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Sample records for stimulated human neutrophils

  1. Neutrophil kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced neutropenia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Yuji; Kawagishi, Mayumi; Kusaka, Masaru )

    1990-01-01

    Single injection of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) immediately induced a decrease in the number of circulating neutrophils in rats. This neutropenia occurred 10 minutes after the injection but disappeared 40 minutes after injection. This transient neutropenia was dose-dependently induced by rhG-CSF and also induced by repeated injections. We studied the kinetics of circulating neutrophils in transient neutropenia. rhG-CSF markedly decreased the number of {sup 3}H-diisopropylfluorophosphate ({sup 3}H-DFP) labeled neutrophils in the circulation 10 minutes after injection but the labeled neutrophils recovered to near the control level 40 minutes after the injection. These results indicate that the neutrophil margination accounts for the neutrophenia and the marginated neutrophils return to the circulation.

  2. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  3. Conditioned medium from stimulated mononuclear leukocytes augments human neutrophil-mediated killing of a virulent Acanthamoeba sp.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, A; Abell, T J

    1986-01-01

    Human neutrophils in the presence of serum containing anti-amoeba antibody either lacked amoebicidal activity or were poorly amoebicidal for Acanthamoeba culbertsoni. In contrast, neutrophils preexposed for 1 h to supernatants from human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (MNLs) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin demonstrated significant amoeba killing in the presence of serum containing anti-acanthamoeba antibodies. Supernatant from MNL cultured in the absence of phytohemagglutinin were not effective in stimulating significant activity in the neutrophils. Serum containing antibody promoted the adherence of many neutrophils to one amoeba. There was no significant difference between the ability of neutrophils treated with supernatants from stimulated MNLs (stimulated conditioned medium [sCM]) and supernatants from nonstimulated MNLs (nonstimulated conditioned medium [nsCM]) in their binding to acanthamoeba. The effects of sCM on neutrophils was a general phenomenon. For example, the sCM but not the nsCM enhanced the antibody-dependent neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity against three tumor targets (K562 erythroid myeloid leukemia cell line, B16 melanoma, and P815 (DBA/2 mastocytoma). Furthermore, the sCM but not the nsCM increased the bactericidal (against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae) and fungicidal (against Torulopsis glabrata) activity of the neutrophil. The sCM but not the nsCM contained activities which inhibited neutrophil migration and stimulated a respiratory burst in these leukocytes. These results suggest that the neutrophil antimicrobial power can be increased by exposing the leukocytes to MNL mediators. Images PMID:3943902

  4. Controlled Pseudopod Extension of Human Neutrophils Stimulated with Different Chemoattractants

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, Doncho V.; Alteraifi, Abdullatif M.; Chodniewicz, David

    2004-01-01

    The formation of pseudopods and lamellae after ligation of chemoattractant sensitive G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for chemotaxis. Here, pseudopod extension was stimulated with chemoattractant delivered from a micropipet. The chemoattractant diffusion and convection mass transport were considered, and it is shown that when the delivery of chemoattractant was limited by diffusion there was a strong chemoattractant gradient along the cell surface. The diffusion-limited delivery of chemoattractant from a micropipet allowed for maintaining an almost constant chemoattractant concentration at the leading edge of single pseudopods during their growth. In these conditions, the rate of pseudopod extension was dependent on the concentration of chemoattractant in the pipet delivering chemoattractant. The pseudopod extension induced using micropipets was oscillatory even in the presence of a constant delivery of chemoattractant. This oscillatory pseudopod extension was controlled by activated RhoA and its downstream effector kinase ROCK and was abolished after the inhibition of RhoA activation with Clostridium botulinium C3 exoenzyme (C3) or the blocking of ROCK activation with Y-27632. The ability of the micropipet assay to establish a well-defined chemoattractant distribution around the activated cell over a wide range of molecular weights of the used chemoattractants allowed for comparison of the effect of chemoattractant stimulation on the dynamics of pseudopod growth. Pseudopod growth was stimulated using N-formylated peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)), platelet activating factor (PAF), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), C5a anaphylotoxin (C5a), and interleukin-8 (IL-8), which represent the typical ligands for G-protein coupled chemotactic receptors. The dependence of the rate of pseudopod extension on the concentration of these chemoattractants and their equimolar mixture was measured and shown to be similar for all chemoattractants. The

  5. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  6. Rat, mouse and human neutrophils stimulated by a variety of activating agents produce much less nitrite than rodent macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, E L; Pruett, S B

    1995-01-01

    The role of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) in the antimicrobial activities of neutrophils from various mammalian species is unclear. However, it has been reported that rodent neutrophils possess the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase and that inflammatory neutrophils from rats produce potentially antimicrobial levels of RNI. In the present study, neutrophils from humans, rats and mice were evaluated for production of nitrite, a stable end-product of RNI. Human neutrophil preparations (> 95% neutrophils) isolated from peripheral blood were stimulated for 2-24 hr with agents known to trigger the Ca(2+)-dependent constitutive nitric oxide synthase, or to stimulate synthesis of the inducible nitric oxide synthase. Superoxide dismutase was added to some cultures to decrease the levels of superoxide, a compound reported to react with RNI and yield products other than nitrite. Even though the cells were viable and responsive to stimuli, they did not produce nitrite concentrations indicative of antimicrobial potential. Preparations of inflammatory (casein-elicited) mouse neutrophils also failed to produce high concentrations of nitrite. Inflammatory rat neutrophils (2.5 x 10(6)/ml) produced nitrite concentrations of approximately 40 microM in 24-hr cultures, but plots of nitrite production versus cell number for neutrophil and macrophage preparations indicated that contaminating macrophages could account for all the nitrite production in the neutrophil preparations. Thus, neutrophils from rats, mice and humans seem comparable in their inability to produce high levels of nitrite in response to a variety of stimuli. This suggests that in most circumstances the constitutive nitric oxide synthase known to be present in these cells is limited to the production of low levels of nitric oxide for intercellular signalling. In addition, this raises questions about the presence or functional status of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rodent neutrophils. PMID:7534260

  7. Stimulation of human neutrophils by soluble and insoluble immunoglobulin aggregates. Secretion of granule constituents and increased oxidation of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Henson, P M; Oades, Z G

    1975-01-01

    Reaction of human neutrophils with aggregated immunoglobulin on nonphagocytosable surfaces results in secretion of granule enzymes (exocytosis of granules) and stimulation of glucose oxidation by the nexose monophosphate pathway (HMP). The role of HMP stimulation in the enzyme secretion and some requirements for the two neutrophil activities have been examined. It was found that (a) HMP stimulation could be selectively inhibited under conditions where release of granule enzymes remained unchanged or was enhanced, for example, by reduced glucose concentration or by 2-deoxyglucose. (b) Removal of Ca++ and addition of agents which increased the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP), however, prevented both activities, while colchicine had greater inhibitory activity on HMP stimulation than upon secretion. (c) Neutrophils incubated in suspension with particulate aggregated gamma-globulin phagocytosed the particles and exhibited a stimulated HMP and released granule enzymes. In contrast, incubation in suspension with soluble aggregated gamma-globulin resulted in the stimulated HMP only. Granule evzymes were not liberated. 300-fold less soluble aggregates bound to a surface, however readily induced exocytosis of granules from adherent neutrophils. This demonstrates the importance of surface effects in the induction of secretion from neutrophils. Aggregated immunoglobulin reacting with neutrophil Fc receptors thus induces both degranulation (exocytosis) and increased HMP activity. The pathways leading to these events are separable although apparently sharing some common steps, including the initiating events. Images PMID:51031

  8. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  9. Effect of oral glutamine supplementation on human neutrophil lipopolysaccharide-stimulated degranulation following prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Walsh, N P; Blannin, A K; Bishop, N C; Robson, P J; Gleeson, M

    2000-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that neutrophils can utilize glutamine and that glutamine supplementation can improve neutrophil function in postoperative and burn patients. The present study investigated the influence of oral glutamine supplementation on stimulated neutrophil degranulation and oxidative burst activity following prolonged exercise. Subjects, 7 well-trained men, reported to the laboratory following an overnight fast and cycled for 2 hrs at 60% VO2max on two occasions a week apart. They were randomly assigned to either a glutamine or placebo treatment. For both trials, subjects consumed a sugar-free lemon drink at 15-min intervals until 90 minutes, then a lemon flavored glutamine drink (GLN) or sugar-free lemon drink (PLA) was consumed at 15-min intervals for the remaining exercise and the 2-hr recovery period. Venous blood samples were taken pre-, during, and postexercise. Glutamine supplementation had no effect on the magnitude of postexercise leukocytosis, the plasma elastase concentration following exercise (which increased in both trials), or the plasma elastase release in response to bacterial stimulation (which fell in both trials). Neutrophil function assessed by oxidative burst activity of isolated cells did not change following exercise in either trial. These findings therefore suggest that the fall in plasma glutamine concentration does not account for the decrease in neutrophil function (degranulation response) following prolonged exercise.

  10. SC-41930: An inhibitor of leukotriene B4-stimulated human neutrophil functions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, B.S.; Villani-Price, D.; Keith, R.H.; Zemaitis, J.M.; Bauer, R.F.; Leonard, R.; Djuric, S.W.; Shone, R.L. )

    1989-12-01

    SC-41930 was evaluated for effects on human neutrophil chemotaxis and degranulation. At concentrations up to 100 microM, SC-41930 alone exhibited no effect on neutrophil migration, but dose-dependently inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis induced by leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in a modified Boyden chamber. Concentrations of SC-41930 from 0.3 microM to 3 microM competitively inhibited LTB4-induced chemotaxis with a pA2 value of 6.35. While inactive at 10 microM against C5a-induced chemotaxis, SC-41930 inhibited N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced chemotaxis, with 10 times less potency than against LTB4-induced chemotaxis. SC-41930 inhibited (3H)LTB4 and (3H)fMLP binding to their receptor sites on human neutrophils with KD values of 0.2 microM and 2 microM, respectively. SC-41930 also inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis induced by 20-OH LTB or 12(R)-HETE. At concentrations up to 10 microM, SC-41930 alone did not cause neutrophil degranulation, but inhibited LTB4-induced degranulation in a noncompetitive manner. SC-41930 also inhibited fMLP- or C5a-induced degranulation, but was about 8 and 10 times less effective for fMLP and C5a, respectively. The results indicate that SC-41930 is a human neutrophil LTB4 receptor antagonist with greater specificity for LTB4 than for fMLP or C5a receptors.

  11. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D; Borregaard, N; Nissen, N I

    1991-04-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma undergoing GM-CSF treatment. Patients with either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with various dosages (2-16 micrograms kg-1 body weight per day for 5 days) of rhGM-CSF by intravenous or subcutaneous route. Prior to and on day 5 of rhGM-CSF treatment, neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence responses to f-Met-Leu-Phe, zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were determined. It was observed that chemotactic response of neutrophils to f-Met-Leu-Phe and ZAS was reduced, whereas the chemiluminescence response of both cell types to f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan was enhanced by up to 43-fold. rhGM-CSF treatment did not affect degranulation of the neutrophils as measured by release of vitamin B12 binding protein. Degree of modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by rhGM-CSF was independent of rhGM-CSF dosages administered. These data suggest that phagocytic defence system may be enhanced by GM-CSF treatment and that this cytokine may be a useful therapeutic adjunct in compromised patients.

  12. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  13. Trans-basement membrane migration of eosinophils induced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils from human peripheral blood in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Fuyumi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Noguchi, Toru; Araki, Ryuichiro; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Soma, Tomoyuki; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the airways of severe asthmatics, an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils is often observed despite high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We previously reported that interleukin-8-stimulated neutrophils induced trans-basement membrane migration (TBM) of eosinophils, suggesting the link between neutrophils and eosinophils. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the airway increase in severe asthma. As neutrophils express Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and can release chemoattractants for eosinophils, we investigated whether LPS-stimulated neutrophils modify eosinophil TBM. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and severe asthmatics. Eosinophil TBM was examined using a modified Boyden's chamber technique. Eosinophils were added to the upper compartment, and neutrophils and LPS were added to the lower compartment. Migrated eosinophils were measured by eosinophil peroxidase assays. LPS-stimulated neutrophils induced eosinophil TBM (about 10-fold increase), although LPS or neutrophils alone did not. A leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist, a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist or an anti-TLR4 antibody decreased eosinophil TBM enhanced by LPS-stimulated neutrophils by almost half. Neutrophils from severe asthmatics induced eosinophil TBM and lower concentrations of LPS augmented neutrophil-induced eosinophil TBM. These results suggest that the combination of neutrophils and LPS leads eosinophils to accumulate in the airways, possibly involved the pathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:27730145

  14. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates the expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of leukotrienes in human blood neutrophils chiefly relies on the activity of two enzymes, phospholipase A2 and 5-lipoxygenase (5- LO). In turn, the activation of the 5-LO requires the participation of a recently characterized membrane-bound protein, the 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP). In this study, we have investigated conditions under which FLAP expression in neutrophils may be modulated. Of several cytokines tested, only granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (and to a lesser extent tumor necrosis factor alpha) significantly increased expression of FLAP. GM-CSF increased FLAP mRNA steady-state levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect of GM-CSF on FLAP mRNA was inhibited by prior treatment of the cells with the transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D, and pretreatment of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, failed to prevent the increase in FLAP mRNA induced by GM-CSF. The accumulation of newly synthesized FLAP, as determined by immunoprecipitation after incorporation of 35S-labeled amino acids, was also increased after incubation of neutrophils with GM-CSF. In addition, the total level of FLAP protein was increased in GM-CSF- treated neutrophils, as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by Western blot. GM-CSF did not alter the stability of the FLAP protein, indicating that the effect of GM-CSF on FLAP accumulation was the consequence of increased de novo synthesis as opposed to decreased degradation of FLAP. Finally, incubation of neutrophils with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone directly stimulated the upregulation of FLAP mRNA and protein, and enhanced the effect of GM-CSF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that FLAP expression may be upmodulated after appropriate stimulation of neutrophils. The increase in FLAP expression induced by GM-CSF in inflammatory conditions could confer upon neutrophils a prolonged capacity to synthesize

  15. Platelets abrogate leukotriene B(4) generation by human blood neutrophils stimulated with monosodium urate monohydrate or f-Met-Leu-Phe in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Poubelle, Patrice E; Molière, Patrick; De Médicis, Rinaldo; Lussier, André; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Neutrophils are physiologically associated with platelets in whole blood. Inflammatory reactions can be modulated by the presence of platelets. To investigate the influence of platelets on neutrophil activity, we studied the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolic pathway in normal human blood neutrophils stimulated with f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) or monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) in the presence of autologous platelets. Platelets inhibited by more than 90% the synthesis of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE in neutrophils activated with fMLP or MSUM. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid did not reverse the inhibitory effect of platelets on 5-LOX-generated metabolites in fMLP- or MSUM-activated neutrophils. Preincubation of neutrophils with adenosine deaminase reversed the inhibitory effect of platelets in fMLP-treated neutrophils, indicating that adenosine was responsible for the platelet inhibition of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE formation. In contrast, adenosine deaminase had no influence on the inhibitory effects of platelets in MSUM-stimulated cells. These results suggest that platelets can inhibit the synthesis of 5-LOX products (a). by acting mainly downstream to phospholipase A(2) in cells stimulated by fMLP or MSUM, (b). through adenosine when neutrophils are activated with fMLP, and (c). by an adenosine-independent mechanism in MSUM-activated neutrophils by an as-yet-unidentified mediator.

  16. Iodination by stimulated human neutrophils. Studies on its stoichiometry, subcellular localization and relevance to microbial killing.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, A W; Garcia, R C; Harper, A M; Banga, J P

    1983-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase of phagocytic leucocytes is thought to utilize H2O2 to oxidize halides, which then react with and kill ingested microbes. This hypothesis was based largely on the incorporation of radiolabelled iodide into cells that had phagocytosed bacteria. The present studies investigated the stoichiometry of these reactions and the subcellular localization and electrophoretic pattern of the cellular components that became iodinated. 1. The stoichiometry of the reactions are such that only a small proportion (less than 0.3%) of the total oxygen consumed is utilized for iodination. Iodination after stimulation with the soluble stimulus phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which is not known to involve the azurophil granules and their contained myeloperoxidase, was comparable with that occurring after bacterial ingestion. 2. Analytical subcellular fractionation of cells that had phagocytosed bacteria localized about 25% of the radioactivity to the membranes, and most of the residual radioactivity distributed with the bacteria and dense granules. In cells stimulated with PMA, more of the radioactivity was associated with the membranes, but about half was still associated with the dense granules. 3. Autoradiographs after dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of cells stimulated with opsonized bacteria gave a similar distribution of iodinated components to that obtained with cells that had been stimulated with PMA or iodinated with Iodogen. These patterns of iodination were very different from those obtained when bacteria alone were iodinated with Iodogen or myeloperoxidase and H2O2. Preparations in which bacteria had been phagocytosed did not show evidence of iodination of bacterial proteins or coating opsonins. Thus positive evidence for the iodination of bacteria has not been produced, and the role of iodination in the microbicidal process of neutrophils remains to be established. Images Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6303312

  17. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) regulates f Met-Leu-Phe receptors on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Y H; Lopez, A F; Marasco, W A; Lucas, C M; Wong, G G; Burns, G F; Vadas, M A

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of mature human neutrophil function by recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) was studied. Preincubation of neutrophils with this CSF did not stimulate superoxide anion directly but enhanced the subsequent release of superoxide anion in response to stimulation with the bacterial product formylmethionylleucyl-phenylalanine (f Met-Leu-Phe). Enhanced superoxide anion production was evident by 5 min and reached a plateau at 30 min. In contrast, neutrophils preincubated with rH GM-CSF exhibited reduced chemotaxis under agarose in response to a gradient of f Met-Leu-Phe. The inhibition of neutrophil migration was dependent on the dose of rH GM-CSF and exhibited a time-course similar to the effect on superoxide production. Binding studies of f Met-Leu-[3H]Phe to purified human neutrophils revealed heterogeneous binding to unstimulated cells. Two affinity components were identified. The high-affinity component consisted of approximately 2000 sites/cell and had an average Kd of 4 +/- 2 nM (n = 6). The low-affinity component consisted of approximately 40,000 sites/cell and had an average Kd of 220 +/- 130 nM (n = 6). rH GM-CSF caused conversion to a linear Scatchard plot showing no significant change in total binding sites but a single Kd of 30 +/- 10 nM. These data indicate that rH GM-CSF may influence neutrophil responses to f Met-Leu-Phe by regulating the affinity of f Met-Leu-Phe receptors. PMID:2842255

  18. Sulfur mustard primes human neutrophils for increased degranulation and stimulates cytokine release via TRPM2/p38 MAPK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Hwa-Yong; Hong, Chang-Won; Lee, Si-Nae; Kwon, Min-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Song, Dong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2′-bis-chloroethyl-sulfide; SM) has been a military threat since the World War I. The emerging threat of bioterrorism makes SM a major threat not only to military but also to civilian world. SM injury elicits an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils. Although SM was reported to prime neutrophils, the mechanism has not been identified yet. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of SM-induced priming in human neutrophils. SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent fashion. Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 2 inhibitors (clotrimazole, econazole and flufenamic acid) and silencing of TRPM2 by shRNA attenuated SM-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase. SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules in response to activation by fMLP as previously reported. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, inhibited SM-induced priming. Neither PD98057, an ERK inhibitor, nor SP600215, a JNK inhibitor, inhibited SM-induced priming. In addition, SM enhanced phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 and release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. SB203580 inhibited SM-induced NF-kB phosphorylation and cytokine release. These results suggest the involvement of TRPM2/p38 MAPK pathway in SM-induced priming and cytokines release in neutrophils. -- Highlights: ► SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils through TPRM2-mediated calcium influx. ► SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules. ► SM enhanced p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. ► SM enhanced release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from human neutrophils. ► SB203580 inhibited SM-induced priming, NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and cytokine release.

  19. Lipoxin A4 and lipoxin B4 stimulate the release but not the oxygenation of arachidonic acid in human neutrophils: dissociation between lipid remodeling and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nigam, S; Fiore, S; Luscinskas, F W; Serhan, C N

    1990-06-01

    The profiles of actions of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and lipoxin B4 (LXB4), two lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids, were examined with human neutrophils. At nanomolar concentrations, LXA4 and LXB4 each stimulated the release of [1-14C]arachidonic acid from esterified sources in neutrophils. Lipoxin-induced release of [1-14C]arachidonic acid was both dose- and time-dependent and was comparable to that induced by the chemotactic peptide f-met-leu-phe. Time-course studies revealed that lipoxin A4 and lipoxin B4 each induced a biphasic release of [1-14C]arachidonic acid, which was evident within seconds (5-15 sec) in its initial phase and minutes (greater than 30 sec) in the second phase. In contrast, the all-trans isomers of LXA4 and LXB4 did not provoke [1-14C]AA release. Lipoxin-induced release of arachidonic acid was inhibited by prior treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin but not by its beta-oligomers, suggesting the involvement of guaninine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in this event. Dual radiolabeling of neutrophil phospholipid classes with [1-14C]arachidonic acid and [3H]palmitic acid showed that phosphatidylcholine was a major source of lipoxin-induced release of [1-14C]arachidonic acid. They also demonstrated that lipoxins rapidly stimulate both formation of phosphatidic acid as well as phospholipid remodeling. Although both LXA4 and LXB4 (10(-8)-10(-6) M) stimulated the release of [1-14C]arachidonic acid, neither compound evoked its oxygenation by either the 5- or 15-lipoxygenase pathways (including the formation of LTB4, 20-COOH-LTB4, 5-HETE, or 15-HETE). LXA4 and LXB4 (10(-7) M) each stimulated the elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ as monitored with Fura 2-loaded cells, albeit to a lesser extent than equimolar concentrations of FMLP. Neither lipoxin altered the binding of [3H]LTB4 to its receptor on neutrophils. In addition, they did not stimulate aggregation or induce adhesion of neutrophils to human endothelial cells. Results indicate that both LXA4 and

  20. Superoxide Anion Production by Human Neutrophils Activated by Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2.-) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  1. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  2. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  3. Interleukin-8 is a major neutrophil chemotactic factor derived from cultured human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with interleukin-1 beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Takashiba, S; Takigawa, M; Takahashi, K; Myokai, F; Nishimura, F; Chihara, T; Kurihara, H; Nomura, Y; Murayama, Y

    1992-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators produced by cells in the gingiva have been implicated in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease, a common infectious disease. In this study, we examined the biological activity of neutrophil chemotactic factors and the kinetics of expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA derived from normal gingival fibroblasts in response to inflammatory mediators in an in vitro model. Gingival fibroblasts stimulated by either recombinant human interleukin-1 beta or recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha produced neutrophil chemotactic factors after 4 h, whereas expression of cell-derived IL-8 mRNA was detected within 1 h after stimulation. Furthermore, in a neutralization assay, rabbit anti-recombinant human IL-8 antiserum inhibited neutrophil chemotactic activity to basal levels. These results provide evidence that gingival fibroblasts synthesize potent chemotactic factors such as IL-8 in the presence of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha. The activity of these factors may contribute to neutrophil-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Images PMID:1452358

  4. Dynamics of neutrophil rolling over stimulated endothelium in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, D J; el-Sabban, M E; Pauli, B U; Hammer, D A

    1994-01-01

    Prior to extravasation at sites of acute inflammation, neutrophils roll over activated endothelium. Neutrophil rolling is often characterized by the average rolling velocity. An additional dynamic feature of rolling that has been identified but not extensively studied is the fluctuation in the rolling velocity about the average. To analyze this characteristic further, we have measured the instantaneous velocity of bovine neutrophils interacting with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated bovine aortic endothelium at shear stresses of 1, 2, 3, and 4 dynes/cm2. The average velocities are quantitatively similar to those reported for human neutrophils rolling over reconstituted P-selectin at a surface density of 400 sites/microns 2. At all shear stresses tested, the population average variance in the instantaneous velocity is at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical variance generated from experimental error, indicating that the neutrophils translate with a nonconstant velocity. Possible sources of the variance are discussed. These include "macroscopic" sources such as topological heterogeneity in the endothelium and microscopic sources, such as inherent stochastic formation and breakage of the receptor-ligand bonds that mediate the rolling. Regardless of the ultimate source of the variance, these results justify the use of mathematical models that incorporate stochastic processes to describe bond formation and breakage between the neutrophil and the endothelium and hence are able to generate variable velocity trajectories. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:7521229

  5. Phosphorylation of CD18 in response to neutrophil stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jakes, S.; Schembri-King, J.; Wallace, R.W. )

    1991-03-11

    Leukocyte integrins containing the common {beta}-subunit (CD18) mediate the adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells. It has been shown that the CD18 is phosphorylated in response to the phorbol ester PMA and proposed that phosphorylation of CD18 triggers the enhanced avidity of leukocyte integrins. The purpose of this study was to determine if CD18 in human neutrophils is also phosphorylated in response to physiological stimuli, i.e. receptor mediated activation. After labeling freshly isolated human neutrophils with {sup 32}p it was found that CD18 was phosphorylated in response to PMA in a time dependent manner that corresponded to the rate of PMA induced homotypic aggregation. The receptor mediated stimuli fMLP, LTB{sub 4}, IL-8, and C5a were also effective at initiating rapid CD18 dependent homotypic aggregation of neutrophils. However, in none of the receptor mediated responses was the level of CD18 phosphorylation increased at any time from the addition of stimuli to the peak of homotypic aggregation. Though not conclusive, this study suggests that in human neutrophils, activation of the leukocyte integrins by PMA may involve signaling pathways distinct from those involved in activation through receptor mediated stimulation.

  6. Delayed human neutrophil apoptosis by Trichomonas vaginalis lysate.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Lim, Young-Su; Moon, Sun-Joo; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2010-03-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in the human immune system for protection against such microorganisms as a protozoan parasite, Trichomonas vaginalis; however, the precise role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of trichomoniasis is still unknown. Moreover, it is thought that trichomonal lysates and excretory-secretory products (ESP), as well as live T. vaginalis, could possibly interact with neutrophils in local tissues, including areas of inflammation induced by T. vaginalis in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of T. vaginalis lysate on the fate of neutrophils. We found that T. vaginalis lysate inhibits apoptosis of human neutrophils as revealed by Giemsa stain. Less altered mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and surface CD16 receptor expression also supported the idea that neutrophil apoptosis is delayed after T. vaginalis lysate stimulation. In contrast, ESP stimulated-neutrophils were similar in apoptotic features of untreated neutrophils. Maintained caspase-3 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) in neutrophils co-cultured with trichomonad lysate suggest that an intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis was involved in T. vaginalis lysate-induced delayed neutrophil apoptosis; this phenomenon may contribute to local inflammation in trichomoniasis. PMID:20333279

  7. Acetaminophen prevents oxidative burst and delays apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Couto, Diana; Porto, Graça; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2013-05-23

    Acetaminophen is a frequently prescribed over-the-counter drug to reduce fever and pain in the event of inflammatory process. As neutrophils are relevant cells in inflammatory processes, the putative interaction of acetaminophen with these cells, if present, would be of paramount importance. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acetaminophen in human neutrophils' oxidative burst and lifespan in vitro. The obtained results demonstrate that acetaminophen efficiently modulates neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner, at in vivo relevant concentrations. It was clearly demonstrated that acetaminophen is a strong scavenger of HOCl and H2O2, which probably contributed to the effect observed in neutrophils. Acetaminophen also induced the depletion of glutathione in stimulated neutrophils, suggesting its transformation into a reactive intermediate. Obtained results further revealed that acetaminophen affects programmed cell death of human neutrophils, resulting in a delay of previously stimulated neutrophils-mediated apoptosis. Overall, our data suggested that acetaminophen has considerable potential to be included in anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies, by preventing biological damage induced by an excessive production of reactive species generated in activated neutrophils and by extending the lifespan of neutrophils, favoring the elimination of pathogens, thus contributing to tissue healing and resolution of inflammation. PMID:23518321

  8. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  9. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  10. Cytochalasin B augments diacylglycerol levels in stimulated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, P.J.; Niedel, J.

    1986-03-05

    Diacylglycerol (DG) has gained wide acceptance as an important second messenger and intracellular activator of protein kinase C, but few studies have directly measured DG levels in cells or tissues. The authors measured the mass of DG in lipid extracts from normal human neutrophils by quantitative conversion of DG to (/sup 32/P) phosphatidic acid using E. coli DG kinase. The chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) stimulated a transient 30% rise in DG that was maximal at 30 to 45 sec and returned to the basal level of 150 picomoles/10/sup 7/ cells by one min. This initial peak was followed by a slower, more prolonged 30% increase in DG that was maximal at 20 min. Cytochalasin B (CB) augments many biological responses of neutrophils to fMLP, including superoxide production and lysosomal enzyme release. CB alone caused no change in basal DG levels, but in the presence of CB, fMLP stimulated a rapid, large, and persistent DG response. DG levels increased to 290% of basal at 5 min with a t1/2 = 45 sec. The DG response to fMLP was maximal at 5 to 10 ..mu..m CB and 1 ..mu..M fMLP. The DG response to optimal fMLP and CB concentrations was decreased 40% by an fMLP antagonist, and no response was elicited by an inactive fMLP analog and CB. Protein kinase C has been implicated in fMLP-stimulated superoxide production and lysosomal enzyme release. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that CB may effect augmentation of biological responses by increasing DG levels.

  11. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  12. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role.

  13. Stimulus-dependent secretion of plasma proteins from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, N; Kjeldsen, L; Rygaard, K; Bastholm, L; Nielsen, M H; Sengeløv, H; Bjerrum, O W; Johnsen, A H

    1992-01-01

    In search for matrix proteins released from secretory vesicles of human neutrophils, a prominent 67-kD protein was identified in the extracellular medium of neutrophils stimulated by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity and partially sequenced. The sequence of the first 32 NH2-terminal amino acids was identical to the sequence of albumin. mRNA for human albumin could not be detected in bone marrow cells, nor could biosynthetic labeling of albumin be demonstrated in bone marrow cells during incubation with [14C]leucine. Immunofluorescence studies on single cells demonstrated the presence of intracellular albumin in fixed permeabilized neutrophils. Light microscopy of immunogold-silver-stained cryosections visualized albumin in cytoplasmic "granules." The morphology of these was determined by immunoelectron microscopy as vesicles of varying form and size. Subcellular fractionation studies on unstimulated neutrophils demonstrated the presence of albumin in the low density pre-gamma and gamma-regions that contain secretory vesicles, but are devoid of specific granules and azurophil granules. Albumin was readily released from these structures during activation of neutrophils with inflammatory mediators. Immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of immunoglobulin and transferrin along with albumin in exocytosed material from stimulated neutrophils. This indicates that secretory vesicles are unique endocytic vesicles that can be triggered to exocytose by inflammatory stimuli. Images PMID:1378856

  14. Roles of phospholipase D in phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophil respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tianhui; Liu, Zhaoxia; Shen, Xun

    2011-03-01

    The phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated nutrophil respiratory burst has been considered to simply involve the activation of protein kinase C (PKC). However, the PLD activity was also increased by 10-fold in human neutrophils stimulated with 100 nM PMA. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, was found to significantly inhibit PMA-stimulated respiratory burst in human neutrophils. U73122 at the concentrations, which were sufficient to inhibit the respiratory burst completely, caused partial inhibition of the PLD activity but no inhibition on PKC translocation and activation, suggesting that PLD activity is also required in PMA-stimulated respiratory burst. Using 1-butanol, a PLD substrate, to block phosphatidic acid (PA) generation, the PMA-stimulated neutrophil respiratory burst was also partially inhibited, further indicating that PLD activation, possibly its hydrolytic product PA and diacylglycerol (DAG), is involved in PMA-stimulated respiratory burst. Since GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC that could completely inhibit the respiratory burst in PMA-stimulated neutrophils, also caused certain suppression of PLD activation, it may suggest that PLD activation in PMA-stimulated neutrophils might be, to some extent, PKC dependent. To further study whether PLD contributes to the PMA stimulated respiratory burst through itself or its hydrolytic product, 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, an analogue of DAG , was used to prime cells at low concentration, and it reversed the inhibition of PMA-stimulated respiratory burst by U73122. The results indicate that U73122 may act as an inhibitor of PLD, and PLD activation is required in PMA-stimulated respiratory burst.

  15. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil. PMID:27034964

  16. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. PMID:27036091

  17. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  18. Modulation of human neutrophil apoptosis by immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Gamberale, R; Giordano, M; Trevani, A S; Andonegui, G; Geffner, J R

    1998-10-01

    In the present study we examined whether immune complexes (IC) are able to modulate human neutrophil apoptosis. We observed different effects depending on the type of IC employed. Precipitating IC (pIC) and Ab-coated erythrocytes (E-IgG) triggered a marked stimulation of apoptosis, while heat-aggregated IgG and soluble IC, significantly delayed spontaneous apoptosis. Blocking Abs directed to Fcgamma receptor type II (FcgammaRII), but not to FcgammaRIII, markedly diminished the acceleration of apoptosis triggered by either pIC or E-IgG, supporting a critical role for FcgammaRII in apoptosis stimulation. This phenomenon, on the other hand, does not appear to involve IC phagocytosis or the participation of CR3. Acceleration of neutrophil apoptosis triggered by either pIC or E-IgG seems to require the activation of the respiratory burst, as suggested by 1) the ability of catalase to prevent apoptosis stimulation; 2) the effect of azide, an heme enzyme inhibitor, which dramatically enhanced apoptosis induced by pIC or E-IgG; and 3) the inability of pIC or E-IgG to accelerate apoptosis of neutrophils isolated from CGD patients. It is well established that IC affect the course of inflammation by inducing the release of inflammatory cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, oxidative agents, and other toxic molecules. Our results suggest that IC may also affect the course of inflammation by virtue of their ability to modulate neutrophil apoptosis.

  19. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  20. Involvement of purinergic signaling on nitric oxide production by neutrophils stimulated with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Bonan, Carla Denise; Tasca, Tiana

    2012-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasite from the human urogenital tract that causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease. The neutrophil infiltration has been considered to be primarily responsible for cytological changes observed at infection site, and the chemoattractants can play an important role in this leukocytic recruitment. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most widespread mediator compounds, and it is implicated in modulation of immunological mechanisms. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides are signaling molecules involved in several processes, including immune responses and control of leukocyte trafficking. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase members, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine deaminase (ectoADA) have been characterized in T. vaginalis. Herein, we investigated the effects of purinergic system on NO production by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis. The trophozoites were able to induce a high NO synthesis by neutrophils through iNOS pathway. The extracellular nucleotides ATP, ADP, and ATPγS (a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog) showed no significant change in NO secretion. In contrast, adenosine and its degradation product, inosine, promoted a low production of the compound. The immunosuppressive effect of adenosine upon NO release by neutrophils occurred due to adenosine A(2A) receptor activation. The ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity displayed by T. vaginalis was shown to be important in adenosine generation, indicating the efficiency of purinergic cascade. Our data suggest the influence of purinergic signaling, specifically adenosinergic system, on NO production by neutrophils in T. vaginalis infection, contributing to the immunological aspects of disease.

  1. The beetroot component betanin modulates ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Kostrzewa, Artur; Łuczak, Michał; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of betanin, one of the beetroot major components, on ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human resting and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate polymorphonuclear neutrophils, one of the key elements of the inflammatory response. Incubation of neutrophils with betanin in the concentration range 2-500 µM resulted in significant inhibition of ROS production (by 15-46%, depending on the ROS detection assay). The antioxidant capacity of betanin was most prominently expressed in the chemiluminescence measurements. This compound decreased also the percentage of DNA in comet tails in stimulated neutrophils, but only at the 24 h time point. In resting neutrophils an increased level of DNA in comet tails was observed. Betanin did not affect the activity of caspase-3, in resting neutrophils, but significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in stimulated neutrophils. The western blot analysis showed, however, an increased level of caspase-3 cleavage products as a result of betanin treatment both in resting and stimulated neutrophils. The results indicate that betanin may be responsible for the effect of beetroot products on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and its consequences, DNA damage and apoptosis. The dose and time dependent effects on these processes require further studies.

  2. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations degranulate human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; De Groot, E R; Eerenberg, A J; Bleeker, W K; Van Mierlo, G; Aarden, L A; Hack, C E

    1998-11-01

    IVIG preparations have biological effects in vivo that are not fully understood. Possible effects include the property to stimulate Fc receptors on various cell types. To study whether IVIG may interact with neutrophils we developed an in vitro system, in which neutrophils, in whole blood or purified, were incubated with IVIG and assessed for degranulation by measuring the release of elastase and lactoferrin in culture medium. All commercially available IVIG preparations tested induced degranulation of neutrophils when incubated for 2 h at therapeutically relevant concentrations. In studies with blocking antibodies against Fc receptors (FcR), this degranulation was shown to be dependent on Fc gammaRII, whereas Fc gammaRIII had no effect. Experiments with purified neutrophils as well as binding experiments with labelled IVIG preparations indicated that neutrophil degranulation resulted from a direct interaction of IVIG with neutrophils. Using gel filtration fractions, it was found that polymeric and dimeric IgG present in IVIG was mainly responsible for the degranulation. We suggest that degranulation of neutrophils may contribute to the (side)effects of IVIG treatment in vivo.

  3. Phagocytic activation of human neutrophils by the detergent component of fluosol.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D A; Forman, M B; Murray, J J

    1992-05-01

    Fluosol (Alpha Therapeutic Corporation, Los Angeles, CA) an emulsion of perfluorocarbons with a high oxygen-carrying capacity, was approved as an adjunct to alleviate myocardial ischemia during coronary angioplasty. This drug also significantly enhances myocardial salvage presumably related to an action on the neutrophil. The mechanism by which fluosol and its individual components, including the detergent Pluronic F-68, affected neutrophil function was examined. During the incubation of neutrophils with fluosol, a rapid stimulation of superoxide anion production and degranulation which progressively increased over a 30-minute period was detected. Neutrophils incubated with only Pluronic F-68 produced similar amounts of superoxide anion. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of phagocytosis, significantly inhibited this superoxide anion generation. As shown previously, neutrophils incubated with fluosol for 30 minutes and then subsequently stimulated manifested a reduction in lysozyme release as compared with untreated cells. Results of an electron microscopic examination confirmed the cellular uptake of the fluosol within phagocytic vacuoles. Neutrophil viability determined by trypan blue was unaffected after fluosol treatment. These observations show that the fluosol emulsion, primarily through micelles formed by the detergent Pluronic F-68, activates human neutrophils by serving as a phagocytic stimulus, which produces a cell refractory to subsequent stimulation.

  4. Intravenous infusion of erythromycin inhibits CXC chemokine production, but augments neutrophil degranulation in whole blood stimulated with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Schultz, M J; Speelman, P; Hack, C E; Buurman, W A; van Deventer, S J; van Der Poll, T

    2000-08-01

    Macrolides may influence the inflammatory response to an infection by mechanisms that are unrelated to their antimicrobial effect. Indeed, erythromycin and other macrolides inhibit cytokine production and induce degranulation of neutrophils in vitro. CXC chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that specifically influence neutrophil functions. To determine the effect of a clinically relevant dose of erythromycin on the production of CXC chemokines and neutrophil degranulation, six healthy humans received a 30 min iv infusion of erythromycin (1000 mg). Whole blood obtained before and at various times after the infusion was stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae. Ex vivo production of the CXC chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8) and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant 78 (ENA-78), in whole blood obtained after erythromycin infusion, was lower than that in blood drawn before erythromycin infusion (maximum inhibition post-infusion: 32.9 +/- 6.5% and 35.2 +/- 12.6% decrease in production, respectively, expressed as percentage change relative to production before infusion of erythromycin, both P < 0.05). In contrast, infusion of erythromycin was associated with an enhanced capacity of whole blood to release the neutrophil degranulation products bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI), human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and human lactoferrin (HLF) upon stimulation with S. pneumoniae. Effects of erythromycin were greatest 4 h after infusion was stopped, when BPI, HNE and HLF concentrations were increased by +107.6 +/- 33.5%, +134.7 +/- 34.8% and +205.9 +/- 55.9 %, respectively (expressed as percentage change relative to production before infusion of erythromycin) (all P < 0. 05). These results indicate the ability of erythromycin to reduce CXC chemokine production and to enhance neutrophil degranulation in human blood.

  5. Phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R; Kennedy, Adam D; Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and, unexpectedly, uptake of S. aureus by adherent neutrophils occurred efficiently in the absence of opsonins. An antibody specific for S. aureus promoted uptake of unopsonized bacteria in suspension, but had little or no capacity to enhance phagocytosis of S. aureus opsonized with normal human serum or by adherent neutrophils. Collectively, these results indicate that assay conditions can have a significant influence on the phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by neutrophils. More importantly, the results suggest a vaccine approach directed to enhance opsonophagocytosis alone is not sufficient to promote increased killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. With the emergence and reemergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, establishing parameters that are optimal for studying neutrophil-S. aureus interactions will pave the way towards developing immune-directed strategies for anti-staphylococcal therapies.

  6. Mechanism of interferon-gamma production by monocytes stimulated with myeloperoxidase and neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Kawata, Jin; Yamamoto, Toshitaka; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ono, Tomomichi; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have an important role in antimicrobial innate immunity and release substances that may modulate the immune response. We investigated the effects of soluble factors from NETs and neutrophil granule proteins on human monocyte function by using the Transwell system to prevent cell-cell contact. NET formation was induced by exposing human neutrophils to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). When monocytes were incubated with PMA alone, expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA was upregulated, but IL-10, IL-12, and interferon (IFN)-gamma mRNA were not detected. Incubation of monocytes with NETs enhanced the expression of IL-10 and IFN-gamma mRNA, but not IL-12 mRNA. Myeloperoxidase stimulated IFN-gamma production by monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Both a nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor (PDTC) and an intracellular calcium antagonist (TMB-8) prevented upregulation of IFN-gamma production. Neither a combined p38alpha and p38beta inhibitor (SB203580) nor an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor (PD98059) suppressed IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, a combined p38gamma and p38delta inhibitor (BIRB796) significantly decreased IFN-gamma production. These findings suggest that myeloperoxidase induces IFN-gamma production by monocytes via p38gamma/delta mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  7. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) stimulates chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hänsch, Gertrud M; Prior, Birgit; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Obst, Ursula; Overhage, Joerg

    2014-06-12

    Cross-talk between bacteria and mammalian cells is increasingly recognized as an important factor, especially during chronic infections. In particular, the interaction of extracellular bacterial signaling molecules with cells of the innate immune response is of special interest. In this context, we investigated whether the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which is a quorum sensing molecule produced by bacteria and participates in biofilm formation and virulence has any influence on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), the cells of the "first line defense" against bacterial infections. We found that PQS did not enhance the bactericidal activity of PMN and did not induce apoptosis at concentrations up to 100 µM. However, PQS stimulated chemotaxis of PMN in doses of 10-100 µM. This PQS-dependent chemotaxis could be inhibited with SB203580 which blocks MAPkinase p38, suggesting a signaling pathway similar to AHL-12 induction. Using bacterial cell culture supernantants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild-type cells and a PQS-deficient mutant strain support the in vivo relevance of these findings. Since PQS is produced in the early phase of biofilm formation, PMN infiltration could be timely enough to eradicate bacteria before biofilm formation is completed, which confers the bacteria with a relative resistance to host defense mechanisms.

  8. Intracellular localization of VAMP-1 protein in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, S M

    2001-02-01

    We studied the intracellular localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP-1 in human neutrophils. VAMP-1 was associated with membranes of gelatinase and specific secretory granules rapidly mobilized during exocytosis. VAMP-1 probably acts as a component of the SNARE complex during exocytosis of gelatinase and specific granules in human neutrophils.

  9. Regulation of catalase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Effects of oxidant stress and exposure to human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H Y; Hassett, D J; Bean, K; Cohen, M S

    1992-09-01

    We studied the effects of oxidant stress on the catalase activity and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is an obligate pathogen of man that evokes a remarkable but ineffective neutrophil response. Gonococci make no superoxide dismutase but express high catalase activity. Gonococcal catalase activity increased threefold when organisms were subjected to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide. This increase in catalase activity was marked by a parallel increase in protein concentration recognized by a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against the purified gonococcal enzyme. Catalase was primarily localized to the gonococcal cytoplasm in the presence or absence of stress; only a single isoenzyme of catalase could be identified. Exposure of gonococci to neutrophil-derived oxidants was accomplished by stimulating neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or by using gonococcal Opa variants that interacted with neutrophils with different degrees of efficiency. Gonococci exposed to neutrophils demonstrated a twofold increase in catalase activity in spite of some reduction in viability. Exposure of gonococci to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide made the organisms significantly more resistant to higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and to neutrophils than control organisms. These results suggest that catalase is an important defense for N. gonorrhoeae during attack by human neutrophils. The rapid response of this enzyme to hydrogen peroxide should be taken into consideration in studies designed to evaluate the interaction between neutrophils and gonococci. PMID:1522209

  10. p38 MAPK is involved in human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodosthoma.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adriana S; Setúbal, Sulamita da S; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; da Silva, Francisquinha Souza; da Silva, Silvana D; Fernandes, Carla F C; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2016-09-01

    The action of LAAO, an L-amino acid oxidase isolated from Calloselasma rhodosthoma snake venom, on isolated human neutrophil function was investigated. Cr-LAAO showed no toxicity on neutrophils. Cr-LAAO in its native form induced the neutrophil chemotaxis, suggesting that its primary structure is essential for stimulation the cell. p38 MAPK and PI3K have a role as signaling pathways of CR-LAAO induced chemotaxis. This toxin also induced the production of hydrogen peroxide and stimulated phagocytosis in neutrophils. Furthermore, Cr-LAAO was able to stimulate neutrophils to release IL-6, IL-8, MPO, LTB4 and PGE2. Together, the data showed that the Cr-LAAO triggers relevant proinflammatory events.

  11. Mediators of neutrophil recruitment in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Houard, Xavier; Touat, Ziad; Ollivier, Véronique; Louedec, Liliane; Philippe, Monique; Sebbag, Uriel; Meilhac, Olivier; Rossignol, Patrick; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neutrophils/platelet interactions are involved in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The intraluminal thrombus (ILT) is a human model of platelet/neutrophil interactions. The present study focused on mediators involved in neutrophil recruitment in AAA. Methods and results Conditioned media from luminal, intermediate, and abluminal layers of 29 human ILTs were analysed for neutrophil markers [elastase/α1-antitrypsin and MMP9/NGAL complexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and α-defensin peptides], RANTES, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Their time-dependent release into serum from clots generated in vitro and their plasma concentrations in AAA patients and controls were determined. Immunohistochemistry for neutrophils, platelets, IL-8, PF4, and RANTES on AAA sections was performed; and molecules involved in ILT neutrophil chemotactic function were analysed in vitro. Neutrophils and platelets colocalized in the luminal layer of the thrombus. Consistently, neutrophil markers and platelet-derived RANTES and PF4 were released predominantly by the luminal thrombus pole, where their concentrations were significantly correlated. The luminal ILT layer was also the main source of IL-8, whose immunostaining colocalized with neutrophils. All were also released time dependently from clots and were increased in plasma of AAA patients. Luminal ILT layers displayed potent neutrophil chemotactic activity in vitro, which was inhibited by RANTES- and IL-8-blocking antibodies as well as by reparixin, an antagonist of the IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that platelet-derived RANTES and neutrophil-derived IL-8 are involved in attracting neutrophils to the luminal layer of AAA ILT. PMID:19201759

  12. Beta 2-adrenergic receptor regulation of human neutrophil function is sexually dimorphic.

    PubMed

    de Coupade, Catherine; Gear, Robert W; Dazin, Paul F; Sroussi, Herve Y; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2004-12-01

    While the mechanisms underlying the marked sexual dimorphism in inflammatory diseases are not well understood, the sexually dimorphic sympathoadrenal axis profoundly affects the inflammatory response. We tested whether adrenergic receptor-mediated activation of human neutrophil function is sexually dimorphic, since neutrophils provide the first line of defense in the inflammatory response. There was a marked sexual dimorphism in beta(2)-adrenergic receptor binding, using the specific beta(2)-adrenergic receptor ligand, [(3)H]-dihydroalprenolol, with almost three times more binding sites on neutrophils from females (20,878 +/- 2470) compared to males (7331 +/- 3179). There was also a marked sexual dimorphism in the effects of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, which increased nondirected locomotion (chemokinesis) in neutrophils obtained from females, while having no effect on neutrophils from males. Isoprenaline stimulated the release of a chemotactic factor from neutrophils obtained from females, but not from males. This chemotactic factor acts on the G protein-coupled CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) chemokine receptor, since an anti-CXCR2 antibody and the selective nonpeptide CXCR2 antagonist SB225002, inhibited chemotaxis produced by this factor. While interleukin- (IL-) 8 is a principal CXCR2 ligand, isoprenaline did not produce an increase in IL-8 release from neutrophils. IL-8-induced chemotaxis was inhibited in a sexually dimorphic manner by isoprenaline, which also stimulated release of a mediator from neutrophils that induced chemotaxis, that was inhibited by anti-CXCR2 antibodies. These findings indicate an important role for adrenergic receptors in the modulation of neutrophil trafficking, which could contribute to sex-differences in the inflammatory response. PMID:15477226

  13. Effects of Anti-Human Neutrophil Antibodies In Vitro. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Laurence A.; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1974-01-01

    Opsonic, antiphagocytic, cytotoxic, and metabolic effects of homologous and heterologous antibodies against human neutrophils were analyzed by means of quantitative assays to facilitate detection of antibody activity, and to probe membrane function of these cells. Normal human neutrophils were purified by gradient centrifugation, sensitized with heat-inactivated antineutrophil antisera, and incubated with rabbit alveolar macrophages in balanced salt solution containing nitroblue tetrazolium. The macrophages engulfed sensitized neutrophils and reduced nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan in phagocytic vacuoles. The initial rate of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by macrophages ingesting the neutrophils was measured spectrophotometrically. Neutrophils treated with rabbit anti-human leukocyte antiserum or IgG, with sera from mothers of infants with neonatal isoimmune neutropenia, and with 27% of sera from frequently transfused patients promoted rapid rates of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by alveolar macrophages. This indicates that antineutrophil antibodies without added complement opsonized neutrophils for ingestion by the macrophages. Some sera from frequently transfused patients with opsonic activity for certain donors' neutrophils did not agglutinate these neutrophils (44%), did not lyse them in the presence of fresh plasma (47%), and did not inhibit phagocytosis of particles by the neutrophils (26%). The reverse was not observed. The opsonic activity of antineutrophil antiserum appears to be the most sensitive and a quantitative means of detecting antibody activity in vitro. Low concentrations of rabbit anti-human leukocyte antisera or IgG stimulated the ingestion rate of unopsonized or opsonized particles by human neutrophils, and, as previously reported by others, enhanced rates of oxidation of [1-14C]glucose by the cells. High concentrations of the antisera or IgG inhibited ingestion. All concentrations of homologous antineutrophil antisera tested only

  14. Phagocytes as Carcinogens: Malignant Transformation Produced by Human Neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzman, Sigmund A.; Weitberg, Alan B.; Clark, Edward P.; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1985-03-01

    In a study of the relation between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis, C3H mouse fibroblasts of the 10T 1/2 clone 8 line (10T 1/2 cells) were exposed to human neutrophils stimulated to synthesize reactive oxygen intermediates or to a cell-free enzymatic system generating superoxide (xanthine oxidase plus hypoxanthine). After exposure, the 10T 1/2 cells were either placed in tissue culture or immediately injected into athymic nude mice. Both malignant and benign tumors developed in the mice injected with treated cells, but not in those injected with control cells; in one instance cells grown from one of the benign tumors subsequently developed a malignant phenotype. Malignant transformation was also observed in treated cells in the experiments in vitro.

  15. Chemotactic response of human neutrophils to N-acetyl chitohexaose in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tokoro, A; Suzuki, K; Matsumoto, T; Mikami, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, M

    1988-01-01

    N-Acetyl chitohexaose (NACOS-6) was able to display chemotactic response of human neutrophils in vitro. In order to analyze the mechanism, a series of chemotaxis studies by means of neutrophils treated with inhibitors of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, or lipoxygenase to NACOS-6 was conducted. The treatment of neutrophils with inhibitors of phospholipase A2 or cyclooxygenase resulted in decrease of number of migrated cells. However, the lipoxygenase inhibitors did not exhibit the same effect. On the other hand, the treatment of neutrophils with inhibitors of phospholipase A2 or lipoxygenase resulted in decrease of chemotactic response to Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP), although the cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not inhibit chemotaxis of neutrophils. Neutrophils added to exogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) caused an enhanced chemotactic response to NACOS-6. These results indicate that the mechanism of chemotactic response to NACOS-6 was different from that of FMLP, and that the response was enhanced by PGE2 released from the neutrophils with stimulation of NACOS-6.

  16. 7-Hydroxycoumarin modulates the oxidative metabolism, degranulation and microbial killing of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Luciana M; Fuzissaki, Carolina N; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H; da C Ferreira, Ana Maria; Naal, Zeki; Santos, Everton O L; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Vermelho, Roberta B; Malvezzi, Alberto; Amaral, Antonia T-do; Lopes, João Luis C; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-10-25

    In the present study, we assessed whether 7-hydroxycoumarin (umbelliferone), 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and their acetylated analogs modulate some of the effector functions of human neutrophils and display antioxidant activity. These compounds decreased the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion, release primary granule enzymes, and kill Candida albicans. Cytotoxicity did not mediate their inhibitory effect, at least under the assessed conditions. These coumarins scavenged hypochlorous acid and protected ascorbic acid from electrochemical oxidation in cell-free systems. On the other hand, the four coumarins increased the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and serum-opsonized zymosan. Oxidation of the hydroxylated coumarins by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase produced highly reactive coumarin radical intermediates, which mediated the prooxidant effect observed in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. These species also oxidized ascorbic acid and the spin traps α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone and 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Therefore, 7-hydroxycoumarin and the derivatives investigated here were able to modulate the effector functions of human neutrophils and scavenge reactive oxidizing species; they also generated reactive coumarin derivatives in the presence of myeloperoxidase. Acetylation of the free hydroxyl group, but not addition of the 4-methyl group, suppressed the biological effects of 7-hydroxycoumarin. These findings help clarify how 7-hydroxycoumarin acts on neutrophils to produce relevant anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:23994743

  17. 7-Hydroxycoumarin modulates the oxidative metabolism, degranulation and microbial killing of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Luciana M; Fuzissaki, Carolina N; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H; da C Ferreira, Ana Maria; Naal, Zeki; Santos, Everton O L; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Vermelho, Roberta B; Malvezzi, Alberto; Amaral, Antonia T-do; Lopes, João Luis C; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-10-25

    In the present study, we assessed whether 7-hydroxycoumarin (umbelliferone), 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and their acetylated analogs modulate some of the effector functions of human neutrophils and display antioxidant activity. These compounds decreased the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion, release primary granule enzymes, and kill Candida albicans. Cytotoxicity did not mediate their inhibitory effect, at least under the assessed conditions. These coumarins scavenged hypochlorous acid and protected ascorbic acid from electrochemical oxidation in cell-free systems. On the other hand, the four coumarins increased the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and serum-opsonized zymosan. Oxidation of the hydroxylated coumarins by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase produced highly reactive coumarin radical intermediates, which mediated the prooxidant effect observed in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. These species also oxidized ascorbic acid and the spin traps α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone and 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Therefore, 7-hydroxycoumarin and the derivatives investigated here were able to modulate the effector functions of human neutrophils and scavenge reactive oxidizing species; they also generated reactive coumarin derivatives in the presence of myeloperoxidase. Acetylation of the free hydroxyl group, but not addition of the 4-methyl group, suppressed the biological effects of 7-hydroxycoumarin. These findings help clarify how 7-hydroxycoumarin acts on neutrophils to produce relevant anti-inflammatory effects.

  18. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  19. Capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans modulate production of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana D B; Nascimento, Michelle T C; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Côrte-Real, Suzana; Morrot, Alexandre; Heise, Norton; Nunes, Marise P; Previato, José Osvaldo; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; DosReis, George A; Saraiva, Elvira M; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we characterized the in vitro modulation of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) induced in human neutrophils by the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, evaluating the participation of capsular polysaccharides glucuronoxylomanan (GXM) and glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal) in this phenomenon. The mutant acapsular strain CAP67 and the capsular polysaccharide GXMGal induced NET production. In contrast, the wild-type strain and the major polysaccharide GXM did not induce NET release. In addition, C. neoformans and the capsular polysaccharide GXM inhibited PMA-induced NET release. Additionally, we observed that the NET-enriched supernatants induced through CAP67 yeasts showed fungicidal activity on the capsular strain, and neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, collagenase and histones were the key components for the induction of NET fungicidal activity. The signaling pathways associated with NET induction through the CAP67 strain were dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peptidylarginine deiminase-4 (PAD-4). Neither polysaccharide induced ROS production however both molecules blocked the production of ROS through PMA-activated neutrophils. Taken together, the results demonstrate that C. neoformans and the capsular component GXM inhibit the production of NETs in human neutrophils. This mechanism indicates a potentially new and important modulation factor for this fungal pathogen. PMID:25620354

  20. Legionella phosphatase hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and inosital triphosphate in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, J.N.; Saha, A.K.; Glew, R.H.

    1987-05-01

    Legionella are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens which multiply in host phagocytes. L. micdadei cells contain an acid phosphatase (ACP) that blocks superoxide anion production by human neutrophils stimulated with the formylated peptide, fMLP. The possibility that ACP acts by interefering with polyphosphoinositide metabolism and the production of the intracellular second messenger, inositol triphosphate (IP3) was explored. When neutrophil phosphoinositides were labeled with TSP, incubation of the cells with ACP caused an 85% loss of the labeled phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) over 2 h. Treatment of (TH)inositol-labeled neutrophils with ACP for 30 min resulted in a 20% decrease of labeled PIP2. Following fMLP stimulation, the fractional reduction in PIP2 and the fractional increase in IP3 was the same in ACP-treated and untreated neutrophils, but the total quantity of IP3 was reduced by ACP pre-treatment. The reduction in IP3 generated following fMLP stimulation seems to be due primarily to the decreased amount of PIP2 available for hydrolysis. However, some loss of IP3 due to direct hydrolysis by ACP cannot be ruled out. The Legionella phosphatase may compromise neutrophil response to the bacteria by hydrolyzing PIP2, the prognitor of IP3, and by hydrolyzing IP3 itself.

  1. Simultaneous use of electrochemistry and chemiluminescence to detect reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Shleev, Sergey; Wetterö, Jonas; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2008-12-01

    A novel approach for the simultaneous optical and electrochemical detection of biologically produced reactive oxygen species has been developed and applied. The set-up consists of a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay combined with two amperometric biosensors sensitive to superoxide anion radicals (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), respectively. The method permits direct, real-time in vitro determination of both extra- and intracellular O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) produced by human neutrophil granulocytes. The rate of O(2)(-) production by stimulated neutrophils was calculated to about 10(-17)mol s(-1) per single cell. With inhibited NADPH oxidase, a distinct extracellular release of H(2)O(2) instead of O(2)(-) was obtained from stimulated neutrophils with the rate of about 3 x 10(-18)mol s(-1) per single cell. When the H(2)O(2) release was discontinued, fast H(2)O(2) utilisation was observed. Direct interaction with and possibly attachment of neutrophils to redox protein-modified gold electrodes, resulted in a spontaneous respiratory burst in the population of cells closely associated to the electrode surface. Hence, further stimulation of human neutrophils with a potent receptor agonist (fMLF) did not significantly increase the O(2)(-) sensitive amperometric response. By contrast, the H(2)O(2) sensitive biosensor, based on an HRP-modified graphite electrode, was able to reflect the bulk concentration of H(2)O(2), produced by stimulated neutrophils and would be very useful in modestly equipped biomedical research laboratories. In summary, the system would also be appropriate for assessment of several other metabolites in different cell types, and tissues of varying complexity, with only minor electrode modifications.

  2. Wolbachia endosymbionts induce neutrophil extracellular trap formation in human onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Turner, Joseph D.; Pionnier, Nicolas; Midgley, Angela; Guimaraes, Ana F.; Johnston, Kelly L.; Edwards, Steven W.; Taylor, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The endosymbiotic bacteria, Wolbachia, induce neutrophilic responses to the human helminth pathogen Onchocerca volvulus. The formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), has been implicated in anti-microbial defence, but has not been identified in human helminth infection. Here, we demonstrate NETs formation in human onchocerciasis. Extracellular NETs and neutrophils were visualised around O. volvulus in nodules excised from untreated patients but not in nodules from patients treated with the anti-Wolbachia drug, doxycycline. Whole Wolbachia or microspheres coated with a synthetic Wolbachia lipopeptide (WoLP) of the major nematode Wolbachia TLR2/6 ligand, peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein, induced NETosis in human neutrophils in vitro. TLR6 dependency of Wolbachia and WoLP NETosis was demonstrated using purified neutrophils from TLR6 deficient mice. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that NETosis occurs during natural human helminth infection and demonstrate a mechanism of NETosis induction via Wolbachia endobacteria and direct ligation of Wolbachia lipoprotein by neutrophil TLR2/6. PMID:27752109

  3. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Is a Human and Murine Neutrophil Chemorepellent

    PubMed Central

    Herlihy, Sarah E.; Pilling, Darrell; Maharjan, Anu S.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, AprA is a secreted protein that inhibits proliferation and causes chemorepulsion of Dictyostelium cells, yet AprA has little sequence similarity to any human proteins. We found that a predicted structure of AprA has similarity to human dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). DPPIV is a serine protease present in extracellular fluids that cleaves peptides with a proline or alanine in the second position. In Insall chambers, DPPIV gradients below, similar to, and above the human serum DPPIV concentration cause movement of human neutrophils away from the higher concentration of DPPIV. A 1% DPPIV concentration difference between the front and back of the cell is sufficient to cause chemorepulsion. Neutrophil speed and viability are unaffected by DPPIV. DPPIV inhibitors block DPPIV-mediated chemorepulsion. In a murine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome, aspirated bleomycin induces a significant increase in the number of neutrophils in the lungs after 3 d. Oropharyngeal aspiration of DPPIV inhibits the bleomycin-induced accumulation of mouse neutrophils. These results indicate that DPPIV functions as a chemorepellent of human and mouse neutrophils, and they suggest new mechanisms to inhibit neutrophil accumulation in acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:23677473

  4. Expression and bioregulation of the kallikrein-related peptidases family in the human neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Lizama, Alejandro J; Andrade, Yessica; Colivoro, Patricio; Sarmiento, Jose; Matus, Carola E; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Bhoola, Kanti D; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2015-08-01

    The family of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) has been identified in a variety of immunolabeled human tissue sections, but no previous study has experimentally confirmed their presence in the human neutrophil. We have investigated the expression and bioregulation of particular KLKs in the human neutrophil and, in addition, examined whether stimulation by a kinin B(1) receptor (B1R) agonist or fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) induces their secretion. Western blot analysis of neutrophil homogenates indicated that the MM of the KLKs ranged from 27 to 50 kDa. RT-PCR showed that blood neutrophils expressed only KLK1, KLK4, KLK10, KLK13, KLK14 and KLK15 mRNAs, whereas the non-differentiated HL-60 cells expressed most of them, with exception of KLK3 and KLK7. Nevertheless, mRNAs for KLK2, KLK5, KLK6 and KLK9 that were previously undetectable appeared after challenging with a mixture of cytokines. Both kinin B(1)R agonist and fMLP induced secretion of KLK1, KLK6, KLK10, KLK13 and KLK14 into the culture medium in similar amounts, whereas the B(1)R agonist caused the release of lower amounts of KLK2, KLK4 and KLK5. When secreted, the differing proteolytic activity of KLKs provides the human neutrophil with a multifunctional enzymatic capacity supporting a new dimension for its role in human disorders of diverse etiology.

  5. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-03-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface.

  6. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface. Images PMID:46842

  7. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. PMID:27558325

  8. A novel member of the integrin receptor family mediates Arg-Gly-Asp- stimulated neutrophil phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Human neutrophils (PMN) express a heterodimeric receptor that has ligand binding specificity for the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence within many adhesive proteins. A monoclonal antibody, B6H12, which binds to this receptor, inhibits both RGD-mediated ligand binding and stimulation of IgG-mediated phagocytosis by fibronectin, fibrinogen, vitronectin, von Willebrand's factor, and collagen type IV. By several criteria this receptor is neither a known very late antigen, a known cytoadhesin (gp IIb/IIIa-vitronectin receptor), nor a member of the LFA- 1, Mac-1, p150,95 group of integrin receptors. Ligand binding via this receptor is rapidly inactivated by products of the myeloperoxidase- hydrogen peroxide-halide system of PMN. We conclude that this receptor, for which we propose the name leukocyte response integrin, is a signal- transducing molecule on PMN which may have a significant early role in modulation of PMN function at inflammatory sites. PMID:2785522

  9. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives.

    PubMed

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Asquith, Becca; Macallan, Derek

    2016-06-30

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. PMID:27136946

  10. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Macallan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. PMID:27136946

  11. Faropenem enhances superoxide anion production by human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Sato, N; Shimizu, H; Tsutiya, T; Takahashi, H; Kakizaki, S; Takayama, H; Takagi, H; Mori, M

    1999-09-01

    Neutrophils are important cellular components in the defence against infections and many studies in vitro have shown that some antibiotics affect neutrophil function. We examined the effect of faropenem, a new oral penem antibiotic on neutrophil killing function by determining the generation of superoxide anion in vitro. The production of superoxide anion was measured by chemiluminescence amplified by a Cypridina luciferin analogue in the presence of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Faropenem significantly enhanced chemiluminescence in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of faropenem was maximal at 5 min of incubation time and continued for at least 30 min. The effect of faropenem was also observed when neutrophils were stimulated by a calcium ionophore (ionomycin), while the effect of faropenem did not change in the presence of 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbolmyristate acetate. Cytosol Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) monitored with Fura-2 increased in response to fMLP, however, faropenem did not influence the response of [Ca2+]i to fMLP. Our results suggest that faropenem enhanced the generation of superoxide anion by neutrophils, probably at the site where cytosol Ca2+ regulates NADPH oxidase. Faropenem might be potentially advantageous in the treatment of infections because a synergic interaction of antibodies and cytocidal neutrophils is necessary for the early eradication of the pathogenic bacteria. PMID:10511400

  12. The Interactions of Human Neutrophils with Shiga Toxins and Related Plant Toxins: Danger or Safety?

    PubMed Central

    Brigotti, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxins and ricin are well characterized similar toxins belonging to quite different biological kingdoms. Plant and bacteria have evolved the ability to produce these powerful toxins in parallel, while humans have evolved a defense system that recognizes molecular patterns common to foreign molecules through specific receptors expressed on the surface of the main actors of innate immunity, namely monocytes and neutrophils. The interactions between these toxins and neutrophils have been widely described and have stimulated intense debate. This paper is aimed at reviewing the topic, focusing particularly on implications for the pathogenesis and diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:22741061

  13. IL-17 attenuates the anti-apoptotic effects of GM-CSF in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Saffar, Arash Shoja; Shan, Lianyu; Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is a pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine that is implicated in chronic inflammatory and degenerative disorders. IL-17 has been demonstrated to link activated T-lymphocyte with the recruitment of neutrophils at sites of inflammation, however whether IL-17 can mediate neutrophil survival and subsequently affect inflammatory responses has not fully been elucidated. In our study, we demonstrate that human peripheral blood and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils express mRNA and cell surface IL-17A receptor. IL-17A does not affect the rate of spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis, however significantly decreased granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mediated survival by antagonizing the signal transduction pathways of p38, Erk1/2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5B. These events were associated with reduced myeloid cell lymphoma-1 (Mcl-1) protein levels, increased translocation and aggregation of Bax to mitochondria, decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential and in an increase in caspase-3/7 activity. These events were independent of increased Fas or soluble Fas ligand expression levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that IL-17 may regulate neutrophil homeostasis and favor the resolution of inflamed tissues by attenuating the delay in neutrophil apoptosis induced by inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Francisella tularensis alters human neutrophil gene expression: insights into the molecular basis of delayed neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Justin T; Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha; Kobayashi, Scott D; McCracken, Jenna; Whitney, Adeline R; Deleo, Frank R; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that Francisella tularensis profoundly impairs human neutrophil apoptosis, but how this is achieved is largely unknown. Herein we used human oligonucleotide microarrays to test the hypothesis that changes in neutrophil gene expression contribute to this phenotype, and now demonstrate that F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) caused significant changes in neutrophil gene expression over a 24-hour time period relative to the uninfected controls. Of approximately 47,000 genes analyzed, 3,435 were significantly up- or downregulated by LVS, including 365 unique genes associated with apoptosis and cell survival. Specific targets in this category included genes asso-ciated with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (CFLAR, TNFAIP3, TNFRSF10D, SOD2, BCL2A1, BIRC4, PIM2, TNFSF10, TNFRSF10C, CASP2 and CASP8) and genes that act via the NFĸB pathway and other mechanisms to prolong cell viability (NFKB1, NFKB2 and RELA, IL1B, CAST, CDK2,GADD45B, BCL3, BIRC3, CDK2, IL1A, PBEF1, IL6, CXCL1, CCL4 and VEGF). The microarray data were confirmed by qPCR and pathway analysis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein remained abundant in polymorphonuclear leukocytes over 48 h of LVS infection, whereas BAX mRNA and protein were progressively downregulated. These data strongly suggest that antiapoptotic and prosurvival mechanisms collaborate to sustain the viability of F. tularensis--infected neutrophils. PMID:22986450

  15. Inactivation of enzymes and oxidative modification of proteins by stimulated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C N

    1987-02-15

    Differentiated, stimulated HL-60 cells and freshly isolated, stimulated neutrophils inactivate glutamine synthetase (L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2) either inside or outside of Escherichia coli. Stimulated neutrophils also inactivate at least four endogenous enzymes which are inactivated by mixed-function oxidation (MFO) systems in vitro (L. Fucci, C.N. Oliver, M.J. Coon, and E.R. Stadtman (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80, 1521-1525). The inactivation of glutamine synthetase by stimulated neutrophils exhibits characteristics similar to those previously described using both enzymic and nonenzymic MFO systems (R.L. Levine, C.N. Oliver, R.M. Fulks, and E.R. Stadtman (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 2120-2124). Although the reaction occurs in the absence of Fe(III), it is stimulated by added Fe (III). Inactivation required molecular oxygen and is partially inhibited by Mn(II), catalase, superoxide dismutase, and metal chelators, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and o-phenanthroline. Both the kinetics and the extent of glutamine synthetase inactivation differ when neutrophils are stimulated with phorbol esters compared with formylated peptides. Glutamine synthetase inactivation catalyzed by MFO systems is accompanied by the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives which form stable hydrazones when treated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Multiple carbonyl derivatives are formed in the soluble protein fraction of stimulated neutrophils and these derivatives collectively exhibit an absorbance spectrum similar to that of glutamine synthetase inactivated by liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 MFO system (K. Nakamura, C.N. Oliver, and E.R. Stadtman (1985) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 240, 319-329).

  16. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  17. Myeloperoxidase deficiency induces MIP-2 production via ERK activation in zymosan-stimulated mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tateno, N; Matsumoto, N; Motowaki, T; Suzuki, K; Aratani, Y

    2013-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major constituent of neutrophils, catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride anion. We have previously reported that MPO-deficient (MPO(-/-)) neutrophils produce greater amount of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in vitro than do wild type when stimulated with zymosan. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in the mutant neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 was blocked by pre-treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blot analysis indicated that U0126 also inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), indicating that MIP-2 was produced via the ERK/NF-κB pathway. Intriguingly, we found that ERK1/2, p65, and alpha subunit of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) in the MPO(-/-) neutrophils were phosphorylated more strongly than in the wild type when stimulated with zymosan. Exogenous H2O2 treatment in addition to zymosan stimulation enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting the zymosan-induced MIP-2 production. In contrast, exogenous HOCl inhibited the production of MIP-2 as well as IκBα phosphorylation without affecting ERK activity. The zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 in the wild-type neutrophils was enhanced by pre-treatment of the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that both lack of HOCl and accumulation of H2O2 due to MPO deficiency contribute to the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in mouse neutrophils stimulated with zymosan.

  18. Myeloperoxidase deficiency induces MIP-2 production via ERK activation in zymosan-stimulated mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tateno, N; Matsumoto, N; Motowaki, T; Suzuki, K; Aratani, Y

    2013-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major constituent of neutrophils, catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride anion. We have previously reported that MPO-deficient (MPO(-/-)) neutrophils produce greater amount of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in vitro than do wild type when stimulated with zymosan. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in the mutant neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 was blocked by pre-treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blot analysis indicated that U0126 also inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), indicating that MIP-2 was produced via the ERK/NF-κB pathway. Intriguingly, we found that ERK1/2, p65, and alpha subunit of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) in the MPO(-/-) neutrophils were phosphorylated more strongly than in the wild type when stimulated with zymosan. Exogenous H2O2 treatment in addition to zymosan stimulation enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting the zymosan-induced MIP-2 production. In contrast, exogenous HOCl inhibited the production of MIP-2 as well as IκBα phosphorylation without affecting ERK activity. The zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 in the wild-type neutrophils was enhanced by pre-treatment of the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that both lack of HOCl and accumulation of H2O2 due to MPO deficiency contribute to the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in mouse neutrophils stimulated with zymosan. PMID:23438680

  19. Potential, pH, and arachidonate gate hydrogen ion currents in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, T E; Cherny, V V

    1993-01-01

    Indirect evidence indicates that a proton-selective conductance is activated during the respiratory burst in neutrophils. A voltage- and time-dependent H(+)-selective conductance, gH, in human neutrophils is demonstrated here directly by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The gH is extremely low at large negative potentials, increases slowly upon membrane depolarization, and does not inactivate. It is enhanced at high external pH or low internal pH and is inhibited by Cd2+ and Zn2+. Arachidonic acid, which plays a pivotal role in inflammatory reactions, amplifies the gH. The properties of the gH described here are compatible with its activation during the respiratory burst in stimulated neutrophils, in which it may facilitate sustained superoxide anion release by dissipating metabolically generated acid. PMID:7506066

  20. Alveolar macrophage-stimulated neutrophil and monocyte migration: effects of in vitro ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Schlesinger, R.B.

    1988-04-01

    The ability of rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) to release factors which stimulate the migration of peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes was examined, and the influence of in vitro ozone exposure on this secretory activity was investigated. To evaluate the ability of AM to release leukocyte chemotactic activity, AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were established in monolayer or suspension culture, with and without added zymosan, for 2 and 6 hr. The resulting macrophage-conditioned medium was tested for chemotactic activity using modified Boyden-type chambers and rabbit peripheral blood neutrophils or monocytes as the responding cells. The results demonstrate that substrate attachment (monolayer culture) and/or zymosan phagocytosis can stimulate AM to release chemoattractants for monocytes and neutrophils. Additionally, the results suggest that AM are constitutively producing low levels of monocyte chemotactic factors. The effects of in vitro ozone exposure on the secretion of chemotactic activity was investigated by exposing monolayer cultures of AM to air, 0.1, 0.3, or 1.2 ppm ozone for 2 hr. Macrophage-conditioned medium was harvested immediately, 2 and 6 hr postexposure, and tested for chemotactic activity. Exposure to 0.3 and 1.2 ppm ozone significantly increased the AM secretion of factors which stimulated neutrophil migration; additionally, the results strongly suggest that ozone can augment the ability of AM to stimulate monocyte migration. These results imply a role for the AM in the recruitment of inflammatory cells after ozone inhalation.

  1. Passive mechanical behavior of human neutrophils: power-law fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M A; Frank, R S; Waugh, R E

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of the neutrophil plays an important role in both the microcirculation and the immune system. Several laboratories in the past have developed mechanical models to describe different aspects of neutrophil deformability. In this study, the passive mechanical properties of normal human neutrophils have been further characterized. The cellular mechanical properties were assessed by single cell micropipette aspiration at fixed aspiration pressures. A numerical simulation was developed to interpret the experiments in terms of cell mechanical properties based on the Newtonian liquid drop model (Yeung and Evans, Biophys. J., 56: 139-149, 1989). The cytoplasmic viscosity was determined as a function of the ratio of the initial cell size to the pipette radius, the cortical tension, aspiration pressure, and the whole cell aspiration time. The cortical tension of passive neutrophils was measured to be about 2.7 x 10(-5) N/m. The apparent viscosity of neutrophil cytoplasm was found to depend on aspiration pressure, and ranged from approximately 500 Pa.s at an aspiration pressure of 98 Pa (1.0 cm H2O) to approximately 50 Pa.s at 882 Pa (9.0 cm H2O) when tested with a 4.0-micron pipette. These data provide the first documentation that the neutrophil cytoplasm exhibits non-Newtonian behavior. To further characterize the non-Newtonian behavior of human neutrophils, a mean shear rate gamma m was estimated based on the numerical simulation. The apparent cytoplasmic viscosity appears to decrease as the mean shear rate increases. The dependence of cytoplasmic viscosity on the mean shear rate can be approximated as a power-law relationship described by mu = mu c(gamma m/gamma c)-b, where mu is the cytoplasmic viscosity, gamma m is the mean shear rate, mu c is the characteristic viscosity at characteristic shear rate gamma c, and b is a material coefficient. When gamma c was set to 1 s-1, the material coefficients for passive neutrophils were determined to be mu c

  2. Subcellular localization and translocation of the receptor for N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sengeløv, H; Boulay, F; Kjeldsen, L; Borregaard, N

    1994-01-01

    The subcellular localization of N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) receptors in human neutrophils was investigated. The fMLP receptor was detected with a high-affinity, photoactivatable, radioiodinated derivative of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanyl-lysine (fMLFK). Neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and fractionated on Percoll density gradients. fMLP receptors were located in the beta-band containing gelatinase and specific granules, and in the gamma-band containing plasma membrane and secretory vesicles. Plasma membranes and secretory vesicles were separated by high-voltage free-flow electrophoresis, and secretory vesicles were demonstrated to be highly enriched in fMLP receptors. The receptors found in secretory vesicles translocated fully to the plasma membrane upon stimulation with inflammatory mediators. The receptor translocation from the beta-band indicated that the receptor present there was mainly located in gelatinase granules. A 25 kDa fMLP-binding protein was found in the beta-band. Immunoprecipitation revealed that this protein was identical with NGAL (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin), a novel protein found in specific granules. In summary, we demonstrate that the compartment in human neutrophils that is mobilized most easily and fastest, the secretory vesicle, is a major reservoir of fMLP receptors. This explains the prompt and extensive upregulation of fMLP receptors on the neutrophil surface in response to inflammatory stimuli. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8172608

  3. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  4. Bioactivation of myelotoxic xenobiotics by human neutrophil myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants and drugs are toxic to the bone marrow. Some of these xenobiotics may initiate toxicity after undergoing bioactivation to free radicals and/or other reactive electrophiles. Peroxidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the one-electron oxidative bioactivation of a variety of xenobiotics in vitro. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidative enzyme found in very high concentration in the neutrophils of human bone marrow. In this study, human MPO was evaluated to determine its ability to catalyze the in vitro bioactivation of known bone marrow toxicants that contain the aromatic hydroxyl (Ar-OH), aromatic amine (Ar-N-R{sub 2}), or heterocyclic tertiary amine ({double bond}N-R) moieties. The formation of free radical metabolites during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of hydroquinone and catechol (benzene metabolites), mitoxantrone and ametantrone (antitumor drugs), and chlorpromazine and promazine (antipsychotic drugs) was demonstrated by EPR spectroscopy. The reactivity of the products formed during the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of ({sup 14}C)hydroquinone and ({sup 14}C)catechol was shown by their covalent binding to protein and DNA in vitro. The covalently binding metabolite in each case is postulated to be the quinone form of the xenobiotic. In addition, both GSH and NADH were oxidized by the reactive intermediate(s) formed during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of many of the bone marrow toxicants tested. It was also shown that p,p-biphenol stimulated the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of both hydroquinone and catechol, while p-cresol stimulated the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of catechol.

  5. A Comparison of Human Neutrophils Acquired from Four Experimental Models of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Madhur P.; Day, Richard M.; Gilroy, Derek W.; O’Brien, Alastair J.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in neutrophil function have been implicated in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. Several models are employed to study activated human neutrophils akin to those found at a site of inflammation. These include whole blood (WB) ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and in vivo techniques: cantharidin blister, skin windows and intra-dermal injection of UV-killed E.coli (UVKEc). Neutrophils obtained from these have never been compared. We compared the activation status of neutrophils from each technique in order to inform the optimal model for use in human studies. Healthy male volunteers were randomised to undergo one of the four techniques (n = 5/group). LPS: WB stimulated with 1ng/ml of LPS for 4 hours. Cantharidin: 12.5μl of 0.1% cantharidin elicited a single blister, aspirated at 24 hours. Skin windows: four 6mm mechanical-suction blisters created, de-roofed and an exudate-collection chamber placed over the windows for 4 hours before aspiration. UVKEc: 1.5 x 107 UVKEc injected intra-dermally. A single 10mm mechanical-suction blister formed and aspirated at 4 hours. Unstimulated WB used as the control. Flow cytometry was used to determine activation status using CD16, CD11b, CD54, CD62L and CD88. Functional status was assessed with a phagocytosis assay. The pattern of neutrophil activation was similar in all models. Neutrophil CD11b was elevated in all models, most markedly in UVKEc (p<0.0001), and CD54 was also elevated but only significant in the LPS model (p = 0.001). CD62L was significantly reduced in all 4 models (p<0.0001) and CD88 was also suppressed in all. There were no changes in CD16 in any model, neither was there any significant difference in the phagocytic capacity of the neutrophils. In summary, there are no significant differences in activation marker expression or phagocytic capacity in the neutrophils obtained from each technique. Therefore we believe whole blood stimulation is the best model in experimentally challenging

  6. Evidence that cathelicidin peptide LL-37 may act as a functional ligand for CXCR2 on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifang; Cherryholmes, Gregory; Chang, Frances; Rose, David M; Schraufstatter, Ingrid; Shively, John E

    2009-11-01

    LL-37, derived from human cathelicidin, stimulates immune responses in neutrophils. Although FPR2 and P2X7 were proposed as LL-37 receptors, we have shown that among 21 neutrophil receptors only CXCR2 was down-regulated by LL-37. LL-37 functions similarly to CXCR2-specific chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL7 in terms of receptor down-regulation and intracellular calcium mobilization on freshly isolated neutrophils. Neutrophils pretreated with CXCL8, a chemokine that binds both CXCR1/2, completely blocked the calcium mobilization in response to LL-37, while LL-37 also partially inhibited (125)I-CXCL8 binding to neutrophils. SB225002, a selective CXCR2 antagonist, blocked LL-37-induced calcium mobilization and migration of neutrophils. LL-37 stimulates calcium mobilization in CXCR2-transfected HEK293 cells, CXCR2(+) THP-1 cells and monocytes, but not in CXCR1-transfected HEK293 cells. WKYMVm peptide (ligand for FPR2) does not block LL-37-stimulated calcium flux in either THP-1 (FPR2(-)) or monocytes (FPR2(high)), further confirming the specificity of LL-37 for CXCR2 and not FPR2. Among all ligands tested (ATP, BzATP, WKYMVm, CXCL1, and LL-37), only LL-37 stimulated migration of monocytes (CXCR2(+) and FPR2(+)) and migration was inhibited by the CXCR2 inhibitor SB225002. Moreover, CXCR2 but not CXCR1 was internalized in LL-37-treated neutrophils. Thus, our data provide evidence that LL-37 may act as a functional ligand for CXCR2 on human neutrophils.

  7. A Chemoattractant-mediated Gi-coupled Pathway Activates Adenylyl Cyclase in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeo, Dana C.; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Smoot, Rory L.; Roselova, Pavla

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophils and Dictyostelium use conserved signal transduction pathways to decipher chemoattractant gradients and migrate directionally. In both cell types, addition of chemoattractants stimulates the production of cAMP, which has been suggested to regulate chemotaxis. We set out to define the mechanism by which chemoattractants increase cAMP levels in human neutrophils. We show that chemoattractants elicit a rapid and transient activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). This activation is sensitive to pertussis toxin treatment but independent of phosphoinositide-3 kinase activity and an intact cytoskeleton. Remarkably, and in sharp contrast to Gαs-mediated activation, chemoattractant-induced AC activation is lost in cell lysates. Of the nine, differentially regulated transmembrane AC isoforms in the human genome, we find that isoforms III, IV, VII, and IX are expressed in human neutrophils. We conclude that the signal transduction cascade used by chemoattractants to activate AC is conserved in Dictyostelium and human neutrophils and is markedly different from the canonical Gαs-meditated pathway. PMID:17135293

  8. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ) in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Yu, Shiyong; Song, Zifang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Wang, Cuiping; Yan, Jinchuan; Wu, Fusheng; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40), i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b) and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the

  9. MBL-Mediated Opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by Human Neutrophils Is Coupled with Intracellular Dectin-1-Triggered ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhongsheng; Wang, Qinning; Liu, Weihuang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Jinbo; Xu, Li; Chen, Liuqing; Duan, Yiqun

    2012-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), a lectin homologous to C1q, greatly facilitates C3/C4-mediated opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans (C. albicans) by human neutrophils, and has the capacity to bind to CR1 (CD35) expressed on circulating neutrophils. The intracellular pool of neutrophil Dectin-1 plays a critical role in stimulating the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through recognition of β-1,3-glucan component of phagocytized zymosan or yeasts. However, little is known about whether MBL can mediate the opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by neutrophils independent of complement activation, and whether MBL-mediated opsonophagocytosis influence the intracellular expression of Dectin-1 and ROS production. Here we showed that the inhibited phagocytic efficiency of neutrophils as a result of blockage of Dectin-1 was compensated by exogenous MBL alone in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the expressions of Dectin-1 at mRNA and intracellular protein levels were significantly up-regulated in neutrophils stimulated by MBL-pre-incubated C. albicans, while the expression of surface Dectin-1 remained almost unchanged. Nevertheless, the stimulated ROS production in neutrophils was partly and irreversibly inhibited by blockage of Dectin-1 in the presence of exogenous MBL. Confocal microscopy examination showed that intracellular Dectin-1 was recruited and co-distributed with ROS on the surface of some phagocytized yeasts. The β-1,3-glucanase digestion test further suggested that the specific recognition and binding site of human Dectin-1 is just the β-1,3-glucan moiety on the cell wall of C. albicans. These data demonstrate that MBL has an ability to mediate the opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by human neutrophils independent of complement activation, which is coupled with intracellular Dectin-1-triggered ROS production. PMID:23239982

  10. 2-Arachidonoyl-glycerol- and arachidonic acid-stimulated neutrophils release antimicrobial effectors against E. coli, S. aureus, HSV-1, and RSV

    PubMed Central

    Chouinard, François; Turcotte, Caroline; Guan, Xiaochun; Larose, Marie-Chantal; Poirier, Samuel; Bouchard, Line; Provost, Véronique; Flamand, Louis; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-AG is highly susceptible to its hydrolysis into AA, which activates neutrophils through de novo LTB4 biosynthesis, independently of CB activation. In this study, we show that 2-AG and AA stimulate neutrophils to release antimicrobial effectors. Supernatants of neutrophils activated with nanomolar concentrations of 2-AG and AA indeed inhibited the infectivity of HSV-1 and RSV. Additionally, the supernatants of 2-AG- and AA-stimulated neutrophils strongly impaired the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This correlated with the release of a large amount (micrograms) of α-defensins, as well as a limited amount (nanograms) of LL-37. All the effects of AA and 2-AG mentioned above were prevented by inhibiting LTB4 biosynthesis or by blocking BLT1. Importantly, neither CB2 receptor agonists nor antagonists could mimic nor prevent the effects of 2-AG, respectively. In fact, qPCR data show that contaminating eosinophils express ~100-fold more CB2 receptor mRNA than purified neutrophils, suggesting that CB2 receptor expression by human neutrophils is limited and that contaminating eosinophils are likely responsible for the previously documented CB2 expression by freshly isolated human neutrophils. The rapid conversion of 2-AG to AA and their subsequent metabolism into LTB4 promote 2-AG and AA as multifunctional activators of neutrophils, mainly exerting their effects by activating the BLT1. Considering that nanomolar concentrations of AA or 2-AG were sufficient to impair viral infectivity, this suggests potential physiological roles for 2-AG and AA as regulators of host defense in vivo. PMID:23242611

  11. Entamoeba histolytica induces human neutrophils to form NETs.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Juarez, J; Campos-Esparza, Mr; Pacheco-Yepez, J; López-Blanco, J A; Adabache-Ortíz, A; Silva-Briano, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica invades the intestine and other organs during the pathogenesis of amoebiasis. In the early stages, the host organism responds with an inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of neutrophils. It has been reported that these immune cells, activated by E. histolytica, exert a protective role by releasing proteolytic enzymes and generating reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and antimicrobial peptides. It is now known that neutrophils also produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are able to damage and kill pathogens. Studies have shown that intracellular protozoan pathogens, including Toxoplasma gondi, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania spp, induce neutrophils to release NETs and are damaged by them. However, the action of this mechanism has not been explored in relation to E. histolytica trophozoites. Through scanning electron, epifluorescence microscopy and viability assays, we show for first time that during in vitro interaction with E. histolytica trophozoites, human neutrophils released NETs that covered amoebas and reduced amoebic viability. These NETs presented histones, myeloperoxidase and decondensed chromatin. The results suggest that NETs participate in the elimination of the parasite. PMID:27138813

  12. The effect of electromagnetic field on reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Poniedzialek, Barbara; Rzymski, Piotr; Nawrocka-Bogusz, Honorata; Jaroszyk, Feliks; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof

    2013-09-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to determine the effect of low frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils in peripheral blood in vitro. We investigated how differently generated EMF and several levels of magnetic induction affect ROS production. To evaluate the level of ROS production, two fluorescent dyes were used: 2'7'-dichlorofluorscein-diacetate and dihydrorhodamine. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), known as strong stimulator of the respiratory burst, was also used. Alternating magnetic field was generated by means of Viofor JPS apparatus. Three different levels of magnetic induction have been analyzed (10, 40 and 60 μT). Fluorescence of dichlorofluorescein and 123 rhodamine was measured by flow cytometry. The experiments demonstrated that only EMF tuned to the calcium ion cyclotron resonance frequency was able to affect ROS production in neutrophils. Statistical analysis showed that this effect depended on magnetic induction value of applied EMF. Incubation in EMF inhibited cell activity slightly in unstimulated neutrophils, whereas the activity of PMA-stimulated neutrophils has increased after incubation in EMF.

  13. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone down-regulates CXC receptors through activation of neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Sarkar, Abira; Sreenivasan, Yashin

    2006-03-01

    Considering the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a large number of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, the regulation of IL-8-mediated biological responses is important. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a tridecapeptide, inhibits most forms of inflammation by an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we have found that alpha-MSH interacts predominantly with melanocortin-1 receptors and inhibits several IL-8-induced biological responses in macrophages and neutrophils. It down-regulated receptors for IL-8 but not for TNF, IL-4, IL-13 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in neutrophils. It down-regulated CXCR type 1 and 2 but not mRNA levels. alpha-MSH did not inhibit IL-8 binding in purified cell membrane or affinity-purified CXCR. IL-8 or anti-CXCR Ab protected against alpha-MSH-mediated inhibition of IL-8 binding. The level of neutrophil elastase, a specific serine protease, but not cathepsin G or proteinase 3 increased in alpha-MSH-treated cells, and restoration of CXCR by specific neutrophil elastase or serine protease inhibitors indicates the involvement of elastase in alpha-MSH-induced down-regulation of CXCR. These studies suggest that alpha-MSH inhibits IL-8-mediated biological responses by down-regulating CXCR through induction of serine protease and that alpha-MSH acts as a potent immunomodulator in neutrophil-driven inflammatory distress. PMID:16479540

  14. T(H)2 cytokines modulate the IL-9R expression on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Takhar, Manrit Kaur; Shan, Lianyu; Hayglass, Kent T; Simons, F Estelle; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2009-06-26

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is associated with key pathological features of asthma such as airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Inflammatory responses mediated by IL-9 rely on the expression of the IL-9R which has been reported on lung epithelial cells, T lymphocytes and recently on airway granulocyte infiltrates. In this study, we assessed the regulatory and constitutive cell surface expression of the IL-9Ralpha in unfractionated and purified human neutrophils from atopic asthmatics, atopic non-asthmatics and healthy normal controls. We demonstrate that T(H)2 cytokines (IL-4 or IL-13) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) up-regulated mRNA and cell surface expression levels of the IL-9Ralpha in primary human and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB did not affect T(H)2-mediated IL-9Ralpha expression in human neutrophils although IFN-gamma and IL-10 down-regulated IL-9Ralpha expression when co-incubated with IL-4, IL-13 or GM-CSF. Collectively, our results reveal a regulatory function for IFN-gamma and IL-10 on modulating the inducible IL-9Ralpha expression levels on peripheral blood neutrophils by T(H)2 cytokines. PMID:19401191

  15. T(H)2 cytokines modulate the IL-9R expression on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Takhar, Manrit Kaur; Shan, Lianyu; Hayglass, Kent T; Simons, F Estelle; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2009-06-26

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is associated with key pathological features of asthma such as airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Inflammatory responses mediated by IL-9 rely on the expression of the IL-9R which has been reported on lung epithelial cells, T lymphocytes and recently on airway granulocyte infiltrates. In this study, we assessed the regulatory and constitutive cell surface expression of the IL-9Ralpha in unfractionated and purified human neutrophils from atopic asthmatics, atopic non-asthmatics and healthy normal controls. We demonstrate that T(H)2 cytokines (IL-4 or IL-13) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) up-regulated mRNA and cell surface expression levels of the IL-9Ralpha in primary human and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB did not affect T(H)2-mediated IL-9Ralpha expression in human neutrophils although IFN-gamma and IL-10 down-regulated IL-9Ralpha expression when co-incubated with IL-4, IL-13 or GM-CSF. Collectively, our results reveal a regulatory function for IFN-gamma and IL-10 on modulating the inducible IL-9Ralpha expression levels on peripheral blood neutrophils by T(H)2 cytokines.

  16. Local rheology of human neutrophils investigated using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong J; Patel, Dipika; Park, Soyeun

    2011-01-01

    During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa) than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa), while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa) regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz), the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the lower elastic moduli

  17. Local rheology of human neutrophils investigated using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong J; Patel, Dipika; Park, Soyeun

    2011-01-01

    During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa) than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa), while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa) regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz), the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the lower elastic moduli

  18. JAK/STAT regulation of Aspergillus fumigatus corneal infections and IL-6/23-stimulated neutrophil, IL-17, elastase, and MMP9 activity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patricia R; Roy, Sanhita; Meszaros, Evan C; Sun, Yan; Howell, Scott J; Malemud, Charles J; Pearlman, Eric

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 and IL-23 (IL-6/23) induce IL-17A (IL-17) production by a subpopulation of murine and human neutrophils, resulting in autocrine IL-17 activation, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, and increased fungal killing. As IL-6 and IL-23 receptors trigger JAK1, -3/STAT3 and JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation, respectively, we examined the role of this pathway in a murine model of fungal keratitis and also examined neutrophil elastase and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9) activity by IL-6/23-stimulated human neutrophils in vitro. We found that STAT3 phosphorylation of neutrophils in Aspergillus fumigatus-infected corne as was inhibited by the JAK/STAT inhibitor Ruxolitinib, resulting in impaired fungal killing and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity. In vitro, we showed that fungal killing by IL-6/23-stimulated human peripheral blood neutrophils was impaired by JAK/STAT inhibitors Ruxolitinib and Stattic, and by the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt inhibitor SR1001. This was also associated with decreased reactive oxygen species, IL-17A production, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt translocation to the nucleus. We also demonstrate that IL-6/23-activated neutrophils exhibit increased elastase and gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase 9) activity, which is inhibited by Ruxolitinib and Stattic but not by SR1001. Taken together, these observations indicate that the regulation of activity of IL-17-producing neutrophils by JAK/STAT inhibitors impairs reactive oxygen species production and fungal killing activity but also blocks elastase and gelatinase activity that can cause tissue damage. PMID:27034404

  19. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  20. Migration of neutrophils across endothelial monolayers is stimulated by treatment of the monolayers with interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Furie, M B; McHugh, D D

    1989-11-15

    To study the effects of the cytokines IL-1 and TNF-alpha on the transendothelial migration of neutrophils, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were grown to confluence on connective tissue prepared from human amniotic membrane. Pretreatment of HUVEC-amnion cultures with rIL-1 beta (7.5 ng/ml) or rTNF-alpha (5 ng/ml) for 4 h resulted in rapid migration of from 20 to 50% of subsequently added neutrophils across the endothelial monolayer. In contrast, only 3 +/- 3% of added neutrophils penetrated the HUVEC monolayer in the absence of any stimulus. The number of neutrophils that migrated across cytokine-treated HUVEC was similar to the number that traversed untreated monolayers in response to gradients of FMLP; in addition, it was only 35% less than the number of neutrophils that migrated in response to leukotriene B4. No consistent additive effect was seen when migration was induced by both cytokine pretreatment of the HUVEC and a chemotactic gradient. The number of neutrophils that migrated across IL-1-treated cultures was proportional to the number added over the range of 2.5 x 10(5) to 4 x 10(6) neutrophils. When used at optimal concentrations, IL-1 and TNF-alpha were equally effective in stimulating neutrophil migration; no additive effect was seen when HUVEC were pretreated with optimal doses of both cytokines together. Direct addition of IL-1 or TNF-alpha to a 1-h migration assay had no effect on neutrophil adhesion to or migration across HUVEC, either in the presence or absence of a chemotactic gradient. Stimulation of neutrophil transendothelial migration in this system did not appear to be caused by adsorption of cytokine by the amniotic tissue, nor was it due to contamination of the cytokine preparations by LPS. These results suggest that IL-1 and TNF-alpha, generated at sites of inflammation, may act upon the endothelium to promote emigration of neutrophils from the vasculature.

  1. Subcellular localization and dynamics of Mac-1 (alpha m beta 2) in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sengeløv, H; Kjeldsen, L; Diamond, M S; Springer, T A; Borregaard, N

    1993-01-01

    The subcellular localization of Mac-1 was determined in resting and stimulated human neutrophils after disruption by nitrogen cavitation and fractionation on two-layer Percoll density gradients. Light membranes were further separated by high voltage free flow electrophoresis. Mac-1 was determined by an ELISA with monoclonal antibodies that were specific for the alpha-chain (CD11b). In unstimulated neutrophils, 75% of Mac-1 colocalized with specific granules including gelatinase granules, 20% with secretory vesicles and the rest with plasma membranes. Stimulation with nanomolar concentrations of FMLP resulted in the translocation of Mac-1 from secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane, and only minimal translocation from specific granules and gelatinase granules. Stimulation with PMA or Ionomycin resulted in full translocation of Mac-1 from secretory vesicles and gelatinase granules to the plasma membrane, and partial translocation of Mac-1 from specific granules. These findings were corroborated by flow cytometry, which demonstrated a 6-10-fold increase in the surface membrane content of Mac-1 in response to stimulation with FMLP, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, IL-8, leukotriene B4, platelet-activating factor, TNF-alpha, and zymosan-activated serum, and a 25-fold increase in response to Ionomycin. Thus, secretory vesicles constitute the most important reservoir of Mac-1 that is incorporated into the plasma membrane during stimulation with inflammatory mediators. PMID:8376598

  2. Interaction between arsenic trioxide (ATO) and human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2011-05-01

    The cytotoxic effect of arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known to be mediated by its ability to induce cell apoptosis in a variety of cells, including neutrophils. More recently, we demonstrated that ATO induced several parameters involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced neutrophil apoptosis but that caspase-4 was not involved. The aim of this study was to better understand how neutrophils are activated by ATO and to further demonstrate that ATO is an ER stressor. Human neutrophils were isolated from healthy blood donors and incubated in vitro in the presence or absence of ATO and several parameters were investigated. We found that ATO induced the expression of the proapoptotic GADD153 protein, a key player involved in ER stress-induced apoptosis, activated nuclear nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activities, and increased prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) production. Using an antibody array approach, we found that ATO increased the production of several cytokines, with interleukin 8 (IL-8) being the predominant one. We confirmed that ATO increased the production of IL-8 by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not inhibit IL-8 production. The results of the present study further support the notion that ATO is an ER stressor and that, although its toxic effect is mediated by induction of apoptosis, this chemical also induced, in parallel, NF-κB activation, the production of PGE2 and several cytokines probably involved in other cell functions. Also, we conclude that the production of IL-8 is not induced by a caspase-4-dependent mechanism, suggesting that ATO-induced caspase-4 activation is involved in other as yet unidentified functions in human neutrophils.

  3. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  4. Pro-oxidative interactions of cobalt with human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ramafi, Grace J; Theron, Annette J; Anderson, Ronald

    2004-08-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of cobalt(II) chloride (Co, 1.5-25 microM) on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 microM) or oxidants generated by activated human neutrophils. The prooxidative interactions of Co with H2O2 or cells were measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), and according to the extent of oxidative inactivation of added alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API). Cobalt dramatically potentiated the oxidation of luminol and API by both H2O2 and neutrophils activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (5 ng/ml), without affecting the assembly of NADPH oxidase or the magnitude of oxygen consumption by the cells. Using 5,5-dimethyl-pyrolline 1-oxide-based electron spin resonance spectroscopy we were unable to detect hydroxyl radical formation by Co in the presence of either H2O2 or activated neutrophils, while the corresponding LECL responses were unaffected by the hydroxyl radical scavengers benzoate and mannitol (50 mM). These observations indicate that Co potentiates the reactivity of neutrophil-derived oxidants, primarily H2O2, which if operative in vivo during exposure to the heavy metal may pose the risk of oxidant- and protease-mediated tissue injury.

  5. Modulation of human neutrophil oxidative metabolism and degranulation by extract of Tamarindus indica L. fruit pulp.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Kabeya, Luciana M; Kanashiro, Alexandre; de Figueiredo, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2009-01-01

    The tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) is indigenous to Asian countries and widely cultivated in the American continents. The tamarind fruit pulp extract (ExT), traditionally used in spices, food components and juices, is rich in polyphenols that have demonstrated anti-atherosclerotic, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. This study evaluated the modulator effect of a crude hydroalcoholic ExT on some peripheral human neutrophil functions. The neutrophil reactive oxygen species generation, triggered by opsonized zymosan (OZ), n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and assessed by luminol- and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL and LucCL, respectively), was inhibited by ExT in a concentration-dependent manner. ExT was a more effective inhibitor of the PMA-stimulated neutrophil function [IC50 (in microg/10(6)cells)=115.7+/-9.7 (LumCL) and 174.5+/-25.9 (LucCL)], than the OZ- [IC50=248.5+/-23.1 (LumCL) and 324.1+/-34.6 (LucCL)] or fMLP-stimulated cells [IC50=178.5+/-12.2 (LumCL)]. The ExT also inhibited neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity (evaluated by O2 consumption), degranulation and elastase activity (evaluated by spectrophotometric methods) at concentrations higher than 200 microg/10(6)cells, without being toxic to the cells, under the conditions assessed. Together, these results indicate the potential of ExT as a source of compounds that can modulate the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  6. Modulation of human neutrophil oxidative metabolism and degranulation by extract of Tamarindus indica L. fruit pulp.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Kabeya, Luciana M; Kanashiro, Alexandre; de Figueiredo, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2009-01-01

    The tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) is indigenous to Asian countries and widely cultivated in the American continents. The tamarind fruit pulp extract (ExT), traditionally used in spices, food components and juices, is rich in polyphenols that have demonstrated anti-atherosclerotic, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. This study evaluated the modulator effect of a crude hydroalcoholic ExT on some peripheral human neutrophil functions. The neutrophil reactive oxygen species generation, triggered by opsonized zymosan (OZ), n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and assessed by luminol- and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL and LucCL, respectively), was inhibited by ExT in a concentration-dependent manner. ExT was a more effective inhibitor of the PMA-stimulated neutrophil function [IC50 (in microg/10(6)cells)=115.7+/-9.7 (LumCL) and 174.5+/-25.9 (LucCL)], than the OZ- [IC50=248.5+/-23.1 (LumCL) and 324.1+/-34.6 (LucCL)] or fMLP-stimulated cells [IC50=178.5+/-12.2 (LumCL)]. The ExT also inhibited neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity (evaluated by O2 consumption), degranulation and elastase activity (evaluated by spectrophotometric methods) at concentrations higher than 200 microg/10(6)cells, without being toxic to the cells, under the conditions assessed. Together, these results indicate the potential of ExT as a source of compounds that can modulate the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:19022329

  7. Luminol-dependent photoemission from single neutrophil stimulated by phorbol ester and calcium ionophore--role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Suematsu, M.; Oshio, C.; Miura, S.; Suzuki, M.; Houzawa, S.; Tsuchiya, M.

    1988-08-30

    Luminol-dependent photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated single neutrophil was visually investigated by using an ultrasensitive photonic image intensifier microscope. Neutrophils stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (0.1 microgram/ml) alone produced a negligible level of photonic activities in the presence of luminol (10 micrograms/ml). The additional application of 0.1 microM Ca2+ ionophore A23187 induced explosive changes of photonic burst corresponding to the distribution of neutrophils, and these photonic activities were gradually spread to extracellular space. Sodium azide, which prevents myeloperoxidase activity, inhibited Ca2+ ionophore-induced photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated neutrophil. These findings suggest a prerequisite role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase release in luminol-dependent photoemission from stimulated neutrophils.

  8. NKT cells mediate the recruitment of neutrophils by stimulating epithelial chemokine secretion during colitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyu; Liu, Ronghua; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Jiajing; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-05-27

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a kind of inflammatory bowel diseases characterized by chronic inflammation and ulcer in colon, and UC patients have increased risk of getting colorectal cancer. NKT cells are cells that express both NK cell markers and semi-invariant CD1d-restricted TCRs, can regulate immune responses via secreting a variety of cytokines upon activation. In our research, we found that the NKT cell-deficient CD1d(-/-) mice had relieved colitis in the DSS-induced colitis model. Further investigations revealed that the colon of CD1d(-/-) mice expressed less neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL 1, 2 and 3, and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Infiltrated neutrophils also produced less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TNF-α, indicating they may cause less epithelial damage. In addition, colitis-associated colorectal cancer was also relieved in CD1d(-/-) mice. During colitis, NKT cells strongly expressed TNF-α, which could stimulate CXCL 1, 2, 3 expressions by the epithelium. In conclusion, NKT cells can regulate colitis via the NKT cell-epithelium-neutrophil axis. Targeting this mechanism may help to improve the therapy of UC and prevent colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27063801

  9. Phorbol myristate acetate receptors in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihira, J.; O'Flaherty, J.T.

    1985-11-01

    Resting or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-pretreated neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and were fractionated on Percoll density gradients to identify the subcellular location of PMA receptors. Receptors were found in the cytoplasm of resting cells; neither primary nor secondary granules bound (/sup 3/H)PMA, and the few binding sites located in non-granule membrane fractions appeared to reflect cytosolic contamination. Contrastingly, PMA-pretreated cells lost cytosolic receptors; > 80% of PMA-binding sites were associated with non-granule membranes. Protein kinase C activity similarly shifted from cytosol to membranes after PMA treatment. Indeed, protein kinase C and PMA receptors co-sedimented on Percoll gradients, co-eluted from Ultragel AcA 44 columns loaded with neutrophil cytoplasm, and were identically influenced by various phospholipids. Finally, PMA, mezerein, diacylglycerol, and dialkylglycerol activated protein kinase C with potencies that paralleled their respective abilities to stimulate neutrophil aggregation responses and inhibit (/sup 3/H)PMA binding to whole cells or cytosol. These results fit a model of stimulus-response coupling wherein exogenous PMA or endogenous diacylglycerol solvate in cellular membranes. Cytosolic protein kinase C binds to the intramembranous ligand, forming an active, membrane-associated complex that phosphorylates nearby elements involved in triggering aggregation and other responses.

  10. Calcium signalling in human neutrophil cell lines is not affected by low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Golbach, Lieke A; Philippi, John G M; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-09-01

    We are increasingly exposed to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) by electrical devices and power lines, but if and how these fields interact with living cells remains a matter of debate. This study aimed to investigate the potential effect of LF EMF exposure on calcium signalling in neutrophils. In neutrophilic granulocytes, activation of G-protein coupled receptors leads to efflux of calcium from calcium stores and influx of extracellular calcium via specialised calcium channels. The cytoplasmic rise of calcium induces cytoskeleton rearrangements, modified gene expression patterns, and cell migration. If LF EMF modulates intracellular calcium signalling, this will influence cellular behaviour and may eventually lead to health problems. We found that calcium mobilisation upon chemotactic stimulation was not altered after a short 30 min or long-term LF EMF exposure in human neutrophil-like cell lines HL-60 or PLB-985. Neither of the two investigated wave forms (Immunent and 50 Hz sine wave) at three magnetic flux densities (5 μT, 300 μT, and 500 μT) altered calcium signalling in vitro. Gene-expression patterns of calcium-signalling related genes also did not show any significant changes after exposure. Furthermore, analysis of the phenotypical appearance of microvilli by scanning electron microscopy revealed no alterations induced by LF EMF exposure. The findings above indicate that exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal or Immunent LF EMF will not affect calcium signalling in neutrophils in vitro.

  11. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Henry, Steven J; Chen, Christopher S; Crocker, John C; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-08-18

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil's morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell's mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (-20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (-106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the onset of

  12. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Henry, Steven J; Chen, Christopher S; Crocker, John C; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-08-18

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil's morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell's mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (-20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (-106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the onset of

  13. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  14. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V.; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A.; Kotukhov, Yuriy A.; Danilova, Alevtina N.; Özek, Temel; Başer, K. Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEOf+l and AKEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyl eugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEOstm, but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEOstm composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). We found that one component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca2+ flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca2+ flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by an inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production. PMID:25959257

  15. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Kotukhov, Yuriy A; Danilova, Alevtina N; Özek, Temel; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-05-27

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEO(f+l) and AKEO(stm), respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyleugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy-four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEO(stm), but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEO(stm) composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). One component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production. PMID:25959257

  16. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Kotukhov, Yuriy A; Danilova, Alevtina N; Özek, Temel; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-05-27

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEO(f+l) and AKEO(stm), respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyleugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy-four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEO(stm), but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEO(stm) composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). One component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production.

  17. Ascorbic acid transport and accumulation in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Washko, P.; Rotrosen, D.; Levine, M. )

    1989-11-15

    The transport, accumulation, and distribution of ascorbic acid were investigated in isolated human neutrophils utilizing a new ascorbic acid assay, which combined the techniques of high performance liquid chromatography and coulometric electrochemical detection. Freshly isolated human neutrophils contained 1.0-1.4 mM ascorbic acid, which was localized greater than or equal to 94% to the cytosol, was not protein bound, and was present only as ascorbic acid and not as dehydroascorbic acid. Upon addition of ascorbic acid to the extracellular medium in physiologic amounts, ascorbic acid was accumulated in neutrophils in millimolar concentrations. Accumulation was mediated by a high affinity and a low affinity transporter; both transporters were responsible for maintenance of concentration gradients as large as 50-fold. The high affinity transporter had an apparent Km of 2-5 microns by Lineweaver-Burk and Eadie-Hofstee analyses, and the low affinity transporter had an apparent Km of 6-7 mM by similar analyses. Each transporter was saturable and temperature dependent. In normal human blood the high affinity transporter should be saturated, whereas the low affinity transporter should be in its linear phase of uptake.

  18. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid*

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Warner, Timothy D.; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W.; Murphy, Robert C.; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  19. Passive mechanical behavior of human neutrophils: effect of cytochalasin B.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M. A.; Frank, R. S.; Waugh, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Actin is a ubiquitous protein in eukaryotic cells. It plays a major role in cell motility and in the maintenance and control of cell shape. In this article, we intend to address the contribution of actin to the passive mechanical properties of human neutrophils. As a framework for assessing this contribution, the neutrophil is modeled as a simple viscous fluid drop with a constant cortical ("surface") tension. The reagent cytochalasin B (CTB) was used to disrupt the F-actin structure, and the neutrophil cortical tension and cytoplasmic viscosity were evaluated by single-cell micropipette aspiration. The cortical tension was calculated by simple force balance, and the viscosity was calculated according to a numerical analysis of the cell entry into the micropipette. CTB reduced the cell cortical tension in a dose-dependent fashion: by 19% at a concentration of 3 microM and by 49% at 30 microM. CTB also reduced the cytoplasmic viscosity by approximately -25% at a concentration of 3 microM and by approximately 65% at a concentration of 30 microM when compared at the same aspiration pressures. All three groups of neutrophils, normal cells, and cells treated with either 3 or 30 microM CTB, exhibited non-Newtonian behavior, in that the apparent viscosity decreased with increasing shear rate. The dependence of the cytoplasmic viscosity on deformation rate can be described empirically by mu = mu c(gamma m/gamma c)-b, where mu is cytoplasmic viscosity, gamma m is mean shear rate, mu c is the characteristic viscosity at the characteristic shear rate gamma c, and b is a material coefficient. The shear rate dependence of the cytoplasmic viscosity was reduced by CTB treatment. This is reflected by the changes in the material coefficients. When gamma c was set to 1 s-1, pc = 130 +/- 23 Pa.s and b = 0.52 +/- 0.09 for normal neutrophils and pc = 54 +/- 15 Pa.S and b = 0.26 +/- 0.05 for cells treated with 30 micro M CTB. These results provide the first quantitative assessment of

  20. Analysis of the mechanisms involved in the stimulation of neutrophil apoptosis by tumour necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Gabriela; Trevani, Analía; Martínez, Diego; Vermeulen, Mónica; Gamberale, Romina; Fernández-Calotti, Paula; Raiden, Silvina; Giordano, Mirta; Geffner, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that human neutrophils pretreated with tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then exposed to a variety of agents such as immune complexes, zymosan, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), C5a, fMLP, or granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), undergo a dramatic stimulation of apoptosis, suggesting that TNF-α is able to prime an apoptotic death programme which can be rapidly triggered by different stimuli. We report here that this response involves the participation of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), is dependent on caspases 3, 8 and 9, and is associated with both a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and a down-regulation in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Interestingly, we also found that the anti-apoptotic cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) improves the ability of TNF-α to promote apoptosis, supporting the notion than TNF-α, acting together with IL-1, may favour the depletion of neutrophils from the inflammatory areas during the course of acute inflammation. PMID:15500622

  1. Abrogation of NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils induces neutrophil survival through sustained p38-MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Langereis, Jeroen D; Raaijmakers, Hanneke A J A; Ulfman, Laurien H; Koenderman, Leo

    2010-10-01

    NF-κB, an important transcription factor in the regulation of cellular inflammation, is one of the prime targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Nowadays, anti-inflammatory therapies rely mostly on steroids, which among other effects, inhibit NF-κB activity. However, steroids have only limited efficacy in the treatment on neutrophil-driven diseases, such as COPD. Human neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD, and clearance of these cells by apoptosis is an effective pathway for resolution of inflammation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that modulation of the NF-κB pathway in human neutrophils affects survival. Importantly, the pharmacological NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 inhibited NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils as expected. However, we found that complete inhibition of NF-κB activity with 10 μM Bay 11-7082 prolonged neutrophil survival significantly, which was not observed with inhibitors for other signaling pathways. Bay 11-7082-induced neutrophil survival was dependent on p38-MAPK kinase activity, as the p38 kinase activity inhibitor SB203580 abrogated this response completely. Bay 11-7082 induced rapid and sustained p38 activation that correlated with inhibited NF-κB signaling and prolonged neutrophil survival. The precise role of NF-κB in regulation of p38-MAPK activation remains to be established. Under these conditions of survival, the stability of Bcl-xL but not Mcl-1 was enhanced. Although inhibition of NF-κB leads to down-regulation of inflammatory genes in many cell types, our results illustrate that interference with basal NF-κB signaling in neutrophils as a drug target should be used with caution.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton’s tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca2+]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26659126

  3. Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 are activated during TNF priming of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Seeds, M C; Jones, D F; Chilton, F H; Bass, D A

    1998-01-23

    Cytokines alter neutrophil (PMN) function during inflammation, and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in vitro primes PMN such that receptor-mediated stimulation causes markedly enhanced release of arachidonic acid. We hypothesized that two Ca(2+)-dependent PLA2's in PMN might be activated during priming of the cell, thus affecting arachidonate release. A low molecular weight, secretory PLA2 was identified by enzymatic activity in the cell free supernates of primed or stimulated PMN, and in PMN disrupted by nitrogen cavitation. The enzymatic activity was calcium-dependent, acid stable, destroyed by dithiothreitol, and blocked by anti-sPLA2 antibodies. TNF caused secretion of sPLA2 and also caused an increase in cell-associated sPLA2 enzymatic activity. Activation and release were maximal with fMLP stimulation of TNF-primed PMN. Neutrophils also contained a cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) characterized by enzymatic activity which was calcium dependent, enhanced by dithiothreitol, and blocked by anti-cPLA2 antibody. TNF caused a doubling of cPLA2 enzymatic activity which was associated with phosphorylation of the enzyme as judged by a migration shift on Western blots. Thus, TNF priming of human PMN caused marked increase in fMLP stimulated AA release in parallel to enhanced activity of two different PLA2's.

  4. Role of gelsolin in actin depolymerization of adherent human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J S; Coburn, J P; Tauber, A I; Zaner, K S

    1997-01-01

    Human neutrophils generally function adherent to an extracellular matrix. We have previously reported that upon adhesion to laminin- or fibronectin-coated, but not uncoated, plastic there is a depolymerization of actin in neutrophils. This phenomenon was not affected by inhibitors of the more well-studied components of the signal transduction pathway, specifically, pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G-proteins, H-7 or staurosporine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, or herbimycin A, an inhibitor of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. We therefore focused our attention on actin-binding proteins and measured the changes in the partitioning of gelsolin between the Triton X-100-soluble and -insoluble cellular fractions which occur upon neutrophil adhesion by means of quantitating anti-gelsolin antibody binding to aliquots of these fractions. It was found that approximately 90% of the total cellular gelsolin was found in the Triton X-100-soluble fraction in suspended cells, but that upon adherence to either fibronectin- or laminin-coated plastic about 40% of the soluble gelsolin could be detected in the insoluble fraction. This effect was not observed in cells adherent to uncoated plastic, wherein more than 90% of the gelsolin was found in the soluble fraction. Results of immunofluorescence microscopy of these cell preparations was consistent with this data. A gelsolin translocation to the insoluble cellular actin network may account for a part of the observed actin depolymerization. Images PMID:9017600

  5. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Steven J.; Chen, Christopher S.; Crocker, John C.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil’s morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell’s mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (−20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (−106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the

  6. Modulation of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oils from Ferula akitschkensis and Their Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Sinharoy, Pritam; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Abidkulova, Karime T; Özek, Temel; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Kovrizhina, Anastasia R; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Damron, Derek S; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-09-28

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the umbels+seeds and stems of Ferula akitschkensis (FAEOu/s and FAEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fifty-two compounds were identified in FAEOu/s; the primary components were sabinene, α-pinene, β-pinene, terpinen-4-ol, eremophilene, and 2-himachalen-7-ol, whereas the primary components of FAEOstm were myristicin and geranylacetone. FAEOu/s, β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, isobornyl acetate, and (E)-2-nonenal stimulated [Ca(2+)]i mobilization in human neutrophils, with the most potent being geranylacetone (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM) and isobornyl acetate 6.4 ± 1.7 (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM). In addition, treatment of neutrophils with β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate desensitized the cells to N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)- and interleukin-8 (IL-8)-induced [Ca(2+)]i flux and inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis. The effects of β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate on neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux were inhibited by transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blockers. Furthermore, the most potent compound, geranylacetone, activated Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. In contrast, myristicin inhibited neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux stimulated by fMLF and IL-8 and inhibited capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. These findings, as well as pharmacophore modeling of TRP agonists, suggest that geranylacetone is a TRPV1 agonist, whereas myristicin is a TRPV1 antagonist. Thus, at least part of the medicinal properties of Ferula essential oils may be due to modulatory effects on TRP channels. PMID:27586050

  7. Modulation of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oils from Ferula akitschkensis and Their Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Sinharoy, Pritam; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Abidkulova, Karime T; Özek, Temel; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Kovrizhina, Anastasia R; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Damron, Derek S; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-09-28

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the umbels+seeds and stems of Ferula akitschkensis (FAEOu/s and FAEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fifty-two compounds were identified in FAEOu/s; the primary components were sabinene, α-pinene, β-pinene, terpinen-4-ol, eremophilene, and 2-himachalen-7-ol, whereas the primary components of FAEOstm were myristicin and geranylacetone. FAEOu/s, β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, isobornyl acetate, and (E)-2-nonenal stimulated [Ca(2+)]i mobilization in human neutrophils, with the most potent being geranylacetone (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM) and isobornyl acetate 6.4 ± 1.7 (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM). In addition, treatment of neutrophils with β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate desensitized the cells to N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)- and interleukin-8 (IL-8)-induced [Ca(2+)]i flux and inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis. The effects of β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate on neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux were inhibited by transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blockers. Furthermore, the most potent compound, geranylacetone, activated Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. In contrast, myristicin inhibited neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux stimulated by fMLF and IL-8 and inhibited capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. These findings, as well as pharmacophore modeling of TRP agonists, suggest that geranylacetone is a TRPV1 agonist, whereas myristicin is a TRPV1 antagonist. Thus, at least part of the medicinal properties of Ferula essential oils may be due to modulatory effects on TRP channels.

  8. Ozone inhalation stimulates expression of a neutrophil chemotactic protein, macrophage inflammatory protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Simpson, L.; Carter, J.; Hassenbein, D.; Leikauf, G.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Short-term exposure of humans and animals to ozone results in increased lung neutrophils; however, the mechanisms underlying this response are not completely understood. We examined the potential involvement of the neutrophil chemotactic factor, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), in ozone-induced inflammation. Exposure-response relationships for ozone and MIP-2 expression were characterized by exposing C57B1/6 mice to 0.1-2 ppm ozone for 3 hr and determining lung levels of MIP-2 mRNA 6 hr after exposure. Temporal relationships between ozone and MIP-2 were determined by exposing mice (2 ppm ozone x 3 hr) and characterizing MIP-2 mRNA expression 0, 2, 6, and 24 hr after exposure. Neutrophils in lung lavage fluid were determined in both exposure-response and time course studies. Ozone concentrations > or = 1.0 ppm increased MIP-2 mRNA and this increase corresponded with recruitment of neutrophils. MIP-2 mRNA was increased immediately after ozone exposure and decreased to control levels by 24 hr. To examine the role of direct oxidant effects in ozone-induced MIP-2 expression, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro for 4 hr to 10(-10)-10(-5) M hydrogen peroxide and MIP-2 expression was characterized. MIP-2 mRNA levels in lung macrophages were increased by > or = 10(-9) M hydrogen peroxide. In summary, our findings suggest the chemotactic protein MIP-2 may be responsible, at least in part, for ozone-induced increases in lung neutrophils and indicate that direct exposure of alveolar macrophages to an oxidant is sufficient to induce MIP-2 expression.

  9. Proton stoichiometry associated with human neutrophil respiratory-burst reactions.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Lefker, B A; Ossanna, P J; Weiss, S J

    1984-11-10

    Control of the intraphagosomal pH in neutrophils may be of importance in creating a microbicidal environment by regulating the activity of the O2-.-generating NADPH oxidase and the lysosomal enzymes discharged into this compartment. In this study, we examined the proton stoichiometry associated with the primary enzymatic reaction underlying the respiratory burst. A preparation of the neutrophil-derived, membrane oxidase consumed NADPH and generated O2-. with a stoichiometry of 1 NADPH:2 O2-. When the enzymatically produced O2-. was prevented from undergoing dismutation, net protons were released in an approximate 1:2 stoichiometry with O2-. generated. In contrast, when O2-. was allowed to dismutate to H2O2, net protons were consumed in a 1:1 stoichiometry with the accumulated H2O2. Thus, the delta pH associated with the NADPH oxidase-dependent production of O2-. was dictated by the fate of the generated radical. The consumption of the oxidase-generated H2O2 by the lysosomal enzyme myeloperoxidase resulted in the formation of HOCl which was trapped in the presence of taurine as the N-chloro derivative. The ratio of chlorinated product formed to H+ consumed was 1:1. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the known intraphagosomal pH changes that occur following neutrophil stimulation. We conclude that the O2-.-generating oxidase plays a dual role in the phagosome by simultaneously creating an oxidizing environment that optimizes pH-dependent microbicidal processes.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to healthy volunteers: analysis of the immediate activating effects on circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Kerst, J M; van der Schoot, C E; Calafat, J; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Roos, D; van Oers, R H; von dem Borne, A E

    1994-12-01

    In four healthy volunteers, we analyzed in detail the immediate in vivo effects on circulating neutrophils of subcutaneous administration of 300 micrograms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Neutrophil activation was assessed by measurement of degranulation. Mobilization of secretory vesicles was shown by a decrease in leukocyte alkaline phosphatase content of the circulating neutrophils. Furthermore, shortly postinjection, Fc gamma RIII was found to be upregulated from an intracellular pool that we identified by immunoelectron microscopy as secretory vesicles. Intravascular release of specific granules was shown by increased plasma levels of lactoferrin and by upregulation of the expression of CD66b and CD11b on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, measurement of fourfold elevated plasma levels of elastase, bound to its physiologic inhibitor alpha 1-antitrypsin, indicated mobilization of azurophil granules. However, no expression of CD63, a marker of azurophil granules, was observed on circulating neutrophils. G-CSF--induced mobilization of secretory vesicles and specific granules could be mimicked in whole blood cultures in vitro, in contrast to release of azurophil granules. Therefore, we postulate that the most activated neutrophils leave the circulation, as observed shortly postinjection, and undergo subsequent stimulation in the endothelial microenvironment, resulting in mobilization of azurophil granules. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF should be regarded as a potent immediate activator of neutrophils in vivo.

  11. In-vivo blockage of neutrophil migration by LPS is mimicked by a factor released from LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, F. Q.; Souza, G. E.; Souza, C. A.; Cerqueira, B. C.; Ferreira, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine the effect of an intravenous injection of the macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MNCF) (Cunha & Ferreira 1986) on neutrophil migration to rat peritoneal cavities, which were challenged with chemotactic stimuli. Macrophage monolayers stimulated by LPS release a factor (MW greater than 10,000 D) which, when injected intravenously, blocked neutrophil migration in carrageenin-induced peritonitis. This inhibition was dependent on dose and lasted more than 2 h. It was not due to neutropaenia, hypotension or LPS contamination. Neutrophil migration induced by LPS, MNCF, the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also blocked by intravenous administration of the factor. Intravenous injection of recombinant interleukin 1 beta or tumour necrosis factor-alpha, present in the samples of the factor, failed to reproduce the described inhibitory effect on neutrophil migration. The release of this factor by LPS-stimulated macrophage monolayers was inhibited by dexamethasone but not by indomethacin. It is suggested that the failure of neutrophils to migrate during septicaemia may be the result of a continuous release of chemotactic factors in the circulation, particularly of the macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor(s). PMID:2647118

  12. The hepatitis B virus e antigen suppresses the respiratory burst and mobility of human monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Leu, Chuen-Miin; Lu, Yong-Chen; Peng, Wei-Li; Chu, Hsin-Tzu; Hu, Cheng-po

    2014-11-01

    The Hepatitis B virus (HBV) e antigen (HBeAg) is a secretory, non-structural protein, and associated with persistent infection of HBV. Previous studies indicate that HBeAg is able to regulate T cell-mediated responses, however, the interaction between HBeAg and the innate immune system is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant HBeAg (rHBe) bound to human peripheral blood monocytes, neutrophils, and B lymphocytes but not to T lymphocytes. We focused on investigating the effects of HBeAg on monocytes and neutrophils and found that rHBe decreased the respiratory burst in both types of cells. Furthermore, we observed that cell migration in monocytes and neutrophils was suppressed by rHBe in a transwell assay. The attenuation of rHBe was not caused by a general cytotoxic effect because rHBe treatment stimulated low levels of cytokine and chemokine production by monocytes and it promoted neutrophil survival. Since the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils to the infected site is crucial for the initiation of inflammation, HBeAg may modulate innate immune responses by diminishing the respiratory burst and migration of monocytes and neutrophils, which might interfere with the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses against HBV, leading to the establishment of chronic infection.

  13. Influence of FcγRIIIb polymorphism on its ability to cooperate with FcγRIIa and CR3 in mediating the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Toller-Kawahisa, Juliana Escher; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Costa, Paulo Inácio; Faria, Carolina Maria Quinello Gomes; Azzolini, Ana Elisa Caleiro Seixas; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria; Marzocchi-Machado, Cleni Mara

    2014-08-01

    Considering that human neutrophil FcγRIIa and FcγRIIIb receptors interact synergistically with CR3 in triggering neutrophil functional responses, allelic polymorphisms in these receptors might influence such interactions. We assessed whether FcγRIIIb polymorphisms affect FcγR/CR cooperation in mediating the neutrophil oxidative burst (OB), in particular the FcγRIIIb/CR3 cooperation that occurs via lectin-saccharide-like interactions. The OB of human neutrophil antigen (HNA)-1a-, HNA-1b-, and HNA-1a/-1b-neutrophils stimulated with immune complexes, opsonized or not with serum complement, was measured by the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. Compared with HNA-1a-neutrophils, HNA-1b-neutrophils exhibited reduced FcγR-stimulated OB, but increased FcγR/CR-stimulated OB. It suggests that (i) FcγR and CR cooperate more effectively in HNA-1b-neutrophils, and (ii) the HNA-1b allotype influences the FcγRIIIb cooperation with FcγRIIa, but not with CR3. HNA-1a- and HNA-1b-neutrophils exhibited similar OB responses elicited via CR3 alone or via FcγR/CR-independent pathways. In addition, the level of FcγRIIIb, FcγRIIa, and CR3 expression did not differ significantly among the neutrophil groups studied. Together, these results demonstrate that the HNA-1b allotype influences the functional cooperation between FcγRIIIb and FcγRIIa, and suggest that the difference in the glycosylation pattern between HNA-1a and HNA-1b does not affect the FcγRIIIb cooperation with CR3.

  14. Staphylococcus epidermidis strategies to avoid killing by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Rigby, Kevin; Wang, Rong; Queck, Shu Y; Braughton, Kevin R; Whitney, Adeline R; Teintze, Martin; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading nosocomial pathogen. In contrast to its more aggressive relative S. aureus, it causes chronic rather than acute infections. In highly virulent S. aureus, phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) contribute significantly to immune evasion and aggressive virulence by their strong ability to lyse human neutrophils. Members of the PSM family are also produced by S. epidermidis, but their role in immune evasion is not known. Notably, strong cytolytic capacity of S. epidermidis PSMs would be at odds with the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus, prompting us to examine the biological activities of S. epidermidis PSMs. Surprisingly, we found that S. epidermidis has the capacity to produce PSMδ, a potent leukocyte toxin, representing the first potent cytolysin to be identified in that pathogen. However, production of strongly cytolytic PSMs was low in S. epidermidis, explaining its low cytolytic potency. Interestingly, the different approaches of S. epidermidis and S. aureus to causing human disease are thus reflected by the adaptation of biological activities within one family of virulence determinants, the PSMs. Nevertheless, S. epidermidis has the capacity to evade neutrophil killing, a phenomenon we found is partly mediated by resistance mechanisms to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including the protease SepA, which degrades AMPs, and the AMP sensor/resistance regulator, Aps (GraRS). These findings establish a significant function of SepA and Aps in S. epidermidis immune evasion and explain in part why S. epidermidis may evade elimination by innate host defense despite the lack of cytolytic toxin expression. Our study shows that the strategy of S. epidermidis to evade elimination by human neutrophils is characterized by a passive defense approach and provides molecular evidence to support the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus.

  15. Migration of neutrophils across endothelial monolayers is stimulated by treatment of the monolayers with beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, C J; Schratzberger, P; Kähler, C M

    1994-09-01

    To study the effects of the cytokine and neuroendocrine hormone beta-endorphin on the transendothelial migration of neutrophils, bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were grown to confluence on PVP-free polycarbonate filters coated with gelatin. Pretreatment of endothelial cell cultures with 1 to 10 mumol/liter of beta-endorphin for 60 min resulted in significantly stimulated migration of subsequently added neutrophils across the endothelial monolayer. The number of neutrophils that migrated across beta-endorphin-treated endothelial cells was similar to the number that traversed untreated monolayers in response to gradients of formylpeptide. Consistently, an additive effect was seen when migration was induced by both beta-endorphin pretreatment of the endothelial cells and a formylpeptide chemotactic gradient. When used at optimal concentration, beta-endorphin was equally effective in stimulating neutrophil migration as was tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In the absence of formylpeptide the effect of apical surface exposure of endothelial cells to beta-endorphin versus basal surface exposure was comparable. Stimulation of neutrophil transendothelial migration in this system appeared to be specific and mediated by opiate receptors, since excess concentration of naloxone completely abolished the effect of beta-endorphin but not of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These results suggest that beta-endorphin, released during stress, may act upon the endothelium to promote emigration of neutrophils from the vasculature.

  16. Ultrastructural observation of human neutrophils during apoptotic cell death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Sim, Seobo; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Yong, Tai-Soon; Park, Soon-Jung; Im, Kyung-il; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2004-12-01

    Neutrophils are important effector cells against protozoan extracellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and liver abscess in human beings. Apoptotic cell death of neutrophils is an important event in the resolution of inflammation and parasite's survival in vivo. This study was undertaken to investigate the ultrastructural aspects of apoptotic cells during neutrophil death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica. Isolated human neutrophils from the peripheral blood were incubated with or without live trophozoites of E. histolytica and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Neutrophils incubated with E. histolytica were observed to show apoptotic characteristics, such as compaction of the nuclear chromatin and swelling of the nuclear envelop. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in the absence of the amoeba had many protrusions of irregular cell surfaces and heterogenous nuclear chromatin. Therefore, it is suggested that Entamoeba-induced neutrophil apoptosis contribute to prevent unwanted tissue inflammation and damage in the amoeba-invaded lesions in vivo.

  17. Ultrastructural observation of human neutrophils during apoptotic cell death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Sim, Seobo; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Yong, Tai-Soon; Park, Soon-Jung; Im, Kyung-il; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2004-12-01

    Neutrophils are important effector cells against protozoan extracellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and liver abscess in human beings. Apoptotic cell death of neutrophils is an important event in the resolution of inflammation and parasite's survival in vivo. This study was undertaken to investigate the ultrastructural aspects of apoptotic cells during neutrophil death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica. Isolated human neutrophils from the peripheral blood were incubated with or without live trophozoites of E. histolytica and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Neutrophils incubated with E. histolytica were observed to show apoptotic characteristics, such as compaction of the nuclear chromatin and swelling of the nuclear envelop. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in the absence of the amoeba had many protrusions of irregular cell surfaces and heterogenous nuclear chromatin. Therefore, it is suggested that Entamoeba-induced neutrophil apoptosis contribute to prevent unwanted tissue inflammation and damage in the amoeba-invaded lesions in vivo. PMID:15591839

  18. Differential stimulation of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and arachidonic acid metabolism in rat peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Cullinan, C.A.; Berkenkopf, J.W.; Weichman, B.M.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) induced the production of radical oxygen species (ROS) from rat peritoneal neutrophils as assessed by CL. ROS generation occurred in a time- (maximum at 13.5 min) and dose- (concentration range of 1.7-498 nM) related fashion. However, 166 nM PMA did not induce either cyclooxygenase (CO) or lipoxygenase (LPO) product formation by 20 min post-stimulation. Conversely, A23187, at concentrations between 0.1 and 10 ..mu..M, stimulated both pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, but had little or no effect upon ROS production. When suboptimal concentrations of PMA (5.5 nM) and A23187 (0.1-1 ..mu..M) were coincubated with the neutrophils, a synergistic ROS response was elicited. However, arachidonic acid metabolism in the presence of PMA was unchanged relative to A12187 alone. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited both PMA-induced CL (IC/sub 50/ = 0.9 ..mu..M) and A23187-induced arachidonic acid metabolism (IC/sub 50/ = 1.7 ..mu..M and 6.0 ..mu..M for LPO and CO, respectively). The mixed LPO-CO inhibitor, BW755C, behaved in a qualitatively similar manner to NDGA, whereas the CO inhibitors, indomethacin, piroxicam and naproxen had no inhibitory effect on ROS generation at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NDGA and BW755C may inhibit CL and arachidonic acid metabolism by distinct mechanisms in rat neutrophils.

  19. Chemiluminescence of neutrophiles stimulated by opsonized Zymosan in children with bronchial asthma and pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowicz-Uszynska, A.; Jankowski, A.

    2004-08-01

    Oxygen metabolism of neutrophils after stimulation with opsonized zymosan was examined using chemiluminescence test (in the presence of the patient serum or pooled serum). Into the study 37 children aged from 2 to 12 years were enrolled (20 girls and 17 boys). 10 healthy volunteers comprised the control group (group III). Two groups of patients were established: group I -- children with bronchial asthma (without infection), group II -- children with pneumonia. The examination in both groups was performed twice -- in acute phase and in remission period. The group I in acute phase comprised 16 children and in remission phase 9 children, group II - 21 children in acute phase and 9 children in remission phase, respectively. The following parameters of CL were estimated average value of so called spontaneous CL, maximal excitation of neutrophils after stimulation by zymogen (CLmax), time of zymosan opsonization. The following results were obtained: increased spontaneous CL and CLmax (at the presence of both sera) in acute phase of bronchial asthma and pneumonia in comparison to the control group. In the period of remission both these parameters were insignificantly decreased. The longest time of zymosan opsonization in acute period of disease was observed in children with pneumonia (18 min.). This time did not change during remission phase. Only slightly longer time of opsonization was observed in the patients from group I (in exacerbation) (15 min) than in the control group (13,1 min). This time was prolonged in the clinical remission (20 min).

  20. Trichomonas vaginalis promotes apoptosis of human neutrophils by activating caspase-3 and reducing Mcl-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Song, H O; Ryu, J S; Shin, M H; Kim, J M; Cho, Y S; Alderete, J F; Ahn, M H; Min, D Y

    2006-09-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in the vaginal discharge of patients with Trichomonas vaginalis infection. However, it is not known whether neutrophil apoptosis is induced by live T. vaginalis. Therefore, we examined whether T. vaginalis can influence neutrophil apoptosis, and also whether caspase-3 and the Bcl-2 family members are involved in the apoptosis. Thus, human neutrophils were incubated with live T. vaginalis and neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated by Giemsa, annexin V-PI, and DiOC6 stainings. The neutrophil apoptosis was significantly higher in those incubated with T. vaginalis than in the control group. When trichomonads were pre-treated with mAb to AP65 (adhesin protein), or when trophozoites were separated from neutrophils using a Transwell chamber, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced. The activation of caspase-3 was evident in neutrophils undergoing spontaneous apoptosis but was markedly enhanced during T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of caspase-3 effectively reduced T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Trichomonad-induced apoptosis was also associated with reduced expression of the neutrophil anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. These results indicate that T. vaginalis alters Mcl-1 expression and caspase-3 activation, thereby inducing apoptosis of human neutrophils. PMID:16916367

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis promotes apoptosis of human neutrophils by activating caspase-3 and reducing Mcl-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    KANG, J. H.; SONG, H. O.; RYU, J. S.; SHIN, M. H.; KIM, J. M.; CHO, Y. S.; ALDERETE, J. F.; AHN, M. H.; MIN, D. Y.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in the vaginal discharge of patients with Trichomonas vaginalis infection. However, it is not known whether neutrophil apoptosis is induced by live T. vaginalis. Therefore, we examined whether T. vaginalis can influence neutrophil apoptosis, and also whether caspase-3 and the Bcl-2 family members are involved in the apoptosis. Thus, human neutrophils were incubated with live T. vaginalis and neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated by Giemsa, annexin V-PI, and DiOC6 stainings. The neutrophil apoptosis was significantly higher in those incubated with T. vaginalis than in the control group. When trichomonads were pre-treated with mAb to AP65 (adhesin protein), or when trophozoites were separated from neutrophils using a Transwell chamber, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced. The activation of caspase-3 was evident in neutrophils undergoing spontaneous apoptosis but was markedly enhanced during T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of caspase-3 effectively reduced T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Trichomonad-induced apoptosis was also associated with reduced expression of the neutrophil anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. These results indicate that T. vaginalis alters Mcl-1 expression and caspase-3 activation, thereby inducing apoptosis of human neutrophils. PMID:16916367

  2. Subcellular localization of the b-cytochrome component of the human neutrophil microbicidal oxidase: translocation during activation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new method for subcellular fractionation of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and the nuclei removed by centrifugation. The postnuclear supernatant was applied on top of a discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Centrifugation for 15 min at 48,000 g resulted in complete separation of plasma membranes, azurophil granules, and specific granules. As determined by ultrastructure and the distribution of biochemical markers of these organelles, approximately 90% of the b-cytochrome in unstimulated cells was recovered from the band containing the specific granules and was shown to be in or tightly associated with the membrane. During stimulation of intact neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or the ionophore A23187, we observed translocation of 40-75% of the b-cytochrome to the plasma membrane. The extent of this translocation closely paralleled release of the specific granule marker, vitamin B12-binding protein. These data indicate that the b- cytochrome is in the membrane of the specific granules of unstimulated neutrophils and that stimulus-induced fusion of these granules with the plasma membrane results in a translocation of the cytochrome. Our observations provide a basis for the assembly of the microbicidal oxidase of the human neutrophil. PMID:6408102

  3. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulates production of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in ANCA associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Plinio R; Jeffs, Lisa; Nitschke, Jodie; Patel, Mittal; Sarvestani, Ghafar; Cassidy, John; Hissaria, Pravin; Gillis, David; Au Peh, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Background Wegener's Granulomatosis and Microscopic Polyangiitis are life-threatening systemic necrotizing vasculitides of unknown aetiology. The appearance of circulating antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens (ANCA) is strongly associated with the development of the disease. A link between infection and disease has long been suspected, and the appearance of ANCA antibodies has been reported following bacterial and viral infections. The depletion of circulating B cells with monoclonal antibody therapy can induce remission, and this observation suggests a pathogenic role for B cells in this disease. As bacterial DNA is known to induce B cell proliferation and antibody production via TLR-9 stimulation, we have explored the possibility that unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, as found in bacterial and viral DNA, may play a role in stimulating circulating autoreactive B cells to produce ANCA in patients with vasculitis. Results We have confirmed that unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide is a potent stimulator of antibody production by PBMC in vitro. The stimulation of PBMC with CpG oligonucleutides resulted in the production of similar amounts of IgG in both ANCA+ patients and normal controls. In spite of this, PR3 ANCA+ patients synthesised significantly higher amount of IgG ANCA than normal controls. In MPO ANCA+ patients, there was a tendency for patients to produce higher amount of ANCA than controls, however, the difference did not reach significance. Furthermore, we were able to detect circulating MPO-reactive B cells by ELISpot assay from the peripheral blood of 2 MPO+ ANCA vasculitis patients. Together, this indicates that circulating anti-neutrophil autoreactive B cells are present in ANCA+ vasculitis patients, and they are capable of producing antibodies in response to CpG stimulation. Of note, CpG also induced the production of the relevant autoantibodies in patients with other types of autoimmune diseases. Conclusion Circulating ANCA autoreactive B

  4. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-06-18

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils.

  5. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils. PMID:27404503

  6. Effects of budlein A on human neutrophils and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    KNOB, Carollinie Dias; SILVA, Milena; GASPAROTO, Thaís Helena; OLIVEIRA, Carine Ervolino; AMÔR, Nádia Ghinelli; ARAKAWA, Nilton Syogo; COSTA, Fernando Batista; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and other ailments. Objective In this study, we evaluated whether budlein A modulates the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes. Material and Methods Our research group has investigated several plant species and several compounds have been isolated, identified, and their medical potential evaluated. Budlein A is a SL isolated from the species Aldama buddlejiformis and A. robusta (Asteraceae) and shows anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Advances in understanding how plant-derived substances modulate the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have led to the development of new therapies for human diseases. Results Budlein A inhibited MPO activity, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and IL-12 production and induces neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, budlein A inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, and IFN-γ production, but it did not lead to cell death. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that budlein A shows distinct immunomodulatory effects on immune cells. PMID:27383709

  7. Purified human plasma kallikrein aggregates human blood neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Schapira, M; Despland, E; Scott, C F; Boxer, L A; Colman, R W

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of human blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to purified active plasma kallikrein resulted in PMN aggregation when kallikrein was present at concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 0.6 U/ml (0.18-0.27 microM). Kallikrein-induced PMN aggregation was not mediated through C5-derived peptides, because identical responses were observed whether or not kallikrein had been preincubated with an antibody to C5. Moreover, kallikrein was specific for aggregating PMN, because no aggregation was observed with Factor XII active fragments (23 nM), Factor XIa (0.6 U/ml or 15nM), thrombin (1.6 microM), plasmin (2 microM), porcine pancreatic elastase (2 microM), bovine pancreatic chymotrypsin (2 microM), or bradykinin (1 microM). Bovine pancreatic trypsin (2 microM) aggregated PMN, but to a lesser extent than kallikrein (0.18 microM). Kallikrein was a potent aggregant agent for PMN because similar responses were observed with kallikrein (0.5 U/ml or 0.23 microM) and an optimal dose (0.2 microM) of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. In addition, PMN incubation with kallikrein resulted in stimulation of their oxidative metabolism as assessed by an increased oxygen uptake. Neutropenia and leukostasis observed in diseases associated with activation of the contact phase system may be the result of PMN aggregation by plasma kallikrein. PMID:6917855

  8. Neutrophil-mediated damage to human vascular endothelium. Role of cytokine activation.

    PubMed Central

    Westlin, W. F.; Gimbrone, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cytokine activation of cultured human vascular endothelial cells renders them hyperadhesive for blood leukocytes. Co-incubation of freshly isolated, unstimulated human blood neutrophils with confluent cytokine-activated human endothelial monolayers for 90 minutes results in extensive endothelial detachment and destruction of monolayer integrity. In contrast, unactivated endothelial monolayers remain intact. Using this in vitro model, we have explored the neutrophil-effector mechanisms involved in this injury. Coincubation in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) or specific elastase inhibitors (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethyl ketone or alpha-1-protease inhibitor) markedly diminished injury. In contrast, scavengers or inhibitors of oxygen-derived free radicals (superoxide dismutase, catalase, mannitol, or sodium azide) were not protective. Purified human neutrophil elastase mimicked the effect of the neutrophils suggesting a key role for elastase in the neutrophil-mediated injury in this model. Interfering with direct neutrophil-endothelial cell contact by interposing a microporous barrier insert prevented endothelial cell detachment. Furthermore, this neutrophil-mediated detachment could be inhibited with interleukin-8, an action correlated with a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to activated endothelial monolayers. By defining the role of endothelial activation in neutrophil-mediated injury, this in vitro model may provide useful insights into potential therapeutic interventions designed to prevent disruption of the endothelial barrier function. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:8424450

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-1 delays Fas-mediated apoptosis in human neutrophils through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Himpe, Eddy; Degaillier, Céline; Coppens, Astrid; Kooijman, Ron

    2008-10-01

    Apoptosis of human neutrophils is a crucial mechanism for the resolution of inflammation. We previously showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) delays spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis without influencing the secretion of cytokines by these cells. In the present study, we further addressed the role of IGF1 in regulating neutrophil survival in the presence of other factors present during inflammation, and the mechanism involved in delaying apoptosis. We show that IGF1 delays neutrophil apoptosis triggered by the agonistic anti-Fas antibody CH11 and that the effect of IGF1 is comparable in magnitude to that of the acknowledged anti-apoptotic cytokines interferon-gamma (IFNG) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; now known as CSF2). Furthermore, IGF1 exerted additional effects on cell survival in the presence of these cytokines. IGF1 did not affect Fas expression or activation by anti-Fas of caspase-8, but inhibited the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. Inhibitor studies indicate that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway, but not the MEK-ERK pathway, mediates the effects of IGF1. However, in contrast to CSF2, IGF1 did not induce phosphorylation and translocation to the membrane of AKT, the canonical downstream target of PI3K. We therefore speculate that other downstream targets of PI3K are involved in the delay of neutrophil apoptosis by IGF1, possibly through stabilization of the mitochondrial membrane.

  10. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára; Mačičková, Tatiana

    2014-12-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation.

  11. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation. PMID:26109900

  12. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Song, Dong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca(2+) signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca(2+)-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca(2+) influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na(+)-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na(+)-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca(2+)]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca(2+)]i increase through Ca(2+) influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  13. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  14. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect of three iridoids in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shihu; Chi, Haidong; Kodama, Hiroyuki; Chen, Guang

    2013-01-01

    To verify the anti-inflammatory potency of iridoids, three iridoids (two natural, loganic acid: LA; geniposide: GE; and an artefact, 7(S)-n-butyl morroniside: BM) were investigated in vitro on the inhibition of superoxide generation in human neutrophils. All compounds showed inhibitory effect on fMLP-induced superoxide generation in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order: BM>LA>GE. BM exhibits potent inhibitory activity on superoxide anion induced by PMA, while LA and GE showed weak effect. When AA was used as stimulus, the generation of superoxide anion was suppressed by BM in a concentration-dependent manner. LA and GE exhibit both sides effect on superoxide generation.

  16. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  17. EGCG reverses human neutrophil elastase-induced migration in A549 cells by directly binding to HNE and by regulating α1-AT

    PubMed Central

    Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Wu, Haoming; Chen, Ya; Yang, Haopeng; Duan, Jianhui; Li, Xin; Pan, Yan; Tie, Lu; Zhang, Liangren; Li, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Lung carcinogenesis is a complex process that occurs in unregulated inflammatory environment. EGCG has been extensively investigated as a multi-targeting anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory compound. In this study, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which EGCG reverses the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. We found that neutrophil elastase directly triggered human adenocarcinoma A549 cell migration and that EGCG suppressed the elevation of tumor cell migration induced by neutrophil elastase. We observed that EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity based on the CDOCKER algorithm, MD stimulation by GROMACS, SPR assay and elastase enzymatic activity assay. As the natural inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, α1-antitrypsin is synthesized in tumor cells. We further demonstrated that the expression of α1-antitrypsin was up-regulated after EGCG treatment in neutrophil elastase-treated A549 cells. We preliminarily discovered that the EGCG-mediated induction of α1-antitrypsin expression might be correlated with the regulatory effect of EGCG on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Overall, our results suggest that EGCG ameliorates the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. The mechanism underlying this effect may include two processes: EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity; EGCG enhances the expression of α1-antitrypsin by regulating the PI3K/AKT pathway. PMID:26177797

  18. EGCG reverses human neutrophil elastase-induced migration in A549 cells by directly binding to HNE and by regulating α1-AT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Wu, Haoming; Chen, Ya; Yang, Haopeng; Duan, Jianhui; Li, Xin; Pan, Yan; Tie, Lu; Zhang, Liangren; Li, Xuejun

    2015-07-01

    Lung carcinogenesis is a complex process that occurs in unregulated inflammatory environment. EGCG has been extensively investigated as a multi-targeting anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory compound. In this study, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which EGCG reverses the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. We found that neutrophil elastase directly triggered human adenocarcinoma A549 cell migration and that EGCG suppressed the elevation of tumor cell migration induced by neutrophil elastase. We observed that EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity based on the CDOCKER algorithm, MD stimulation by GROMACS, SPR assay and elastase enzymatic activity assay. As the natural inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, α1-antitrypsin is synthesized in tumor cells. We further demonstrated that the expression of α1-antitrypsin was up-regulated after EGCG treatment in neutrophil elastase-treated A549 cells. We preliminarily discovered that the EGCG-mediated induction of α1-antitrypsin expression might be correlated with the regulatory effect of EGCG on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Overall, our results suggest that EGCG ameliorates the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. The mechanism underlying this effect may include two processes: EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity; EGCG enhances the expression of α1-antitrypsin by regulating the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  19. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2α regulates key neutrophil functions in humans, mice, and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. A. Roger; Elks, Philip M.; Marriott, Helen M.; Eamsamarng, Suttida; Higgins, Kathryn R.; Lewis, Amy; Williams, Lynne; Parmar, Selina; Shaw, Gary; McGrath, Emmet E.; Formenti, Federico; Van Eeden, Fredericus J.; Kinnula, Vuokko L.; Pugh, Christopher W.; Sabroe, Ian; Dockrell, David H.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Robbins, Peter A.; Percy, Melanie J.; Simon, M. Celeste; Johnson, Randall S.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Whyte, Moira K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil lifespan and function are regulated by hypoxia via components of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)/von Hippel Lindau/hydroxylase pathway, including specific roles for HIF-1α and prolyl hydroxylase-3. HIF-2α has both distinct and overlapping biological roles with HIF-1α and has not previously been studied in the context of neutrophil biology. We investigated the role of HIF-2α in regulating key neutrophil functions. Human and murine peripheral blood neutrophils expressed HIF-2α, with expression up-regulated by acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli and in disease-associated inflammatory neutrophil. HIF2A gain-of-function mutations resulted in a reduction in neutrophil apoptosis both ex vivo, through the study of patient cells, and in vivo in a zebrafish tail injury model. In contrast, HIF-2α–deficient murine inflammatory neutrophils displayed increased sensitivity to nitrosative stress induced apoptosis ex vivo and increased neutrophil apoptosis in vivo, resulting in a reduction in neutrophilic inflammation and reduced tissue injury. Expression of HIF-2α was temporally dissociated from HIF-1α in vivo and predominated in the resolution phase of inflammation. These data support a critical and selective role for HIF-2α in persistence of neutrophilic inflammation and provide a platform to dissect the therapeutic utility of targeting HIF-2α in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24196071

  20. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C; Wilson, Mary E; Carvalho, Edgar M; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-05-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects.

  1. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C.; Wilson, Mary E.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-01-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects. PMID:27167379

  2. Effects of Alchornea cordifolia on elastase and superoxide anion produced by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kouakou-Siransy, Gisèle; Sahpaz, Sevser; Nguessan, G Irié; Datté, Jacques Yao; Brou, Jérome Kablan; Gressier, Bernard; Bailleul, François

    2010-02-01

    The ability of Alchornea cordifolia (Schum. and Thonn.) Müll. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) leaves to inhibit human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) activities was evaluated on aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts as they allow for a targeted extraction of polyphenols. The direct effect of A. cordifolia extracts on HNE and O(2)(*-) was assessed in an acellular system. Results showed that extracts scavenge HNE and O(2)(*-) in a dose-dependent manner. Better activity was exhibited by the ethyl acetate extract with lower IC(50) (2.2 and 4. 1 mg/L for HNE and O(2)(*-), respectively) than for the aqueous extract. Cellular systems including isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were investigated to assess the effect of extracts on PMN metabolism. PMN were stimulated with 4beta-phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), calcium ionophore (CaI), or N-formyl-methionyl-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP), each stimulant having its own stimulation pathway. From the IC(50) obtained, it can be concluded that A. cordifolia reduces HNE and O(2)(*-) liberation. Furthermore it was demonstrated that A. cordifolia extracts have no cytotoxic activity on PMN by measuring release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. As the ethyl acetate extract offers a higher rate of total phenols than the aqueous extract as well as better scavenging activity, it can be supposed that polyphenols, which are well known for their potent antioxidant and antielastase activity, are implicated in the activity of the plant. Phenolic substances such as quercetin, myricetin-3-glucopyranoside, myricetin-3-rhamnopyranoside, and proanthocyanidin A2 were identified in the ethyl acetate extract. In conclusion, the study provides proof of ethnomedical claims and partly explains the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory action of A. cordifolia leaves. PMID:20645828

  3. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-enriched IgG induces adhesion of human T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Y; Lider, O; Gilburd, B; Hershkoviz, R; Meroni, P L; Wiik, A; Shoenfeld, Y

    1997-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) can activate neutrophils to adhere to endothelium, degranulate, and cause endothelial cell injury. These data have lead to the hypothesis that the T cell inflammatory response causing the vasculitis in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is secondary to stimulation of neutrophils by ANCA. So far there is no evidence for a direct effect of ANCA on lymphocytes. The present study was designed to examine whether lymphocytes can be directly stimulated by ANCA to adhere to endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Human and mouse ANCA-enriched IgG were tested for their ability to increase adhesion of human T lymphocytes to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM. Incubation of human T lymphocytes with human ANCA-enriched IgG increased adhesion of the lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM (the percentage adhesion to intact ECM was 55.7 +/- 3.1 and 45.0 +/- 1.0% for lymphocytes incubated with human IgG containing ANCA or control human IgG, respectively; P = 0.0045). The same induction of adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM was observed when the cells were incubated with the F(ab)2 fragment of ANCA-enriched IgG. Similarly, ANCA-enriched IgG produced in mice increased the adhesion of lymphocytes to fibronectin (the percentage adhesion to fibronectin was 29.7 +/- 4.3 and 16.6 +/- 1.9% for lymphocytes incubated with mouse IgG-ANCA or control mouse IgG, respectively; P = 0.0008). These results may suggest that ANCA can directly stimulate lymphocytes to adhere to endothelial ECM and to induce the vasculitic lesions of WG. It remains to be shown by which mechanisms ANCA stimulate lymphocytes to adhere to ECM. PMID:9175913

  4. Specific binding, internalization, and degradation of human neutrophil activating factor by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Besemer, J.; Hujber, A.; Kuhn, B. )

    1989-10-15

    The interaction of {sup 125}I-labeled recombinant human neutrophil activating factor (NAF) with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was studied by means of a radioreceptor assay. The binding was characterized by a rapid transition (t1/2 less than or equal to 1 min) from a pH 3-sensitive state at 4{degree}C to pH 3 resistance at 37{degree}C. This was not caused by internalization of NAF since pH 3-resistant bound iodinated NAF could still be exchanged by an excess of nonlabeled NAF, i.e. was dissociable. Internalized iodinated NAF was processed into trichloroacetic acid-soluble forms. Scatchard transformation of binding isotherms at 4 and 37{degree}C led to nonlinear curves, a finding which is consistent with the expression of two receptor populations, one with high (KD = 11-35 pM) and the other with lower affinity (KD = 640-830 pM) at 4 degrees C. Numbers of the low affinity binding sites were approximately 34,000, and those with high affinity were 5,200/PMN when estimated at 4 degrees C. Binding of iodinated NAF to PMN was specific since it could be competed by an excess of nonlabeled NAF but not by two other activators of PMN function, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In addition to human PMN, NAF also bound specifically to two human monocytic cell lines; however, only the low affinity binding site could be detected on these cells.

  5. [3H]-SCH 58261 labelling of functional A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dionisotti, Silvio; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1998-01-01

    The present study describes the direct labelling of A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes with the potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of a number of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding, adenylyl cyclase and superoxide anion production assays.Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 1.34 nM and 75 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. Adenosine receptor ligands competed for the binding of 1 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human neutrophil membranes, with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A adenosine receptors. In the adenylyl cyclase and in the superoxide anion production assays the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency identical to that observed in binding experiments.Thermodynamic data indicated that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human neutrophils is entropy and enthalpy-driven. This finding is in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists binding to rat striatal A2A adenosine receptors.It was concluded that in human neutrophil membranes, [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites with pharmacological properties similar to those of A2A adenosine receptors of other tissues. The receptors labelled by [3H]-SCH 58261 mediated the effects of adenosine and adenosine receptor agonists to stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation and inhibition of superoxide anion production in human neutrophils. PMID:9605581

  6. Role of defective ERK phosphorylation in the impaired GM-CSF-induced oxidative response of neutrophils in elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Cosimo; Stella, Isabella; Piazzolla, Giuseppina; Simone, Olivia; Cappiello, Valentina; Antonaci, Salvatore

    2004-08-01

    GM-CSF-induced oxidative responses are defective in neutrophils of elderly humans. In the present study we evaluated whether this phenomenon might be related to alterations in cytokine-dependent MAPK signalling. Neutrophils obtained from elderly humans and stimulated with GM-CSF showed a significant reduction in phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels and an even higher decrease in ERK1/2 activation with respect to baseline. No changes in GM-CSF-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation were observed. Cell pretreatment with the MEK inhibitor PD98059 determined a marked suppression of GM-CSF-induced O2- release. Interestingly, under the above experimental condition, there was no longer any difference in O2- production observed between elderly and young subjects. Furthermore, despite the fact that the p38 MAPK pathway was activated less strongly by GM-CSF, the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 reduced GM-CSF-induced O2- production in the neutrophils of the elderly to levels similar to those obtained with PD98059. TNF-alpha-triggered O2- production was not altered by ageing and in fact, a similar ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK activation was found in TNF-alpha-stimulated neutrophils from elderly and young individuals. In accordance with the different potency of TNF-alpha in activating ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, the TNF-alpha-induced oxidative responses were more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of SB203580 than to those of PD98059 in young as well as elderly subjects. These results suggest that, along the GM-CSF-dependent ERK signalling pathway, a step proximal to MEK1/2 but distal to the connection with the p38 MAPK module likely becomes defective as a feature of age. The consequent decline in ERK1/2 activation could potentially account for the GM-CSF-dependent impairment of the neutrophil respiratory burst that occurs with ageing.

  7. Neutrophil Elastase-Generated Fragment of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A Stimulates Macrophage and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kurtagic, Elma; Rich, Celeste B.; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Nugent, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Elastase released from neutrophils as part of the innate immune system has been implicated in chronic diseases such as emphysema and cardiovascular disease. We have previously shown that neutrophil elastase targets vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) for partial degradation to generate a fragment of VEGF (VEGFf) that has distinct activities. Namely, VEGFf binds to VEGF receptor 1 but not to VEGF receptor 2 and shows altered signaling compared to intact VEGF. In the present study we investigated the chemotactic function of VEGF and VEGFf released from cells by neutrophil elastase. We found that endothelial cells migrated in response to intact VEGF but not VEGFf whereas RAW 264.7 macrophages/monocytes and embryonic endothelial progenitor cells were stimulated to migrate by either VEGF or VEGFf. To investigate the role of elastase-mediated release of VEGF from cells/extracellular matrices, a co-culture system was established. High or low VEGF producing cells were co-cultured with macrophages, endothelial or endothelial progenitor cells and treated with neutrophil elastase. Elastase treatment stimulated macrophage and endothelial progenitor cell migration with the response being greater with the high VEGF expressing cells. However, elastase treatment led to decreased endothelial cell migration due to VEGF cleavage to VEGF fragment. These findings suggest that the tissue response to NE-mediated injury might involve the generation of diffusible VEGF fragments that stimulate inflammatory cell recruitment. PMID:26672607

  8. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  9. Augmentation of human neutrophil and alveolar macrophage LTB4 production by N-acetylcysteine: role of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Gordon; Rabe, Klaus F; Magnussen, Helgo

    1997-01-01

    The actions of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production by human resting and stimulated peripheral blood neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were investigated. At a concentration of 100 μM, NAC significantly (P<0.01) suppressed the accumulation of H2O2 in the incubation medium of resting and opsonized zymosan (OZ; 0.5 mg ml−1)- or N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP; 1 μM)-stimulated neutrophils and of resting and OZ-stimulated macrophages. At concentrations of 10 μM and above, NAC augmented significantly the level of LTB4 in the supernatants of OZ- and fMLP-stimulated neutrophils (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively) and OZ-stimulated macrophages (P<0.05 at 10 μM, P<0.01 at 100 μM NAC). NAC (100 μM) caused a significant (P<0.01) reduction in the quantity of measurable H2O2 when incubated with exogenous H2O2 concentrations equivalent to those released from OZ-stimulated neutrophils and macrophages. At no concentration did NAC affect quantitites of measurable LTB4 when incubated with exogenous LTB4. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), which catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to H2O2 had no significant effect on LTB4 production by human neutrophils. In contrast, catalase, which catalyzes the conversion of H2O2 to H2O and O2, caused a pronounced, statistically significant (P<0.01) increase in the levels of LTB4 measured in the supernatants of OZ- and fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. H2O2 (12.5 μM and 25 μM, concentrations equivalent to those measured in the supernatants of activated neutrophils and alveolar macrophages, respectively) caused a small (13%) decrease in the quantity of measurable LTB4 (P=0.051 and P<0.05 at 12.5 μM and 25 μM, respectively) that was inhibited by NAC (100 μM) but not by catalase (400 u ml−1). In conclusion, the anti-oxidant drug, NAC, increases LTB4 production by human neutrophils and alveolar macrophages, probably through the elimination of cell

  10. Proteomic analysis of secretagogue-stimulated neutrophils implicates a role for actin and actin-interacting proteins in Rac2-mediated granule exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are abundant leukocytes that play a primary role in defence against pathogens. Neutrophils enter sites of infection where they eliminate pathogens via phagocytosis and the release of antimicrobial mediators via degranulation. Rho GTPases, particularly Rac2, play a key role in neutrophil degranulation. The purpose of this study was to identify Rac2-dependent changes in protein abundance in stimulated neutrophils. Methods We performed a proteomic analysis on secretagogue-stimulated bone marrow neutrophils that were isolated from wild-type and Rac2-/- mice. Protein abundance was analyzed by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE of fluorescently labelled samples which allowed the detection ~3500 proteins. Results We identified 22 proteins that showed significant changes in abundance after secretagogue-stimulation of wild-type neutrophils, which did not occur in neutrophils isolated from Rac2-/- mice. As expected, the abundance of several granule proteins was reduced in wild-type cells; this did not occur in Rac2-/- neutrophils which confirms the requirement for Rac2 in degranulation. We also found changes in abundance of many actin remodelling proteins including coronin-1A, β-actin and the F-actin capping protein, (CapZ-β). Coronin-1A showed elevated levels of several isoforms after stimulation of neutrophils from wild-type, but not from Rac2-/- mice. These isoforms were immunoreactive with anti-phospho-threonine antibodies, suggesting that neutrophil stimulation triggers a Rac2-dependent kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of coronin-1A. Conclusion The control of Rac2-mediated degranulation in neutrophils likely functions through actin remodelling via activation of several actin-binding proteins. We found coronin-1A to be a novel downstream effector protein of this pathway that is threonine phosphorylated in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:22081935

  11. Fucoidan delays apoptosis and induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-O; Yu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although some immune modulatory effects of fucoidan have been elucidated, the effects of fucoidan on the apoptosis and activation of human neutrophils have not been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan purified from the brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifilda delays spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils and induces their activation. Fucoidan treatment inhibited apoptotic nuclei changes and phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure on neutrophils cultured in vitro for 24h. The delay in neutrophil apoptosis mediated by fucoidan was associated with increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and decreased levels of activated caspase-3. Screening of the signaling pathways by specific inhibitors indicated that fucoidan-induced delay in neutrophil apoptosis was dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, whereas MAPK signaling pathway was not critical. In addition, fucoidan enhanced the production of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α from neutrophils in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrated that fucoidan delays human neutrophil apoptosis and induces their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This knowledge could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases and neutropenia by controlling neutrophil homeostasis and function with fucoidan.

  12. The in vitro effects of Newcastle disease virus on the metabolic and antibacterial functions of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faden, H.; Humbert, J.; Lee, J.; Sutyla, P.; Ogra, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    Live Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was used to investigate the in vitro effects of a viral infection on phagocytosis, chemiluminescence generation, superoxide production, oxygen consumption, NADPH-oxidase activity, and intracellular killing of bacteria by Ficoll-Hypaque separated human neutrophils. Phagocytosis of oil red O particles by NDV-treated PMN was inhibited by 50%. Chemiluminescence by PMN was inhibited 79% after zymosan stimulation and 86% after tetradeconyl phorbol acetate stimulation. Superoxide generation was inhibited by 68%. Oxygen consumption was inhibited in the presence of NDV by 37% after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate, while membrane-associated NADPH-enzyme activity was decreased by 19%. The percent of surviving intracellular S. aureus was significantly elevated in NDV-treated PMN after 60 and 120 min of incubation. Purified bacterial neuraminidase markedly suppressed chemiluminescence, while neuraminic acid blocked the effects of the virus. These observations suggest that infections with myxoviruses may suppress a number of vital neutrophil functions. It appears that the effects may be partly mediated by the interaction of viral neuraminidase with the external neutrophil membrane.

  13. Phagocytosis and Killing of Carbapenem-Resistant ST258 Klebsiella pneumoniae by Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Porter, Adeline R; Dorward, David W; Brinkworth, Amanda J; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; DeLeo, Frank R

    2016-05-15

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains classified as multilocus sequence type 258 (ST258) are among the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens. Treatment of infections caused by these organisms is difficult, and mortality is high. The basis for the success of ST258, outside of antibiotic resistance, remains incompletely determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that ST258K. pneumoniae has enhanced capacity to circumvent killing by human neutrophils, the primary cellular defense against bacterial infections. There was limited binding and uptake of ST258 by human neutrophils, and correspondingly, there was limited killing of bacteria. On the other hand, transmission electron microscopy revealed that any ingested organisms were degraded readily within neutrophil phagosomes, thus indicating that survival in the neutrophil assays is due to limited phagocytosis, rather than to microbicide resistance after uptake. Our findings suggest that enhancing neutrophil phagocytosis is a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of infection caused by carbapenem-resistant ST258K. pneumoniae.

  14. DNA damage induced by phorbol ester-stimulated neutrophils is augmented by extracellular cofactors. Role of histidine and metals.

    PubMed

    Shacter, E; Lopez, R L; Beecham, E J; Janz, S

    1990-04-25

    Activated neutrophils cause extensive DNA damage in neighboring nonphagocytic cells. To determine whether compounds in the extracellular milieu participate in the DNA damage process, murine neutrophils were cocultivated with target tumor cells in media of varying composition. Using the alkaline elution assay, it was found that the level of strand breaks induced was significantly higher (2.8-fold) in complex cell culture media than in minimal phosphate-buffered saline. Addition of amino acids in general and of histidine in particular increased the level of damage nearly to that observed in complete media (2.7- and 2.1-fold, respectively). The histidine stimulation was concentration-dependent and reached a maximum at 100-400 microM. The mechanism whereby this occurred is not proven but probably derived from chelation of metals and participation in a site-specific Fenton reaction. Addition of the cell-impermeable chelator EDTA dramatically inhibited induction of strand breaks by neutrophils in complete media and prevented the enhancement of damage induced by histidine in phosphate-buffered saline. None of the effects on neutrophil-induced damage could be attributed to modulation of the oxidative burst activity of the cells (O2- and H2O2 production). Histidine also enhanced induction of strand breaks by reagent H2O2. However, EDTA had no effect or actually increased the level of damage induced by both a bolus of H2O2 and a flux of H2O2 generated by glucose oxidase. The cell-permeable chelator o-phenanthroline inhibited both neutrophil- and H2O2-induced damage. The results indicate that secondary reactions involving extracellular amino acids and metals contribute significantly to neutrophil-induced DNA damage to neighboring cells. Moreover, the data show that the mechanism whereby neutrophils induce this damage cannot be attributed solely to secretion of H2O2.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis- induced neutrophil extracellular traps activate human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braian, Clara; Hogea, Valentin; Stendahl, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity.

  16. Differential involvement of NF-kappaB and MAP kinase pathways in the generation of inflammatory cytokines by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Alexandre; Ear, Thornin; Blais-Charron, Emilie; Dubois, Claire M; McDonald, Patrick P

    2007-02-01

    The ability of human neutrophils to express a variety of genes encoding inflammatory mediators is well documented, and mounting evidence suggests that neutrophil-derived cytokines and chemokines contribute to the recruitment of discrete leukocyte populations at inflammatory sites. Despite this, our understanding of the signaling intermediates governing the generation of inflammatory cytokines by neutrophils remains fragmentary. Here, we report that inhibitors of the p38 MAPK and MEK pathways substantially diminish the release of (and in the case of p38 inhibitors, the gene expression of) several inflammatory cytokines in neutrophils stimulated with LPS or TNF. In addition, various NF-kappaB inhibitors were found to profoundly impede the inducible gene expression and release of inflammatory cytokines in these cells. The MAPK inhibitors did not affect NF-kappaB activation; instead, the transcriptional effects of the p38 MAPK inhibitor appear to involve transcriptional factor IID. Conversely, the NF-kappaB inhibitors failed to affect the activation of MAPKs. Finally, the MAPK inhibitors were found to prevent the activation a key component of the translational machinery, S6 ribosomal protein, in keeping with their post-transcriptional impact on cytokine generation. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first demonstration that in neutrophils, the inducible expression of proinflammatory cytokines by physiological stimuli largely reflects the ability of the latter to activate NF-kappaB and selected MAPK pathways. Our data also raise the possibility that NF-kappaB or MAPK inhibitors could be useful in the treatment of inflammatory disorders in which neutrophils predominate.

  17. Regulation of isocyanate-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation in cultured human neutrophils: isocyanate-induced neutrophils apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P K; Khan, S; Bhargava, A; Panwar, H; Banerjee, S; Jain, S K; Maudar, K K

    2010-06-01

    Implications of environmental toxins on the regulation of neutrophil function are being significantly appraised. Such effects can be varied and markedly different depending on the type and extent of chemical exposure, which results in direct damage to the immune system. Isocyanates with functional group (-NCO), are considered as highly reactive molecules with diverse industrial applications. However, patho-physiological implications resulting from their occupational and accidental exposures have not been well delineated. The present study was carried out to assess the immunotoxic response of isocyanates and their mode of action at a molecular level on cultured human neutrophils isolated from healthy human volunteers. Studies were conducted to evaluate both dose- and time-dependent (n = 3) response using N-succinimidyl N-methylcarbamate, a chemical entity that mimics the effects of methyl isocyanate in vitro. Measure of apoptosis through annexin-V-FITC/PI assay, active caspase-3, apoptotic DNA ladder assay and mitochondrial depolarization; induction of oxidative stress by CM-H(2)DCFDA and formation of 8'-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine; and levels of antioxidant defense system enzyme glutathione reductase, multiplex cytometric bead array analysis to quantify the secreted cytokine levels (interleukin-8, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-12p70) parameters were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that isocyanates induce neutrophil apoptosis via activation of mitochondrial-mediated pathway along with reactive oxygen species production; depletion in antioxidant defense states; and elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

  18. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  19. Attenuation of human neutrophil migration and function by uropathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Jennifer A.; Hunstad, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of bacterial infections at mucosal epithelial surfaces is determined by the balance of virulence attributes of the pathogen with the activity of innate host defenses. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are key responders in many bacterial infections, but the mechanisms by which pathogens subvert these early responses to establish infection are largely undefined. Here, we model early interactions between human PMN and the primary cause of urinary tract infections, namely uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Our objective was to define virulence phenotypes of uropathogens that permit evasion of PMN activity. We show that UPEC strains, as compared with laboratory and commensal E. coli, resist phagocytic killing and dampen the production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen species by PMN. Analysis of the transcriptional responses of PMN to E. coli strains revealed that UPEC exposure downregulates the expression of PMN genes that direct proinflammatory signaling and PMN chemotaxis, adhesion, and migration. Consistent with these data, UPEC attenuated transepithelial neutrophil recruitment in an in vitro model of acute infection and in a murine model of bacterial cystitis. We propose that these UPEC strategies are important in the establishment of epithelial infection, and that the findings are germane to bacterial infections at other epithelial surfaces. PMID:21315174

  20. Human polymorphonuclear neutrophils specifically recognize and kill cancerous cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Kloecker, Goetz; Fleming, Chris; Bousamra, Michael; Hansen, Richard; Hu, Xiaoling; Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Xiang, Dong; Donninger, Howard; Eaton, John W; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the main effectors of the innate immune system, have rarely been considered as an anticancer therapeutic tool. However, recent investigations using animal models and preliminary clinical studies have highlighted the potential antitumor efficacy of PMNs. In the current study, we find that PMNs from some healthy donors naturally have potent cancer-killing activity against 4 different human cancer cell lines. The killing activity appears to be cancer cell-specific since PMNs did not kill primary normal epithelial cells or an immortalized breast epithelial cell line. Transfecting the immortalized mammary cells with plasmids expressing activated forms of the rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Ras) and teratocarcinoma oncogene 21 (TC21) oncogenes was sufficient to provoke aggressive attack by PMNs. However, transfection with activated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac1) was ineffective, suggesting specificity in PMN-targeting of neoplastic cells. Furthermore, PMNs from lung cancer patients were also found to exhibit relatively poor cancer-killing activity compared to the cytolytic activity of the average healthy donor. Taken together, our results suggest that PMN-based treatment regimens may represent a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy that may be easily introduced into the clinic to benefit a subset of patients with PMN-vulnerable tumors. PMID:25610737

  1. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    PubMed

    Ávila, Eva E; Salaiza, Norma; Pulido, Julieta; Rodríguez, Mayra C; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica. PMID:27415627

  2. The Linear Motor in the Human Neutrophil Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereycken, V.; Gruler, H.; Bucherer, C.; Lacombe, C.; Lelièvre, J. C.

    1995-09-01

    The kinematics and dynamics of human neutrophils in a narrow glass tube (4.9 μm to 6.3 μm in diameter) have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Cells were activated by the tri-peptide (fMLP) to migrate through a tube with a mean speed of 0.15± 0.03~μm/s (54 activated cells). When a hydrostatic pressure was applied across the cell, the mean speed of the cell leading front linearly decreases when the pressure is increased. At a pressure difference of 1530± 140 Pa (9 activated cells), the cell was forced to stop. The cell migration has been approximated by a tractor-trailer model. The cellular motor (leading front), the tractor, produced a traction force by converting chemical energy into mechanical work. This motor has been characterized as a linear motor with two machine coefficients: (i) the maximum traction T_0~(37.7 nN) at V = 0, where V is the cellular speed (ii) the maximum cellular speed V_max~(0.15~μm/s). A characteristic time of approximately 100 s was measured for the action cycle of the linear motor. A phenomenological description of the chemotactic machine has been presented.

  3. Pathogenic Neisseria hitchhike on the uropod of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Söderholm, Niklas; Vielfort, Katarina; Hultenby, Kjell; Aro, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are important components of the human innate immune system and are rapidly recruited at the site of bacterial infection. Despite the effective phagocytic activity of PMNs, Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections are characterized by high survival within PMNs. We reveal a novel type IV pilus-mediated adherence of pathogenic Neisseria to the uropod (the rear) of polarized PMNs. The direct pilus-uropod interaction was visualized by scanning electron microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We showed that N. meningitidis adhesion to the PMN uropod depended on both pilus-associated proteins PilC1 and PilC2, while N. gonorrhoeae adhesion did not. Bacterial adhesion elicited accumulation of the complement regulator CD46, but not I-domain-containing integrins, beneath the adherent bacterial microcolony. Electrographs and live-cell imaging of PMNs suggested that bacterial adherence to the uropod is followed by internalization into PMNs via the uropod. We also present data showing that pathogenic Neisseria can hitchhike on PMNs to hide from their phagocytic activity as well as to facilitate the spread of the pathogen through the epithelial cell layer.

  4. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Ávila, Eva E.; Rodríguez, Mayra C.; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P.; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica. PMID:27415627

  5. Human neutrophil-mediated nonoxidative antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Mambula, S S; Simons, E R; Hastey, R; Selsted, M E; Levitz, S M

    2000-11-01

    It has long been appreciated that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) kill Cryptococcus neoformans, at least in part via generation of fungicidal oxidants. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of nonoxidative mechanisms to the inhibition and killing of C. neoformans. Treatment of human PMN with inhibitors and scavengers of respiratory burst oxidants only partially reversed anticryptococcal activity, suggesting that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. To define the mediators of nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity, PMN were fractionated into cytoplasmic, primary (azurophil) granule, and secondary (specific) granule fractions. Incubation of C. neoformans with these fractions for 18 h resulted in percent inhibition of growth of 67.4 +/- 3.4, 84.6 +/- 4.4, and 29.2 +/- 10.5 (mean +/- standard error, n = 3), respectively. Anticryptococcal activity of the cytoplasmic fraction was abrogated by zinc and depletion of calprotectin. Antifungal activity of the primary granules was significantly reduced by pronase treatment, boiling, high ionic strength, and magnesium but not calcium. Fractionation of the primary granules by reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography on a C(4) column over an acetonitrile gradient revealed multiple peaks with anticryptococcal activity. Of these, peaks 1 and 6 had substantial fungistatic and fungicidal activity. Peak 1 was identified by acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and mass spectroscopy as human neutrophil proteins (defensins) 1 to 3. Analysis of peak 6 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE revealed multiple bands. Thus, human PMN have nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity residing principally in their cytoplasmic and primary granule fractions. Calprotectin mediates the cytoplasmic activity, whereas multiple proteins, including defensins, are responsible for activity of the primary granules. PMID:11035733

  6. Genomic modulators of gene expression in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Makino, Seiko; Humburg, Peter; Wong, Daniel; Ng, Esther; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Knight, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils form the most abundant leukocyte subset and are central to many disease processes. Technical challenges in transcriptomic profiling have prohibited genomic approaches to date. Here we map expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in peripheral blood CD16+ neutrophils from 101 healthy European adults. We identify cis-eQTL for 3281 neutrophil-expressed genes including many implicated in neutrophil function, with 450 of these not previously observed in myeloid or lymphoid cells. Paired comparison with monocyte eQTL demonstrates nuanced conditioning of genetic regulation of gene expression by cellular context, which relates to cell-type-specific DNA methylation and histone modifications. Neutrophil eQTL are markedly enriched for trait-associated variants particularly autoimmune, allergy and infectious disease. We further demonstrate how eQTL in PADI4 and NOD2 delineate risk variant function in rheumatoid arthritis, leprosy and Crohn's disease. Taken together, these data help advance understanding of the genetics of gene expression, neutrophil biology and immune-related diseases. PMID:26151758

  7. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  8. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  9. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis.

  10. Morphological evidence of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Caruso, R A; Muda, A O; Bersiga, A; Rigoli, L; Inferrera, C

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrophil-tumor cell emperipolesis or phagocytosis has been documented by light microscopy in various human carcinomas, but little is known about the cellular pathological processes and the morphological changes involved. In an attempt to clarify the nature of this phenomenon, the authors' ultrastructural studies on the relationships among neutrophils and tumor cells in human gastric carcinomas are reviewed and analyzed. At the electron microscopy level, apoptotic neutrophils were found within vacuoles of adenocarcinoma cells in 2 cases. They showed either early apoptotic morphology with perinuclear chromatin aggregation but cytoplasm integrity or late apoptotic morphology with uniform, collapsed nucleus and tightly packed cytoplasmic granules. A light microscopy review of 200 cases of resected gastric carcinomas identified 22 cases (11%) that were characterized by neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism). TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic neutrophils within the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. This study provides light and electron microscopic evidence of apoptotic neutrophils phagocytosed by gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The morphological features of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) would suggest a particular mechanism of tumor-immune escape in human gastric carcinoma. PMID:12396242

  11. Subcellular location and properties of bactericidal factors from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabay, J E; Heiple, J M; Cohn, Z A; Nathan, C F

    1986-11-01

    We examined the subcellular location of bactericidal factors (BF) in human neutrophils, using an efficient fractionation scheme. Nitrogen bomb cavitates of DIFP-treated PMN were centrifuged through discontinuous Percoll gradients, each fraction extracted with 0.05 M glycine, pH 2.0, and tested for the killing of Escherichia coli. greater than 90% of BF coisolated with the azurophil granules. After lysis of azurophils, 98% of azurophil-derived BF (ADBF) sedimented with the membrane. ADBF activity was solubilized from azurophil membrane with either acid or nonionic detergent (Triton X-100, Triton X-114). Bactericidal activity was linear with respect to protein concentration over the range 0.3-30 micrograms/ml. 0.1-0.3 microgram/ml ADBF killed 10(5) E. coli within 30 min at 37 degrees C. At 1.4 micrograms/ml, 50% of 2 X 10(5) bacteria were killed within 5 min. ADBF was effective between pH 5-8, with peak activity at pH 5.5. Glucose (20 mM), EDTA (1-25 mM), and physiologic concentrations of NaCl or KCl had little or no inhibitory effect on ADBF. ADBF killed both Gram-positive and Gram-negative virulent clinical isolates, including listeria, staphylococci, beta-hemolytic streptococci, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, under these conditions of cell disruption, fractionation, extraction, and assay, almost all BF in human PMN appeared to be localized to the membrane of azurophilic granules as a highly potent, broad-spectrum, rapidly acting protein(s) effective in physiologic medium. Some of these properties appear to distinguish ADBF from previously described PMN bactericidal proteins. PMID:3772295

  12. Subcellular location and properties of bactericidal factors from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabay, J E; Heiple, J M; Cohn, Z A; Nathan, C F

    1986-11-01

    We examined the subcellular location of bactericidal factors (BF) in human neutrophils, using an efficient fractionation scheme. Nitrogen bomb cavitates of DIFP-treated PMN were centrifuged through discontinuous Percoll gradients, each fraction extracted with 0.05 M glycine, pH 2.0, and tested for the killing of Escherichia coli. greater than 90% of BF coisolated with the azurophil granules. After lysis of azurophils, 98% of azurophil-derived BF (ADBF) sedimented with the membrane. ADBF activity was solubilized from azurophil membrane with either acid or nonionic detergent (Triton X-100, Triton X-114). Bactericidal activity was linear with respect to protein concentration over the range 0.3-30 micrograms/ml. 0.1-0.3 microgram/ml ADBF killed 10(5) E. coli within 30 min at 37 degrees C. At 1.4 micrograms/ml, 50% of 2 X 10(5) bacteria were killed within 5 min. ADBF was effective between pH 5-8, with peak activity at pH 5.5. Glucose (20 mM), EDTA (1-25 mM), and physiologic concentrations of NaCl or KCl had little or no inhibitory effect on ADBF. ADBF killed both Gram-positive and Gram-negative virulent clinical isolates, including listeria, staphylococci, beta-hemolytic streptococci, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, under these conditions of cell disruption, fractionation, extraction, and assay, almost all BF in human PMN appeared to be localized to the membrane of azurophilic granules as a highly potent, broad-spectrum, rapidly acting protein(s) effective in physiologic medium. Some of these properties appear to distinguish ADBF from previously described PMN bactericidal proteins.

  13. Ozone effects on inhibitors of human neutrophil proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.E.; Stack, M.S.; Johnson, D.A.

    1987-02-15

    The effects of ozone on human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (A-1-PI), alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (A-1-Achy), bronchial leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (BLPI), and Eglin C were studied using in vitro exposures in phosphate-buffered solutions. Following ozone exposure, inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and/or cathepsin G (Cat G) were measured. Exposure of A-1-PI to 50 mol O3/mol protein resulted in a complete loss of HNE inhibitory activity, whereas A-1-Achy lost only 50% of its Cat G inhibitory activity and remained half active even after exposure to 250 mol of O3. At 40 mol O3/mol protein, BLPI lost 79% of its activity against HNE and 87% of its Cat G inhibitory activity. Eglin C, a leech-derived inhibitor, lost 81% of its HNE inhibitory activity and 92% of its ability to inhibit Cat G when exposed to 40 mol O3/mol. Amino acid analyses of ozone-exposed inhibitors showed destruction of Trp, Met, Tyr, and His with as little as 10 mol O3/mol protein, and higher levels of O3 resulted in more extensive oxidation of susceptible residues. The variable ozone susceptibility of the different amino acid residues in the four proteins indicated that oxidation was a function of protein structure, as well as the inherent susceptibility of particular amino acids. Exposure of A-1-PI and BLPI in the presence of the antioxidants, Trolox C (water soluble vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C), showed that antioxidant vitamins may protect proteins from oxidative inactivation by ozone. Methionine-specific modification of BLPI reduced its HNE and Cat G inhibitory activities. Two moles of N-chlorosuccinimide per mole of BLPI methionine caused an 80% reduction in activity against Cat G, but only a 40% reduction in HNE inhibitory activity.

  14. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  15. Metabolism of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in the human neutrophil

    SciTech Connect

    Triggiani, M.; D'Souza, D.M.; Chilton, F.H. )

    1991-04-15

    The biosynthesis of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC) together with that of 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-GPC (platelet-activating factor) has been demonstrated in a variety of inflammatory cells and tissues. It has been hypothesized that the relative proportion of these phospholipids produced upon cell activation may be influenced by their rates of catabolism. We studied the catabolism of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC in resting and activated human neutrophils and compared it to that of 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-GPC. Neutrophils rapidly catabolize both 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-GPC and 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC; however, the rate of catabolism of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC is approximately 2-fold higher than that of 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-GPC. In addition, most of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC is catabolized through a pathway different from that of 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-GPC. The main step in the catabolism of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC is the removal of the long chain at the sn-1 position; the long chain residue is subsequently incorporated either into triglycerides or into phosphatidylcholine. The 1-lyso-2-acetyl-GPC formed in this reaction is then further degraded to glycerophosphocholine, choline, or phosphocholine. 1-Acyl-2-acetyl-GPC is also catabolized, to a lesser extent, through deacetylation at the sn-2 position and reacylation with a long chain fatty acid. Stimulation of neutrophils by A23187 results in a higher rate of catabolism of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC by increasing both the removal of the long chain at the sn-1 position and the deacetylation-reacylation at the sn-2 position. In a broken cell preparation, the cytosolic fraction of the neutrophil was shown to contain an enzyme activity which cleaved the sn-1 position of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC and 1-acyl-2-lyso-GPC but not of 1,2-diacyl-GPC.

  16. Contribution of complement-stimulated hepatic macrophages and neutrophils to endotoxin-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H; Farhood, A; Smith, C W

    1994-04-01

    The role of complement as potential activator for tissue macrophages and neutrophils was investigated in an experimental model of endotoxin-induced liver injury in male Fischer rats. Injection of Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin (1 mg/kg) into Corynebacterium parvum-pretreated animals (7 mg/kg; single dose 6 days before endotoxin) resulted in severe oxidant stress, as indicated by a 37-fold increase of plasma levels of glutathione disulfide (basal concentration, 0.36 +/- 14 mumol/L), accumulation of neutrophils in the liver (600 +/- 31 neutrophils/50 high-power fields) and liver injury (plasma ALT, 1184 +/- 185 U/l; necrosis; 19% +/- 3%) 10 hr after endotoxin. The oxidant stress induced by 1 mg/kg endotoxin in the C. parvum-treated animals was always significantly higher than that in control animals receiving the same dose of endotoxin. Inhibition of complement activation with the soluble complement receptor type 1 attenuated the oxidant stress and liver injury by 50% to 65% but had no effect on hepatic neutrophil accumulation or plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels. Treatment with a monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha-chain of CD11b/CD18 adhesion proteins (clone 17), which was highly effective in attenuating ischemia-reperfusion injury in the liver by reducing the number of neutrophils and functionally inactivating these cells, neither protected against parenchymal cell injury nor affected hepatic neutrophil infiltration in the C. parvum model. We conclude that reactive oxygen derived from complement-stimulated macrophages is critical for the development of liver injury in the C. parvum/endotoxin model. PMID:8138272

  17. B–helper neutrophils stimulate immunoglobulin diversification and production in the marginal zone of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Irene; Cols, Montserrat; Barra, Carolina M.; He, Bing; Cassis, Linda; Gentile, Maurizio; Comerma, Laura; Chorny, Alejo; Shan, Meimei; Xu, Weifeng; Magri, Giuliana; Knowles, Daniel M.; Tam, Wayne; Chiu, April; Bussel, James B; Serrano, Sergi; Lorente, José Antonio; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Lloreta, Josep; Juanpere, Nuria; Alameda, Francesc; Baró, Teresa; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Torán, Núria; Català, Albert; Torrebadell, Montserrat; Fortuny, Claudia; Cusi, Victoria; Carreras, Carmen; Diaz, George A.; Blander, J. Magarian; Farber, Claire-Michèle; Silvestri, Guido; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Calvillo, Michaela; Dufour, Carlo; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Lougaris, Vassilios; Plebani, Alessandro; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Ganal, Stephanie C.; Diefenbach, Andreas; Aróstegui, Juan Ignacio; Juan, Manel; Yagüe, Jordi; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Donadieu, Jean; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophils utilize immunoglobulins (Igs) to clear antigen, but their role in Ig production is unknown. Here we identified neutrophils around the marginal zone (MZ) of the spleen, a B cell area specialized in T-independent Ig responses to circulating antigen. Neutrophils colonized peri-MZ areas after post-natal mucosal colonization by microbes and enhanced their B-helper function upon receiving reprogramming signals from splenic sinusoidal endothelial cells, including interleukin 10 (IL-10). Splenic neutrophils induced Ig class switching, somatic hypermutation and antibody production by activating MZ B cells through a mechanism involving the cytokines BAFF, APRIL and IL-21. Neutropenic patients had fewer and hypomutated MZ B cells and less preimmune Igs to T-independent antigens, which indicates that neutrophils generate an innate layer of antimicrobial Ig defense by interacting with MZ B cells. PMID:22197976

  18. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer.

  19. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Khalaf F; Thomas, Mark R; Judge, Heather M; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C; Storey, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7%±4.4 vs. control 22.6%±2.4; p<0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6±6.6 vs. 28.0±6.6; p=0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection.

  20. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Khalaf F.; Thomas, Mark R.; Judge, Heather M.; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R.; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C.; Storey, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7% ± 4.4 vs. control 22.6% ± 2.4; p < 0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6 ± 6.6 vs. 28.0 ± 6.6; p = 0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  1. Detection of Human Neutrophil Elastase with Fluorescent Peptide Sensors Conjugated to Nanocellulosic Solid Supports Targeting Wound Care Diagnostics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a biomarker for chronic wounds and a therapeutic target for certain diseases. An unchecked influx of neutrophils, which contain about one pictogram of elastase per neutrophil, is responsible for degrading growth factors and collagen formation, indefinitely delaying...

  2. Human Neutrophils Secrete Bioactive Paucimannosidic Proteins from Azurophilic Granules into Pathogen-Infected Sputum*

    PubMed Central

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Loke, Ian; Laurini, Christine; Diestel, Simone; Parker, Benjamin L.; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike plants and invertebrates, mammals reportedly lack proteins displaying asparagine (N)-linked paucimannosylation (mannose1–3fucose0–1N-acetylglucosamine2Asn). Enabled by technology advancements in system-wide biomolecular characterization, we document that protein paucimannosylation is a significant host-derived molecular signature of neutrophil-rich sputum from pathogen-infected human lungs and is negligible in pathogen-free sputum. Five types of paucimannosidic N-glycans were carried by compartment-specific and inflammation-associated proteins of the azurophilic granules of human neutrophils including myeloperoxidase (MPO), azurocidin, and neutrophil elastase. The timely expressed human azurophilic granule-resident β-hexosaminidase A displayed the capacity to generate paucimannosidic N-glycans by trimming hybrid/complex type N-glycan intermediates with relative broad substrate specificity. Paucimannosidic N-glycoepitopes showed significant co-localization with β-hexosaminidase A and the azurophilic marker MPO in human neutrophils using immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, promyelocyte stage-specific expression of genes coding for paucimannosidic proteins and biosynthetic enzymes indicated a novel spatio-temporal biosynthetic route in early neutrophil maturation. The absence of bacterial exoglycosidase activities and paucimannosidic N-glycans excluded exogenous origins of paucimannosylation. Paucimannosidic proteins from isolated and sputum neutrophils were preferentially secreted upon inoculation with virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Finally, paucimannosidic proteins displayed affinities to mannose-binding lectin, suggesting immune-related functions of paucimannosylation in activated human neutrophils. In conclusion, we are the first to document that human neutrophils produce, store and, upon activation, selectively secrete bioactive paucimannosidic proteins into sputum of lungs undergoing pathogen-based inflammation. PMID:25645918

  3. Human neutrophils secrete bioactive paucimannosidic proteins from azurophilic granules into pathogen-infected sputum.

    PubMed

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Loke, Ian; Laurini, Christine; Diestel, Simone; Parker, Benjamin L; Packer, Nicolle H

    2015-04-01

    Unlike plants and invertebrates, mammals reportedly lack proteins displaying asparagine (N)-linked paucimannosylation (mannose(1-3)fucose(0-1)N-acetylglucosamine(2)Asn). Enabled by technology advancements in system-wide biomolecular characterization, we document that protein paucimannosylation is a significant host-derived molecular signature of neutrophil-rich sputum from pathogen-infected human lungs and is negligible in pathogen-free sputum. Five types of paucimannosidic N-glycans were carried by compartment-specific and inflammation-associated proteins of the azurophilic granules of human neutrophils including myeloperoxidase (MPO), azurocidin, and neutrophil elastase. The timely expressed human azurophilic granule-resident β-hexosaminidase A displayed the capacity to generate paucimannosidic N-glycans by trimming hybrid/complex type N-glycan intermediates with relative broad substrate specificity. Paucimannosidic N-glycoepitopes showed significant co-localization with β-hexosaminidase A and the azurophilic marker MPO in human neutrophils using immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, promyelocyte stage-specific expression of genes coding for paucimannosidic proteins and biosynthetic enzymes indicated a novel spatio-temporal biosynthetic route in early neutrophil maturation. The absence of bacterial exoglycosidase activities and paucimannosidic N-glycans excluded exogenous origins of paucimannosylation. Paucimannosidic proteins from isolated and sputum neutrophils were preferentially secreted upon inoculation with virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Finally, paucimannosidic proteins displayed affinities to mannose-binding lectin, suggesting immune-related functions of paucimannosylation in activated human neutrophils. In conclusion, we are the first to document that human neutrophils produce, store and, upon activation, selectively secrete bioactive paucimannosidic proteins into sputum of lungs undergoing pathogen-based inflammation. PMID:25645918

  4. TRPC1 regulates fMLP-stimulated migration and chemotaxis of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, O; Strodthoff, C; Horstmann, M; Nielsen, N; Jung, F; Schimmelpfennig, S; Heitzmann, M; Schwab, A

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense of the innate immune system and are rapidly recruited by chemotactic signals to sites of inflammation. Understanding the mechanisms of neutrophil chemotaxis is therefore of great interest for the potential development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It has been shown that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels are involved in both cell migration and chemotaxis. In this study, we demonstrate that TRPC1 channels play an important role in fMLP mediated chemotaxis and migration of murine neutrophils. The knock-out of TRPC1 channels leads to an impaired migration, transmigration and chemotaxis of the neutrophils. In contrast, Ca²⁺ influx but not store release after activation of the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils with fMLP is strongly enhanced. We show that the enhanced Ca²⁺ influx in the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils is associated with a steepened front to rear gradient of the intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration with higher levels at the cell rear. Taken together, this paper highlights a distinct role of TRPC1 in neutrophil migration and chemotaxis. We propose that TRPC1 controls the activity of further Ca²⁺ influx channels and thus regulates the maintenance of intracellular Ca²⁺ gradients which are critical for cell migration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  5. Intracellular acidification-induced alkali metal cation/H+ exchange in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment of isolated human neutrophils (resting pHi congruent to 7.25 at pHo 7.40) with 30 mM NH4Cl for 30 min leads to an intracellular acidification (pHi congruen to 6.60) when the NH4Cl prepulse is removed. Thereafter, in 140 mM Na+ medium, pHi recovers exponentially with time (initial rate, approximately 0.12 pH/min) to reach the normal resting pHi by approximately 20 min, a process that is accomplished mainly, if not exclusively, though an exchange of internal H+ for external Na+. This Na+/H+ countertransport is stimulated by external Na+ (Km congruent to 21 mM) and by external Li+ (Km congruent to 14 mM), though the maximal transport rate for Na+ is about twice that for Li+. Both Na+ and Li+ compete as substrates for the same translocation sites on the exchange carrier. Other alkali metal cations, such as K+, Rb+, or Cs+, do not promote pHi recovery, owing to an apparent lack of affinity for the carrier. The exchange system is unaffected by ouabain or furosemide, but can be competitively inhibited by the diuretic amiloride (Ki congruent to 8 microM). The influx of Na+ or Li+ is accompanied by an equivalent counter-reflux of H+, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for the exchange reaction, a finding consistent with the lack of voltage sensitivity (i.e., electroneutrality) of pHi recovery. These studies indicate that the predominant mechanism in human neutrophils for pHi regulation after intracellular acidification is an amiloride-sensitive alkali metal cation/H+ exchange that shares a number of important features with similar recovery processes in a variety of other mammalian cell types. PMID:3694176

  6. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.

  7. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates the PAF-synthesizing enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase and PAF synthesis in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Doebber, T W; Wu, M S

    1987-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; PAF) induced in isolated rat peritoneal and human peripheral neutrophils a rapid and potent activation of the PAF biosynthetic enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67). The PAF-induced activation of the neutrophil acetyltransferase (8-10 times basal neutrophil activity) was maximal within 30 sec after PAF addition, as was the PAF-stimulated degranulation. After 1 min of PAF stimulation, the elevated acetyltransferase activity steadily decreased. Within 2 min of stimulation of neutrophils with 10(-6) M PAF, the 7-fold increase in acetyltransferase activity was coincident with substantial PAF synthesis (as measured by [3H]acetate incorporation into PAF), which was 14% of the PAF synthesis induced by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 at 10(-5) M. PAF activation of the acetyltransferase and PAF synthesis required intact neutrophils as they did not occur in cells broken by sonication. The neutrophil acetyltransferase was 10-30 times more sensitive to activation by PAF than was degranulation as the acetyltransferase activation was evident with 10(-9) M PAF and was about maximal with 3 x 10(-8) M PAF. The unstimulated and PAF-induced acetyltransferase exhibited the same Km for acetyl-CoA (67 microM), but the Vmax for the PAF-induced enzyme (1667 pmol/min per 10(7) cells) was 10 times that of the unstimulated enzyme (175 pmol/min per 10(7) cells). The PAF induction of the acetyltransferase was less sensitive to inhibition by the specific PAF receptor antagonist L-652,731 than was PAF-induced degranulation. This, along with the differing sensitivities to PAF, suggests that acetyltransferase activation and degranulation induced by PAF either involve two different PAF receptors or involve one receptor type with different receptor occupancy requirements. Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase, which greatly decreased the activity of the acetyltransferase in spleen

  8. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J; Gu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications. PMID:26639836

  9. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J; Gu, Jiang

    2015-12-07

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications.

  10. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J.; Gu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications. PMID:26639836

  11. Influence of minor thermal injury on expression of complement receptor CR3 on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R. D.; Hasslen, S. R.; Ahrenholz, D. H.; Haus, E.; Solem, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal injury is well known to inhibit functions of the circulating neutrophil related to its role in host defense against infection, but the mechanism(s) of this phenomenon are not fully understood. To gain further clues to these mechanisms, the authors have studied patients with thermal injury in terms of altered expression of neutrophil cell membrane receptors for the opsonic complement-derived ligand C3bi--complement receptor Type 3, or CR3. CR3 expression was selected for study because an increase in the number of receptors on the cell surface can be stimulated by products of complement activation known to accumulate after thermal injury and because of the role of CR3 in phagocytic and adherence functions of the neutrophil. Expression of CR3 was monitored semiquantitatively by flow cytometry with the use of a murine monoclonal antibody (OKM1) specific for an antigen (CD11) associated with this receptor. Patients evaluated were limited in this study to those with minor degrees of thermal injury (second-degree burn involving less than 20% of total body surface area) so that possible confounding effects of major injury and its complications could be eliminated. It was observed that patient neutrophil CR3 becomes significantly up-regulated during the first week, as early as 1 day after injury. The maximum level of expression of CR3 averaged greater than 150% (range, 70-314%) of the respective minimum level observed for each patient. The minimum levels of expression of CR3 on patient neutrophils, reached 11-37 days after injury for 7 of 8 patients, were comparable to the level of expression of CR3 on unstimulated control neutrophils. Such temporal up-regulation of patient neutrophil CR3 suggests the early generation of stimuli of CR3 mobilization in response to thermal injury. Increased numbers of CR3 on patient neutrophils may augment microbicidal function and enhance or inhibit delivery of cells to the burn site. PMID:3541642

  12. Subcellular fractionation of human neutrophils and analysis of subcellular markers.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Stine Novrup; Udby, Lene; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The neutrophil has long been recognized for its impressive number of cytoplasmic granules that harbor proteins indispensable for innate immunity. Analysis of isolated granules has provided important information on how the neutrophil grades its response to match the challenges it meets on its passage from blood to tissues. Nitrogen cavitation was developed as a method for disruption of cells on the assumption that sudden reduction of the partial pressure of nitrogen would lead to aeration of nitrogen dissolved in the lipid bilayer of plasma membranes. We find that cells are broken by the shear stress that is associated with passage through the outlet valve under high pressure and that this results in disruption of the neutrophil cell membrane while granules remain intact. The unique properties of Percoll as a sedimentable density medium with no inherent tonicity or viscosity are used for creation of continuous density gradients with shoulders in the density profile created to optimize the physical separation of granule subsets and light membranes. Immunological methods (sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) are used for quantitation of proteins that are characteristic constituents of the granule subsets of neutrophils. PMID:24504946

  13. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  14. Differential activation of human neutrophil cytosolic phospholipase A2 and secretory phospholipase A2 during priming by 1,2-diacyl- and 1-O-alkyl-2-acylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Seeds, M C; Nixon, A B; Wykle, R L; Bass, D A

    1998-11-01

    We have shown previously that both 1,2-diacylglycerol (AAG) and 1-O-alkyl-2-acylglycerol (EAG) prime neutrophil release of arachidonic acid via uncharacterized phospholipases A2. Therefore, we investigated the actions of EAG and AAG specifically on neutrophil cytosolic (cPLA2) and secretory (sPLA2) phospholipase A2s. We hypothesized that AAG as a protein kinase activator would activate cPLA2 via phosphorylation events. EAG is antagonistic to the AAG activation of PKC, thus it was not expected to act via phosphorylation of cPLA2. Neutrophils were primed with either AAG or EAG and then stimulated with fMLP. When neutrophils were primed with 5-20 microM 1,2-diacylglycerol, a shift was observed in cPLA2 migration on SDS-PAGE gels, consistent with phosphorylation of the protein. This gel shift was not seen after exposure to EAG. AAG also caused a parallel increase in enzymatic activity of cPLA2 that was not seen with EAG. We also investigated whether either diglyceride would cause similar priming or direct secretion of sPLA2. Both AAG and EAG directly caused significant secretion of neutrophil sPLA2. EAG also increased the release of sPLA2 in cells subsequently stimulated with fMLP. Thus, AAG activated cPLA2 and stimulated secretion of sPLA2. In contrast, EAG did not activate cPLA2, but directly activated secretion of sPLA2. We also demonstrated that human synovial fluid sPLA2 increased AA release from resting and fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. Given that diglycerides prime for release of AA, PAF, and LTB4, these current data support the hypothesis that such priming may be mediated by phosphorylation dependent (cPLA2) or phosphorylation independent (e.g. secretion of sPLA2) events.

  15. Autocrine enhancement of leukotriene synthesis by endogenous leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, P. P.; McColl, S. R.; Braquet, P.; Borgeat, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), two potent lipid mediators synthesized by activated neutrophils, are known to stimulate several neutrophil functional responses. In this study, we have determined that endogenous LTB4 and PAF exert autocrine effects on LT synthesis, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. 2. Pretreatment of neutrophils with either pertussis toxin (PT), or with receptor antagonists for LTB4 and PAF, resulted in an inhibition of LT synthesis induced by calcium ionophore, A23187. This inhibition was most marked at submaximal (100-300 nM) A23187 concentrations, whilst it was least at ionophore concentrations which induce maximal LT synthesis (1-3 microM). Thus newly-synthesized PAF and LTB4 can enhance LT synthesis induced by A23187 under conditions where the LT-generating system is not fully activated. 3. In recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-primed neutrophils, LT synthesis in response to chemoattractants (fMet-Leu-Phe or rhC5a) was also significantly inhibited by the LTB4 receptor antagonist, and to a lesser extent by PAF receptor antagonists. 4. Further investigation revealed that LTB4 and/or PAF exert their effects on LT synthesis via an effect on arachidonic acid (AA) availability, as opposed to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation. Indeed, the receptor antagonists, as well as PT, inhibited LT synthesis and AA release to a similar extent, whereas 5-LO activation (assessed with an exogenous 5-LO substrate) was virtually unaffected under the same conditions. Accordingly, we showed that addition of exogenous LTB4 could enhance AA availability in response to chemoattractant challenge in rhGM-CSF-primed cells, without significantly affecting the 5-LO activation status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019762

  16. Biomaterial surface-dependent neutrophil mobility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Doerschuk, Claire M; Anderson, James M; Marchant, Roger E

    2004-06-15

    Compromised neutrophil function in the presence of an implanted biomaterial may represent an important mechanism that allows for the development of implant-associated infections. Here, human neutrophil mobility has been investigated on a polyurethane (ChronoFlex AR), a hydrophobic surface consisting of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer, and a glass reference material. Neutrophil mobility was quantified, based on cell movement speed and persistence time obtained from time-lapse optical microscopy, while neutrophil cytoskeletal structures and morphology were visualized using confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our results show that material surface properties affect neutrophil-surface interactions, as reflected by morphological changes, and the mobility of neutrophils stimulated by N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). In the absence of adsorbed plasma proteins, the mobility of stimulated neutrophils increased with increasing material hydrophobicity from glass, to polyurethane, to OTS. The opposite trend was observed in the presence of adsorbed plasma proteins, such that neutrophil mobility increased with decreasing material hydrophobicity. Analysis of the results showed that the mobility of fMLP-stimulated neutrophils cells was inversely related to the extent of cell spreading on the materials. PMID:15162402

  17. Heterogeneity of Human Neutrophil CD177 Expression Results from CD177P1 Pseudogene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rong; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Cho, Vicky; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Gatenby, Paul A.; Perera, Chandima; Zhang, Yafei; Whittle, Belinda; Sinclair, Andrew; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Field, Matthew; Andrews, T. Daniel; Cook, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Most humans harbor both CD177neg and CD177pos neutrophils but 1–10% of people are CD177null, placing them at risk for formation of anti-neutrophil antibodies that can cause transfusion-related acute lung injury and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. By deep sequencing the CD177 locus, we catalogued CD177 single nucleotide variants and identified a novel stop codon in CD177null individuals arising from a single base substitution in exon 7. This is not a mutation in CD177 itself, rather the CD177null phenotype arises when exon 7 of CD177 is supplied entirely by the CD177 pseudogene (CD177P1), which appears to have resulted from allelic gene conversion. In CD177 expressing individuals the CD177 locus contains both CD177P1 and CD177 sequences. The proportion of CD177hi neutrophils in the blood is a heritable trait. Abundance of CD177hi neutrophils correlates with homozygosity for CD177 reference allele, while heterozygosity for ectopic CD177P1 gene conversion correlates with increased CD177neg neutrophils, in which both CD177P1 partially incorporated allele and paired intact CD177 allele are transcribed. Human neutrophil heterogeneity for CD177 expression arises by ectopic allelic conversion. Resolution of the genetic basis of CD177null phenotype identifies a method for screening for individuals at risk of CD177 isoimmunisation. PMID:27227454

  18. Guarea kunthiana Bark Extract Enhances the Antimicrobial Activities of Human and Bovine Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jerjomiceva, Natalja; Seri, Hisham; Yaseen, Ragheda; de Buhr, Nicole; Setzer, William N; Naim, Hassan Y; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-06-01

    Guarea kunthiana is used in folk remedies for the treatment of several diseases including microbial infections. The mechanism behind this phenomenon still needs to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of G. kunthiana bark extract on antimicrobial functions of human and bovine neutrophils as the first line of defense against infections. For this aim, neutrophils were isolated from either human or bovine blood and treated with G. kunthiana bark extract. The antimicrobial activity of the neutrophils against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Escherichia (E.) coli was tested in a bacterial survival assay and a fluorescence-based phagocytosis assay. Furthermore, the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. We show that neutrophils treated with G. kunthiana extract distinctly increased phagocytosis of S. aureus or E. coli. Interestingly, we demonstrate that G. kunthiana bark extract induces the formation of NETs in both cell types. This effect was abolished when treating the cells with diphenyleniodonium chloride (DPI) pointing to a direct implication of the NADPH oxidase-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species in this process. In summary, our data strongly suggest that G. kunthiana bark extract boosts the antimicrobial activities of neutrophils as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. PMID:27534112

  19. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Thompson III, George R.; Hastey, Christine J.; Hodge, Gregory C.; Lunetta, Jennine M.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Heinrich, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis) as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis). This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores. PMID:26070210

  20. Inhibition of human neutrophil activation by the allergic mediator release inhibitor, CI-922: differential inhibition of responses to a variety of stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wright, C D; Hoffman, M D; Thueson, D O; Conroy, M C

    1987-07-01

    The allergic mediator release inhibitor 3,7-dimethoxy-4-phenyl-N-1H-tetrazol-5-yl-4H-furo[3,2-b]indole-2- carboxamide, L-arginate (CI-922) is a potent inhibitor of human neutrophil functions in vitro. Over a concentration range from 1 to 100 mumol CI-922 inhibits the chemotactic response of neutrophils to the synthetic chemotaxin N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). CI-922 also inhibits respiratory and secretory responses of neutrophils in response to agents that stimulate phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis to generate the second messengers inositol 1,4,5, trisphosphate and 1,2 diacylglycerol, including: the plasma membrane receptor-specific ligands FMLP and C5a; serum-opsonized zymosan; concanavalin A; and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein-specific stimulus guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S). CI-922 also inhibits neutrophil functions stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast, CI-922 does not inhibit neutrophil responses to protein kinase C-specific stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or L-alpha-1,2 dioctanoylglycerol (DiC8). CI-922 also fails to inhibit the synergistic activation of the respiratory burst by suboptimal concentrations of PMA and calcium ionophore A23187. The observation that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil responses to a variety of soluble and particulate stimuli, excluding protein kinase C-specific stimuli, allows us to postulate the site of action of the compound. We propose that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil activation at a site distal to signal transduction through the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein required for second messenger generation but proximal to phosphorylation reactions mediated by protein kinase C and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases.

  1. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  2. αVβ3 Integrin Regulation of Respiratory Burst in Fibrinogen Adherent Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Skokos, Eleni A.; Myer, Deborah J.; Agaba, Perez; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.

    2015-01-01

    In response to inflammatory stimuli, microvascular endothelial cells become activated, initiating the capture and exit of neutrophils from the blood vessel and into the extravascular extracellular matrix (ECM). In the extravascular space, neutrophils bind to ECM proteins, regulating cellular functions via signaling through adhesion molecules known as integrins. The αVβ3 integrin is an important mediator of neutrophil adhesion to ECM proteins containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence, including fibrinogen and fibronectin. Despite the abundance of RGD sequence in the ECM, adhesion molecule-mediated neutrophil activity has been focused on the β2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) and β1 integrin response to matrix proteins. Here we investigated αVβ3 integrin-mediated reactive oxidant suppression as a consequence of human neutrophil adhesion to RGD containing proteins. Using integrin ligand-modified (poly)ethylene glycol hydrogels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitive fluorescent probes (dihydrotetramethylrhosamine, H2TMRos), we evaluated integrin–peptide interactions that effectively regulate ROS generation. This study demonstrates that neutrophil adhesion suppresses ROS production in an αVβ3-dependent manner. Additionally, we determine that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in the respiratory burst signaling pathway is interrupted by integrin-mediated adhesion. These data indicate that ECM/integrin interactions can induce αVβ3-mediated adhesion dependent downstream signaling of ROS regulation via a Mac-1 independent mechanism. PMID:25632307

  3. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and mercury on human neutrophil apoptosis, actin cytoskelton, and oxidative state

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweet, L.I.; Passino-Reader, D. R.; Meier, P.G.; Omann, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, has been proposed as a biomarker for environmental contaminant effects. In this work, we test the hypothesis that in vitro assays of apoptosis are sensitive indicators of immunological effects of polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and mercury on human neutrophils. Apoptosis, necrosis, and viability as well as the related indicators F-actin levels, and active thiol state were measured in purified human neutrophils after treatment with contaminants. Effective concentrations observed were 0.3 μM (60 μg/L) mercury, 750 μg/L Aroclor 1254, and 50 μM (14,500 μg/L) hexachlorocylcohexanes. Concentrations of contaminants that induced apoptosis also decreased cellular F-actin levels. Active thiols were altered by mercury, but not organochlorines. Comparison of these data with levels of contaminants reported to be threats to human health indicate neutrophil apoptosis is a sensitive indicator of mercury toxicity.

  4. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to a particulate superoxide-forming system stimulate a respiratory burst in intact guinea pig neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Berton, G; Rosen, H; Ezekowitz, R A; Bellavite, P; Serra, M C; Rossi, F; Gordon, S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal rat antibodies were produced against a subcellular preparation of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated guinea pig neutrophils that retains NADPH-oxidase activity. Two antibodies, 1A10.4 and IG4, were isolated that bind to a surface antigen restricted to guinea pig neutrophils from bone marrow and peritoneal exudate and to macrophages and that trigger a respiratory burst in neutrophils in the presence of cytochalasin B. Intact antibody 1A10.4, subclass IgG2c, can trigger superoxide anion release directly; F(ab')2 fragments of 1A10.4 and intact IG4 require further cross-linking by F(ab')2 fragments of anti-rat immunoglobulin antibody. Both antibodies recognize the same antigen, a proteolipid of apparent molecular mass 10 kDa. Immunoprecipitation of solubilized oxidase activity with 1A10.4 brings down this activity as part of a macromolecular complex. Surface expression of the antigen is increased on treatment of cells with both PMA and cytochalasin B. 1A10.4 also triggers release of the granule enzyme beta-glucuronidase. Triggering of a respiratory burst by the antibodies appears distinct from the PMA and fMet-Leu-Phe signalling systems. These studies indicate that the antigen defined by antibodies 1A10.4 and IG4 becomes associated with the superoxide anion-generating system of neutrophils but may play a more general role in signal transduction in phagocytic cells. Images PMID:3012541

  6. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Src family kinase is required for respiratory burst in rat neutrophils stimulated with artocarpol A.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Lin, Hui-Yi; Huang, Li-Jiau; Tsai, Chi-Ren; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chang, Ling-Chu; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2006-06-14

    Artocarpol A (ART), a natural product isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated superoxide anion (O2*-) generation, which was inhibited by 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (LY 294002), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, in rat neutrophils. ART stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) on both T308 and S473 residues, and LY 294002 inhibited these effects. Rat neutrophils expressed both class IA PI3K subunits (p85, p110alpha, p110beta, and p110delta) and a class IB PI3K subunit (p110gamma) as assessed by a combination of Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approaches. Stimulation of neutrophils with ART evoked phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) formation, which reached a maximal level at 2 min and was attenuated by LY 294002, as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry. Detectable membrane-association of class IA PI3Ks, class IB PI3K and Ras was seen as early as 1.5, 0.5 and 1.5 min, respectively, after stimulation with ART. The kinetics of ART-induced Ras activation paralleled the kinetics of class IA PI3Ks recruitment to membrane caused by ART, and the p85 and p110gamma immunoprecipitates contain Ras. ART stimulated Src family kinase activation, which was detectable within 1.5 min of incubation with ART. Both Src kinase activity and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 formation in ART-stimulated neutrophils were inhibited by 4-amino-1-tert-butyl-3-(1'-naphthyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP1 analog). PP1 analog also attenuated the ART-stimulated O2*- generation in rat neutrophils. These results indicate that the stimulation of respiratory burst by ART in neutrophils implicates PI3K signaling.

  7. Activated human valvular interstitial cells sustain interleukin-17 production to recruit neutrophils in infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju; Chia, Jean-San

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4(+) CD45RA(-) CD25(-) CCR6(+) Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify

  8. Functionally and morphologically distinct populations of extracellular vesicles produced by human neutrophilic granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Ákos M; Schütte, Maria; Timár, Csaba I; Veres, Daniel S; Kittel, Ágnes; McLeish, Kenneth R; Merchant, Michael L; Ligeti, Erzsébet

    2015-10-01

    EVs in the microvesicle size range released during spontaneous death of human neutrophils were characterized and their properties compared with previously described EVs with antibacterial effect (aEVs, generated on specific activation) or produced spontaneously (sEVs). The 3 vesicle populations overlapped in size and in part of the constituent proteins were stained with annexin V and were impermeable to PI. However, none of them produced superoxide. In contrast, remarkable differences were observed in the morphology, abundance of proteins, and antibacterial function. EVs formed spontaneously in 30 min (sEVs) were more similar to EVs released during spontaneous death in 1-3 d than to EVs formed in 30 min on stimulation of opsonin receptors (aEVs). Spontaneously generated EVs had no antibacterial effect despite their large number and protein content. We hypothesized 2 parallel mechanisms: one that proceeds spontaneously and produces EVs without antibacterial effect and another process that is triggered by opsonin receptors and results in differential sorting of proteins into EVs with antibacterial capacity. Our results call attention to the functional and morphologic heterogeneity within the microvesicle/ectosome fraction of EVs.

  9. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Protect against Oxidative Stress in Staphylococcus aureus Encountering Exogenous Oxidants and Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yun Yun; Schwartz, Jamie; Bloomberg, Sarah; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Horswill, Alexander R.; Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    To establish infection successfully, S. aureus must evade clearance by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). We studied the expression and regulation of the methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) that are involved in the repair of oxidized staphylococcal proteins and investigated their influence over the fate of S. aureus exposed to oxidants or PMN. We evaluated a mutant deficient in msrA1 and msrB for susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and PMN. The expression of msrA1 in wild-type bacteria ingested by human PMN was assessed by real-time PCR. The regulation of msr was studied by screening a library of two-component regulatory system (TCS) mutants for altered msr responses. Relative to the wild-type, bacteria deficient in Msr were more susceptible to oxidants and to PMN. Upregulation of staphylococcal msrA1 occurred within the phagosomes of normal PMN and PMN deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, PMN granule-rich extract stimulated the upregulation of msrA1. Modulation of msrA1 within PMN was shown to be partly dependent on the VraSR TCS. Msr contributes to staphylococcal responses to oxidative attack and PMN. Our study highlights a novel interaction between the oxidative protein repair pathway and the VraSR TCS that is involved in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:24247266

  10. Specificity of antibodies against Neisseria gonorrhoeae that stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis. Role of antibodies directed against lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Densen, P; Gulati, S; Rice, P A

    1987-01-01

    Five strains each of Neisseria gonorrhoeae sensitive or resistant to complement (C) dependent killing by normal human serum (NHS) were examined for their ability to stimulate chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) after preincubation with NHS; or IgM or IgG derived from NHS. Serum-sensitive N. gonorrhoeae stimulated C-dependent chemotaxis when opsonized with IgM, but not IgG, however, serum-resistant strains, taken as a whole, failed to promote chemotaxis when opsonized with either isotype. IgM titers in NHS against lipooligosaccharide (LOS) antigens from individual serum-sensitive, but not serum-resistant strains, correlated with the magnitude of chemotaxis generated by the corresponding opsonized strains (r = 0.99). Western blots demonstrated that IgM and IgG from NHS recognized different antigenic determinants on LOS from serum-sensitive gonococci. IgM from NHS immunopurified against serum-sensitive LOS accounted for two-thirds of the chemotaxis promoting activity present in whole serum. IgG titers in NHS against LOS antigens from individual serum-resistant strains also correlated with magnitude of chemotaxis generated by the corresponding opsonized strains (r = 0.87), although most opsonized serum-resistant strains did not generate significantly higher magnitudes of chemotaxis than controls. In contrast, a serum-resistant isolate from a patient with disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) stimulated chemotaxis when opsonized with IgG obtained from the patient's convalescent serum. By Western blot, convalescent IgG antibody recognized an additional determinant on serum-resistant LOS not seen by normal IgG. Images PMID:2439546

  11. Microfluidic assay for precise measurements of mouse, rat, and human neutrophil chemotaxis in whole-blood droplets.

    PubMed

    Jones, Caroline N; Hoang, Anh N; Martel, Joseph M; Dimisko, Laurie; Mikkola, Amy; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Kuriyama, Naohide; Yamada, Marina; Hamza, Bashar; Kaneki, Masao; Warren, H Shaw; Brown, Diane E; Irimia, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Animal models of human disease differ in innate immune responses to stress, pathogens, or injury. Precise neutrophil phenotype measurements could facilitate interspecies comparisons. However, such phenotype comparisons could not be performed accurately with the use of current assays, as they require the separation of neutrophils from blood using species-specific protocols, and they introduce distinct artifacts. Here, we report a microfluidic technology that enables robust characterization of neutrophil migratory phenotypes in a manner independent of the donor species and performed directly in a droplet of whole blood. The assay relies on the particular ability of neutrophils to deform actively during chemotaxis through microscale channels that block the advance of other blood cells. Neutrophil migration is measured directly in blood, in the presence of other blood cells and serum factors. Our measurements reveal important differences among migration counts, velocity, and directionality among neutrophils from 2 common mouse strains, rats, and humans. PMID:26819316

  12. Cyclic AMP inhibits secretion from electroporated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Smolen, J E; Stoehr, S J; Kuczynski, B

    1991-02-01

    It has long been known that intracellular cAMP inhibits and cGMP enhances intact neutrophil function. However, these effects are modest and require relatively high concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides. We decided to re-examine the effects of cyclic nucleotides on Ca2(+)-induced secretion by electroporated cells. This system allowed us to bypass normal cell surface receptor-ligand interactions as well as to directly expose the intracellular space to native cyclic nucleotides. We found that concentrations of cAMP as low as 3 microM inhibited Ca2(+)-induced secretion; 30-300 microM cAMP was maximally inhibitory. cAMP was actually slightly more potent than dibutyryl cAMP, a membrane-permeant derivative. In contrast, cGMP was only slightly stimulatory at 3 microM and modestly inhibitory at 300 microM; dibutyryl cGMP was ineffective. A more detailed investigation of the effects of cAMP showed that inhibition was only obtained in the presence of Mg2+. Half-maximal inhibition by cAMP occurred at 10-30 microM. Inhibition by cAMP was achieved by shifting the Ca2+ dose-response curve for secretion to the right; this was observed for the release of both specific granules (vitamin B12 binding protein) and azurophil granules (B-glucuronidase). We previously showed that ATP could enhance Ca2(+)-induced secretion in the presence of Mg2+, apparently by interacting with a cell surface purine receptor. However, increasing concentrations of ATP could not overcome inhibition by cAMP; this suggested that cAMP acted at some site other than the purine receptor. Inhibition by cAMP was also less apparent in the presence of the protein kinase C agonist phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), suggesting that the cyclic nucleotide did not produce systemic desensitization of the neutrophils. In summary, these results demonstrate that low, physiologically relevant concentrations of cAMP can modulate neutrophil responsiveness. PMID:1846904

  13. Inhibition of the lymphocyte metabolic switch by the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Philip A; Prichard, Lynn; Chacko, Balu; Ravi, Saranya; Overton, E Turner; Heath, Sonya L; Darley-Usmar, Victor

    2015-09-01

    Activation of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX-2) in neutrophils is a critical process in the innate immune system and is associated with elevated local concentrations of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypochlorous acid. Under pathological conditions, NOX-2 activity has been implicated in the development of autoimmunity, indicating a role in modulating lymphocyte effector function. Notably, T-cell clonal expansion and subsequent cytokine production requires a metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies demonstrate that H2O2 generated from activated neutrophils suppresses lymphocyte activation but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that activated neutrophils would prevent the metabolic switch and suppress the effector functions of T-cells through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. To test this, we developed a model co-culture system using freshly isolated neutrophils and lymphocytes from healthy human donors. Extracellular flux analysis was used to assess mitochondrial and glycolytic activity and FACS analysis to assess immune function. The neutrophil oxidative burst significantly inhibited the induction of lymphocyte aerobic glycolysis, caused inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and suppressed lymphocyte activation through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. Hydrogen peroxide and a redox cycling agent, DMNQ, were used to confirm the impact of H2O2 on lymphocyte bioenergetics. In summary, we have shown that the lymphocyte metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis is prevented by the oxidative burst of neutrophils. This direct inhibition of the metabolic switch is then a likely mechanism underlying the neutrophil-dependent suppression of T-cell effector function.

  14. A lack of confirmation with alternative assays questions the validity of IL-17A expression in human neutrophils using immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Wright, Helen L; Thomas, Huw B; Edwards, Steven W; Taylor, Mark J

    2014-12-01

    We identified IL-17A-positive neutrophils in Wolbachia-positive Onchocerca volvulus nodules using an antibody that has previously reported IL-17A-positive neutrophils in several inflammatory conditions. However, we could not detect IL-17A using a range of alternative assays. Our data question the IL-17A antibody specificity and the ability of human neutrophils to express IL-17A. PMID:25445614

  15. 4-Methylcoumarin Derivatives Inhibit Human Neutrophil Oxidative Metabolism and Elastase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuzissaki, Carolina N.; Andrade, Micássio F.; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C.S.; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H.; Vermelho, Roberta B.; Lopes, João Luis C.; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased neutrophil activation significantly contributes to the tissue damage in inflammatory illnesses; this phenomenon has motivated the search for new compounds to modulate their effector functions. Coumarins are natural products that are widely consumed in the human diet. We have evaluated the antioxidant and immunomodulator potential of five 4-methylcoumarin derivatives. We found that the 4-methylcoumarin derivatives inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils triggered by serum-opsonized zymosan or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate; this inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, as revealed by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assays. Cytotoxicity did not mediate this inhibitory effect. The 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin suppressed the neutrophil oxidative metabolism more effectively than the 6,7- and 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins, but the 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins were less effective than their hydroxylated counterparts. An analysis of the biochemical pathways suggested that the 6,7- and 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins inhibit the protein kinase C-mediated signaling pathway, but 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, as well as 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins do not significantly interfere in this pathway of the activation of the human neutrophil oxidative metabolism. The 4-methylcoumarin derivatives bearing the catechol group suppressed the elastase and myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical the most strongly. Interestingly, the 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin scavenged hypochlorous acid more effectively than the o-dihydroxy-substituted 4-methylcoumarin derivatives, and the diacetoxylated 4-methylcoumarin derivatives scavenged hypochlorous acid as effectively as the 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The significant influence of small structural modifications in the inhibitory potential of 4-methylcoumarin derivatives on the

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Is a Very Potent Cytotoxic Factor for Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Bettina; Hussain, Muzaffar; Grundmeier, Matthias; Brück, Michaela; Holzinger, Dirk; Varga, Georg; Roth, Johannes; Kahl, Barbara C.; Proctor, Richard A.; Peters, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The role of the pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) in severe necrotizing diseases is debated due to conflicting data from epidemiological studies of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections and various murine disease-models. In this study, we used neutrophils isolated from different species to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of PVL in comparison to other staphylococcal cytolytic components. Furthermore, to study the impact of PVL we expressed it heterologously in a non-virulent staphylococcal species and examined pvl-positive and pvl-negative clinical isolates as well as the strain USA300 and its pvl-negative mutant. We demonstrate that PVL induces rapid activation and cell death in human and rabbit neutrophils, but not in murine or simian cells. By contrast, the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), a newly identified group of cytolytic staphylococcal components, lack species-specificity. In general, after phagocytosis of bacteria different pvl-positive and pvl-negative staphylococcal strains, expressing a variety of other virulence factors (such as surface proteins), induced cell death in neutrophils, which is most likely associated with the physiological clearing function of these cells. However, the release of PVL by staphylococcal strains caused rapid and premature cell death, which is different from the physiological (and programmed) cell death of neutrophils following phagocytosis and degradation of virulent bacteria. Taken together, our results question the value of infection-models in mice and non-human primates to elucidate the impact of PVL. Our data clearly demonstrate that PVL acts differentially on neutrophils of various species and suggests that PVL has an important cytotoxic role in human neutrophils, which has major implications for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA infections. PMID:20072612

  17. Role of secretory events in modulating human neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Gallin, J I; Wright, D G; Schiffmann, E

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) locomotion and the exocytosis of neutrophil cytoplasmic granules was studied by assessing these processes in cells migrating through micropore filters and by measuring the effects of degranulating stimuli on PMN chemotaxis, orientation, adhesiveness, and ability to bind the chemoattractant f-Met-Leu-[3H]Phe. Studies of cells migrating through cellulose nitrate filters indicated that concentrations of f-Met-Leu-Phe optimal for exocytosis were greater than those optimal for chemotaxis and actually inhibited cell migration. In other studies incubation of PMNs with concentrations of secretagogues causing exocytosis of 30% or greater PMN lysozyme increased cell adhesiveness and inhibited chemotaxis. PMNs that had secreted more than 30% lysozyme appeared round, did not orient in a gradient of chemoattractant, and were capable of significantly less f-Met-Leu-[3H]Phe binding than were control cells. The decreased binding of f-Met-Leu-Phe was not associated with hydrolysis of chemotactic peptide by washed cells, although peptide hydrolysis was caused by cell products secreted extracellularly after vigorous exocytosis. In contrast, when only 10--15% cellular lysozyme was released f-Met-Leu-Phe binding was enhanced significantly and there was no depression of chemotaxis. The data indicate limited exocytosis of intracellular granule contents is associated with increased availability of PMN cehmotactic factor receptors. Vigorous exocytosis is associated with inactivation of chemotactic responsiveness related to increase cell adhesiveness, decreased PMN binding of chemotactic factors, and to hydrolysis of chemoattractants by factors secreted extracellularly. PMID:372235

  18. Characterisation of electron currents generated by the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-04-11

    Electron transport by the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase is an important microbicidal weapon for phagocytes. The electron current (I{sub e}) generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is poorly characterised due to the lack of appropriate electrophysiological data. In this study, I fully characterise the neutrophil generated I{sub e} when the NADPH oxidase is activated by NADPH and GTP{gamma}S. The neutrophil I{sub e} was markedly voltage-dependent in the entire voltage range in comparison to those electron currents measured after chloride was removed from the external bath solution. The difference in I{sub e} measured in chloride free conditions was not due to a change in the activation kinetics of voltage-gated proton channels. The I{sub e} depolarises the neutrophil plasma membrane at a rate of 2.3 V s{sup -1} and this depolarisation was opposed when voltage-gated proton channels are activated. 3 mM ZnCl{sub 2} depolarised the membrane potential to +97.8 {+-} 2.5 mV (n = 4), and this depolarisation was abolished after NADPH oxidase inhibition.

  19. The use of collagen or fibrin gels for the assay of human neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Islam, L N; McKay, I C; Wilkinson, P C

    1985-12-17

    Neutrophil leucocytes are known to migrate actively into 3-dimensional gels of collagen or fibrin. In this paper, we have used such gels to study chemotaxis of human blood neutrophils towards gradient sources of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) using 2 assay systems. The first resembled the micropore filter assay in that neutrophils on the upper surface of collagen gels were allowed to invade in the presence of either an isotropic concentration or a gradient of FMLP. Neutrophils invaded the gel vigorously in both cases. The effect of the gradient was assessed by determining the population distribution at different levels in the gel. Cells moving randomly should be distributed normally, and directional locomotion should cause deviation from normal distribution. Such a deviation was seen, but was of marginal significance. A more direct demonstration of chemotaxis was achieved by the second assay in which an agarose slab containing FMLP was incorporated into a gel, and the paths of nearby neutrophils were filmed. These cells showed an unequivocal directional response to the FMLP gradient. Protein gels can thus be used in the same way as both the presently used filter assays and visual assays using plane substrata, but with the advantage of providing a more physiological environment for the study of chemotaxis than either.

  20. Neutrophil enhancement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development: human F-actin and DNA as targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Parks, Quinn M; Young, Robert L; Poch, Katie R; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Vasil, Michael L; Nick, Jerry A

    2009-04-01

    In the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway, chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa results from biofilm formation in a neutrophil-rich environment. We tested the capacity of human neutrophils to modify early biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1, and an isogenic CF strain isolated early and years later in infection. In a static reactor, P. aeruginosa biofilm density of all strains was enhanced at 24 h in the presence of neutrophils, with the greatest relative increase associated with the lowest inoculum of P. aeruginosa tested. Previously, neutrophil-induced biofilm enhancement was shown to largely result from the incorporation of F-actin and DNA polymers into the bacterial biofilm. This finding was advanced by the comparison of biofilm enhancement from intact unstimulated neutrophils and from lysed or apoptotic neutrophils. Apoptotic neutrophils, with an intact cell membrane, were unable to contribute to biofilm enhancement, while lysed neutrophils evoked a similar response to that of intact cells. Using F-actin and DNA as targets, the capacity of negatively charged poly(amino acids) to disrupt, or prevent, early biofilm formation was tested. Anionic poly(aspartic acid) effectively prevented or disrupted biofilm formation. Combination of poly(aspartic acid) with DNase resulted in a synergistic increase in biofilm disruption. These results demonstrate that the presence of dying neutrophils can facilitate the initial stages of biofilm development by low inocula of P. aeruginosa. Neutrophil F-actin represents a potential new therapeutic target for disruption of pathogenic biofilms.

  1. In vitro and in vivo stimulation of neutrophil migration and lymphocyte transformation by thiamine related to inhibition of the peroxidase/H2O2/halide system.

    PubMed Central

    Theron, A; Anderson, R; Grabow, G; Meiring, J L

    1981-01-01

    The effects of thiamine on neutrophil functions and mitogen-induced lymphocyte transformation were investigated in vitro and in vivo in adult volunteers following the injection of 50 mg thiamine intramuscularly. Thiamine caused stimulation of neutrophil motility in vitro and in vivo and increased lymphocyte transformation in vivo. Enhancement of these functions was related to inhibition of neutrophil post-phagocytic iodination of Candida albicans by the MPO/H2O2/halide system. The horseradish peroxidase/-H2O2/125 I-mediated iodination of bovine serum albumin was also inhibited by thiamine concentrations which caused increased neutrophil motility. It was found that preincubation of neutrophils and lymphocytes with the horseradish peroxidase/H2O2/halide system caused considerable inhibition of the migratory and proliferative responses respectively. Inclusion of thiamine at concentrations which were found to inhibit the peroxidase/-H2O2/halide system protected the neutrophil migratory and lymphocyte proliferative responses from inactivation by this system. It is suggested that thiamine may cause increased neutrophil migration and lymphocyte transformation by protecting these cells from toxic oxidative products generated by the peroxidase/H2O2/halide system. PMID:6273033

  2. Primary granule exocytosis in human neutrophils is regulated by Rac-dependent actin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Troy; Lo, Andrea; Logan, Michael R; Lacy, Paige; Eitzen, Gary

    2008-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton regulates exocytosis in all secretory cells. In neutrophils, Rac2 GTPase has been shown to control primary (azurophilic) granule exocytosis. In this report, we propose that Rac2 is required for actin cytoskeletal remodeling to promote primary granule exocytosis. Treatment of neutrophils with low doses (< or = 10 microM) of the actin-depolymerizing drugs latrunculin B (Lat B) or cytochalasin B (CB) enhanced both formyl peptide receptor- and Ca(2+) ionophore-stimulated exocytosis. Higher concentrations of CB or Lat B, or stabilization of F-actin with jasplakinolide (JP), inhibited primary granule exocytosis measured as myeloperoxidase release but did not affect secondary granule exocytosis determined by lactoferrin release. These results suggest an obligatory role for F-actin disassembly before primary granule exocytosis. However, lysates from secretagogue-stimulated neutrophils showed enhanced actin polymerization activity in vitro. Microscopic analysis showed that resting neutrophils contain significant cortical F-actin, which was redistributed to sites of primary granule translocation when stimulated. Exocytosis and actin remodeling was highly polarized when cells were primed with CB; however, polarization was reduced by Lat B preincubation, and both polarization and exocytosis were blocked when F-actin was stabilized with JP. Treatment of cells with the small molecule Rac inhibitor NSC23766 also inhibited actin remodeling and primary granule exocytosis induced by Lat B/fMLF or CB/fMLF, but not by Ca(2+) ionophore. Therefore, we propose a role for F-actin depolymerization at the cell cortex coupled with Rac-dependent F-actin polymerization in the cell cytoplasm to promote primary granule exocytosis.

  3. Complement factor H modulates the activation of human neutrophil granulocytes and the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Kárpáti, Éva; Józsi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Factor H (FH) is a major inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement activation in plasma and on certain host surfaces. In addition to being a complement regulator, FH can bind to various cells via specific receptors, including binding to neutrophil granulocytes through complement receptor type 3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18), and modulate their function. The cellular roles of FH are, however, poorly understood. Because neutrophils are important innate immune cells in inflammatory processes and the host defense against pathogens, we aimed at studying the effects of FH on various neutrophil functions, including the generation of extracellular traps. FH co-localized with CD11b on the surface of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and cell-bound FH retained its cofactor activity and enhanced C3b degradation. Soluble FH supported neutrophil migration and immobilized FH induced cell spreading. In addition, immobilized but not soluble FH enhanced IL-8 release from neutrophils. FH alone did not trigger the cells to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), but NET formation induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus fungal β-glucan were inhibited by immobilized, but not by soluble, FH. Moreover, in parallel with NET formation, immobilized FH also inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus β-glucan. Altogether, these data indicate that FH has multiple regulatory roles on neutrophil functions. While it can support the recruitment of neutrophils, FH may also exert anti-inflammatory effects and influence local inflammatory and antimicrobial reactions, and reduce tissue damage by modulating NET formation. PMID:26938503

  4. Cell acidification in apoptosis: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays programmed cell death in neutrophils by up-regulating the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, R A; Giesing, H A; Zhu, J Y; Engler, R L; Babior, B M

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils in tissue culture spontaneously undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis), a process characterized by well-defined morphological alterations affecting the cell nucleus. We found that these morphological changes were preceded by intracellular acidification and that acidification and the apoptotic changes in nuclear morphology were both delayed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Among the agents that defend neutrophils against intracellular acidification is a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase that pumps protons out of the cytosol. When this proton pump was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, G-CSF no longer protected the neutrophils against apoptosis. We conclude that G-CSF delays apoptosis in neutrophils by up-regulating the cells' vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and that intracellular acidification is an early event in the apoptosis program. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7541139

  5. Effects of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis on human neutrophil interactions with Coccidioides immitis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Hewlett, E L; Friedman, R L

    1988-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis extract that contained adenylate cyclase toxin produced large increases in human neutrophil cyclic AMP levels and inhibited their oxidative burst, as reflected by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence and superoxide release. The adenylate cyclase toxin-containing extract blocked neutrophil-mediated inhibition of N-acetylglucosamine incorporation by arthroconidia of Coccidioides immitis in a dose-dependent fashion but had no effect on neutrophil phagocytosis of Candida glabrata and only a slight inhibitory effect on arthroconidial attachment. Neither purified pertussis toxin nor extracts from Bordetella mutants lacking the adenylate cyclase toxin affected neutrophil-mediated inhibition of arthroconidial N-acetylglucosamine incorporation. These studies indicate that adenylate cyclase toxin, alone or in concert with other B. pertussis-elaborated toxins, blocks neutrophil inhibition of arthroconidia, primarily by affecting neutrophil responses other than attachment or phagocytosis. PMID:2894360

  6. Selective kallikrein inhibitors alter human neutrophil elastase release during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Kettner, C; Reilly, T M; Knabb, R M; Bischoff, R; Tschesche, H; Wenzel, H; Kucich, U

    1995-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass causes hemorrhagic complications and initiates a biochemical and cellular "whole body inflammatory response." This study investigates whether a variety of selective inhibitors of the contact pathway of intrinsic coagulation modulate complement and neutrophil activation during simulated extracorporeal circulation. After 60 min of recirculation in the presence of the slow tight-binding boronic acid inhibitor, Bz-Pro-Phe-boroArg-OH (10.7 microM), complete inhibition of kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complex formation and marked inhibition of C1-C1-inhibitor complex formation and the release of human neutrophil elastase were observed. Arg15-aprotinin (3.1 microM), Ala357,Arg358 alpha 1-antitrypsin (2.6 microM), and soybean trypsin inhibitor (48.0 microM) either completely or partially inhibited the generation of kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes but were less effective inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase release. The second-order rate constants for the inhibition of kallikrein in purified systems are consistent with the order of effectiveness of the inhibitors in blocking human neutrophil elastase release in heparinized blood. Our results suggest that low-molecular-weight selective inhibitors of kallikrein may be effective agents in the attenuation of the contact-mediated inflammatory response in cardiopulmonary bypass.

  7. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    PubMed

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri.

  8. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    PubMed

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri. PMID:27189133

  9. Assessment of antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts of Psidium guajava leaves by DPPH and chemiluminescence inhibition in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M R V; Azzolini, A E C S; Martinez, M L L; Souza, C R F; Lucisano-Valim, Y M; Oliveira, W P

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β -cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH(•) method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  10. Assessment of Antioxidant Activity of Spray Dried Extracts of Psidium guajava Leaves by DPPH and Chemiluminescence Inhibition in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M. R. V.; Azzolini, A. E. C. S.; Martinez, M. L. L.; Souza, C. R. F.; Lucisano-Valim, Y. M.; Oliveira, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β-cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH• method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  11. [Roles of intracellular calcium and monomeric G-proteins in regulating exocytosis of human neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Jun-Han; Wu, Jian-Min; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Chun-Guang

    2003-12-25

    Neutrophils play a major role in host defense against microbial infection. There are some clues indicate that neutrophils may also play a role in the pathophysiology of the airway obstruction in chronic asthma. We studied the roles of intracellular calcium and GTP gamma S in the regulation of neutrophils exocytosis using pipette perfusion and membrane capacitance measurement technique in whole cell patch clamp configuration. The results showed that the membrane capacitance increase induced by calcium revealed a biphasic process. The first phase occurred when the calcium level was between 0.2-14 micromol/L with a plateau amplitude of 1.23 pF and a calcium EC50 of 1.1 micromol/L. This phase might correspond to the release of the tertiary granules. The second phase occurred when the calcium concentration was between 20-70 micromol/L with a plateau increment of 6.36 pF, the calcium EC50 being about 33 micromol/L. This phase might represent the release of the primary and secondary granules. Intracellular calcium also simultaneously increased the exocytotic rate and the eventual extent in neutrophils. On the other hand, GTP gamma S can increase the exocytotic rate in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on the eventual extent of membrane capacitance increment (>6 pF) if the cell was stimulated for a long period (>20 min). GTP gamma S (ranging from 20 to 100 micromol/L) induced the neutrophils to release all four types of the granules at very low intracellular calcium level. PMID:14695488

  12. Hypohalous acid-modified human serum albumin induces neutrophil NADPH oxidase activation, degranulation, and shape change.

    PubMed

    Gorudko, Irina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Kostevich, Valeria A; Sokolov, Alexey V; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Arnhold, Jürgen; Panasenko, Oleg M

    2014-03-01

    Halogenated lipids, proteins, and lipoproteins formed in reactions with myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypobromous acid (HOBr) can contribute to the regulation of functional activity of cells and serve as mediators of inflammation. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the major plasma protein target of hypohalous acids. This study was performed to assess the potency of HSA modified by HOCl (HSA-Cl) and HOBr (HSA-Br) to elicit selected neutrophil responses. HSA-Cl/Br were found to induce neutrophil degranulation, generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, shape change, and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Thus HSA-Cl/Br can initially act as a switch and then as a feeder of the "inflammatory loop" under oxidative stress. In HSA-Cl/Br-treated neutrophils, monoclonal antibodies against CD18, the β subunit of β2 integrins, reduced the production of superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide as well as MPO exocytosis, suggesting that CD18 contributed to neutrophil activation. HSA-Cl/Br-induced neutrophil responses were also inhibited by genistein, a broad-specificity tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, supporting the notion that activation of both tyrosine kinase and PI3K may play a role in neutrophil activation by HSA modified in MPO-dependent reactions. These results confirm the hypothesis that halogenated molecules formed in vivo via MPO-dependent reactions can be considered as a new class of biologically active substances potentially able to contribute to activation of myeloid cells in sites of inflammation and serve as inflammatory response modulators. PMID:24384524

  13. Human Neutrophil Elastase Induce Interleukin-10 Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells through Protein Kinase C Theta/Delta and Phospholipase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Jin; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Sakamoto, Arisa; Aoki, Manabu; Kitano, Masafumi; Umehashi, Misako; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neutrophils have an important role in the rapid innate immune response, and the release or active secretion of elastase from neutrophils is linked to various inflammatory responses. Purpose of this study was to determine how the human neutrophil elastase affects the interleukin-10 (IL-10) response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Materials and Methods In this prospective study, changes in IL-10 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels in monocytes derived from human PBMCs were investigated after stimulation with human neutrophil elastase (HNE). A set of inhibitors was used for examining the pathways for IL-10 production induced by HNE. Results Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that stimulation with HNE upregulated IL-10 mRNA expression by monocytes, while the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed an increase of IL-10 protein level in the culture medium. A phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) partially blunt- ed the induction of IL-10 mRNA expression by HNE, while IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly reduced by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Rottlerin). A calcium chelator (3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester: TMB-8) inhibited the response of IL-10 mRNA to stimulation by HNE. In addition, pretreatment with a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor (Ro-318425) partly blocked the response to HNE. Finally, an inhibitor of PKC theta/delta abolished the increased level of IL-10 mRNA expression. Conclusion These results indicate that HNE mainly upregulates IL-10 mRNA ex- pression and protein production in moncytes via a novel PKC theta/delta, although partially via the conventional PKC pathway. PMID:26862528

  14. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  15. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  16. The association of FAD with the cytochrome b−245 of human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Andrew R.; Jones, Owen T. G.; Garcia, Rudolfo; Segal, Anthony W.

    1982-01-01

    A plasma membrane fraction prepared from human neutrophils had a fluorescence resembling that of a fluorescent flavoprotein, with emission maximum near 520nm and excitation maxima near 380 and 460nm. The fluorescence emission and excitation properties of Triton N-101-solubilized membrane fraction resembled those of FAD. FAD was present in the membranes at a concentration of 417pmol/mg of protein and cytochrome b−245 at a concentration of 407pmol/mg of protein. In a 110-fold purified preparation of cytochrome b−245 the ratio of FAD:cytochrome b was 1:1. Analytical gradient centrifugation of neutrophil homogenates shows a coincidence of two cytochrome b peaks and two peaks of fluorescence, corresponding with plasma membrane and specific granule fractions; most of the FAD was non-fluorescent and located in fractions lighter than the plasma membrane. Plasma membrane fractions prepared from neutrophils of patients suffering from the X-linked form of chronic granulomatous disease lacked cytochrome b and contained 194pmol of FAD/mg of protein; plasma membrane fractions prepared from neutrophils of patients with the autosomal recessive form of chronic granulomatous disease contained both cytochrome b−245 and FAD in the normal range of concentrations in a ratio of 1:1. Phagocytic vesicles were prepared from normal neutrophils and found to contain FAD and cytochrome b in a ratio 2.22:1, suggesting that activation of neutrophils many involve the incorporation of an additional flavin into the membrane. Under anaerobic conditions in the presence of EDTA to act as an electron donor to a flavin, the cytochrome b−245 of neutrophil membranes was partly (12%) photoreducible, an effect increased to 100% by the addition of FMN. The extent of reduction of cytochrome b in an anaerobic neutrophil homogenate containing NADH increased from 30% to 70% on illumination. We suggest that these results indicate a close association between FAD and cytochrome b−245 and support a scheme

  17. Chimaeric Lym-1 monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis by neutrophils from G-CSF-treated patients: stimulation by GM-CSF and role of Fcγ-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Tortolina, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2001-01-01

    Chimaeric Lym-1 (chLym-1) is a monoclonal antibody generated by fusing the variable region genes of murine Lym-1 to human γ1 and κ constant regions. Owing to its selectivity and avidity for human malignant B cells, it is an attractive candidate for developing immune-interventions in B-lymphomas. In the attempt to identify rational bases for optimizing potential chLym-1 related therapeutic approaches, we studied the ability of this ch-mAb to trigger neutrophil-mediated Raji cell cytolysis in cooperation with two neutrophil-related cytokines, G-CSF and GM-CSF. ChLym-1 triggered low levels of cytolysis by normal neutrophils but induced consistent cytolysis in neutrophils from individuals treated with G-CSF. When exposed to GM-CSF, neutrophils from subjects treated with G-CSF became potent effectors, also leading to 75% lysis. By using mAbs specific for distinct FcγRs, normal neutrophils were inhibited by mAb IV.3, suggesting the intervention of FcγRII, constitutively expressed on the cells. On the other hand, neutrophils from patients treated with G-CSF were inhibited by mAb IV.3 plus mAb 197, a finding consistent with a cooperative intervention of FCγRII and G-CSF-induced FcγRI. The anti-FcγRIII mAb 3G8 promoted significant enhancement of the neutrophil cytolytic efficiency. Therefore, neutrophil FcγRIII behaves as a down-regulator of the cytolytic potential. The present findings suggest new attempts to develop mAb-based and G-CSF/GM-CSF combined immune-interventions in B lymphomas. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487281

  18. Genetic Mechanism of Human Neutrophil Antigen 2 Deficiency and Expression Variations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfang; Mair, David C.; Schuller, Randy M.; Li, Ling; Wu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophil antigen 2 (HNA-2) deficiency is a common phenotype as 3–5% humans do not express HNA-2. HNA-2 is coded by CD177 gene that associates with human myeloproliferative disorders. HNA-2 deficient individuals are prone to produce HNA-2 alloantibodies that cause a number of disorders including transfusion-related acute lung injury and immune neutropenia. In addition, the percentages of HNA-2 positive neutrophils vary significantly among individuals and HNA-2 expression variations play a role in human diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and gastric cancer. The underlying genetic mechanism of HNA-2 deficiency and expression variations has remained a mystery. In this study, we identified a novel CD177 nonsense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP 829A>T) that creates a stop codon within the CD177 coding region. We found that all 829TT homozygous individuals were HNA-2 deficient. In addition, the SNP 829A>T genotypes were significantly associated with the percentage of HNA-2 positive neutrophils. Transfection experiments confirmed that HNA-2 expression was absent on cells expressing the CD177 SNP 829T allele. Our data clearly demonstrate that the CD177 SNP 829A>T is the primary genetic determinant for HNA-2 deficiency and expression variations. The mechanistic delineation of HNA-2 genetics will enable the development of genetic tests for diagnosis and prognosis of HNA-2-related human diseases. PMID:26024230

  19. C1q-mediated chemotaxis by human neutrophils: involvement of gClqR and G-protein signalling mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, L E; Ghebrehiwet, B; Perera, T P; Bird, I N; Strong, P; Kishore, U; Reid, K B; Eggleton, P

    1998-01-01

    C1q, the first component of the classical pathway of the complement system, interacts with various cell types and triggers a variety of cell-specific cellular responses, such as oxidative burst, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, etc. Different biological responses are attributed to the interaction of C1q with more than one putative cell-surface C1q receptor/C1q-binding protein. Previously, it has been shown that C1q-mediated oxidative burst by neutrophils is not linked to G-protein-coupled fMet-Leu-Phe-mediated response. In the present study, we have investigated neutrophil migration brought about by C1q and tried to identify the signal-transduction pathways involved in the chemotactic response. We found that C1q stimulated neutrophil migration in a dose-dependent manner, primarily by enhancing chemotaxis (directed movement) rather than chemokinesis (random movement). This C1q-induced chemotaxis could be abolished by an inhibitor of G-proteins (pertussis toxin) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 kinase (wortmannin and LY294002). The collagen tail of C1q appeared to mediate chemotaxis. gC1qR, a C1q-binding protein, has recently been reported to participate in C1q-mediated chemotaxis of murine mast cells and human eosinophils. We observed that gC1qR enhanced binding of free C1q to adherent neutrophils and promoted C1q-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils by nearly seven-fold. Our results suggests C1q-mediated chemotaxis involves gC1qR as well as G-protein-coupled signal-transduction mechanisms operating downstream to neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:9461517

  20. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase and metalloprotease-9 of human adenocarcinoma gastric cells by chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) infusion.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Michela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Colombo, Elisa; Maschi, Omar; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether the antiinflammatory effect of chamomile infusion at gastric level could be ascribed to the inhibition of metalloproteinase-9 and elastase. The infusions from capitula and sifted flowers (250-1500 µg/mL) and individual flavonoids (10 µM) were tested on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated AGS cells and human neutrophil elastase. The results indicate that the antiinflammatory activity associated with chamomile infusions from both the capitula and sifted flowers is most likely due to the inhibition of neutrophil elastase and gastric metalloproteinase-9 activity and secretion; the inhibition occurring in a concentration dependent manner. The promoter activity was inhibited as well and the decrease of metalloproteinase-9 expression was found to be associated with the inhibition of NF-kB driven transcription. The results further indicate that the flavonoid-7-glycosides, major constituents of chamomile flowers, may be responsible for the antiinflammatory action of the chamomile infusion observed here. PMID:22407864

  1. Genome-wide analysis of the genetic regulation of gene expression in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Melchiotti, Rossella; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Nah, Michelle; Puan, Kia Joo; Vigano, Elena; Haase, Doreen; Yusof, Nurhashikin; San Luis, Boris; Lum, Josephine; Kumar, Dilip; Foo, Shihui; Zhuang, Li; Vasudev, Anusha; Irwanto, Astrid; Lee, Bernett; Nardin, Alessandra; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Connolly, John; Liu, Jianjun; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Wang, De Yun; Poidinger, Michael; Larbi, Anis; Zolezzi, Francesca; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant immune cell type involved in both antimicrobial defence and autoimmunity. The regulation of their gene expression, however, is still largely unknown. Here we report an eQTL study on isolated neutrophils from 114 healthy individuals of Chinese ethnicity, identifying 21,210 eQTLs on 832 unique genes. Unsupervised clustering analysis of these eQTLs confirms their role in inflammatory responses and immunological diseases but also indicates strong involvement in dermatological pathologies. One of the strongest eQTL identified (rs2058660) is also the tagSNP of a linkage block reported to affect leprosy and Crohn's disease in opposite directions. In a functional study, we can link the C allele with low expression of the β-chain of IL18-receptor (IL18RAP). In neutrophils, this results in a reduced responsiveness to IL-18, detected both on the RNA and protein level. Thus, the polymorphic regulation of human neutrophils can impact beneficial as well as pathological inflammatory responses. PMID:26259071

  2. Genome-wide analysis of the genetic regulation of gene expression in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Melchiotti, Rossella; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Nah, Michelle; Puan, Kia Joo; Vigano, Elena; Haase, Doreen; Yusof, Nurhashikin; San Luis, Boris; Lum, Josephine; Kumar, Dilip; Foo, Shihui; Zhuang, Li; Vasudev, Anusha; Irwanto, Astrid; Lee, Bernett; Nardin, Alessandra; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Connolly, John; Liu, Jianjun; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Wang, De Yun; Poidinger, Michael; Larbi, Anis; Zolezzi, Francesca; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant immune cell type involved in both antimicrobial defence and autoimmunity. The regulation of their gene expression, however, is still largely unknown. Here we report an eQTL study on isolated neutrophils from 114 healthy individuals of Chinese ethnicity, identifying 21,210 eQTLs on 832 unique genes. Unsupervised clustering analysis of these eQTLs confirms their role in inflammatory responses and immunological diseases but also indicates strong involvement in dermatological pathologies. One of the strongest eQTL identified (rs2058660) is also the tagSNP of a linkage block reported to affect leprosy and Crohn's disease in opposite directions. In a functional study, we can link the C allele with low expression of the β-chain of IL18-receptor (IL18RAP). In neutrophils, this results in a reduced responsiveness to IL-18, detected both on the RNA and protein level. Thus, the polymorphic regulation of human neutrophils can impact beneficial as well as pathological inflammatory responses. PMID:26259071

  3. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Lorena; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Le-Moal, Vanessa Lievin; Sandré, Catherine; Bianchini, Elsa; Nicolas, Valerie; Pallardy, Marc; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis, and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme AluI was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins [histone 3, lactoferrin (LF)] were quantified by western blotting, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase (ELA) activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, LF, ELA, and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating, and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  4. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-05-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  5. Human neutrophil alloantigen genotype frequencies among blood donors with Turkish and German descent.

    PubMed

    Hauck, B; Philipp, A; Eckstein, R; Ott, S; Zimmermann, R; Dengler, T; Zingsem, J

    2011-12-01

    Antibodies against the human neutrophil antigens (HNA) are able to stimulate transfusion reactions, autoimmune and neonatal neutropenia. The aim of this study was to determine the HNA allele frequencies in the largest ethnic minority group in Germany in comparison with the German population for predicting the risk of alloimmunization and associated transfusion reactions, as well as the risk of developing neonatal neutropenia for the newborn of racial mixed couples. However, there exists no data about HNA genotype distribution in Turkish population. DNA was isolated from blood samples of 119 German and 118 Turkish blood donors and typed them for HNA-1, -3, -4, and -5 by using a commercial polymerase chain reaction kit with sequence-specific primers (SSP-PCR) and compared the HNA genotype distribution of both groups. In German blood donors, the gene frequencies for HNA-1a and HNA-1b were 0.391 and 0.601, for HNA-3a and -3b, 0.744 and 0.256, for HNA-4a and -4b, 0.908 and 0.092, and for HNA-5a and -5bw, 0.731 and 0.269. In Turkish blood donors, we observed 0.420/0.564, 0.737/0.263, 0.881/0.119, and 0.754/0.246 for HNA-1a/1b, -3a/3b, -4a/4b, and -5a/5bw. No statistic significant difference between genotypes in these populations was observed. This study is the first to report HNA gene frequencies in a Turkish population. It showed that there is no difference of HNA genotype in blood donors with Turkish descent in comparison with German blood donors. The alternating transfusion of blood and blood components is no increased risk for developing alloantibodies against HNA antigens. In pregnancy of mixed couples no special screening programs for HNA are necessary.

  6. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L.; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G.; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-01-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN. PMID:25946018

  7. Microbe-specific unconventional T-cells induce human neutrophil differentiation into antigen cross-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Tyler, Christopher J.; Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Szakmany, Tamas; Hall, Judith E.; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The early immune response to microbes is dominated by the recruitment of neutrophils whose primary function is to clear invading pathogens. However, there is emerging evidence that neutrophils play additional effector and regulatory roles. The present study demonstrates that human neutrophils assume antigen cross-presenting functions, and suggests a plausible scenario for the local generation of APC-like neutrophils through the mobilization of unconventional T-cells in response to microbial metabolites. Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells and MAIT cells are abundant in blood, inflamed tissues and mucosal barriers. Here, both human cell types responded rapidly to neutrophils after phagocytosis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria producing the corresponding ligands, and in turn mediated the differentiation of neutrophils into APCs for both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells through secretion of GM-CSF, IFN-γ and TNF-α. In patients with acute sepsis, circulating neutrophils displayed a similar APC-like phenotype and readily processed soluble proteins for cross-presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells, at a time when peripheral Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells were highly activated. Our findings indicate that unconventional T-cells represent key controllers of neutrophil-driven innate and adaptive responses to a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25165152

  8. Transient increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Traynor-Kaplan, A E; Thompson, B L; Harris, A L; Taylor, P; Omann, G M; Sklar, L A

    1989-09-15

    We recently showed that phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) was present in a unique lipid fraction generated in neutrophils during activation. Here, we demonstrate that the band containing this fraction isolated from thin layer chromatography consists primarily of PIP3 and that only small amounts of radiolabeled PIP3 exist prior to activation. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography of deacylated phospholipids from stimulated cells reveals an increase in a fraction eluting ahead of glycerophosphoinositol 4,5-P2. After removal of the glycerol we found that it coeluted with inositol 1,3,4-P3 when resubjected to high performance liquid chromatography. Thus, we have detected a second, novel form of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in activated neutrophils, PI-(3,4)P2. The elevation of PIP3 through the formyl peptide receptor is blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, implicating mediation of the increase in PIP3 by a guanosine triphosphate-binding (G) protein. The rise in PIP3 is not secondary to calcium elevation. Buffering the rise in intracellular calcium did not diminish the increase in PIP3. The elevation of PIP3 appears to occur during activation with physiological agonists, its level varying with the degree of activation. Leukotriene B4, which elicits many of the same responses as stimulation of the formyl peptide receptor but with minimal oxidant production, stimulates a much attenuated rise in PIP3. Isoproterenol, which inhibits oxidant production also reduces the rise in PIP3. Hence formation of PI(3,4)P2 and PIP3 (presumed to be PI(3,4,5)P3) correlates closely with the early events of neutrophil activation. PMID:2549071

  9. The adenosine/neutrophil paradox resolved: human neutrophils possess both A1 and A2 receptors that promote chemotaxis and inhibit O2 generation, respectively.

    PubMed Central

    Cronstein, B N; Daguma, L; Nichols, D; Hutchison, A J; Williams, M

    1990-01-01

    Occupancy of specific receptors on neutrophils by adenosine or its analogues diminishes the stimulated release of toxic oxygen metabolites from neutrophils, while paradoxically promoting chemotaxis. We now report evidence that two distinct adenosine receptors are found on neutrophils (presumably the A1 and A2 receptors of other cell types). These adenosine receptors modulate chemotaxis and O2- generation, respectively. N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a selective A1 agonist, promoted neutrophil chemotaxis to the chemoattractant FMLP as well as or better than 5'N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA). In contrast, CPA did not inhibit O2- generation stimulated by FMLP. Pertussis toxin completely abolished promotion of chemotaxis by CPA but enhanced inhibition by NECA of O2- generation. Disruption of microtubules by colchicine or vinblastine also abrogated the enhancement by NECA of chemotaxis whereas these agents did not markedly interfere with inhibition by NECA of O2- generation. FMLP receptors, once they have bound ligand, shift to a high affinity state and become associated with the cytoskeleton. NECA significantly increased association of [3H]FMLP with cytoskeletal preparations as it inhibited O2-. Disruption of microtubules did not prevent NECA from increasing association of [3H]FMLP with cytoskeletal preparations. Additionally, CPA (A1 agonist) did not increase binding of [3H]FMLP to the cytoskeleton as well as NECA (A2 agonist). These studies indicate that occupancy of one class of adenosine receptors (A1) promotes chemotaxis by a mechanism requiring intact microtubules and G proteins whereas engagement of a second class of receptors (A2) inhibits O2- generation. Signalling via A2 receptors is independent of microtubules, insensitive to pertussis toxin and is associated with binding of [3H]FMLP to cytoskeletal preparations. PMID:2156895

  10. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-11

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd(2)O(3)) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  11. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  12. How neutrophils kill fungi.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the prevention of invasive fungal infections. Whereas mouse studies have demonstrated the role of various neutrophil pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), signal transduction pathways, and cytotoxicity in the murine antifungal immune response, much less is known about the killing of fungi by human neutrophils. Recently, novel primary immunodeficiencies have been identified in patients with a susceptibility to fungal infections. These human 'knock-out' neutrophils expand our knowledge to understand the role of PRRs and signaling in human fungal killing. From the studies with these patients it is becoming clear that neutrophils employ fundamentally distinct mechanisms to kill Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:27558342

  13. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2alpha are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  14. Recombinant C1 inhibitor P5/P3 variants display resistance to catalytic inactivation by stimulated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Huijbregts, C C; Nuijens, J H; Verhoeven, A J; Hack, C E

    1993-03-01

    Proteolytic inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by neutrophil elastase (HNE) is presumed to contribute to the deregulation of plasma cascade systems in septic shock. Here, we report a supplementary approach to construct serpins, in our case C1 inhibitor, that are resistant to catalytic inactivation by HNE. Instead of shifting the specificity of alpha 1-antitrypsin towards the proteases of the contact activation and complement systems, we attempted to obtain a C1 inhibitor species which resists proteolytic inactivation by HNE. 12 recombinant C1 inhibitor variants were produced with mainly conservative substitutions at the cleavage sites for HNE, 440-Ile and/or 442-Val. Three variants significantly resisted proteolytic inactivation, both by purified HNE, as well as by activated neutrophils. The increase in functional half-life in the presence of FMLP-stimulated cells was found to be 18-fold for the 440-Leu/442-Ala variant. Inhibitory function of these variants was relatively unimpaired, as examined by the formation of stable complexes with C1s, beta-Factor XIIa, kallikrein, and plasmin, and as determined by kinetic analysis. The calculated association rate constants (k(on)) were reduced twofold at most for C1s, and appeared unaffected for beta-Factor XIIa. The effect on the k(on) with kallikrein was more pronounced, ranging from a significant ninefold reduction to an unmodified rate. The results show that the reactive centre loop of C1 inhibitor can be modified towards decreased sensitivity for nontarget proteases without loss of specificity for target proteases. We conclude that this approach extends the possibilities of applying recombinant serpin variants for therapeutic use in inflammatory diseases.

  15. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation. PMID:21266049

  16. cap alpha. -Naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) stimulates the release of superoxide by rat neutrophils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.A.; Hewett, J.

    1986-03-01

    ..cap alpha..-Naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) is an hepatotoxicant that produces cholestasis and hyperbilirubinemia in rats. Its mechanism of action is unknown. The observation that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) accumulate in the bile ductular region of the liver following ANIT administration prompted us to examine the ability of ANIT to stimulate these cells. PMNs elicited from rat peritoneum were treated with ANIT in vitro to test for the release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/). ANIT stimulated O/sub 2//sup -/ release from PMNs in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximal O/sub 2//sup -/ release was achieved by an ANIT concentration of 110 ..mu.. M. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was rapid after the first few minutes of ANIT addition and ceased entirely between 10 and 15 minutes. An increase in the extracellular activity of lactate dehydrogenase also occurred after a 5-10 minute lag phase following ANIT addition. PMNs exposed to ANIT also failed to exclude trypan blue dye, either in the presence or in the absence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, suggesting a direct, oxygen radical-independent, cytotoxic effect of ANIT on PMNs. Release of the lysosomal enzyme, ..beta..-glucuronidase, also occurred within 5 min following exposure of PMNs to ANIT. These results indicate that ANIT stimulates the release of cytotoxic agents from rat PMNs in vitro and suggests that the direct stimulation of PMNs in vivo may contribute to ANIT-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

  17. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel human neutrophil protein related to the S100 family.

    PubMed Central

    Guignard, F; Mauel, J; Markert, M

    1995-01-01

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8), a protein of the S100 family, recognized another S100 protein (MRP-14) as well as a protein of 6.5 kDa (p6) in the cytosol of resting neutrophils. p6 was found to be a novel member of the S100 family. It consisted of two isoforms with pI values of 6.2 (the minor form, p6a) and 6.3 (the major form, p6b) and constituted 5% of the total cytosolic proteins. Both isoforms were also demonstrated in the cytosol of monocytes, but not in lymphocytes, as previously shown for MRP-8 and MRP-14. Only the major isoform bound radioactive Ca2+, as also observed for MRP-8, whereas the different variants of MRP-14 were all labelled. On neutrophil activation with opsonized zymosan, a stimulant known to require extracellular Ca2+, 58% of p6a and 42% of p6b was translocated to the membrane. With phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a Ca(2+)-independent stimulant, no translocation was detected. This translocation pattern was similar to that observed with MRP-8 and MRP-14. In addition, p6, MRP-8 and MRP-14 were specifically associated with the cytoskeletal fraction of the membrane. The Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of the novel S100 protein in parallel with MRP-8 and MRP-14 suggests a role for these proteins in regulating the Ca2+ signal to the membrane cytoskeleton and thus in regulating neutrophil activation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626002

  19. Stimulation of proliferation, differentiation, and function of human cells by primate interleukin 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.F.; To, L.B.; Yang, Y.C.; Gamble, J.R.; Shannon, M.F.; Burns, G.F.; Dyson, P.G.; Juttner, C.A.; Clark, S.; Vadas, M.A.

    1987-05-01

    Cloned gibbon interleukin 3 (gIL-3) was found to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow cells to produce day-14 granulocyte, macrophage, granulocyte-macrophage, and eosinophil colonies in semisolid agar. In the presence of normal human plasma, gIL-3 stimulated megakaryocytes. In methylcellulose cultures, it stimulated erythroid colonies in the presence, but not in the absence, of erythropoietin. When mature human leukocytes were used, gIL-3 stimulated the function of purified mature eosinophils as measured by the capacity to kill /sup 51/Cr-labeled antibody-coated target cells, to produce superoxide anions, and to phagocytize opsonized yeast particles in a manner similar to recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In contrast, gIL-3 did not significantly stimulate any of the neutrophil functions tested, whereas human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was active in these assay. Among cytokines that are active on human hematopoietic cells, gIL-3 thus has a distinct set of functions and may predict the range of actions of the human molecule.

  20. The significance of functional receptor heterogeneity in the biological responses of the rabbit neutrophil to stimulation by chemotactic formyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, J C; Freer, R J; Becker, E L

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of binding to the chemotactic receptors on rabbit peritoneal neutrophils were examined for seven formyl peptide analogues. These receptor-binding characteristics were compared with the abilities of the analogues to induce the biological responses of degranulation and chemotaxis. Five of the analogues showed distinct functional heterogeneity in their receptor-binding patterns, whereas the two most potent compounds displayed homogeneous binding patterns. The relative potencies of the formyl peptide analogues for stimulation of degranulation correlated well with their relative potencies for high-affinity, but not low-affinity, binding. The biphasic patterns for stimulation of chemotactic migration were similar for the less potent analogues, and their potencies paralleled those for both degranulation and receptor binding. In contrast, the most potent analogues induced a greater maximal extent of chemotactic migration than the other compounds, but displayed a lower than expected potency (i.e. they required higher than expected concentrations). These anomalies in the patterns of the chemotactic response cannot be reconciled with a simple receptor model comprising two independent classes of receptors. Instead, a model comprising interconvertible states of different affinities is proposed. The state of higher affinity appears to play a central role in initiation of both degranulation and chemotaxis. The more potent formyl peptide analogues are thought to stabilize an activated, higher-affinity, state of the receptor; this can explain their greater efficacy in stimulating chemotaxis. The proposed model may also be applicable to other receptors that are coupled by a guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein to their associated effector. PMID:2064609

  1. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Regulation of N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor affinity and function on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Y H; Marasco, W A; Lopez, A F; Vadas, M A

    1988-01-01

    Preincubation of neutrophils with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rH TNF-alpha) enhanced the subsequent release of superoxide anion in response to various concentrations of N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP). Enhanced superoxide anion production was evident by 5 min and had reached a plateau by 15 min. Not only was the total amount of superoxide anion released greater, but the rate of release was also enhanced threefold by rH TNF-alpha. In contrast, rH TNF-alpha reduced or abolished neutrophil locomotion under agarose in response to a gradient of FMLP. Binding studies of f-Met-Leu-[3H]Phe to purified human neutrophils revealed a heterogeneous binding to unstimulated cells. The high affinity component consisted of approximately 2,000 sites per cell and had an average Kd of 2 +/- 0.7 nM (n = 4). The low affinity component consisted of approximately 40,000 sites per cell and had an average Kd of 180 +/- 50 nM (n = 4). rH TNF-alpha caused conversion to a linear Scatchard plot showing no significant change in total binding sites but a single Kd of 40 +/- 10 nM (n = 4). These data indicate that rH TNF-alpha may influence neutrophil responses to FMLP by regulating the affinity of FMLP receptors. PMID:2830314

  2. The selective augmentation by recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-alpha of neutrophil responses to pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, R; Petersen, M M; Williams, D; Matthews, N; Williams, J D

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxin release may amplify the neutrophil (PMN) responses to bacterial infection through the release of monocyte-derived tumour necrosis factor (TNF). The present study was designed to assess the effect of recombinant human TNF-alpha (rhTNF-alpha) on the in vitro response of human PMN to two defined strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli. In the absence of rhTNF-alpha, a P-fimbriate strain caused significant release of the PMN secondary granule marker vitamin B12-binding protein (B12 BP), and a low level of release of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Type 1-fimbriate strain 504, however, stimulated the release of the primary granule marker myeloperoxidase (MPO) and PMN chemiluminescence (CL), in addition to B12 BP and LTB4 release. Following rhTNF-alpha (10(-9) M) pretreatment, the release of LTB4 by PMN stimulated with the P-fimbriate strain was synergistically augmented, while B12 BP and MPO release were additively increased. In contrast, rhTNF-alpha did not significantly affect any of the responses by the type 1-fimbriate strain. These results suggest selectivity in the priming of PMN by rhTNF-alpha and confirm the independence of PMN responses to phagocytic stimuli. PMID:2162324

  3. Neutrophil elastase enhances IL-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages via transactivation of the PAR-2/EGFR/TLR4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are involved in innate immune responses and signaling cross-talk between these receptor molecules has the potential to augment an ongoing inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cooperative influence of PAR-2 and TLR4 on IL-12p40 production by macrophages after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). During culture, GM-CSF upregulated PAR-2 expression by macrophages in a time-dependent manner. Stimulation with LPS enhanced IL-12p40 production by macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. While human neutrophil elastase (HNE) did not induce IL-12p40 production, pretreatment of macrophages with HNE synergistically increased the IL-12p40 protein level after LPS exposure. Silencing of TLR4 with small interfering RNA blunted the synergistic enhancement of IL-12p40 by HNE combined with LPS. Silencing of β-arrestin 2, p22phox, or ERK1/2 also inhibited an increase of IL-12p40. Interestingly, transfection of macrophages with small interfering RNA duplexes for DUOX-2, EGFR, TLR4, or TRAF6 significantly blunted the increase of IL-12p40 in response to treatment with HNE plus LPS. U73122 and Rottlerin also inhibited the increased production of IL-12p40. In conclusion, HNE is involved in transactivation of TLR4 through activation of DUOX-2/EGFR and synergistically enhances IL-12p40 production by macrophages stimulated with LPS. PMID:27282560

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Mark

    2000-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly developing as a powerful, non-invasive tool for studying the human brain. A pulsed magnetic field creates current flow in the brain and can temporarily excite or inhibit specific areas. TMS of motor cortex can produce a muscle twitch or block movement; TMS of occipital cortex can produce visual phosphenes or scotomas. TMS can also alter the functioning of the brain beyond the time of stimulation, offering potential for therapy.

  5. Characterization of 58-kilodalton human neutrophil collagenase: Comparison with human fibroblast collagenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mallya, S.K.; Mookhtiar, K.A.; Gao, Y.; Dioszegi, M.; Wart, H.E.V. ); Brew, K. ); Birkedal-Hansen, H. )

    1990-11-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out to characterize 58-kDa human neutrophil collagenase (HNC) and compare it with human fibroblast collagenase (HFC). N-Terminal sequencing of latent and spontaneously activated HNC shows that it is a distinct collagenase that is homologous to HFC and other members of the matrix metalloproteinase gene family. Activation occurs autolytically by hydrolysis of an M-L bond at a locus homologous to the Q{sub 80}-F{sub 81}-V{sub 82}-L{sub 83} autolytic activation site of HFC. This releases a 16-residue propeptide believed to contain the cysteine switch residue required for latency. Polyclonal antibody raised against HNC cross-reacts with HFC but with none of the other major human matrix metalloproteinases examined. Treatment of HNC with endoglycosidase F or N-glycosidase F indicates that it is glycosylated at multiple sites. The deglycosylated latent and spontaneously activated enzymes have molecular weights of approximately 44K and 42K, respectively. Differences in the carbohydrate processing of HFC and HNC may determine why HFC is a secreted protein while HNC is stored in intracellular granules. The kinetic parameters K{sub cat} and K{sub M} for the hydrolysis of the interstitial collagen types I, II, and III in solution by both collagenases have been determined. The rates of hydrolysis of these peptides vary very little, indicating that it is the collagen conformation at the cleavage site and not the sequence specificity of the collagenases that determines their collagen specificities.

  6. Regulation of Human Neutrophil Apoptosis and Lifespan in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Jenna M; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils (also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMNs) are the most abundant white blood cells in humans and play a central role in innate host defense. Another distinguishing feature of PMNs is their short lifespan. Specifically, these cells survive for less than 24 hours in the bloodstream and are inherently pre-programed to die by constitutive apoptosis. Recent data indicate that this process is regulated by intracellular signaling and changes in gene expression that define an “apoptosis differentiation program.” Infection typically accelerates neutrophil turnover, and as such, phagocytosis-induced cell death (PICD) and subsequent clearance of the corpses by macrophages are essential for control of infection and resolution of the inflammatory response. Herein we reprise recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil apoptosis with a focus on regulatory factors and pathway intermediates that are specific to this cell type. In addition, we summarize mechanisms whereby perturbation of PMN death contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory disease states. PMID:25278783

  7. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Mothes, Henning; Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Kaufmann, Roland; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Settmacher, Utz

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP) 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment. To further specify the role of α-defensins in tumourigenesis and progression, HNP1–3 were analyzed in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas of 87 patients and quantified in relation to cancer stage and grading. Using the ProteinChip arrays, HNP1–3 were found upregulated in both colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. By combining the array with Laser capture microscopy we were able to confirm that HNP1–3 are expressed by tumour cells but not by neutrophils or other tumour invading cells. These findings suggest that α-defensins are more likely to contribute to tumour growth than they are to mount an effective host anti-tumour response. However, the amount of HNP-expression was not found to be related to tumour stage, grading, and serological tumour markers. PMID:18957723

  8. Protectin DX, a double lipoxygenase product of DHA, inhibits both ROS production in human neutrophils and cyclooxygenase activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Boussetta, Tarek; Makni-Maalej, Karama; Fay, Michèle; Driss, Fathi; El-Benna, Jamel; Lagarde, Michel; Guichardant, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidase (NOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This ROS overproduction is mediated by phosphorylation of the NOX subunits with an uncontrolled manner. Therefore, targeting neutrophil subunits would represent a promising strategy to moderate NOX activity, lower ROS, and other inflammatory agents, such as cytokines and leukotrienes, produced by neutrophils. For this purpose, we investigated the effects of protectin DX (PDX) - a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) di-hydroxylated product which inhibits blood platelet aggregation - on neutrophil activation in vitro. We found that PDX decreases ROS production, inhibits NOX activation and MPO release from neutrophils. We also confirm, that PDX is an anti-aggregatory and anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting both cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2, E.C. 1.14.99.1) as well as COX-2 in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-treated human neutrophils. However, PDX has no effect on the 5-lipoxygenase pathway that produces the chemotactic agent leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Taken together, our results suggest that PDX could be a protective agent against neutrophil invasion in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24254970

  9. Thrombin and human plasma kallikrein inhibition during simulated extracorporeal circulation block platelet and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kettner, C; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Reilly, T M; Knabb, R M; Kucich, U; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1998-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass causes hemorrhagic complications, and initiates a chemical and cellular inflammatory response. Contact of blood with synthetic surfaces leads to qualitative and quantitative alterations in platelets, neutrophils, complement, and contact systems. Despite the fact that cardiopulmonary bypass is carried out in the presence of high doses of heparin, there is significant activation of both platelets and neutrophils. Thrombin is protected on cell and fibrin surfaces from antithrombin, even in the presence of high doses of heparin (approximately 5 U/ml). We therefore studied the effect of a small (Mr = 497), highly effective (Ki = 41 pM), reversible tripeptide inhibitor of thrombin, DUP 714 (1 microM), in a well characterized model of simulated extracorporeal circulation. In the absence of DUP 714, platelet counts decreased by 75% 5 min after the start of extracorporeal bypass and increased to 48% at 120 min of recirculation. DUP 714 significantly preserved platelet counts, decreased plasma levels of platelet beta-thromboglobulin levels, but did not prevent a decrease in sensitivity of platelets to adenosine diphosphate. Kallikrein-C1-inhibitor and C1-C1-inhibitor complexes increased progressively from 0.32 U/ml to 0.67 U/ml and from 4.45 U/ml to 7.25 U/ml, respectively, during 120 min of recirculation without DUP 714. Addition of DUP 714 significantly inhibited kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complex formation but did not affect C1-C1-inhibitor complexes. In the absence of DUP 714, human neutrophil elastase levels rose from a baseline of 0.01 +/- 0.00 microg/ml to 1.18 +/- 0.21 microg/ml during 120 min of recirculation. Human neutrophil elastase release at 120 min was significantly inhibited in the presence of DUP 714 to 37% of the value with heparin alone. These results indicated that addition of this novel thrombin (and kallikrein) inhibitor to heparin preserved platelet counts, decreased platelet secretion, and provided the additional benefit of

  10. Identification and cloning of the SNARE proteins VAMP-2 and syntaxin-4 from HL-60 cells and human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Smolen, J E; Hessler, R J; Nauseef, W M; Goedken, M; Joe, Y

    2001-08-01

    Degranulation and membrane fusion by neutrophils are essential to host defense. We sought homologues of neuron-specific fusion proteins in human neutrophils and in their precursors, the promyelocytic cell line HL-60. We screened a differentiated HL-60 library and obtained an 848 bp sequence with a 351 bp open reading frame, identical to that published for human VAMP-2 and including 5' and 3' untranslated regions. RNA from HL-60 cells during differentiation into the neutrophil lineage was subjected to Northern blot analysis. which revealed a transcript of approximately 1050 bp at all stages of differentiation. The amount of these transcripts increased approximately threefold during differentiation, a finding confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. We also detected mRNA for VAMP-2 in human neutrophils and monocytes using RT-PCR. In like fashion, transcripts of syntaxin-4, another fusion protein, were recovered from a neutrophil cDNA library. As with VAMP-2, expression of syntaxin-4 (determined by Northern blots) also increased, but by only 50%, during differentiation of HL-60 cells. These studies demonstrate that neutrophils and their progenitors possess mRNA for the fusion proteins VAMP-2 and syntaxin-4, and that their transcription increases during differentiation, concurrent with the functional maturation of myeloid cells.

  11. Production of nitric oxide is lower in Shiga toxin-stimulated neutrophils of infants compared to those of children or adults.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji; Iharada, Anna; Kimata, Takahisa; Shimo, Tomohiko; Hirabayashi, Masato; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in infants is mainly caused by the Shiga toxin (Stx), which is produced by pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7. Infants are prone to develop HUS in comparison to older children and adults, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown. Recent observations suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) including nitric oxide (NO) may be involved in the pathogenesis of HUS. We therefore measured NO production by neutrophils prepared from infants (6-27 months old), children (5.3-11 years old) or adults (25-47 years old). The NO production was measured by a flow cytometric analysis with a fluorescent indicator (expressed as mean fluorescence intensity), and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The amount of NO produced was significantly lower in Stx-stimulated neutrophils prepared from infants (45.8 ± 23.3) than that in those from children (120.5 ± 81.5) or adults (127.7 ± 45.8) (n = 10 each group, P < 0.05). The expression level of iNOS mRNA was lower in Stx-stimulated neutrophils of the infants than the level in those of children or adults. In conclusion, Stx increased NO production in neutrophils probably via iNOS. Importantly, the degree of the Stx-mediated increase in NO production was lower in neutrophils of infants compared to those of children or adults, which may explain the higher incidence of HUS in infants. These results suggest that NO may contribute to the cellular defense mechanisms against Stx.

  12. Fluorescence aptasensor based on competitive-binding for human neutrophil elastase detection.

    PubMed

    He, Jing-Lin; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Zhang, Song-Bai; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2010-01-15

    To our knowledge, we report the first fluorescence aptasensor for detecting human neutrophil elastase (HNE) in homogeneous solution. The biosensor contains a short DNA scrambled sequence strand (SS) complementary to part of the aptamer sequence or the loop of molecular beacon (MB). The aptamer-HNE recognition event involves competition between the molecular beacon and loose HNE aptamer for the binding the short DNA strand. The new biosensor can detect as little as 0.34nM of HNE, and the response is linear in the tested concentration range of 0.34-68nM with the detection limit of 47pM.

  13. Novel Human Cytomegalovirus Viral Chemokines, vCXCL-1s, Display Functional Selectivity for Neutrophil Signaling and Function.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinho; Dogra, Pranay; Masi, Tom J; Pitt, Elisabeth A; de Kruijf, Petra; Smit, Martine J; Sparer, Tim E

    2015-07-01

    Human CMV (HCMV) uses members of the hematopoietic system including neutrophils for dissemination throughout the body. HCMV encodes a viral chemokine, vCXCL-1, that is postulated to attract neutrophils for dissemination within the host. The gene encoding vCXCL-1, UL146, is one of the most variable genes in the HCMV genome. Why HCMV has evolved this hypervariability and how this affects the virus' dissemination and pathogenesis is unknown. Because the vCXCL-1 hypervariability maps to important binding and activation domains, we hypothesized that vCXCL-1s differentially activate neutrophils, which could contribute to HCMV dissemination, pathogenesis, or both. To test whether these viral chemokines affect neutrophil function, we generated vCXCL-1 proteins from 11 different clades from clinical isolates from infants infected congenitally with HCMV. All vCXCL-1s were able to induce calcium flux at a concentration of 100 nM and integrin expression on human peripheral blood neutrophils, despite differences in affinity for the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors. In fact, their affinity for CXCR1 or CXCR2 did not correlate directly with chemotaxis, G protein-dependent and independent (β-arrestin-2) activation, or secondary chemokine (CCL22) expression. Our data suggest that vCXCL-1 polymorphisms affect the binding affinity, receptor usage, and differential peripheral blood neutrophil activation that could contribute to HCMV dissemination and pathogenesis.

  14. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in WIL2-NS cells: a sensitive system to detect chromosomal damage induced by reactive oxygen species and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, K; Fenech, M

    2000-05-01

    We have developed a method that can detect the DNA-damaging and cytotoxic effects of physiological levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated human neutrophils. This was achieved using WIL2-NS cells, a human B lymphoblastoid cell line, as target cells and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. With this method, we observed a 4- and a 30-fold increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNed BNC) when cells were exposed to 10 and 30 microM hydrogen peroxide, for 1 h, respectively. A dose-dependent increase in the frequency of MNed BNC was also detected when cells were exposed to hypoxanthine (HX)/xanthine oxidase (XO), a superoxide generating system: a 50-fold increase in the frequency of MNed BNC was observed at the highest XO dose (12.5 mU/ml). In this CBMN assay, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in BNC and necrotic cells were also readily detected, especially at the higher exposure doses of hydrogen peroxide or HX/XO. When WIL2-NS cells were exposed to neutrophils stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA) for 1 h, the frequencies of MNed BNC in WIL2-NS cells increased in a dose-dependent manner (30-fold increase at 100 nM PMA) and with an increasing neutrophil:WIL2-NS co-culture ratio. The frequencies of MNed BNC were closely related to the production of ROS, especially hydrogen peroxide, by the neutrophils. Differentiated HL60 cells (DMSO-treated HL60) also produced ROS in response to PMA. In this case, we used a 'Transwell' system to expose WIL2-NS cells to DMSO-treated HL60 cells, because direct contact with DMSO-treated HL60 cells impaired cell division in WIL2-NS target cells. Exposure to PMA-stimulated DMSO-treated HL60 cells resulted in a PMA dose-dependent increase in the frequency of MNed BNC in WIL2-NS cells. MNed BNC frequencies were positively correlated with NPB (r = 0.61-0.93) and necrosis (r = 0.55-0.86) and negatively correlated with nuclear division index (r = -0.72 to -0. 91) in all of the above

  15. The innate defense regulator peptides IDR-HH2, IDR-1002, and IDR-1018 modulate human neutrophil functions.

    PubMed

    Niyonsaba, François; Madera, Laurence; Afacan, Nicole; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-07-01

    Although HDPs were originally hypothesized to act as antimicrobial agents, they also have been shown to broadly modulate the immune response through the activation of different cell types. We recently developed a series of novel, synthetic peptides, termed IDRs, which are conceptually based on a natural HDP, bovine bactenecin. We showed that IDR-1 and IDR-1002 protect the host against bacterial infections through the induction of chemokines. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the IDRs on various functions of human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrated that IDR-HH2, IDR-1002, and IDR-1018 modulated the expression of neutrophil adhesion and activation markers. Moreover, these IDRs enhanced neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells in a β₂ integrin-dependent manner and induced neutrophil migration and chemokine production. The IDR peptides also increased the release of the neutrophil-generated HDPs (antimicrobial), human α-defensins, and LL-37 and augmented neutrophil-mediated killing of Escherichia coli. Notably, the IDRs significantly suppressed LPS-mediated neutrophil degranulation, the release of ROS, and the production of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-10, consistent with their ability to dampen inflammation. As evidenced by the inhibitory effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, IDRs activated the MAPK pathway that was required for chemokine production. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence regarding the contribution of the IDR peptides to the innate immune response through the modulation of neutrophil functions. The results described here may aid in the development of IDRs as novel, anti-infective and immunomodulatory agents.

  16. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  17. Role of high-avidity binding of human neutrophil myeloperoxidase in the killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Zambon, J J; Jones, C A; Wilson, M E

    1987-01-01

    The binding of the neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) to microbial surfaces is believed to be the first step in its microbicidal activity. The MPO-H2O2-Cl- system is responsible for most oxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils. There appear to be three forms of MPO (MPO I, II, and III), all of which can kill this organism in the presence of H2O2 and chloride. In this study, we characterized the binding of native human neutrophil MPO to A. actinomycetemcomitans by an elution procedure dependent on the cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Binding of native MPO was rapid and reached apparent equilibrium within 1 min. A proportion of binding under equilibrium conditions was saturable and highly avid, with a capacity of 4,500 sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 7.9 X 10(-10) M. At equal protein concentrations, more MPO III bound than MPO II, and more MPO II bound than MPO I. The high-avidity interaction was inhibitable with yeast mannan and with the serotype-defining mannan of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Binding was also partially reversible with yeast mannan. MPO bound to the high-avidity sites did not oxidize guaiacol but oxidized chloride, as detected by the chlorination of taurine. MPO bound to the high-avidity sites was incapable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans alone in the presence of H2O2 and Cl-, but potentiated killing when sufficient additional MPO was provided. The killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by the MPO-H2O2-Cl- system was inhibited by yeast mannan and a serotype-defining mannan of A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that high-avidity binding of MPO to the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans is a mannan-specific interaction and that MPO bound to the high-avidity sites is essential but not alone sufficient to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:3032796

  18. Azithromycin Enhances Phagocytic Killing of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Schibler, Mark R.; Walters, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans resists killing by neutrophils and is inhibited by azithromycin (AZM) and amoxicillin (AMX). AZM actively concentrates inside host cells, whereas AMX enters by diffusion. The present study is conducted to determine whether AZM is more effective than AMX at enhancing phagocytic killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by neutrophils. Methods Killing assays were conducted in the presence of either 2 μg/mL AZM or 16 μg/mL AMX (equipotent against A. actinomycetemcomitans). Neutrophils were loaded by incubation with the appropriate antibiotic. Opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 was incubated with the indicated antibiotic alone, with loaded neutrophils and antibiotic, or with control neutrophils (without antibiotic) at multiplicities of infection (MOIs) of 30 and 90 bacteria per neutrophil. Results Neutrophil incubation with 2 μg/mL AZM yielded an intracellular concentration of 10 μg/mL. At an MOI of 30, neutrophils loaded with AZM failed to kill significantly more bacteria than control neutrophils during the 60- and 90-minute assay periods. At an MOI of 90, neutrophils loaded with AZM killed significantly more bacteria than either AZM alone or control neutrophils during 60- and 90-minute incubations (P <0.05), and killed significantly more bacteria after 90 minutes than the sum of the killing produced by AZM alone or neutrophils alone. Neutrophils incubated with AMX under identical conditions also killed significantly more bacteria than either AMX alone or control neutrophils, but there was no evidence of synergism between AMX and neutrophils. Conclusions Neutrophils possess a concentrative transport system for AZM that may enhance killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its effects are most pronounced when neutrophils are greatly outnumbered by bacteria. PMID:25186779

  19. Effects of an aqueous extract from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on mediators of inflammation in a human neutrophils model.

    PubMed

    Czerwińska, Monika E; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2013-07-01

    Leaves of Ligustrum vulgare (common privet) have been used for treatment of oropharyngeal inflammations or as antirheumatic, diuretic, and hypotensive agents in folk medicine in southern Europe. Taking into account that neutrophils are involved in the inflammation, the aim of the study was to determine the effect of an aqueous extract prepared from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on neutrophil functions. The extract was characterized by the HPLC-DAD-MSn method. The inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils was determined using luminol- or lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. The effect on myeloperoxidase, metalloproteinase 9, and interleukin 8 production by neutrophils was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutrophil elastase release was established spectrophotometrically. The expression of adhesion molecules on neutrophils was analyzed with flow cytometry. The main compounds detected were flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, hydroxycinnamates, and secoiridoids. The inhibition of oxidative burst by the extract was comparable in both stimuli models (formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine: IC50 = 18.2 ± 4.0 µg/mL; phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: IC50 = 19.8 ± 3.0 µg/mL). The extract in the concentration range of 5-50 µg/mL inhibited neutrophil elastase release by 23.9-34.1 % and myeloperoxidase release by 24.2-37.4 %. The inhibitory effect on metalloproteinase 9 and interleukin 8 production was around 20 %. The extract in the highest concentration modulated the expression of L-selectin and β2 integrin. Our results partly support the traditional use of common privet leaves as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  20. Effects of an aqueous extract from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on mediators of inflammation in a human neutrophils model.

    PubMed

    Czerwińska, Monika E; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2013-07-01

    Leaves of Ligustrum vulgare (common privet) have been used for treatment of oropharyngeal inflammations or as antirheumatic, diuretic, and hypotensive agents in folk medicine in southern Europe. Taking into account that neutrophils are involved in the inflammation, the aim of the study was to determine the effect of an aqueous extract prepared from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on neutrophil functions. The extract was characterized by the HPLC-DAD-MSn method. The inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils was determined using luminol- or lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. The effect on myeloperoxidase, metalloproteinase 9, and interleukin 8 production by neutrophils was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutrophil elastase release was established spectrophotometrically. The expression of adhesion molecules on neutrophils was analyzed with flow cytometry. The main compounds detected were flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, hydroxycinnamates, and secoiridoids. The inhibition of oxidative burst by the extract was comparable in both stimuli models (formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine: IC50 = 18.2 ± 4.0 µg/mL; phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: IC50 = 19.8 ± 3.0 µg/mL). The extract in the concentration range of 5-50 µg/mL inhibited neutrophil elastase release by 23.9-34.1 % and myeloperoxidase release by 24.2-37.4 %. The inhibitory effect on metalloproteinase 9 and interleukin 8 production was around 20 %. The extract in the highest concentration modulated the expression of L-selectin and β2 integrin. Our results partly support the traditional use of common privet leaves as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23824550

  1. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects.

    PubMed

    Mariano, F S; Campanelli, A P; Nociti Jr, F H; Mattos-Graner, R O; Gonçalves, R B

    2012-11-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis Participates in Pathogenesis of Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Neutrophil Activation. Proof of Concept in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Delbosc, Sandrine; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Journe, Clement; Louedec, Liliane; Castier, Yves; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Ruimy, Raymond; Rossignol, Patrick; Bouchard, Philippe; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Background Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) represent a particular form of atherothrombosis where neutrophil proteolytic activity plays a major role. We postulated that neutrophil recruitment and activation participating in AAA growth may originate in part from repeated episodes of periodontal bacteremia. Methods and Findings Our results show that neutrophil activation in human AAA was associated with Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) formation in the IntraLuminal Thrombus, leading to the release of cell-free DNA. Human AAA samples were shown to contain bacterial DNA with high frequency (11/16), and in particular that of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), the most prevalent pathogen involved in chronic periodontitis, a common form of periodontal disease. Both DNA reflecting the presence of NETs and antibodies to Pg were found to be increased in plasma of patients with AAA. Using a rat model of AAA, we demonstrated that repeated injection of Pg fostered aneurysm development, associated with pathological characteristics similar to those observed in humans, such as the persistence of a neutrophil-rich luminal thrombus, not observed in saline-injected rats in which a healing process was observed. Conclusions Thus, the control of periodontal disease may represent a therapeutic target to limit human AAA progression. PMID:21533243

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to HIV-infected subjects augments reduced leukotriene synthesis and anticryptococcal activity in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M J; Phare, S M; George, S; Peters-Golden, M; Kazanjian, P H

    1998-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) dysfunction occurs in HIV infection. Leukotrienes (LT) are mediators derived from the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway that play a role in host defense and are synthesized by PMN. We investigated the synthesis of LT by PMN from HIV-infected subjects. There was a reduction (4.0+/-1.3% of control) in LT synthesis in PMN from HIV-infected compared with normal subjects. This was associated with reduced expression of 5-LO-activating protein (31.2+/-9.6% of normal), but not of 5-LO itself. Since HIV does not directly infect PMN, we considered that these effects were due to reduced release of cytokines, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We examined the effect of G-CSF treatment (300 microgram daily for 5 d) on eight HIV-infected subjects. PMN were studied in vitro before therapy (day 1) and on days 4 and 7. LTB4 synthesis was increased on day 4 of G-CSF treatment, and returned toward day 1 levels on day 7. 5-LO and 5-LO-activating protein expression were increased in parallel. As a functional correlate to this increase in PMN LT synthesis by G-CSF, we examined the effects on killing of Cryptococcus neoformans. Anticryptococcal activity of PMN from HIV-infected subjects was less than that of PMN from normal subjects. G-CSF treatment improved fungistatic activity of PMN. This increase in antifungal activity was attenuated by in vitro treatment with the LT synthesis inhibitor, MK-886. In conclusion, PMN from HIV-infected subjects demonstrate reduced 5-LO metabolism and antifungal activity in vitro, which was reversed by in vivo G-CSF therapy. PMID:9710433

  4. Artocarpol A stimulation of superoxide anion generation in neutrophils involved the activation of PLC, PKC and p38 mitogen-activated PK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-06-01

    1 Artocarpol A (ART), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated a slow onset and long-lasting superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils, whereas only slightly activated the NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system. 2 Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin (1 microg ml(-1)), 50 microM 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), or 1 microM 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U0126) had no effect on ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation. ART (30 microM) did not induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. 3 4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-1H-imidazole (SB 203580) markedly attenuated the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 4.3+/-0.3 microM). Moreover, ART induced p38 mitogen-activated PK (MAPK) phosphorylation and activation. 4 The superoxide anion generation in response to ART was also substantially inhibited in a Ca2+-free medium, and by pretreatment with 1 microM 1-[6-((17beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl)amino)hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122) and 100 microM 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB). ART (30 microM) stimulated the [Ca2+]i elevation in the presence or absence of external Ca2+, and also increased the D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. 5 2-[1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X) greatly inhibited the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 7.8+/-1.0 nM). ART increased the recruitment of PKC-alpha, -betaI, and -betaII to the plasma membrane of neutrophils, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent PKC activation in the cytosol preparation. 6 ART induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, which was attenuated by GF 109203X. Moreover, ART evoked the membrane association of p47(phox), which was inhibited by GF 109203X and SB 203580. 7 These results indicate that the ART stimulation of superoxide anion generation involved the activation of p38 MAPK, PLC/Ca2

  5. Neutrophil killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells is oxygen radical-mediated and enhanced by TNF-. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, M.K.; Varani, J.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells are sensitive to killing by activated human neutrophils. Killing is inhibited in the presence of catalase and deferoxamine mesylate but not soybean trypsin inhibitor. Reagent hydrogen peroxide can substitute for activated neutrophils in producing endothelial cell injury. These data suggest that lethal injury is due to the production of oxygen radicals by activated neutrophils. In these respects, the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in that pretreatment with TNF-{alpha} increases sensitivity to injury by activated neutrophils. In part, the increased endothelial cell sensitivity to killing by neutrophils may be due to up-regulation of surface adhesion molecules. However, it was observed that cells passaged more than two times in culture did not demonstrate increased killing after treatment with TNF-{alpha} while up-regulation of neutrophil adhesion could be detected through several additional passages. Although the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are qualitatively similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in their sensitivity to killing, they are quantitatively much more resistant. What accounts for the relative resistance of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells is not fully understood. In the rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, killing is known to be dependent on an intraendothelial source of iron. Pre-treatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 8-hydroxyquinoline-bound iron increased their sensitivity to oxidant injury. These data suggest that the availability of iron within the human umbilical vein endothelial cells may be a limiting factor in sensitivity to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  6. Gold nanoparticles induce apoptosis, endoplasmic reticulum stress events and cleavage of cytoskeletal proteins in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Noël, Claudie; Simard, Jean-Christophe; Girard, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are promising candidates for developing nanomedicines, for the treatment of different disorders, including inflammatory diseases. However, how AuNPs could alter the biology of human neutrophils, key player cells in inflammation, is a poorly documented area of research. Here we found that, although AuNP of 20 nm (AuNP20) could be internalized in cytosolic vacuoles but that AuNP70 were localized at the cell membrane, both induced apoptosis similarly by a caspase-dependent mechanism. AuNPs induced degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins vimentin, lamin B1 and gelsolin, but, unexpectedly, did not increase their cell surface expression. Consequent with caspase-4 processing, AuNPs were found to activate endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress, as evidenced by activation of the three ER sensors, IRE1 (inositol-requiring protein-1), ATF-6 (activating transcription factor-6) and PERK (protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase). AuNPs are novel human neutrophil proapoptotic agents indicating that they are toxic to these cells. However, the fact that they do not induce cell surface expression of cytoskeletal proteins could decrease potential adverse effects and toxicity of AuNPs by limiting, for example, the production of autoantibody against cytoskeleton components.

  7. Clickable 4-Oxo-β-lactam-Based Selective Probing for Human Neutrophil Elastase Related Proteomes.

    PubMed

    Ruivo, Eduardo F P; Gonçalves, Lídia M; Carvalho, Luís A R; Guedes, Rita C; Hofbauer, Stefan; Brito, José A; Archer, Margarida; Moreira, Rui; Lucas, Susana D

    2016-09-20

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a serine protease associated with several inflammatory processes such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The precise involvement of HNE in COPD and other inflammatory disease mechanisms has yet to be clarified. Herein we report a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, or 'click' chemistry) approach based on the 4-oxo-β-lactam warhead that yielded potent HNE inhibitors containing a triazole moiety. The resulting structure-activity relationships set the basis to develop fluorescent and biotinylated activity-based probes as tools for molecular functional analysis. Attaching the tags to the 4-oxo-β-lactam scaffold did not affect HNE inhibitory activity, as revealed by the IC50 values in the nanomolar range (56-118 nm) displayed by the probes. The nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-based probe presented the best binding properties (ligand efficiency (LE)=0.31) combined with an excellent lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE=4.7). Moreover, the probes showed adequate fluorescence properties, internalization in human neutrophils, and suitable detection of HNE in the presence of a large excess of cell lysate proteins. This allows the development of activity-based probes with promising applications in target validation and identification, as well as diagnostic tools. PMID:27465595

  8. Beneficial and Adverse Effects of an LXR Agonist on Human Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism and Circulating Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, Todd G; Sleph, Paul; Ostrowski, Jacek; Lupisella, John; Ryan, Carol S; Liu, Xiaoqin; Fernando, Gayani; Grimm, Denise; Shipkova, Petia; Zhang, Rongan; Garcia, Ricardo; Zhu, Jun; He, Aiqing; Malone, Harold; Martin, Richard; Behnia, Kamelia; Wang, Zhaoqing; Barrett, Yu Chen; Garmise, Robert J; Yuan, Long; Zhang, Jane; Gandhi, Mohit D; Wastall, Philip; Li, Tong; Du, Shuyan; Salvador, Lisa; Mohan, Raju; Cantor, Glenn H; Kick, Ellen; Lee, John; Frost, Robert J A

    2016-08-01

    The development of LXR agonists for the treatment of coronary artery disease has been challenged by undesirable properties in animal models. Here we show the effects of an LXR agonist on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and neutrophils in human subjects. BMS-852927, a novel LXRβ-selective compound, had favorable profiles in animal models with a wide therapeutic index in cynomolgus monkeys and mice. In healthy subjects and hypercholesterolemic patients, reverse cholesterol transport pathways were induced similarly to that in animal models. However, increased plasma and hepatic TG, plasma LDL-C, apoB, apoE, and CETP and decreased circulating neutrophils were also evident. Furthermore, similar increases in LDL-C were observed in normocholesterolemic subjects and statin-treated patients. The primate model markedly underestimated human lipogenic responses and did not predict human neutrophil effects. These studies demonstrate both beneficial and adverse LXR agonist clinical responses and emphasize the importance of further translational research in this area. PMID:27508871

  9. Beneficial and Adverse Effects of an LXR Agonist on Human Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism and Circulating Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, Todd G; Sleph, Paul; Ostrowski, Jacek; Lupisella, John; Ryan, Carol S; Liu, Xiaoqin; Fernando, Gayani; Grimm, Denise; Shipkova, Petia; Zhang, Rongan; Garcia, Ricardo; Zhu, Jun; He, Aiqing; Malone, Harold; Martin, Richard; Behnia, Kamelia; Wang, Zhaoqing; Barrett, Yu Chen; Garmise, Robert J; Yuan, Long; Zhang, Jane; Gandhi, Mohit D; Wastall, Philip; Li, Tong; Du, Shuyan; Salvador, Lisa; Mohan, Raju; Cantor, Glenn H; Kick, Ellen; Lee, John; Frost, Robert J A

    2016-08-01

    The development of LXR agonists for the treatment of coronary artery disease has been challenged by undesirable properties in animal models. Here we show the effects of an LXR agonist on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and neutrophils in human subjects. BMS-852927, a novel LXRβ-selective compound, had favorable profiles in animal models with a wide therapeutic index in cynomolgus monkeys and mice. In healthy subjects and hypercholesterolemic patients, reverse cholesterol transport pathways were induced similarly to that in animal models. However, increased plasma and hepatic TG, plasma LDL-C, apoB, apoE, and CETP and decreased circulating neutrophils were also evident. Furthermore, similar increases in LDL-C were observed in normocholesterolemic subjects and statin-treated patients. The primate model markedly underestimated human lipogenic responses and did not predict human neutrophil effects. These studies demonstrate both beneficial and adverse LXR agonist clinical responses and emphasize the importance of further translational research in this area.

  10. Transcranial laser stimulation improves human cerebral oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fenghua; Hase, Snehal N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Transcranial laser stimulation of the brain with near‐infrared light is a novel form of non‐invasive photobiomodulation or low‐level laser therapy (LLLT) that has shown therapeutic potential in a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. Understanding of its neurophysiological effects is essential for mechanistic study and treatment evaluation. This study investigated how transcranial laser stimulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in the human brain in vivo using functional near‐infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Materials and Methods Two separate experiments were conducted in which 1,064‐nm laser stimulation was administered at (1) the center and (2) the right side of the forehead, respectively. The laser emitted at a power of 3.4 W and in an area of 13.6 cm2, corresponding to 0.25 W/cm2 irradiance. Stimulation duration was 10 minutes. Nine healthy male and female human participants of any ethnic background, in an age range of 18–40 years old were included in each experiment. Results In both experiments, transcranial laser stimulation induced an increase of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) and a decrease of deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[Hb]) in both cerebral hemispheres. Improvements in cerebral oxygenation were indicated by a significant increase of differential hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbD] = Δ[HbO2] − Δ[Hb]). These effects increased in a dose‐dependent manner over time during laser stimulation (10 minutes) and persisted after laser stimulation (6 minutes). The total hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbT] = Δ[HbO2] + Δ[Hb]) remained nearly unchanged in most cases. Conclusion Near‐infrared laser stimulation applied to the forehead can transcranially improve cerebral oxygenation in healthy humans. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:343–349, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26817446

  11. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  12. Visualization of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Fibrin Meshwork in Human Fibrinopurulent Inflammatory Lesions: II. Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Takanori; Shiogama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takahiro; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an extracellular, spider’s web-like structure resulting from cell death of neutrophils. NETs play an important role in innate immunity against microbial infection, but their roles in human pathological processes remain largely unknown. NETs and fibrin meshwork both showing fibrillar structures are observed at the site of fibrinopurulent inflammation, as described in our sister paper [Acta Histochem. Cytochem. 49; 109–116, 2016]. In the present study, immunoelectron microscopic study was performed for visualizing NETs and fibrin fibrils (thick fibrils in our tongue) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of autopsied lung tissue of legionnaire’s pneumonia. Lactoferrin and fibrinogen gamma chain were utilized as markers of NETs and fibrin, respectively. Analysis of immuno-scanning electron microscopy indicated that NETs constructed thin fibrils and granular materials were attached onto the NETs fibrils. The smooth-surfaced fibrin fibrils were much thicker than the NETs fibrils. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that lactoferrin immunoreactivities were visible as dots on the fibrils, whereas fibrinogen gamma chain immunoreactivities were homogeneously observed throughout the fibrils. Usefulness of immunoelectron microscopic analysis of NETs and fibrin fibrils should be emphasized.

  13. Standardization of the antibody-dependent respiratory burst assay with human neutrophils and Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, David; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P; Williams, Andrew R; Murungi, Linda M; Shi, Jianguo; Hodgson, Susanne H; Douglas, Alexander D; Osier, Faith H; Fairhurst, Rick M; Diakite, Mahamadou; Pleass, Richard J; Long, Carole A; Draper, Simon J

    2015-09-16

    The assessment of naturally-acquired and vaccine-induced immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria is of long-standing interest. However, the field has suffered from a paucity of in vitro assays that reproducibly measure the anti-parasitic activity induced by antibodies in conjunction with immune cells. Here we optimize the antibody-dependent respiratory burst (ADRB) assay, which assesses the ability of antibodies to activate the release of reactive oxygen species from human neutrophils in response to P. falciparum blood-stage parasites. We focus particularly on assay parameters affecting serum preparation and concentration, and importantly assess reproducibility. Our standardized protocol involves testing each serum sample in singlicate with three independent neutrophil donors, and indexing responses against a standard positive control of pooled hyper-immune Kenyan sera. The protocol can be used to quickly screen large cohorts of samples from individuals enrolled in immuno-epidemiological studies or clinical vaccine trials, and requires only 6 μL of serum per sample. Using a cohort of 86 samples, we show that malaria-exposed individuals induce higher ADRB activity than malaria-naïve individuals. The development of the ADRB assay complements the use of cell-independent assays in blood-stage malaria, such as the assay of growth inhibitory activity, and provides an important standardized cell-based assay in the field.

  14. Visualization of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Fibrin Meshwork in Human Fibrinopurulent Inflammatory Lesions: II. Ultrastructural Study.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takanori; Shiogama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takahiro; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-Ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-08-30

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an extracellular, spider's web-like structure resulting from cell death of neutrophils. NETs play an important role in innate immunity against microbial infection, but their roles in human pathological processes remain largely unknown. NETs and fibrin meshwork both showing fibrillar structures are observed at the site of fibrinopurulent inflammation, as described in our sister paper [Acta Histochem. Cytochem. 49; 109-116, 2016]. In the present study, immunoelectron microscopic study was performed for visualizing NETs and fibrin fibrils (thick fibrils in our tongue) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of autopsied lung tissue of legionnaire's pneumonia. Lactoferrin and fibrinogen gamma chain were utilized as markers of NETs and fibrin, respectively. Analysis of immuno-scanning electron microscopy indicated that NETs constructed thin fibrils and granular materials were attached onto the NETs fibrils. The smooth-surfaced fibrin fibrils were much thicker than the NETs fibrils. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that lactoferrin immunoreactivities were visible as dots on the fibrils, whereas fibrinogen gamma chain immunoreactivities were homogeneously observed throughout the fibrils. Usefulness of immunoelectron microscopic analysis of NETs and fibrin fibrils should be emphasized. PMID:27682015

  15. Visualization of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Fibrin Meshwork in Human Fibrinopurulent Inflammatory Lesions: II. Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Takanori; Shiogama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takahiro; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an extracellular, spider’s web-like structure resulting from cell death of neutrophils. NETs play an important role in innate immunity against microbial infection, but their roles in human pathological processes remain largely unknown. NETs and fibrin meshwork both showing fibrillar structures are observed at the site of fibrinopurulent inflammation, as described in our sister paper [Acta Histochem. Cytochem. 49; 109–116, 2016]. In the present study, immunoelectron microscopic study was performed for visualizing NETs and fibrin fibrils (thick fibrils in our tongue) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of autopsied lung tissue of legionnaire’s pneumonia. Lactoferrin and fibrinogen gamma chain were utilized as markers of NETs and fibrin, respectively. Analysis of immuno-scanning electron microscopy indicated that NETs constructed thin fibrils and granular materials were attached onto the NETs fibrils. The smooth-surfaced fibrin fibrils were much thicker than the NETs fibrils. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that lactoferrin immunoreactivities were visible as dots on the fibrils, whereas fibrinogen gamma chain immunoreactivities were homogeneously observed throughout the fibrils. Usefulness of immunoelectron microscopic analysis of NETs and fibrin fibrils should be emphasized. PMID:27682015

  16. Thrombin Production and Human Neutrophil Elastase Sequestration by Modified Cellulosic Dressings and Their Electrokinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Judson Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing). Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze). A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration. PMID:24956451

  17. Thrombin production and human neutrophil elastase sequestration by modified cellulosic dressings and their electrokinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Judson Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette

    2011-12-15

    Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing). Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze). A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration.

  18. Intracellular mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide-mediated neutrophil adherence to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Okayama, N; Coe, L; Oshima, T; Itoh, M; Alexander, J S

    1999-03-01

    We examined which endothelial second messengers are involved in peroxide-mediated endothelial-neutrophil adhesion with respect to endothelial P-selectin expression and platelet-activating factor (PAF). Peroxide (0.5 mM)-mediated adhesion was blocked by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, Gö6976 (10 nM); an intracellular calcium chelator, TMB-8 (0.1 mM); and a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor, KT5823 (0.5 microM); but not by a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein (1 microM), or a protein kinase A inhibitor, H-89 (0.1 microM). These data were consistent with the proadhesive effects of PMA (0.1 microM), a PKC activator; a calcium ionophore, A23187 (1 microM); and dibutyryl cGMP (0.5 and 1 mM); but not phenylarsine oxide (0.1 mM), a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, or dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM). Conversely, peroxide-mediated P-selectin expression was blocked by Gö6976 and KT5823, but not by TMB-8. These data are strengthened by the observation that PMA and dibutyryl cGMP, but not A23187, increased P-selectin expression. WEB 2086 (10 microM), a PAF-receptor antagonist, blocked peroxide-, PMA-, and A23187-mediated adhesion, but not peroxide-mediated P-selectin expression. PAF itself (10 nM) stimulated adhesion, but not P-selectin expression. These data indicate that PKC and PKG are involved in peroxide-mediated neutrophil adhesion via P-selectin mobilization and PAF synthesis; however, intracellular calcium appears to mediate adhesion only through PAF synthesis.

  19. Functional heterogeneity and differential priming of circulating neutrophils in human experimental endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Janesh; Ramakers, Bart P; Kamp, Vera M; Loi, Adele Lo Tam; Lam, Siu W; Hietbrink, Falco; Leenen, Luke P; Tool, Anton T; Pickkers, Peter; Koenderman, Leo

    2010-07-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in host defense. However, deregulation of neutrophils contributes to tissue damage in severe systemic inflammation. In contrast to complications mediated by an overactive neutrophil compartment, severe systemic inflammation is a risk factor for development of immune suppression and as a result, infectious complications. The role of neutrophils in this clinical paradox is poorly understood, and in this study, we tested whether this paradox could be explained by distinct neutrophil subsets and their functionality. We studied the circulating neutrophil compartment immediately after induction of systemic inflammation by administering 2 ng/kg Escherichia coli LPS i.v. to healthy volunteers. Neutrophils were phenotyped by expression of membrane receptors visualized by flow cytometry, capacity to interact with fluorescently labeled microbes, and activation of the NADPH-oxidase by oxidation of Amplex Red and dihydrorhodamine. After induction of systemic inflammation, expression of membrane receptors on neutrophils, such as CXCR1 and -2 (IL-8Rs), C5aR, FcgammaRII, and TLR4, was decreased. Neutrophils were also refractory to fMLF-induced up-regulation of membrane receptors, and suppression of antimicrobial function was shown by decreased interaction with Staphylococcus epidermis. Simultaneously, activation of circulating neutrophils was demonstrated by a threefold increase in release of ROS. The paradoxical phenotype can be explained by the selective priming of the respiratory burst. In contrast, newly released, CD16(dim) banded neutrophils display decreased antimicrobial function. We conclude that systemic inflammation leads to a functionally heterogeneous neutrophil compartment, in which newly released refractory neutrophils can cause susceptibility to infections, and activated, differentiated neutrophils can mediate tissue damage. PMID:20400675

  20. Effect of decaglycerol monooleate on phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of human neutrophils: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Suzuki, K; Kudo, S; Yamada, M; Kowatari, K; Umeda, T; Nakaji, S; Sugawara, K

    2000-05-01

    Decaglycerol monooleate (DGMO), a type of polyglycerol esters of fatty acids (PGEF), was evaluated for its in vitro effect on phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of isolated human neutrophils using flow cytometric assay. Opsonized zymosan particles labelled with FITC (FITC-OZ) were employed as an indicator of phagocytosis. Fluorescence of FITC-OZ attached on to the surface of neutrophils was quenched by addition of trypan blue solution. After 10 minutes of incubation with DGMO up to a concentration of 10 mg/ml, neutrophil phagocytosis was not affected markedly. At the same time, the DGMO emulsion left little influence on complement receptor type three (CR3) that is associated with phagocytosis. On the other hand, oxidation of hydroethidine, which was used as an indicator of intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (mainly for superoxide anion), was significantly inhibited by DGMO over 1 mg/ml. However, this phenomenon was not seen in DGMO-treated neutrophils when DGMO was removed after incubation. The present data suggest that DGMO does not affect phagocytosis of human neutrophils but down-regulates respiratory burst activity.

  1. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:2254020

  2. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated silver nanoparticles: activation of neutrophils and nanotoxicology effects in human hepatocarcinoma and mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Paino, Iêda Maria Martinez; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2015-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNps) have been described as important for their excellent biocompatibility, biomedical applications. Nevertheless, AgNps can interact with the immune system which is essential to analyze human exposure to assess their potential risk to health and environment. In general, the primary site for accumulation of nanoparticles has been demonstrated to be the liver. Furthermore, the direct activation of neutrophils or oxidative burst by a given nanoparticle is poorly documented. In this paper, we investigated the cell uptake, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2), primary normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the direct activation of primary isolated neutrophils through the oxidative burst on exposure to AgNps coated with Polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA). All cell types were incubated in the presence of 1.0 and 50.0 μM of AgNps-PVA for 24h. A significant cyto- and genotoxic-response and the activation of human neutrophils were induced by AgNps-PVA (p<0.05). Our results revealed that AgNps can interact with the normal isolated neutrophils, PBMC and HepG2 cells in vitro, which opens the way for further studies on the toxicological effects of AgNps in the human immune system response and cancer cells. PMID:25681999

  3. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents down-regulate the oxidative burst induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Morone, M P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1995-01-01

    Human neutrophils, plated on fibronectin-precoated wells, were found to release large quantities of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to GM-CSF. O2- production was reduced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. Both agents are known to increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels by inducing its production (PGE2) or blocking its catabolism (RO 20-1724). When added in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 had a marked synergistic inhibitory effect, which was reproduced by replacing PGE2 with a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, i.e. forskolin (FK). Moreover, the neutrophil response to GM-CSF was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analogue of cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. As GM-CSF and PGE2 are known to be generated at tissue sites of inflammation, the results suggest the existence of a PGE2-dependent regulatory pathway potentially capable of controlling the neutrophil response to GM-CSF, in turn limiting the risk of local oxidative tissue injury. Moreover, owing to its susceptibility to amplification by RO 20-1724, the PGE2-dependent pathway and in particular PDE-IV may represent a pharmacological target to reduce the generation of histotoxic oxidants by GM-CSF-responding neutrophils. PMID:7664497

  4. Granzyme B-expressing neutrophils correlate with bacterial load in granulomas from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Joshua T.; Maiello, Pauline; Sun, Tao; Via, Laura E.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of neutrophils in tuberculosis (TB), and whether neutrophils express granzyme B (grzB), a pro-apoptotic enzyme associated with cytotoxic T cells, is controversial. We examined neutrophils in peripheral blood (PB) and lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cynomolgus macaques and humans to determine whether mycobacterial products or pro-inflammatory factors induce neutrophil grzB expression. We found large numbers of grzB-expressing neutrophils in macaque and human granulomas and these cells contained more grzB+ granules than T cells. Higher neutrophil, but not T cell, grzB expression correlated with increased bacterial load. Although unstimulated PB neutrophils lacked grzB expression, grzB expression increased upon exposure to M. tuberculosis bacilli, M. tuberculosis culture filtrate protein or lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli. Perforin is required for granzyme-mediated cytotoxicity by T cells, but was not observed in PB or granuloma neutrophils. Nonetheless, stimulated PB neutrophils secreted grzB as determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assays. Purified grzB was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic, suggesting secreted neutrophil grzB acts on extracellular targets, potentially enhancing neutrophil migration through extracellular matrix and regulating apoptosis or activation in other cell types. These data indicate mycobacterial products and the pro-inflammatory environment of granulomas up-regulates neutrophil grzB expression and suggests a previously unappreciated aspect of neutrophil biology in TB. PMID:25653138

  5. Inhibition of human neutrophil elastase by labdane diterpenes from the fruiting bodies of Ramaria formosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Kwan-Chul; Yoo, Ick-Dong; Ha, Byung-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Two new labdane diterpenes (1 and 2) were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ramaria formosa. The structures of these compounds were established by extensive spectroscopic studies and chemical evidence. The inhibitory activity of compounds 1 and 2 against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) was evaluated in vitro. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HNE activity moderately. The IC50 values for compounds 1 and 2 were 36.4 ± 1.2 and 40.8 ± 1.5 μM, respectively; the IC50 value for the positive control, EGCG, was 12.5 ± 0.8 μM. In addition, the mechanism by which 2 inhibited HNE was a mixed-type noncompetitive inhibition, with a Ki of 41.5 ± 1.8 μM.

  6. Neutralization by Acetyl Salicylic Acid of the Testosterone induced Impaired Maspin Synthesis Stimulated by Estriol in Neutrophils through Nitric Oxide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Emili; Bank, Sarbashri; Maiti, Smarajit; Jana, Pradipta; Sinha, Asru K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Maspin, an anti breast cancer protein in the mammary cell and normal neutrophil has been reported to be synthesised by the stimulation of NO production induced by estriol. The role of testosterone was investigated in the synthesis of maspin in relation to that of estriol. Methods: Fifty normal female between the ages of 25-65 years old participated in the study. Maspin synthesis was demonstrated by in vitro translation of maspin mRNA, followed by the quantification of maspin by enzyme linked immune absorbent assay. NO was determined by methomoglobin method. Results: Incubation of the neutrophils in HBSS both with 30 nM estriol resulted in the synthesis of 1.8 ngm maspin with simultaneous increase of NO synthesis. In contrast incubating neutrophils with 20 nM testosterone in the presence of estriol inhibited maspin synthesis to 0.33 nM with simultaneous inhibition of NO synthesis from 1.89 nM to 0 nM at the same time. Addition of 0.2 μM flutamide, a testosterone receptor blocker to the incubation mixture restored the synthesis of maspin by 60.64 %. Incubation of 25 μM aspirin that stimulated NO synthesis restored the inhibition of maspin synthesis by testosterone by 79.1%. I-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, abolished both maspin and NO synthesis. Scatchard plot of estriol binding in the presence of testosterone demonstrated that the male sex hormone inhibited the female sex hormone binding to its receptor by “cross talk” between the receptors. It was found that while 1.02 × 103 molecules of estriol bind each neutrophil at equilibrium, in the presence of testosterone (20 nM) in the binding mixture decreases the binding of estriol to 0.5 × 103 with little change in the dissociation constant compared to controls. Conclution: Estriol was found to stimulate maspin synthesis through the stimulation of NO, testosterone inhibited maspin synthesis through the inhibition of NO synthesis. PMID:26759534

  7. Human neutrophil elastase detection with fluorescent peptide sensors conjugated to cellulosic and nanocellulosic materials: part II, structure/function analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is one of a number of proteases that is receiving increased attention as a marker for inflammatory diseases and sensor-based point of care diagnostics. Integral to sensor-based detection is the transducer surface which is the platform of the sensor's signal transmitta...

  8. Human neutrophil elastase peptide sensors conjugated to cellulosic and nanocellulosic materials: part I, synthesis and characterization of fluorescent analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of peptide conjugated cellulose and nanocellulose materials as sensors for fluorescent detection of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The cellulose sensor surfaces selected are filter paper (FP) and print cloth (PC) fabric, which are composed of pro...

  9. Binding characteristics of radioiodinated crystal - induced chemotactic factor to human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Spilberg, I.; Mehta, J.

    1984-12-01

    The binding of radiolabeled crystal-induced chemotactic factor (CCF) to human neutrophils is characterized. Binding of /sup 125/I-CCF to the cells was higher at 4/sup 0/C than at 24/sup 0/ or 37/sup 0/C and was found to be independent of Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration. The binding showed a pH optimum of 6.0. Tosylamido phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone at 100 ..mu..mol/L concentration inhibited 20% of /sup 125/I-CCF binding, but phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride at 200 ..mu..mol/L had no effect. Approximately 50% of the cell-associated /sup 125/I-CCF was released after treatment with proteases. The nonspecific uptake by the cells, as measured by the uptake of /sup 3/H-sucrose and /sup 14/C-inulin in the presence of CCF, was negligible. After the steady-state binding of /sup 125/I-CCF to the cells, approx. 15% of the cell-associated radioactivity at 4/sup 0/C and 40% to 50% at 24/sup 0/ and 37/sup 0/C was released into the medium after 60 minutes of incubation in medium alone. Dissociation of the radioactive material was not affected by the presence of tosylamido phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone or phenanthroline in the media. The dissociated material was determined to be degraded /sup 125/I-CCF, suggesting that degradation of /sup 125/I-CCF occurs after binding to its specific receptor on the human neutrophil. 22 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin cause neutrophil extracellular trap formation by bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Hellenbrand, Katrina M; Klos, Heather; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2010-11-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important member of the bovine respiratory disease complex, which is characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration into the alveoli and fibrin deposition. Recently several authors have reported that human neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of trapping and killing pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that the leukotoxin (LKT) of M. haemolytica causes NET formation by bovine neutrophils in a CD18-dependent manner. Using an unacylated, noncytotoxic pro-LKT produced by an ΔlktC mutant of M. haemolytica, we show that binding of unacylated pro-LKT stimulates NET formation despite a lack of cytotoxicity. Inhibition of LKT binding to the CD18 chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) on bovine neutrophils reduced NET formation in response to LKT or M. haemolytica cells. Further investigation revealed that NETs formed in response to M. haemolytica are capable of trapping and killing a portion of the bacterial cells. NET formation was confirmed by confocal microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Prior exposure of bovine neutrophils to LKT enhanced subsequent trapping and killing of M. haemolytica cells in bovine NETs. Understanding NET formation in response to M. haemolytica and its LKT provides a new perspective on how neutrophils contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine respiratory disease. PMID:20823211

  11. Inhibitors and Antibody Fragments as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics Targeting Neutrophil Proteinase 3 in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Brice; Lesner, Adam; Guarino, Carla; Wysocka, Magdalena; Kellenberger, Christine; Watier, Hervé; Specks, Ulrich; Gauthier, Francis; Jenne, Dieter E

    2016-07-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) has received great scientific attention after its identification as the essential antigenic target of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies in Wegener's granulomatosis (now called granulomatosis with polyangiitis). Despite many structural and functional similarities between neutrophil elastase (NE) and PR3 during biosynthesis, storage, and extracellular release, unique properties and pathobiological functions have emerged from detailed studies in recent years. The development of highly sensitive substrates and inhibitors of human PR3 and the creation of PR3-selective single knockout mice led to the identification of nonredundant roles of PR3 in cell death induction via procaspase-3 activation in cell cultures and in mouse models. According to a study in knockout mice, PR3 shortens the lifespan of infiltrating neutrophils in tissues and accelerates the clearance of aged neutrophils in mice. Membrane exposure of active human PR3 on apoptotic neutrophils reprograms the response of macrophages to phagocytosed neutrophils, triggers secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and undermines immune silencing and tissue regeneration. PR3-induced disruption of the anti-inflammatory effect of efferocytosis may be relevant for not only granulomatosis with polyangiitis but also for other autoimmune diseases with high neutrophil turnover. Inhibition of membrane-bound PR3 by endogenous inhibitors such as the α-1-protease inhibitor is comparatively weaker than that of NE, suggesting that the adverse effects of unopposed PR3 activity resurface earlier than those of NE in individuals with α-1-protease inhibitor deficiency. Effective coverage of PR3 by anti-inflammatory tools and simultaneous inhibition of both PR3 and NE should be most promising in the future. PMID:27329045

  12. Inhibitors and Antibody Fragments as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics Targeting Neutrophil Proteinase 3 in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Brice; Lesner, Adam; Guarino, Carla; Wysocka, Magdalena; Kellenberger, Christine; Watier, Hervé; Specks, Ulrich; Gauthier, Francis; Jenne, Dieter E

    2016-07-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) has received great scientific attention after its identification as the essential antigenic target of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies in Wegener's granulomatosis (now called granulomatosis with polyangiitis). Despite many structural and functional similarities between neutrophil elastase (NE) and PR3 during biosynthesis, storage, and extracellular release, unique properties and pathobiological functions have emerged from detailed studies in recent years. The development of highly sensitive substrates and inhibitors of human PR3 and the creation of PR3-selective single knockout mice led to the identification of nonredundant roles of PR3 in cell death induction via procaspase-3 activation in cell cultures and in mouse models. According to a study in knockout mice, PR3 shortens the lifespan of infiltrating neutrophils in tissues and accelerates the clearance of aged neutrophils in mice. Membrane exposure of active human PR3 on apoptotic neutrophils reprograms the response of macrophages to phagocytosed neutrophils, triggers secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and undermines immune silencing and tissue regeneration. PR3-induced disruption of the anti-inflammatory effect of efferocytosis may be relevant for not only granulomatosis with polyangiitis but also for other autoimmune diseases with high neutrophil turnover. Inhibition of membrane-bound PR3 by endogenous inhibitors such as the α-1-protease inhibitor is comparatively weaker than that of NE, suggesting that the adverse effects of unopposed PR3 activity resurface earlier than those of NE in individuals with α-1-protease inhibitor deficiency. Effective coverage of PR3 by anti-inflammatory tools and simultaneous inhibition of both PR3 and NE should be most promising in the future.

  13. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide stimulates bovine neutrophil production of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-12 and IFN-gamma.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid recruitment and bacterial phagocytosis and killing by neutrophils (PMN) are the most effective defenses against establishment of bacterial infection. In addition to their phagocytic and bactericidal properties, PMN may play a key supportive role through secretion of cytokines during the innat...

  14. Technical advance: autofluorescence-based sorting: rapid and nonperturbing isolation of ultrapure neutrophils to determine cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Dorward, David A; Lucas, Christopher D; Alessandri, Ana L; Marwick, John A; Rossi, Fiona; Dransfield, Ian; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G

    2013-07-01

    The technical limitations of isolating neutrophils without contaminating leukocytes, while concurrently minimizing neutrophil activation, is a barrier to determining specific neutrophil functions. We aimed to assess the use of FACS for generating highly pure quiescent neutrophil populations in an antibody-free environment. Peripheral blood human granulocytes and murine bone marrow-derived neutrophils were isolated by discontinuous Percoll gradient and flow-sorted using FSC/SSC profiles and differences in autofluorescence. Postsort purity was assessed by morphological analysis and flow cytometry. Neutrophil activation was measured in unstimulated-unsorted and sorted cells and in response to fMLF, LTB4, and PAF by measuring shape change, CD62L, and CD11b expression; intracellular calcium flux; and chemotaxis. Cytokine production by human neutrophils was also determined. Postsort human neutrophil purity was 99.95% (sem=0.03; n=11; morphological analysis), and 99.68% were CD16(+ve) (sem=0.06; n=11), with similar results achieved for murine neutrophils. Flow sorting did not alter neutrophil activation or chemotaxis, relative to presorted cells, and no differences in response to agonists were observed. Stimulated neutrophils produced IL-1β, although to a lesser degree than CXCL8/IL-8. The exploitation of the difference in autofluorescence between neutrophils and eosinophils by FACS is a quick and effective method for generating highly purified populations for subsequent in vitro study.

  15. Identification and characterization of VEGF-A–responsive neutrophils expressing CD49d, VEGFR1, and CXCR4 in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Massena, Sara; Christoffersson, Gustaf; Vågesjö, Evelina; Seignez, Cédric; Gustafsson, Karin; Binet, François; Herrera Hidalgo, Carmen; Giraud, Antoine; Lomei, Jalal; Weström, Simone; Shibuya, Masabumi; Claesson-Welsh, Lena; Gerwins, Pär; Welsh, Michael; Kreuger, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is upregulated during hypoxia and is the major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF-A expression has also been found to recruit myeloid cells to ischemic tissues where they contribute to angiogenesis. This study investigates the mechanisms underlying neutrophil recruitment to VEGF-A as well as the characteristics of these neutrophils. A previously undefined circulating subset of neutrophils shown to be CD49d+VEGFR1highCXCR4high was identified in mice and humans. By using chimeric mice with impaired VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) or VEGFR2 signaling (Flt-1tk−/−, tsad−/−), we found that parallel activation of VEGFR1 on neutrophils and VEGFR2 on endothelial cells was required for VEGF-A-induced recruitment of circulating neutrophils to tissue. Intravital microscopy of mouse microcirculation revealed that neutrophil recruitment by VEGF-A versus by the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 [CXCL2]) involved the same steps of the recruitment cascade but that an additional neutrophil integrin (eg, VLA-4 [CD49d/CD29]) played a crucial role in neutrophil crawling and emigration to VEGF-A. Isolated CD49d+ neutrophils featured increased chemokinesis but not chemotaxis compared with CD49d– neutrophils in the presence of VEGF-A. Finally, by targeting the integrin α4 subunit (CD49d) in a transplantation-based angiogenesis model that used avascular pancreatic islets transplanted to striated muscle, we demonstrated that inhibiting the recruitment of circulating proangiogenic neutrophils to hypoxic tissue impairs vessel neoformation. Thus, angiogenesis can be modulated by targeting cell-surface receptors specifically involved in VEGF-A-dependent recruitment of proangiogenic neutrophils without compromising recruitment of the neutrophil population involved in the immune response to pathogens. PMID:26286848

  16. A Randomized Controlled Phase III Trial of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Filgrastim) for Treatment of Severe Chronic Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Dale, David C.; Bonilla, Mary Ann; Davis, Mark W.; Nakanishi, Arline M.; Hammond, William P.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Wang, Winfred; Jakubowski, Ann; Winton, Elliott; Lalezari, Parviz; Robinson, William; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Steve; Gabrilove, Janice; Vincent, Martha; Boxer, Laurence A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic, cyclic, and congenital neutropenia have recurrent severe bacterial infections. One hundred twenty-three patients with recurrent infections and severe chronic neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count < 0.5 × 109/L) due to these diseases were enrolled in this multi-center phase III trial. They were randomized to either immediately beginning recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) (3.45 to 11.50 μg/kg/d, subcutaneously) or entering a 4-month observation period followed by filgrastim administration. Blood neutrophil counts, bone marrow (BM) cell histology, and incidence and duration of infection-related events were monitored. Of the 123 patients enrolled, 120 received filgrastim. On therapy, 108 patients had a median absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 1.5 × 109/L. Examination of BM aspirates showed increased proportions of maturing neutrophils. Infection-related events were significantly decreased (P < .05) with approximately 50% reduction in the incidence and duration of infection-related events and almost 70% reduction in duration of antibiotic use. Asymptomatic splenic enlargement occurred frequently: adverse events frequently reported were bone pain, headache, and rash, which were generally mild and easily manageable. These data indicate that treatment of patients with severe chronic neutropenia with filgrastim results in a stimulation of BM production and maturation of neutrophils, an increase in circulating neutrophils, and a reduction in infection-related events. PMID:8490166

  17. Effects of Montelukast on free radical production in whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Al Saadi, Muslim M.; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Mustafa, Ali; Shafi, Ahmed; Tuwajri, Ali S. Al

    2011-01-01

    Montelukast is a highly selective leukotriene-receptor antagonist (LTRA). It is widely used in the treatment of bronchial asthma, primarily as an adjunct to corticosteroids. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and oxidative stress contributing to the initiation and worsening of inflammatory respiratory disorders, such as asthma. Antioxidant drugs may have a role in minimizing or preventing damage in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant effect of montelukast on the production of free radicals in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children. A group of 48 (38 males and 10 females), apparently healthy asthmatic children were recruited with ages ranging between 6 and 14 years. In asthmatic children, base line (premedication) and post medication free radicals activity in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was determined by measuring chemiluminescence (CL) response through chemiluminescence luminometer. Free radical productions were significantly decreased in the whole blood, when stimulated with Phorbol Myristate Acetate (p < 0.04) and Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05). The free radicals were also significantly decreased in isolated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) when stimulated with Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05) after the post medication treatment of montelukast in asthmatic children. Montelukast decreased the reactive oxygen species production, both in the whole blood as well as isolated PMNs in asthmatic children. PMID:23960762

  18. Activities of LL-37, a cathelin-associated antimicrobial peptide of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Cho, Y; Dinh, N N; Waring, A J; Lehrer, R I

    1998-09-01

    Human neutrophils contain two structurally distinct types of antimicrobial peptides, beta-sheet defensins (HNP-1 to HNP-4) and the alpha-helical peptide LL-37. We used radial diffusion assays and an improved National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards-type broth microdilution assay to compare the antimicrobial properties of LL-37, HNP-1, and protegrin (PG-1). Although generally less potent than PG-1, LL-37 showed considerable activity (MIC, <10 microgram/ml) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, even in media that contained 100 mM NaCl. Certain organisms (methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Candida albicans) were resistant to LL-37 in media that contained 100 mM NaCl but were susceptible in low-salt media. Burkholderia cepacia was resistant to LL-37, PG-1, and HNP-1 in low- or high-salt media. LL-37 caused outer and inner membrane permeabilization of E. coli ML-35p. Chromogenic Limulus assays revealed that LL-37 bound to E. coli O111:B4 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a high affinity and that this binding showed positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient = 2.02). Circular dichroism spectrometry disclosed that LL-37 underwent conformational change in the presence of lipid A, transitioning from a random coil to an alpha-helical structure. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties of LL-37, its presence in neutrophils, and its inducibility in keratinocytes all suggest that this peptide and its precursor (hCAP-18) may protect skin and other tissues from bacterial intrusions and LPS-induced toxicity. The potent activity of LL-37 against P. aeruginosa, including mucoid and antibiotic-resistant strains, suggests that it or related molecules might have utility as topical bronchopulmonary microbicides in cystic fibrosis.

  19. Activities of LL-37, a cathelin-associated antimicrobial peptide of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Cho, Y; Dinh, N N; Waring, A J; Lehrer, R I

    1998-09-01

    Human neutrophils contain two structurally distinct types of antimicrobial peptides, beta-sheet defensins (HNP-1 to HNP-4) and the alpha-helical peptide LL-37. We used radial diffusion assays and an improved National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards-type broth microdilution assay to compare the antimicrobial properties of LL-37, HNP-1, and protegrin (PG-1). Although generally less potent than PG-1, LL-37 showed considerable activity (MIC, <10 microgram/ml) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, even in media that contained 100 mM NaCl. Certain organisms (methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Candida albicans) were resistant to LL-37 in media that contained 100 mM NaCl but were susceptible in low-salt media. Burkholderia cepacia was resistant to LL-37, PG-1, and HNP-1 in low- or high-salt media. LL-37 caused outer and inner membrane permeabilization of E. coli ML-35p. Chromogenic Limulus assays revealed that LL-37 bound to E. coli O111:B4 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a high affinity and that this binding showed positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient = 2.02). Circular dichroism spectrometry disclosed that LL-37 underwent conformational change in the presence of lipid A, transitioning from a random coil to an alpha-helical structure. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties of LL-37, its presence in neutrophils, and its inducibility in keratinocytes all suggest that this peptide and its precursor (hCAP-18) may protect skin and other tissues from bacterial intrusions and LPS-induced toxicity. The potent activity of LL-37 against P. aeruginosa, including mucoid and antibiotic-resistant strains, suggests that it or related molecules might have utility as topical bronchopulmonary microbicides in cystic fibrosis. PMID:9736536

  20. Cell volume regulation in human neutrophils: 2-(aminomethyl)phenols as Cl- channel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Simchowitz, L; Textor, J A; Cragoe, E J

    1993-07-01

    When subjected to hypotonic stress, human peripheral neutrophils initially swell due to rapid water entry and thereafter recover toward the normal cell size (approximately 330 microns 3). Neutrophils do not behave as perfect osmometers: when resuspended in half-isotonic medium (150 mosM), they swell by only approximately 40% rather than doubling in size as predicted for ideal behavior. As with lymphocytes, restoration to the normal cell size involves the net loss of K+ and Cl- from the cytosol through independent conductance pathways. Volume regulation is sensitive to 0.4-1 mM of quinine, UK-5099, 3,5-diiodosalicylate (DISA), MK-473 (an indanyloxyacetate derivative), and to MK-447 [a 2-(aminomethyl)phenol]. From correlation of drug effects on the time course of cell volume recovery and the associated volume-activated 86Rb+ and 36Cl- fluxes, it was evident that quinine blocked only K+ channels, whereas MK-447 acted as a selective inhibitor of Cl- channels. In contrast, UK-5099, DISA, and MK-473 were nonspecific in that the compounds displayed comparable suppressive effects on all three parameters. Structure-activity relationships in the MK-447 series revealed the critical elements of the molecule responsible for drug potency. In particular, the importance of the neighboring ionizable 1-hydroxyl and 2-aminomethyl groups and the formation of secondary ring structures for biological activity is emphasized. The most potent derivative thus far identified, termed analogue A [inhibitor constant (Ki) approximately 16 microM], had a potency approximately sixfold greater than that of the parent compound (Ki approximately 90 microM). These findings define the mechanism of action of a relatively new class of agents that behave as inhibitors of swelling-activated Cl- channels in these cells.

  1. Heterogeneous profiles of a factor that renders neutrophils cytotoxic obtained from a concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cell culture in partial purification process

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Y.; Inoue, T.; Ito, M.; Kimura, S.; Fuyama, S.; Arai, S.; Naiki, M.; Sendo, F.

    1986-05-15

    Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated rat spleen cells were cultured in a serum-free conditioned medium. This culture supernatant contained a certain factor(s) that renders neutrophil cytotoxic for various tumor cells. The factor was tentatively termed neutrophil-activating factor (NAF). NAF activity was eluted in broad fractions by the ion exchange chromatography and the gel filtration. Moreover, on the Con A column, some NAF activities were bound to the column, but other activities passed through the column. These results showed the heterogeneity or polydispersity of NAF activity in both molecular size and charge-based separation properties. Monoclonal antibodies were produced by fusing BALB/c myeloma cells (P3-X63 Ag8.653) with spleen cells from syngeneic mice immunized with partially purified NAF (pNAF) obtained from the gel filtration. Absorbent beads which were linked with one monoclonal antibody (ANAF-10) partially absorbed NAF activity from supernatants of a Con A-stimulated spleen cell culture. By further purification of pNAF the NAF activity was concentrated about 10,000-fold. Heterogeneity of NAF activity, however, did not disappear in even this affinity chromatography. On the other hand, /sup 125/I-labeled material of the final product migrated to one major band corresponding with an m.w. of about 20,000 as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis, and NAF activity was detected in the same band.

  2. Disentangling the effects of tocilizumab on neutrophil survival and function.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Timo; Hahne, Martin; Strehl, Cindy; Hoff, Paula; Dörffel, Yvonne; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represents a hypoxic environment with up-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines and cellular infiltrates including neutrophils. Although inhibition of the interleukin (IL)6 receptor pathway by tocilizumab is a potent treatment option for RA, it may also cause adverse effects such as an occasionally high-grade neutropenia. We analysed the impact of tocilizumab on survival, mediator secretion, oxidative burst, phagocytosis and energy availability of high-dose toll-like receptor (TLR)2/4-stimulated neutrophils (to mimic an arthritis flare) under normoxic versus hypoxic conditions. Human neutrophils were purified, pre-treated with varying doses of tocilizumab, dexamethasone or human IgG1 and high-dose-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone-triggering TLR2/4-, LPS plus IL6, or left unstimulated. Cells were then incubated under normoxic (18 % O2) or hypoxic (1 % O2) conditions and subsequently analysed. Neutrophil survival and energy availability were significantly decreased by tocilizumab in a dose-dependent manner in high-dose TLR2/4-stimulated cells, but to a greater extent under normoxia as compared to hypoxia. We also found high-dose LPS-stimulated oxidative burst and phagocytosis of neutrophils to be higher under hypoxic versus normoxic conditions, but this difference was reduced by tocilizumab. Finally, we observed that tocilizumab affected neutrophil mediator secretion as a function of oxygen availability. Tocilizumab is known for both beneficial effects and a higher incidence of neutropenia when treating RA patients. Our results suggest that both effects can at least in part be explained by a reduction in neutrophil survival, a dose-dependent inhibition of hypoxia-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative burst and phagocytosis of infiltrating hypoxic neutrophils and an alteration of mediator secretion.

  3. Multifaceted effects of Francisella tularensis on human neutrophil function and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Kinkead, Lauren C; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2016-09-01

    Francisella tularensis in an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes a potentially lethal disease called tularemia. Studies performed nearly 100 years ago revealed that neutrophil accumulation in infected tissues correlates directly with the extent of necrotic damage during F. tularensis infection. However, the dynamics and details of bacteria-neutrophil interactions have only recently been studied in detail. Herein, we review current understanding regarding the mechanisms that recruit neutrophils to F. tularensis-infected lungs, opsonization and phagocytosis, evasion and inhibition of neutrophil defense mechanisms, as well as the ability of F. tularensis to prolong neutrophil lifespan. In addition, we discuss distinctive features of the bacterium, including its ability to act at a distance to alter overall neutrophil responsiveness to exogenous stimuli, and the evidence which suggests that macrophages and neutrophils play distinct roles in tularemia pathogenesis, such that macrophages are major vehicles for intracellular growth and dissemination, whereas neutrophils drive tissue destruction by dysregulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27558340

  4. Influence of gut microbiota-derived ellagitannins' metabolites urolithins on pro-inflammatory activities of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Piwowarski, Jakub P; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2014-07-01

    Ellagitannin-rich products exhibit beneficial influence in the case of inflammation-associated diseases. Urolithins, metabolites of ellagitannins produced by gut microbiota, in contrary to high molecular weight hydrophilic parental polyphenols, possess well established bioavailability. Because of the important role of neutrophils in progression of inflammation, the influence of urolithins on their pro-inflammatory functions was tested. Urolithin B at a concentration of 20 µM showed significant inhibition of interleukin 8 and extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme MMP-9 production. It was also significantly active in prevention of cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-triggered selectin CD62L shedding. Urolithin C was the only active compound towards inhibition of elastase release from cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils with 39.0 ± 15.9% inhibition at a concentration of 5 µM. Myeloperoxidase release was inhibited by urolithins A and C (at 20 µM by 46.7 ± 16.1 and 63.8 ± 8.6%, respectively). Urolithin A was the most potent reactive oxygen species release inhibitor both in formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine and 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-R13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. At the concentration of 1 µM, it caused reactive oxygen species level decrease by 42.6 ± 26.6 and 53.7 ± 16.0%, respectively. Urolithins can specifically modulate inflammatory functions of neutrophils, and thus could contribute to the beneficial health effects of ellagitannin-rich medicinal plant materials and food products.

  5. Heterogeneity in Neutrophil Microparticles Reveals Distinct Proteome and Functional Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Norling, Lucy V; Yin, Xiaoke; Hinds, Charles; Haskard, Dorian; Mayr, Manuel; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Altered plasma neutrophil microparticle levels have recently been implicated in a number of vascular and inflammatory diseases, yet our understanding of their actions is very limited. Herein, we investigate the proteome of neutrophil microparticles in order to shed light on their biological actions. Stimulation of human neutrophils, either in suspension or adherent to an endothelial monolayer, led to the production of microparticles containing >400 distinct proteins with only 223 being shared by the two subsets. For instance, postadherent microparticles were enriched in alpha-2 macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, whereas microparticles produced by neutrophils in suspension were abundant in heat shock 70 kDa protein 1. Annexin A1 and lactotransferrin were expressed in both microparticle subsets. We next determined relative abundance of these proteins in three types of human microparticle samples: healthy volunteer plasma, plasma of septic patients and skin blister exudates finding that these proteins were differentially expressed on neutrophil microparticles from these samples reflecting in part the expression profiles we found in vitro. Functional assessment of the neutrophil microparticles subsets demonstrated that in response to direct stimulation neutrophil microparticles produced reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4 as well as locomoted toward a chemotactic gradient. Finally, we investigated the actions of the two neutrophil microparticles subsets described herein on target cell responses. Microarray analysis with human primary endothelial cells incubated with either microparticle subset revealed a discrete modulation of endothelial cell gene expression profile. These findings demonstrate that neutrophil microparticles are heterogenous and can deliver packaged information propagating the activation status of the parent cell, potentially exerting novel and fundamental roles both under homeostatic and disease conditions. PMID:23660474

  6. Effects of ghrelin on the apoptosis of human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zeng, Mian; Zheng, Haichong; Huang, Chunrong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Chen, Yanzhu; Xie, Ruijie

    2016-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung inflammation and the diffuse infiltration of neutrophils into the alveolar space. Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die via apoptosis following the activation and uptake of microbes, and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter pathogens. Apoptosis is essential for the removal of neutrophils from inflamed tissues and for the timely resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor, produced and secreted mainly from the stomach. Previous studies have reported that ghrelin exerts anti-inflammatory effects in lung injury through the regulation of the apoptosis of different cell types; however, the ability of ghrelin to regulate alveolar neutrophil apoptosis remains largely undefined. We hypothesized that ghrelin may have the ability to modulate neutrophil apoptosis. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on freshly isolated neutrophils in vitro. Our findings demonstrated a decrease in the apoptotic ratio (as shown by flow cytometry), as well as in the percentage of cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick‑end labeling-positive rate, accompanied by an increased B-cell lymphoma 2/Bax ratio and the downregulation of cleaved caspase-3 in neutrophils following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (100 ng/ml). However, pre-treatment with ghrelin at a physiological level (100 nM) did not have a notable influence on the neutrophils in all the aforementioned tests. Our findings suggest that ghrelin may not possess the ability to modulate the neutrophil lifespan in vitro. PMID:27431014

  7. Effects of ghrelin on the apoptosis of human neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zeng, Mian; Zheng, Haichong; Huang, Chunrong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Chen, Yanzhu; Xie, Ruijie

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung inflammation and the diffuse infiltration of neutrophils into the alveolar space. Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die via apoptosis following the activation and uptake of microbes, and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter pathogens. Apoptosis is essential for the removal of neutrophils from inflamed tissues and for the timely resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor, produced and secreted mainly from the stomach. Previous studies have reported that ghrelin exerts anti-inflammatory effects in lung injury through the regulation of the apoptosis of different cell types; however, the ability of ghrelin to regulate alveolar neutrophil apoptosis remains largely undefined. We hypothesized that ghrelin may have the ability to modulate neutrophil apoptosis. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on freshly isolated neutrophils in vitro. Our findings demonstrated a decrease in the apoptotic ratio (as shown by flow cytometry), as well as in the percentage of cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling-positive rate, accompanied by an increased B-cell lymphoma 2/Bax ratio and the downregulation of cleaved caspase-3 in neutrophils following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (100 ng/ml). However, pre-treatment with ghrelin at a physiological level (100 nM) did not have a notable influence on the neutrophils in all the aforementioned tests. Our findings suggest that ghrelin may not possess the ability to modulate the neutrophil lifespan in vitro. PMID:27431014

  8. Impact of cagPAI and T4SS on the Inflammatory Response of Human Neutrophils to Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Zauco, Norma Angélica; Torres, Javier; Pérez-Figueroa, Gloria Erandi; Álvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Gómez, Alejandro; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori contains a pathogenicity island, cagPAI, with genes homologous to components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The T4SS components assemble a structure that transfers CagA protein and peptidoglycan into host epithelial cells, causing the increased release of interleukin 8 (IL8) from the cells. The Toll-like receptors on neutrophils recognize H. pylori, initiating signaling pathways that enhance the activation of NF-κB. However, the roles of cagPAI and T4SS in the inflammatory response of neutrophils are unknown. We evaluated the participation of cagPAI and T4SS in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori infection. Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and infected with H. pylori cagPAI+, cagPAI–, and cagPAI mutant strains virB4– and virD4–. Whereas cagPAI+ strain 26695 induced the greatest IL8 production, a proinflammatory response, cagPAI– strain 8822 induced the greatest IL10 production, an anti-inflammatory response. In contrast, the virB4– and virD4– mutant strains produced significantly more of the two proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and tumor necrosis factor αthan the cagPAI+ strain 26695. We observed that H. pylori downregulated the expression of TLRs 2 and 5 but upregulated TLR9 expression in a cagPAI and T4SS-independent manner. These results show for the first time that the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori may vary from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory response, depending on cagPAI and the integrity of T4SS. PMID:23755130

  9. The effect of cigarette smoking on neutrophil kinetics in human lungs (see comments

    SciTech Connect

    MacNee, W.; Wiggs, B.; Belzberg, A.S.; Hogg, J.C. )

    1989-10-05

    Neutrophils may play a part in the pathogenesis of the centrilobular emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. The capillary bed of the lungs concentrates neutrophils approximately 100-fold with respect to erythrocytes, producing a large pool of marginated cells. We examined the effect of cigarette smoking on the kinetics of this pool of cells, using 99mTc-labeled erythrocytes to measure regional blood velocity and 111In-labeled neutrophils to measure the removal of neutrophils during the first passage through the pulmonary circulation, their subsequent washout from the lungs, and the effect of local blood velocity on the number of neutrophils retained in each lung region. We observed no difference in these measurements between subjects who had never smoked (n = 6) and smokers who did not smoke during the study (n = 12). However, subjects who did smoke during the study (n = 12) had a significantly slower rate of washout of radiolabeled neutrophils from the lung (0.08 +/- 0.04 of the total per minute, as compared with 0.13 +/- 0.06 in smokers who did not smoke during the experiment and 0.14 +/- 0.08 in non-smokers) (P = 0.02). We also observed an increase in the regional retention of labeled neutrophils with respect to blood velocity in 5 of the 12 subjects who smoked during the study, but in none of the other subjects. We conclude that the presence of cigarette smoke in the lungs of some subjects increases the local concentration of neutrophils, and suggest that the lesions that characterize emphysema may be a result of the destruction of lung tissue by neutrophils that remain within pulmonary microvessels.

  10. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  11. Human neutrophils and oral microbiota: a constant tug-of-war between a harmonious and a discordant coexistence.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Silvia M; Edmisson, Jacob S; Jimenez-Flores, Emeri

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are a major component of the innate host response, and the outcome of the interaction between the oral microbiota and neutrophils is a key determinant of oral health status. The composition of the oral microbiome is very complex and different in health and disease. Neutrophils are constantly recruited to the oral cavity, and their protective role is highlighted in cases where their number or functional responses are impeded, resulting in different forms of periodontal disease. Periodontitis, one of the more severe and irreversible forms of periodontal disease, is a microbial-induced chronic inflammatory disease that affects the gingival tissues supporting the tooth. This chronic inflammatory disease is the result of a shift of the oral bacterial symbiotic community to a dysbiotic more complex community. Chronic inflammatory infectious diseases such as periodontitis can occur because the pathogens are able to evade or disable the innate immune system. In this review, we discuss how human neutrophils interact with both the symbiotic and the dysbiotic oral community; an understanding of which is essential to increase our knowledge of the periodontal disease process. PMID:27558341

  12. Comparison of the sensitivities of Salmonella typhimurium oxyR and katG mutants to killing by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Papp-Szabò, E; Firtel, M; Josephy, P D

    1994-01-01

    The respiratory burst of neutrophils is believed to kill bacteria by generating oxidative species, such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized halogen species. The oxyR gene of Salmonella typhimurium controls a regulon induced by oxidative stress, such as exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Some researchers have suggested that oxyR may play a key role in bacterial survival following phagocytosis. We have tested this possibility by comparing the survival, following exposure to human neutrophils, of isogenic strains bearing different oxyR alleles. Neither inactivation of the oxyR gene nor constitutive overexpression of the oxyR-regulated proteins (oxyR1 allele) greatly alters bacterial resistance to neutrophils. The katG gene, encoding the oxyR-regulated enzyme hydroperoxidase I, was also without effect on survival following exposure to neutrophils. We conclude that the oxyR response does not play a significant role in the resistance of S. typhimurium to phagocytic killing in vitro. Images PMID:8005658

  13. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2•−, and intracellular Ca2+ were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170–225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca2+ influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity. PMID:25609950

  14. Effects of penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose on human neutrophil function: significant down-regulation of L-selectin expression.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Anna K; Filipek, Agnieszka; Zyżyńska-Granica, Barbara; Naruszewicz, Marek

    2013-07-01

    Penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG) occurrs in high concentrations in medicinal herbs such as Rhus chinensis, Paeonia suffruticosa, Acer truncatum and Terminalia chebula, which demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity. We investigated the effect of PGG on stimulated and non-stimulated neutrophils in processes which included reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), metalloproteinase-9 and interleukin-8 secretion (IL-8), β₂ integrin (CD11b) and L-selectin (CD62L) expression and apoptosis. In concentrations of 5 μM-20 μM, PGG demonstrated statistically significant inhibition of ROS generation, IL-8 secretion and β₂ integrin expression in stimulated neutrophils. The inhibition of L-selectin expression by PGG resulted in prevention in neutrophils' endothelial attachment. The result obtained may explain the anti-inflammatory activity of this compound and underline the contribution of PGG in the activity of PGG rich plant extracts.

  15. Theophylline and adenosine modulate the inflammatory functions of the human neutrophil by exerting an opposing influence on the stimulus-induced increase in intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeichel Morley, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Based on evidence that endogenously-produced adenosine inhibited neutrophil responses, the influence of methylxanthine bronchodilators on neutrophil responses stimulated in vitro by n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) was examined. At concentrations between 10/sup /minus/5/ M and 10/sup /minus/4/ M, theophylline potentiated lysosomal enzyme release by 30 to 50%, superoxide anion formation by 30 to 60%, and neutrophil aggregation. Theophylline at concentrations >10/sup /minus/4/ M inhibited the same responses by >90%. Adenosine deaminase mimicked, whereas adenosine reversed the theophylline potentiation. A potential role for calcium in the modulation of the neutrophil responses by theophylline and adenosine was explored. Theophylline enhanced by >150% the fMLP-stimulated increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration ((Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/) at time points between 5 and 90 sec as measured by Fura-2. Adenosine deaminase induced a comparable enhancement, whereas 3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ M adenosine and 10/sup /minus/7/ M N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine decreased the (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. Extracellular calcium was not required for the opposing influences of theophylline and adenosine and neither compound altered fMLP-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake at the early time points.

  16. Prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene E4 synergize to stimulate diverse TH2 functions and TH2 cell/neutrophil crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Luzheng; Fergusson, Joannah; Salimi, Maryam; Panse, Isabel; Ussher, James E.; Hegazy, Ahmed N.; Vinall, Shân L.; Jackson, David G.; Hunter, Michael G.; Pettipher, Roy; Ogg, Graham; Klenerman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are lipid mediators derived from mast cells, which activate TH2 cells. The combination of PGD2 and cysLTs (notably cysteinyl leukotriene E4 [LTE4]) enhances TH2 cytokine production. However, the synergistic interaction of cysLTs with PGD2 in promoting TH2 cell activation is still poorly understood. The receptors for these mediators are drug targets in the treatment of allergic diseases, and hence understanding their interaction is likely to have clinical implications. Objective We aimed to comprehensively define the roles of PGD2, LTE4, and their combination in activating human TH2 cells and how such activation might allow the TH2 cells to engage downstream effectors, such as neutrophils, which contribute to the pathology of allergic responses. Methods The effects of PGD2, LTE4, and their combination on human TH2 cell gene expression were defined by using a microarray, and changes in specific inflammatory pathways were confirmed by means of PCR array, quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, Luminex, flow cytometry, and functional assays, including analysis of downstream neutrophil activation. Blockade of PGD2 and LTE4 was tested by using TM30089, an antagonist of chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells, and montelukast, an antagonist of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1. Results PGD2 and LTE4 altered the transcription of a wide range of genes and induced diverse functional responses in TH2 cells, including cell adhesion, migration, and survival and cytokine production. The combination of these lipids synergistically or additively enhanced TH2 responses and, strikingly, induced marked production of diverse nonclassical TH2 inflammatory mediators, including IL-22, IL-8, and GM-CSF, at concentrations sufficient to affect neutrophil activation. Conclusions PGD2 and LTE4 activate TH2 cells through different pathways but act synergistically to promote multiple downstream effector

  17. Dual effects of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate on secretion by electroporated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J E; Stoehr, S J; Kuczynski, B; Koh, E K; Omann, G M

    1991-01-01

    It is generally believed that G-proteins play stimulatory roles on cell activation. In contrast, we found that guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) was a potent inhibitor of Ca(2+)-induced secretion from specific granules (as monitored by vitamin B-12-binding protein). GTP[S] inhibition of specific-granule release occurred in the presence or absence of adenine nucleotides, required Mg2+ (1-3 mM), and was half-maximal at 30 microM-GTP[S]. The dual stimulatory and inhibitory effects of GTP[S] could be readily observed and differentiated when degranulation was monitored over a range of Ca2+ concentrations. Inhibition of specific-granule release by GTP[S] was observed at low Ca2+ concentrations and resulted from shifting the Ca2+ dose-response curves to the right. In contrast, GTP[S] promoted azurophil-granule secretion at relatively high concentrations of Ca2+ and appeared to be due to a general enhancement at all Ca2+ concentrations. A series of hydrolysable and non-hydrolysable nucleotides did not mimic GTP[S] or block its action. Inhibition by GTP[S] occurred in cells which were sensitized with a protein kinase C agonist, suggesting that inhibition of secretion took place distal to this enzyme. However, the inhibitory effects of GTP[S] on specific-granule secretion were reversed by cytochalasin D, which prevents new microfilament formation; this compound also enhanced the stimulation of azurophil-granule release by GTP[S]. We also found that GTP[S] greatly increased the F-actin content of permeabilized neutrophils, whereas Ca2+ (to a lesser extent) decreased F-actin. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that at least two G-proteins are involved in regulating secretion: one which has been previously described as stimulating Ca(2+)-induced secretion (particularly from azurophil granules) and a second, possibly involved in promoting microfilament assembly, which inhibits the discharge of specific granules. PMID:1953659

  18. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

  19. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  20. Optimization of N-benzoylindazole Derivatives as Inhibitors of Human Neutrophil Elastase

    PubMed Central

    Crocetti, Letizia; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Giomi, Donatella; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Quinn, Mark T.; Giovannoni, Maria Paola

    2013-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is an important therapeutic target for treatment of pulmonary diseases. Previously, we identified novel N-benzoylindazole derivatives as potent, competitive, and pseudoirreversible HNE inhibitors. Here, we report further development of these inhibitors with improved potency, protease selectivity, and stability compared to our previous leads. Introduction of a variety of substituents at position 5 of the indazole resulted in the potent inhibitor 20f (IC50~10 nM), and modifications at position 3 resulted the most potent compound in this series, the 3-CN derivative 5b (IC50= 7 nM); both derivatives demonstrated good stability and specificity for HNE versus other serine proteases. Molecular docking of selected N-benzoylindazoles into the HNE binding domain suggested that inhibitory activity depended on geometry of the ligand-enzyme complexes. Indeed, the ability of a ligand to form a Michaelis complex and favorable conditions for proton transfer between Hys57, Asp102 and Ser195 both affected activity. PMID:23844670

  1. Neisseria gonorrhoeae phagosomes delay fusion with primary granules to enhance bacterial survival inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Brittany; Criss, Alison K

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) promotes inflammation driven by polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs, neutrophils), yet some Gc survive PMN exposure during infection. Here we report a novel mechanism of gonococcal resistance to PMNs: Gc phagosomes avoid maturation into phagolysosomes by delayed fusion with primary (azurophilic) granules, which contain antimicrobial components including serine proteases. Reduced phagosome-primary granule fusion was observed in gonorrheal exudates and human PMNs infected ex vivo. Delayed phagosome-granule fusion could be overcome by opsonizing Gc with immunoglobulin. Using bacterial viability dyes along with antibodies to primary granules revealed that Gc survival in PMNs correlated with early residence in primary granule-negative phagosomes. However, when Gc was killed prior to PMN exposure, dead bacteria were also found in primary granule-negative phagosomes. These results suggest that Gc surface characteristics, rather than active bacterial processes, influence phagosome maturation and that Gc death inside PMNs occurs after phagosome-granule fusion. Ectopically increasing primary granule-phagosome fusion, by immunoglobulin opsonization or PMN treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine, reduced intracellular Gc viability, which was attributed in part to serine protease activity. We conclude that one method for Gc to avoid PMN clearance in acute gonorrhoea is by delaying primary granule-phagosome fusion, thus preventing formation of a degradative phagolysosome. PMID:23374609

  2. Heavy Metals Stimulate Human LINE-1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Shubha P.; Moore, Lakisha; Deininger, Prescott L.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2005-01-01

    L1 and Alu elements are among the most active retroposons (mobile elements) in the human genome. Several human diseases, including certain forms of breast cancer and leukemia, are associated with L1 and Alu insertions in functionally important areas of the genome. We present data demonstrating that environmental pollutants, such as heavy metals, can stimulate L1 retrotransposition in a tissue culture system using two different types of assays. The response to these agents was equivalent when using a cell line with a stably integrated L1 vector (genomic) or a by introducing the L1 vector by transient transfection (episomal) of the cell. Reproducible results showed that mercury (HgS), cadmium (CdS), and nickel (NiO) increase the activity of L1 by an average of three (3) fold p<0.001. This observation is the first to link several carcinogenic agents with the increased retrotransposition activity of L1 as an alternate mechanism of generating genomic instability contributing to the process of carcinogenesis. Our results demonstrate that mobile element activation must be considered as one of the mechanisms when evaluating genomic damage/instability in response to environmental agents. PMID:16705797

  3. The Beta-2-Adrenoreceptor Agonists, Formoterol and Indacaterol, but Not Salbutamol, Effectively Suppress the Reactivity of Human Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ronald; Theron, Annette J.; Steel, Helen C.; Durandt, Chrisna; Tintinger, Gregory R.; Feldman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The clinical relevance of the anti-inflammatory properties of beta-2 agonists remains contentious possibly due to differences in their molecular structures and agonist activities. The current study has compared the effects of 3 different categories of β2-agonists, namely, salbutamol (short-acting), formoterol (long-acting) and indacaterol (ultra-long-acting), at concentrations of 1–1000 nM, with human blood neutrophils in vitro. Neutrophils were activated with either N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP, 1 µM) or platelet-activating factor (PAF, 200 nM) in the absence and presence of the β2-agonists followed by measurement of the generation of reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4, release of elastase, and expression of the β2-integrin, CR3, using a combination of chemiluminescence, ELISA, colorimetric, and flow cytometric procedures respectively. These were correlated with alterations in the concentrations of intracellular cyclic-AMP and cytosolic Ca2+. At the concentrations tested, formoterol and indacaterol caused equivalent, significant (P < 0.05 at 1–10 nM) dose-related inhibition of all of the pro-inflammatory activities tested, while salbutamol was much less effective (P < 0.05 at 100 nM and higher). Suppression of neutrophil reactivity was accompanied by elevations in intracellular cAMP and accelerated clearance of Ca2+ from the cytosol of activated neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that β2-agonists vary with respect to their suppressive effects on activated neutrophils. PMID:24733958

  4. Constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, Timothy J.; Dixon, Padraic M.; Haslett, Christopher; Murray, Joanna; McGorum, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils, including assessment of factors that potentially modulate neutrophil survival through alteration of the rate of constitutive apoptosis. Cells underwent spontaneous time-dependent constitutive apoptosis when aged in culture for up to 36 h, developing the structural and functional features of apoptosis observed in many cell types, including human neutrophils. Neutrophils undergoing apoptosis also had diminished zymosan activated serum (ZAS)-stimulated chemiluminescence, but maintained responsiveness to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The constitutive rate of equine neutrophil apoptosis was promoted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor α and phagocytosis of opsonised ovine erythrocytes, while it was inhibited by dexamethasone and ZAS (a source of C5a). Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, platelet activating factor and PMA had no demonstrable effect on equine neutrophil apoptosis. There was a difference between equine and human neutrophil apoptosis in response to LPS and the time-dependence of the response to dexamethasone. PMID:25239298

  5. Identification of Lys49-PLA2 from crude venom of Crotalus atrox as a human neutrophil-calcium modulating protein.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Md Tipu; Li, Hong-Mei; Lee, Yong Zu; Lim, Soon Sung; Song, Dong-Keun

    2016-03-01

    We fortuitously observed a human neutrophil intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increasing activity in the commercially available phosphodiesterase I (PDE I), which is actually dried crude venom of Crotalus atrox. As this activity was not observed with another commercially available pure PDE I, we tried to find out the causative molecule(s) present in 'crude' PDE, and identified Lys49-phospholipase A2 (Lys49-PLA2 or K49-PLA2), a catalytically inactive protein which belongs to the phospholipase A2 family, by activity-driven three HPLC (reverse phase, size exclusion, reverse phase) steps followed by SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. K49-PLA2 induced Ca(2+) infl ux in human neutrophils without any cytotoxic eff ect. Two calcium channel inhibitors, 2-aminoetoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (30 µM) and SKF-96365 (20 µM) signifi cantly inhibited K49-PLA2-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. These results suggest that K49-PLA2 modulates [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils via 2-APB- and SKF-96365-sensitive calcium channels without causing membrane disruption.

  6. Identification of Lys49-PLA2 from crude venom of Crotalus atrox as a human neutrophil-calcium modulating protein

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Md. Tipu; Li, Hong-Mei; Lee, Yong Zu

    2016-01-01

    We fortuitously observed a human neutrophil intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) increasing activity in the commercially available phosphodiesterase I (PDE I), which is actually dried crude venom of Crotalus atrox. As this activity was not observed with another commercially available pure PDE I, we tried to find out the causative molecule(s) present in 'crude' PDE, and identified Lys49-phospholipase A2 (Lys49-PLA2 or K49-PLA2), a catalytically inactive protein which belongs to the phospholipase A2 family, by activity-driven three HPLC (reverse phase, size exclusion, reverse phase) steps followed by SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. K49-PLA2 induced Ca2+ infl ux in human neutrophils without any cytotoxic eff ect. Two calcium channel inhibitors, 2-aminoetoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (30 µM) and SKF-96365 (20 µM) signifi cantly inhibited K49-PLA2-induced [Ca2+]i increase. These results suggest that K49-PLA2 modulates [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils via 2-APB- and SKF-96365-sensitive calcium channels without causing membrane disruption. PMID:26937214

  7. Expression and polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on human intestinal epithelia: consequences for CD11b/CD18-mediated interactions with neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Parkos, C. A.; Colgan, S. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Nusrat, A.; Liang, T. W.; Springer, T. A.; Madara, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epithelial dysfunction and patient symptoms in inflammatory intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease correlate with migration of neutrophils (PMN) across the intestinal epithelium. In vitro modeling of PMN transepithelial migration has revealed distinct differences from transendothelial migration. By using polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), PMN transepithelial migration has been shown to be dependent on the leukocyte integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1), but not on CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1). Since intercellular adhesion molecule-I (ICAM-1) is an important endothelial counterreceptor for these integrins, its expression in intestinal epithelia and role in PMN-intestinal epithelial interactions was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A panel of antibodies against different domains of ICAM-1, polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), and natural human colonic epithelia were used to examine the polarity of epithelial ICAM-1 surface expression and the functional role of ICAM-1 in neutrophil-intestinal epithelial adhesive interactions. RESULTS: While no surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected on unstimulated T84 cells, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) elicited a marked expression of ICAM-1 that selectively polarized to the apical epithelial membrane. Similarly, apically restricted surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected in natural human colonic epithelium only in association with active inflammation. With or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, physiologically directed (basolateral-to-apical) transepithelial migration of PMN was unaffected by blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to ICAM-1. In contrast, PMN migration across IFN gamma-stimulated monolayers in the reverse (apical-to-basolateral) direction was inhibited by anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. Adhesion studies revealed that T84 cells adhered selectively to purified CD11b/CD18 and such adherence, with or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, was unaffected by ICAM-1 m

  8. Arachidonic acid-induced mobilization of calcium in human neutrophils: evidence for a multicomponent mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, P. H.; McColl, S. R.; Caon, A. C.; Borgeat, P.

    1989-01-01

    1. The mechanism(s) involved in the mobilization of calcium induced by arachidonic acid in human neutrophils was investigated. 2. The addition of arachidonic acid to a suspension of human neutrophils led to a time- and concentration-dependent mobilization of calcium which was the result of two separate and experimentally differentiable processes. The latter consisted of a rapid and transient phase followed by a slower and more sustained response. 3. The initial phase of calcium mobilization elicited by arachidonic acid was decreased in the presence of EGTA, inhibited by pertussis toxin as well as by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), and diminished following a pre-incubation with leukotriene B4, but not platelet-activating factor. 4. The characteristics of the first phase of the mobilization of calcium were consistent with an interaction of the fatty acid with the leukotriene B4 receptors, either directly or indirectly following the synthesis of leukotriene B4, as well as with a release of internal calcium. 5. The second, slower and more sustained phase of calcium mobilization was more apparent at high concentrations (greater than or equal to 8-16 microM) of arachidonic acid, and was relatively insensitive to pertussis toxin, EGTA or NDGA. 6. The characteristics of the 'slow' phase of calcium mobilization by arachidonic acid are consistent with its being associated primarily with a release of calcium from internal storage pools. 7. The data presented indicate that the mechanism of mobilization of calcium by arachidonic acid in human neutrophils is complex and involves specific activation pathways employed, in part at least, by other neutrophil agonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2547474

  9. Tamoxifen augments the innate immune function of neutrophils through modulation of intracellular ceramide.

    PubMed

    Corriden, Ross; Hollands, Andrew; Olson, Joshua; Derieux, Jaclyn; Lopez, Justine; Chang, John T; Gonzalez, David J; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a selective oestrogen receptor modulator widely used for the treatment of breast cancer. In addition to its activity as an oestrogen receptor agonist/antagonist, tamoxifen also modulates sphingolipid biosynthesis, which has been shown to play an important role in the regulation of neutrophil activity. Here, we find that tamoxifen stimulation enhances several pro-inflammatory pathways in human neutrophils, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. The enhancement of NET production occurs via a ceramide/PKCζ-mediated pathway, and treatment with synthetic ceramide is sufficient to promote NET formation. Pretreatment of human neutrophils with tamoxifen boosts neutrophil bactericidal capacity against a variety of pathogens in vitro and enhances clearance of the leading human pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vivo. Our results suggest that tamoxifen, and the lipid signalling pathways it modulates, merit further exploration as targets for boosting host innate immune function. PMID:26458291

  10. Tamoxifen Augments the Innate Immune Function of Neutrophils Through Modulation of Intracellular Ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Corriden, Ross; Hollands, Andrew; Olson, Joshua; Derieux, Jaclyn; Lopez, Justine; Chang, John T.; Gonzalez, David J.; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator widely used for the treatment of breast cancer. In addition to its activity as an estrogen receptor agonist/antagonist, tamoxifen also modulates sphingolipid biosynthesis, which has been shown to play an important role in the regulation of neutrophil activity. Here, we find that tamoxifen stimulation enhances several pro-inflammatory pathways in human neutrophils, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. The enhancement of NET production occurs via a ceramide/PKCζ-mediated pathway, and treatment with synthetic ceramide is sufficient to promote NET formation. Pretreatment of human neutrophils with tamoxifen boosts neutrophil bactericidal capacity against a variety of pathogens in vitro and enhances clearance of the leading human pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vivo. Our results suggest that tamoxifen, and the lipid signaling pathways it modulates, merit further exploration as targets for boosting host innate immune function. PMID:26458291

  11. Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation

    PubMed Central

    Köffel, René; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Warszawska, Joanna; Hennig, Annika; Wagner, Karin; Jörgl, Almut; Gubi, Daniela; Moser, Doris; Hladik, Anastasiya; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Fischer, Michael B.; van den Berg, Wim; Koenders, Marije; Scheinecker, Clemens; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Knapp, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell subsets. According to descriptive immunophenotypic and cell culture studies, neutrophils may directly “transdifferentiate” into monocytes/macrophages. We provide mechanistic data in human and murine models supporting the existence of this cellular pathway. First, the inflammatory signal–induced MKK6-p38MAPK cascade activates a monocyte differentiation program in human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor–dependent neutrophils. Second, adoptively transferred neutrophils isolated from G-CSF–pretreated mice rapidly acquired monocyte characteristics in response to inflammatory signals in vivo. Consistently, inflammatory signals led to the recruitment of osteoclast progenitor cell potential from ex vivo–isolated G-CSF–mobilized human blood neutrophils. Monocytic cell differentiation potential was retained in left-shifted band-stage neutrophils but lost in neutrophils from steady-state PB. MKK6-p38MAPK signaling in HL60 model cells led to diminishment of the transcription factor C/EBPα, which enabled the induction of a monocytic cell differentiation program. Gene profiling confirmed lineage conversion from band-stage neutrophils to monocytic cells. Therefore, inflammatory signals relayed by the MKK6-p38MAPK cascade induce monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils. PMID:25214442

  12. Dynamic NETosis is Carried Out by Live Neutrophils in Human and Mouse Bacterial Abscesses and During Severe Gram-Positive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yipp, Bryan G.; Petri, Björn; Salina, Davide; Jenne, Craig N.; Scott, Brittney N. V.; Zbytnuik, Lori D.; Pittman, Keir; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Wu, Kaiyu; Meijndert, H. Christopher; Malawista, Stephen E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, Anne; Zhang, Kunyan; Conly, John; Kubes, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released, as neutrophils die in vitro, in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap for invasive microbes to exploit. Functional neutrophils undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live PMN in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMN developed diffuse decondensed nuclei ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei displayed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A combined requirement of Tlr2 and complement mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally live human PMN developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection, non-cell death NETosis occurs in vivo during Gram-positive infection in mice and humans. PMID:22922410

  13. Imaging Electrical Stimulation of the Human Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Sonya; Suh, Minah; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2004-03-01

    The intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is a change in light reflectance from neural tissue that correlates spatially with electrophysiological activity. Depending on the wavelength of incident light, the IOS reveals different physiological changes in the tissue. In order for the IOS to be applicable to problems such as the intraoperative brain mapping, it is critical to determine which wavelengths of incident light provide optimal information about the time course and spatial localization of the underlying activity. We performed intraoperative imaging of the human cortex during direct electrical stimulation, with illumination at 546 nm (corresponding mainly to blood flow) and 605 nm (corresponding to the oxy/deoxy ratio of hemoglobin). Incident light at 546 nm showed a much larger reflectance change than orange light; at 605 nm an initial reflectance change was observed which may correspond to the ``initial dip'' observed in BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI imaging, followed by a large inverse reflectance signal which may correlate closely with the BOLD fMRI signal itself.

  14. Sulfite-mediated oxidation of myeloperoxidase to a free radical: immuno-spin trapping detection in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B; Lardinois, Olivier M; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Steinckwich, Natacha; Deterding, Leesa J; Garantziotis, Stavros; Mason, Ronald P

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies focused on catalyzed oxidation of (bi)sulfite, leading to the formation of the reactive sulfur trioxide ((•)SO3(-)), peroxymonosulfate ((-)O3SOO(•)), and sulfate (SO4(•-)) anion radicals, which can damage target proteins and oxidize them to protein radicals. It is known that these very reactive sulfur- and oxygen-centered radicals can be formed by oxidation of (bi)sulfite by peroxidases. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme protein secreted from activated neutrophils that play a central role in host defense mechanisms, allergic reactions, and asthma, is a likely candidate for initiating the respiratory damage caused by sulfur dioxide. The objective of this study was to examine the oxidative damage caused by (bi)sulfite-derived free radicals in human neutrophils through formation of protein radicals. We used immuno-spin trapping and confocal microscopy to study the protein oxidations driven by sulfite-derived radicals. We found that the presence of sulfite can cause MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated human neutrophils. We trapped the MPO-derived radicals in situ using the nitrone spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and detected them immunologically as nitrone adducts in cells. Our present study demonstrates that myeloperoxidase initiates (bi)sulfite oxidation leading to MPO radical damage, possibly leading to (bi)sulfite-exacerbated allergic reactions.

  15. Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies identify a novel diisopropylfluorophosphate-binding protein in the lysosomes of normal human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Goldschmeding, R; van der Schoot, C E; ten Bokkel Huinink, D; Hack, C E; van den Ende, M E; Kallenberg, C G; von dem Borne, A E

    1989-11-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specifically associated with Wegener's granulomatosis were found to be directed against a saline-soluble glycoprotein triplet that migrates on SDS gels as distinct bands of Mr 29,000, 30,500, and 32,000 and is present in the azurophilic granules. This antigen was specifically recognized by all cytoplasmic-staining (C)-ANCA-positive sera from patients with Wegener's disease. C-ANCA antigen bound [3H]diisopropylfluorophosphate, which indicates that it is a serine protease, but it could clearly be distinguished from the serine proteases elastase and cathepsin G. Stimulation of cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils with FMLP induced release of C-ANCA antigen. This indicates that in vivo C-ANCA might interact with the C-ANCA antigen after its release upon inflammatory stimulation. We further demonstrate that in some perinuclear staining (P-ANCA) patients' sera autoantibodies against other myeloid lysosomal enzymes can be detected, such as antimyeloperoxidase and antielastase. C-ANCA and P-ANCA thus represent a novel class of autoantibodies directed against myeloid lysosomal enzymes. The originally described Wegener-specific C-ANCA show an apparently uniform specificity for the 29,000 serine protease. In contrast, P-ANCA may recognize myeloperoxidase as well as elastase and/or other antigens.

  16. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Induces NADPH-Oxidase Activity in Human Neutrophils by Interaction with Mobilizable Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a lectin with specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid, was investigated with respect to its ability to activate the NADPH-oxidase of in vivo-exudated neutrophils (obtained from a skin chamber), and the activity was compared to that of peripheral blood neutrophils. The exudate cells responded to WGA, by both releasing reactive oxygen species into the extracellular milieu and producing oxygen metabolites intracellularly. The peripheral blood cells were unresponsive. To mimic the in vivo-exuded neutrophils with regards to receptor exposure, peripheral blood neutrophils were induced to mobilize their granules and vesicles to varying degrees (in vitro priming), prior to challenge with WGA. The oxidative response to WGA increased with increasing levels of granule mobilization, and the receptor(s) could be shown to reside in the secretory vesicles and/or the gelatinase granules in resting neutrophils. Several WGA-binding glycoproteins were detected in subcellular fractions containing these organelles. The extra- and intracellular NADPH-oxidase responses showed differences in sialic acid dependency, indicating that these two responses are mediated by different receptor structures. PMID:10377127

  17. Attachment to fibronectin or vitronectin makes human neutrophil migration sensitive to alterations in cytosolic free calcium concentration

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, appear to be required for the migration of human neutrophils on poly-D- lysine-coated glass in the presence of dilute serum (Marks, P. W., and F. R. Maxfield. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:43-52). In contrast, no requirement for [Ca2+]i transients exists when neutrophils migrate on albumin-coated glass in the absence of serum. To determine the mechanism that necessitates [Ca2+]i transients on poly-D-lysine in the presence of serum, migration was examined on substrates consisting of purified adhesive glycoproteins. In the absence of external Ca2+, a treatment which causes the cessation of [Ca2+]i transients, migration on fibronectin (fn) and vitronectin (vn) was significantly inhibited. Migration was also inhibited in Ca2(+)-buffered cells on these substrates, indicating that this effect was the result of an alteration of [Ca2+]i. In the absence of external Ca2+, the inhibition of migration on fn or vn was more pronounced when soluble fn or vn was added to cells migrating on these substrates. This effect of soluble adhesive glycoprotein was specific: in the absence of external Ca2+, soluble fn did not affect the migration of cells on vn, and soluble vn did not affect the migration on fn. No additional inhibition of migration was observed in Ca2(+)-buffered cells with the addition of soluble adhesive glycoprotein. These data indicate that [Ca2+]i transients are involved in continued migration of human neutrophils on fn or vn, proteins which are part of the extracellular matrix that neutrophils encounter in vivo. PMID:1702443

  18. Thalidomide inhibits granulocyte responses in healthy humans after ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Juffermans, N P; Verbon, A; Schultz, M J; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; Speelman, P; van der Poll, T

    2001-05-01

    Ingestion of thalidomide was associated with a reduction in the upregulation of the granulocyte activation marker CD11b and a reduced capacity to release elastase and lactoferrin after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. A single oral dose of thalidomide attenuates neutrophil activation upon ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

  19. Comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analysis of human neutrophil elastase inhibition by pyridone-containing trifluoromethylketones.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, C; Pastor, M; Pérez, C; Gago, F

    2001-12-01

    The complexes of human neutrophil elastase with a series of 40 N3-substituted trifluoromethylketone-based pyridone inhibitors have been modelled. The series spans three orders of magnitude in inhibition constants despite the fact that it was originally developed in an attempt to improve the oral activity of a lead compound. Ligand-receptor interaction energies calculated using molecular mechanics did not correlate well with the experimental activities. A good correlation with activity was found, however, when a COMBINE analysis of the same data was carried out, which allowed a quantitative interpretation of the modelled complexes. The essence of this method is to partition the ligand-receptor interaction energies into individual residue-based van der Waals and electrostatic contributions, and to subject the resulting energy matrix to partial least squares analysis. Incorporation of two additional descriptors representing the electrostatic energy contributions to the partial desolvation of both the receptor and the ligands improved the QSAR model, as did the replacement of the distance-dependent electrostatic contributions with solvent-screened electrostatic interactions calculated by numerically solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The model was validated both internally (cross-validation) and externally, using a set of twelve 6-phenyl-pyridopyrimidine analogs. The analysis reveals the subtle interplay of binding forces which occurs within the enzyme active site and provides objective information that can be interpreted in the light of the receptor structure. This information, gained from a series of real compounds, can be easily translated into 3D real or virtual database queries in the search for more active derivatives.

  20. Cellular Uptake of Two Fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghaffar, H.; Vazifeh, D.; Labro, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed the cellular accumulation of two new fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro. Both compounds were rapidly taken up by PMN, with a cellular-to-extracellular concentration ratio (C/E) of about 141 (HMR 3562) and 117 (HMR 3787) at 5 min, and this was followed by a plateau at 60 to 180 min, with a C/E of >300 at 180 min. Both ketolides were mainly located in PMN granules (about 75%) and egressed slowly from loaded cells (about 40% at 60 min), owing to avid reuptake. Uptake was moderately sensitive to external pH, and activation energy was also moderate (about 70 kJ/mol). As with other macrolides and ketolides, the existence of an active transport system was suggested by (i) the strong interindividual variability in uptake kinetics, suggesting variability in the number or activity of a transport protein; (ii) the saturation kinetics characteristic of a carrier-mediated transport system (Vmax, about 2,300 ng/2.5 × 106 PMN/5 min; Km, about 50 μg/ml); (iii) the inhibitory effects of Ni2+ (a blocker of the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger), phorbol myristate acetate (a protein kinase C activator), and H89 (a protein kinase A inhibitor). Although these two ketolides are more related to HMR 3647 (telithromycin), it is interesting that the presence of a fluoride gave these molecules a cellular pharmacokinetics more like those of HMR 3004 than those of HMR 3647. The macrolide transport system has not been yet elucidated, but our data confirm that, despite variations in chemical structure, all erythromycin A derivatives share a transmembrane transport system. PMID:11557472

  1. Human neutrophil antigen profiles in Banjar, Bugis, Champa, Jawa and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Manaf, Siti M.; NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z.A.; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Norazmi, Mohd N.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Edinur, Hisham A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human neutrophil antigens (HNA) are polymorphic and immunogenic proteins involved in the pathogenesis of neonatal alloimmune neutropenia, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-related alloimmune neutropenia. The characterisation of HNA at a population level is important for predicting the risk of alloimmunisation associated with blood transfusion and gestation and for anthropological studies. Materials and methods Blood samples from 192 healthy, unrelated Malays were collected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (HNA-1, -3, -4) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (HNA-5). The group comprised 30 Banjar, 37 Bugis, 51 Champa, 39 Jawa and 35 Kelantan Malays. Results The most common HNA alleles in the Malays studied were HNA-1a (0.641–0.765), -3a (0.676–0.867), -4a (0.943–1.000) and -5a (0.529–0.910). According to principal coordinate plots constructed using HNA allele frequencies, the Malay sub-ethnic groups are closely related and grouped together with other Asian populations. The risks of TRALI or neonatal neutropenia were not increased for subjects with HNA-1, -3 and -4 loci even for donor and recipient or pairs from different Malay sub-ethnic groups. Nonetheless, our estimates showed significantly higher risks of HNA alloimmunisation during pregnancy and transfusion between Malays and other genetically differentiated populations such as Africans and Europeans. Discussion This study reports HNA allele and genotype frequencies for the five Malay sub-ethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia for the first time. These Malay sub-ethnic groups show closer genetic relationships with other Asian populations than with Europeans and Africans. The distributions of HNA alleles in other lineages of people living in Malaysia (e.g. Chinese, Indian and Orang Asli) would be an interesting subject for future study. PMID:26057487

  2. Rabbit neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) activates both CXCR1 and CXCR2 and is the functional homologue for human CXCL6.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Struyf, Sofie; Wuyts, Anja; Weyler, Myke; Loos, Tamara; Gijsbers, Klara; Gouwy, Mieke; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo

    2004-11-15

    Neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) is a rabbit CXC chemokine with activating and chemotactic properties on neutrophilic granulocytes. Although its selective activity on neutrophils is demonstrated, its interactions with specific chemokine receptors are not defined. For further functional characterization, NCP was chemically synthesized and was found to be equipotent as natural NCP in neutrophil chemotaxis. To identify its human homologue, we separately expressed two potential rabbit NCP receptors (CXCR1 and CXCR2) in Jurkat cells. Pure synthetic NCP was equally efficient to promote chemotaxis through either rabbit CXCR1 or CXCR2. Moreover, chemotaxis assays on rabbit CXCR1 and CXCR2 transfectants showed that NCP uses the same receptors as interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major rabbit CXC chemokine, but not rabbit GROalpha, which only recognized CXCR2. In addition, specific inhibitors for CXCR1 or CXCR2 reduced rabbit neutrophil chemotaxis induced by NCP and rabbit IL-8. Furthermore, NCP and the structurally related human CXCR1/CXCR2 agonist CXCL6/GCP-2 (granulocyte chemotactic protein-2) cross-desensitized each other in intracellular calcium release assays on human neutrophils, further indicating that both chemokines share the same receptors. The inflammatory role of NCP was also evidenced by its potent granulocytosis inducing capacity in rabbits upon systemic administration. This study provides in vitro and in vivo evidences that NCP is the functional rabbit homologue for human CXCL6/GCP-2 rather than the most related CXCR2 agonist CXCL5/ENA-78 (epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78). It is concluded that the rabbit is a better model to study human neutrophil activation compared to mice, which lack CXCL8/IL-8.

  3. Complement fragments C3b and iC3b coupled to latex induce a respiratory burst in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, M; Weening, R S; Hack, C E; Roos, D

    1990-02-01

    The complement fragments C3b and iC3b were purified from human serum by affinity chromatography with Sepharose-coupled monoclonal antibody against the C3d region of C3. The resulting preparations were more than 95% pure and contained less than 0.1% native IgG. Purified C3b and iC3b were coupled to latex beads (0.8 micron diameter) by means of F(ab')2 fragments of monoclonal antibodies against the beta chain or the C3d region of C3, thus orienting the C3b and the iC3b on the latex with the C3b- and iC3b-specific regions outwards. These particles were found to activate the respiratory burst of freshly isolated human neutrophils to 20-30% of the maximal capacity. Latex particles randomly coated with C3b or iC3b were about 3 times less stimulatory. C3b, iC3b and IgG coupled to latex in an oriented fashion were about equally effective in stimulating the respiratory burst. Neutrophils from a patient with a total deficiency of CR3 responded normally to C3b-coated latex but did not respond to iC3b-coated latex. A monoclonal antibody against the alpha chain of CR3 inhibited the activation by iC3b-coated latex and a polyclonal antibody against CR1 partially inhibited the activation by C3b-coated latex. We found an additive effect between IgG-coated latex and C3b-coated latex, regardless of the presence of IgG and C3b on the same particle or on different particles. Thus, binding of ligands to either CR1 or CR3 per se is sufficient to induce an activating signal to the NADPH oxidase in human neutrophils.

  4. Effects of exogenous arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids on the generation of 5-lipoxygenase pathway products by ionophore-activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T H; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Shih, C; Corey, E J; Lewis, R A; Austen, K F

    1984-01-01

    Exogenous eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DCHA) have been compared with exogenous arachidonic acid for their capacity to modulate the oxidative metabolism of membrane-derived arachidonic acid by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in ionophore-activated human neutrophils and for their suitability as parallel substrates in this pathway. The products from specific 14C- or 3H-labeled substrates were isolated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and were identified by elution of radiolabel at the retention times of the appropriate synthetic standards. Each product was also characterized by its ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum, and 7-hydroxy-DCHA was defined in addition by analysis of its mass spectrum. The metabolites, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-leukotriene B5 diastereoisomers, leukotriene B5 (LTB5), and 7-hydroxy-DCHA were quantitated by integrated UV absorbance during resolution by RP-HPLC. LTB4 and LTB5 were also quantitated by radioimmunoassay of the eluate fractions, and leukotrienes C4 and C5 (LTC4 and LTC5, respectively) were quantitated by radioimmunoassay alone. None of the unlabeled exogenous fatty acids (5-40 micrograms/ml) altered the release of radioactivity from [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled, ionophore-activated neutrophils. The metabolism of 5 and 10 micrograms/ml of exogenous EPA by ionophore-activated, [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled neutrophils not only generated 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB5, LTB5, and LTC5, but also stimulated the formation of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, and LTC4 from membrane-derived arachidonic acid. In contrast, LTB4 production was diminished throughout the EPA dose-response, beginning at 5 micrograms/ml EPA and reaching 50% suppression at 10 micrograms/ml and 84% suppression at 40 micrograms/ml. The selective decrease in extracellular LTB4

  5. Cationic surfactants in the form of nanoparticles and micelles elicit different human neutrophil responses: a toxicological study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Sung, Calvin T; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-02-01

    Cationic surfactants are an ingredient commonly incorporated into nanoparticles for clinical practicability; however, the toxicity of cationic surfactants in nanoparticles is not fully elucidated. We aimed to evaluate the inflammatory responses of cationic nanobubbles and micelles in human neutrophils. Soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate (SME) and hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) are the two cationic surfactants employed in this study. The zeta potential of CTAB nanobubbles was 80 mV, which was the highest among all formulations. Nanobubbles, without cationic surfactants, showed no cytotoxic effects on neutrophils in terms of inflammatory responses. Cationic nanobubbles caused a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of degranulation (elastase release) and membrane damage (release of lactate dehydrogenase, LDH). Among all nanoparticles and micelles, CTAB-containing nanosystems showed the greatest inflammatory responses. A CTAB nanobubble diluent (1/150) increased the LDH release 80-fold. Propidium iodide staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) verified cell death and morphological change of neutrophils treated by CTAB nanobubbles. SME, in a micelle form, strengthened the inflammatory response more than SME-loaded nanobubbles. Membrane interaction and subsequent Ca(2+) influx were the mechanisms that triggered inflammation. The information obtained from this work is beneficial in designing nanoparticulate formulations for balancing clinical activity and toxicity. PMID:24246197

  6. Formation of the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin from apo-obelin and mRNA inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, A K; Patel, A K; Razavi, Z S; McCapra, F

    1988-01-01

    1. A method has been developed to incorporate the apoprotein of the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin, and mRNA purified from the hydroid Obelia, into the cytoplasm of intact human neutrophils. This was based on internal release from pH-sensitive immunoliposomes taken up initially by phagocytosis. 2. Addition of the prosthetic group of obelin, coelenterazine, to these cells containing apo-obelin or Obelia mRNA resulted in formation of active Ca2+-activated obelin. 3. The obelin formed within the neutrophils responded to the chemotactic peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (1 microM) and to the membrane attack complex of complement (C5B6789n). 4. The formation of the apo-obelin from mRNA within neutrophils was inhibited by over 80% in the absence of added amino acids, and by over 90% by the protein-synthesis inhibitor puromycin (100 micrograms/ml). 5. The translation of Obelia mRNA inside cells provides a method for circumventing consumption of Ca2+-activated photoproteins during cell activation or injury, and for monitoring protein synthesis in living cells. PMID:3421897

  7. Human neutrophils are activated by a peptide fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin B presumably via formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Goy, Sebastian D; Olling, Alexandra; Neumann, Detlef; Pich, Andreas; Gerhard, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile may induce antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and, in severe cases, pseudomembranous colitis characterized by tremendous neutrophil infiltration. All symptoms are caused by two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. We describe here the activation of isolated human blood neutrophils by TcdB and, moreover, by toxin fragments generated by limited proteolytical digestion. Kinetics and profiles of TcdB-induced rise in intracellular-free Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production were similar to that induced by fMLF, which activates the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) recognizing formylated bacterial peptide sequences. Transfection assays with the FPR-1 isoform hFPR26 in HEK293 cells, heterologous desensitization experiments and FPR inhibition via cyclosporine H strongly suggest activation of cells via FPR-1. Domain analyses revealed that the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB is a potent activator of FPR pointing towards an additional mechanism that might contribute to pathogenesis. This pro-inflammatory ligand effect can be triggered even by cleaved and, thus, non-cytotoxic toxin. In summary, we report (i) a ligand effect on neutrophils as completely new molecular mode of action, (ii) pathogenic potential of truncated or proteolytically cleaved 'non-cytotoxic' fragments and (iii) an interaction of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain instead of the C-terminal receptor binding domain of TcdB with target cells. PMID:25529763

  8. Early production of human neutrophils and platelets posttransplant is severely compromised by growth factor exposure.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul H; Knapp, David J H F; Beer, Philip A; MacAldaz, Margarita; Rabu, Gabrielle; Cheung, Alice M S; Wei, Lisa; Eaves, Connie J

    2016-07-01

    The critical human cells that produce neutrophils and platelets within 3 weeks in recipients of hematopoietic transplants are thought to produce these mature blood cells with the same kinetics in sublethally irradiated immunodeficient mice. Quantification of their numbers indicates their relative underrepresentation in cord blood (CB), likely explaining the clinical inadequacy of single CB units in rescuing hematopoiesis in myelosuppressed adult patients. We here describe that exposure of CD34(+) CB cells ex vivo to growth factors that markedly expand their numbers and colony-forming cell content also rapidly (within 24 hours) produce a significant and sustained net loss of their original short-term repopulating activity. This loss of short-term in vivo repopulating activity affects early platelet production faster than early neutrophil output, consistent with their origin from distinct input populations. Moreover, this growth factor-mediated loss is not abrogated by published strategies to increase progenitor homing despite evidence that the effect on rapid neutrophil production is paralleled in time and amount by a loss of the homing of their committed clonogenic precursors to the bone marrow. These results highlight the inability of in vitro or phenotype assessments to reliably predict clinical engraftment kinetics of cultured CB cells. PMID:27090409

  9. Phenol-soluble modulin α4 mediates Staphylococcus aureus-associated vascular leakage by stimulating heparin-binding protein release from neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    li, Lin; Pian, Yaya; Chen, Shaolong; Hao, Huaijie; Zheng, Yuling; Zhu, Li; Xu, Bin; Liu, Keke; Li, Min; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Vascular leakage frequently occurs in patients with severe Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the mechanism underlying S. aureus infection-induced vascular leakage remains unclear. Here, we identified the S. aureus virulence factor phenol-soluble modulin (PSM)α4 from the culture supernatant of strain USA300 as a stimulator of heparin-binding protein (HBP) release from polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and demonstrated that PSMα4-induced HBP release from PMNs leads to vascular leakage. PSMα4 appeared less cytolytic than PSMα1–3 and was insensitive to lipoproteins; it significantly increased myeloperoxidase and elastase release from PMNs and cell surface CD63 expression in PMNs. PSMα4-induced HBP release required formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and depended on Ca2+ influx and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Thus, PSMα4 may stimulate HBP release by activating FPR2 and PI3K to initiate PMN degranulation. PSMα4-induced HBP release from PMNs increased endothelial cell monolayer permeability in vitro and induced vascular leakage in mice. This novel function of PSMα4 may contribute to the pathogenesis of S. aureus and may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27383625

  10. Alkalinizing the intralysosomal pH inhibits degranulation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Klempner, M S; Styrt, B

    1983-01-01

    Degranulation of lysosomes is one of the consequences of neutrophil activation. Regulatory mechanisms of lysosomal secretion are thought to be localized largely in the plasma membrane and cytosol, with the lysosome playing a passive role in secretion. Recent evidence indicates that the intralysosomal pH is highly acidic (pH congruent to 5.5) and is maintained by active transport of H+. We investigated whether changes in the intralysosomal pH altered the availability of lysosomes for exocytosis. Intralysosomal pH in intact neutrophils was monitored with the weakly basic fluorescent probe, 9-aminoacridine (9AA). The weak bases, methylamine, chloroquine, clindamycin, propanolol, and ammonium chloride (0.1-50 mM), caused an alkalinization of the intralysosomal pH as determined by reversal of quenching of 9AA fluorescence. Similarly, each of the weak bases, including ammonium chloride, methylamine, chloroquine, ethylamine, propylamine, propanolol, clindamycin, and dansylcadaverine, inhibited neutrophil degranulation in response to the calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol myristate acetate, or the chemotactic peptide, formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine plus cytochalasin B. These studies indicate that an acid intralysosomal pH is important to the neutrophil secretory response and suggest that the lysosome may play an active part in control of degranulation. PMID:6415117

  11. Molecular Analysis of Neutrophil Differentiation from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Delineates the Kinetics of Key Regulators of Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Colin L; Teng, Ruifeng; Wang, Hongmei; Merling, Randall K; Lee, Janet; Choi, Uimook; Koontz, Sherry; Wright, Daniel G; Malech, Harry L

    2016-06-01

    In vitro generation of mature neutrophils from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) requires hematopoietic progenitor development followed by myeloid differentiation. The purpose of our studies was to extensively characterize this process, focusing on the critical window of development between hemogenic endothelium, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and myeloid commitment, to identify associated regulators and markers that might enable the stem cell field to improve the efficiency and efficacy of iPSC hematopoiesis. We utilized a four-stage differentiation protocol involving: embryoid body (EB) formation (stage-1); EB culture with hematopoietic cytokines (stage-2); HSPC expansion (stage-3); and neutrophil maturation (stage-4). CD34(+) CD45(-) putative hemogenic endothelial cells were observed in stage-3 cultures, and expressed VEGFR-2/Flk-1/KDR and VE-cadherin endothelial markers, GATA-2, AML1/RUNX1, and SCL/TAL1 transcription factors, and endothelial/HSPC-associated microRNAs miR-24, miR-125a-3p, miR-126/126*, and miR-155. Upon further culture, CD34(+) CD45(-) cells generated CD34(+) CD45(+) HSPCs that produced hematopoietic CFUs. Mid-stage-3 CD34(+) CD45(+) HSPCs exhibited increased expression of GATA-2, AML1/RUNX1, SCL/TAL1, C/EBPα, and PU.1 transcription factors, but exhibited decreased expression of HSPC-associated microRNAs, and failed to engraft in immune-deficient mice. Mid-stage-3 CD34(-) CD45(+) cells maintained PU.1 expression and exhibited increased expression of hematopoiesis-associated miR-142-3p/5p and a trend towards increased miR-223 expression, indicating myeloid commitment. By late Stage-4, increased CD15, CD16b, and C/EBPɛ expression were observed, with 25%-65% of cells exhibiting morphology and functions of mature neutrophils. These studies demonstrate that hematopoiesis and neutrophil differentiation from human iPSCs recapitulates many features of embryonic hematopoiesis and neutrophil production in marrow, but reveals

  12. Beta 2 integrin-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the FGR protein tyrosine kinase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of adherent human neutrophils (PMN) with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) triggers protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Fuortes, M., W. W. Jin, and C. Nathan. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:777-784). We investigated the dependence of this response on beta 2 integrins by using PMN isolated from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, which do not express beta 2 integrins, and by plating PMN on surface bound anti-beta 2 (CD18) antibodies. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in PMN plated on fibrinogen and this phosphorylation was enhanced by TNF. Triggering of protein tyrosine phosphorylation did not occur in LAD PMN plated on fibrinogen either in the absence or the presence of TNF. Surface bound anti-CD18, but not isotype-matched anti- Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, antibodies triggered tyrosine phosphorylation in normal, but not in LAD PMN. As the major tyrosine phosphorylated proteins we found in our assay conditions migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 56-60 kD, we investigated whether beta 2 integrins are implicated in activation of members of the src family of intracellular protein-tyrosine kinases. We found that the fgr protein-tyrosine kinase (p58fgr) activity, and its extent of phosphorylation in tyrosine, in PMN adherent to fibrinogen, was enhanced by TNF. Activation of p58fgr in response to TNF was evident within 10 min of treatment and increased with times up to 30 min. Also other activators of beta 2 integrins such as phorbol-12- myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced activation of p58fgr kinase activity. Activation of p58fgr kinase activity, and phosphorylation in tyrosine, did not occur in PMN of a LAD patient in response to TNF. Soluble anti-CD18, but not anti-Class I MHC antigens, antibodies inhibited activation of p58fgr kinase activity in PMN adherent to fibrinogen in response to TNF, PMA, and FMLP. These findings demonstrate that, in PMN, beta 2 integrins

  13. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, María A; Carretta, María D; Teuber, Stefanie E; Zárate, Cristian; Cárcamo, Leonardo; Concha, Ilona I; Burgos, Rafael A

    2015-01-01

    N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor) inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils. PMID:26634216

  14. Comparison of alkylacylglycerol vs. diacylglycerol as activators of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cytosolic phospholipase A2 in human neutrophil priming.

    PubMed

    Nixon, A B; Seeds, M C; Bass, D A; Smitherman, P K; O'Flaherty, J T; Daniel, L W; Wykle, R L

    1997-08-16

    In human neutrophils, the choline-containing phosphoglycerides contain almost equal amounts of alkylacyl- and diacyl-linked subclasses. In contrast to phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis which yields diacylglycerol, hydrolysis of choline-containing phosphoglycerides by phospholipase D coupled with phosphohydrolase yields both alkylacyl- and diacylglycerol. While diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, alkylacylglycerol does not, and its role is unclear. Yet previous studies have shown that exogenous alkylacyl- and diacylglycerols can prime for the release of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) in intact neutrophils stimulated by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. We have now examined the effects of both diacylglycerol (1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; OAG) and alkylacylglycerol (1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetylglycerol; EAG) on the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and the 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in human neutrophils. We observed that while OAG could effectively activate p42 and p44 MAP kinases along with cPLA2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, EAG could not. A novel p40 MAP kinase isoform is also present and activated in response to OAG treatment; the behavior of this MAP kinase isoform is discussed. The activation of cPLA2 and MAP kinase by 20 microM OAG could be inhibited by pretreatment with 1 microM GF-109203X, a selective inhibitor of protein kinase C. Although only OAG activated cPLA2, both OAG and EAG primed for the release of AA mass as determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The priming of AA release by OAG may be explained by the phosphorylation of cPLA2 through the activation of protein kinase C linked to MAP kinase. However, priming by EAG appears to involve a separate mechanism that is dependent on a different PLA2. Our results support a role for phospholipase D-derived products modulating the activation of cPLA2, further supporting the idea of cross-talk among various phospholipases.

  15. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  16. Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, H; Orr, S K; Dalli, J; Serhan, C N

    2016-05-01

    Human milk contains nutrients and bioactive products relevant to infant development and immunological protection. Here, we investigated the proresolving properties of milk using human milk lipid mediator isolates (HLMIs) and determined their impact on resolution programs in vivo and with human macrophages. HLMIs reduced the maximum neutrophil numbers (14.6±1.2 × 10(6)-11.0±1.0 × 10(6) cells per exudate) and shortened the resolution interval (Ri; 50% neutrophil reduction) by 54% compared with peritonitis. Using rigorous liquid-chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS)-based lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomics, we demonstrated that human milk possesses a proresolving LM-specialized proresolving mediator (LM-SPM) signature profile, containing SPMs (e.g. resolvins (Rv), protectins (PDs), maresins (MaRs), and lipoxins (LXs)) at bioactive levels (pico-nanomolar concentrations) that enhanced human macrophage efferocytosis and bacterial containment. SPMs identified in human milk included D-series Rvs (e.g., RvD1, RvD2, RvD3, AT-RvD3, and RvD4), PD1, MaR1, E-series Rvs (e.g. RvE1, RvE2, and RvE3), and LXs (LXA4 and LXB4). Of the SPMs identified in human milk, RvD2 and MaR1 (50 ng per mouse) individually shortened Ri by ∼75%. Milk from mastitis gave higher leukotriene B4 and prostanoids and lower SPM levels. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that human milk has proresolving actions via comprehensive LM-SPM profiling, describing a potentially novel mechanism in maternal-infant biochemical imprinting.

  17. Human Milk Proresolving Mediators Stimulate Resolution of Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Serhan, Charles N

    2015-01-01

    Human milk contains nutrients and bioactive products relevant to infant development and immunological protection. Here, we investigated the pro-resolving properties of milk using human milk lipid mediator isolates (HLMI) and determined their impact on resolution programs in vivo and with human macrophages. HLMI reduced maximum neutrophil numbers (14.6±1.2×106 to 11.0±1.0×106 cells/exudate) and shortened the resolution interval (Ri; 50% neutrophil reduction) 54% compared to peritonitis. Using rigorous liquid-chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS)-based lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomics, we demonstrated that human milk possesses a proresolving LM-SPM signature profile, containing specialized proresolving mediators (SPM; e.g. resolvins, protectins, maresins and lipoxins) at bioactive levels (pico-nanomolar concentrations) that enhanced human macrophage efferocytosis and bacterial containment. SPM identified in human milk included D-series resolvins, (e.g. Resolvin (Rv) D1, RvD2, RvD3, AT-RvD3 and RvD4), Protectin (PD)1, Maresin (MaR)1, E-series resolvins (e.g. RvE1, RvE2 and RvE3) and lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4). Of the SPM identified in human milk, RvD2 and MaR1 (50 ng/mouse) individually shortened Ri ~75%. Milk from mastitis gave higher LTB4 and prostanoids and lower SPM levels. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that human milk has pro-resolving actions via comprehensive LM-SPM profiling, describing a potentially novel mechanism in maternal-infant biochemical imprinting. PMID:26462421

  18. Ultrastructural studies on the effect of tumor necrosis factor on the interaction of neutrophils and Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Michelson, M K; Henderson, W R; Chi, E Y; Fritsche, T R; Klebanoff, S J

    1990-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the common etiologic agent of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). We investigated the interaction of human neutrophils with Naegleria trophozoites and examined the effect of neutrophil stimulation by the recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on this interaction. As indicated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, TNF stimulated the adherence of neutrophils to N. fowleri with destruction of the ameba. Neutrophil iodination, an indirect measure of stimulation, increased from 0.81 +/- 0.23 nmol/10(7) cells/hr to 2.41 +/- 0.62 nmol/10(7) cells/hr following the addition of TNF to the neutrophil-N. fowleri mixture (P less than 0.05). This was independent of complement or specific immunoglobulin. Ingestion of neutrophils by Naegleria trophozoites was observed following more prolonged incubation, particularly in the absence of TNF. These findings suggest a role for TNF-mediated destruction of Naegleria trophozoites by neutrophils in host defense, and that ingestion of host neutrophils by Naegleria trophozoites may represent a virulence factor.

  19. The superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase of human neutrophils is electrogenic and associated with an H+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L M; Chappell, J B; Jones, O T

    1987-01-01

    The membrane potential of cytoplasts, derived from human neutrophils, was depolarized by the activation of the superoxide-generating NADPH-dependent oxidase. The extent of the depolarization was inhibited by diphenylene iodonium and was therefore due directly to the activity of the oxidase, which must be electrogenic. The extent of the depolarization was influenced by alteration of the delta pH across the cytoplast membrane, indicating that the outward translocation of H+ eventually compensates for superoxide generation. The depolarization of the potential is enhanced by Cd2+, a blocker of H+ currents, suggesting that the compensatory movement is via an H+ channel. PMID:2825632

  20. Effect of venoruton on hypoxic stress-induced neurotoxicity in mice and oxygen free radical generation by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V K; Sethi, A K; Garg, S K; Ganguly, N K; Kulkarni, S K

    1989-01-01

    Venoruton offers a protection against hypoxic stress-induced neurotoxicity (convulsions and death) in mice. It also inhibits free radical generation, since it produces a concentration-dependent (5-160 micrograms/10(6) cells/ml) decrease of chemiluminescence response from human neutrophils. The maximum inhibition was observed at 140 micrograms/10(6) cells/ml. The in vivo protective effect against hypoxic stress-induced neurotoxicity has been correlated to the inhibitory action of venoruton on oxygen free radical generation.

  1. Dissociations in the Effects of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists on cAMP Formation and Superoxide Production in Human Neutrophils: Support for the Concept of Functional Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Brunskole Hummel, Irena; Reinartz, Michael T.; Kälble, Solveig; Burhenne, Heike; Schwede, Frank; Buschauer, Armin; Seifert, Roland

    2013-01-01

    In neutrophils, activation of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a Gs-coupled receptor, inhibits inflammatory responses, which could be therapeutically exploited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various β2AR ligands on adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced superoxide anion (O2•−) production in human neutrophils and to probe the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations (also referred to as functional selectivity or biased signaling) in a native cell system. This is an important question because so far, evidence for functional selectivity has been predominantly obtained with recombinant systems, due to the inherent difficulties to genetically manipulate human native cells. cAMP concentration was determined by HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry, and O2•− formation was assessed by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome c. β2AR agonists were generally more potent in inhibiting fMLP-induced O2•− production than in stimulating cAMP accumulation. (−)-Ephedrine and dichloroisoproterenol were devoid of any agonistic activity in the cAMP assay, but partially inhibited fMLP-induced O2•− production. Moreover, (−)-adrenaline was equi-efficacious in both assays whereas the efficacy of salbutamol was more than two-fold higher in the O2•− assay. Functional selectivity was visualized by deviations of ligand potencies and efficacies from linear correlations for various parameters. We obtained no evidence for involvement of protein kinase A in the inhibition of fMLP-induced O2•− production after β2AR-stimulation although cAMP-increasing substances inhibited O2•− production. Taken together, our data corroborate the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations with unique signaling capabilities in native human cells and suggest that the β2AR inhibits O2•− production in a cAMP-independent manner. PMID

  2. Aggregation of complement receptors on human neutrophils in the absence of ligand

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    C3bi receptors (CR3) on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) bind ligand-coated particles and promote their ingestion. The binding activity of CR3 is not constitutive but is transiently enabled by phorbol esters (Wright, S. D., and B. D. Meyer, 1986, J. Immunol. 136:1759-1764). Our observations indicate that the capacity of CR3 to bind ligand is tightly correlated with the degree of ligand-independent aggregation of the receptor in the plane of the membrane. Fixed PMN were labeled with anti-CR3 monoclonal antibodies and streptavidin colloidal gold before viewing in the electron microscope either en face or in thin section. On unstimulated PMN, gold particles marking CR3 were dispersed randomly. Stimulation of PMN for 25 min with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) dramatically enhances binding of C3bi-coated particles, and the CR3 on such stimulated cells was observed in clusters containing more than six gold particles. CR3 was not aggregated over coated pits. After 50 min in PMA, the binding activity of CR3 falls, and the distribution of CR3 was again observed to be disperse. If a hydrophilic phorbol ester was washed away after a 20-min stimulation, binding activity remains elevated for at least 50 min, and CR3 remained aggregated. Thus, clustering of CR3 was temporally correlated with its ability to bind ligand and initiate phagocytosis. Unlike CR3, Fc receptors and HLA did not exhibit changes in their aggregation state in response to PMA. Treating PMN with formyl- methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, which enhances expression of CR3 but not its function, did not lead to aggregation of CR3. These observations suggest that a clustered configuration is a precondition necessary for binding ligand and signaling phagocytosis. PMID:2958480

  3. Anesthetic agent propofol inhibits myeloid differentiation factor 88-dependent and independent signaling and mitigates lipopolysaccharide-mediated reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuli; Lv, Fei; Fang, Bo; Liu, Song; Lv, Huangwei; He, Guannan; Ma, Hong; Cao, Yaming; Wang, Yue

    2014-12-01

    Engagement of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) can activate the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/toll-interleukin-1-resistance domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) dependent pathways, inducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils. Propofol (PPF) has both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPF influences human neutrophil function is yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the influence of PPF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils. We isolated neutrophils from the peripheral blood of 10 healthy male donors. Neither 1 µg/ml LPS nor 10-150 μmol/L PPF influenced the rate of neutrophil apoptosis, but PPF significantly inhibited LPS-mediated reactive oxygen species production in a dose-dependent manner. PPF inhibited LPS-induced expression of MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and TRIF, but not the expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 or phosphorylation of p47(phox), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, particularly in the neutrophils in which MyD88 or TRIF had been silenced by siRNA. The inhibitory effect of PPF on LPS-induced activation of p47(phox), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-κB was partially antagonized by over-expression of MyD88 or TRIF in neutrophils. These observations provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of PPF. PPF reduces LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils via inhibiting expression of MyD88 and TRIF signaling. PMID:25446563

  4. A serine proteinase inhibitor isolated from Tamarindus indica seeds and its effects on the release of human neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Fook, J M S L L; Macedo, L L P; Moura, G E D D; Teixeira, F M; Oliveira, A S; Queiroz, A F S; Sales, M P

    2005-05-01

    Proteinaceous inhibitors with high inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) were found in seeds of the Tamarind tree (Tamarindus indica). A serine proteinase inhibitor denoted PG50 was purified using ammonium sulphate and acetone precipitation followed by Sephacryl S-300 and Sephadex G-50 gel filtration chromatographies. Inhibitor PG50 showed a Mr of 14.9 K on Sephadex G-50 calibrated column and a Mr of 11.6 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PG50 had selective activity while cysteine proteinases (papain and bromelain) and serine proteinases (porcine pancreatic elastase and bovine chymotrypsin) were not inhibited, it was strongly effective against serine proteinases such as bovine trypsin and isolated human neutrophil elastase. The IC50 value was determined to be 55.96 microg.mL-1. PG50 showed neither cytotoxic nor haemolytic activity on human blood cells. After pre-incubation of PG50 with cytochalasin B, the exocytosis of elastase was initiated using PAF and fMLP. PG50 exhibited different inhibition on elastase release by PAF, at 44.6% and on release by fMLP, at 28.4%. These results showed that PG50 preferentially affected elastase release by PAF stimuli and this may indicate selective inhibition on PAF receptors.

  5. The murine neutrophil NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by soluble but not particulate or crystalline agonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiwen W; Bezbradica, Jelena S; Groß, Christina J; Wall, Adam A; Sweet, Matthew J; Stow, Jennifer L; Schroder, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils express pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and regulate immune responses via PRR-dependent cytokine production. An emerging theme is that neutrophil PRRs often exhibit cell type-specific adaptations in their signalling pathways. This prompted us to examine inflammasome signalling by the PRR NLRP3 in murine neutrophils, in comparison to well-established NLRP3 signalling pathways in macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that while murine neutrophils can indeed signal via the NLRP3 inflammasome, neutrophil NLRP3 selectively responds to soluble agonists but not to the particulate/crystalline agonists that trigger NLRP3 activation in macrophages via phagolysosomal rupture. In keeping with this, alum did not trigger IL-1β production from human PMN, and the lysosomotropic peptide Leu-Leu-OMe stimulated only weak NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production from murine neutrophils, suggesting that lysosomal rupture is not a strong stimulus for NLRP3 activation in neutrophils. We validated our in vitro findings for poor neutrophil NLRP3 responses to particles in vivo, where we demonstrated that neutrophils do not significantly contribute to alum-induced IL-1β production in mice. In all, our studies highlight that myeloid cell identity and the nature of the danger signal can strongly influence signalling by a single PRR, thus shaping the nature of the resultant immune response. PMID:27062120

  6. Abnormal neutrophil-pulmonary interaction in the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of pulmonary neutrophil kinetics in humans with in vivo /sup 111/indium neutrophil scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Warshawski, F.J.; Sibbald, W.J.; Driedger, A.A.; Cheung, H.

    1986-05-01

    In the absence of direct toxins, the majority of evidence from animal models suggests that neutrophils (PMN) are necessary for the full expression of the abnormal pulmonary permeability accompanying acute microvascular lung injury. We therefore studied the role of the PMN in the human correlate of this disease, the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), by assessing the pulmonary retention of infused autologous /sup 111/Indium-labeled PMN (PMN-In). We evaluated 79 patients, prospectively categorized as: active ARDS (Aa; n = 30), active ARDS and concurrent corticosteroid therapy (As; n = 11), resolving ARDS (Ar; n = 13), sepsis without pulmonary edema (S; n = 7), and cardiac pulmonary edema (C; n = 18). This clinical separation was confirmed by retrospective analysis of associated measures of hemodynamic and respiratory dysfunction. We found that both analog scintigrams (positive/negative for diffuse pulmonary PMN-In sequestration) and computer-assisted quantitative analysis in 46 patients (T 1/2 of first hour demargination and percentage of peak activity/pixel/second remaining at 17 to 20 h) showed a significant rank order decrease in the pulmonary retention of labeled PMN-In through the Groups Aa----As----S----Ar----C. Our findings recognized aspects of in vivo PMN-In behavior that implied pathophysiologic differences between groups of critically ill patients in either the PMN themselves or in PMN-pulmonary endothelial interaction. This demonstrates the possibility of abnormal in vivo PMN-endothelial interaction in ARDS by virtue of the greater pulmonary localization of PMN in active ARDS versus resolving disease, septic non-ARDS states, and cardiac pulmonary edema.

  7. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence. PMID:26039751

  8. Enhancement of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence to plastic and endothelium by phorbol myristate acetate. Comparison with human C5a.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R. O.; Wysolmerski, R. B.; Lagunoff, D.

    1986-01-01

    The adherence of circulating neutrophils to vascular endothelium represents a necessary step in the chemotactic emigration of neutrophils to extravascular inflammatory sites. Studies of neutrophil adherence induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) were undertaken to determine the ability of a nonchemotactic neutrophil stimulus to provoke increased adherence. The authors found that the adherence of human neutrophils to plastic surfaces or confluent monolayers of endothelial cells is enhanced in a concentration-dependent fashion by exposure of neutrophils to PMA. The effect of PMA concentration (0.1-5.0 ng/ml) on increased neutrophil adherence parallels that observed for superoxide anion generation and release of lysosomal enzymes from specific granules. Whereas complement C5a-treated neutrophils exhibited a fourfold to fivefold increase in adherence to endothelial cells, PMA-treated neutrophils showed a 10-fold to 20-fold increase. The ability of PMA to cause increased neutrophil adherence to endothelium appeared to be directed primarily at the neutrophil. Pretreatment of neutrophils with PMA was as effective as coincubation in causing increased adherence to plastic surfaces or confluent cultured endothelial cells, but pretreatment of endothelial cells with PMA failed to promote neutrophil adherence. Alteration of neutrophil cytoskeletal structures by cytochalasin B treatment did not prevent subsequent PMA-stimulated neutrophil adherence. These results demonstrate that increased neutrophil adherence to surfaces can be induced by a nonchemotactic stimulus and that neutrophil adherence is independent of organized microfilaments. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:3789092

  9. The two neutrophil plasma membrane markers alkaline phosphatase and HLA class I antigen localize differently in granule-deficient cytoplasts. An ideal plasma membrane marker in human neutrophils is still lacking.

    PubMed

    Pellmé, Sara; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-08-31

    Neutrophil function relies largely on the ability of the cell to mobilize its different granules and vesicles to the cell surface and thereby expose and/or release effector molecules to the surrounding tissue. To properly identify these subcellular compartments is thus a prerequisite for studies of neutrophil physiology. A range of specific markers for the classical granules is available, but finding optimal markers for the secretory vesicles and plasma membrane has historically been more challenging. Latent and non-latent alkaline phosphatase activities are often used to distinguish these two light membrane structures, but the outcome using this technique depends on the level of cellular activation. Therefore, HLA-I was introduced some years ago as a specific, stimulation-independent marker for the plasma membrane. In this study we however report that detailed fractionation studies of neutrophil cytoplasts, lacking secretory vesicles, granules and other dense organelles, reveal that the HLA-I antigen is not only co-localizing with the plasma membrane marker ALP, but is also present in other, more dense organelles. Further, we found the mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), detecting the beta(2)-microglobulin/HLA-I complex, to be negatively influenced by uncomplexed beta(2)-microglobulin present in the specific granules and secretory vesicles, making it difficult to use HLA-I as a plasma membrane marker during maturation of for example phagolysosomes. PMID:17673253

  10. Neuroethics of deep brain stimulation for mental disorders: brain stimulation reward in humans.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hideki; Katayama, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of some deep brain stimulation (DBS) trials undertaken in the early years was the phenomenon of "brain stimulation reward (BSR)," which was first identified in rats. The animals appeared to be rewarded by pleasure caused by the stimulation of certain brain regions (reward system), such as the septal area. "Self-stimulation" experiments, in which rats were allowed to stimulate their own brain by pressing a freely accessible lever, they quickly learned lever pressing and sometimes continued to stimulate until they exhausted themselves. BSR was also observed with DBS of the septal area in humans. DBS trials in later years were undertaken on other theoretical bases, but unexpected BSR was sometimes induced by stimulation of some areas, such as the locus coeruleus complex. When BSR was induced, the subjects experienced feelings that were described as "cheerful," "alert," "good," "well-being," "comfort," "relaxation," "joy," or "satisfaction." Since the DBS procedure is equivalent to a "self-stimulation" experiment, they could become "addicted to the stimulation itself" or "compulsive about the stimulation," and stimulate themselves "for the entire day," "at maximum amplitude" and, in some instances, "into convulsions." DBS of the reward system has recently been applied to alleviate anhedonia in patients with refractory major depression. Although this approach appears promising, there remains a difficult problem: who can adjust their feelings and reward-oriented behavior within the normal range? With a self-stimulation procedure, the BSR may become uncontrollable. To develop DBS to the level of a standard therapy for mental disorders, we need to discuss "Who has the right to control the mental condition?" and "Who makes decisions" on "How much control is appropriate?" in daily life. PMID:20885119

  11. Neuroethics of deep brain stimulation for mental disorders: brain stimulation reward in humans.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hideki; Katayama, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of some deep brain stimulation (DBS) trials undertaken in the early years was the phenomenon of "brain stimulation reward (BSR)," which was first identified in rats. The animals appeared to be rewarded by pleasure caused by the stimulation of certain brain regions (reward system), such as the septal area. "Self-stimulation" experiments, in which rats were allowed to stimulate their own brain by pressing a freely accessible lever, they quickly learned lever pressing and sometimes continued to stimulate until they exhausted themselves. BSR was also observed with DBS of the septal area in humans. DBS trials in later years were undertaken on other theoretical bases, but unexpected BSR was sometimes induced by stimulation of some areas, such as the locus coeruleus complex. When BSR was induced, the subjects experienced feelings that were described as "cheerful," "alert," "good," "well-being," "comfort," "relaxation," "joy," or "satisfaction." Since the DBS procedure is equivalent to a "self-stimulation" experiment, they could become "addicted to the stimulation itself" or "compulsive about the stimulation," and stimulate themselves "for the entire day," "at maximum amplitude" and, in some instances, "into convulsions." DBS of the reward system has recently been applied to alleviate anhedonia in patients with refractory major depression. Although this approach appears promising, there remains a difficult problem: who can adjust their feelings and reward-oriented behavior within the normal range? With a self-stimulation procedure, the BSR may become uncontrollable. To develop DBS to the level of a standard therapy for mental disorders, we need to discuss "Who has the right to control the mental condition?" and "Who makes decisions" on "How much control is appropriate?" in daily life.

  12. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B.; Konrad, Peter E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients (n=7) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.23  J/cm2. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at 1.09  J/cm2 and a 2∶1 safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans. PMID:26157986

  13. Extracellular Fibrils of Pathogenic Yeast Cryptococcus gattii Are Important for Ecological Niche, Murine Virulence and Human Neutrophil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Deborah J.; Ren, Ping; Raina, Ramesh; Dong, Yimin; Behr, Melissa J.; McEwen, Bruce F.; Bowser, Samuel S.; Samsonoff, William A.; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2010-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii, an emerging fungal pathogen of humans and animals, is found on a variety of trees in tropical and temperate regions. The ecological niche and virulence of this yeast remain poorly defined. We used Arabidopsis thaliana plants and plant-derived substrates to model C. gattii in its natural habitat. Yeast cells readily colonized scratch-wounded plant leaves and formed distinctive extracellular fibrils (40–100 nm diameter ×500–3000 nm length). Extracellular fibrils were observed on live plants and plant-derived substrates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by high voltage- EM (HVEM). Only encapsulated yeast cells formed extracellular fibrils as a capsule-deficient C. gattii mutant completely lacked fibrils. Cells deficient in environmental sensing only formed disorganized extracellular fibrils as apparent from experiments with a C. gattii STE12α mutant. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were more virulent in murine model of pulmonary and systemic cryptococcosis than cells lacking fibrils. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were also significantly more resistant to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro even though these PMN produced elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These observations suggest that extracellular fibril formation could be a structural adaptation of C. gattii for cell-to-cell, cell-to-substrate and/or cell-to- phagocyte communications. Such ecological adaptation of C. gattii could play roles in enhanced virulence in mammalian hosts at least initially via inhibition of host PMN– mediated killing. PMID:20539754

  14. Thermal treatment of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) increases the antioxidant content and the inhibitory effect on human neutrophil burst.

    PubMed

    Lo Scalzo, Roberto; Fibiani, Marta; Mennella, Giuseppe; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Dal Sasso, Monica; Culici, Maria; Spallino, Alessandra; Braga, Pier Carlo

    2010-03-24

    The aim of this study was to compare the amount and activity of phytonutrients in raw, grilled, and boiled eggplant fruit using chemical measures and a biological assay of oxidative bursts in human neutrophils. The thermally treated samples showed various changes in their chemical composition (dry matter, soluble solids, acidity, and the amount of alcohol insoluble substances) due to the cooking processes and were much richer in the main phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic and caffeic acids, which are known to be antioxidants. Consequently, their free radical scavenging activity was significantly higher, especially that of superoxide anion. The biological assay of oxidative bursts from human neutrophils in the presence of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine confirmed the greater activity of extracts of the cooked eggplants with respect to raw eggplants. Successive extract dilutions showed a significant activity up to 1.25 microg/mL after cooking, while raw fruits resulted in an activity up to 10.00 microg/mL. These results showed that the thermal treatment commonly used before consumption can increase the content and biological activity of antioxidant compounds of eggplants.

  15. Alpha 1-antitrypsin Pittsburgh (Met358-->Arg) inhibits the contact pathway of intrinsic coagulation and alters the release of human neutrophil elastase during simulated extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Bischoff, R; Bauer, R; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Kucich, U; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1994-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass prolongs bleeding time, increases postoperative blood loss, and triggers activation of plasma proteolytic enzyme systems and blood cells referred to as the "whole body inflammatory response". Contact of blood with synthetic surfaces leads to qualitative and quantitative alterations in platelets, neutrophils, contact and complement systems. Contact and complement pathway proteins both induce neutrophil activation. alpha 1-antitrypsin Pittsburgh (Met358-->Arg), a mutant of alpha 1-antitrypsin, is a potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein and thrombin. We investigated whether this recombinant mutant protein inhibited platelet activation, as well as contact and/or complement-induced neutrophil activation during simulated extracorporeal circulation. Arg358 alpha 1-antitrypsin did not prevent the 34% drop in platelet count at 5 min of recirculation, did not block the 50% decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation at 120 min of recirculation, nor inhibit the release of 6.06 +/- 1.07 micrograms/ml beta-thromboglobulin at 120 min of recirculation suggesting that the inhibitor had little effect on platelet activation. However, Arg358 alpha 1-antitrypsin totally blocked kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complex formation but not C1-C1-inhibitor complex formation. Most importantly, Arg358 alpha 1-antitrypsin decreased the release of 1.11 +/- 0.16 micrograms/ml human neutrophil elastase by 43%. The attenuation of neutrophil activation in the absence of an effect on complement activation via the classical pathway, supports the concept that kallikrein is a major mediator of neutrophil degranulation during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide induces VCAM-1 expression and neutrophil adhesion to human tracheal smooth muscle cells: Involvement of Src/EGFR/PI3-K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-N.; Luo, S.-F.; Wu, C.-B.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-04-15

    In our previous study, LPS has been shown to induce vascular cell adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1) expression through MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). In addition to these pathways, the non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src), EGF receptor (EGFR), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to be implicated in the expression of several inflammatory target proteins. Here, we reported that LPS-induced up-regulation of VCAM-1 enhanced the adhesion of neutrophils onto HTSMC monolayer, which was inhibited by LY294002 and wortmannin. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases including Src, PYK2, and EGFR, which were further confirmed using specific anti-phospho-Src, PYK2, or EGFR Ab, respectively, revealed by Western blotting. LPS-stimulated Src, PYK2, EGFR, and Akt phosphorylation and VCAM-1 expression were attenuated by the inhibitors of Src (PP1), EGFR (AG1478), PI3-K (LY294002 and wortmannin), and Akt (SH-5), respectively, or transfection with siRNAs of Src or Akt and shRNA of p110. LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression was also blocked by pretreatment with curcumin (a p300 inhibitor) or transfection with p300 siRNA. LPS-stimulated Akt activation translocated into nucleus and associated with p300 and VCAM-1 promoter region was further confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This association of Akt and p300 to VCAM-1 promoter was inhibited by pretreatment with PP1, AG1478, wortmannin, and SH-5. LPS-induced p300 activation enhanced VCAM-1 promoter activity and VCAM-1 mRNA expression. These results suggested that in HTSMCs, Akt phosphorylation mediated through transactivation of Src/PYK2/EGFR promoted the transcriptional p300 activity and eventually led to VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS.

  17. Augmentation of the neutrophil response to Naegleria fowleri by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, A

    1989-01-01

    Conditioned medium from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human mononuclear leukocytes, previously shown to activate neutrophils for amoeba killing, was found to contain high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effects of human recombinant TNF-alpha on the response of human neutrophils to the pathogenic free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri was studied in vitro. The data showed that recombinant human TNF-alpha augmented the neutrophil respiratory burst (assessed by the cytochrome c reduction assay and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence assay) in response to amoebae opsonized with human serum. The priming effects of TNF-alpha were transient; marked enhancement was found with short 5- to 30-min preincubations of neutrophils with the cytokine. The enhancement of oxygen radical production was evident with 20 U of TNF-alpha per 10(6) neutrophils and continued to increase with up to 100 U. TNF-alpha also augmented the neutrophil lysosomal enzyme release in response to N. fowleri. The results support previous reports suggesting an important role of neutrophil cytokine activation for effective immunity against free-living amoebae. PMID:2777375

  18. [Alterations in heat shock protein 70 kDa levels in human neutrophils under the heat shock conditions].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, A A; Vetchinin, S S; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular content of heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family (HSP70) possessing chaperone and cytoprotective functions depends on specialization and functional activity of the cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of constitutive and inducible HSP70 levels evoked by heat shock in human neutrophils, the short-lived fraction of white blood cells providing non-specific defense against bacterial pathogens. Biphasic dynamics of the intracellular HSP70 level with an increase and following decrease in 15-30 min after the heat shock was revealed by flow cytometry. This dynamics was similar for constitutive and inducible forms of HSP70. Pre-incubation of neutrophils with cycloheximide, the inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not change the intracellular HSP70 dynamics registered by flow cytometry indicating that the increased HSP70 level detected immediately after the heat shock was not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. It was confirmed by Western blotting analysis of HSP70 intracellular content. It was suggested that the elevated HSP70 level was related to conformational HSP70 molecule changes and to increased availability of HSP70 epitopes for antibody binding. Using a panel of antibodies specific to the N-terminal ATP-binding or C-terminal substrate-binding domains of HSP70 it has been demonstrated by cell immunofluorescence and flow cytometry methods that the heat shock-associated increase of the intracellular HSP70 level was mediated by HSP70 interaction with antibodies recognizing HSP70 substrate-binding domain. It was demonstrated that the decrease of intracellular HSP70 level after heat treatment could be connected with a release of both inducible and constitutive HSP70 into extracellular space. Our data suggest that stress-induced release of HSP70 from neutrophils is regulated by ABC-transporters.

  19. Decreased apoptosis of beta 2- integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Teraoka, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kenji; Takahashi, Kensi; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Inanami, Osamu; Kuwabara, Mikwori

    2004-02-01

    Stimulant-induced viability of neutrophils, nuclear-fragmentation, increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), expression of annexin V on neutrophils and proteolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate Ac-DEVD-MCA (acetyl Asp-Glu-Val-Asp alpha-[4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide]) by neutrophil lysates from five normal calves and three calves with leucocyte adhesion deficiency were determined to evaluate the apoptosis of normal and CD18-deficient neutrophils. Viability was markedly decreased in control neutrophils stimulated with opsonized zymosan (OPZ), compared to CD18-deficient neutrophils at 37 degrees C after incubation periods of 6 and 24 hours. The rate of apoptosis of control neutrophils stimulated with OPZ increased significantly depending on the incubation time, whereas no apparent increase in apoptosis was found in CD18-deficient neutrophils under the same conditions. Aggregated bovine (Agg) IgG-induced apoptosis of control neutrophils was not significantly different from that of CD18-deficient neutrophils. The expression of annexin V on OPZ-stimulated control neutrophils was greater than that of unstimulated ones 6 h after stimulation. No apparent increase in annexin V expression on CD18-deficient neutrophils was found with OPZ stimulation. A delay in apoptosis was demonstrated in CD18-deficient bovine neutrophils and this appeared to be closely associated with lowered signalling via [Ca2+]i, diminished annexin V expression on the cell surface, and decreased caspase 3 activity in lysates. PMID:14984592

  20. Treatment of methimazole-induced severe aplastic anemia with recombinant human granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor and glucocorticosteroids.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, X; Ulloa-Aguirre, A; von Eiff, C; Hurtado-Monroy, R; Alanis, A

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo response to recombinant human granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (rHu GM-CSF) in facilitating the reconstitution of granulomonopoiesis was evaluated in a patient with Graves' disease who developed severe aplastic anemia during methimazole therapy. After 10 days of treatment with rHu GM-CSF, the neutrophil and monocyte counts rose to 1.65 x 10(9)/l and 0.41 x 10(9)/l, respectively. However, the patient was still dependent on erythrocyte and platelet transfusions. Two days after rHu GM-CSF withdrawal, the neutrophil count dropped off to 0.41 x 10(9)/l.rHu GM-CSF was reinitiated for 2 days along with glucocorticosteroids. With this combined therapeutic approach, the neutrophil count returned to normal and remained stable, and both Hb and platelet values began to improve. It is concluded that the combination of rHu GM-CSF and glucocorticosteroids can be used as a therapeutic option that may lead to beneficial results in drug-induced aplastic anemia.

  1. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils have altered chemoattractant-induced F-actin polymerization and polarization characteristics.

    PubMed

    Orelio, Claudia; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2009-03-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a hereditary disorder characterized by pancreatic insufficiency and bone marrow failure. Most Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients have mutations in the SBDS gene located at chromosome 7 and suffer from recurrent infections, due to neutropenia in combination with impaired neutrophil chemotaxis. Currently, the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils has not been investigated. Therefore, we performed immunofluorescence for SBDS and F-actin on human neutrophilic cells. Additionally, we examined in control neutrophils and cells from genetically defined Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients F-actin polymerization and cytoskeletal polarization characteristics upon chemoattractant stimulation. These studies showed that SBDS and F-actin co-localize in neutrophilic cells and that F-actin polymerization and depolymerization characteristics are altered in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils as compared to control neutrophils in response to both fMLP and C5a. Moreover, F-actin cytoskeletal polarization is delayed in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils. Thus, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils have aberrant chemoattractant-induced F-actin properties which might contribute to the impaired neutrophil chemotaxis.

  2. Capsaicin stimulates the non-store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry but inhibits the store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-P. . E-mail: w1994@vghtc.gov.tw; Tseng, C.-S.; Sun, S.-P.; Chen, Y.-S.; Tsai, C.-R.; Hsu, M.-F.

    2005-12-01

    Rat neutrophils express the mRNA encoding for transient receptor potential (TRP) V1. However, capsaicin-stimulated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation occurred only at high concentrations ({>=}100 {mu}M). This response was substantially decreased in a Ca{sup 2+}-free medium. Vanilloids displayed similar patterns of Ca{sup 2+} response with the rank order of potency as follows: scutigeral>resiniferatoxin>capsazepine>capsaicin=olvanil>isovelleral. Arachidonyl dopamine (AAD), an endogenous ligand for TRPV1, failed to desensitize the subsequent capsaicin challenge. Capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} response was not affected by 8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose (8-Br-cADPR), the ryanodine receptor blocker, but was slightly attenuated by 1-[6-[17{beta}-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,= 5-dione (U-73122), the inhibitor of phospholipase C-coupled processes, 1-[{beta}-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole (SKF-96365), the blocker of receptor-gated and store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) channels, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB), the blocker of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphospahte (IP{sub 3}) receptor and Ca{sup 2+} influx, and by ruthenium red, a blocker of TRPV channels, and enhanced by the Ca{sup 2+} channels blocker, cis-N-(2-phenylcyclopentyl)azacyclotridec-1-en-2-amine (MDL-12330A) and Na{sup +}-deprivation. In addition, capsaicin had no effect on the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity or the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) or on the total thiols content. Capsaicin ({>=}100 {mu}M) inhibited the cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). In the absence of external Ca{sup 2+}, the robust Ca{sup 2+} entry after subsequent addition of Ca{sup 2+} was decreased by capsaicin in CPA-activated cells. Capsaicin alone increased the actin cytoskeleton, and also increased the actin filament content in cell activation with CPA. These results indicate that capsaicin

  3. Platelets may inhibit leucotriene biosynthesis by human neutrophils at the integrin level.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Moliere, Patrick; Merhi-Soussi, Faten; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood platelets co-operate in several pathophysiological processes, and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced in response to the activation of these cells are potent mediators of their functions. We studied the role of platelets in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase products from AA by autologous neutrophils, especially the chemotactic agent leucotriene (LT) B4. The formation of all products, namely 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), LTB4 and the other LTA4-derived metabolites, in response to the calcium ionophore A23187 was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography. All the 5-lipoxygenase products were significantly diminished by physiological concentrations of platelets. This inhibitory effect was lost when platelets were previously degranulated by thrombin in non-aggregating conditions. Peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser or His-His-Leu-Gly-Gly-Ala-Lys-Gln-Ala-Gly-Asp-Val sequence, which prevent the adhesion of platelets to neutrophils via the fibrinogen released from platelet granules and the integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, markedly decreased the inhibitory effect of non-degranulated platelets. The production of transcellular metabolites of AA such as LTC4, the dual 5- and 12-lipoxygenase product 5,12-diHETE and lipoxins could not account for the decreased formation of 5-HETE and LTA4-derived metabolites. It is concluded that platelets may inhibit the neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase activity at the integrin level and in turn may play a role in slowing down the production of LTB4 in the course of inflammation.

  4. Interference with the oxidative response of neutrophils by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, F E; Elson, C J; Greenham, L W; Catterall, J R

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pneumococcal infections are still a major clinical problem. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (neutrophils) are considered to have a key role in the host's defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae but the mechanisms by which they kill the pneumococcus remain unclear. As reactive oxygen species are regarded as a major antimicrobial defence of phagocytes an attempt has been made to establish their role in the response of neutrophils to S pneumoniae. METHODS--S pneumoniae isolated from patients with bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia were incubated with neutrophils in suspension and superoxide production was measured by reduction of ferricytochrome c. RESULTS--S pneumoniae did not stimulate superoxide production alone or in the presence of normal human serum. Spontaneous superoxide production by neutrophils was actually abrogated by S pneumoniae, as was the powerful respiratory burst stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate. This phenomenon depended on both the dose and the viability of the bacteria. With S pneumoniae in the logarithmic phase of growth inhibitory activity was confined to the organisms themselves but with organisms undergoing autolysis it was also present in filtered supernatants, suggesting that the inhibitory activity can be attributed to a factor released during autolysis. CONCLUSIONS--S pneumoniae can interfere with the respiratory burst of neutrophils. This property may help to explain the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID:8390109

  5. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    PubMed

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'.

  6. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    PubMed

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:24793872

  7. Source and role of diacylglycerol formed during phagocytosis of opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Della Bianca, V.; Grzeskowiak, M.; Lissandrini, D.; Rossi, F. )

    1991-06-28

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate that in human neutrophils phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles is associated with activation of phospholipase D and that this reaction is the main source of diglycerides. The demonstration is based upon the following findings: (1) the challenge of neutrophils with these opsonized particles was followed by a rapid formation of (3H)alkyl-phosphatidic acid (( 3H)alkyl-PA) and (3H)alkyl-diglyceride (( 3H)alkyl-DG) in cells labeled with (3H)alkyl-lyso-phosphatidylcholine; (2) in the presence of ethanol (3H)alkyl-phosphatidylethanol was formed, and accumulation of (3H)alkyl-PA and (3H)alkyl-DG was depressed; (3) propranolol, by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of (3H)alkyl-PA, completely inhibited the accumulation of (3H)alkyl-DG and depressed by about 75% the formation of diglyceride mass. Evidence is also presented that phagocytosis of C3b/bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst can take place independently of diglyceride formation and of the activity of this second messenger on protein kinase C. In fact: (a) propranolol while completely inhibited the formation of diglyceride mass did not modify either the phagocytosis or respiratory burst; (b) these two processes were insensitive to staurosporine.

  8. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is increased in psoriasis and induces human β-defensin-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Yu, Hsin-Su; Yen, Feng-Lin; Lin, Chi-Ling; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lan, Cheng-Che E

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in the development of certain immune-mediated diseases, but their role in psoriasis has not been clearly defined. Human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) is an important antimicrobial peptide overexpressed in psoriasis epidermis. We evaluated whether the amount of NETs is increased in psoriasis and determined the effect of NETs on HBD-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes. Using fluorescent microscopy, we found that patients with psoriasis (n = 48) had higher amount of NETotic cells in their peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (n = 48) and patients with eczema (n = 35). Psoriasis sera showed increased ability to induce NET formation in control neutrophils but normal NET degradation ability. The amount of NETs in the peripheral blood correlated with psoriasis disease severity. NETosis was also observed in the majority (18 of 20) of psoriasis skin sp