene B4 and neutrophil attractant/activation protein (interleukin 8) sequentially in response to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and zymosan.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, J A; Sylvester, I; Smith, S; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), zymosan, and calcium ionophore A23187 to induce neutrophil chemotactic activity (NCA), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and neutrophil attractant/activation protein (NAP-1) release from human alveolar macrophages (AM) retrieved from normal nonsmokers was evaluated. LPS induced a dose-dependent release of LTB4 that began by 1 h, 4.0 +/- 3.2 ng/10(6) viable AM; peaked at 3 h, 24.7 +/- 13.5 ng/10(6) viable AM; and decreased by 24 h, 1.2 +/- 1.0 ng/10(6) viable AM (n = 8). Quantities of LTB4 in cell-free supernatants of AM stimulated with LPS were determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and corresponded well with results obtained by radioimmunoassay. By contrast, NAP-1 release began approximately 3-5 h after stimulation of AM with LPS, 197 +/- 192 ng/ml, and peaked at 24 h, 790 +/- 124 ng/ml. Release of NAP-1 was stimulus specific because A23187 evoked the release of LTB4 but not NAP-1, whereas LPS and zymosan induced the release of both LTB4 and NAP-1. The appearance of neutrophil chemotactic activity in supernatants of AM challenged with LPS for 3 h could be explained completely by the quantities of LTB4 present. After stimulation with LPS or zymosan for 24 h, AM had metabolized almost all generated LTB4. Preincubation of AM with nordihydroguiaretic acid (10(-4) M) completely abolished the appearance of NCA, LTB4, and NAP-1 in supernatants of AM challenged with LPS. Therefore, LPS and zymosan particles were potent stimuli of the sequential release of LTB4 and NAP-1 from AM. PMID:2173722

  14. Apoptotic neutrophils augment the inflammatory response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik; Andersson, Blanka; Eklund, Daniel; Ngoh, Eyler; Persson, Alexander; Svensson, Kristoffer; Lerm, Maria; Blomgran, Robert; Stendahl, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages in the lung are the primary cells being infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) during the initial manifestation of tuberculosis. Since the adaptive immune response to Mtb is delayed, innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils mount the early immune protection against this intracellular pathogen. Neutrophils are short-lived cells and removal of apoptotic cells by resident macrophages is a key event in the resolution of inflammation and tissue repair. Since anti-inflammatory activity is not compatible with effective immunity to intracellular pathogens, we therefore investigated how uptake of apoptotic neutrophils modulates the function of Mtb-activated human macrophages. We show that Mtb infection exerts a potent proinflammatory activation of human macrophages with enhanced gene activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines and that this response was augmented by apoptotic neutrophils. The enhanced macrophage response is linked to apoptotic neutrophil-driven activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent IL-1β signalling. We also demonstrate that apoptotic neutrophils not only modulate the inflammatory response, but also enhance the capacity of infected macrophages to control intracellular growth of virulent Mtb. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role for apoptotic neutrophils in the modulation of the macrophage-dependent inflammatory response contributing to the early control of Mtb infection.

  15. Whole Blood Human Neutrophil Trafficking in a Microfluidic Model of Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Bashar; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate inflammatory responses to wounds and infections require adequate numbers of neutrophils arriving at injury sites. Both insufficient and excessive neutrophil recruitment can be detrimental, favouring systemic spread of microbes or triggering severe tissue damage. Despite its importance in health and disease, the trafficking of neutrophils through tissues remains difficult to control and the mechanisms regulating it are insufficiently understood. These mechanisms are also complex and difficult to isolate using traditional in vivo models. Here we designed a microfluidic model of tissue infection/inflammation, in which human neutrophils emerge from a droplet-size samples of whole blood and display bi-directional traffic between this and micro-chambers containing chemoattractant and microbe-like particles. Two geometrical barriers restrict the entrance of red blood cells from the blood to the micro-chambers and simulate the mechanical function of the endothelial barrier separating the cells in blood from cells in tissues. We found that in the presence of chemoattractant, the number of neutrophils departing the chambers by retrotaxis is in dynamic equilibrium with the neutrophils recruited by chemotaxis. We also found that in the presence of microbe-like particles, the number of neutrophils trapped in the chambers is proportional to the number of particles. Together, the dynamic equilibrium between migration, reversed-migration and trapping processes determine the optimal number of neutrophils at a site. These neutrophils are continuously refreshed and responsive to the number of microbes. Further studies using this infection-inflammation-on-a-chip-model could help study the processes of inflammation resolution. The new in vitro experimental tools may also eventually help testing new therapeutic strategies to limit neutrophil accumulation in tissues during chronic inflammation, without increasing the risk for infections. PMID:25987163

  16. Lipoproteins of Treponema denticola: their effect on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sela, M N; Bolotin, A; Naor, R; Weinberg, A; Rosen, G

    1997-07-01

    The presence of lipoproteins and lipooligosaccharides in Treponema denticola, an oral spirochaete associated with periodontal diseases, was investigated. T. denticola ATCC 35404 and the clinical isolate GM-1 were metabolically labeled with [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid and extracted with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114. The extract was phase separated, precipitated with acetone and delipidated to remove non-covalently bound lipid (dLPP). In T. denticola ATCC 35404, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide electrophoretic separation followed by autoradiography showed [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation in bands with apparent molecular masses of 14, 20, 26, 31, 38, 72 and 85 kDa and a broad band running from 113 kDa to the top of the gel. This last band resolved into a 53 kDa [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid band upon heating for 10 min, at 100 degrees C. The structural relationship of the outer sheath major oligomeric polypeptide of strain ATCC 35404 and the 53 kDa protein was demonstrated immunologically. Antibodies against the 113 kDa component of the oligomer cross-reacted with the 53 kDa protein. Proteinase K degraded the [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid bands with the exception of the 14 kDa. The 14 kDa was also the major [3H]-fatty acid labeled compound found in the water phase following phenol-water extraction of whole T. denticola ATCC 35404 cells. This compound was purified from the water phase by gel filtration followed by hydrophobic chromatography. Chemical analysis showed that hexadecanoic acid was the predominant fatty acid bound to T. denticola lipoproteins. In the GM-1 strain [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation was observed in the 116 kDa and 14 kDa bands. dLPP from strain ATCC 35404 caused an enhanced (0.8-8 micrograms/ml) luminol dependent chemiluminiscence (LDCL) effect in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) which could be related to protein concentration. The addition of dLPP to PMN together with FMLP at submaximal concentration (1

  17. The Antibacterial Activity of Human Neutrophils and Eosinophils Requires Proton Channels but Not BK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Femling, Jon K.; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Morgan, Deri; Rada, Balázs; Davis, A. Paige; Czirják, Gabor; Enyedi, Peter; England, Sarah K.; Moreland, Jessica G.; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Nauseef, William M.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Electrophysiological events are of central importance during the phagocyte respiratory burst, because NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and voltage sensitive. We investigated the recent suggestion that large-conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels, rather than proton channels, play an essential role in innate immunity (Ahluwalia, J., A. Tinker, L.H. Clapp, M.R. Duchen, A.Y. Abramov, S. Page, M. Nobles, and A.W. Segal. 2004. Nature. 427:853–858). In PMA-stimulated human neutrophils or eosinophils, we did not detect BK currents, and neither of the BK channel inhibitors iberiotoxin or paxilline nor DPI inhibited any component of outward current. BK inhibitors did not inhibit the killing of bacteria, nor did they affect NADPH oxidase-dependent degradation of bacterial phospholipids by extracellular gIIA-PLA2 or the production of superoxide anion (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). Moreover, an antibody against the BK channel did not detect immunoreactive protein in human neutrophils. A required role for voltage-gated proton channels is demonstrated by Zn2+ inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity assessed by H2O2 production, thus validating previous studies showing that Zn2+ inhibited \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} production when assessed by cytochrome c reduction. In conclusion, BK channels were not detected in human neutrophils or eosinophils, and

  18. TRPC1 regulates fMLP-stimulated migration and chemotaxis of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, O; Strodthoff, C; Horstmann, M; Nielsen, N; Jung, F; Schimmelpfennig, S; Heitzmann, M; Schwab, A

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense of the innate immune system and are rapidly recruited by chemotactic signals to sites of inflammation. Understanding the mechanisms of neutrophil chemotaxis is therefore of great interest for the potential development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It has been shown that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels are involved in both cell migration and chemotaxis. In this study, we demonstrate that TRPC1 channels play an important role in fMLP mediated chemotaxis and migration of murine neutrophils. The knock-out of TRPC1 channels leads to an impaired migration, transmigration and chemotaxis of the neutrophils. In contrast, Ca²⁺ influx but not store release after activation of the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils with fMLP is strongly enhanced. We show that the enhanced Ca²⁺ influx in the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils is associated with a steepened front to rear gradient of the intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration with higher levels at the cell rear. Taken together, this paper highlights a distinct role of TRPC1 in neutrophil migration and chemotaxis. We propose that TRPC1 controls the activity of further Ca²⁺ influx channels and thus regulates the maintenance of intracellular Ca²⁺ gradients which are critical for cell migration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  19. Intracellular acidification-induced alkali metal cation/H+ exchange in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment of isolated human neutrophils (resting pHi congruent to 7.25 at pHo 7.40) with 30 mM NH4Cl for 30 min leads to an intracellular acidification (pHi congruen to 6.60) when the NH4Cl prepulse is removed. Thereafter, in 140 mM Na+ medium, pHi recovers exponentially with time (initial rate, approximately 0.12 pH/min) to reach the normal resting pHi by approximately 20 min, a process that is accomplished mainly, if not exclusively, though an exchange of internal H+ for external Na+. This Na+/H+ countertransport is stimulated by external Na+ (Km congruent to 21 mM) and by external Li+ (Km congruent to 14 mM), though the maximal transport rate for Na+ is about twice that for Li+. Both Na+ and Li+ compete as substrates for the same translocation sites on the exchange carrier. Other alkali metal cations, such as K+, Rb+, or Cs+, do not promote pHi recovery, owing to an apparent lack of affinity for the carrier. The exchange system is unaffected by ouabain or furosemide, but can be competitively inhibited by the diuretic amiloride (Ki congruent to 8 microM). The influx of Na+ or Li+ is accompanied by an equivalent counter-reflux of H+, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for the exchange reaction, a finding consistent with the lack of voltage sensitivity (i.e., electroneutrality) of pHi recovery. These studies indicate that the predominant mechanism in human neutrophils for pHi regulation after intracellular acidification is an amiloride-sensitive alkali metal cation/H+ exchange that shares a number of important features with similar recovery processes in a variety of other mammalian cell types. PMID:3694176

  20. Effects of human IgG on locomotion of human neutrophils related to IgG binding of a hydrophobic probe.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C

    1980-01-01

    Heat-denatured (63 degrees) human IgG had complex effects on locomotion of human neutrophils. At concentrations of 1 mg/ml and below, it stimulated chemotactic locomotion into filters judged by the leading front assay, however, pre-treatment of the cells or of the filters with denatured IgG caused a reduction in the number of locomoting cells, compared to cells locomoting in a medium containing albumin. These effects took place in complement-free media. Native IgG was not chemotactic. The chemotactic activity of denatured IgG correlated well with increased binding by the same IgG preparations of the hydrophobic probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate (ANS), and it is suggested that heating induces a conformational change in the IgG molecule which allows recognition of the altered molecule by neutrophils and activation of a chemotactic response. The integrity of the Fc fragment is required for this activity. As well as a direct chemoattractant activity of IgG, evidence for release of chemotactic factors by cells in contact with aggregated IgG was also obtained. It is suggested that the contrary effects of denatured IgG on neutrophil locomotion are explicable if the protein, like other denatured proteins, activates the sensory chemotactic mechanism in the neutrophil, while at the same time causing a modification of adhesion of cell to substratum which may impair the locomotor capacity of the cells. PMID:7439936

  1. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an amelioration at

  2. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-12-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an

  3. Influence of minor thermal injury on expression of complement receptor CR3 on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R. D.; Hasslen, S. R.; Ahrenholz, D. H.; Haus, E.; Solem, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal injury is well known to inhibit functions of the circulating neutrophil related to its role in host defense against infection, but the mechanism(s) of this phenomenon are not fully understood. To gain further clues to these mechanisms, the authors have studied patients with thermal injury in terms of altered expression of neutrophil cell membrane receptors for the opsonic complement-derived ligand C3bi--complement receptor Type 3, or CR3. CR3 expression was selected for study because an increase in the number of receptors on the cell surface can be stimulated by products of complement activation known to accumulate after thermal injury and because of the role of CR3 in phagocytic and adherence functions of the neutrophil. Expression of CR3 was monitored semiquantitatively by flow cytometry with the use of a murine monoclonal antibody (OKM1) specific for an antigen (CD11) associated with this receptor. Patients evaluated were limited in this study to those with minor degrees of thermal injury (second-degree burn involving less than 20% of total body surface area) so that possible confounding effects of major injury and its complications could be eliminated. It was observed that patient neutrophil CR3 becomes significantly up-regulated during the first week, as early as 1 day after injury. The maximum level of expression of CR3 averaged greater than 150% (range, 70-314%) of the respective minimum level observed for each patient. The minimum levels of expression of CR3 on patient neutrophils, reached 11-37 days after injury for 7 of 8 patients, were comparable to the level of expression of CR3 on unstimulated control neutrophils. Such temporal up-regulation of patient neutrophil CR3 suggests the early generation of stimuli of CR3 mobilization in response to thermal injury. Increased numbers of CR3 on patient neutrophils may augment microbicidal function and enhance or inhibit delivery of cells to the burn site. PMID:3541642

  4. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  5. Human neutrophils do not express purinergic P2X7 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Martel-Gallegos, Guadalupe; Rosales-Saavedra, María T.; Reyes, Juan P.; Casas-Pruneda, Griselda; Toro-Castillo, Carmen; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that in human neutrophils, external ATP activates plasma membrane purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) to elicit Ca2+ entry, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), processing and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, shedding of adhesion molecules and uptake of large molecules. However, the expression of P2X7R at the plasma membrane of neutrophils has also been questioned since these putative responses are not always reproduced. In this work, we used electrophysiological recordings to measure functional responses associated with the activation of membrane receptors, spectrofluorometric measurements of ROS production and ethidium bromide uptake to asses coupling of P2X7R activation to downstream effectors, immune-labelling of P2X7R using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody to detect the receptors at the plasma membrane, RT-PCR to determine mRNA expression of P2X7R and Western blot to determine protein expression in neutrophils and HL-60 cells. None of these assays reported the presence of P2X7R in the plasma membrane of neutrophils and non-differentiated or differentiated HL-60 cells—a model cell for human neutrophils. We concluded that P2X7R are not present at plasma membrane of human neutrophils and that the putative physiological responses triggered by external ATP should be reconsidered. PMID:21103213

  6. Ligation of the adhesion-GPCR EMR2 regulates human neutrophil function.

    PubMed

    Yona, Simon; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Dri, Pietro; Davies, John Q; Hayhoe, Richard P G; Lewis, Sion M; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E M; Brown, K Alun; Perretti, Mauro; Hamann, Jörg; Treacher, David F; Gordon, Siamon; Stacey, Martin

    2008-03-01

    At present, approximately 150 different members of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family have been identified in metazoans. Surprisingly, very little is known about their function, although they all possess large extracellular domains coupled to a seven-transmembrane domain, suggesting a potential role in cell adhesion and signaling. Here, we demonstrate how the human-restricted adhesion-GPCR, EMR2 (epidermal growth factor-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor), regulates neutrophil responses by potentiating the effects of a number of proinflammatory mediators and show that the transmembrane region is critical for adhesion-GPCR function. Using an anti-EMR2 antibody, ligation of EMR2 increases neutrophil adhesion and migration, and augments superoxide production and proteolytic enzyme degranulation. On neutrophil activation, EMR2 is rapidly translocated to membrane ruffles and the leading edge of the cell. Further supporting the role in neutrophil activation, EMR2 expression on circulating neutrophils is significantly increased in patients with systemic inflammation. These data illustrate a definitive function for a human adhesion-GPCR within the innate immune system and suggest an important role in potentiating the inflammatory response. Ligation of the adhesion-GPCR EMR2 regulates human neutrophil function.

  7. Purification and characterization of a lipid thiobis ester from human neutrophil cytosol that reversibly deactivates the O2- -generating NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Eklund, E A; Gabig, T G

    1990-05-25

    Intact neutrophils possess a cellular mechanism that efficiently deactivates the microbicidal O2-generating NADPH oxidase during the respiratory burst (Akard, L. P., English, D., and Gabig, T. G. (1988) Blood 72, 322-327). The present studies directed at identifying the molecular mechanism(s) involved in NADPH oxidase deactivation showed that a heat- and trypsin-insensitive species in the cytosolic fraction from normal unstimulated neutrophils was capable of deactivating the membrane-associated NADPH oxidase isolated from opsonized zymosan- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. This cytosolic species also deactivated the cell-free-activated oxidase. Deactivation by this cytosolic species occurred in the absence of NADPH-dependent catalytic turnover and was reversible, since NADPH oxidase activity could be subsequently reactivated in the cell-free system. The sedimentable particulate fraction from unstimulated neutrophils did not demonstrate deactivator activity. Deactivator activity was demonstrated in the neutral lipid fraction of neutrophil cytosol extracted with chloroform:methanol. Following complete purification of cytosolic deactivator activity by thin layer chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, the deactivator species was shown to be a lipid thiobis ester compound by mass spectroscopy. Cellular metabolism of this compound in human neutrophils may reveal a unique mechanism for enzymatic control of the NADPH oxidase system and thereby play an important role in regulation of the inflammatory response.

  8. Development and Identification of a Novel Subpopulation of Human Neutrophil-derived Giant Phagocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Lena; Dyugovskaya, Larissa; Polyakov, Andrey; Rogovoy, Oksana; Leder, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are best known for their phagocytic functions against invading pathogens and microorganisms. They have the shortest half-life amongst leukocytes and in their non-activated state are constitutively committed to apoptosis. When recruited to inflammatory sites to resolve inflammation, they produce an array of cytotoxic molecules with potent antimicrobial killing. Yet, when these powerful cytotoxic molecules are released in an uncontrolled manner they can damage surrounding tissues. In recent years however, neutrophil versatility is increasingly evidenced, by demonstrating plasticity and immunoregulatory functions. We have recently identified a new neutrophil-derived subpopulation, which develops spontaneously in standard culture conditions without the addition of cytokines/growth factors such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interleukin (IL)-4. Their phagocytic abilities of neutrophil remnants largely contribute to increase their size immensely; therefore they were termed giant phagocytes (Gϕ). Unlike neutrophils, Gϕ are long lived in culture. They express the cluster of differentiation (CD) neutrophil markers CD66b/CD63/CD15/CD11b/myeloperoxidase (MPO)/neutrophil elastase (NE), and are devoid of the monocytic lineage markers CD14/CD16/CD163 and the dendritic CD1c/CD141 markers. They also take-up latex and zymosan, and respond by oxidative burst to stimulation with opsonized-zymosan and PMA. Gϕ also express the scavenger receptors CD68/CD36, and unlike neutrophils, internalize oxidized-low density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Moreover, unlike fresh neutrophils, or cultured monocytes, they respond to oxLDL uptake by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Additionally, these phagocytes contain microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3B (LC3B) coated vacuoles, indicating the activation of autophagy. Using specific inhibitors it is evident that both phagocytosis and autophagy are prerequisites for their development and

  9. 5-lipoxygenase-dependent recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages by eotaxin-stimulated murine eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Luz, Ricardo Alves; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro; de Luca, Bianca; Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Cauduro, Priscila Soares; Arcanjo, Luiz Carlos Gondar; dos Santos, Ana Carolina Cordeiro Faria; de Oliveira, Ivi Cristina Maria; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez Capella

    2014-01-01

    The roles of eosinophils in antimicrobial defense remain incompletely understood. In ovalbumin-sensitized mice, eosinophils are selectively recruited to the peritoneal cavity by antigen, eotaxin, or leukotriene(LT)B4, a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolite. 5-LO blockade prevents responses to both antigen and eotaxin. We examined responses to eotaxin in the absence of sensitization and their dependence on 5-LO. BALB/c or PAS mice and their mutants (5-LO-deficient ALOX; eosinophil-deficient GATA-1) were injected i.p. with eotaxin, eosinophils, or both, and leukocyte accumulation was quantified up to 24 h. Significant recruitment of eosinophils by eotaxin in BALB/c, up to 24 h, was accompanied by much larger numbers of recruited neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. These effects were abolished by eotaxin neutralization and 5-LO-activating protein inhibitor MK886. In ALOX (but not PAS) mice, eotaxin recruitment was abolished for eosinophils and halved for neutrophils. In GATA-1 mutants, eotaxin recruited neither neutrophils nor macrophages. Transfer of eosinophils cultured from bone-marrow of BALB/c donors, or from ALOX donors, into GATA-1 mutant recipients, i.p., restored eotaxin recruitment of neutrophils and showed that the critical step dependent on 5-LO is the initial recruitment of eosinophils by eotaxin, not the secondary neutrophil accumulation. Eosinophil-dependent recruitment of neutrophils in naive BALB/c mice was associated with increased binding of bacteria.

  10. Characterization of polymorphic forms of Fc receptor III on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ory, P A; Goldstein, I M; Kwoh, E E; Clarkson, S B

    1989-01-01

    We characterized Fc receptor III (FcR III) on human neutrophils and found it to be heavily glycosylated and polymorphic. In some individuals, FcR III that had been digested with N-glycanase appeared after SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions as two bands with apparent molecular masses of 33 and 29 kD. In other individuals, N-glycanase-treated FcR III appeared as a single band with an Mr of either 33 or 29 kD. After SDS-PAGE of N-glycanase-treated FcR III under nonreducing conditions, the apparent Mr of each structural type was decreased, suggesting the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. Digestion of the 33-kD band and the 29-kD band with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease yielded similar, but not identical, peptide maps. Thus, at least two polymorphic forms of FcR III are expressed on human neutrophils. The structural polymorphism of neutrophil FcR III correlated with previously described antigenic polymorphisms detected by monoclonal antibody Gran 11 and by alloantisera which recognize epitopes of the biallelic, neutrophil antigen (NA) system. Individuals whose neutrophils expressed the two-band structural type of FcR III were NA1NA2 heterozygotes. Individuals whose neutrophils expressed the single 33-kD band structural type were NA2NA2 homozygotes, and individuals whose neutrophils expressed the single 29-kD band structural type were NA1NA1 homozygotes. These findings indicate that antigenic and structural polymorphisms of human neutrophil FcR III are related and can be accounted for by differences at the level of primary protein structure. Images PMID:2523415

  11. Activation of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 on Human Neutrophils by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-21

    vitro interaction of human neutrophils with MARV and EBOV. We report that although productive filovirus replication was not observed in human neutrophils...supernatants. Where alphaviruses such as Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) were used as nonfilovirus controls, the viruses to be inactivated...viral replication in human neutrophils exposed to live MARV or EBOV (MOI 1), as measured by plaque assay of supernatants 1, 6, 24, or 48 h

  12. PAF mediates neutrophil adhesion to thrombin or TNF-stimulated endothelial cells under shear stress.

    PubMed

    Macconi, D; Foppolo, M; Paris, S; Noris, M; Aiello, S; Remuzzi, G; Remuzzi, A

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to modulate polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion to endothelial cells cultured under static conditions and activated by thrombin. In contrast, there are no data on the role of PAF in PMN adhesion to cells exposed to flow conditions and activated by stimuli other than thrombin. Here we used the PAF receptor antagonist L-659,989 to evaluate PMN adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in basal conditions or upon challenge with thrombin or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Experiments were performed under dynamic flow using a parallel-plate flow chamber and a computer-based image analysis system. Rolling and adhesion of PMNs to endothelial cells significantly increased upon stimulation with thrombin. Thrombin-stimulated HUVEC also synthesized higher amounts of PAF than untreated cells. Pretreatment of PMNs with L-659,989 significantly reduced their rolling and adhesion to thrombin-activated HUVEC. Stimulation of HUVEC with TNF-alpha significantly increased the number of rolling and adherent PMNs as compared with untreated cells. Adhesion of PMNs to and migration across TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC were reduced by L-659,989, whereas cell rolling was unchanged. We conclude that PAF mediates leukocyte interaction under flow conditions with HUVEC activated by inflammatory stimuli.

  13. Neutrophil Elastase, Proteinase 3, and Cathepsin G as Therapeutic Targets in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Gauthier, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the first cells recruited to inflammatory sites and form the earliest line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are three hematopoietic serine proteases stored in large quantities in neutrophil cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They act in combination with reactive oxygen species to help degrade engulfed microorganisms inside phagolysosomes. These proteases are also externalized in an active form during neutrophil activation at inflammatory sites, thus contributing to the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. As multifunctional proteases, they also play a regulatory role in noninfectious inflammatory diseases. Mutations in the ELA2/ELANE gene, encoding neutrophil elastase, are the cause of human congenital neutropenia. Neutrophil membrane-bound proteinase 3 serves as an autoantigen in Wegener granulomatosis, a systemic autoimmune vasculitis. All three proteases are affected by mutations of the gene (CTSC) encoding dipeptidyl peptidase I, a protease required for activation of their proform before storage in cytoplasmic granules. Mutations of CTSC cause Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. Because of their roles in host defense and disease, elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are of interest as potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we describe the physicochemical functions of these proteases, toward a goal of better delineating their role in human diseases and identifying new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of their bioavailability and activity. We also describe how nonhuman primate experimental models could assist with testing the efficacy of proposed therapeutic strategies. PMID:21079042

  14. Involvement of nitric oxide donor compounds in the bactericidal activity of human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klink, Magdalena; Cedzyński, Maciej; St Swierzko, Anna; Tchórzewski, Henryk; Sulowska, Zofia

    2003-04-01

    The bactericidal activity of human neutrophils against extracellular and facultatively intracellular bacteria was studied in the presence of the nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a molsidomine metabolite. SNP and molsidomine are drugs commonly used as nitrovasodilators in coronary heart disease. It is demonstrated here that the NO donor compounds themselves did not affect the viability and survival of the bacterial strains tested. Neither SNP nor SIN-1 had any effect on the process of bacteria ingestion. In contrast, NO donors enhanced the ability of neutrophils to kill Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella Anatum. However, strains differed in their susceptibility to SNP- and SIN-1-mediated killing by neutrophils. Removal of the superoxide anion reduced the bactericidal activity of SNP- and SIN-1-treated neutrophils against E. coli and S. Anatum. This suggests that the NO derivatives formed in the reaction of NO generated from donors with the reactive oxygen species released by phagocytosed neutrophils potentiate the bactericidal activity of human neutrophils in vitro. The above original observation discussed here suggests clinical significance for the treatment of patients with nitrovasodilators in the course of coronary heart disease therapy.

  15. Heterogeneity of Human Neutrophil CD177 Expression Results from CD177P1 Pseudogene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rong; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Cho, Vicky; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Gatenby, Paul A.; Perera, Chandima; Zhang, Yafei; Whittle, Belinda; Sinclair, Andrew; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Field, Matthew; Andrews, T. Daniel; Cook, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Most humans harbor both CD177neg and CD177pos neutrophils but 1–10% of people are CD177null, placing them at risk for formation of anti-neutrophil antibodies that can cause transfusion-related acute lung injury and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. By deep sequencing the CD177 locus, we catalogued CD177 single nucleotide variants and identified a novel stop codon in CD177null individuals arising from a single base substitution in exon 7. This is not a mutation in CD177 itself, rather the CD177null phenotype arises when exon 7 of CD177 is supplied entirely by the CD177 pseudogene (CD177P1), which appears to have resulted from allelic gene conversion. In CD177 expressing individuals the CD177 locus contains both CD177P1 and CD177 sequences. The proportion of CD177hi neutrophils in the blood is a heritable trait. Abundance of CD177hi neutrophils correlates with homozygosity for CD177 reference allele, while heterozygosity for ectopic CD177P1 gene conversion correlates with increased CD177neg neutrophils, in which both CD177P1 partially incorporated allele and paired intact CD177 allele are transcribed. Human neutrophil heterogeneity for CD177 expression arises by ectopic allelic conversion. Resolution of the genetic basis of CD177null phenotype identifies a method for screening for individuals at risk of CD177 isoimmunisation. PMID:27227454

  16. Characterization of a receptor for human monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8

    SciTech Connect

    Grob, P.M.; David, E.; Warren, T.C.; DeLeon, R.P.; Farina, P.R.; Homon, C.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8 (MDNCF/IL-8) is an 8,000-dalton protein produced by monocytes which exhibits activity as a chemoattractant for neutrophils with maximal activity achieved at a concentration of 50 ng/ml. This polypeptide has been iodinated by chloramine-T methodology (350 Ci/mM), and specific receptors for MDNCF/IL-8 have been detected on human neutrophils, U937 cells, THP-1 cells, and dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells. The binding of MDNCF/IL-8 to human neutrophils is not inhibited by interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. In addition, chemoattractants such as C5a, fMet-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, and platelet-activating factor fail to inhibit binding, suggesting that MDNCF/IL-8 utilizes a unique receptor. The receptor for MDNCF/IL-8 is apparently glycosylated since ligand binding is inhibited by the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin with a binding specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid. Steady state binding experiments indicate Kd values of 4 and 0.5 nM and receptor numbers of 75,000 and 7,400 for human neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells, respectively. 125I-MDNCF/IL-8 bound to human neutrophils is rapidly internalized and subsequently released from cells as trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity. Affinity labeling experiments suggest that the human neutrophil MDNCF/IL-8 receptor exhibits a mass of approximately 58,000 daltons.

  17. Involvement of ROCK-mediated endothelial tension development in neutrophil-stimulated microvascular leakage

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Jerome W.; Sun, Hengrui; Xu, Wenjuan; Rodarte, Charles; Moy, Alan B.; Wu, Mack H.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil-induced coronary microvascular barrier dysfunction is an important pathophysiological event in heart disease. Currently, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms of neutrophil-induced microvascular leakage are not clear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that rho kinase (ROCK) increases coronary venular permeability in association with elevated endothelial tension. We assessed permeability to albumin (Pa) in isolated porcine coronary venules and in coronary venular endothelial cell (CVEC) monolayers. Endothelial barrier function was also evaluated by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) of CVEC monolayers. In parallel, we measured isometric tension of CVECs grown on collagen gels. Transference of constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein into isolated coronary venules or CVEC monolayers caused a significant increase in Pa and decreased TER in CVECs. The ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 blocked the ca-ROCK-induced changes. C5a-activated neutrophils (106/ml) also significantly elevated venular Pa, which was dose-dependently inhibited by Y-27632 and a structurally distinct ROCK inhibitor, H-1152. In CVEC monolayers, activated neutrophils increased permeability with a concomitant elevation in isometric tension, both of which were inhibited by Y-27632 or H-1152. Treatment with ca-ROCK also significantly increased CVEC monolayer permeability and isometric tension, coupled with actin polymerization and elevated phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on Thr18/Ser19. The data suggest that during neutrophil activation, ROCK promotes microvascular leakage in association with actin-myosin-mediated tension development in endothelial cells. PMID:16172166

  18. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-α causes release of cytosolic interleukin-18 from human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kelher, Marguerite R.; Gamboni-Robertson, Fabia; Hamiel, Christine; England, Kelly M.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Wyman, Travis H.; Khan, Samina Y.; McLaughlin, Nathan J. D.; Bercovitz, Rachel S.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are a vital part of host defense and are the principal leukocyte in innate immunity. Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine with roles in both innate and adaptive immunity. We hypothesize that PMNs contain preformed IL-18, which is released in response to specific inflammatory stimuli. Isolated PMNs were stimulated with a battery of chemoattractants (5 min to 24 h), and IL-18 release was measured. PMNs were also separated into subcellular fractions and immunoblotted with antibodies against IL-18 or were fixed and probed with antibodies to IL-18 as well as to the contents of granules, intracellular organelles, and filamentous actin (F-actin), incubated with fluorescent secondary antibodies, and examined by digital microscopy. Quiescent PMNs contained IL-18 in the cytoplasm, associated with F-actin, as determined by positive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET+). In turn, TNF-α stimulation disrupted the association of IL-18 with F-actin, induced a FRET+ interaction of IL-18 with lipid rafts, and elicited IL-18 release. Manipulation of F-actin status confirmed the relationship between IL-18 and F-actin in resting PMNs. Consequently, incubation with monomeric IL-18 binding protein inhibited TNF-α-mediated priming of the PMN oxidase. We conclude that human PMNs contain IL-18 associated with F-actin in the cytoplasm and TNF-α stimulation causes dissociation of IL-18 from F-actin, association with lipid rafts, and extracellular release. Extracellular IL-18 participates in TNF-α priming of the PMN oxidase as demonstrated by inhibition with the IL-18 binding protein. PMID:19907017

  20. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and mercury on human neutrophil apoptosis, actin cytoskelton, and oxidative state

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweet, L.I.; Passino-Reader, D. R.; Meier, P.G.; Omann, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, has been proposed as a biomarker for environmental contaminant effects. In this work, we test the hypothesis that in vitro assays of apoptosis are sensitive indicators of immunological effects of polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and mercury on human neutrophils. Apoptosis, necrosis, and viability as well as the related indicators F-actin levels, and active thiol state were measured in purified human neutrophils after treatment with contaminants. Effective concentrations observed were 0.3 μM (60 μg/L) mercury, 750 μg/L Aroclor 1254, and 50 μM (14,500 μg/L) hexachlorocylcohexanes. Concentrations of contaminants that induced apoptosis also decreased cellular F-actin levels. Active thiols were altered by mercury, but not organochlorines. Comparison of these data with levels of contaminants reported to be threats to human health indicate neutrophil apoptosis is a sensitive indicator of mercury toxicity.

  1. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 mediates rolling of human neutrophils on P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils roll on P-selectin expressed by activated platelets or endothelial cells under the shear stresses in the microcirculation. P- selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a high affinity ligand for P- selectin on myeloid cells. However, it has not been demonstrated that PSGL-1 contributes to the rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin. We developed two IgG mAbs, PL1 and PL2, that appear to recognize protein- dependent epitopes on human PSGL-1. The mAbs bound to PSGL-1 on all leukocytes as well as on heterologous cells transfected with PSGL-1 cDNA. PL1, but not PL2, blocked binding of 125-I-PSGL-1 to immobilized P-selectin, binding of fluid-phase P-selectin to myeloid and lymphoid leukocytes, adhesion of neutrophils to immobilized P-selectin under static conditions, and rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin-expressing CHO cells under a range of shear stresses. PSGL-1 was localized to microvilli on neutrophils, a topography that may facilitate its adhesive function. These data indicate that (a) PSGL-1 accounts for the high affinity binding sites for P-selectin on leukocytes, and (b) PSGL- 1 must interact with P-selectin in order for neutrophils to roll on P- selectin at physiological shear stresses. PMID:7532174

  2. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  3. Oxidized mitochondrial nucleoids released by neutrophils drive type I interferon production in human lupus

    PubMed Central

    Caielli, Simone; Athale, Shruti; Domic, Bojana; Murat, Elise; Chandra, Manjari; Banchereau, Romain; Baisch, Jeanine; Phelps, Kate; Clayton, Sandra; Gong, Mei; Wright, Tracey; Punaro, Marilynn; Palucka, Karolina; Guiducci, Cristiana; Banchereau, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleic acids and excessive type I interferon (IFN) are hallmarks of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We previously reported that SLE neutrophils exposed to TLR7 agonist autoantibodies release interferogenic DNA, which we now demonstrate to be of mitochondrial origin. We further show that healthy human neutrophils do not complete mitophagy upon induction of mitochondrial damage. Rather, they extrude mitochondrial components, including DNA (mtDNA), devoid of oxidized (Ox) residues. When mtDNA undergoes oxidation, it is directly routed to lysosomes for degradation. This rerouting requires dissociation from the transcription factor A mitochondria (TFAM), a dual high-mobility group (HMG) protein involved in maintenance and compaction of the mitochondrial genome into nucleoids. Exposure of SLE neutrophils, or healthy IFN-primed neutrophils, to antiribonucleotide protein autoantibodies blocks TFAM phosphorylation, a necessary step for nucleoid dissociation. Consequently, Ox nucleoids accumulate within mitochondria and are eventually extruded as potent interferogenic complexes. In support of the in vivo relevance of this phenomenon, mitochondrial retention of Ox nucleoids is a feature of SLE blood neutrophils, and autoantibodies against Ox mtDNA are present in a fraction of patients. This pathway represents a novel therapeutic target in human SLE. PMID:27091841

  4. The effect of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) on Bax and Mcl-1 expression in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Jakub; Jablonska, Ewa; Leonik, Agnieszka

    2011-12-01

    In the present study we examined a role of pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 proteins, participating in the regulation of intrinsic apoptosis pathway in human neutrophils (PMNs) exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), the environmental xenobiotic. For the purpose comparison, the same studies were conducted in autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of cytochrome c by PMNs was also determined. A deficit of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and overexpression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax suggest that the apoptosis process in human neutrophils exposed to NDMA is dependent on changes in the expression of these proteins. PMNs were more sensitive to NDMA than PBMCs.

  5. Effect of natural porcine surfactant in Staphylococcus aureus induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species generation in monocytes and neutrophils from human blood.

    PubMed

    de Guevara, Yuliannis Lugones Ladrón; Hidalgo, Odalys Blanco; Santos, Sidnéia Sousa; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Faure, Roberto; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2014-08-01

    Surfacen® is a clinical surfactant preparation of porcine origin. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of Surfacen® in the modulation of oxidative burst in monocytes and neutrophils in human blood and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was measured in monocytes and neutrophils by flow cytometry using 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) as substrate, while, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were estimated in PBMC supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Our results show that Staphylococcus aureus-induced ROS level was slightly affected by Surfacen® added to whole blood monocytes and neutrophils. The time course experiments of pre-incubation with Surfacen® showed no significant increase of ROS level at 2h; however, the ROS level decreased when pre incubated for 4h and 6h with Surfacen®. Pre-incubation of PBMC cells with Surfacen® at 0.125 and 0.5mg/mL showed a dose-dependent suppression of TNF-α levels measured after 4h of S. aureus stimulation, an effect less impressive when cells were stimulated for 24h. A similar behavior was observed in IL-6 release. In summary, the present study provides experimental evidence supporting an anti-inflammatory role of Surfacen® in human monocytes and neutrophils in vitro.

  6. Neutrophil function of neonatal foals is enhanced in vitro by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular bacterium that causes pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised adult horses. Evidence exists that foals become infected with R. equi early in life, a period when innate immune responses are critically important for protection against infection. Neutrophils are i...

  7. Activated Human Valvular Interstitial Cells Sustain Interleukin-17 Production To Recruit Neutrophils in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4+ CD45RA− CD25− CCR6+ Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4+ T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify the

  8. Alternative spliced variants in the pantetheinase family of genes expressed in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-15

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.92) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes pantetheine, an intermediate metabolite of coenzyme A, into pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and cysteamine, a potent antioxidant. The pantetheinase gene family consists of three independent genes, pantetheinase/vanin-1/VNN1, GPI-80/VNN2 and vanin-3/VNN3 that are each composed of seven exons. We herein report that human neutrophils express transcripts encoding at least nine splice variants of VNN3 and four splice variants of GPI-80/VNN2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the human VNN3 gene demonstrated that the VNN3 locus in the human genome as well as the sequence of cDNA clones obtained in this study does not encode the complete VNN3 protein, as previously reported due to a frame shift caused by lack of one nucleotide. Moreover, the VNN3 locus indeed encodes smaller peptides compared to the proteins encoded by the mouse orthologous gene, vanin-3. The anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody 3H9 recognized amino acids 120-179 of the GPI-80/VNN2 protein as shown by the results of immunoblotting with recombinant GPI-80/VNN2 variant proteins. Immunoblotting with human neutrophil lysate suggests that the GPI-80/VNN2 variants exist in human neutrophils. The existence of splice variants in the pantetheinase gene family suggests the possibility of alternative roles in addition to canonical enzymatic activity in human neutrophils.

  9. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Protect against Oxidative Stress in Staphylococcus aureus Encountering Exogenous Oxidants and Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yun Yun; Schwartz, Jamie; Bloomberg, Sarah; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Horswill, Alexander R.; Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    To establish infection successfully, S. aureus must evade clearance by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). We studied the expression and regulation of the methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) that are involved in the repair of oxidized staphylococcal proteins and investigated their influence over the fate of S. aureus exposed to oxidants or PMN. We evaluated a mutant deficient in msrA1 and msrB for susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and PMN. The expression of msrA1 in wild-type bacteria ingested by human PMN was assessed by real-time PCR. The regulation of msr was studied by screening a library of two-component regulatory system (TCS) mutants for altered msr responses. Relative to the wild-type, bacteria deficient in Msr were more susceptible to oxidants and to PMN. Upregulation of staphylococcal msrA1 occurred within the phagosomes of normal PMN and PMN deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, PMN granule-rich extract stimulated the upregulation of msrA1. Modulation of msrA1 within PMN was shown to be partly dependent on the VraSR TCS. Msr contributes to staphylococcal responses to oxidative attack and PMN. Our study highlights a novel interaction between the oxidative protein repair pathway and the VraSR TCS that is involved in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:24247266

  10. Mechanism of inhibition of human neutrophil activation by the allergic mediator release inhibitor, CI-922

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.D.; Wright, C.D.

    1986-03-05

    The allergic mediator release inhibitor CI-922 (3,7-dimethoxy-4-phenyl-N-1H-tetrazol-5-yl-4H-furo(3,2-b)indole-2-carboxamide) is a potent inhibitor of human neutrophil (PMN) respiratory and secretory responses in vitro. At concentrations from 1 to 100 micromolar, CI-922 inhibits activation of PMNs by agents which stimulate phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis to generate the second messengers inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, including: the plasma membrane receptor-specific ligands fMet-Leu-Phe and C5a; concanavalin A; and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein-specific stimulus GTPgammaS. In contrast, CI-922 does not inhibit PMN responses to protein kinase C-specific stimuli such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or sn-1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol. CI-922 is also unable to inhibit the synergistic activation of PMNs by suboptimal concentrations of PMA and calcium ionophore A23187. These results suggest that CI-922 inhibits PMN activation at a site distal to signal transduction through the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein required for second messenger generation but proximal cophosphorylation reactions mediated by protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases.

  11. Specificity of antibodies against Neisseria gonorrhoeae that stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis. Role of antibodies directed against lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Densen, P; Gulati, S; Rice, P A

    1987-01-01

    Five strains each of Neisseria gonorrhoeae sensitive or resistant to complement (C) dependent killing by normal human serum (NHS) were examined for their ability to stimulate chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) after preincubation with NHS; or IgM or IgG derived from NHS. Serum-sensitive N. gonorrhoeae stimulated C-dependent chemotaxis when opsonized with IgM, but not IgG, however, serum-resistant strains, taken as a whole, failed to promote chemotaxis when opsonized with either isotype. IgM titers in NHS against lipooligosaccharide (LOS) antigens from individual serum-sensitive, but not serum-resistant strains, correlated with the magnitude of chemotaxis generated by the corresponding opsonized strains (r = 0.99). Western blots demonstrated that IgM and IgG from NHS recognized different antigenic determinants on LOS from serum-sensitive gonococci. IgM from NHS immunopurified against serum-sensitive LOS accounted for two-thirds of the chemotaxis promoting activity present in whole serum. IgG titers in NHS against LOS antigens from individual serum-resistant strains also correlated with magnitude of chemotaxis generated by the corresponding opsonized strains (r = 0.87), although most opsonized serum-resistant strains did not generate significantly higher magnitudes of chemotaxis than controls. In contrast, a serum-resistant isolate from a patient with disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) stimulated chemotaxis when opsonized with IgG obtained from the patient's convalescent serum. By Western blot, convalescent IgG antibody recognized an additional determinant on serum-resistant LOS not seen by normal IgG. Images PMID:2439546

  12. Binding of human serum albumin to single-walled carbon nanotubes activated neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Jiayu; Tian, Rong; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2014-06-16

    Previous studies have shown that carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be catalytically biodegraded by hypochlorite (OCl-) and reactive radical intermediates of the human neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). However, the importance of protein-SWCNT interactions in the biodegradation of SWCNTs was not stressed. Here, we used both experimental and theoretical approaches to investigate the interactions of SWCNTs with human serum albumin (HSA, one of the most abundant proteins in blood circulation) and found that the binding was involved in the electrostatic interactions of positively charged Arg residues of HSA with the carboxyls on the nanotubes, along with the π-π stacking interactions between SWCNTs and aromatic Tyr residues in HSA. Compared with SWCNTs, the binding of HSA could result in a reduced effect for OCl- (or the human MPO system)-induced SWCNTs degradation in vitro. However, the HSA-SWCNT interactions would enhance cellular uptake of nanotubes and stimulate MPO release and OCl- generation in neutrophils, thereby creating the conditions favorable for the degradation of the nanotubes. Upon zymosan stimulation, both SWCNTs and HSA-SWCNTs were significantly biodegraded in neutrophils, and the degree of biodegradation was more for HSA-SWCNTs under these relevant in vivo conditions. Our findings suggest that the binding of HSA may be an important determinant for MPO-mediated SWCNT biodegradation in human inflammatory cells and therefore shed light on the biomedical and biotechnological applications of safe carbon nanotubes by comprehensive preconsideration of their interactions with human serum proteins.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Is a Very Potent Cytotoxic Factor for Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Bettina; Hussain, Muzaffar; Grundmeier, Matthias; Brück, Michaela; Holzinger, Dirk; Varga, Georg; Roth, Johannes; Kahl, Barbara C.; Proctor, Richard A.; Peters, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The role of the pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) in severe necrotizing diseases is debated due to conflicting data from epidemiological studies of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections and various murine disease-models. In this study, we used neutrophils isolated from different species to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of PVL in comparison to other staphylococcal cytolytic components. Furthermore, to study the impact of PVL we expressed it heterologously in a non-virulent staphylococcal species and examined pvl-positive and pvl-negative clinical isolates as well as the strain USA300 and its pvl-negative mutant. We demonstrate that PVL induces rapid activation and cell death in human and rabbit neutrophils, but not in murine or simian cells. By contrast, the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), a newly identified group of cytolytic staphylococcal components, lack species-specificity. In general, after phagocytosis of bacteria different pvl-positive and pvl-negative staphylococcal strains, expressing a variety of other virulence factors (such as surface proteins), induced cell death in neutrophils, which is most likely associated with the physiological clearing function of these cells. However, the release of PVL by staphylococcal strains caused rapid and premature cell death, which is different from the physiological (and programmed) cell death of neutrophils following phagocytosis and degradation of virulent bacteria. Taken together, our results question the value of infection-models in mice and non-human primates to elucidate the impact of PVL. Our data clearly demonstrate that PVL acts differentially on neutrophils of various species and suggests that PVL has an important cytotoxic role in human neutrophils, which has major implications for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA infections. PMID:20072612

  14. 4-Methylcoumarin Derivatives Inhibit Human Neutrophil Oxidative Metabolism and Elastase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuzissaki, Carolina N.; Andrade, Micássio F.; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C.S.; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H.; Vermelho, Roberta B.; Lopes, João Luis C.; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased neutrophil activation significantly contributes to the tissue damage in inflammatory illnesses; this phenomenon has motivated the search for new compounds to modulate their effector functions. Coumarins are natural products that are widely consumed in the human diet. We have evaluated the antioxidant and immunomodulator potential of five 4-methylcoumarin derivatives. We found that the 4-methylcoumarin derivatives inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils triggered by serum-opsonized zymosan or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate; this inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, as revealed by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assays. Cytotoxicity did not mediate this inhibitory effect. The 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin suppressed the neutrophil oxidative metabolism more effectively than the 6,7- and 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins, but the 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins were less effective than their hydroxylated counterparts. An analysis of the biochemical pathways suggested that the 6,7- and 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins inhibit the protein kinase C-mediated signaling pathway, but 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, as well as 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins do not significantly interfere in this pathway of the activation of the human neutrophil oxidative metabolism. The 4-methylcoumarin derivatives bearing the catechol group suppressed the elastase and myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical the most strongly. Interestingly, the 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin scavenged hypochlorous acid more effectively than the o-dihydroxy-substituted 4-methylcoumarin derivatives, and the diacetoxylated 4-methylcoumarin derivatives scavenged hypochlorous acid as effectively as the 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The significant influence of small structural modifications in the inhibitory potential of 4-methylcoumarin derivatives on the

  15. A Bio-Sensor for Human Neutrophil Elastase Employs Peptide-p-nitroanilide Cellulose Conjugates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High levels of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) in chronic wounds have been associated with degradation of cytokine growth factors necessary for normal wound healing. Thus, accurate clinical detection and quantification of HNE will be important to the therapeutic management of chronic wounds. Colorim...

  16. Characterisation of electron currents generated by the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-04-11

    Electron transport by the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase is an important microbicidal weapon for phagocytes. The electron current (I{sub e}) generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is poorly characterised due to the lack of appropriate electrophysiological data. In this study, I fully characterise the neutrophil generated I{sub e} when the NADPH oxidase is activated by NADPH and GTP{gamma}S. The neutrophil I{sub e} was markedly voltage-dependent in the entire voltage range in comparison to those electron currents measured after chloride was removed from the external bath solution. The difference in I{sub e} measured in chloride free conditions was not due to a change in the activation kinetics of voltage-gated proton channels. The I{sub e} depolarises the neutrophil plasma membrane at a rate of 2.3 V s{sup -1} and this depolarisation was opposed when voltage-gated proton channels are activated. 3 mM ZnCl{sub 2} depolarised the membrane potential to +97.8 {+-} 2.5 mV (n = 4), and this depolarisation was abolished after NADPH oxidase inhibition.

  17. Growth hormone augments superoxide anion secretion of human neutrophils by binding to the prolactin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Y K; Arkins, S; Fuh, G; Cunningham, B C; Wells, J A; Fong, S; Cronin, M J; Dantzer, R; Kelley, K W

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (HuGH) and human prolactin (HuPRL), but not GH of bovine or porcine origin, prime human neutrophils for enhanced superoxide anion (O2-) secretion. Since HuGH, but not GH of other species, effectively binds to the HuPRL receptor (HuPRL-R), we used a group of HuGH variants created by site-directed mutagenesis to identify the receptor on human neutrophils responsible for HuGH priming. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against the HuPRL-R completely abrogated O2- secretion by neutrophils incubated with either HuGH or HuPRL, whereas a MAb to the HuGH-R had no effect. The HuGH variant K172A/F176A, which has reduced affinity for both the HuGH-binding protein (BP) and the HuPRL-BP, was unable to prime human neutrophils. This indicates that priming is initiated by a ligand-receptor interaction, the affinity of which is near that defined for receptors for PRL and GH. Another HuGH variant, K168A/E174A, which has relatively low affinity for the HuPRL-BP but slightly increased affinity for the HuGH-BP, had much reduced ability to prime neutrophils. In contrast, HuGH variant E56D/R64M, which has a similar affinity as wild-type HuGH for the HuPRL-BP but a lower affinity for the HuGH-BP, primed neutrophils as effectively as the wild-type HuGH. Finally, binding of HuGH to the HuPRL-BP but not to the HuGH-BP has been shown to be zinc dependent, and priming of neutrophils by HuGH was also responsive to zinc. Collectively, these data directly couple the binding of HuGH to the HuPRL-R with one aspect of functional activation of human target cells. Images PMID:1310696

  18. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    PubMed

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri.

  19. Assessment of Antioxidant Activity of Spray Dried Extracts of Psidium guajava Leaves by DPPH and Chemiluminescence Inhibition in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M. R. V.; Azzolini, A. E. C. S.; Martinez, M. L. L.; Souza, C. R. F.; Lucisano-Valim, Y. M.; Oliveira, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β-cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH• method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  20. Enterococcus faecalis Bearing Aggregation Substance Is Resistant to Killing by Human Neutrophils despite Phagocytosis and Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rakita, Robert M.; Vanek, Natalie N.; Jacques-Palaz, Karen; Mee, Mee; Mariscalco, M. Michele; Dunny, Gary M.; Snuggs, Mark; Van Winkle, W. Barry; Simon, Scott I.

    1999-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis aggregation substance (AS) mediates efficient bacterium-bacterium contact to facilitate plasmid exchange as part of a bacterial sex pheromone system. We have previously determined that AS promotes direct, opsonin-independent binding of E. faecalis to human neutrophils (PMNs) via complement receptor type 3 and other receptors on the PMN surface. We have now examined the functional consequences of this bacterium-host cell interaction. AS-bearing E. faecalis was phagocytosed and internalized by PMNs, as determined by deconvolution fluorescence microscopy. However, these bacteria were not killed by PMNs, and internalized bacteria excluded propidium iodide, indicating intact bacterial membranes. Resistance to killing occurred despite activation of PMNs, as indicated by an increase in both functional and total surface Mac-1 expression, shedding of l-selectin, and an increase in PMN extracellular superoxide and phagosomal oxidant production. Deconvolution fluorescence microscopy also revealed that phagosomes containing AS-bearing bacteria were markedly larger than phagosomes containing opsonized E. faecalis, suggesting that some modification of phagosomal maturation may be involved in AS-induced resistance to killing. PMN phagosomal pH was significantly higher after ingestion of nonopsonized AS-bearing E. faecalis than after that of opsonized bacteria. The novel ability of AS to promote intracellular survival of E. faecalis inside PMNs suggests that AS may be a virulence factor used by strains of E. faecalis. PMID:10531268

  1. Host and Pathogen Hyaluronan Signal Through Human Siglec-9 to Suppress Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Ismael; Lizcano, Anel; Roupé, K. Markus; Wang, Xiaoxia; Cole, Jason N.; Olson, Joshua; Ali, S. Raza; Dahesh, Samira; Amayreh, Lenah K.; Henningham, Anna; Varki, Ajit; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory CD33-related Siglec receptors regulate immune cell activation upon engaging ubiquitous sialic acids (Sias) on host cell surface glycans. Through molecular mimicry, Sia-expressing pathogen group B Streptococcus binds inhibitory human Siglec-9 (hSiglec-9) to blunt neutrophil activation and promote bacterial survival. We unexpectedly discovered that hSiglec-9 also specifically binds high molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA), another ubiquitous host glycan, through a region of its terminal Ig-like V-set domain distinct from the Sia-binding site. HMW-HA recognition by hSiglec-9 limited neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, oxidative burst, and apoptosis, defining HMW-HA as a regulator of neutrophil activation. However, the pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) expresses a HMW-HA capsule that engages hSiglec-9, blocking NET formation and oxidative burst, thereby promoting bacterial survival. Thus, a single inhibitory lectin receptor detects two distinct glycan “self-associated molecular patterns” to maintain neutrophil homeostasis, and two leading human bacterial pathogens have independently evolved molecular mimicry to exploit this immunoregulatory mechanism. PMID:26411873

  2. Neutrophil-derived MRP-14 is up-regulated in infectious osteomyelitis and stimulates osteoclast generation.

    PubMed

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Giese, Thomas; Maurer, Susanne; Stegmaier, Sabine; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, G Maria; Gaida, Matthias M

    2015-10-01

    Bone infections of patients with joint replacement by endoprosthesis (so called "periprosthetic joint infection") pose a severe problem in the field of orthopedic surgery. The diagnosis is often difficult, and treatment is, in most cases, complicated and prolonged. Patients often require an implant exchange surgery, as the persistent infection and the accompanying inflammation lead to tissue damage with bone degradation and consequently, to a loosening of the implant. To gain insight into the local inflammatory process, expression of the proinflammatory cytokine MRP-14, a major content of neutrophils, and its link to subsequent bone degradation was evaluated. We found MRP-14 prominently expressed in the affected tissue of patients with implant-associated infection, in close association with the chemokine CXCL8 and a dense infiltrate of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, the number of MRP-14-positive cells correlated with the presence of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. MRP-14 plasma concentrations were significantly higher in patients with implant-associated infection compared with patients with sterile inflammation or healthy individuals, advocating MRP-14 as a novel diagnostic marker. A further biologic activity of MRP-14 was detected: rMRP-14 directly induced the differentiation of monocytes to osteoclasts, thus linking the inflammatory response in implant infections with osteoclast generation, bone degradation, and implant loosening.

  3. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  4. Phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils and their subsets in early-stage human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophils accumulate in many types of human and murine tumors and represent a significant portion of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Our current understanding of the role of neutrophils in tumor development has depended primarily on murine models of cancer. However, there are crucial species differences in the evolution of tumors, genetic diversity, immune and inflammatory responses, and intrinsic biology of neutrophils that might have a profound impact on the tumor development and function of neutrophils in mouse versus human tumors. To date, the majority of experimental approaches to study neutrophils in cancer patients have been limited to the examination of circulating blood neutrophils. The phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans, particularly in the early stages of tumor development, have not been extensively investigated. Thus, the long-term goal of our work has been to characterize human TANs and determine their specific role in tumor development. Here, we summarize our findings on human TANs obtained from human early stage lung cancer patients. We will describe the phenotypes of different TAN subsets identified in early stage lung tumors, as well as their functional dialog with T cells.

  5. The hederagenin saponin SMG-1 is a natural FMLP receptor inhibitor that suppresses human neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wang, Chien-Chiao; Kuo, Yao-Haur; Huang, Hui-Chi; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Wu, Yi-Hsiu

    2010-10-15

    The pericarp of Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn is traditionally used as an expectorant in Japan, China, and Taiwan. Activated neutrophils produce high concentrations of the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and elastase known to be involved in airway mucus hypersecretion. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory functions of hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-di-acetyl-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (SMG-1), a saponin isolated from S. mukorossi, and its underlying mechanisms were investigated in human neutrophils. SMG-1 potently and concentration-dependently inhibited O(2)(*-) generation and elastase release in N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP)-activated human neutrophils. Furthermore, SMG-1 reduced membrane-associated p47(phox) expression in FMLP-induced intact neutrophils, but did not alter subcellular NADPH oxidase activity in reconstituted systems. SMG-1 attenuated FMLP-induced increase of cytosolic calcium concentration and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, and AKT. However, SMG-1 displayed no effect on cellular cAMP levels and activity of adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase. Significantly, receptor-binding analysis showed that SMG-1 inhibited FMLP binding to its receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, neither phorbol myristate acetate-induced O(2)(*-) generation and MAPKs activation nor thapsigargin-caused calcium mobilization was altered by SMG-1. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SMG-1 is a natural inhibitor of the FMLP receptor, which may have the potential to be developed into a useful new therapeutic agent for treating neutrophilic inflammatory diseases.

  6. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-05-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  7. Effects of oxygen tension and pH on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Bearman, S I; Babior, B M

    1979-06-01

    The respiratory burst of human neutrophils was measured under conditions of hypoxia and low pH. O2 -- production by neutrophils activated with opsonized zymosan fell slowly as the oxygen concentration declined to 1%, then dropped more sharply, reaching negligible levels at oxygen concentrations less than 0.25%. Production was half maximal at an oxygen concentration of 0.35% (equivalent to approximately 10-microM dissolved oxygen). O2- production by the cell-free O2- -forming system prepared from zymosan-activated neutrophils showed a similar dependence on oxygen concentration. A drop in pH caused decreases in both oxygen consumption and O2-- production by zymosan-treated neutrophils, values at PH 6.0 being 10%--20% of those observed at pH 7.5. Experiments with the cell-free O2-- -forming system suggested that this decline in respiratory burst activity at low pH was due to inefficient activation of the O2-- -forming enzyme under acidic conditions.

  8. Microbe-specific unconventional T-cells induce human neutrophil differentiation into antigen cross-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Tyler, Christopher J.; Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Szakmany, Tamas; Hall, Judith E.; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The early immune response to microbes is dominated by the recruitment of neutrophils whose primary function is to clear invading pathogens. However, there is emerging evidence that neutrophils play additional effector and regulatory roles. The present study demonstrates that human neutrophils assume antigen cross-presenting functions, and suggests a plausible scenario for the local generation of APC-like neutrophils through the mobilization of unconventional T-cells in response to microbial metabolites. Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells and MAIT cells are abundant in blood, inflamed tissues and mucosal barriers. Here, both human cell types responded rapidly to neutrophils after phagocytosis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria producing the corresponding ligands, and in turn mediated the differentiation of neutrophils into APCs for both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells through secretion of GM-CSF, IFN-γ and TNF-α. In patients with acute sepsis, circulating neutrophils displayed a similar APC-like phenotype and readily processed soluble proteins for cross-presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells, at a time when peripheral Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells were highly activated. Our findings indicate that unconventional T-cells represent key controllers of neutrophil-driven innate and adaptive responses to a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25165152

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 expression is down-regulated by angiotensin II and under hypertension in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Alba, Gonzalo; El Bekay, Rajaa; Chacón, Pedro; Reyes, M Edith; Ramos, Eladio; Oliván, Josefina; Jiménez, Juan; López, José M; Martín-Nieto, José; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a peptide hormone able to elicit a strong production of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils. In this work, we have addressed whether expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, becomes altered in these cells upon Ang II treatment or under hypertension conditions. In neutrophils from healthy and hypertensive subjects, induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein expression with a parallel increase in enzyme activity took place upon treatment with 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2 (15dPGJ2). However, Ang II prevented HO-1 synthesis by normal neutrophils in vitro, and HO-1 expression was depressed in neutrophils from hypertensive patients in comparison with cells from healthy subjects. In addition, Ang II treatment led to a reduced HO-1 enzyme activity to levels similar to those found in neutrophils from hypertensive patients. NO donors reversed the inhibition of 15dPGJ2-dependent HO-1 expression in neutrophils from hypertensive patients, and conversely, inhibition of inducible NO synthase (NOS2) activity counteracted the stimulatory effect of 15dPGJ2 on HO-1 expression in normal human neutrophils. Moreover, Ang II canceled 15dPGJ2-dependent induction of NOS2 mRNA synthesis. Present findings indicate that down-regulation of HO-1 expression in neutrophils from hypertensive subjects is likely exerted through the inhibition of NOS2 expression. Additionally, they underscore the potential usefulness of NO donors as new, therapeutic agents against hypertension.

  10. Transient increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate during activation of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Traynor-Kaplan, A.E.; Thompson, B.L.; Harris, A.L.; Taylor, P.; Omann, G.M.; Sklar, L.A. )

    1989-09-15

    We recently showed that phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) was present in a unique lipid fraction generated in neutrophils during activation. Here, we demonstrate that the band containing this fraction isolated from thin layer chromatography consists primarily of PIP3 and that only small amounts of radiolabeled PIP3 exist prior to activation. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography of deacylated phospholipids from stimulated cells reveals an increase in a fraction eluting ahead of glycerophosphoinositol 4,5-P2. After removal of the glycerol we found that it coeluted with inositol 1,3,4-P3 when resubjected to high performance liquid chromatography. Thus, we have detected a second, novel form of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in activated neutrophils, PI-(3,4)P2. The elevation of PIP3 through the formyl peptide receptor is blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, implicating mediation of the increase in PIP3 by a guanosine triphosphate-binding (G) protein. The rise in PIP3 is not secondary to calcium elevation. Buffering the rise in intracellular calcium did not diminish the increase in PIP3. The elevation of PIP3 appears to occur during activation with physiological agonists, its level varying with the degree of activation. Leukotriene B4, which elicits many of the same responses as stimulation of the formyl peptide receptor but with minimal oxidant production, stimulates a much attenuated rise in PIP3. Isoproterenol, which inhibits oxidant production also reduces the rise in PIP3. Hence formation of PI(3,4)P2 and PIP3 (presumed to be PI(3,4,5)P3) correlates closely with the early events of neutrophil activation.

  11. Propofol Treatment Inhibits Constitutive Apoptosis in Human Primary Neutrophils and Granulocyte-Differentiated Human HL60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis regulation is essential for neutrophil homeostasis. We previously demonstrated that a process involving glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β determines neutrophil apoptosis. As for this apoptotic process, an overdose of propofol (2,6-Diisopropylphenol; 25 μg/ml or 140 μM) also causes GSK-3β-mediated macrophage apoptosis; however, the early deactivation of GSK-3β with low-dose propofol has been shown. Therefore, we hypothesize that low-dose propofol may induce neutrophil survival via GSK-3β inactivation. Following in vitro culture, the therapeutic concentration of propofol (10 μg/ml or 56 μM) treatment decreased constitutive apoptosis in isolated human primary neutrophils and in granulocyte-differentiated HL60 cells after all-trans retinoic acid (1 μM) treatment. The inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/AKT and the activation of GSK-3β results in myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) down-regulation, the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and caspase-3 activation in these cells, which is accompanied by apoptosis. Notably, propofol treatment attenuates these effects in a PI3-kinase-regulated manner. We found that propofol initiates PI3-kinase/AKT-mediated GSK-3β inactivation and Mcl-1 stabilization, rescuing the constitutive apoptosis in primary neutrophils and granulocyte-differentiated acute promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells.

  12. Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) inhibits IL-1- and TNF-α-dependent, but not chemotactic-factor-stimulated, neutrophil transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Issekutz, Andrew C; Rowter, Derek; Macmillan, Heather F

    2011-11-01

    High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has anti-inflammatory effects via incompletely understood mechanisms. By investigating whether IVIG might modulate neutrophil (PMN) recruitment, we observed that IVIG dose-dependently inhibited (by 30-50%) PMN transendothelial migration (TEM) across human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) stimulated with IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α or IL-1β+TNF-α. Inhibition required the presence of IVIG with the responding PMNs, was attributable to the F(ab)(2) portion and was unrelated to putative contaminants in IVIG. IVIG did not inhibit IL-1β- or TNF-α-induced increase of PMN adhesion to EC, nor did it affect C5a- or IL-8-induced PMN TEM across unstimulated EC. Effects of IVIG and F(ab)(2) fragments were not associated with PMN activation, assessed by CD62L shedding, CD11b upregulation or PMN shape. Thus, IVIG selectively inhibits PMN TEM across inflammatory-cytokine-stimulated - but not unstimulated - EC, perhaps contributing to therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammation with minimal impact on chemotactic-factor-induced PMN recruitment during acute infection.

  13. Purification and partial characterization of human neutrophil elastase inhibitors from the marine snail Cenchritis muricatus (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    González, Yamile; Tanaka, Aparecida S; Hirata, Izaura Y; del Rivero, Maday Alonso; Oliva, Maria L V; Araujo, Mariana S; Chávez, Maria A

    2007-04-01

    Human neutrophil elastase inhibition was detected in a crude extract of the marine snail Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda, Mollusca). This inhibitory activity remained after heating this extract at 60 degrees C for 30 min. From this extract, three human neutrophil elastase inhibitors (designated CmPI-I, CmPI-II and CmPI-III) were purified by affinity and reversed-phase chromatographies. Homogeneity of CmPI-I and CmPI-II was confirmed, while CmPI-III showed a single peak in reversed-phase chromatography, but heterogeneity in SDS-PAGE with preliminary molecular masses in the range of 18.4 to 22.0 kDa. In contrast, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of CmPI-I and CmPI-II showed that these inhibitors are molecules of low molecular mass, 5576 and 5469 Da, respectively. N-terminal amino acid sequences of CmPI-I (6 amino acids) and CmPI-II (20 amino acids) were determined. Homology to Kazal-type protease inhibitors was preliminarily detected for CmPI-II. Both inhibitors, CmPI-I and CmPI-II are able to inhibit human neutrophil elastase strongly, with equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) values of 54.2 and 1.6 nM, respectively. In addition, trypsin and pancreatic elastase were also inhibited, but not plasma kallikrein or thrombin. CmPI-I and CmPI-II are the first human neutrophil elastase inhibitors described in a mollusk.

  14. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  15. Human neutrophil FcγRIIA regulation by C5aR promotes inflammatory arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Naotake; Ernandez, Thomas; Li, Xun; Nishi, Hiroshi; Cullere, Xavier; Mekala, Divya; Hazen, Melissa; Köhl, Jörg; Lee, David M.; Mayadas, Tanya N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis culminates in joint destruction that in mouse models of disease, is supported by innate immune molecules including FcγRs and complement. However, the results may not predict outcomes in humans given the structural differences between murine and human activating FcγRs on neutrophils, a prominent component of joint exudates. In this study, we examined the role of the human neutrophil FcγRIIA in the development of arthritis and probed the underlying mechanism by which FcγRIIA initiated disease. Methods K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis was examined in mice that express FcγRIIA on neutrophils but lack their own activating FcγRs (γ-chain-deficient). The role of mast cells, complement (C3 and C5a) and CD18 integrins in FcγRIIA-initiated disease was examined using cell reconstitution approaches, inhibitors, and functional blocking antibodies respectively. Cross-talk between C5aR and FcγRIIA on neutrophils was evaluated in vitro. Results Neutrophil FcγRIIA expression was sufficient to restore susceptibility to K/BxN serum induced neutrophil recruitment, synovitis and bone destruction in γ-chain-deficient mice. Joint inflammation was robust and proceeded even in the absence of mast cells and vascular permeability, shown to contribute to disease in wild-type mice. Neutrophil recruitment was dependent on CD18 integrin LFA-1 and C5aR. C5aR in addition significantly enhanced FcγRIIA mediated phagocytosis and oxidative burst in vitro. Conclusion Human and murine activating FcγRs on neutrophils are not functionally equivalent, and in humans may play a primary role in arthritis. Cross-talk between neutrophil C5aR and FcγRIIA is essential for disease thus highlighting a new aspect of complement during the effector phase of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:21280001

  16. Quantitative comparison of C-X-C chemokines produced by endotoxin-stimulated human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Goodman, R B; Strieter, R M; Frevert, C W; Cummings, C J; Tekamp-Olson, P; Kunkel, S L; Walz, A; Martin, T R

    1998-07-01

    The C-X-C chemokines are a structurally related and functionally redundant family of proteins with neutrophil chemotactic activity. Many of the C-X-C chemokines are produced by endotoxin-stimulated alveolar macrophages (AMs), but knowledge of their relative quantities and their relative contributions to the total chemotactic activity released from these cells is incomplete. Human AMs were stimulated with or without Escherichia coli endotoxin for 2, 4, 8, and 24 h. The mRNA sequences of interleukin (IL)-8, the 78-amino acid epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activator (ENA-78), growth-related protein (GRO) alpha, GRObeta, and GROgamma were cloned by PCR and identified by sequence analysis. The relative mRNA quantities were compared by Northern analysis, and IL-8 was found to predominate. Similarly, IL-8 protein concentrations in the cell supernatants were consistently higher than either the ENA-78 or GRO concentration, and by 24 h, IL-8 concentrations were 10-fold higher than those of the other C-X-C chemokines. Blocking polyclonal antibodies to IL-8 substantially reduced the chemotactic activity in the AM supernatants, whereas antibodies to ENA-78 and GRO had little or no effect. We conclude that IL-8 is the predominant C-X-C chemokine and the dominant neutrophil chemoattractant accumulating in 24-h supernatants of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human AMs. These studies provide insight into potentially effective strategies of interrupting AM-derived inflammatory signals in the lungs.

  17. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2alpha are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  18. cap alpha. -Naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) stimulates the release of superoxide by rat neutrophils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.A.; Hewett, J.

    1986-03-01

    ..cap alpha..-Naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) is an hepatotoxicant that produces cholestasis and hyperbilirubinemia in rats. Its mechanism of action is unknown. The observation that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) accumulate in the bile ductular region of the liver following ANIT administration prompted us to examine the ability of ANIT to stimulate these cells. PMNs elicited from rat peritoneum were treated with ANIT in vitro to test for the release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/). ANIT stimulated O/sub 2//sup -/ release from PMNs in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximal O/sub 2//sup -/ release was achieved by an ANIT concentration of 110 ..mu.. M. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was rapid after the first few minutes of ANIT addition and ceased entirely between 10 and 15 minutes. An increase in the extracellular activity of lactate dehydrogenase also occurred after a 5-10 minute lag phase following ANIT addition. PMNs exposed to ANIT also failed to exclude trypan blue dye, either in the presence or in the absence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, suggesting a direct, oxygen radical-independent, cytotoxic effect of ANIT on PMNs. Release of the lysosomal enzyme, ..beta..-glucuronidase, also occurred within 5 min following exposure of PMNs to ANIT. These results indicate that ANIT stimulates the release of cytotoxic agents from rat PMNs in vitro and suggests that the direct stimulation of PMNs in vivo may contribute to ANIT-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Mark

    2000-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly developing as a powerful, non-invasive tool for studying the human brain. A pulsed magnetic field creates current flow in the brain and can temporarily excite or inhibit specific areas. TMS of motor cortex can produce a muscle twitch or block movement; TMS of occipital cortex can produce visual phosphenes or scotomas. TMS can also alter the functioning of the brain beyond the time of stimulation, offering potential for therapy.

  20. Evidence for production of oxidizing radicals by the particulate O-2-forming system from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tauber, A I; Gabig, T G; Babior, B M

    1979-04-01

    The particulate O-2-forming system from human neutrophils was found to oxidize methional and 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) to ethylene, indicating the formation by this system of strongly oxidizing radicals. Conforming this interpretation was the observation that ethylene production was inhibited by the radical scavengers benzoate, ethanol, and mannitol. Ethylene production was also sharply reduced by superoxide dismutase, implicatin O-2 as a precursor of oxidizing radicals. In our system catalase only partially inhibited ethylene generation from either methional or KMB, suggesting that oxidizing radicals are generated at least in part by the reacton of O-2 with compounds other than H2O2. We propose that in neutrophils oxidizing radicals are formed in a reaction between O-2 and a peroxide according to the following equation: O-2 + ROOH leads to RO . + OH- + O2, in which ROOH may be hydrogen peroxide, an alkyl peroxide, or an acyl peroxide (i.e., a peroxy acid).

  1. A selective reversible azapeptide inhibitor of human neutrophil proteinase 3 derived from a high affinity FRET substrate.

    PubMed

    Epinette, Christophe; Croix, Cécile; Jaquillard, Lucie; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Lalmanach, Gilles; Cadene, Martine; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2012-03-15

    The biological functions of human neutrophil proteinase 3 (PR3) remain unclear because of its close structural resemblance to neutrophil elastase and its apparent functional redundancy with the latter. Thus, all natural inhibitors of PR3 preferentially target neutrophil elastase. We have designed a selective PR3 inhibitor based on the sequence of one of its specific, sensitive FRET substrates. This azapeptide, azapro-3, inhibits free PR3 in solution, PR3 bound to neutrophil membranes, and the PR3 found in crude lung secretions from patients with chronic inflammatory pulmonary diseases. But it does not inhibit significantly neutrophil elastase or cathepsin G. Unlike most of azapeptides, this inhibitor does not form a stable acyl-enzyme complex; it is a reversible competitive inhibitor with a K(i) comparable to the K(m) of the parent substrate. Low concentrations (60 μM) of azapro-3 totally inhibited the PR3 secreted by triggered human neutrophils (200,000 cells/100 μL) and the PR3 in neutrophil homogenates and in lung secretions of patients with lung inflammation for hours. Azapro-3 also resisted proteolysis by all proteases contained in these samples for at least 2h.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Fragments Released upon Bacterial Contact with the Human Lung Mucosa Alter the Neutrophil Response to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Scordo, Julia M.; Arcos, Jesús; Kelley, Holden V.; Diangelo, Lauren; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Youngmin, Ellie; Wewers, Mark D.; Wang, Shu-Hua; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the World Health Organization reported that one person dies of tuberculosis (TB) every 21 s. A host environment that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) finds during its route of infection is the lung mucosa bathing the alveolar space located in the deepest regions of the lungs. We published that human lung mucosa, or alveolar lining fluid (ALF), contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes that can significantly alter the M.tb surface during infection by cleaving off parts of its cell wall. This interaction results in two different outcomes: modifications on the M.tb cell wall surface and release of M.tb cell wall fragments into the environment. Typically, one of the first host immune cells at the site of M.tb infection is the neutrophil. Neutrophils can mount an extracellular and intracellular innate immune response to M.tb during infection. We hypothesized that exposure of neutrophils to ALF-induced M.tb released cell wall fragments would prime neutrophils to control M.tb infection better. Our results show that ALF fragments activate neutrophils leading to an increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative radicals. However, neutrophil exposure to these fragments reduces production of chemoattractants (i.e., interleukin-8), and degranulation, with the subsequent reduction of myeloperoxidase release, and does not induce cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, these ALF fragment-derived modulations in neutrophil activity do not further, either positively or negatively, contribute to the intracellular control of M.tb growth during infection. However, secreted products from neutrophils primed with ALF fragments are capable of regulating the activity of resting macrophages. These results indicate that ALF-induced M.tb fragments could further contribute to the control of M.tb growth and local killing by resident neutrophils by switching on the total oxidative response and limiting migration of neutrophils to the infection site. PMID:28373877

  3. Noninvasive stimulation of the human corticospinal tract.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2004-04-01

    Spinal tracts can be stimulated noninvasively in human subjects by passing a high-voltage stimulus between the mastoids or by magnetic stimulation over the back of the head. The stimulus probably activates the corticospinal tract at the cervicomedullary junction (pyramidal decussation) and evokes large, short-latency motor responses in the arm muscles. These responses have a large monosynaptic component. Responses in leg muscles can be elicited by cervicomedullary junction stimulation or by stimulation over the cervical or thoracic spine. Because nerve roots are more easily activated than spinal tracts, stimulus spread to motor axons can occur. Facilitation of responses by voluntary activity confirms that the responses are evoked synaptically. Stimulation of the corticospinal tract is useful in studies of central conduction and studies of the behavior of motoneurons during different tasks. It also provides an important comparison to allow interpretation of changes in responses to stimulation of the motor cortex. The major drawback to the use of electrical stimulation of the corticospinal tract is that each stimulus is transiently painful.

  4. Guanine nucleotide-induced polymerization of actin in electropermeabilized human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The effects of exogenous guanine nucleotides on the polymerization of actin in human neutrophils were tested in an electropermeabilized cell preparation. Close to 40% permeabilization was achieved with a single electric discharge as measured by nucleic acid staining with ethidium bromide or propidium iodide with minimal (less than 2%) release of the cytoplasmic marker lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, electropermeabilized neutrophils retained their capacity to produce superoxide anions and to sustain a polymerization of actin in response to surface-receptor dependent stimuli such as chemotactic factors. Electropermeabilization produced a rapid and transient permeabilization that allowed the entry of guanine nucleotides into the cells. GTP and, to a larger extent, its nonhydrolyzable analog guanosine 5'-O-2- thiotriphosphate (GTP[S]), induced a time- and concentration-dependent polymerization of actin, as determined by increased staining with 7- nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazolylphallacidin. The effects of the aforementioned guanine nucleotides were antagonized by GDP[S], but were insensitive to pertussis toxin. Cholera toxin potentiated to a small degree the amount of actin polymerization induced by GTP[S]. These results provided direct evidence for the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the regulation of the organization of the cytoskeleton of neutrophils, an event that is of crucial importance to the performance of the defense-oriented functions of these cells. PMID:2768336

  5. Regulation of Human Neutrophil Apoptosis and Lifespan in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Jenna M; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils (also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMNs) are the most abundant white blood cells in humans and play a central role in innate host defense. Another distinguishing feature of PMNs is their short lifespan. Specifically, these cells survive for less than 24 hours in the bloodstream and are inherently pre-programed to die by constitutive apoptosis. Recent data indicate that this process is regulated by intracellular signaling and changes in gene expression that define an “apoptosis differentiation program.” Infection typically accelerates neutrophil turnover, and as such, phagocytosis-induced cell death (PICD) and subsequent clearance of the corpses by macrophages are essential for control of infection and resolution of the inflammatory response. Herein we reprise recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil apoptosis with a focus on regulatory factors and pathway intermediates that are specific to this cell type. In addition, we summarize mechanisms whereby perturbation of PMN death contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory disease states. PMID:25278783

  6. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Mothes, Henning; Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Kaufmann, Roland; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Settmacher, Utz

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP) 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment. To further specify the role of α-defensins in tumourigenesis and progression, HNP1–3 were analyzed in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas of 87 patients and quantified in relation to cancer stage and grading. Using the ProteinChip arrays, HNP1–3 were found upregulated in both colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. By combining the array with Laser capture microscopy we were able to confirm that HNP1–3 are expressed by tumour cells but not by neutrophils or other tumour invading cells. These findings suggest that α-defensins are more likely to contribute to tumour growth than they are to mount an effective host anti-tumour response. However, the amount of HNP-expression was not found to be related to tumour stage, grading, and serological tumour markers. PMID:18957723

  7. A novel microfluidic assay reveals a key role for protein kinase C δ in regulating human neutrophil-endothelium interaction.

    PubMed

    Soroush, Fariborz; Zhang, Ting; King, Devon J; Tang, Yuan; Deosarkar, Sudhir; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Kilpatrick, Laurie E; Kiani, Mohammad F

    2016-11-01

    A key step in neutrophil-mediated tissue damage is the migration of activated neutrophils across the vascular endothelium. Previously, we identified protein kinase C δ as a critical regulator of neutrophil migration in sepsis but did not identify specific steps in migration. In this study, we used our novel biomimetic microfluidic assay to delineate systematically the mechanism by which protein kinase C δ regulates individual steps in human neutrophil-endothelial interaction during inflammation. The biomimetic microfluidic assay includes a network of vascular channels, produced from in vivo images connected to a tissue compartment through a porous barrier. HUVECs cultured in vascular channels formed a complete lumen under physiologic shear flow. HUVECs were pretreated with TNF-α ± a protein kinase C δ inhibitor, and the tissue compartment was filled with a chemoattractant (fMLP or IL-8). Under physiologic shear flow, the role of protein kinase C δ on spatial and temporal neutrophil adherence/migration was quantified. Protein kinase C δ inhibition significantly reduced neutrophil adhesion in response to fMLP and IL-8 only under low shear rate and near bifurcations. Protein kinase C δ inhibition also decreased adherence to nonactivated HUVECs in response to fMLP or IL-8. Protein kinase C δ inhibition reduced neutrophil migration into the tissue compartment in response to fMLP and to a lesser degree, to IL-8. Antibody-coated microparticles demonstrated that protein kinase C δ inhibition down-regulated E-selectin and ICAM-1 but not VCAM-1 expression. With the use of a physiologically relevant in vitro model system, we demonstrate that protein kinase C δ plays an important role in the regulation of neutrophil adherence/migration during inflammation and identifies key steps regulated by protein kinase C δ in neutrophil-endothelial interactions.

  8. In vivo stimulation of granulopoiesis by recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.M.; Zsebo, K.M.; Inoue, H.; Hines, D.; Boone, T.C.; Chazin, V.R.; Tsai, L.; Ritch, T.; Souza, L.M.

    1987-04-01

    Osmotic pumps containing Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) were attached to indwelling jugular vein catheters and implanted subcutaneously into Golden Syrian hamsters. Within 3 days, peripheral granulocyte counts had increased > 10-fold with a concomitant 4-fold increase in total leukocytes. Microscopic examination of Wright-Giemsa-stained blood smears from rhG-CSF hamsters showed that only the neutrophil subpopulation of granulocytes had increased. After subcutaneous injection at /sup 35/S-labeled rhG-CSF doses of up to 10 ..mu..g x kg/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/ only granulocyte counts were affected. However, at higher dose levels, a transient thrombocytopenia was noted. Erythrocyte and lymphocyte/monocyte counts remained unaffected by rhG-CSF over the entire dose range studied. Total leukocyte counts increased 3-fold within 12 hr after a single s.c. injection of rhG-CSF. This early effect was associated with an increase in the total number of colony-forming cells and the percent of active cycling cells in the marrow. A sustained elevation of peripheral leukocyte and marrow progenitor counts was observed following seven daily s.c. injections of rhG-CSF. The ability of rhG-CSF to increase the production and release of granulocytes from the marrow may underlie the beneficial effect it produced on the restoration of peripheral leukocyte counts in hamsters made leukopenic by treatment with 5-fluorouracil.

  9. A novel immunomodulatory function of neutrophils on rhinovirus-activated monocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Francesca S M; Hansbro, Philip M; Burgess, Janette K; Ammit, Alaina J; Baines, Katherine J; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Background Rhinovirus (RV) infections are the major precipitant of asthma exacerbations. While neutrophilic lung inflammation occurs during such infections, its role remains unclear. Neutrophilic inflammation is associated with increased asthma severity and steroid refractory disease. Neutrophils are vital for controlling infections but also have immunomodulatory functions. Previously, we found that neutrophils respond to viral mimetics but not replication competent RV. We aimed to investigate if neutrophils are activated and/or modulate immune responses of monocytes during RV16 infection. Methods Primary human monocytes and autologous neutrophils were cocultured with or without RV16, in direct contact or separated by transwells. RV16-stimulated monocytes were also exposed to lysed neutrophils, neutrophil membrane components or soluble neutrophil intracellular components. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-X-C motif (CXC)L8 mRNA and proteins were measured by quantitative PCR and ELISA at 24 hours. Results RV16 induced IL-6 and CXCL8 in monocytes, but not neutrophils. RV16-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 from monocytes was reduced in the presence of live neutrophils. Transwell separation abolished the inhibitory effects. Lysed neutrophils inhibited RV16-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 from monocytes. Neutrophil intracellular components alone effectively inhibited RV16-induced monocyte-derived IL-6 and CXCL8. Neutrophil intracellular components reduced RV16-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 mRNA in monocytes. Conclusions Cell contact between monocytes and neutrophils is required, and preformed neutrophil mediator(s) are likely to be involved in the suppression of cytokine mRNA and protein production. This study demonstrates a novel regulatory function of neutrophils on RV-activated monocytes in vitro, challenging the paradigm that neutrophils are predominantly proinflammatory. PMID:27287090

  10. Transcranial laser stimulation improves human cerebral oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fenghua; Hase, Snehal N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Transcranial laser stimulation of the brain with near‐infrared light is a novel form of non‐invasive photobiomodulation or low‐level laser therapy (LLLT) that has shown therapeutic potential in a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. Understanding of its neurophysiological effects is essential for mechanistic study and treatment evaluation. This study investigated how transcranial laser stimulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in the human brain in vivo using functional near‐infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Materials and Methods Two separate experiments were conducted in which 1,064‐nm laser stimulation was administered at (1) the center and (2) the right side of the forehead, respectively. The laser emitted at a power of 3.4 W and in an area of 13.6 cm2, corresponding to 0.25 W/cm2 irradiance. Stimulation duration was 10 minutes. Nine healthy male and female human participants of any ethnic background, in an age range of 18–40 years old were included in each experiment. Results In both experiments, transcranial laser stimulation induced an increase of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) and a decrease of deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[Hb]) in both cerebral hemispheres. Improvements in cerebral oxygenation were indicated by a significant increase of differential hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbD] = Δ[HbO2] − Δ[Hb]). These effects increased in a dose‐dependent manner over time during laser stimulation (10 minutes) and persisted after laser stimulation (6 minutes). The total hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbT] = Δ[HbO2] + Δ[Hb]) remained nearly unchanged in most cases. Conclusion Near‐infrared laser stimulation applied to the forehead can transcranially improve cerebral oxygenation in healthy humans. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:343–349, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26817446

  11. Recombinant gamma interferon causes neutrophil migration mediated by the release of a macrophage neutrophil chemotactic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, R. A.; Cunha, F. Q.; Ferreira, S. H.

    1990-01-01

    A dose-dependent neutrophil migration was observed following the injection of purified (Hu IFN-gamma) or recombinant (rIFN-gamma) human gamma interferon into rat peritoneal cavities. This finding contrasts with their inability to cause chemotaxis in vitro in the Boyden chamber. Neutrophil migration into peritoneal cavities and subcutaneous air pouches induced by both preparations of interferon was abolished by pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone. IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration was enhanced when the macrophage population of the peritoneal cavities was increased by previous injection of thioglycollate and reduced by peritoneal lavage. Macrophage monolayers pretreated either with rIFN-gamma or with lipopolysaccharide from E. coli release into the supernatant a factor that stimulates neutrophil recruitment in animals treated with dexamethasone. Dexamethasone blocked this release but did not affect the neutrophil recruitment induced by this factor. These results suggest that IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration in vivo may be mediated by the release from resident macrophages of a neutrophil chemotactic factor and that dexamethasone blockade of neutrophil recruitment by IFN-gamma is due to inhibition of the release of this factor. PMID:2119790

  12. Activation of the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase results in coupling of electron carrier function between ubiquinone-10 and cytochrome b559.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Lefker, B A

    1985-04-10

    The enzymatic activity underlying the respiratory burst in human neutrophils was examined in a subcellular fraction with high specific activity and shown to be a membrane-associated complex of a flavoprotein, ubiquinone-10, and cytochrome b559 in an approximate 1.3:1:2 molar ratio. Study of the redox poise of these electron carriers indicated that electron flow in the intact complex from unstimulated cells proceeded: NADPH----E-FAD----ubiquinone-10. Similar studies on the complex prepared from stimulated neutrophils indicated that electron flow proceeded: NADPH----E-FAD----ubiquinone-10----cytochrome b559----oxygen. The active enzyme complex was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate. Inhibition persisted after removal of excess inhibitor, was reversed by dithiothreitol, and could be blocked by prior addition of substrate (NADPH). Inhibition of the active oxidase complex by p-chloromercuribenzoate also inhibited electron flow from NADPH to all purported electron carriers in the chain (i.e. E-FAD, ubiquinone-10, and cytochrome b559). We conclude that activation of the oxidase enzyme complex in the intact neutrophil resulted in linkage of electron carrier function between endogenous ubiquinone-10 and cytochrome b559 and was without demonstrable effect on proximal electron flow. The p-chloromercuribenzoate sensitive site(s) proximal to the initial electron acceptor (E-FAD) did not appear to be altered by the cellular activation process.

  13. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, F.S.; Campanelli, A.P.; Nociti, F.H.; Mattos-Graner, R.O.; Gonçalves, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens. PMID:22850872

  14. Multiple receptors mobilize calcium through a pertussis toxin (PT) sensitive GTP-binding protein in human neutrophils (PMN's)

    SciTech Connect

    Lad, P.M.; Olson, C.V.; Grewal, I.S.; Frolich, M.; Scott, S.J.

    1986-03-05

    Treatment of PMN's with PT causes an abolition of chemotaxis, enzyme release, superoxide generation and aggregation caused by f-met-leu-phe (FMLP),C5a and platelet activating factor (PAF). Lectin (Con-A) induced capping and receptor induced shape change are abolished, but phagocytosis is unaltered. In whole cells, calcium mobilization induced by FMLP, PAF and Con-A inhibited by PT although the FMLP-mediated effect is more susceptible to PT's effects. Treatment of PMN's with phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA) causes an abolition of calcium mobilization by all agents in a range which also inhibits cap formation. Investigation of calcium uptake reveals PT sensitive and insensitive components. Reciprocal interactions between Ns and Ni proteins are also observed since pretreatment with FMLP and PAF causes a stimulation of Ns-mediated cyclic AMP enhancement while pretreatment with Ns linked receptors (PGE/sub 1/ and beta receptor agonists) inhibits calcium mobilization. Comparative peptide mapping studies indicate substantial similarity between Ni proteins in PMN's, platelets and human erythrocytes. The authors results suggest that the Ni linked calcium mobilization sensitive to PMA is important to the regulation of the human neutrophil.

  15. Artocarpol A stimulation of superoxide anion generation in neutrophils involved the activation of PLC, PKC and p38 mitogen-activated PK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-06-01

    1 Artocarpol A (ART), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated a slow onset and long-lasting superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils, whereas only slightly activated the NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system. 2 Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin (1 microg ml(-1)), 50 microM 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), or 1 microM 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U0126) had no effect on ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation. ART (30 microM) did not induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. 3 4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-1H-imidazole (SB 203580) markedly attenuated the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 4.3+/-0.3 microM). Moreover, ART induced p38 mitogen-activated PK (MAPK) phosphorylation and activation. 4 The superoxide anion generation in response to ART was also substantially inhibited in a Ca2+-free medium, and by pretreatment with 1 microM 1-[6-((17beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl)amino)hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122) and 100 microM 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB). ART (30 microM) stimulated the [Ca2+]i elevation in the presence or absence of external Ca2+, and also increased the D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. 5 2-[1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X) greatly inhibited the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 7.8+/-1.0 nM). ART increased the recruitment of PKC-alpha, -betaI, and -betaII to the plasma membrane of neutrophils, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent PKC activation in the cytosol preparation. 6 ART induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, which was attenuated by GF 109203X. Moreover, ART evoked the membrane association of p47(phox), which was inhibited by GF 109203X and SB 203580. 7 These results indicate that the ART stimulation of superoxide anion generation involved the activation of p38 MAPK, PLC/Ca2

  16. Inhibition of phospholipase D activation by CYL-26z in formyl peptide-stimulated neutrophils involves the blockade of RhoA activation.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Chen, Yeh-Long; Tzeng, Cherng-Chyi; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-09-15

    5-[4-Acridin-9-ylamino]phenyl]-5-methyl-3-methylenedihydrofuran-2-one (CYL-26z) inhibited the formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)-stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) activity, which was assessed by the production of phosphatidylethanol (PEt) in the presence of ethanol, in rat neutrophils (IC50 1.2+/-0.2 microM). CYL-26z caused a slight but significant attenuation of the global protein tyrosine phosphorylation stimulated by fMLP only at concentrations of CYL-26z up to 30 microM. CYL-26z blocked the membrane recruitment of protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) at concentrations of CYL-26z > or =3 microM, but failed to affect the membrane association of PKC-betaI and -betaII. The translocation of RhoA to the membrane was attenuated by CYL-26z (IC50 3.8+/-0.8 microM) in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils, whereas CYL-26z caused no significant inhibition of the membrane recruitment of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf). CYL-26z inhibited the activation of RhoA and dissociation of the RhoA-Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complex in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils (IC50 1.8+/-1.0 microM and 1.8+/-0.9 microM, respectively). In a cell-free system, CYL-26z effectively attenuated the membrane association of RhoA in response to GTPgammaS (IC50 1.3+/-0.5 microM). In contrast, the GTPgammaS-stimulated translocation of Arf to membrane was suppressed only at concentrations of CYL-26z up to 30 microM. CYL-26z inhibited the fMLP-stimulated membrane expression of CD11b, CD45 and CD63, and the release of lysozyme and beta-glucuronidase. These results indicate that CYL-26z inhibited the fMLP-stimulated PLD activity, mainly through the blockade of RhoA activation, and degranulation in rat neutrophils.

  17. Human protein HC and its IgA complex are inhibitors of neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, E; Fernández-Luna, J L; Grubb, A; Leyva-Cobián, F

    1986-01-01

    Protein HC, a heterogeneously charged low molecular weight glycoprotein, and its IgA complex were isolated from human plasma and urine. Plasma from individuals with monoclonal IgA populations was used as starting material for the isolation of the protein HC-IgA complex to obtain homogeneous complex populations. Neither low molecular weight protein HC nor its IgA complex in the concentrations 30 and 600 mg/liter influenced the random migration of normal human neutrophils. The chemotactic response of neutrophils to endotoxin-activated serum was, however, attenuated in a dose-dependent way by both low molecular weight protein HC and protein HC-IgA complex. Concentrations of protein HC and its IgA complex producing significant inhibition of the chemotactic response were found to occur in plasma from healthy and diseased individuals as well as in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These results suggest that protein HC and its IgA complex play physiological roles in the regulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:2419908

  18. Clickable 4-Oxo-β-lactam-Based Selective Probing for Human Neutrophil Elastase Related Proteomes.

    PubMed

    Ruivo, Eduardo F P; Gonçalves, Lídia M; Carvalho, Luís A R; Guedes, Rita C; Hofbauer, Stefan; Brito, José A; Archer, Margarida; Moreira, Rui; Lucas, Susana D

    2016-09-20

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a serine protease associated with several inflammatory processes such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The precise involvement of HNE in COPD and other inflammatory disease mechanisms has yet to be clarified. Herein we report a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, or 'click' chemistry) approach based on the 4-oxo-β-lactam warhead that yielded potent HNE inhibitors containing a triazole moiety. The resulting structure-activity relationships set the basis to develop fluorescent and biotinylated activity-based probes as tools for molecular functional analysis. Attaching the tags to the 4-oxo-β-lactam scaffold did not affect HNE inhibitory activity, as revealed by the IC50 values in the nanomolar range (56-118 nm) displayed by the probes. The nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-based probe presented the best binding properties (ligand efficiency (LE)=0.31) combined with an excellent lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE=4.7). Moreover, the probes showed adequate fluorescence properties, internalization in human neutrophils, and suitable detection of HNE in the presence of a large excess of cell lysate proteins. This allows the development of activity-based probes with promising applications in target validation and identification, as well as diagnostic tools.

  19. Purification, inhibition and mechanistic studies of Clostridium histolyticum and human neutrophil collagenases

    SciTech Connect

    Mookhtiar, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The specific collagenase stored in the granules of human neutrophils has been purified by a simple, reproducible method. A sensitive, accurate and convenient assay for tissue collagenases has been developed to aid the purification. This assay, which is based on the hydrolysis of (/sup 3/H)acetylated rat tail tendon type I collagen, has also enabled the inhibition of this enzyme to be studied quantitatively. The purified enzyme has very high specific activity towards type I collagen and is devoid of other contaminating proteolytic activities. It is a zinc metalloproteinase that requires calcium ions for activity. In addition, it contains essential lysine, tyrosine and carboxyl residues within the active site. The types of compounds that have been found to be good inhibitors for other zinc metalloproteinases also inhibit both the human neutrophil and the class I and class II Clostridial collageneases. The Clostridial enzymes are strongly inhibited by phosphonoamidates and ketone analogs that contain collagen-like sequences. This pattern of inhibition suggests a remarkable similarity between the mechanism of action of these collagenases and other well studied zinc metalloproteinases. The inhibition data also suggest the possible use of these inhibitors as pharmaceuticals and as affinity ligands for the purification of the collagenases. In fact, the use of the ketone analogs to purify the class I and class II Clostridial collagenases from crude mixtures has been successfully demonstrated.

  20. Superoxide dismutase and the resistance of Escherichia coli to phagocytic killing by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Papp-Szabò, E; Sutherland, C L; Josephy, P D

    1993-01-01

    Transformation of Escherichia coli K-12-derived strains with a plasmid carrying the genetic determinants for synthesis of lipopolysaccharide O antigen by Shigella dysenteriae allows the construction of phenotypically smooth derivatives. We show that such E. coli K-12 derivatives are highly resistant to killing by human serum. Isogenic wild-type and sodB mutant (Fe superoxide dismutase-deficient) strains were constructed. The results of experiments on phagocytic killing of these strains by human neutrophils are reported. We observed no difference between the sensitivities of wild-type and sodB mutant strains to phagocytic killing, in contrast to the results reported by other researchers who used species other than E. coli or strains other than K-12. Images PMID:8454348

  1. Gene frequencies of human neutrophil antigens in the Tunisian blood donors and Berbers.

    PubMed

    Abid, S; Zili, M; Bouzid, L; Kibech, R; Foudhaili, N; Joudi, K; Ren Regaya, Z; Abdennaji, B; Mrad, R; Boukef, K

    2001-08-01

    Human neutrophil antigens play an important role in provoking immune neutropenia and transfusion-reactions. The aim of this study was to determine granulocyte-specific antigens on the neutrophil Fc gamma receptor IIIb (Fc gamma RIIIb, CD16b), namely, the HNA-1a(NA1) and HNA-1b(NA2) antigens and their gene frequencies in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers. One hundred and ninety-nine unrelated healthy Tunisian blood donors and Berbers were typed for HNA-1a and HNA-1b(NA1 and NA2), using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). In 24 granulocyte samples, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b phenotypes was additionally determined by the granulocyte immunofluorescence test (GIFT) and correlated with the genotyping results. A subsequent analysis of the genotyping study showed that, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed, were 0.342 and 0.658 for Berbers, and 0.311 and 0.668 for blood donors, respectively. In the genotyping study conducted, it was determined that the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers are similar to those previously reported in other white populations.

  2. Biochemical and immunological identification of human neutrophil elastase on nitrocellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K H

    1991-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) was analyzed for protein(s), antibody staining and activity staining, on lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting. The HNE activity, which was identified with N-acetyl-D,L-alanine alpha-naphthyl ester as substrate, was well preserved in the presence of 0.1% LDS at 4 C during electrophoresis. As little as 0.1 microgram HNE was required for the activity staining. The HNE appeared to be three peptides having a major band at mass ratio 27,000, a second major band at mass ratio 28,000 with a minor protein band at mass ratio 29,000. On transfer to nitrocellulose, the mass ratio 28,000 band displayed poor immunoreactivity. This was the second most dense band with highest enzymatic staining. This procedure is a useful method and analytical tool to determine the correlation of enzymatically active proteins, subunits and immunoreactive protein(s) of elastase from various sources, including neutrophils.

  3. Standardization of the antibody-dependent respiratory burst assay with human neutrophils and Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, David; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P; Williams, Andrew R; Murungi, Linda M; Shi, Jianguo; Hodgson, Susanne H; Douglas, Alexander D; Osier, Faith H; Fairhurst, Rick M; Diakite, Mahamadou; Pleass, Richard J; Long, Carole A; Draper, Simon J

    2015-09-16

    The assessment of naturally-acquired and vaccine-induced immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria is of long-standing interest. However, the field has suffered from a paucity of in vitro assays that reproducibly measure the anti-parasitic activity induced by antibodies in conjunction with immune cells. Here we optimize the antibody-dependent respiratory burst (ADRB) assay, which assesses the ability of antibodies to activate the release of reactive oxygen species from human neutrophils in response to P. falciparum blood-stage parasites. We focus particularly on assay parameters affecting serum preparation and concentration, and importantly assess reproducibility. Our standardized protocol involves testing each serum sample in singlicate with three independent neutrophil donors, and indexing responses against a standard positive control of pooled hyper-immune Kenyan sera. The protocol can be used to quickly screen large cohorts of samples from individuals enrolled in immuno-epidemiological studies or clinical vaccine trials, and requires only 6 μL of serum per sample. Using a cohort of 86 samples, we show that malaria-exposed individuals induce higher ADRB activity than malaria-naïve individuals. The development of the ADRB assay complements the use of cell-independent assays in blood-stage malaria, such as the assay of growth inhibitory activity, and provides an important standardized cell-based assay in the field.

  4. Calcium mobilization and phosphoinositide turnover in fluoride-activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, C.F.; Wong, K.

    1986-05-01

    Fluoride ion, at concentrations above 10 mM, has been found to activate a superoxide production response in human neutrophils which is strongly dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. In an attempt to further explore the calcium requirement of fluoride-induced neutrophil activation, intracellular calcium concentrations were monitored through use of the fluorescent calcium probe, Quin 2. Fluoride ion, at concentrations between 10 and 20 mM, was found to elicit a rise in intracellular calcium levels which was characterized by a lag period of 4 to 10 min and a prolonged duration of action (greater than 20 min). In contrast, the chemotactic peptide, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced a rise in intracellular calcium concentration which peaked within 1 min. Preincubation of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin resulted in inhibition of the FMLP-induced response, but not that elicited by fluoride. Furthermore, anion exchange chromatography indicated that inositol phosphate accumulation occurred in fluoride-treated cells in association with calcium mobilization. Recent evidence suggests that the FMLP receptor is coupled to phospholipase C and phosphoinositide turnover through a guanine nucleotide binding protein susceptible to inhibition by pertussis toxin. Present results suggest that fluoride ion may serve to activate this protein in a manner resistant to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  5. Bryostatins trigger human polymorphonuclear neutrophil and monocyte oxidative metabolism: association with in vitro antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Esa, A H; Warren, J T; Hess, A D; May, W S

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin-1-but not bryostatin-13-a macrocyclic lactone isolated from the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina, triggered human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) and monocyte release of reactive oxygen radicals, as measured by the generation of lucigenin chemiluminescence and by the ferricytochrome c reduction assay. The release of oxygen radicals by bryostatins was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinases, but resistant to the inhibition of phospholipase A2 activity and arachidonic acid metabolism (prior treatment with mepacrine or indomethacin). Comparison of the effect of protein kinase (PK) inhibitors H-8, H-7 and staurosporine on bryostatin-1-induced neutrophil oxygen radical release further suggested a requirement for activation of phospholipid-dependent PKC, but not for cGMP- or cAMP-dependent PK. In cytostatic assays, PMNs treated with bryostatin-1 inhibited the growth of the erythroleukaemic cell line K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the reported antineoplastic effect of bryostatins may result at least in part from activation of PMNs and monocytes.

  6. Visualization of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Fibrin Meshwork in Human Fibrinopurulent Inflammatory Lesions: II. Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Takanori; Shiogama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takahiro; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an extracellular, spider’s web-like structure resulting from cell death of neutrophils. NETs play an important role in innate immunity against microbial infection, but their roles in human pathological processes remain largely unknown. NETs and fibrin meshwork both showing fibrillar structures are observed at the site of fibrinopurulent inflammation, as described in our sister paper [Acta Histochem. Cytochem. 49; 109–116, 2016]. In the present study, immunoelectron microscopic study was performed for visualizing NETs and fibrin fibrils (thick fibrils in our tongue) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of autopsied lung tissue of legionnaire’s pneumonia. Lactoferrin and fibrinogen gamma chain were utilized as markers of NETs and fibrin, respectively. Analysis of immuno-scanning electron microscopy indicated that NETs constructed thin fibrils and granular materials were attached onto the NETs fibrils. The smooth-surfaced fibrin fibrils were much thicker than the NETs fibrils. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that lactoferrin immunoreactivities were visible as dots on the fibrils, whereas fibrinogen gamma chain immunoreactivities were homogeneously observed throughout the fibrils. Usefulness of immunoelectron microscopic analysis of NETs and fibrin fibrils should be emphasized. PMID:27682015

  7. Thrombin Production and Human Neutrophil Elastase Sequestration by Modified Cellulosic Dressings and Their Electrokinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Judson Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing). Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze). A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration. PMID:24956451

  8. Characterization of neutrophil extracellular traps in cats naturally infected with feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Wardini, Amanda B; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; Nascimento, Michelle T C; Nadaes, Natalia R; Danelli, Maria G M; Mazur, Carlos; Benjamim, Claudia F; Saraiva, Elvira M; Pinto-da-Silva, Lucia H

    2010-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), a common, naturally occurring gammaretrovirus in domestic cats, is associated with degenerative diseases of the haematopoietic system, immunodeficiency and neoplasia. FeLV infection causes an important suppression of neutrophil function, leading to opportunistic infections. Recently, a new microbicidal mechanism named NETosis was described in human, bovine and fish neutrophils, as well as in chicken heterophils. The purpose of the present study was to characterize NETosis in feline neutrophils, as well as to evaluate neutrophil function in FeLV naturally infected symptomatic and asymptomatic cats through the phagocytosis process, release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The results showed that feline neutrophils stimulated with protozoa parasites released structures comprising DNA and histones, which were characterized as NETs by immunofluorescence. Quantification of NETs after neutrophil stimulation showed a significant increase in NET release by neutrophils from FeLV(-) and FeLV(+) asymptomatic cats compared with FeLV(+) symptomatic cats. Moreover, the number of released NETs and MPO activity in unstimulated neutrophils of FeLV(+) symptomatic cats were higher than those in unstimulated neutrophils from FeLV(-) and FeLV(+) asymptomatic cats. This study reports, for the first time, NET release by feline neutrophils, along with the fact that NET induction may be modulated by a viral infection. The results indicate that the NET mechanism appears to be overactivated in FeLV(+) cats and that this feature could be considered a marker of disease progression in FeLV infection.

  9. Novel human cytomegalovirus viral chemokines, vCXCL-1s, display functional selectivity for neutrophil signaling and function

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinho; Dogra, Pranay; Masi, Tom J.; Pitt, Elisabeth A.; de Kruijf, Petra; Smit, Martine J.; Sparer, Tim E.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) uses members of the hematopoietic system including neutrophils for dissemination throughout the body. HCMV encodes a viral chemokine, vCXCL-1, that is postulated to attract neutrophils for dissemination within the host. The gene encoding vCXCL-1, UL146, is one of the most variable genes in the HCMV genome. Why HCMV has evolved this hypervariability and how this affects the virus’ dissemination/pathogenesis is unknown. Because the vCXCL-1 hypervariability maps to important binding and activation domains, we hypothesized that vCXCL-1s differentially activate neutrophils, which could contribute to HCMV dissemination and/or pathogenesis. In order to test whether these viral chemokines affect neutrophil function, we generated vCXCL-1 proteins from 11 different clades from clinical isolates from HCMV-congenitally infected infants. All vCXCL-1s were able to induce calcium flux at a concentration of 100 nM and integrin expression on human peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) in spite of differences in affinity for the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors. In fact their affinity for CXCR1 or CXCR2 did not directly correlate with chemotaxis, G protein-dependent and independent (β-arrestin2) activation, or secondary chemokine (CCL22) expression. Our data suggest that vCXCL-1 polymorphisms impact the binding affinity, receptor usage, and differential PBN activation that could contribute to HCMV dissemination and/or pathogenesis. PMID:25987741

  10. Subcellular localization and release of human neutrophil gelatinase, confirming the existence of separate gelatinase-containing granules.

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, L; Bjerrum, O W; Askaa, J; Borregaard, N

    1992-01-01

    An e.l.i.s.a. was developed using specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies against human neutrophil gelatinase. This assay, in contrast to the functional assay, is independent of activation of gelatinase, and is specific for the detection of gelatinase in both its reduced and unreduced forms. Using this assay, we were able to demonstrate a difference between the subcellular localization of gelatinase on the one hand, and the subcellular localization of vitamin B-12-binding protein, lactoferrin and cytochrome b558 on the other hand. The latter three co-localized in fractions of slightly higher density than gelatinase on a two-layer Percoll density gradient. Furthermore, the release of gelatinase exceeded the release of vitamin B-12-binding protein as well as lactoferrin by a factor of 3-6 following stimulation with formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, leukotriene B4 and other soluble stimuli. Thus, although gelatinase has previously been found to co-localize with lactoferrin on immuno-electron microscopy, we confirm the existence of gelatinase-rich and lactoferrin- and vitamin B-12-binding-protein-poor granules, that are lighter and mobilized more easily than specific granules. These gelatinase-containing granules are not the store of cytochrome b558. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1332677

  11. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:2254020

  12. Identification and evaluation on the phagocytic function of human neutrophils in diabetic patients by optical microscopy with cellular monolayer techniques and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ye-Rong; Liang, Jing-Zhong

    1995-01-01

    A comparative study on phagocytosis of P. Aeruginosa by human neutrophils in diabetic patients and healthy volunteers was carried out by means of the monolayer of neutrophils in optical microscopy and ultrastructural observation in electronic microscopy. The results demonstrated that the level of phagocytosis in diabetics is lower than health people. The impairment in phagocytosis of neutrophils may be the important cause of severe and repeated infection in diabetic patients.

  13. Virus-stimulated neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment enhance T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin Yang; Tai, Jiayu A.; Li, Sumin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) fosters tumors by attenuating anti-tumor immunity, reinforcing tumor cell survival and increasing angiogenesis. Among the constituents of the TME, here, we focused on tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). First, we found that the combination of poly I:C and inactivated Sendai virus particles (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) synergistically suppressed tumor growth in the B16-F10 melanoma mouse model. In this model, poly I:C contributed to the recruitment of CD11b+Ly6G+ neutrophils to the TME, and co-injection of poly I:C and HVJ-E increased CD11b+Ly6G+FAS+ TAN in the TME. Depletion of neutrophils abolished the synergistic anti-tumor effect of HVJ-E and poly I:C in B16-F10 tumors. We revealed that C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CXCL2) is produced in the TME by poly I:C, but HVJ-E enhanced neutrophil infiltration of the TME does not occur. An anti-CXCL2 antibody inhibited the tumor suppression by HVJ-E+poly I:C. HVJ-E in combination with recombinant CXCL2 protein or CXCL2 pDNA suppressed mouse melanoma by increasing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity against B16-F10 melanoma, which was abolished by an anti-Ly6G antibody. HVJ-E directly and indirectly increased FAS and ICAM-1 expression in cultured bone marrow-derived naïve neutrophils. Thus, HVJ-E activates anti-tumor immunity via anti-tumorigenic neutrophils in the TME. An HVJ-E vector containing the CXCL2 gene may be applicable as a novel cancer gene therapy strategy. PMID:27259252

  14. Azurocidin, a natural antibiotic from human neutrophils: expression, antimicrobial activity, and secretion.

    PubMed

    Almeida, R P; Vanet, A; Witko-Sarsat, V; Melchior, M; McCabe, D; Gabay, J E

    1996-06-01

    The azurophil granules of human PMN contain four antibiotic proteins, the serprocidins, which have extensive homology to one another and to serine proteases. Azurocidin, a member of this family, is a 29-kDa glycoprotein with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and chemotactic activity toward monocytes. Insect cells transfected with a baculovirus vector carrying azurocidin cDNA produced a recombinant azurocidin protein. We purified the recombinant azurocidin protein from the culture medium of the infected cells and showed that it retained the antimicrobial activity of the native neutrophil-derived molecule. In addition, we present evidence that a 49-amino-acid region of the recombinant azurocidin protein is required for its secretion from insect cells.

  15. Human neutrophil peptide-1 decreases during ageing in selected Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; de Haro-Acosta, Jeny; Torres-Juarez, Flor; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; González-Amaro, Roberto; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptide innate immunity plays a central role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases, as has been described extensively in different settings. However, the role that these molecules play in the immunity mediated by polymorphonuclear phagocytes as part of the innate immunity of ageing individuals has not been described. In the present study, we addressed the question whether antimicrobial activity in polymorphonuclear cells from elderly individuals was altered in comparison with young adults. We compared phagocytosis index, bacterial killing efficiency, myeloperoxidase activity and cathelicidin expression. Results showed that there were no statistical differences among groups. However, human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) was decreased in the elderly individuals group. Results suggest that the decreased HNP-1 production in the polymorphonuclear phagocytes form elderly individuals might have an important participation in the increased susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  16. Human Platelets Damage Aspergillus fumigatus Hyphae and May Supplement Killing by Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Christin, Laurent; Wysong, Deborah R.; Meshulam, Tova; Hastey, Ryan; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Diamond, Richard D.

    1998-01-01

    Neutropenia is considered a significant risk factor for invasive aspergillosis but is almost always associated with concurrent thrombocytopenia. Studies determined that platelets, like neutrophils, attached to cell walls of the invasive hyphal form of Aspergillus fumigatus. Organisms were damaged as shown by loss of cell wall integrity in scanning laser confocal microscopy and release of defined hyphal surface glycoproteins. Rapid expression appearance of surface antigen CD63 and release of markers of platelet degranulation confirmed activation during attachment to hyphae. Optimal platelet activation required opsonization of hyphae with fresh or heat-inactivated whole plasma. These effects of opsonization with whole plasma could not be duplicated by pooled human serum, immunoglobulin G, or fibrinogen, whether used separately or combined. Thus, platelets in the presence of whole plasma have the potential to play an important role in normal host defenses against invasive aspergillosis. PMID:9488412

  17. Human neutrophil elastase detection with fluorescent peptide sensors conjugated to cellulosic and nanocellulosic materials: part II, structure/function analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is one of a number of proteases that is receiving increased attention as a marker for inflammatory diseases and sensor-based point of care diagnostics. Integral to sensor-based detection is the transducer surface which is the platform of the sensor's signal transmitta...

  18. Human neutrophil elastase peptide sensors conjugated to cellulosic and nanocellulosic materials: part I, synthesis and characterization of fluorescent analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of peptide conjugated cellulose and nanocellulose materials as sensors for fluorescent detection of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The cellulose sensor surfaces selected are filter paper (FP) and print cloth (PC) fabric, which are composed of pro...

  19. Neutralization by Acetyl Salicylic Acid of the Testosterone induced Impaired Maspin Synthesis Stimulated by Estriol in Neutrophils through Nitric Oxide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Emili; Bank, Sarbashri; Maiti, Smarajit; Jana, Pradipta; Sinha, Asru K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Maspin, an anti breast cancer protein in the mammary cell and normal neutrophil has been reported to be synthesised by the stimulation of NO production induced by estriol. The role of testosterone was investigated in the synthesis of maspin in relation to that of estriol. Methods: Fifty normal female between the ages of 25-65 years old participated in the study. Maspin synthesis was demonstrated by in vitro translation of maspin mRNA, followed by the quantification of maspin by enzyme linked immune absorbent assay. NO was determined by methomoglobin method. Results: Incubation of the neutrophils in HBSS both with 30 nM estriol resulted in the synthesis of 1.8 ngm maspin with simultaneous increase of NO synthesis. In contrast incubating neutrophils with 20 nM testosterone in the presence of estriol inhibited maspin synthesis to 0.33 nM with simultaneous inhibition of NO synthesis from 1.89 nM to 0 nM at the same time. Addition of 0.2 μM flutamide, a testosterone receptor blocker to the incubation mixture restored the synthesis of maspin by 60.64 %. Incubation of 25 μM aspirin that stimulated NO synthesis restored the inhibition of maspin synthesis by testosterone by 79.1%. I-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, abolished both maspin and NO synthesis. Scatchard plot of estriol binding in the presence of testosterone demonstrated that the male sex hormone inhibited the female sex hormone binding to its receptor by “cross talk” between the receptors. It was found that while 1.02 × 103 molecules of estriol bind each neutrophil at equilibrium, in the presence of testosterone (20 nM) in the binding mixture decreases the binding of estriol to 0.5 × 103 with little change in the dissociation constant compared to controls. Conclution: Estriol was found to stimulate maspin synthesis through the stimulation of NO, testosterone inhibited maspin synthesis through the inhibition of NO synthesis. PMID:26759534

  20. Quantitative in vitro assay to measure neutrophil adhesion to activated primary human microvascular endothelial cells under static conditions.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Farrar, Katherine; Hellman, Judith

    2013-08-23

    The vascular endothelium plays an integral part in the inflammatory response. During the acute phase of inflammation, endothelial cells (ECs) are activated by host mediators or directly by conserved microbial components or host-derived danger molecules. Activated ECs express cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules that mobilize, activate and retain leukocytes at the site of infection or injury. Neutrophils are the first leukocytes to arrive, and adhere to the endothelium through a variety of adhesion molecules present on the surfaces of both cells. The main functions of neutrophils are to directly eliminate microbial threats, promote the recruitment of other leukocytes through the release of additional factors, and initiate wound repair. Therefore, their recruitment and attachment to the endothelium is a critical step in the initiation of the inflammatory response. In this report, we describe an in vitro neutrophil adhesion assay using calcein AM-labeled primary human neutrophils to quantitate the extent of microvascular endothelial cell activation under static conditions. This method has the additional advantage that the same samples quantitated by fluorescence spectrophotometry can also be visualized directly using fluorescence microscopy for a more qualitative assessment of neutrophil binding.

  1. Synthesis of chlorinated flavonoids with anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic activities in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Ribeiro, Daniela; Tomé, Sara M; Silva, Artur M S; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-10-30

    Neutrophils are considered the central cells of acute inflammation. Flavonoids have been suggested as therapeutic agents to avoid damages induced by inflammatory processes. It is well known the reactivity of flavonoids with hypochlorous acid produced by neutrophils, to form stable mono and dichlorinated products. In this study, we synthesized novel chlorinated flavonoids and investigated their effect in neutrophils' oxidative burst and in its lifespan, in comparison with the parent non-chlorinated flavonoids. The obtained results demonstrate that chlorinated flavonoids were more efficient than their parent compounds in modulating neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. Some of the tested flavonoids drive neutrophil apoptosis in a caspase 3-dependent fashion. The present data showed that 8-chloro-3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (4a) constitute an alternative anti-inflammatory therapy, due to the proven ability to suppress mechanisms engaged at the onset and progression of inflammation.

  2. Technical Advance: Autofluorescence-based sorting: rapid and nonperturbing isolation of ultrapure neutrophils to determine cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Marwick, John A.; Rossi, Fiona; Dransfield, Ian; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2013-01-01

    The technical limitations of isolating neutrophils without contaminating leukocytes, while concurrently minimizing neutrophil activation, is a barrier to determining specific neutrophil functions. We aimed to assess the use of FACS for generating highly pure quiescent neutrophil populations in an antibody-free environment. Peripheral blood human granulocytes and murine bone marrow-derived neutrophils were isolated by discontinuous Percoll gradient and flow-sorted using FSC/SSC profiles and differences in autofluorescence. Postsort purity was assessed by morphological analysis and flow cytometry. Neutrophil activation was measured in unstimulated-unsorted and sorted cells and in response to fMLF, LTB4, and PAF by measuring shape change, CD62L, and CD11b expression; intracellular calcium flux; and chemotaxis. Cytokine production by human neutrophils was also determined. Postsort human neutrophil purity was 99.95% (sem=0.03; n=11; morphological analysis), and 99.68% were CD16+ve (sem=0.06; n=11), with similar results achieved for murine neutrophils. Flow sorting did not alter neutrophil activation or chemotaxis, relative to presorted cells, and no differences in response to agonists were observed. Stimulated neutrophils produced IL-1β, although to a lesser degree than CXCL8/IL-8. The exploitation of the difference in autofluorescence between neutrophils and eosinophils by FACS is a quick and effective method for generating highly purified populations for subsequent in vitro study. PMID:23667167

  3. Sequence and molecular characterization of human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Remold-O'Donnell, E; Chin, J; Alberts, M

    1992-01-01

    cDNA encoding human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor (EI), a M(r) approximately 42,000 protein with serpin-like functional properties, has been sequenced. The 1316-base-pair sequence was obtained from overlapping clones and amplified DNA from libraries of monocyte-like and neutrophil-like cells. Hybridization with EI cDNA identified three EI mRNA species of 1.5, 1.9, and 2.6 kilobases in U937 monocyte-like cells and no hybridizing mRNA in lymphoblastoid cells lacking detectable EI. The cDNA open reading frame encodes a 379-amino acid protein, of which 167 residues were confirmed by tryptic peptides. Although EI may function extracellularly as well as intracellularly, its deduced sequence lacks a typical cleavable N-terminal signal sequence. Sequence analysis established that EI is a member of the serpin superfamily. EI has greatest homology (50.1% identity of amino acids) with plasminogen activator inhibitor 2, also a monocyte protein, and ovalbumin and gene Y, which were previously grouped as an ancient branch of the serpin superfamily. The extent of EI identity with the functionally related serpin alpha 1 antitrypsin is only 30.1%. Sequence alignment indicates that the reactive center P1 residue is Cys-344, consistent with abrogation of elastase inhibitory activity by iodoacetamide and making EI a naturally occurring Cys-serpin. The cleavable bond, Cys-Met, suggests an oxidation-sensitive molecule capable of inhibiting more than one serine protease. Oxidation sensitivity would limit the place of action of EI to the immediate vicinity of carrier cells. The molecular structure will help clarify the likely role of EI in regulating protease action and preventing tissue damage by phagocytic cells. Images PMID:1376927

  4. Transmigration of polymorphnuclear neutrophils and monocytes through the human blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier after bacterial infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial invasion through the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) during bacterial meningitis causes secretion of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines followed by the recruitment of leukocytes into the CNS. In this study, we analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) and monocyte transepithelial transmigration (TM) across the BCSFB after bacterial infection. Methods Using an inverted transwell filter system of human choroid plexus papilloma cells (HIBCPP), we studied leukocyte TM rates, the migration route by immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, the secretion of cytokines/chemokines by cytokine bead array and posttranslational modification of the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) α via western blot. Results PMNs showed a significantly increased TM across HIBCPP after infection with wild-type Neisseria meningitidis (MC58). In contrast, a significantly decreased monocyte transmigration rate after bacterial infection of HIBCPP could be observed. Interestingly, in co-culture experiments with PMNs and monocytes, TM of monocytes was significantly enhanced. Analysis of paracellular permeability and transepithelial electrical resistance confirmed an intact barrier function during leukocyte TM. With the help of the different imaging techniques we could provide evidence for para- as well as for transcellular migrating leukocytes. Further analysis of secreted cytokines/chemokines showed a distinct pattern after stimulation and transmigration of PMNs and monocytes. Moreover, the transmembrane glycoprotein SIRPα was deglycosylated in monocytes, but not in PMNs, after bacterial infection. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that PMNs and monoctyes differentially migrate in a human BCSFB model after bacterial infection. Cytokines and chemokines as well as transmembrane proteins such as SIRPα may be involved in this process. PMID:23448224

  5. Role of ERK1/2 kinase in the expression of iNOS by NDMA in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Garley, Marzena; Jablonski, Jakub; Radziwon, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Potential role of ERK1/2 kinase in conjunction with p38 in the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production, and superoxide anion generation by human neutrophils (PMNs) exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was determined. Increased synthesis of NO due to the involvement of iNOS in neutrophils exposed to NDMA was observed. In addition, intensified activation of ERK1/2 and p38 kinases was determined in these cells. Inhibition of kinase regulated by extracellular signals (ERK1/2) pathway, in contrast to p38 pathway, led to an increased production of NO and expression of iNOS in PMNs. Moreover, as a result of inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway, a decreased activation of p38 kinase was observed in neutrophils, while inhibition of p38 kinase did not affect activation of ERK1/2 pathway in these cells. An increased ability to release superoxide anion by the studied PMNs was observed, which decreased after ERK1/2 pathway inhibition. In conclusion, in human neutrophils, ERK1/2 kinase is not directly involved in the regulation of iNOS and NO production induced by NDMA; however, the kinase participates in superoxide anion production in these cells.

  6. Simultaneous mobilization of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) and formyl peptide chemoattractant receptors in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Graves, V; Gabig, T; McCarthy, L; Strour, E F; Leemhuis, T; English, D

    1992-08-01

    Mobilization of a distinct subset of specific granules provides a physiologically important mechanism to recruit Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) from an intracellular pool to the external surface of the neutrophil plasma membrane, where the functionally active heterodimer mediates several adherence-dependent processes that are crucial for adequate host defense and cellular inflammatory responses. We observed similar characteristics for translocation of Mac-1 and neutrophil formyl peptide receptors (FPR) and hypothesize that the readily accessible pools of both Mac-1 and FPR are colocalized within this specific granule subset. Plasma membrane levels of both FPR (assessed with 3H-FMLP) and Mac-1 (assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-Mo-1-labeled cells) were markedly downregulated in cells prepared at low temperature from blood cooled to 4 degrees C immediately after removal from the circulation. Levels of both FPR and Mac-1 remained low on cells held at 4 degrees C. Upon warming, spontaneous upregulation of Mac-1 and FPR occurred with similar kinetics and temperature dependency. Translocation of both Mac-1 and FPR was markedly potentiated by exposure of cells to either fluoride ion (which has been shown by others to specifically elicit exocytosis of gelatinase-rich and vitamin B-12 binding protein-poor granules) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that markedly potentiates the neutrophils' host defense capabilities. Levels of both FPR and Mac-1 on F-- or GM-CSF-treated neutrophils exceeded those present on cells incubated at 37 degrees C for extended time intervals, indicating that stimulated translocation may involve mobilization of an additional granule subset. Scatchard analysis showed that only low-affinity FPR were translocated during spontaneous and stimulus-dependent upregulation. To directly compare FPR levels on the surface of cells displaying varying levels of Mac-1 within a

  7. α-Linoleic Acid Enhances the Capacity of α1-Antitrypsin to Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Induced IL-1β in Human Blood Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nupur; Korenbaum, Elena; Mahadeva, Ravi; Immenschuh, Stephan; Grau, Veronika; Dinarello, Charles A; Welte, Tobias; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT, SERPINA1), a major circulating inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3 (PR3), has been proposed to reduce the processing and release of IL-1β. Since the antiinflammatory properties of A1AT are influenced by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, we compared the effects of fatty acid–free (A1AT-0) and α-linoleic acid (LA)–bound (A1AT-LA) forms of A1AT) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced synthesis of the IL-1β precursor and the release of IL-1β from human blood neutrophils. The presence of A1AT-LA or A1AT-0 significantly reduced LPS-induced release of mature IL-1β. However, only A1AT-LA reduced both steady-state mRNA levels of IL-1β and the secretion of mature IL-1β. In LPS-stimulated neutrophils, mRNA levels of TLR2/4, NFKBIA, P2RX7, NLRP3, and CASP1 decreased significantly in the presence of A1AT-LA but not A1AT-0. A1AT-0 and A1AT-LA did not inhibit the direct enzymatic activity of caspase-1, but we observed complexes of either form of A1AT with NE and PR3. Consistent with the effect on TLR and IL-1β gene expression, only A1AT-LA inhibited LPS-induced gene expression of NE and PR3. Increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ was observed in A1AT-LA–treated neutrophils without LPS stimulation, and the selective PPAR-γ antagonist (GW9662) prevented a reduction in IL-1β by A1AT-LA. We conclude from our data that the ability of A1AT to reduce TLR and IL-1β gene expression depends on its association with LA. Moreover, the antiinflammatory properties of A1AT-LA are likely to be mediated by activation of PPARγ. PMID:27452044

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and human muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2001-01-01

    During exercise, changes occur at many sites in the motor pathway, including the muscle fiber, motoneuron, motor cortex, and "upstream" of the motor cortex. Some of the changes result in fatigue, which can be defined as a decrease in ability to produce maximal muscle force voluntarily. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the human motor cortex reveals changes in both motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and the silent period during and after fatiguing voluntary contractions in normal subjects. The relationship of these changes to loss of force or fatigue is unclear. However, during a sustained maximal contraction TMS evokes extra force from the muscle and thus demonstrates the development of suboptimal output from the motor cortex, that is, fatigue at a supraspinal level. In some patients with symptoms of fatigue, the response to TMS after exercise is altered, but the changed MEP behavior is not yet linked to particular symptoms or pathology.

  9. Human neutrophil-mediated fungistasis against Histoplasma capsulatum. Localization of fungistatic activity to the azurophil granules.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S L; Gootee, L; Gabay, J E

    1993-01-01

    Human neutrophils (PMN) demonstrated potent fungistatic activity against Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) yeasts in a sensitive microassay that quantifies the growth of yeasts by the incorporation of [3H]leucine. At a PMN:yeast ratio of 1:2, PMN inhibited the growth of yeasts by 37%. Maximum inhibition of 85% to 95% was achieved at a PMN/yeast ratio of 10:1 to 50:1. Opsonization of the yeasts in fresh or heat-inactivated serum was required for PMN-mediated fungistasis, but ingestion of the yeasts was not required. Recognition and phagocytosis of opsonized yeasts was via PMN complement receptor (CR) type 1 (CR1), CR3, and FcRIII (CD16). PMN fungistatic activity was evident by 2 h, was maximum at 24 h, and persisted up to 5 d. In contrast, yeasts multiplied within monocytes to a greater extent than in culture medium alone. PMN from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) inhibited the growth of Hc yeasts by an average of 97%, compared with 86% in three normal controls. Furthermore, preincubation of PMN with the lysosomotropic agent NH4Cl inhibited fungistatic activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, experiments with subcellular fractions of PMN demonstrated that the principal component of the fungistatic activity of PMN was localized in the azurophil granules. These data demonstrate that human PMN possess potent fungistatic activity against Hc yeasts and further show that fungistasis is mediated by antimicrobial agents contained in the azurophil granules. PMID:8349801

  10. Impact of cagPAI and T4SS on the Inflammatory Response of Human Neutrophils to Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Zauco, Norma Angélica; Torres, Javier; Pérez-Figueroa, Gloria Erandi; Álvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Gómez, Alejandro; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori contains a pathogenicity island, cagPAI, with genes homologous to components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The T4SS components assemble a structure that transfers CagA protein and peptidoglycan into host epithelial cells, causing the increased release of interleukin 8 (IL8) from the cells. The Toll-like receptors on neutrophils recognize H. pylori, initiating signaling pathways that enhance the activation of NF-κB. However, the roles of cagPAI and T4SS in the inflammatory response of neutrophils are unknown. We evaluated the participation of cagPAI and T4SS in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori infection. Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and infected with H. pylori cagPAI+, cagPAI–, and cagPAI mutant strains virB4– and virD4–. Whereas cagPAI+ strain 26695 induced the greatest IL8 production, a proinflammatory response, cagPAI– strain 8822 induced the greatest IL10 production, an anti-inflammatory response. In contrast, the virB4– and virD4– mutant strains produced significantly more of the two proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and tumor necrosis factor αthan the cagPAI+ strain 26695. We observed that H. pylori downregulated the expression of TLRs 2 and 5 but upregulated TLR9 expression in a cagPAI and T4SS-independent manner. These results show for the first time that the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori may vary from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory response, depending on cagPAI and the integrity of T4SS. PMID:23755130

  11. Mast Cell Interaction with Neutrophils in Human Gastric Carcinomas: Ultrastructural Observations

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Giovanni; Alberto Caruso, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The role of mast cells in cell-cell immune interactions has received increasing attention, although their functional interaction with neutrophils still remains to be clarified in tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between mast cells and neutrophils in a series of gastric carcinomas (GC). Patients and Methods. 52 surgically resected GC specimens were routinely processed for both light and electron microscopy. Only cases showing both mast cells and neutrophils in the tumor stroma were considered in the analysis. Results. Only 9 GC (M : F = 5 : 4; age range: 50–82 years) showed both mast cells and neutrophils in the tumor stroma. At ultrathin sections, we identified heterotypic aggregation and intermingling of mast cells and neutrophils. Mast cells had mature phenotype and showed full complement of granules with homogeneous, scroll, particle, and mixed pattern. In addition, we found normal-appearing or early apoptosis showing neutrophils. Conclusion. Our histological findings showed the likely interaction between mast cells and neutrophils in GC. We hypothesize that the granular content of mast cells may be released in small quantity through a mechanism called “kiss-and-run fusion,” which is alternative to well-known massive anaphylactic or piecemeal degranulation. PMID:27882290

  12. Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Blazkova, Jana; Gupta, Sarthak; Liu, Yudong; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Bolen, Christopher R.; Saar-Dover, Ron; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Angst, Martin S.; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Aghaeepour, Nima; Stevenson, David; Baldwin, Nicole; Anguiano, Esperanza; Chaussabel, Damien; Altman, Matthew C.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite clear differences in immune system responses and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases between males and females, there is little understanding of the processes involved. In this study, we identified a gene signature of immature-like neutrophils, characterized by the overexpression of genes encoding for several granule-containing proteins, which was found at higher levels (up to 3-fold) in young (20–30 y old) but not older (60 to >89 y old) males compared with females. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood neutrophils revealed more mature and responsive neutrophils in young females, which also exhibited an elevated capacity in neutrophil extracellular trap formation at baseline and upon microbial or sterile autoimmune stimuli. The expression levels of the immature-like neutrophil signature increased linearly with pregnancy, an immune state of increased susceptibility to certain infections. Using mass cytometry, we also find increased frequencies of immature forms of neutrophils in the blood of women during late pregnancy. Thus, our findings show novel sex differences in innate immunity and identify a common neutrophil signature in males and in pregnant women. PMID:28179497

  13. Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Blazkova, Jana; Gupta, Sarthak; Liu, Yudong; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A; Bolen, Christopher R; Saar-Dover, Ron; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K; Angst, Martin S; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Aghaeepour, Nima; Stevenson, David; Baldwin, Nicole; Anguiano, Esperanza; Chaussabel, Damien; Altman, Matthew C; Kaplan, Mariana J; Davis, Mark M; Furman, David

    2017-03-15

    Despite clear differences in immune system responses and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases between males and females, there is little understanding of the processes involved. In this study, we identified a gene signature of immature-like neutrophils, characterized by the overexpression of genes encoding for several granule-containing proteins, which was found at higher levels (up to 3-fold) in young (20-30 y old) but not older (60 to >89 y old) males compared with females. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood neutrophils revealed more mature and responsive neutrophils in young females, which also exhibited an elevated capacity in neutrophil extracellular trap formation at baseline and upon microbial or sterile autoimmune stimuli. The expression levels of the immature-like neutrophil signature increased linearly with pregnancy, an immune state of increased susceptibility to certain infections. Using mass cytometry, we also find increased frequencies of immature forms of neutrophils in the blood of women during late pregnancy. Thus, our findings show novel sex differences in innate immunity and identify a common neutrophil signature in males and in pregnant women.

  14. Fc gamma receptor III on human neutrophils. Allelic variants have functionally distinct capacities.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J E; Edberg, J C; Kimberly, R P

    1990-01-01

    As a model system to explore the functional consequences of structural variants of human Fc gamma receptors (Fc gamma R), we have investigated Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis in relation to the NA1-NA2 polymorphism of Fc gamma RIII (CD16) on neutrophils (Fc gamma RIIIPMN). The neutrophil-specific NA antigen system is a biallelic polymorphism with codominant expression demonstrating a gene dose effect with the anti-NA1 MAb CLB-gran 11 in a large donor population. To explore the impact of this allelic variation of Fc gamma RIIIPMN on phagocytosis, we used two Fc gamma RIII-dependent probes, IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) and concanavalin. A-treated erythrocytes (E-ConA). Comparison of Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis by PMN from NA1 subjects and from NA2 subjects showed lower levels of phagocytosis of both probes by the NA2 individuals. The difference was most pronounced with lightly opsonized EA: at the lowest level of sensitization the phagocytic index was 72% lower for NA2 donors, whereas at the highest level of sensitization it was 21% lower (P less than 0.003). Blockade of Fc gamma RII with MAb IV.3 Fab amplified by threefold the difference between NA1 and NA2 donors. NA1 and NA2 individuals had identical phagocytic capacities for the non-Fc gamma RIII probes, serum-treated and heat-treated zymosan. These individuals did not show differential quantitative cell surface expression of Fc gamma RIIIPMN measured by a panel of anti-CD16 MAb (3G8, CLB FcR-gran 1, VEP13, BW209/2) and by Scatchard analysis of 125I-IgG dimer binding. The difference in Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis was not explicable on the basis of differential collaboration of Fc gamma RIIIPMN alleles with Fc gamma RII, since (a) the difference in phagocytic capacity between NA1 and NA2 individuals was readily apparent with the E-ConA probe (which is independent of Fc gamma RII) and (b) the difference in phagocytosis of EA was magnified by Fc gamma RII blockade. The demonstration that allelic

  15. The effect of cigarette smoking on neutrophil kinetics in human lungs (see comments

    SciTech Connect

    MacNee, W.; Wiggs, B.; Belzberg, A.S.; Hogg, J.C. )

    1989-10-05

    Neutrophils may play a part in the pathogenesis of the centrilobular emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. The capillary bed of the lungs concentrates neutrophils approximately 100-fold with respect to erythrocytes, producing a large pool of marginated cells. We examined the effect of cigarette smoking on the kinetics of this pool of cells, using 99mTc-labeled erythrocytes to measure regional blood velocity and 111In-labeled neutrophils to measure the removal of neutrophils during the first passage through the pulmonary circulation, their subsequent washout from the lungs, and the effect of local blood velocity on the number of neutrophils retained in each lung region. We observed no difference in these measurements between subjects who had never smoked (n = 6) and smokers who did not smoke during the study (n = 12). However, subjects who did smoke during the study (n = 12) had a significantly slower rate of washout of radiolabeled neutrophils from the lung (0.08 +/- 0.04 of the total per minute, as compared with 0.13 +/- 0.06 in smokers who did not smoke during the experiment and 0.14 +/- 0.08 in non-smokers) (P = 0.02). We also observed an increase in the regional retention of labeled neutrophils with respect to blood velocity in 5 of the 12 subjects who smoked during the study, but in none of the other subjects. We conclude that the presence of cigarette smoke in the lungs of some subjects increases the local concentration of neutrophils, and suggest that the lesions that characterize emphysema may be a result of the destruction of lung tissue by neutrophils that remain within pulmonary microvessels.

  16. Neuregulin1-β decreases IL-1β-induced neutrophil adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Limin; Walas, Samantha; Leung, Wendy; Sykes, David B.; Wu, Jiang; Lo, Eng H.; Lok, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and multiple sclerosis, resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of neurological function. The response of the microvascular endothelium often contributes to neuroinflammation. One such response is the up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules which facilitate neutrophil adhesion to the endothelium and their migration from blood to tissue. Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is an endogenous growth factor which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental stroke models. We hypothesized that NRG1 would decrease the endothelial response to inflammation, and result in a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. We tested this hypothesis in an in-vitro model of cytokine-induced endothelial injury, in which human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) were treated with IL-1β, along with co-incubation with vehicle or NRG1-β. Outcome measures included protein levels of endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin; as well as the number of neutrophils that adhere to the endothelial monolayer. Our data show that NRG1-β decreased the levels of VCAM-1, E-selectin, and neutrophil adhesion to brain microvascular endothelial cells activated by IL1-β. These findings open new possibilities for investigating NRG1 in neuroprotective strategies in brain injury. PMID:24863743

  17. Human neutrophils and oral microbiota: a constant tug-of-war between a harmonious and a discordant coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Edmisson, Jacob S.; Jimenez-Flores, Emeri

    2017-01-01

    Summary Neutrophils are a major component of the innate host response, and the outcome of the interaction between the oral microbiota and neutrophils is a key determinant of oral health status. The composition of the oral microbiome is very complex and different in health and disease. Neutrophils are constantly recruited to the oral cavity, and their protective role is highlighted in cases where their number or functional responses are impeded, resulting in different forms of periodontal disease. Periodontitis, one of the more severe and irreversible forms of periodontal disease, is a microbial-induced chronic inflammatory disease that affects the gingival tissues supporting the tooth. This chronic inflammatory disease is the result of a shift of the oral bacterial symbiotic community to a dysbiotic more complex community. Chronic inflammatory infectious diseases such as periodontitis can occur because the pathogens are able to evade or disable the innate immune system. In this review, we discuss how human neutrophils interact with both the symbiotic and the dysbiotic oral community; an understanding of which is essential to increase our knowledge of the periodontal disease process. PMID:27558341

  18. CIN85 Modulates the Down-regulation of FcγRIIa Expression and Function by c-Cbl in a PKC-dependent Manner in Human Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Marois, Louis; Vaillancourt, Myriam; Paré, Guillaume; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J. G.; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Naccache, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    We previously described a non-classical mechanism that arrests FcγRIIa signaling in human neutrophils once engaged by immune complexes or opsonized pathogens. The engagement of FcγRIIa leads to its ubiquitination by the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl and degradation by the proteasome. Herein, we further examined some of the events regulating this novel pathway. The adaptor protein CIN85 was described in other systems to be involved in the regulation of the c-Cbl-dependent pathway. We found that CIN85 is expressed in human neutrophils and that it translocates like c-Cbl from the cytosol to the plasma membrane following receptor cross-linking. CIN85 was also recruited to the same subset of high density detergent-resistant membrane fractions in which stimulated FcγRIIa partitioned with c-Cbl. The integrity of these microdomains is essential to the FcγRIIa degradation process because the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin inhibits this event. Silencing the expression of CIN85 by siRNA in dibutyryl cyclic AMP-differentiated PLB 985 cells prevented FcγRIIa degradation and increased IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Confocal microscopy revealed that the presence of CIN85 is essential to the proper sorting of FcγRIIa during endocytosis. We also provide direct evidence that CIN85 is a substrate of serine/threonine kinase PKCs. Classical PKCs positively regulate FcγRIIa ubiquitination and degradation because these events were inhibited by Gö6976, a classical PKC inhibitor. We conclude that the ubiquitination and degradation of stimulated FcγRIIa mediated by c-Cbl are positively regulated by the adaptor protein CIN85 in a PKC-dependent manner and that these events contribute to the termination of FcγRIIa signaling. PMID:21372129

  19. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit phosphoinositide formation and chemotaxis in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, R I; Benincaso, A I; Knoell, C T; Larkin, J K; Austen, K F; Robinson, D R

    1993-01-01

    supplementation inhibits the autoamplification of the neutrophil inflammatory response by decreasing LTB4 formation through the inactivation of the LTA epoxide hydrolase and independently by inhibiting LTB4- (and PAF) stimulated chemotaxis by attenuating the formation of IP3 by the PI-selective phospholipase C. This is the initial demonstration that dietary omega-3 PUFA supplementation can suppress signal transduction at the level of the PI-specific phospholipase C in humans. Images PMID:8381824

  20. Ultra-structure and localisation of formazan formed by human neutrophils and amoebae phagocytosing virulent and avirulent Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Halablab, M A; Bazin, M; Richards, L; Pacy, J

    1990-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila (LP) strains of differing virulence were incubated with a solution of nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) at a concentration of 1 mg.ml-1 in the presence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga or human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). Reduction of NBT to formazan occurred at a faster rate in the presence of virulent strains. Reduction appeared to be temperature dependent; at 37 degrees C the reaction rate was higher than at 20 degrees C. On microscopic examination, deposits of formazan around Legionella cells were observed inside amoebae similar to those deposited in human neutrophils. Electron microscopy revealed electron-dense particles surrounding virulent legionellae, which appeared to be associated with formazan formation. Formazan formation inside amoebae may suggest the presence of a respiratory burst against LP, which is more intense with virulent strains.

  1. Bioactive secondary metabolites of a marine Bacillus sp. inhibit superoxide generation and elastase release in human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Jimmy; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chung, Pei-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-03

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils.

  2. A rapid microtiter plate method for the detection of lysozyme release from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Ludewig, R; Healy, C T

    1992-04-01

    An improved method was devised to measure lysozyme secreted from human neutrophils [polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)] using a microtiter plate reader capable of analyzing enzyme kinetics. The assay is an adaptation of the classical photometric method which detects changes in the turbidity of a bacterial suspension, Micrococcus lysodeikticus, caused by the enzymatic activity of lysozyme. A standard curve using chicken egg white lysozyme was generated, and activity was detectable between the range of 1 and 100 ng/ml. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-induced lysozyme release from human PMN was comparable in both the standard assay and the microtiter plate adaptation with EC50 values of 6.5 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Other select stimuli and their receptor antagonists were also used to evaluate the method. Dose-response curves for chemotactic hexapeptide (CHP), recombinant human C5a (rhC5a), and platelet-activating factor (PAF) resulted in EC50 values of 0.14, 0.80, and 542.00 nM, respectively. Inhibition of lysozyme release was studied using receptor antagonists N-t-Boc-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (N-t-Boc), LY223982, and protamine, which are putative inhibitors of formyl peptides (i.e., CHP), LTB4, and C5a, respectively. N-t-Boc inhibited CHP-induced (0.2 nM) enzyme release with an IC50 of 2 microM; LY223982 blocked LTB4-induced (20 nM) release resulting in an IC50 of 52 nM; and protamine inhibited rhC5a-induced (1.5 nM) release with an IC50 of 2 microM. Further studies revealed that CHP, LTB4, and rhC5a were selectively inhibited by their respective antagonists, albeit LY223982 and protamine were also weak inhibitors of CHP and LTB4, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Roles of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Candido, Saverio; Maestro, Roberta; Polesel, Jerry; Catania, Alessia; Maira, Francesca; Signorelli, Santo S; McCubrey, James A; Libra, Massimo

    2014-03-30

    Cancer remains one of the major cause of death in the Western world. Although, it has been demonstrated that new therapies can improve the outcome of cancer patients, still many patients relapse after treatment. Therefore, there is a need to identify novel factors involved in cancer development and/or progression. Recently, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) has been suggested as a key player in different cancer types. Its oncogenic effect may be related to the complex NGAL/MMP-9. In the present study, NGAL was analyzed at both transcript and protein levels in different cancer types by analysing 38 public available microarray datasets and the Human Protein Atlas tool. NGAL transcripts were significantly higher in the majority of solid tumors compared to the relative normal tissues for every dataset analyzed. Furthermore, concordance of NGAL at both mRNA and protein levels was observed for 6 cancer types including bladder, colorectal, liver, lung, ovarian, and pancreatic. All metastatic tumors showed a decrease of NGAL expression when compared to matched primary lesions. According to these results, NGAL is a candidate marker for tumor growth in a fraction of solid tumors. Further investigations are required to elucidate the function of NGAL in tumor development and metastatic processes.

  4. Cell Intrinsic Galectin-3 Attenuates Neutrophil ROS-Dependent Killing of Candida by Modulating CR3 Downstream Syk Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Yang; Huang, Juin-Hua; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chan, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Yee-Chun; Liu, Fu-Tong; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Neutrophils are the important effector cells in host resistance to candidiasis. To investigate the modulation of neutrophil fungicidal function will advance our knowledge on the control of candidiasis. While recombinant galectin-3 enhances neutrophil phagocytosis of Candida, we found that intracellular galectin-3 downregulates neutrophil fungicidal functions. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining reveal that cytosolic gal3 physically interacts with Syk in neutrophils after Candida stimulation. Gal3−/− neutrophils have higher level of Syk activation as well as greater abilities to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and kill Candida than gal3+/+ cells. While galectin-3 deficiency modulates neutrophil and macrophage activation and the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cells, the deficiency does not affect the numbers of infiltrating neutrophils or macrophages. Galectin-3 deficiency ameliorates systemic candidiasis by reducing fungal burden, renal pathology, and mortality. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrate that cell intrinsic galectin-3 negatively regulates neutrophil effector functions against candidiasis. Reducing galectin-3 expression or activity by siRNA or gal3 inhibitor TD139 enhances human neutrophil ROS production. Mice treated with TD139 have enhanced ability to clear the fungus. Our work unravels the mechanism by which galectin-3 regulates Syk-dependent neutrophil fungicidal functions and raises the possibility that blocking gal3 in neutrophils may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating systemic candidiasis. PMID:28217127

  5. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

  6. Expression of genes involved in initiation, regulation, and execution of apoptosis in human neutrophils and during neutrophil differentiation of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Santos-Beneit, A M; Mollinedo, F

    2000-05-01

    Neutrophils possess a very short lifespan, dying by apoptosis. HL-60 cells undergo apoptosis after neutrophil differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We have found that the onset of apoptosis in neutrophil-differentiating HL-60 cells correlates with the achievement of an apoptosis-related gene expression pattern similar to that of peripheral blood mature neutrophils. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and sequencing techniques, we have found that HL-60 cells express bak, bik, bax, bad, bcl-2, bcl-xL, bcl-w, bfl-1, fas, and caspases 1-4 and 7-10. After DMSO treatment, bak, bcl-w, bfl-1, fas, and caspases 1 and 9 were up-regulated, whereas bik, bcl-2, and caspases 2, 3, and 10 were down-regulated at different degrees, achieving mRNA expression levels that correlated with those detected in peripheral blood neutrophils. Caspase-2 mRNA and protein expression was drastically reduced after HL-60 cell differentiation, being absent in both HL-60-differentiated neutrophils and mature neutrophils, whereas caspase-3 and -10 mRNA and protein expression were diminished upon HL-60 cell differentiation until achieving the respective levels found in mature neutrophils. Bak and bfl-1 mRNA levels were largely increased during DMSO-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells, and these genes were the bcl-2 family members that were expressed most abundantly in mature neutrophils. Bcl-2 overexpression or caspase inhibition prevented differentiation-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells, but not their differentiation capability. Neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis was also blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-Asp-2,6-dichlorobenzoyloxymethylketone. Peripheral blood neutrophils expressed bak, bad, bcl-w, bfl-1, fas, and caspases 1, 3, 4, and 7-10, but hardly expressed bcl-2, bcl-xL, bik, bax, and caspase-2. These results suggest that the above gene expression changes in neutrophil-differentiating HL-60 cells may play a role in the acquisition of the neutrophil

  7. Constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, Timothy J.; Dixon, Padraic M.; Haslett, Christopher; Murray, Joanna; McGorum, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils, including assessment of factors that potentially modulate neutrophil survival through alteration of the rate of constitutive apoptosis. Cells underwent spontaneous time-dependent constitutive apoptosis when aged in culture for up to 36 h, developing the structural and functional features of apoptosis observed in many cell types, including human neutrophils. Neutrophils undergoing apoptosis also had diminished zymosan activated serum (ZAS)-stimulated chemiluminescence, but maintained responsiveness to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The constitutive rate of equine neutrophil apoptosis was promoted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor α and phagocytosis of opsonised ovine erythrocytes, while it was inhibited by dexamethasone and ZAS (a source of C5a). Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, platelet activating factor and PMA had no demonstrable effect on equine neutrophil apoptosis. There was a difference between equine and human neutrophil apoptosis in response to LPS and the time-dependence of the response to dexamethasone. PMID:25239298

  8. Constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brazil, Timothy J; Dixon, Padraic M; Haslett, Christopher; Murray, Joanna; McGorum, Bruce C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils, including assessment of factors that potentially modulate neutrophil survival through alteration of the rate of constitutive apoptosis. Cells underwent spontaneous time-dependent constitutive apoptosis when aged in culture for up to 36 h, developing the structural and functional features of apoptosis observed in many cell types, including human neutrophils. Neutrophils undergoing apoptosis also had diminished zymosan activated serum (ZAS)-stimulated chemiluminescence, but maintained responsiveness to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The constitutive rate of equine neutrophil apoptosis was promoted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor α and phagocytosis of opsonised ovine erythrocytes, while it was inhibited by dexamethasone and ZAS (a source of C5a). Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, platelet activating factor and PMA had no demonstrable effect on equine neutrophil apoptosis. There was a difference between equine and human neutrophil apoptosis in response to LPS and the time-dependence of the response to dexamethasone.

  9. Identification of Lys49-PLA2 from crude venom of Crotalus atrox as a human neutrophil-calcium modulating protein

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Md. Tipu; Li, Hong-Mei; Lee, Yong Zu

    2016-01-01

    We fortuitously observed a human neutrophil intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) increasing activity in the commercially available phosphodiesterase I (PDE I), which is actually dried crude venom of Crotalus atrox. As this activity was not observed with another commercially available pure PDE I, we tried to find out the causative molecule(s) present in 'crude' PDE, and identified Lys49-phospholipase A2 (Lys49-PLA2 or K49-PLA2), a catalytically inactive protein which belongs to the phospholipase A2 family, by activity-driven three HPLC (reverse phase, size exclusion, reverse phase) steps followed by SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. K49-PLA2 induced Ca2+ infl ux in human neutrophils without any cytotoxic eff ect. Two calcium channel inhibitors, 2-aminoetoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (30 µM) and SKF-96365 (20 µM) signifi cantly inhibited K49-PLA2-induced [Ca2+]i increase. These results suggest that K49-PLA2 modulates [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils via 2-APB- and SKF-96365-sensitive calcium channels without causing membrane disruption. PMID:26937214

  10. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  11. Expression and polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on human intestinal epithelia: consequences for CD11b/CD18-mediated interactions with neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Parkos, C. A.; Colgan, S. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Nusrat, A.; Liang, T. W.; Springer, T. A.; Madara, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epithelial dysfunction and patient symptoms in inflammatory intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease correlate with migration of neutrophils (PMN) across the intestinal epithelium. In vitro modeling of PMN transepithelial migration has revealed distinct differences from transendothelial migration. By using polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), PMN transepithelial migration has been shown to be dependent on the leukocyte integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1), but not on CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1). Since intercellular adhesion molecule-I (ICAM-1) is an important endothelial counterreceptor for these integrins, its expression in intestinal epithelia and role in PMN-intestinal epithelial interactions was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A panel of antibodies against different domains of ICAM-1, polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), and natural human colonic epithelia were used to examine the polarity of epithelial ICAM-1 surface expression and the functional role of ICAM-1 in neutrophil-intestinal epithelial adhesive interactions. RESULTS: While no surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected on unstimulated T84 cells, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) elicited a marked expression of ICAM-1 that selectively polarized to the apical epithelial membrane. Similarly, apically restricted surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected in natural human colonic epithelium only in association with active inflammation. With or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, physiologically directed (basolateral-to-apical) transepithelial migration of PMN was unaffected by blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to ICAM-1. In contrast, PMN migration across IFN gamma-stimulated monolayers in the reverse (apical-to-basolateral) direction was inhibited by anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. Adhesion studies revealed that T84 cells adhered selectively to purified CD11b/CD18 and such adherence, with or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, was unaffected by ICAM-1 m

  12. Harmine stimulates proliferation of human neural progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Vanja; Maciel, Renata de Moraes; Drummond, Hannah; Nascimento, Juliana M.; Trindade, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Harmine is the β-carboline alkaloid with the highest concentration in the psychotropic plant decoction Ayahuasca. In rodents, classical antidepressants reverse the symptoms of depression by stimulating neuronal proliferation. It has been shown that Ayahuasca presents antidepressant effects in patients with depressive disorder. In the present study, we investigated the effects of harmine in cell cultures containing human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs, 97% nestin-positive) derived from pluripotent stem cells. After 4 days of treatment, the pool of proliferating hNPCs increased by 71.5%. Harmine has been reported as a potent inhibitor of the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase (DYRK1A), which regulates cell proliferation and brain development. We tested the effect of analogs of harmine, an inhibitor of DYRK1A (INDY), and an irreversible selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO) but not DYRK1A (pargyline). INDY but not pargyline induced proliferation of hNPCs similarly to harmine, suggesting that inhibition of DYRK1A is a possible mechanism to explain harmine effects upon the proliferation of hNPCs. Our findings show that harmine enhances proliferation of hNPCs and suggest that inhibition of DYRK1A may explain its effects upon proliferation in vitro and antidepressant effects in vivo. PMID:27957390

  13. Tamoxifen Augments the Innate Immune Function of Neutrophils Through Modulation of Intracellular Ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Corriden, Ross; Hollands, Andrew; Olson, Joshua; Derieux, Jaclyn; Lopez, Justine; Chang, John T.; Gonzalez, David J.; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator widely used for the treatment of breast cancer. In addition to its activity as an estrogen receptor agonist/antagonist, tamoxifen also modulates sphingolipid biosynthesis, which has been shown to play an important role in the regulation of neutrophil activity. Here, we find that tamoxifen stimulation enhances several pro-inflammatory pathways in human neutrophils, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. The enhancement of NET production occurs via a ceramide/PKCζ-mediated pathway, and treatment with synthetic ceramide is sufficient to promote NET formation. Pretreatment of human neutrophils with tamoxifen boosts neutrophil bactericidal capacity against a variety of pathogens in vitro and enhances clearance of the leading human pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vivo. Our results suggest that tamoxifen, and the lipid signaling pathways it modulates, merit further exploration as targets for boosting host innate immune function. PMID:26458291

  14. Colocalization of elastase and myeloperoxidase in human blood and bone marrow neutrophils using a monoclonal antibody and immunogold.

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, E. M.; Beesley, J. E.; Pulford, K. A.; Breton-Gorius, J.; Mason, D. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have localized elastase in human blood and bone marrow neutrophils by immunoelectron microscopy using a monoclonal anti-human elastase antibody (NP 57) and compared its distribution with myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoferrin (LF), which mark primary and secondary neutrophil granule, respectively. Human bone marrow and blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), either unstimulated or after phagocytosis of latex microbeads, were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Ultrathin frozen sections were immunolabeled with NP 57, followed by an immunogold probe. In bone marrow granulocyte precursors elastase appeared simultaneously in the immature first granules of myeloblasts with MPO. As these granules became denser with maturation, labeling for both enzymes became weaker and sometimes negative (possibly due to masking of immunoreactivity). The ellipsoidal primary granules were strongly labeled by NP57. LF positive granules appeared later, at the myelocyte stage, and contained neither MPO nor elastase. In mature neutrophils, immunolabeling for elastase was found together with MPO in the large electron-dense primary granules and in a different granule population from the LF-positive secondary granules. Double labeling with two different-sized gold particles was used to compare the kinetics of degranulation of secondary and primary granules. The observation and the analysis of single phagosome content was made possible by this new technique. In conclusion, immunoelectron microscopy was used to show elastase in the primary granules of neutrophils, where it appears simultaneously with MPO. This technique has also allowed comparison of the kinetics of degranulation of both types of granules, and could be applied to different experimental and pathologic conditions. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2547320

  15. PADMA-28, a traditional tibetan herbal preparation inhibits the respiratory burst in human neutrophils, the killing of epithelial cells by mixtures of oxidants and pro-inflammatory agonists and peroxidation of lipids.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Sadovnik, M; Sallon, S; Milo-Goldzweig, I; Mechoulam, R; Breuer, A; Gibbs, D; Varani, J; Roberts, S; Cleator, E; Singh, N

    1999-01-01

    Both aqueous and methanolic fractions derived from the Tibetan preparation PADMA-28 (a mixture of 22 plants) used as an anti-atherosclerotic agent, and which is non-cytolytic to a variety of mammalian cells, were found to strongly inhibit (1) the killing of epithelial cells in culture induced by 'cocktails' comprising oxidants, membrane perforating agents and proteinases; (2) the generation of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence in human neutrophils stimulated by opsonized bacteria; (3) the peroxidation of intralipid (a preparation rich in phopholipids) induced in the presence of copper; and (4) the activity of neutrophil elastase. It is proposed that PADMA-28 might prove beneficial for the prevention of cell damage induced by synergism among pro-inflammatory agonists which is central in the initiation of tissue destruction in inflammatory and infectious conditions.

  16. The NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating oxidase from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1983-05-25

    A subcellular particulate fraction from normal neutrophils that was enriched in NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating activity (Gabig, T. G., Schervish, E. W., and Santinga, J. T. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4114-4119) has been further characterized. This preparation contained 0.25 +/- 0.02 nmol of flavin adenine dinucleotide/mg of protein and 0.28 +/- 0.01 nmol of cytochrome b/mg of protein. Measurable amounts of riboflavin or flavin mononucleotide were not present. The flavoprotein was completely resolved from the cytochrome b by selective bile salt extraction of the particulate oxidase fraction. The identical subcellular particulate fraction was studied in the neutrophils from two male patients with chronic granulomatous disease. The neutrophil oxidase fraction from one of the chronic granulomatous disease patients had a cytochrome b component that was spectrally abnormal, but a normal content of flavin adenine dinucleotide. The fraction from this patient's neutrophils corresponding to the resolved flavoprotein from normal cells had fluorescence excitation and emission spectra that were identical to the normal flavoprotein. The neutrophil oxidase fraction from the second chronic granulomatous disease patient had a quantitatively and spectrally normal cytochrome b but less than 8% of the normal amount of flavin adenine dinucleotide. The fraction from the latter patient's neutrophils corresponding to the resolved flavoprotein from normal cells had no detectable flavoprotein by fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. It is postulated that these two patients represent distinct mutants in two separate components of the neutrophil NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating oxidase system, flavoprotein and cytochrome b.

  17. Dynamic NETosis is Carried Out by Live Neutrophils in Human and Mouse Bacterial Abscesses and During Severe Gram-Positive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yipp, Bryan G.; Petri, Björn; Salina, Davide; Jenne, Craig N.; Scott, Brittney N. V.; Zbytnuik, Lori D.; Pittman, Keir; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Wu, Kaiyu; Meijndert, H. Christopher; Malawista, Stephen E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, Anne; Zhang, Kunyan; Conly, John; Kubes, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released, as neutrophils die in vitro, in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap for invasive microbes to exploit. Functional neutrophils undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live PMN in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMN developed diffuse decondensed nuclei ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei displayed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A combined requirement of Tlr2 and complement mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally live human PMN developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection, non-cell death NETosis occurs in vivo during Gram-positive infection in mice and humans. PMID:22922410

  18. Noncanonical NF-κB mediates the Suppressive Effect of Neutrophil Elastase on IL-8/CXCL8 by Inducing NKRF in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shu-Chuan; Wu, Sheng-Ming; Feng, Po-Hao; Liu, Wen-Te; Chen, Kuan-Yuan; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Chan, Yao-Fei; Kuo, Lu-Wei; Lee, Kang-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) suppresses IL-8/CXCL8 in human airway smooth muscle cells (hASM) while stimulating its production in respiratory epithelial cells. This differential effect is mediated by the selective induction of NKRF and dysregulation in chronic inflammatory diseases. We hypothesized that the differential activation of NF-κB subunits confer the opposite effect of NKRF on IL-8/CXCL8 in primary hASM and A549 cells stimulated with NE. The events occurring at the promoters of NKRF and IL-8/CXCL8 were observed by ChIP assays, and the functional role of RelB was confirmed by knockdown and overexpression. Although p65 was stimulated in both cell types, RelB was only activated in NE-treated hASM, as confirmed by NF-κB DNA binding ELISA, Western blotting and confocal microscopy. Knockdown of RelB abolished the induction of NKRF and converted the suppression of IL-8/CXCL8 to stimulation. The forced expression of RelB induced NKRF production in hASM and A549 cells. NE activated the NIK/IKK1/RelB non-canonical NF-κB pathway in hASM but not in A549. The nuclear-translocated RelB was recruited to the NKRF promoter around the putative κB site, accompanied by p52 and RNA polymerase II. In conclusion, NFRF is a novel RelB-response gene, and NE is a stimulator of the non-canonical RelB/NF-κB pathway in hASM. PMID:28322300

  19. Resonance Raman microspectroscopy of myeloperoxidase and cytochrome b558 in human neutrophilic granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sijtsema, N M; Otto, C; Segers-Nolten, G M; Verhoeven, A J; Greve, J

    1998-01-01

    With (resonance) Raman microscospectroscopy, it is possible to investigate the chemical constitution of a very small volume (0.5 fl) in a living cell. We have measured resonance Raman spectra in the cytoplasm of living normal, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-deficient, and cytochrome b558-deficient neutrophils and in isolated specific and azurophilic granule fractions, using an excitation wavelength of 413.1 nm. Similar experiments were performed after reduction of the redox centers by the addition of sodium dithionite. The specific and azurophilic granules in both redox states appeared to have clearly distinguishable Raman spectra when exciting at a wavelength of 413.1 nm. The azurophilic granules and the cytochrome b558-deficient neutrophils showed Raman spectra similar to that of the isolated MPO. The spectra of the specific granules and the MPO-deficient neutrophils corresponded very well to published cytochrome b558 spectra. The resonance Raman spectrum of the cytoplasmic region of normal neutrophilic granulocytes could be fitted with a combination of the spectra of the specific and azurophilic granules, which shows that the Raman signal of neutrophilic granulocytes mainly originates from MPO and cytochrome b558, at an excitation wavelength of 413.1 nm. PMID:9635778

  20. Solubilization of the O2(-)-forming activity responsible for the respiratory burst in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Kipnes, R S; Babior, B M

    1978-10-10

    On exposure to suitable activating agents, neutrophils sharply alter their oxygen metabolism, showing large increases in oxygen uptake, O2 and H2O2 production, and glucose consumption via the hexose monophosphate shunt. These metabolic alterations, which together are designated the "respiratory burst," are due to the activation of a system which catalyzes the reaction: 2O2 + NADPH leads to 2O2(-) + NADP. This O2(-)-forming system is found in a particulate fraction isolated from neutrophils which had been activated with opsonized zymosan. When these particles were treated with detergent under suitable conditions, the O2(-)-forming activity was released in a form which passed through a membrane filter capable of retaining species of Mr greater than 3000,000. Soluble O2(-)-forming activity was obtained from normal activated neutrophils, but not from normal resting neutrophils or from activated neutrophils obtained from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, an inherited condition in which the respiratory burst is defective. O2(-)production by the soluble system required a reduced pyridine nucleotide as electron donor, and showed a quadratic dependence on the concentration of the solubilized preparation.

  1. Attachment to fibronectin or vitronectin makes human neutrophil migration sensitive to alterations in cytosolic free calcium concentration

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, appear to be required for the migration of human neutrophils on poly-D- lysine-coated glass in the presence of dilute serum (Marks, P. W., and F. R. Maxfield. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:43-52). In contrast, no requirement for [Ca2+]i transients exists when neutrophils migrate on albumin-coated glass in the absence of serum. To determine the mechanism that necessitates [Ca2+]i transients on poly-D-lysine in the presence of serum, migration was examined on substrates consisting of purified adhesive glycoproteins. In the absence of external Ca2+, a treatment which causes the cessation of [Ca2+]i transients, migration on fibronectin (fn) and vitronectin (vn) was significantly inhibited. Migration was also inhibited in Ca2(+)-buffered cells on these substrates, indicating that this effect was the result of an alteration of [Ca2+]i. In the absence of external Ca2+, the inhibition of migration on fn or vn was more pronounced when soluble fn or vn was added to cells migrating on these substrates. This effect of soluble adhesive glycoprotein was specific: in the absence of external Ca2+, soluble fn did not affect the migration of cells on vn, and soluble vn did not affect the migration on fn. No additional inhibition of migration was observed in Ca2(+)-buffered cells with the addition of soluble adhesive glycoprotein. These data indicate that [Ca2+]i transients are involved in continued migration of human neutrophils on fn or vn, proteins which are part of the extracellular matrix that neutrophils encounter in vivo. PMID:1702443

  2. Effect of monodesethyl amodiaquine on human polymorphonuclear neutrophil functions in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Labro, M T; el Benna, J

    1991-01-01

    We have previously observed that the antimalarial drug amodiaquine impairs the human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) oxidative burst in vitro. However, the drug acted at a concentration of 100 micrograms/ml, far higher than that which is achievable therapeutically. Since amodiaquine is extensively metabolized into monodesethyl amodiaquine, we investigated whether the metabolite modified PMN functions at lower concentrations than amodiaquine does. Monodesethyl amodiaquine strongly depressed PMN chemotaxis and phagocytosis at concentrations as low as 10 micrograms/ml. This inhibition was reversed by washing out the drug. The PMN oxidative burst was markedly depressed by monodesethyl amodiaquine, whatever the assay technique (luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence, myeloperoxidase activity) or stimulus used (opsonized zymosan, phorbol myristate acetate, formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine). There were extreme interindividual variations in sensitivity to the depressive effect of monodesethyl amodiaquine when the PMN oxidative burst was assayed in terms of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence or lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence. PMN samples were divided into two groups on the basis of the MIC of the drug: 60% of the samples were "highly sensitive," being strongly inhibited at concentrations as low as 0.1 micrograms/ml (obtained during therapy), whereas the "moderately sensitive" samples were inhibited at concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml and above. The difference between the two groups was highly significant. This PMN sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of the drug was not related to intrinsic oxidative metabolism. Our data indicate that monodesethyl amodiaquine, the main metabolite of amodiaquine, has a far stronger inhibitory effect on various PMN functions in vitro than the parent drug, warranting relevant in vivo studies. PMID:1649569

  3. Oxygen radicals induce human endothelial cells to express GMP-140 and bind neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The initial step in extravasation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) to the extravascular space is adherence to the endothelium. We examined the effect of oxidants on this process by treating human endothelial cells with H2O2, t-butylhydroperoxide, or menadione. This resulted in a surface adhesive for PMN between 1 and 4 h after exposure. The oxidants needed to be present only for a brief period at the initiation of the assay. Adhesion was an endothelial cell- dependent process that did not require an active response from the PMN. The adhesive molecule was not platelet-activating factor, which mediates PMN adherence when endothelial cells are briefly exposed to higher concentrations of H2O2 (Lewis, M. S., R. E. Whatley, P. Cain, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, and G. A. Zimmerman. 1988. J. Clin. Invest. 82:2045-2055), nor was it ELAM-1, an adhesive glycoprotein induced by cytokines. Oxidant-induced adhesion did not require protein synthesis, was inhibited by antioxidants, and, when peroxides were the oxidants, was inhibited by intracellular iron chelators. Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140) is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that can be translocated from its intracellular storage pool to the surface of endothelial cells where it acts as a ligand for PMN adhesion (Geng, J.-G., M. P. Bevilacqua, K. L. Moore, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, J. M. Kim, G. A. Bliss, G. A. Zimmerman, and R. P. McEver. 1990. Nature (Lond). 343:757-760). We found that endothelial cells exposed to oxidants expressed GMP-140 on their surface, and that an mAb against GMP-140 or solubilized GMP-140 completely blocked PMN adherence to oxidant-treated endothelial cells. Thus, exposure of endothelial cells to oxygen radicals induces the prolonged expression of GMP-140 on the cell surface, which results in enhanced PMN adherence. PMID:1704376

  4. Cellular Uptake of Two Fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghaffar, H.; Vazifeh, D.; Labro, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed the cellular accumulation of two new fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro. Both compounds were rapidly taken up by PMN, with a cellular-to-extracellular concentration ratio (C/E) of about 141 (HMR 3562) and 117 (HMR 3787) at 5 min, and this was followed by a plateau at 60 to 180 min, with a C/E of >300 at 180 min. Both ketolides were mainly located in PMN granules (about 75%) and egressed slowly from loaded cells (about 40% at 60 min), owing to avid reuptake. Uptake was moderately sensitive to external pH, and activation energy was also moderate (about 70 kJ/mol). As with other macrolides and ketolides, the existence of an active transport system was suggested by (i) the strong interindividual variability in uptake kinetics, suggesting variability in the number or activity of a transport protein; (ii) the saturation kinetics characteristic of a carrier-mediated transport system (Vmax, about 2,300 ng/2.5 × 106 PMN/5 min; Km, about 50 μg/ml); (iii) the inhibitory effects of Ni2+ (a blocker of the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger), phorbol myristate acetate (a protein kinase C activator), and H89 (a protein kinase A inhibitor). Although these two ketolides are more related to HMR 3647 (telithromycin), it is interesting that the presence of a fluoride gave these molecules a cellular pharmacokinetics more like those of HMR 3004 than those of HMR 3647. The macrolide transport system has not been yet elucidated, but our data confirm that, despite variations in chemical structure, all erythromycin A derivatives share a transmembrane transport system. PMID:11557472

  5. Human neutrophil antigen profiles in Banjar, Bugis, Champa, Jawa and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Manaf, Siti M.; NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z.A.; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Norazmi, Mohd N.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Edinur, Hisham A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human neutrophil antigens (HNA) are polymorphic and immunogenic proteins involved in the pathogenesis of neonatal alloimmune neutropenia, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-related alloimmune neutropenia. The characterisation of HNA at a population level is important for predicting the risk of alloimmunisation associated with blood transfusion and gestation and for anthropological studies. Materials and methods Blood samples from 192 healthy, unrelated Malays were collected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (HNA-1, -3, -4) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (HNA-5). The group comprised 30 Banjar, 37 Bugis, 51 Champa, 39 Jawa and 35 Kelantan Malays. Results The most common HNA alleles in the Malays studied were HNA-1a (0.641–0.765), -3a (0.676–0.867), -4a (0.943–1.000) and -5a (0.529–0.910). According to principal coordinate plots constructed using HNA allele frequencies, the Malay sub-ethnic groups are closely related and grouped together with other Asian populations. The risks of TRALI or neonatal neutropenia were not increased for subjects with HNA-1, -3 and -4 loci even for donor and recipient or pairs from different Malay sub-ethnic groups. Nonetheless, our estimates showed significantly higher risks of HNA alloimmunisation during pregnancy and transfusion between Malays and other genetically differentiated populations such as Africans and Europeans. Discussion This study reports HNA allele and genotype frequencies for the five Malay sub-ethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia for the first time. These Malay sub-ethnic groups show closer genetic relationships with other Asian populations than with Europeans and Africans. The distributions of HNA alleles in other lineages of people living in Malaysia (e.g. Chinese, Indian and Orang Asli) would be an interesting subject for future study. PMID:26057487

  6. The respiratory burst oxidase of human neutrophils. Further studies of the purified enzyme.

    PubMed

    Glass, G A; DeLisle, D M; DeTogni, P; Gabig, T G; Magee, B H; Markert, M; Babior, B M

    1986-10-05

    A superoxide-forming oxidase from activated human neutrophil membranes was solubilized by two slightly different methods, then purified by "dye-affinity" chromatography. Kinetic studies of the purified preparations gave Vmax values of 5-10 mumol of O-2/min/mg of protein, and Km values for NADH and NADPH that were in reasonable agreement with values determined previously using particulate and crude solubilized preparations of the respiratory burst oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed prominent bands at 67, 48, and 32 kDa, together with some minor contaminants, whereas gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions gave a single major band that when eluted and re-electrophoresed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate showed bands at 67, 48, 32 kDa. We believe that all three bands represent oxidase components. The flavin content of the purified enzyme was 20.4 +/- 2.0 S.E. pmol of FAD/microgram of protein, whereas heme averaged 0.1 +/- 0.02 pmol/microgram and ubiquinone could not be detected. Assuming that the enzyme is composed of one 67-kDa subunit, one 48-kDa subunit, and one 32-kDa subunit (i.e. that its molecular mass is approximately 150 kDa), it can be calculated to have a turnover number of 700-1500 min-1, in agreement with a value reported previously for oxidase in a particulate O-2-forming system (Cross, A. R., Parkinson, J. F., and Jones, O. T. G. (1985) Biochem. J. 226, 881-884), and to contain the following quantities of redox carriers (mol/mol): FAD, 3.0; heme, 0.015; ubiquinone, less than 0.06. It remains to be determined whether this preparation represents the complete respiratory burst oxidase or is only the pyridine nucleotide dehydrogenating component of a more complex enzyme.

  7. Oviduct-specific expression of human neutrophil defensin 4 in lentivirally generated transgenic chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxin; Wu, Hanyu; Cao, Dainan; Li, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yaqiong; Li, Ning; Hu, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    The expression of oviduct-specific recombinant proteins in transgenic chickens is a promising technology for the production of therapeutic biologics in eggs. In this study, we constructed a lentiviral vector encoding an expression cassette for human neutrophil defensin 4 (HNP4), a compound that displays high activity against Escherichia coli, and produced transgenic chickens that expressed the recombinant HNP4 protein in egg whites. After the antimicrobial activity of the recombinant HNP4 protein was tested at the cellular level, a 2.8-kb ovalbumin promoter was used to drive HNP4 expression specifically in oviduct tissues. From 669 injected eggs, 218 chickens were successfully hatched. Ten G0 roosters, with semens identified as positive for the transgene, were mated with wild-type hens to generate G1 chickens. From 1,274 total offspring, fifteen G1 transgenic chickens were positive for the transgene, which was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The results of the Southern blotting and genome walking indicated that a single copy of the HNP4 gene was integrated into chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 of the chickens. As expected, HNP4 expression was restricted to the oviduct tissues, and the levels of both transcriptional and translational HNP4 expression varied greatly in transgenic chickens with different transgene insertion sites. The amount of HNP4 protein expressed in the eggs of G1 and G2 heterozygous transgenic chickens ranged from 1.65 μg/ml to 10.18 μg/ml. These results indicated that the production of transgenic chickens that expressed HNP4 protein in egg whites was successful.

  8. Human neutrophil clearance of bacterial pathogens triggers anti-microbial γδ T cell responses in early infection.

    PubMed

    Davey, Martin S; Lin, Chan-Yu; Roberts, Gareth W; Heuston, Sinéad; Brown, Amanda C; Chess, James A; Toleman, Mark A; Gahan, Cormac G M; Hill, Colin; Parish, Tanya; Williams, John D; Davies, Simon J; Johnson, David W; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Human blood Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells, monocytes and neutrophils share a responsiveness toward inflammatory chemokines and are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. Studying their interaction in vitro and relating these findings to in vivo observations in patients may therefore provide crucial insight into inflammatory events. Our present data demonstrate that Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells provide potent survival signals resulting in neutrophil activation and the release of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL8 (IL-8). In turn, Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells readily respond to neutrophils harboring phagocytosed bacteria, as evidenced by expression of CD69, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. This response is dependent on the ability of these bacteria to produce the microbial metabolite (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP), requires cell-cell contact of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with accessory monocytes through lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and results in a TNF-α dependent proliferation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells. The antibiotic fosmidomycin, which targets the HMB-PP biosynthesis pathway, not only has a direct antibacterial effect on most HMB-PP producing bacteria but also possesses rapid anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting γδ T cell responses in vitro. Patients with acute peritoneal-dialysis (PD)-associated bacterial peritonitis--characterized by an excessive influx of neutrophils and monocytes into the peritoneal cavity--show a selective activation of local Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells by HMB-PP producing but not by HMB-PP deficient bacterial pathogens. The γδ T cell-driven perpetuation of inflammatory responses during acute peritonitis is associated with elevated peritoneal levels of γδ T cells and TNF-α and detrimental clinical outcomes in infections caused by HMB-PP positive microorganisms. Taken together, our findings indicate a direct link between invading pathogens, neutrophils, monocytes and microbe-responsive γδ T cells in early

  9. Flow cytometric study of in vitro neutrophil activation by biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gorbet, M B; Yeo, E L; Sefton, M V

    1999-03-05

    Neutrophil activation for adherent and nonadherent cells, as measured by flow cytometry, was not strongly dependent on material surface chemistry. We had hypothesized that material-induced neutrophil activation was an important parameter associated with material failure. All materials tested [cellophane, an acrylonitrile copolymer (AN69), Pellethane, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, low density polyethylene, and polydimethylsiloxane] activated isolated human neutrophils, which were resuspended in plasma or serum, to similar extents based on L-selectin shedding, CD11b upregulation, and stimulation of the oxidative burst after 30-min exposure. Inhibition of complement activation by sCR1 unexpectedly had little effect if any on nonadherent neutrophils. However, neutrophil adhesion, but not the level of activation of the adherent cells, was strongly dependent on complement activation. Pretreatment with albumin did not inhibit adhesion or reduce neutrophil activation, but plasma pretreatment resulted in increased activation for nonadherent and adherent cells. More adhesion and a higher level of activation of adherent cells was observed following pretreatment with fibrinogen, a ligand of CD11b. Taken together these results suggest that upon contact with a material, neutrophil activation may occur though mechanisms that are not mediated by complement. For example, the presence of plasma proteins such as fibrinogen at the interface may trigger activation and the release of other activating agents. Although the material differences are small, the extent of activation may be significant and warrant further study of the mechanism and consequences of that activation.

  10. High concentrations of glucose reduce the oxidative metabolism of dog neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dogs are commonly affected by hyperglycemic conditions. Hyperglycemia compromises the immune response and favors bacterial infections; however, reports on the effects of glucose on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and apoptosis are conflicting in humans and rare in dogs. Considering the many complex factors that affect neutrophil oxidative metabolism in vivo, we investigated in vitro the specific effect of high concentrations of glucose on superoxide production and apoptosis rate in neutrophils from healthy dogs. Results The capacity of the neutrophils to reduce tetrazolium nitroblue decreased significantly in the higher concentration of glucose (15.13 ± 9.73% (8 mmol/L) versus 8.93 ± 5.71% (16 mmol/L)). However, there were no changes in tetrazolium nitroblue reduction at different glucose concentrations when the neutrophils were first activated with phorbol myristate acetate. High concentrations of glucose did not affect the viability and apoptosis rate of canine neutrophils either with or without prior camptothecin stimulation. This study provides the first evidence that high concentrations of glucose inhibit the oxidative metabolism of canine neutrophils in vitro in a manner similar to that which occurs in humans, and that the decrease in superoxide production did not increase the apoptosis rate. Conclusions A high concentration of glucose reduces the oxidative metabolism of canine neutrophils in vitro. It is likely that glucose at high concentrations rapidly affects membrane receptors responsible for the activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils; therefore, the nonspecific immune response can be compromised in dogs with acute and chronic hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:23388121

  11. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits. PMID:27907124

  12. Engagement of beta2 integrins recruits 14-3-3 proteins to c-Cbl in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Melander, Fredrik; Andersson, Tommy; Dib, Karim

    2004-05-14

    We found that engagement of beta2 integrins on human neutrophils triggered both tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of c-Cbl. Pretreatment of the neutrophils with the broad range protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF-109203X blocked the serine but not the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl. Moreover, the Src kinase inhibitor PP1 prevented the beta2 integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl but not the simultaneous serine phosphorylation. These results indicate that Src family kinases and PKC can separately modulate the properties of c-Cbl. Indeed, tyrosine kinase-dependent phosphorylation of c-Cbl regulated the ubiquitin ligase activity of that protein, whereas PKC-dependent phosphorylation of c-Cbl had no such effect. Instead, c-Cbl that underwent PKC-induced serine phosphorylation associated with the scaffolding and anti-apoptotic 14-3-3 proteins. Consequently, c-Cbl can independently target proteins for degradation or intracellular localization and may initiate an anti-apoptotic signal in neutrophils.

  13. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  14. Phenotypic differences of human neutrophils of carriers of the PSGL-1 A and B-allele in binding to immobilised P-selectin under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Meyer dos Santos, Sascha; Klinkhardt, Ute; Lang, Katharina; Parisius, Jeannine; Kuczka, Karina; Harder, Sebastian

    2011-02-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) interacts with P-selectin expressed on endothelial cells and platelets. PSGL-1 extracellular mucin-like domain displays a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) polymorphism. The wildtype consists of 16 decameric repeats (designated A isoforms) and variants with 15 (B allele) and 14 (C allele) repeats that are assumed to be associated with reduced risk of vascular disease. We investigated the adhesion of these natural variants to P-selectin in native human neutrophils. Healthy volunteers were genotyped and the adhesion of neutrophils expressing the PSGL-1 isoforms A/A, A/B and B/B were studied under static and physiologic flow conditions. Homozygous B/B neutrophils attached significantly weaker to P-selectin at elevated shear rates from 24 up to 64 dyn/cm(2) than A/A and A/B neutrophils. No difference in adhesion rate was found under static conditions and shear stress below 24 dyn/cm(2), but B/B neutrophils rolled significantly faster than A/A neutrophils at shear stress ≥ 12 dyn/cm(2). There was no difference in the adhesive capacity between A/A an A/B neutrophils. These data support the view that the role of the decamers is to extend the ligand binding domain far above the cell surface to support stable leukocyte adhesion and rolling.

  15. Leukotriene A4 modulates generation of leukotriene B4 and sulphidopeptide leukotrienes by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Hilger, R A; König, W

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the influence of exogenous leukotriene A4 (LTA4) on the reactivity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN). PMN were either prestimulated with LTA4 or incubated simultaneously with LTA4 and the Ca ionophore A23187 or sodium fluoride (NaF). The Ca ionophore A23187 and NaF induced generation of LTB4 from PMN was significantly diminished in the presence of LTA4 while the formation of LTC4 was enhanced. In contrast, preincubation of cells with LTA4 followed by subsequent stimulation with NaF synergistically increased the LTB4 generation from PMN. LTA4, either alone or in combination with the calcium ionophore A23187 or NaF, decreases GTPase activity in human PMN. This decrease was abolished when LTA4 pretreated cells were subsequently stimulated with NaF, but not with calcium ionophore A23187, suggesting a regulatory role of LTA4 on G-proteins. The results demonstrate dual functions of LTA4: it serves as a substrate for the generation of leukotrienes and also regulates the susceptibility of human PMN for subsequent response. PMID:1335961

  16. Phenol-soluble modulin α4 mediates Staphylococcus aureus-associated vascular leakage by stimulating heparin-binding protein release from neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    li, Lin; Pian, Yaya; Chen, Shaolong; Hao, Huaijie; Zheng, Yuling; Zhu, Li; Xu, Bin; Liu, Keke; Li, Min; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Vascular leakage frequently occurs in patients with severe Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the mechanism underlying S. aureus infection-induced vascular leakage remains unclear. Here, we identified the S. aureus virulence factor phenol-soluble modulin (PSM)α4 from the culture supernatant of strain USA300 as a stimulator of heparin-binding protein (HBP) release from polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and demonstrated that PSMα4-induced HBP release from PMNs leads to vascular leakage. PSMα4 appeared less cytolytic than PSMα1–3 and was insensitive to lipoproteins; it significantly increased myeloperoxidase and elastase release from PMNs and cell surface CD63 expression in PMNs. PSMα4-induced HBP release required formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and depended on Ca2+ influx and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Thus, PSMα4 may stimulate HBP release by activating FPR2 and PI3K to initiate PMN degranulation. PSMα4-induced HBP release from PMNs increased endothelial cell monolayer permeability in vitro and induced vascular leakage in mice. This novel function of PSMα4 may contribute to the pathogenesis of S. aureus and may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27383625

  17. Prompt inhibition of fMLP-induced Ca2+ mobilization by parenteral lipid emulsions in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert; Rops, Angelique; van Emst-De Vries, Sjenet E; Naber, Ton; Willems, Peter H G M

    2002-04-01

    It remains unclear whether modulation of immune system functions by lipids contributes to the increased infection rate observed in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. We therefore evaluated the effects of lipid emulsions derived from fish oil [very long chain triglycerides (VLCT)], olive oil [long-chain triglycerides- mono-unsaturated fatty acid (LCT-MUFA)], soya oil [long-chain triglycerides (LCT)], or a physical mixture of coconut and soya oil [mixed long- and medium-chain triglycerides (LCT-MCT)] on neutrophil activation. N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) evoked an immediate increase of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+](i,av)) in a suspension of neutrophils. When added 3 min before fMLP, however, all four lipid emulsions reduced the hormone-induced increase in [Ca2+](i,av) with the same efficacy but with different potency. Half-maximal inhibition was reached at emulsion concentrations of 0.24 mM VLCT, 0.32 mM LCT-MCT, 0.52 mM LCT, and 0.82 mM LCT-MUFA. Similarly to the lipids, the protein kinase C (PKC) activator PMA markedly reduced the fMLP-induced increase in [Ca2+](i,av). PMA inhibition was abolished by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. In contrast, however, this drug did not interfere with the inhibitory lipid effect, indicating that the lipids act primarily in a PKC-independent manner. In summary, this study shows that nutritional lipids can evoke a prompt and significant attenuation of hormone-induced neutrophil stimulation and that the emulsions based on fish oil and a mixture of coconut oil and soya oil are among the most potent ones in this respect.

  18. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, María A.; Carretta, María D.; Teuber, Stefanie E.; Zárate, Cristian; Cárcamo, Leonardo; Concha, Ilona I.; Burgos, Rafael A.

    2015-01-01

    N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor) inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils. PMID:26634216

  19. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, María A; Carretta, María D; Teuber, Stefanie E; Zárate, Cristian; Cárcamo, Leonardo; Concha, Ilona I; Burgos, Rafael A

    2015-01-01

    N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor) inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils.

  20. The Priming Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Interleukin-1 on Canine Neutrophils Stimulated with Interleukin-8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    production .............................. 65 1 CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION Cytokines Cytokines are a family of heterogeneous glycoproteins that stimulate many...digest invading bacteria can destroy surrounding healthy tissues. Unexpectedly high levels of Interleukin-8 have keen demonstrated in lesions of psoriasis ...cell responsible for localizing, digesting, and killing invading microorganisms. It is also the prevalent leukocyte in the peripheral circulation. The

  1. Cloning of cDNA for proteinase 3: a serine protease, antibiotic, and autoantigen from human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Closely similar but nonidentical NH2-terminal amino acid sequences have been reported for a protein or proteins in human neutrophils whose bioactivities is/are diverse (as a serine protease, antibiotic, and Wegener's granulomatosis autoantigen) but that share(s) several features: localization in the azurophil granules, a molecular mass of approximately 29 kD, reactivity with diisopropylfluorophosphate, and the ability to degrade elastin. We previously purified one such entity, termed p29b. Using a monospecific antibody, we have cloned from human bone marrow a cDNA encoding the complete p29b protein in its mature form, along with pre- and pro-sequences. The predicted amino acid sequence agrees closely with the NH2-terminal sequence obtained previously from purified p29b, as well as with sequences newly obtained from CNBr fragments. The primary structure is highly homologous to elastase, cathepsin G, T cell granzymes, and other serine proteases, and shares both the catalytic triad and substrate binding pocket of elastase. Hybridization of the full-length cDNA with restriction enzyme digests of human genomic DNA revealed only one fragment. This suggests that the closely related species described previously are the same, and can be subsumed by the term used for the first-described activity, proteinase 3. Proteinase 3 is more abundant in neutrophils than elastase and has a similar proteolytic profile and specific activity. Thus, proteinase 3 may share the role previously attributed to neutrophil elastase in tissue damage, and has the potential to function as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:2258701

  2. Human neutrophil elastase inhibition studied by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection and microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Syntia, Fayad; Nehmé, Reine; Claude, Bérengère; Morin, Philippe

    2016-01-29

    Capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CZE-LIF) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) were used for the first time to study the inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We recently studied HNE kinetics (Km and Vmax) by developing an in-capillary CZE-LIF assay based on transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles (TDLFP) for reactant mixing. In this work, the former assay was adapted to monitor HNE inhibition. Two natural well known HNE inhibitors from the triterpene family, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid, were tested to validate the developed assay. Since the solubility of pentacyclic triterpenes in aqueous media where the enzymatic reaction will take place is limited, the effect of DMSO and ethanol on HNE was studied using microscale thermophoresis (MST). An agglomeration of the enzyme was revealed when preparing the inhibitor in 5% (v/v) DMSO. This phenomenon did not occur in the presence of ethanol. Therefore, ethanol was used as inhibitor solvent, at a limited percentage of 20% (v/v). In these conditions and after optimization of the TDLFP approach, the repeatability (RSD on migration times and peak-areas inferior to 2.2%) of the CZE-LIF assay and the sensitivity (LOQ of few nM) were found to be satisfactory for conducting inhibition assays. IC50 values for ursolic and oleanolic acid were successfully determined. They were respectively equal to 5.62±0.10μM (r(2)=0.9807; n=3) and to 8.21±0.23μM (r(2)=0.9887; n=3). Excellent agreement was found between the results obtained by CE and those reported in literature which validates the developed method. Particularly, the CE-based assay is able to rank HNE inhibitors relative to each other. Furthermore, MST technique was used for evaluating HNE interaction with the ursolic acid. Up to 16 capillaries were automatically processed to obtain in one titration experiment the dissociation constant for the HNE-ursolic acid complex. Ki was found to be 2.72±0.66μM (n=3) which is in excellent agreement

  3. Selective inhibition of extracellular oxidants liberated from human neutrophils--A new mechanism potentially involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Jančinová, Viera; Pažoureková, Silvia; Lucová, Marianna; Perečko, Tomáš; Mihalová, Danica; Bauerová, Katarína; Nosáľ, Radomír; Drábiková, Katarína

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxychloroquine is used in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis or lupus erythematosus. Although these diseases are often accompanied by activation of neutrophils, there are still few data relating to the impact of hydroxychloroquine on these cells. We investigated the effect of orally administered hydroxychloroquine on neutrophil oxidative burst in rats with adjuvant arthritis. In human neutrophils, extra- and intracellular formation of oxidants, mobilisation of intracellular calcium and the phosphorylation of proteins regulating NADPH oxidase assembly were analysed. Administration of hydroxychloroquine decreased the concentration of oxidants in blood of arthritic rats. The inhibition was comparable with the reference drug methotrexate, yet it was not accompanied by a reduction in neutrophil count. When both drugs were co-applied, the effect became more pronounced. In isolated human neutrophils, treatment with hydroxychloroquine resulted in reduced mobilisation of intracellular calcium, diminished concentration of external oxidants and in decreased phosphorylation of Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C isoforms PKCα and PKCβII, which regulate activation of NADPH oxidase on plasma membrane. On the other hand, no reduction was observed in intracellular oxidants or in the phosphorylation of p40(phox) and PKCδ, two proteins directing the oxidase assembly to intracellular membranes. Hydroxychloroquine reduced neutrophil-derived oxidants potentially involved in tissue damage and protected those capable to suppress inflammation. The observed effects may represent a new mechanism involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of this drug.

  4. Rac2 GTPase activation by angiotensin II is modulated by Ca2+/calcineurin and mitogen-activated protein kinases in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    El Bekay, Rajaa; Alba, Gonzalo; Reyes, M Edith; Chacón, Pedro; Vega, Antonio; Martín-Nieto, José; Jiménez, Juan; Ramos, Eladio; Oliván, Josefina; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2007-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) highly stimulates superoxide anion production by neutrophils. The G-protein Rac2 modulates the activity of NADPH oxidase in response to various stimuli. Here, we describe that Ang II induced both Rac2 translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and Rac2 GTP-binding activity. Furthermore, Clostridium difficile toxin A, an inhibitor of the Rho-GTPases family Rho, Rac and Cdc42, prevented Ang II-elicited O2-/ROS production, phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, and Rac2 activation. Rac2 GTPase inhibition by C. difficile toxin A was accompanied by a robust reduction of the cytosolic Ca(2)(+) elevation induced by Ang II in human neutrophils. Furthermore, SB203580 and PD098059 act as inhibitors of p38MAPK and ERK1/2 respectively, wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, and cyclosporin A, a calcineurin inhibitor, hindered both translocation of Rac2 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and enhancement of Rac2 GTP-binding elicited by Ang II. These results provide evidence that the activation of Rac2 by Ang II is exerted through multiple signalling pathways, involving Ca(2)(+)/calcineurin and protein kinases, the elucidation of which should be insightful in the design of new therapies aimed at reversing the inflammation of vessel walls found in a number of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B.; Konrad, Peter E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients (n=7) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.23  J/cm2. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at 1.09  J/cm2 and a 2∶1 safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans. PMID:26157986

  6. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan M; Wells, Jonathon D; Malphrus, Jonathan D; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B; Konrad, Peter E; Jansen, E Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients ([Formula: see text]) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and [Formula: see text]. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at [Formula: see text] and a [Formula: see text] safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans.

  7. Neuroethics of deep brain stimulation for mental disorders: brain stimulation reward in humans.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hideki; Katayama, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of some deep brain stimulation (DBS) trials undertaken in the early years was the phenomenon of "brain stimulation reward (BSR)," which was first identified in rats. The animals appeared to be rewarded by pleasure caused by the stimulation of certain brain regions (reward system), such as the septal area. "Self-stimulation" experiments, in which rats were allowed to stimulate their own brain by pressing a freely accessible lever, they quickly learned lever pressing and sometimes continued to stimulate until they exhausted themselves. BSR was also observed with DBS of the septal area in humans. DBS trials in later years were undertaken on other theoretical bases, but unexpected BSR was sometimes induced by stimulation of some areas, such as the locus coeruleus complex. When BSR was induced, the subjects experienced feelings that were described as "cheerful," "alert," "good," "well-being," "comfort," "relaxation," "joy," or "satisfaction." Since the DBS procedure is equivalent to a "self-stimulation" experiment, they could become "addicted to the stimulation itself" or "compulsive about the stimulation," and stimulate themselves "for the entire day," "at maximum amplitude" and, in some instances, "into convulsions." DBS of the reward system has recently been applied to alleviate anhedonia in patients with refractory major depression. Although this approach appears promising, there remains a difficult problem: who can adjust their feelings and reward-oriented behavior within the normal range? With a self-stimulation procedure, the BSR may become uncontrollable. To develop DBS to the level of a standard therapy for mental disorders, we need to discuss "Who has the right to control the mental condition?" and "Who makes decisions" on "How much control is appropriate?" in daily life.

  8. Inhibition by polyphenolic phytochemicals and sulfurous compounds of the formation of 8-chloroguanosine mediated by hypochlorous acid, human myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiki; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Toshinori; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) of activated neutrophils can react with nucleic acid bases to form chlorinated nucleosides such as 8-chloroguanosine (Cl-Guo). Chlorination is enhanced by nicotine. We investigated the effects of various natural antioxidants including polyphenolic phytochemicals on the formation of Cl-Guo by HOCl in the presence and the absence of nicotine. Polyphenols, including catechins, curcumin, resveratrol, silibinin, and sulfurous compound α-lipoic acid, were found to inhibit both HOCl- and human MPO-induced Cl-Guo formation dose-dependently. Among the test compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Cl-Guo formation, mediated by activated human neutrophils in the presence of nicotine, was inhibited by EGCG, silibinin, and α-lipoic acid. These results suggest that polyphenols and sulfurous compounds have the potential to inhibit the induction of nucleobase damage mediated by chlorination, with possible application to reducing DNA damage associated with inflammation and cigarette-smoke inhalation.

  9. Effects of red grape juice polyphenols in NADPH oxidase subunit expression in human neutrophils and mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; de la Peña, Gema; Sánchez-Martín, Carolina C; Teresa Guerra, M; Bartolomé, Begoña; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2009-10-01

    The NADPH oxidase enzyme system is the main source of superoxide anions in phagocytic and vascular cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide generation has been found to be abnormally enhanced in several chronic diseases. Evidence is accumulating that polyphenols may have the potential to improve cardiovascular health, although the mechanism is not fully established. Consumption of concentrated red grape juice, rich in polyphenols, has been recently shown to reduce NADPH oxidase activity in circulating neutrophils from human subjects. In the present work we studied whether red grape juice polyphenols affected NADPH oxidase subunit expression at the transcription level. For this, we used human neutrophils and mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, HL-60-derived neutrophils and the endothelial cell line EA.hy926.Superoxide production was measured with 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate or lucigenin, mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Each experiment was performed at least three times. In all cell types tested, red grape juice, dealcoholised red wine and pure polyphenols decreased superoxide anion production. Red grape juice and dealcoholised red wine selectively reduced p47phox, p22phox and gp91phox expression at both mRNA and protein levels, without affecting the expression of p67phox. Pure polyphenols, particularly quercetin, also reduced NADPH oxidase subunit expression, especially p47phox, in all cell types tested. The present results showing that red grape juice polyphenols reduce superoxide anion production provide an alternative mechanism by which consumption of grape derivatives may account for a reduction of oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular and/or inflammatory diseases related to NADPH oxidase superoxide overproduction.

  10. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence. PMID:26039751

  11. Overhauser-Enhanced MRI of Elastase Activity from In Vitro Human Neutrophil Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Parzy, Elodie; Bouchaud, Véronique; Massot, Philippe; Voisin, Pierre; Koonjoo, Neha; Moncelet, Damien; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudière, Eric; Mellet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging can reveal exquisite anatomical details. However several diseases would benefit from an imaging technique able to specifically detect biochemical alterations. In this context protease activity imaging is one of the most promising areas of research. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed an elastase substrate by grafting stable nitroxide free radicals on soluble elastin. This substrate generates a high Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) contrast upon digestion by the target proteases through the modulation of its rotational correlation time. The sensitivity is sufficient to generate contrasted images of the degranulation of neutrophils induced by a calcium ionophore from 2×104 cells per milliliter, well under the physiological neutrophils concentrations. Conclusions/Significance These ex-vivo experiments give evidence that OMRI is suitable for imaging elastase activity from neutrophil degranulation. Provided that a fast protease-substrate is used these results open the door to better diagnoses of a number of important pathologies (cystic fibrosis, inflammation, pancreatitis) by OMRI or Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging in vivo. It also provides a long-expected method to monitor anti-protease treatments efficiency and help pharmaceutical research. PMID:23469112

  12. Novel Anti-bacterial Activities of β-defensin 1 in Human Platelets: Suppression of Pathogen Growth and Signaling of Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Schwertz, Hansjörg; Cody, Mark J.; Franks, Zechariah; Tolley, Neal D.; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Lindemann, Stephan; Seizer, Peter; Yost, Christian C.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2011-01-01

    Human β-defensins (hBD) are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria. PMID:22102811

  13. Extracellular stimulation with human "noisy" electromyographic patterns facilitates myotube activity.

    PubMed

    Sciancalepore, M; Coslovich, T; Lorenzon, P; Ziraldo, G; Taccola, G

    2015-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) of skeletal muscle partially mimics the benefits of physical activity. However, the stimulation protocols applied clinically to date, often cause unpleasant symptoms and muscle fatigue. Here, we compared the efficiency of a "noisy" stimulus waveform derived from human electromyographic (EMG) muscle patterns, with stereotyped 45 and 1 Hz electrical stimulations applied to mouse myotubes in vitro. Human gastrocnemius medialis electromyograms recorded from volunteers during real locomotor activity were used as a template for a noisy stimulation, called EMGstim. The stimulus-induced electrical activity, intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics and mechanical twitches in the myotubes were assessed using whole-cell perforated patch-clamp, Ca(2+) imaging and optical visualization techniques. EMGstim was more efficient in inducing myotube cell firing, [Ca(2+)]i changes and contractions compared with more conventional electrical stimulation. Its stimulation strength was also much lower than the minimum required to induce contractions via stereotyped stimulation protocols. We conclude that muscle cells in vitro can be more efficiently depolarized using the "noisy" stochastic stimulation pattern, EMGstim, a finding that suggests a way to favor a higher level of electrical activity in a larger number of cells.

  14. Hypertonicity regulates the function of human neutrophils by modulating chemoattractant receptor signaling and activating mitogen-activated protein kinase p38.

    PubMed Central

    Junger, W G; Hoyt, D B; Davis, R E; Herdon-Remelius, C; Namiki, S; Junger, H; Loomis, W; Altman, A

    1998-01-01

    Excessive neutrophil activation causes posttraumatic complications, which may be reduced with hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation. We tested if this is because of modulated neutrophil function by HS. Clinically relevant hypertonicity (10-25 mM) suppressed degranulation and superoxide formation in response to fMLP and blocked the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1/2 and p38, but did not affect Ca2+ mobilization. HS did not suppress oxidative burst in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This indicates that HS suppresses neutrophil function by intercepting signal pathways upstream of or apart from PKC. HS activated p38 by itself and enhanced degranulation in response to PKC activation. This enhancement was reduced by inhibition of p38 with SB203580, suggesting that p38 up-regulation participates in HS-induced enhancements of degranulation. HS had similar effects on the degranulation of cells that were previously stimulated with fMLP, but had no effect on its own, suggesting that HS enhancement of degranulation requires another signal. We conclude that depending on other stimuli, HS can suppress neutrophil activation by intercepting multiple receptor signals or augment degranulation by enhancing p38 signaling. In patients HS resuscitation may reduce posttraumatic complications by preventing neutrophil activation via chemotactic factors released during reperfusion. PMID:9637711

  15. Thermal treatment of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) increases the antioxidant content and the inhibitory effect on human neutrophil burst.

    PubMed

    Lo Scalzo, Roberto; Fibiani, Marta; Mennella, Giuseppe; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Dal Sasso, Monica; Culici, Maria; Spallino, Alessandra; Braga, Pier Carlo

    2010-03-24

    The aim of this study was to compare the amount and activity of phytonutrients in raw, grilled, and boiled eggplant fruit using chemical measures and a biological assay of oxidative bursts in human neutrophils. The thermally treated samples showed various changes in their chemical composition (dry matter, soluble solids, acidity, and the amount of alcohol insoluble substances) due to the cooking processes and were much richer in the main phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic and caffeic acids, which are known to be antioxidants. Consequently, their free radical scavenging activity was significantly higher, especially that of superoxide anion. The biological assay of oxidative bursts from human neutrophils in the presence of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine confirmed the greater activity of extracts of the cooked eggplants with respect to raw eggplants. Successive extract dilutions showed a significant activity up to 1.25 microg/mL after cooking, while raw fruits resulted in an activity up to 10.00 microg/mL. These results showed that the thermal treatment commonly used before consumption can increase the content and biological activity of antioxidant compounds of eggplants.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide induces VCAM-1 expression and neutrophil adhesion to human tracheal smooth muscle cells: Involvement of Src/EGFR/PI3-K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-N.; Luo, S.-F.; Wu, C.-B.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-04-15

    In our previous study, LPS has been shown to induce vascular cell adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1) expression through MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). In addition to these pathways, the non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src), EGF receptor (EGFR), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to be implicated in the expression of several inflammatory target proteins. Here, we reported that LPS-induced up-regulation of VCAM-1 enhanced the adhesion of neutrophils onto HTSMC monolayer, which was inhibited by LY294002 and wortmannin. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases including Src, PYK2, and EGFR, which were further confirmed using specific anti-phospho-Src, PYK2, or EGFR Ab, respectively, revealed by Western blotting. LPS-stimulated Src, PYK2, EGFR, and Akt phosphorylation and VCAM-1 expression were attenuated by the inhibitors of Src (PP1), EGFR (AG1478), PI3-K (LY294002 and wortmannin), and Akt (SH-5), respectively, or transfection with siRNAs of Src or Akt and shRNA of p110. LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression was also blocked by pretreatment with curcumin (a p300 inhibitor) or transfection with p300 siRNA. LPS-stimulated Akt activation translocated into nucleus and associated with p300 and VCAM-1 promoter region was further confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This association of Akt and p300 to VCAM-1 promoter was inhibited by pretreatment with PP1, AG1478, wortmannin, and SH-5. LPS-induced p300 activation enhanced VCAM-1 promoter activity and VCAM-1 mRNA expression. These results suggested that in HTSMCs, Akt phosphorylation mediated through transactivation of Src/PYK2/EGFR promoted the transcriptional p300 activity and eventually led to VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS.

  17. [Alterations in heat shock protein 70 kDa levels in human neutrophils under the heat shock conditions].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, A A; Vetchinin, S S; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular content of heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family (HSP70) possessing chaperone and cytoprotective functions depends on specialization and functional activity of the cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of constitutive and inducible HSP70 levels evoked by heat shock in human neutrophils, the short-lived fraction of white blood cells providing non-specific defense against bacterial pathogens. Biphasic dynamics of the intracellular HSP70 level with an increase and following decrease in 15-30 min after the heat shock was revealed by flow cytometry. This dynamics was similar for constitutive and inducible forms of HSP70. Pre-incubation of neutrophils with cycloheximide, the inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not change the intracellular HSP70 dynamics registered by flow cytometry indicating that the increased HSP70 level detected immediately after the heat shock was not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. It was confirmed by Western blotting analysis of HSP70 intracellular content. It was suggested that the elevated HSP70 level was related to conformational HSP70 molecule changes and to increased availability of HSP70 epitopes for antibody binding. Using a panel of antibodies specific to the N-terminal ATP-binding or C-terminal substrate-binding domains of HSP70 it has been demonstrated by cell immunofluorescence and flow cytometry methods that the heat shock-associated increase of the intracellular HSP70 level was mediated by HSP70 interaction with antibodies recognizing HSP70 substrate-binding domain. It was demonstrated that the decrease of intracellular HSP70 level after heat treatment could be connected with a release of both inducible and constitutive HSP70 into extracellular space. Our data suggest that stress-induced release of HSP70 from neutrophils is regulated by ABC-transporters.

  18. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils have altered chemoattractant-induced F-actin polymerization and polarization characteristics.

    PubMed

    Orelio, Claudia; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2009-03-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a hereditary disorder characterized by pancreatic insufficiency and bone marrow failure. Most Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients have mutations in the SBDS gene located at chromosome 7 and suffer from recurrent infections, due to neutropenia in combination with impaired neutrophil chemotaxis. Currently, the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils has not been investigated. Therefore, we performed immunofluorescence for SBDS and F-actin on human neutrophilic cells. Additionally, we examined in control neutrophils and cells from genetically defined Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients F-actin polymerization and cytoskeletal polarization characteristics upon chemoattractant stimulation. These studies showed that SBDS and F-actin co-localize in neutrophilic cells and that F-actin polymerization and depolymerization characteristics are altered in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils as compared to control neutrophils in response to both fMLP and C5a. Moreover, F-actin cytoskeletal polarization is delayed in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils. Thus, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils have aberrant chemoattractant-induced F-actin properties which might contribute to the impaired neutrophil chemotaxis.

  19. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers.

  20. Capsaicin stimulates the non-store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry but inhibits the store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-P. . E-mail: w1994@vghtc.gov.tw; Tseng, C.-S.; Sun, S.-P.; Chen, Y.-S.; Tsai, C.-R.; Hsu, M.-F.

    2005-12-01

    Rat neutrophils express the mRNA encoding for transient receptor potential (TRP) V1. However, capsaicin-stimulated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation occurred only at high concentrations ({>=}100 {mu}M). This response was substantially decreased in a Ca{sup 2+}-free medium. Vanilloids displayed similar patterns of Ca{sup 2+} response with the rank order of potency as follows: scutigeral>resiniferatoxin>capsazepine>capsaicin=olvanil>isovelleral. Arachidonyl dopamine (AAD), an endogenous ligand for TRPV1, failed to desensitize the subsequent capsaicin challenge. Capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} response was not affected by 8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose (8-Br-cADPR), the ryanodine receptor blocker, but was slightly attenuated by 1-[6-[17{beta}-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,= 5-dione (U-73122), the inhibitor of phospholipase C-coupled processes, 1-[{beta}-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole (SKF-96365), the blocker of receptor-gated and store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) channels, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB), the blocker of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphospahte (IP{sub 3}) receptor and Ca{sup 2+} influx, and by ruthenium red, a blocker of TRPV channels, and enhanced by the Ca{sup 2+} channels blocker, cis-N-(2-phenylcyclopentyl)azacyclotridec-1-en-2-amine (MDL-12330A) and Na{sup +}-deprivation. In addition, capsaicin had no effect on the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity or the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) or on the total thiols content. Capsaicin ({>=}100 {mu}M) inhibited the cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). In the absence of external Ca{sup 2+}, the robust Ca{sup 2+} entry after subsequent addition of Ca{sup 2+} was decreased by capsaicin in CPA-activated cells. Capsaicin alone increased the actin cytoskeleton, and also increased the actin filament content in cell activation with CPA. These results indicate that capsaicin

  1. Activation of peripheral blood neutrophils and lymphocytes by human procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Vĕtvicka, V; Fusek, M

    1994-07-01

    Cathepsin D, a lysosomal aspartic proteinase, is well known to be overexpressed and secreted in the form of its zymogen by many types of human breast cancer tissues. In the cell lines derived from these tissues, cathepsin D functions as an autocrine mitogen, and it was suggested that its secretion might pose some physiological functions. Recently we have identified the presence of procathepsin D in human breast milk and similar findings were reported for bovine milk which imply also some physiological function. Thus, we have tested the influence of procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II on the expression of CD11a, CD11b, FcRI, CD62L, and HLA-DR surface determinants on neutrophils and lymphocytes. We have used procathepsin D purified from the secretions of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 and commercially available IGF II. Our results showed that both studied factors significantly influence the expression of tested surface molecules.

  2. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  3. Source and role of diacylglycerol formed during phagocytosis of opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Della Bianca, V.; Grzeskowiak, M.; Lissandrini, D.; Rossi, F. )

    1991-06-28

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate that in human neutrophils phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles is associated with activation of phospholipase D and that this reaction is the main source of diglycerides. The demonstration is based upon the following findings: (1) the challenge of neutrophils with these opsonized particles was followed by a rapid formation of (3H)alkyl-phosphatidic acid (( 3H)alkyl-PA) and (3H)alkyl-diglyceride (( 3H)alkyl-DG) in cells labeled with (3H)alkyl-lyso-phosphatidylcholine; (2) in the presence of ethanol (3H)alkyl-phosphatidylethanol was formed, and accumulation of (3H)alkyl-PA and (3H)alkyl-DG was depressed; (3) propranolol, by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of (3H)alkyl-PA, completely inhibited the accumulation of (3H)alkyl-DG and depressed by about 75% the formation of diglyceride mass. Evidence is also presented that phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst can take place independently of diglyceride formation and of the activity of this second messenger on protein kinase C. In fact: (a) propranolol while completely inhibited the formation of diglyceride mass did not modify either the phagocytosis or respiratory burst; (b) these two processes were insensitive to staurosporine.

  4. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is increased in psoriasis and induces human β-defensin-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Yu, Hsin-Su; Yen, Feng-Lin; Lin, Chi-Ling; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lan, Cheng-Che E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in the development of certain immune-mediated diseases, but their role in psoriasis has not been clearly defined. Human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) is an important antimicrobial peptide overexpressed in psoriasis epidermis. We evaluated whether the amount of NETs is increased in psoriasis and determined the effect of NETs on HBD-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes. Using fluorescent microscopy, we found that patients with psoriasis (n = 48) had higher amount of NETotic cells in their peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (n = 48) and patients with eczema (n = 35). Psoriasis sera showed increased ability to induce NET formation in control neutrophils but normal NET degradation ability. The amount of NETs in the peripheral blood correlated with psoriasis disease severity. NETosis was also observed in the majority (18 of 20) of psoriasis skin specimens. Furthermore, NETs induced HBD-2 mRNA and protein production in keratinocytes, and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed strong expression of HBD-2 in psoriasis lesional skin. In summary, NET formation is increased in peripheral blood and lesional skin of psoriasis patients and correlates with disease severity. Additionally, NET-induced HBD-2 production may provide a novel mechanism for the decreased susceptibility of psoriasis plaques to microbial infections. PMID:27493143

  5. Effect of deuterium oxide on neutrophil oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, and lysosomal enzyme release

    SciTech Connect

    Tsan, M.F.; Turkall, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    We have previously shown that deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) enhances the oxidation of methionine, a myeloperoxidase (MPO) -mediated reaction, by human neutrophils during phagocytosis. However, D/sub 2/O has no effect on the oxidation of methionine by the purified MPO-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-Cl- system. To explain this observation, we studied the effect of D/sub 2/O on the oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, and lysosomal enzyme release by human neutrophils. D/sub 2/O stimulated the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity of resting neutrophils in a dose-response fashion. In the presence of latex particles or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), D/sub 2/O brought about an exaggerated stimulation of the HMS activity. This enhancement of the HMS activity by D/sub 2/O was markedly reduced when neutrophils form two patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) were used, either in the presence or absence of latex particles or PMA. Superoxide and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production by neutrophils in the presence of latex particles or PMA were also stimulated by D/sub 2/O. In contrast, D/sub 2/O inhibited the ingestion of latex particles. D/sub 2/O enhanced the extracellular release of MPO, but not lactate dehydrogenase, by neutrophils only in the simultaneous presence of cytochalasin B and latex particles. The enhancement of HMS activity and MPO release by D/sub 2/O was partially inhibited by colchicine. Our results suggest that enhancement of neutrophil oxidative metabolism by D/sub 2/O may in part explain the stimulation of methionine oxidation by phagocytosing neutrophils.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-11-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, erionite, and wollastonite) than in mixtures with the manmade fibres (rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres). In the presence of externally added iron, all the fibres were found to generate OH. and the natural fibres caused about three times more OH. formation than the manmade fibres. In the absence of external iron, there was less OH. formation; however, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite still generated considerable amounts of OH., also under circumstances in which only small amounts of OH. were produced in mixtures with the manmade fibres. These findings indicate that natural fibres generate more H2O2 and OH. than manmade fibres when incubated with PMNLs in the presence of external iron. They also suggest that the natural fibres, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite may act catalytically in the dissociation of H2O2 to OH. in the absence of external iron, whereas manmade fibres such as rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres, do not seem to be able to generate OH. in the absence of external iron.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-01-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, erionite, and wollastonite) than in mixtures with the manmade fibres (rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres). In the presence of externally added iron, all the fibres were found to generate OH. and the natural fibres caused about three times more OH. formation than the manmade fibres. In the absence of external iron, there was less OH. formation; however, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite still generated considerable amounts of OH., also under circumstances in which only small amounts of OH. were produced in mixtures with the manmade fibres. These findings indicate that natural fibres generate more H2O2 and OH. than manmade fibres when incubated with PMNLs in the presence of external iron. They also suggest that the natural fibres, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite may act catalytically in the dissociation of H2O2 to OH. in the absence of external iron, whereas manmade fibres such as rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres, do not seem to be able to generate OH. in the absence of external iron. Images PMID:1334424

  8. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strain C1845 induces neutrophil extracellular traps that kill bacteria and damage human enterocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Turbica, Isabelle; Dufour, Guillaume; Semiramoth, Nicolas; Gleizes, Aude; Gorges, Roseline; Beau, Isabelle; Servin, Alain L; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Sandré, Catherine; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2012-05-01

    We recently documented the neutrophil response to enterovirulent diffusely adherent Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr fimbriae (Afa/Dr DAEC), using the human myeloid cell line PLB-985 differentiated into fully mature neutrophils. Upon activation, particularly during infections, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides, histones, and proteases, which entrap and kill pathogens. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy, we observed NET production by PLB-985 cells infected with the Afa/Dr wild-type (WT) E. coli strain C1845. We found that these NETs were able to capture, immobilize, and kill WT C1845 bacteria. We also developed a coculture model of human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cells and PLB-985 cells previously treated with WT C1845 and found, for the first time, that the F-actin cytoskeleton of enterocyte-like cells is damaged in the presence of bacterium-induced NETs and that this deleterious effect is prevented by inhibition of protease release. These findings provide new insights into the neutrophil response to bacterial infection via the production of bactericidal NETs and suggest that NETs may damage the intestinal epithelium, particularly in situations such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. Human neutrophil formyl peptide receptor phosphorylation and the mucosal inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giovanna; Gripentrog, Jeannie; Lord, Connie; Riesselman, Marcia; Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma; Jesaitis, Algirdas J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial/mitochondrial fMLF analogs bind FPR1, driving accumulation/activation of PMN at sites of infection/injury, while promoting wound healing in epithelia. We quantified levels of UFPR1 and TFPR1 in isolated PMN by use of phosphosensitive NFPRb and phosphorylation-independent NFPRa antibodies. UFPR1 and total TFPR were assessed inflamed mucosa, observed in human IBD. In isolated PMN after fMLF stimulation, UFPR1 declined 70% (fMLFEC50 = 11 ± 1 nM; t1/2 = 15 s) and was stable for up to 4 h, whereas TFPR1 changed only slightly. Antagonists (tBoc-FLFLF, CsH) and metabolic inhibitor NaF prevented the fMLF-dependent UFPR1 decrease. Annexin A1 fragment Ac2-26 also induced decreases in UFPR1 (Ac2-26EC50 ∼ 3 µM). Proinflammatory agents (TNF-α, LPS), phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid), and G-protein activator (MST) modestly increased fMLFEC50, 2- to 4-fold, whereas PTX, Ca2+ chelators (EGTA/BAPTA), H2O2, GM-CSF, ENA-78, IL-1RA, and LXA4 had no effect. Aggregation-inducing PAF, however, strongly inhibited fMLF-stimulated UFPR1 decreases. fMLF-driven PMN also demonstrated decreased UFPR1 after traversing monolayers of cultured intestinal epithelial cells, as did PMN in intestinal mucosal samples, demonstrating active inflammation from UC patients. Total TFPR remained high in PMN within inflamed crypts, migrating through crypt epithelium, and in the lamina propria-adjoining crypts, but UFPR1 was only observed at some peripheral sites on crypt aggregates. Loss of UFPR1 in PMN results from C-terminal S/T phosphorylation. Our results suggest G protein–insensitive, fMLF-dependent FPR1 phosphorylation in isolated suspension PMN, which may manifest in fMLF-driven transmigration and potentially, in actively inflamed tissues, except at minor discrete surface locations of PMN-containing crypt aggregates. PMID:25395303

  10. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  11. Role of AP-1 family proteins in regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Garley, Marzena; Jablonski, Jakub; Radziwon, Piotr; Iwaniuk, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the activity of AP-1 family proteins, e.g. Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, JunD, and FosB, engaged in the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and the production of NO by neutrophils (PMN) exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) xenobiotic. Isolated human PMN were incubated in the presence of NDMA. iNOS mRNA expression was then analyzed using Northern blot and the expression of other proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions were assessed using Western blot. The obtained results indicate that NDMA increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in human PMN. Furthermore, it increased the expression of Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, and JunD in the cytoplasmic fraction, and FosB expression in the fractions of analyzed cells. As a consequence of inhibiting p38 pathway and JNK, reduced iNOS expression and NO production was noted in PMN exposed to NDMA. Inhibition of the p38 pathway resulted in reduced expression of all analyzed proteins in the cytoplasmic fraction of PMN exposed to NDMA. Furthermore, increased Fra-2 expression and reduced FosB expression were found in the nuclear fraction of those cells. Inhibiting ERK5 pathway resulted in increased JunB expression in both fractions of the analyzed cells. Therefore, no changes in the expression of analyzed proteins in the presence of NDMA were observed in PMN pre-incubated with JNK pathway inhibitor. In conclusion, the results here indicate a role of Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, JunD, and FosB transcription factors in the regulation of iNOS expression and NO production by human neutrophils exposed to NDMA.

  12. The impact of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like mediators on the functional activity of neutrophils: anti-inflammatory effects of human PAF-acetylhydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, T W; Van Den Berg1, J M; Tool, A T J; Roos, D

    2001-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory agent in infectious and inflammatory diseases, partly due to the activation of infiltrating phagocytes. PAF exerts its actions after binding to a monospecific PAF receptor (PAFR). The potent bioactivity is reflected by its ability to activate neutrophils at picomolar concentrations, as defined by changes in levels of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and induction of chemotaxis and actin polymerization at nanomolar concentration. The role of PAF in neutrophil survival is, however, less well appreciated. In this study, the inhibitory effects of synthetic PAFR-antagonists on various neutrophil functions were compared with the effect of recombinant human plasma-derived PAF-acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH), as an important enzyme for PAF degradation in blood and extracellular fluids. We found that endogenously produced PAF (–like) substances were involved in the spontaneous apoptosis of neutrophils. At concentrations of 8 µg/ml or higher than normal plasma levels, rPAF-AH prevented spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis (21 ± 4% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; control) versus 62 ± 12% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; rPAF-AH 20 µg/ml); P < 0·01), during overnight cultures of 15 h. This effect depended on intact enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH and was not due to the resulting product lyso-PAF. The anti-inflammatory activity of rPAF-AH toward neutrophils was substantiated by its inhibition of PAF-induced chemotaxis and changes in [Ca2+]i. In conclusion, the efficient and stable enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH over so many hours of coculture with neutrophils demonstrates the potential for its use in the many inflammatory processes in which PAF (–like) substances are believed to be involved. PMID:11298128

  13. Noninvasive stimulation of human corticospinal axons innervating leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Martin, P G; Butler, J E; Gandevia, S C; Taylor, J L

    2008-08-01

    These studies investigated whether a single electrical stimulus over the thoracic spine activates corticospinal axons projecting to human leg muscles. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and electrical stimulation over the thoracic spine were paired at seven interstimulus intervals, and surface electromyographic responses were recorded from rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, and soleus. The interstimulus intervals (ISIs) were set so that the first descending volley evoked by cortical stimulation had not arrived at (positive ISIs), was at the same level as (0 ISI) or had passed (negative ISIs) the site of activation of descending axons by the thoracic stimulation at the moment of its delivery. Compared with the responses to motor cortical stimulation alone, responses to paired stimuli were larger at negative ISIs but reduced at positive ISIs in all three leg muscles. This depression of responses at positive ISIs is consistent with an occlusive interaction in which an antidromic volley evoked by the thoracic stimulation collides with descending volleys evoked by cortical stimulation. The cortical and spinal stimuli activate some of the same corticospinal axons. Thus it is possible to examine the excitability of lower limb motoneuron pools to corticospinal inputs without the confounding effects of changes occurring within the motor cortex.

  14. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain.

  15. The Role of Neutrophils in Transplanted Organs.

    PubMed

    Scozzi, D; Ibrahim, M; Menna, C; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D; Gelman, A E

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophils are often viewed as nonspecialized effector cells whose presence is a simple indicator of tissue inflammation. There is new evidence that neutrophils exist in subsets and have specialized effector functions that include extracellular trap generation and the stimulation of angiogenesis. The application of intravital imaging to transplanted organs has revealed novel requirements for neutrophil trafficking into graft tissue and has illuminated direct interactions between neutrophils and other leukocytes that promote alloimmunity. Paradoxically, retaining some neutrophilia may be important to induce or maintain tolerance. Neutrophils can stimulate anti-inflammatory signals in other phagocytes and release molecules that inhibit T cell activation. In this article, we will review the available evidence of how neutrophils regulate acute and chronic inflammation in transplanted organs and discuss the possibility of targeting these cells to promote tolerance.

  16. The Role of Neutrophils in Transplanted Organs

    PubMed Central

    Menna, Cecilia; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are often viewed as non-specialized effector cells whose presence is a simple indicator of tissue inflammation. There is new evidence that neutrophils exist in subsets and have specialized effector functions that include extracellular trap generation and the stimulation of angiogenesis. The application of intravital imaging to transplanted organs has revealed novel requirements for neutrophil trafficking into graft tissue and illuminated direct interactions between neutrophils and other leukocytes that promote alloimmunity. Paradoxically, retaining some neutrophilia may be important to induce or maintain tolerance. Neutrophils can stimulate anti-inflammatory signals in other phagocytes and release molecules that inhibit T cell activation. Here we will review the available evidence of how neutrophils regulate acute and chronic inflammation in transplanted organs and discuss the possibility of targeting these cells to promote tolerance. PMID:27344051

  17. Design, synthesis and evaluation of N-benzoylindazole derivatives and analogues as inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Letizia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A; Quinn, Mark T; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia

    2011-08-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays an important role in tumour invasion and inflammation. A series of N-benzoylindazoles was synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit HNE. We found that this scaffold is appropriate for HNE inhibitors and that the benzoyl fragment at position 1 is essential for activity. The most active compounds inhibited HNE activity with IC₅₀ values in the submicromolar range. Furthermore, docking studies indicated that the geometry of an inhibitor within the binding site and energetics of Michaelis complex formation were key factors influencing the inhibitor's biological activity. Thus, N-benzoylindazole derivatives and their analogs represent novel structural templates that can be utilized for further development of efficacious HNE inhibitors.

  18. TLR9 and NF-κB are partially involved in activation of human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and its purified DNA.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils.

  19. TLR9 and NF-κB Are Partially Involved in Activation of Human Neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and Its Purified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils. PMID:24987851

  20. Neutrophil-platelet adhesion: relative roles of platelet P-selectin and neutrophil beta2 (DC18) integrins.

    PubMed

    Brown, K K; Henson, P M; Maclouf, J; Moyle, M; Ely, J A; Worthen, G S

    1998-01-01

    Neutrophils and platelets interact both physically and metabolically during inflammation and thrombosis, but the mechanisms responsible for their adhesion remain incompletely understood. Neutrophil-platelet adhesion was measured after specific stimulation of neutrophils, platelets, or both and quantified by flow cytometry. Specific stimulation of either the neutrophil or the platelet led to a marked increase in the percentage of neutrophils that bound platelets, although platelet stimulation led to a large increase and neutrophil stimulation to only a small increase in the number of platelets per neutrophil. Stimulation of both cells further increased the number of neutrophil-platelet adhesive events and led to large numbers of platelets binding to each neutrophil. Confirming previous observations, blocking antibodies to platelet P-selectin (CD62P) partially inhibited adhesion. However, blockade of the neutrophil beta2 integrin CD11b/CD18 also inhibited the percentage of neutrophils that bound platelets. Combining P-selectin and CD11b/18 blockade further inhibited the stimulated increase in the percentage of neutrophils binding platelets and the increased number of platelets per neutrophil. Both cell adhesion molecules were active even when only a single cell type was primarily activated, supporting physiologically important transcellular activation. These data suggest that: (1) neutrophil-platelet adhesion can be initiated by specific activation of either the neutrophil or the platelet and that specific activation of either cell type leads to distinct patterns of adhesion, and (2) neutrophil-platelet adhesion uses both platelet P-selectin and the neutrophil beta2 integrin CD11b/CD18 when the cells are primarily or secondarily activated.

  1. Environmental Stimulation, Parental Nurturance and Cognitive Development in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farah, Martha J.; Betancourt, Laura; Shera, David M.; Savage, Jessica H.; Giannetta, Joan M.; Brodsky, Nancy L.; Malmud, Elsa K.; Hurt, Hallam

    2008-01-01

    The effects of environmental stimulation and parental nurturance on brain development have been studied extensively in animals. Much less is known about the relations between childhood experience and cognitive development in humans. Using a longitudinally collected data set with ecologically valid in-home measures of childhood experience and later…

  2. Cholera toxin stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1982-06-01

    Addition of cholera toxin to human mammary epithelial cultures derived from reduction mammoplasties and primary carcinomas greatly stimulated cell growth and increased the number of times the cells could be successfully subcultured. Other agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels were also growth stimulatory. The increased growth potential conferred by cholera toxin enhances the usefulness of this cell culture system.

  3. APPLICATION OF PROTEOMICS TO NEUTROPHIL BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Luerman, Gregory C.; Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils are a primary effector cell of the innate immune system and contribute to the development of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils participate in both the initiation and resolution of inflammatory responses through a series of highly coordinated molecular and phenotypic changes. To accomplish these changes, neutrophils express numerous receptors and use multiple overlapping and redundant signal transduction pathways. Dysregulation of the activation or resolution pathways plays a role in a number of human diseases. A comprehensive understanding of the regulation of neutrophil responses can be provided by high throughput proteomic technologies and sophisticated computational analysis. The first steps in the application of proteomics to understanding neutrophil biology have been taken. Here we review the application of expression, structural, and functional proteomic studies to neutrophils. Although defining the complex molecular events associated with neutrophil activation is in the early stages, the data generated to date suggest that proteomic technologies will dramatically enhance our understanding of neutrophil biology. PMID:19580889

  4. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF): cloning, overexpression, purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vanz, Ana LS; Renard, Gaby; Palma, Mario S; Chies, Jocelei M; Dalmora, Sérgio L; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biopharmaceutical drugs are mainly recombinant proteins produced by biotechnological tools. The patents of many biopharmaceuticals have expired, and biosimilars are thus currently being developed. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine that acts on cells of the neutrophil lineage causing proliferation and differentiation of committed precursor cells and activation of mature neutrophils. Recombinant hG-CSF has been produced in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (Filgrastim) and successfully used to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Filgrastim is a 175 amino acid protein, containing an extra N-terminal methionine, which is needed for expression in E. coli. Here we describe a simple and low-cost process that is amenable to scaling-up for the production and purification of homogeneous and active recombinant hG-CSF expressed in E. coli cells. Results Here we describe cloning of the human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor coding DNA sequence, protein expression in E. coli BL21(DE3) host cells in the absence of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, efficient isolation and solubilization of inclusion bodies by a multi-step washing procedure, and a purification protocol using a single cationic exchange column. Characterization of homogeneous rhG-CSF by size exclusion and reverse phase chromatography showed similar yields to the standard. The immunoassay and N-terminal sequencing confirmed the identity of rhG-CSF. The biological activity assay, in vivo, showed an equivalent biological effect (109.4%) to the standard reference rhG-CSF. The homogeneous rhG-CSF protein yield was 3.2 mg of bioactive protein per liter of cell culture. Conclusion The recombinant protein expression in the absence of IPTG induction is advantageous since cost is reduced, and the protein purification protocol using a single chromatographic step should reduce cost even further for large

  5. Aspirin Triggered-Lipoxin A4 Reduces the Adhesion of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Endothelial Cells Initiated by Preeclamptic Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Villa, AM; Norling, LV; Serhan, CN; Cordero, D; Rojas, M; Cadavid, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. Here, we evaluated the role of aspirin triggered-lipoxin A4 (ATL, 15-epi-LXA4) on the modulation of the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelial cells initiated by preeclamptic plasma. Materials and methods Plasma from preeclamptic, normotensive pregnant, and non-pregnant women were analysed for factors involved in regulating angiogenesis, inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Plasma from preeclamptic women was added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and the adhesion of PMN (incubated with or without ATL) to cells was evaluated. Results Preeclampsia was associated with some augmented anti-angiogenic, oxidative and pro-inflammatory markers, as well as increasing human PMN-endothelial cell adhesion. This cell adhesion was reduced when human PMN were incubated with ATL prior to addition to endothelial monolayers. Discussions and Conclusions Our results are the starting point for further research on the efficacy and rational use of aspirin in preeclampsia. PMID:22974760

  6. Enhanced and Secretory Expression of Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor by Bacillus subtilis SCK6

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shaista; Sadaf, Saima; Ahmad, Sajjad; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for enhanced expression and secretion of a pharmaceutically important human cytokine, that is, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), in the culture supernatant of Bacillus subtilis SCK6 cells. Codon optimized GCSF and pNWPH vector containing SpymwC signal sequence were amplified by prolonged overlap extension PCR to generate multimeric plasmid DNA, which was used directly to transform B. subtilis SCK6 supercompetent cells. Expression of GCSF was monitored in the culture supernatant for 120 hours. The highest expression, which corresponded to 17% of the total secretory protein, was observed at 72 hours of growth. Following ammonium sulphate precipitation, GCSF was purified to near homogeneity by fast protein liquid chromatography on a QFF anion exchange column. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis showed that the secondary structure contents of the purified GCSF are similar to the commercially available GCSF. Biological activity, as revealed by the regeneration of neutrophils in mice treated with ifosfamine, was also similar to the commercial preparation of GCSF. This, to our knowledge, is the first study that reports secretory expression of human GCSF in B. subtilis SCK6 with final recovery of up to 96 mg/L of the culture supernatant, without involvement of any chemical inducer. PMID:26881203

  7. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  8. Stimulation at the cervicomedullary junction in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janet L

    2006-06-01

    In awake human subjects, corticospinal axons can be activated at the level of the cervicomedullary junction by electrical or magnetic stimulation. Such stimuli evoke single descending volleys which activate motoneurones and elicit responses in muscles of the upper limb. These responses (cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials, CMEPs) have a large monosynaptic component and can be used to test motoneurone excitability in a variety of tasks. CMEPs can be elicited in resting muscle and during all strengths of voluntary contraction. Examination of CMEPs during and after voluntary contractions reveals changes in motoneurone excitability but also suggests activity-dependent changes in the efficacy of the corticospinal pathway. Because they test the same subcortical pathway as transcranial magnetic stimulation, but are unaffected by altered excitability at a cortical level, CMEPs often offer the most appropriate comparison to allow interpretation of changes in motor evoked potentials. The advantages and disadvantages of stimulation at the cervicomedullary junction as a test of motoneurone excitability are reviewed.

  9. Environmental stimulation, parental nurturance and cognitive development in humans.

    PubMed

    Farah, Martha J; Betancourt, Laura; Shera, David M; Savage, Jessica H; Giannetta, Joan M; Brodsky, Nancy L; Malmud, Elsa K; Hurt, Hallam

    2008-09-01

    The effects of environmental stimulation and parental nurturance on brain development have been studied extensively in animals. Much less is known about the relations between childhood experience and cognitive development in humans. Using a longitudinally collected data set with ecologically valid in-home measures of childhood experience and later in-laboratory behavioral measures of cognitive ability, we were able to test hypotheses concerning the effects of environmental stimulation and parental nurturance. A double dissociation was found: On the one hand, there was a selective relation between parental nurturance and memory development, consistent with the animal literature on maternal buffering of stress hormone effects on hippocampal development. On the other hand, there was a selective relation between environmental stimulation and language development. The relevance of these findings to socioeconomic gradients in cognitive ability is discussed.

  10. LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) triggers hydrogen peroxide production by canine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Ballantyne, C; Smith, C W

    2000-07-01

    The respiratory burst of neutrophils stimulated by chemotactic factors is markedly augmented by Mac-1-dependent adhesion such as the interaction of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) with intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; CD54) expressed on the surface of parenchymal cells (e.g., cardiac myocytes). In the current study, we evaluate the hypothesis that lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18) can also trigger the respiratory burst in neutrophils. To isolate LFA-1/ICAM-1 interactions from Mac-1/ ICAM-1 interactions, full-length chimeric ICAM-1 was developed and expressed in L cells with domains 1 and 2 from canine ICAM-1 and domains 3-5 from human ICAM-1 (C1,2;H3-5). We have shown that canine neutrophils do not bind to human ICAM-1. We demonstrated that chimeric ICAM-1 C1,2;H3-5 supported only LFA-1-dependent adhesion of canine neutrophils and that such adhesion triggered rapid onset of H2O2 production from canine neutrophils. The following seven experimental conditions distinguished LFA-1-dependent H2O2 production from Mac-1-dependent production: It did not require exogenous chemotactic stimulation; H2O2 release was more rapid, but the amount released was <40% of that mediated by Mac-1 adhesion; it was inhibited by anti-CD11a and anti-ICAM-1 antibodies; in contrast to that mediated by Mac-1, it was not inhibited by anti-CD11b antibody, neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF), or cytochalasin B or H7. Thus, canine neutrophils seem to be able to utilize two members of the beta2 integrin family to interact with ICAM-1 and signal H2O2 production, with LFA-1 at an early stage without prior chemotactic stimulation and Mac-1 at a later stage requiring chemotactic stimulation.

  11. Treatment with Rutin - A Therapeutic Strategy for Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Bahareh Abd; Adineh, Mohtaram; Hajiali, Farid

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Neutrophils represent the front line of human defense against infections. Immediately after stimulation, neutrophilic enzymes are activated and produce toxic mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). These mediators can be toxic not only to infectious agents but also to host tissues. Because flavonoids exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, they are subjects of interest for pharmacological modulation of inflammation. In the present study, the effects of rutin on stimulus-induced NO and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α productions and MPO activity in human neutrophils were investigated. Methods: Human peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated using Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation coupled with dextran T500 sedimentation. The cell preparations containing > 98% granulocytes were determined by morphological examination through Giemsa staining. Neutrophils were cultured in complete Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium, pre-incubated with or without rutin (25 μM) for 45 minutes, and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Then, the TNF-α, NO and MPO productions were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Griess Reagent, and MPO assay kits, respectively. Also, the viability of human neutrophils was assessed using tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and neutrophils were treated with various concentrations of rutin (1 - 100 μM), after which MTT was appended and incubated at 37ºC for 4 hour. Results: Rutin at concentrations up to 100 μM did not affect neutrophil viability during the 4-hour incubation period. Rutin significantly decreased the NO and TNF-α productions in human peripheral blood neutrophils compared to PMA-control cells (P < 0.001). Also, MPO activity was significantly reduced by rutin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: In this in vitro study, rutin had an anti-inflammatory effect due to

  12. The Natural Stilbenoid Piceatannol Decreases Activity and Accelerates Apoptosis of Human Neutrophils: Involvement of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Nosal, Radomir; Svitekova, Klara; Drabikova, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are able to release cytotoxic substances and inflammatory mediators, which, along with their delayed apoptosis, have a potential to maintain permanent inflammation. Therefore, treatment of diseases associated with chronic inflammation should be focused on neutrophils; formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of these cells represent two promising targets for pharmacological intervention. Piceatannol, a naturally occurring stilbenoid, has the ability to reduce the toxic action of neutrophils. This substance decreased the amount of oxidants produced by neutrophils both extra- and intracellularly. Radicals formed within neutrophils (fulfilling a regulatory role) were reduced to a lesser extent than extracellular oxidants, potentially dangerous for host tissues. Moreover, piceatannol did not affect the phosphorylation of p40phox—a component of NADPH oxidase, responsible for the assembly of functional oxidase in intracellular (granular) membranes. The stilbenoid tested elevated the percentage of early apoptotic neutrophils, inhibited the activity of protein kinase C (PKC)—the main regulatory enzyme in neutrophils, and reduced phosphorylation of PKC isoforms α, βII, and δ on their catalytic region. The results indicated that piceatannol may be useful as a complementary medicine in states associated with persisting neutrophil activation and with oxidative damage of tissues. PMID:24288583

  13. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Extract on Killing Activity of Human Neutrophils and Membrane Integrity of Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hmoteh, Jutharat; Syed Musthafa, Khadar; Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-05-27

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 is one of the most virulent causative agents of foodborne disease. Use of antibiotics for the treatment against E. coli O157:H7 infection leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The present study evaluated the potential of ethanolic leaf extract of a medicinal plant, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa in enhancing the killing activity of human neutrophils against E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the effects of the extract on membrane permeability of the organisms were studied. In the killing assay, percentage survival of the bacterial cells after being exposed to human neutrophils in the presence of various concentrations of the extract were determined. At 45 min, percentage survival of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 after treated with neutrophils in the presence of the extract at 125-250 µg/mL was 58.48%-50.28% and 69.13%-35.35%, respectively. Furthermore, upon treatment with R. tomentosa at 250 µg/mL uptake of crystal violet by E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 was increased to 40.07% and 36.16%, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that the extract exhibited dual effects as immunostimulant and membrane permeabilizing agent perhaps resulted in enhancing the killing activity of neutrophils against the organisms.

  14. Interleukin-1 stimulates zinc uptake by human thymic epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Coto, J.A.; Hadden, J.W. )

    1991-03-15

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) are known to secrete peptides which influence the differentiation and maturation of T-lymphocytes. These peptides include the thymic hormones thymulin, thymosin-{alpha}1, and thymopoietin. The biological activity of thymulin is dependent on the presence of zinc in an equimolar ratio. The authors have shown that both interleukin-1{alpha}(IL-1{alpha}) and interleukin-1{beta}(IL-1{beta}), which stimulate proliferation of TEC, stimulate the uptake of Zn-65 in-vitro independent of this proliferation. Mitomycin-C was used to inhibit the proliferation of TEC. Two other stimulators of proliferation of TEC, bovine pituitary extract (BPE) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), did not stimulate zinc uptake by the TEC independent of proliferation. They have also shown, utilizing in-situ hybridization, that IL-1 and zinc induce metallothionein(MT) mRNA expression in human thymic epithelial cells. The exact role of metallothionein is not clear, but it is thought to be involved in regulation of trace metal metabolism, especially in maintenance of zinc homeostasis. Their current hypothesis is that IL-1 stimulates uptake of zinc into the TEC, followed by its complexing with metallothionein. Zinc is then thought to be transferred from metallothionein to thymulin. Immunostaining, utilizing an antithymulin antibody and a fluoresceinated goat anti-rabbit second antibody, confirms the presence of thymulin in TEC and its dependence on zinc. Upon stimulation, thymulin is then secreted. Known stimulants for thymulin include progesterone, dexamethasone, estradiol, testosterone, and prolactin. None of these secretagogues increase zinc uptake, suggesting the priming of the zinc-thymulin complex is unrelated to the regulation of its secretion.

  15. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity.

  16. Transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation of human primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Jung, Yujin; Chung, Yong An; Song, In-Uk; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is making progress as a new non-invasive mode of regional brain stimulation. Current evidence of FUS-mediated neurostimulation for humans has been limited to the observation of subjective sensory manifestations and electrophysiological responses, thus warranting the identification of stimulated brain regions. Here, we report FUS sonication of the primary visual cortex (V1) in humans, resulting in elicited activation not only from the sonicated brain area, but also from the network of regions involved in visual and higher-order cognitive processes (as revealed by simultaneous acquisition of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging). Accompanying phosphene perception was also reported. The electroencephalo graphic (EEG) responses showed distinct peaks associated with the stimulation. None of the participants showed any adverse effects from the sonication based on neuroimaging and neurological examinations. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic profile showed the presence of individual variability in terms of the location and intensity of the acoustic focus. With exquisite spatial selectivity and capability for depth penetration, FUS may confer a unique utility in providing non-invasive stimulation of region-specific brain circuits for neuroscientific and therapeutic applications. PMID:27658372

  17. Modulating Human Auditory Processing by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Heimrath, Kai; Fiene, Marina; Rufener, Katharina S.; Zaehle, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial alternating current stimulation, and transcranial random noise stimulation has emerged. While the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders. PMID:27013969

  18. Transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation of human primary visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Jung, Yujin; Chung, Yong An; Song, In-Uk; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is making progress as a new non-invasive mode of regional brain stimulation. Current evidence of FUS-mediated neurostimulation for humans has been limited to the observation of subjective sensory manifestations and electrophysiological responses, thus warranting the identification of stimulated brain regions. Here, we report FUS sonication of the primary visual cortex (V1) in humans, resulting in elicited activation not only from the sonicated brain area, but also from the network of regions involved in visual and higher-order cognitive processes (as revealed by simultaneous acquisition of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging). Accompanying phosphene perception was also reported. The electroencephalo graphic (EEG) responses showed distinct peaks associated with the stimulation. None of the participants showed any adverse effects from the sonication based on neuroimaging and neurological examinations. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic profile showed the presence of individual variability in terms of the location and intensity of the acoustic focus. With exquisite spatial selectivity and capability for depth penetration, FUS may confer a unique utility in providing non-invasive stimulation of region-specific brain circuits for neuroscientific and therapeutic applications.

  19. Chemotactic and enzyme-releasing activity of amphipathic proteins for neutrophils. A possible role for protease in chemotaxis on substratum-bound protein gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C; Bradley, G R

    1981-01-01

    The purified amphipathic proteins, alpha s 1-casein, beta-casein, and alkali-denatured serum albumin were studied for chemotactic and enzyme-releasing effects on human neutrophil leucocytes. Evidence for chemotaxis both in fluid-phase gradients and on solid-phase gradients was obtained using visual assays. In fluid-phase gradients, neutrophils showed good orientation to gradient sources of these proteins at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-5) M. Solid-phase gradients of casein and of denatured albumin were prepared on glass coverslips, and the locomotion of neutrophils attached to these coverslips was filmed by time-lapse cinematography. Displacement of neutrophils towards the highest concentration of substratum-bound protein was observed, suggesting that neutrophils can show true chemotaxis on a solid-phase gradient. All three proteins induced enzyme release from neutrophils in the absence of cytochalasin B. Lysozyme release was equivalent to that released by stimulation with formyl methionyl peptide in the presence of cytochalasin B, but the proteins stimulated a smaller release of beta-glucuronidase than the peptide. The proteins stimulated release of neutrophil proteases which were able to digest both casein and denatured albumin extracellularly. It is suggested that this proteolytic activity may assist locomotion of neutrophils, especially on solid-phase protein gradients, by cleaving membrane-attached protein, thus both freeing cell-surface receptors and allowing the cell to detach itself from the substratum and continue movement. Images Figure 1 PMID:7016748

  20. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Jethwaney, Deepa; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Leidal, Kevin G; de Bernabe, Daniel Beltran-Valero; Campbell, Kevin P; Nauseef, William M; Gibson, Bradford W

    2007-01-01

    Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting) and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli. PMID:17692124

  1. A GCSFR/CSF3R zebrafish mutant models the persistent basal neutrophil deficiency of severe congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Pazhakh, Vahid; Clark, Sharon; Keightley, M. Cristina; Lieschke, Graham J.

    2017-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) and its receptor (GCSFR), also known as CSF3 and CSF3R, are required to maintain normal neutrophil numbers during basal and emergency granulopoiesis in humans, mice and zebrafish. Previous studies identified two zebrafish CSF3 ligands and a single CSF3 receptor. Transient antisense morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of both these ligands and receptor reduces neutrophil numbers in zebrafish embryos, a technique widely used to evaluate neutrophil contributions to models of infection, inflammation and regeneration. We created an allelic series of zebrafish csf3r mutants by CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis targeting csf3r exon 2. Biallelic csf3r mutant embryos are viable and have normal early survival, despite a substantial reduction of their neutrophil population size, and normal macrophage abundance. Heterozygotes have a haploinsufficiency phenotype with an intermediate reduction in neutrophil numbers. csf3r mutants are viable as adults, with a 50% reduction in tissue neutrophil density and a substantial reduction in the number of myeloid cells in the kidney marrow. These csf3r mutants are a new animal model of human CSF3R-dependent congenital neutropenia. Furthermore, they will be valuable for studying the impact of neutrophil loss in the context of other zebrafish disease models by providing a genetically stable, persistent, reproducible neutrophil deficiency state throughout life. PMID:28281657

  2. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) induced by donor-derived anti-HLA antibodies in aplastic anemia: possible priming effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the recipient neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Mitsuhashi, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tatsuharu

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is currently the leading cause of transfusion-related death. A 67-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia developed TRALI, consisting of acute respiratory insufficiency with severe hypoxia and diffuse pulmonary infiltration 2 hours after the transfusion of platelet concentrates. Although he required intensive respiratory support, he promptly recovered within 4 days. The presence of anti-HLA antibody (anti-HLA B52) in the donated blood product was demonstrated, and a lymphocytotoxicity test disclosed antibody-mediated cytotoxicity against the patient's cells. Furthermore, administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor was suggested to predispose the patient to TRALI by priming the neutrophils.

  3. Insulin stimulation of glycogen synthase in cultured human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, H; Howard, B V; Kosmakos, F C; Fields, R M; Craig, J W; Bennett, P H; Larner, J

    1980-10-01

    The effect of insulin on glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts has been studied. As little as 2 X 10(-10) M insulin increased the glycogen synthase / activity without changing the total activity. Stimulation occurred within 5 min and became maximal in 30 min. A half-maximal increase of / activity was achieved at 3 X 10(-9) M insulin. Glucose starvation increased the magnitude of response of glycogen synthase to insulin but did not change the insulin concentration necessary to give a half-maximal stimulation. Glucose increased the basal level of / activity in human diploid fibroblasts; the effect of insulin was additive. During in vitro senescence the total glycogen synthase activity declined, but the concentration of insulin that produced a half-maximal stimulation remained unchanged. These data indicate that regulation of glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts is responsive to physiologic insulin levels and that the system provides a useful model for the in vitro study of insulin sensitivity.

  4. Augmenting Plasticity Induction in Human Motor Cortex by Disinhibition Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cash, Robin F H; Murakami, Takenobu; Chen, Robert; Thickbroom, Gary W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Cellular studies showed that disinhibition, evoked pharmacologically or by a suitably timed priming stimulus, can augment long-term plasticity (LTP) induction. We demonstrated previously that transcranial magnetic stimulation evokes a period of presumably GABA(B)ergic late cortical disinhibition (LCD) in human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we hypothesized that, in keeping with cellular studies, LCD can augment LTP-like plasticity in humans. In Experiment 1, patterned repetitive TMS was applied to left M1, consisting of 6 trains (intertrain interval, 8 s) of 4 doublets (interpulse interval equal to individual peak I-wave facilitation, 1.3-1.5 ms) spaced by the individual peak LCD (interdoublet interval (IDI), 200-250 ms). This intervention (total of 48 pulses applied over ∼45 s) increased motor-evoked potential amplitude, a marker of corticospinal excitability, in a right hand muscle by 147% ± 4%. Control experiments showed that IDIs shorter or longer than LCD did not result in LTP-like plasticity. Experiment 2 indicated topographic specificity to the M1 hand region stimulated by TMS and duration of the LTP-like plasticity of 60 min. In conclusion, GABA(B)ergic LCD offers a powerful new approach for augmenting LTP-like plasticity induction in human cortex. We refer to this protocol as disinhibition stimulation (DIS).

  5. Flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis by down-regulation of Mcl-1 via a proteasomal-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Christopher D; Allen, Keith C; Dorward, David A; Hoodless, Laura J; Melrose, Lauren A; Marwick, John A; Tucker, Carl S; Haslett, Christopher; Duffin, Rodger; Rossi, Adriano G

    2013-03-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis and subsequent nonphlogistic clearance by surrounding phagocytes are key to the successful resolution of neutrophilic inflammation, with dysregulated apoptosis reported in multiple human inflammatory diseases. Enhancing neutrophil apoptosis has proresolution and anti-inflammatory effects in preclinical models of inflammation. Here we investigate the ability of the flavones apigenin, luteolin, and wogonin to induce neutrophil apoptosis in vitro and resolve neutrophilic inflammation in vivo. Human neutrophil apoptosis was assessed morphologically and by flow cytometry following incubation with apigenin, luteolin, and wogonin. All three flavones induced time- and concentration-dependent neutrophil apoptosis (apigenin, EC=12.2 μM; luteolin, EC=14.6 μM; and wogonin, EC=28.9 μM). Induction of apoptosis was caspase dependent, as it was blocked by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh and was associated with both caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Flavone-induced apoptosis was preceded by down-regulation of the prosurvival protein Mcl-1, with proteasomal inhibition preventing flavone-induced Mcl-1 down-regulation and apoptosis. The flavones abrogated the survival effects of mediators that prolong neutrophil life span, including lipoteichoic acid, peptidoglycan, dexamethasone, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, by driving apoptosis. Furthermore, wogonin enhanced resolution of established neutrophilic inflammation in a zebrafish model of sterile tissue injury. Wogonin-induced resolution was dependent on apoptosis in vivo as it was blocked by caspase inhibition. Our data show that the flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis and have potential as neutrophil apoptosis-inducing anti-inflammatory, proresolution agents.

  6. Francisella tularensis modulates a distinct subset of regulatory factors and sustains mitochondrial integrity to impair human neutrophil apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Jenna M.; Kinkead, Lauren C.; McCaffrey, Ramona L.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2016-01-01

    Tularemia is a disease characterized by profound neutrophil accumulation and tissue destruction. The causative organism, Francisella tularensis, is a facultative intracellular bacterium that replicates in neutrophil cytosol, inhibits caspase activation, and profoundly prolongs cell lifespan. Herein we identify unique features of this infection and provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms of apoptosis inhibition. Mitochondria are critical regulators of neutrophil apoptosis. We demonstrate that F. tularensis significantly inhibits Bax translocation and Bid processing through 24–48 h of infection, and in this manner sustains mitochondrial integrity. Downstream of mitochondria, XIAP and PCNA inhibit caspase-9 and caspase-3 by direct binding. Notably, we find that PCNA disappeared rapidly and selectively from infected cells, thereby demonstrating that it is not essential for neutrophil survival, whereas upregulation of calpastatin correlated with diminished calpain activity and reduced XIAP degradation. In addition, R-roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor developed for treatment of cancer that also induces neutrophil apoptosis and can promote resolution of several infectious and inflammatory disorders. Herein we confirm the ability of R-roscovitine to induce neutrophil apoptosis, yet also demonstrate that its efficacy is significantly impaired by F. tularensis. Collectively, our findings advance understanding of neutrophil apoptosis and its capacity to be manipulated by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26906922

  7. Selective incorporation of ( sup 15 S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in phosphatidylinositol of human neutrophils: Agonist-induced deacylation and transformation of stored hydroxyeicosanoids

    SciTech Connect

    Brezinski, M.E.; Serhan, C.N. )

    1990-08-01

    The uptake and mobilization of (15S)-hydroxy-5,8,11-cis-13-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), a major product of arachidonic acid metabolism, was examined with human neutrophils. Upon exposure to labeled 15-HETE, PMNs rapidly (15 sec to 20 min) incorporated approximately 20% of the label into phosphatidylinositol, while less than 4% was associated with other phospholipid classes and neutral lipids. This pattern was distinct from that of either labeled arachidonate or labeled(5S)-hydroxy-8,11,14-cis-6-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which within 20 min were predominantly associated with triglycerides and phosphatidylcholine. After reversed-phase HPLC, greater than 98% of the label in phosphatidylinositol, isolated from PMNs, was released with phospholipase A2. Upon exposure to either chemotactic peptide (FMLP), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, or an ionophore (A23187), 15-HETE-labeled PMNs released 15-HETE from phosphatidylinositol and displayed an impaired ability to generate leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 20-OH-LTB4, and 20-COOH-LTB4. Deacylated (3H)15-HETE was converted to (5S,15S)-dihydroxy-6,13-trans-8,11-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (5,15-DHETE), lipoxin A4, and lipoxin B4, each carrying 3H label. PMNs labeled with 5-HETE also released and transformed this HETE when stimulated. However, the profile of labeled products differed between PMNs with either esterified 15-HETE or 5-HETE. When activated, 5-HETE-labeled PMNs generated both 5,20-DHETE and 5,15-DHETE but not labeled lipoxins. Threshold aggregation induced by FMLP with 15-HETE-labeled PMNs was inhibited, while the threshold response was relatively unimpaired with either A23187 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced aggregation. Results indicate that 15-HETE is esterified into phosphatidylinositol of PMNs, which can be mobilized and transformed upon exposure of the cells to a second signal.

  8. Identification of a thermolabile component of the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase. A model for chronic granulomatous disease caused by deficiency of the p67-phox cytosolic component.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, R W; Malawista, S E; Garrett, M C; Van Blaricom, G; Leto, T L; Curnutte, J T

    1992-01-01

    Mild heating of human neutrophils inactivates the respiratory burst oxidase, producing a defect in superoxide production and bacterial killing comparable to that seen in patients afflicted with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). We have now investigated the mechanism and specificity of this inactivation by examining the effect of mild heating on the known oxidase components: the membrane-bound subunits of the cytochrome b558 (gp91-phox and p22-phox) and the two cytosolic oxidase factors (p47-phox and p67-phox). Heating (46 degrees C for 7.5 min) caused intact neutrophils to lose greater than 85% of their capacity to produce superoxide, a defect which was localized to the cytosolic, but not the membrane, fraction. Complementation studies with CGD cytosols deficient in either p47-phox or p67-phox suggested that the defective component of heat-inactivated cytosol was p67-phox. This was confirmed by experiments showing that recombinant p67-phox, but not p47-phox, exhibited lability at 46 degrees C and completely reconstituted oxidase activity of heat-treated cytosol. These studies indicate that mild heating of either intact neutrophils or normal neutrophil cytosol results in a selective inactivation of p67-phox, providing a model oxidase system for the extremely rare p67-phox-deficient form of CGD. PMID:1314852

  9. The src-family protein-tyrosine kinase p59hck is located on the secretory granules in human neutrophils and translocates towards the phagosome during cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Möhn, H; Le Cabec, V; Fischer, S; Maridonneau-Parini, I

    1995-01-01

    The src-family protein-tyrosine kinase p59hck is mainly expressed in neutrophils; however, its functional role in these cells is unknown. Several other src-family members are localized on secretory vesicles and have been proposed to regulate intracellular traffic. We have established here the subcellular localization of p59hck in human neutrophils. Immunoblotting of subcellular fractions showed that approx. 60% of the p59hck per cell is localized on the secretory granules; the other 40% is distributed equally between non-granular membranes and the cytosol. Immunofluorescence of neutrophils and HL60 cells suggests that the p59hck-positive granules are azurophil granules. Granular p59hck is highly susceptible to degradation by an azurophil-granule proteinase. Different forms of p59hck occur in the three subcellular compartments: a 61 kDa form is mainly found in the granules, a 59 kDa form is predominant in the non-granular membranes, whereas cytosolic p59hck migrates as a doublet at 63 kDa. During the process of phagocytosis-linked degranulation, induced by serum-opsonized zymosan in neutrophils or HL60 cells, granular p59hck translocates towards the phagosome. The subcellular localization of p59hck suggests that the enzyme could be involved in the regulation of the degranulation process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626033

  10. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Neutrophils▿

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.; Klos, Heather; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important member of the bovine respiratory disease complex, which is characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration into the alveoli and fibrin deposition. Recently several authors have reported that human neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of trapping and killing pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that the leukotoxin (LKT) of M. haemolytica causes NET formation by bovine neutrophils in a CD18-dependent manner. Using an unacylated, noncytotoxic pro-LKT produced by an ΔlktC mutant of M. haemolytica, we show that binding of unacylated pro-LKT stimulates NET formation despite a lack of cytotoxicity. Inhibition of LKT binding to the CD18 chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) on bovine neutrophils reduced NET formation in response to LKT or M. haemolytica cells. Further investigation revealed that NETs formed in response to M. haemolytica are capable of trapping and killing a portion of the bacterial cells. NET formation was confirmed by confocal microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Prior exposure of bovine neutrophils to LKT enhanced subsequent trapping and killing of M. haemolytica cells in bovine NETs. Understanding NET formation in response to M. haemolytica and its LKT provides a new perspective on how neutrophils contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine respiratory disease. PMID:20823211

  11. Inhibition of neutrophil priming and tyrosyl phosphorylation by cepharanthine, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, H; Li, M J; Matsuno, T; Yasuda, T; Utsumi, K

    1992-12-01

    Receptor-mediated superoxide (O2.-)-generation and tyrosyl phosphorylation of neutrophil proteins, such as 58, 65, 84, 108 and 115 kDa, were enhanced by priming cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) [Akimura, K. et al. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 298: 703-709, 1992]. To elucidate the possible involvement of tyrosyl phosphorylation of neutrophil proteins in the enhancing mechanism of O2.- generation, the effect of cepharanthine, a biscoclaurine alkaloid that inhibits phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- and receptor-mediated O2.- generation, on the priming of human peripheral neutrophils (HPPMN) was studied. Both enhancement of formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (FMLP)-mediated O2.- generation and tyrosyl phosphorylation of some neutrophil proteins, i.e., 115, 108 and 84 kDa proteins, by HHPMN after treatment with G-CSF were strongly inhibited by cepharanthine in a concentration- and treatment-time-dependent manner. In contrast, inhibition of PMA-mediated O2.- generation by cepharanthine was weak and independent of treatment time. These results suggest that cepharanthine might inhibit the priming step of neutrophil activation concomitantly with its inhibition of the tyrosyl phosphorylation of some neutrophil proteins that might underlie the mechanism for priming of neutrophils with G-CSF.

  12. Endotoxin promotes neutrophil hierarchical chemotaxis via the p38-membrane receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Qin, Weiting; Zhang, Yisen; Zhang, Huafeng; Sun, Bingwei

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood and play critical a role in bacterial infection, tumor immunity and wound repair. Clarifying the process of neutrophil chemotaxis to target sites of immune activity has been a focus of increased interest within the past decade. In bacterial infectious foci, neutrophils migrate toward the bacterial-derived chemoattractant N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) and ignore other intermediary chemoattractants to arrive at the area of infection. Using an under agarose chemotaxis assay, we observed that the bacterial fMLP-induced neutrophil chemotaxis signal overrode interleukin 8 (IL-8)- and leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-induced chemotaxis signals. Moreover, in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the fMLP-induced hierarchical chemotaxis signal was enhanced. Further studies revealed that LPS increased the membrane expression of the fMLP receptor, formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). However, expression levels of the membrane receptors for IL-8 and LTB4 were decreased by LPS administration. A human Phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proteome array showed that the p38 pathway was significantly activated by LPS stimulation. Moreover, p38 was responsible for the altered expression of neutrophil membrane chemoattractant receptors. Inhibition of neutrophil p38 restored LPS-improved hierarchical chemotaxis. Taken together, these data indicate that endotoxin promotes neutrophil hierarchical chemotaxis via the p38-membrane receptor pathway. PMID:27655676

  13. Sphingosine kinase: a point of convergence in the action of diverse neutrophil priming agents.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Alison C; Buckley, Avril; Chilvers, Edwin R; Rossi, Adriano G; Haslett, Christopher; Sethi, Tariq

    2002-12-01

    Neutrophils are a vital component of the early acute inflammatory response, but can cause profound tissue damage when activated to excess or prevented from undergoing apoptosis. However, much remains unknown about the intracellular signaling pathways regulating neutrophil activity. The structurally diverse neutrophil-priming agents platelet-activating factor, TNF-alpha, and the substance P analog [D-Arg(6), D-Trp(7,9),N(me)Phe(8)]-substance P(6-11) (SP-G) stimulated a rapid increase in sphingosine kinase activity in freshly isolated human neutrophils. This activity was blocked by preincubation with the sphingosine kinase inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS). DMS also inhibited the increase in intracellular calcium concentration stimulated by platelet-activating factor, fMLP, and SP-G. This suggests that the increase in intracellular calcium concentration by these agents is dependent on sphingosine kinase activation and the generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate. Changes in cell polarization and the augmentation of the fMLP-induced superoxide anion generation, by all priming agents were also inhibited by DMS, while only the superoxide anion release was blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, SP-G and GM-CSF inhibited constitutive neutrophil apoptosis which was completely blocked by DMS. These results suggest a novel role for sphingosine kinase in the regulation of neutrophil priming.

  14. Endogenous Acute Phase Serum Amyloid A Lacks Pro-Inflammatory Activity, Contrasting the Two Recombinant Variants That Activate Human Neutrophils through Different Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Karin; Björkman, Lena; Ahlin, Sofie; Olsson, Maja; Sjöholm, Kajsa; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Most notable among the acute phase proteins is serum amyloid A (SAA), levels of which can increase 1000-fold during infections, aseptic inflammation, and/or trauma. Chronically elevated SAA levels are associated with a wide variety of pathological conditions, including obesity and rheumatic diseases. Using a recombinant hybrid of the two human SAA isoforms (SAA1 and 2) that does not exist in vivo, numerous in vitro studies have given rise to the notion that acute phase SAA is a pro-inflammatory molecule with cytokine-like properties. It is however unclear whether endogenous acute phase SAA per se mediates pro-inflammatory effects. We tested this in samples from patients with inflammatory arthritis and in a transgenic mouse model that expresses human SAA1. Endogenous human SAA did not drive production of pro-inflammatory IL-8/KC in either of these settings. Human neutrophils derived from arthritis patients displayed no signs of activation, despite being exposed to severely elevated SAA levels in circulation, and SAA-rich sera also failed to activate cells in vitro. In contrast, two recombinant SAA variants (the hybrid SAA and SAA1) both activated human neutrophils, inducing L-selectin shedding, production of reactive oxygen species, and production of IL-8. The hybrid SAA was approximately 100-fold more potent than recombinant SAA1. Recombinant hybrid SAA and SAA1 activated neutrophils through different receptors, with recombinant SAA1 being a ligand for formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2). We conclude that even though recombinant SAAs can be valuable tools for studying neutrophil activation, they do not reflect the nature of the endogenous protein. PMID:23626589

  15. Yawning induced by focal electrical stimulation in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sweta; Bayat, Arezou; Gagnon, Linda; Shields, Donald C; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2017-01-01

    The primary function of yawning is not fully understood. We report a case in which electrical stimulation of the putamen in the human brain consistently elicited yawning. A 46-year-old woman with intractable epilepsy had invasive depth electrode monitoring and cortical stimulation mapping as part of her presurgical epilepsy evaluation. The first two contacts of a depth electrode that was intended to sample the left insula were in contact with the putamen. Stimulation of these contacts at 6mA and 8mA consistently elicited yawning on two separate days. Engagement in arithmetic and motor tasks during stimulation did not result in yawning. When considering the role of the putamen in motor control and its extensive connectivity to cortical and brainstem regions, our findings suggest that it plays a key role in the execution of motor movements necessitated by yawning. Furthermore, given the role of the anterior insula in attention and focused tasks, activation of this area while engaged in arithmetic and motor tasks could inhibit the putaminal processing necessary for yawning. Many have hypothesized the function of yawning; however, it remains debatable whether yawning serves a primarily physiological or communicative function or perhaps both.

  16. Effects of essential oil extracted from Nigella sativa (L.) seeds and its main components on human neutrophil elastase activity.

    PubMed

    Kacem, Rachid; Meraihi, Zahia

    2006-04-01

    The effects of essential oil extracted from Nigella sativa (L.) seeds and its main components on human neutrophil elastase (HNE) activity were investigated. Essential oil was extracted from N. sativa (L.) seeds using hydrodistillation. The yield was equal to 0.4%. Inhibition of HNE activity by essential oil was found to be dose dependent. The highest inhibitory concentration (HIC) of essential oil which caused total inhibition of HNE activity was 5.8 mg/ml. Microassays carried out to evaluate the inhibitory effect of major components of essential oil on HNE activity revealed that carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) showed marked HNE inhibitory activity with a very low IC(50) value (12 microM). Based on these results, the inhibitory effects of essential oil on HNE activity are due to the presence of bioactive molecules, mainly carvacrol this compound is an inhibitor of HNE and could be considered as a natural antielastase agent and possible candidate for phytotherapy in the treatment of injuries that appear in some pathologic cases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema.

  17. The subcellular distribution of myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14 in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Stroncek, David F; Shankar, Raji A; Skubitz, Keith M

    2005-01-01

    Background Myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14 are S100 family calcium binding proteins that form a heterodimer known as calprotectin or MRP8/14 that is present in the cytosol of neutrophils and monocytes. MRP8/14 becomes associated with endothelium at sites of monocyte and neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and induces a thrombogenic and inflammatory response by increasing the endothelial transcription of proinflamatory chemokines and adhesion molecules. The distribution of MRP8/MRP14 among neutrophil granules and plasma membranes is unclear and was investigated to better understand the role of this molecule in acute inflammation. Study design Three monoclonal antibodies specific for MRP8 and MRP14 were characterized and used in immunoblotting assays of neutrophil whole cell extracts, and isolated plasma membranes, primary granules, secondary granules and cytosol. Results MRP8 and MRP14 were detected in neutrophil cytosol, plasma membrane, primary granule and secondary granule fractions. MRP8/14 demonstrated a calcium-dependent adherence to plasma membranes and primary granules and could be removed by washing with EGTA in a high ionic strength buffer. In contrast, MRP8/14 was found within the contents of the secondary granules. Activated neutrophils released secondary granules and MRP8/14. Conclusion MRP8/14 is located in neutrophil cytosol and secondary granule fractions and is loosely associated with plasma membranes. MRP8/14 released with secondary granules by activated neutrophils likely binds to endothelium and plays an important role in acute inflammation. PMID:16191197

  18. Neutrophil migration across monolayers of cytokine-prestimulated endothelial cells: a role for platelet-activating factor and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we observed that neutrophils respond with a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i during adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cells (EC), caused by EC membrane-associated platelet-activating factor (PAF). In the present study, we investigated whether this form of PAF was important in neutrophil adherence and migration across monolayers of rIL-1 beta- or rTNF alpha-prestimulated EC. PAF receptor antagonists prevented neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated EC by approximately 60% (P less than 0.005) without interfering with the process of adherence. The antagonists WEB 2086 and L-652,731 had no effect on neutrophil migration across resting EC induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). A murine anti-IL-8 antiserum was found to also partially inhibit the neutrophil transmigration across cytokine-activated EC. When the anti-IL-8 antiserum was used in combination with a PAF receptor antagonist, neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated monolayers of EC was completely prevented. During transmigration, LAM-1 and CD44 on the neutrophils were down-modulated; both WEB 2086 and anti-IL-8 antiserum partially prevented this down-modulation caused by cytokine- prestimulated EC. Our results indicate that human neutrophils are activated and guided by EC-associated PAF and EC-derived IL-8 during the in vitro diapedesis in between cytokine-stimulated EC. PMID:1315317

  19. Effect of a 2.45-GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    The potential public health risks of radiofrequency (RF) fields have been discussed at length, especially with the use of mobile phones spreading extensively throughout the world. In order to investigate the properties of RF fields, we examined the effect of 2.45-GHz RF fields at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2 and 10 W/kg for 4 and 24 h on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells. Neutrophil chemotaxis was not affected by RF-field exposure, and subsequent phagocytosis was not affected either compared with that under sham exposure conditions. These studies demonstrated an initial immune response in the human body exposed to 2.45-GHz RF fields at the SAR of 2 W/kg, which is the maximum value recommended by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The results of our experiments for RF-field exposure at an SAR under 10 W/kg showed very little or no effects on either chemotaxis or phagocytosis in neutrophil-like human HL-60 cells.

  20. Effect of a 2.45-GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    The potential public health risks of radiofrequency (RF) fields have been discussed at length, especially with the use of mobile phones spreading extensively throughout the world. In order to investigate the properties of RF fields, we examined the effect of 2.45-GHz RF fields at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2 and 10 W/kg for 4 and 24 h on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis in differentiated human HL-60 cells. Neutrophil chemotaxis was not affected by RF-field exposure, and subsequent phagocytosis was not affected either compared with that under sham exposure conditions. These studies demonstrated an initial immune response in the human body exposed to 2.45-GHz RF fields at the SAR of 2 W/kg, which is the maximum value recommended by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The results of our experiments for RF-field exposure at an SAR under 10 W/kg showed very little or no effects on either chemotaxis or phagocytosis in neutrophil-like human HL-60 cells. PMID:25194051

  1. IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis is mediated by Janus kinase 3 (JAK3).

    PubMed

    Henkels, Karen M; Frondorf, Kathleen; Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Doseff, Andrea L; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2011-01-03

    Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase vital to the regulation of T-cells. We report that JAK3 is a mediator of interleukin-8 (IL-8) stimulation of a different class of hematopoietic relevant cells: human neutrophils. IL-8 induced a time- and concentration-dependent activation of JAK3 activity in neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 leukemic cells. JAK3 was more robustly activated by IL-8 than other kinases: p70S6K, mTOR, MAPK or PKC. JAK3 silencing severely inhibited IL-8-mediated chemotaxis. Thus, IL-8 stimulates chemotaxis through a mechanism mediated by JAK3. Further, JAK3 activity and chemotaxis were inhibited by the flavonoid apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) at ∼5nM IC(50). These new findings lay the basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of cell migration as it relates to neutrophil-mediated chronic inflammatory processes.

  2. Peptide conjugated cellulose nanocrystals with sensitive human neutrophil elastase sensor activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In chronic wounds, elevated human neutorphil elastase (HNE) is a destructive protease that has been proposed as a biomarker. Numerous wound dressing designs have been introduced in an effort to lower HNE levels. The clinical detection of HNE as a point of care biomarker or an in situ colorimetric ...

  3. Cunninghamella bertholletiae exhibits increased resistance to human neutrophils with or without antifungal agents as compared to Rhizopus spp.

    PubMed

    Simitsopoulou, Maria; Georgiadou, Elpiniki; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2010-08-01

    Among Zygomycetes, Cunninghamella bertholletiae occurs less frequently as the etiologic agent of human disease but causes more aggressive, refractory, and fatal infections despite antifungal therapy. Little is known about the differential innate host response against Cunninghamella and other Zygomycetes in the presence of antifungal agents. We therefore studied the activity of human neutrophils (PMNs) alone or in combination with caspofungin, posaconazole (PSC), and voriconazole (VRC) against hyphae of Rhizopus oryzae, Rhizopus microsporus and C. bertholletiae. Hyphal damage was measured by XTT metabolic assay and release of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha from PMNs by ELISA. Cunninghamella bertholletiae was more resistant to PMN-induced hyphal damage than either Rhizopus spp. at effector:target (E:T) ratios of 1:1, 5:1 and 10:1 (P < 0.05). The hyphal damage caused by caspofungin at 0.1 microg/ml or PSC and VRC at 0.5 microg/ml with C. bertholletiae and R. oryzae and by caspofungin against R. microsporus ranged from 18-29%. The PMN-induced hyphal damage was not modulated by combination with antifungal agents. Cunninghamella bertholletiae induced significantly decreased IL-8 (P < 0.05), but increased TNF-alpha release from PMNs compared to both Rhizopus spp. (P < 0.01). No IL-6 was released from PMNs exposed to the three Zygomycetes. In comparison to R. oryzae and R. microsporus, C. bertholletiae is more resistant to PMN-induced hyphal damage with or without antifungal therapy and is more capable of suppressing release of IL-8.

  4. UV stimulation of DNA-mediated transformation of human cells

    SciTech Connect

    van Duin, M.; Westerveld, A.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.

    1985-04-01

    Irradiation of dominant marker DNA with UV light (150 to 1,000 J/m2) was found to stimulate the transformation of human cells by this marker from two- to more than fourfold. This phenomenon is also displayed by xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA. Also, exposure to UV of the transfected (xeroderma pigmentosum) cells enhanced the transfection efficiency. Removal of the pyrimidine dimers from the DNA by photoreactivating enzyme before transfection completely abolished the stimulatory effect, indicating that dimer lesions are mainly responsible for the observed enhancement. A similar stimulation of the transformation efficiency is exerted by 2-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene modification of the DNA. These findings suggest that lesions which are targets for the excision repair pathway induce the increase in transformation frequency. The stimulation was found to be independent of sequence homology between the irradiated DNA and the host chromosomal DNA. Therefore, the increase of the transformation frequency is not caused by a mechanism inducing homologous recombination between these two DNAs. UV treatment of DNA before transfection did not have a significant effect on the amount of DNA integrated into the xeroderma pigmentosum genome.

  5. Cationic antimicrobial proteins isolated from human neutrophil granulocytes in the presence of diisopropyl fluorophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, W M; Martin, L E; Spitznagel, J K

    1984-01-01

    Acid (0.2 M sodium acetate, pH 4.0) extracts of granules recovered from disrupted human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) exhibited in vitro antimicrobial activity against Salmonella typhimurium. To minimize proteolytic destruction or modification of antimicrobial proteins derived from