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Sample records for stimulating factor g-csf

  1. Close Association between Clearance of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and G-CSF Receptor on Neutrophils in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Terashi, Kenji; Oka, Mikio; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Furukubo, Taku; Ikeda, Chizuko; Fukuda, Minoru; Soda, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Shun; Kohno, Shigeru

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is used to counter chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Our previous study showed an inverse correlation between serum rhG-CSF levels and the number of circulating neutrophils in cancer patients (H. Takatani, H. Soda, M. Fukuda, M. Watanabe, A. Kinoshita, T. Nakamura, and M. Oka, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 40:988–991, 1996). The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between rhG-CSF clearance and G-CSF receptors on circulating neutrophils. In five cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, a bolus dose of rhG-CSF (5 μg/kg) was injected intravenously during defined phases of posttreatment neutropenia and neutrophilia. Serum rhG-CSF levels were measured by a chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay and analyzed by moment analysis. G-CSF receptors on neutrophils were detected by flow cytometry with biotinylated rhG-CSF. rhG-CSF clearance was significantly higher at neutrophilia than at neutropenia (1,497 ± 132 versus 995 ± 266 ml/h; P < 0.01). The percentage of G-CSF receptor-positive neutrophils, reflecting the number of G-CSF receptors per cell, was low at neutropenia without rhG-CSF therapy (44.5% ± 22.1%) and high at neutrophilia with rhG-CSF therapy (73.0% ± 11.4%; P < 0.01). rhG-CSF clearance closely correlated with the percentage of G-CSF receptor-positive neutrophils (r2 = 0.91; P < 0.0001) and neutrophil count (r2 = 0.72; P < 0.005). Our results indicate that, in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, rhG-CSF increases the number of G-CSF receptors per cell as well as circulating neutrophil counts, resulting in modulation of its own clearance. PMID:9869559

  2. Tyrosine residues in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor mediate G-CSF-induced differentiation of murine myeloid leukemic (M1) cells.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S E; Starr, R; Novak, U; Hilton, D J; Layton, J E

    1996-10-25

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine residues of many growth factor receptors have been shown to be important for receptor signal transduction via the recruitment of proteins containing phosphotyrosine-binding domains. This study demonstrates the importance of specific tyrosine residues in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor cytoplasmic domain in G-CSF-induced macrophage cell differentiation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a series of G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) mutants in which the tyrosine residues were replaced with phenylalanine either singly or in combination. The mouse myeloid leukemic cell line (M1) transfected with G-CSF-R cDNA can be induced to differentiate into macrophages in response to G-CSF. The effect of the tyrosine mutations on this differentiation response was assessed by examining cell morphology and differentiation in soft agar colony assays. Although three of the four cytoplasmic tyrosine residues appeared to contribute to the differentiation response, mutation of a single residue (Tyr744) significantly reduced the ability of the M1 cells to differentiate. The STAT family of signaling molecules (Stat1, Stat3, and Stat5) were activated by G-CSF in M1 cells expressing those G-CSF-R tyrosine mutants unable to mediate G-CSF-induced differentiation. Furthermore, activation of STAT proteins was shown to occur in the absence of all four cytoplasmic tyrosine residues, suggesting an alternative mechanism for STAT activation other than direct interaction with receptor phosphotyrosines.

  3. Expression and purification of canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (cG-CSF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akira; Iwata, Akira; Saito, Toshiki; Watanabe, Fumiko; Ueda, Susumu

    2009-08-15

    Canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (cG-CSF) with modification of cysteine at position 17 to serine was expressed in Brevibacillus choshinensis HPD31. cG-CSF secreted into the culture medium was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and consecutive column chromatography, using butyl sepharose and DEAE sepharose. Biological activity of the recombinant cG-CSF was 8.0 x 10(6) U/mg protein, as determined by its stimulatory effect on NFS-60 cell proliferation. Purified cG-CSF was subcutaneously administered once a day for two successive days to dogs (1, 5, 25, or 125 microg). Neutrophil count increased the following day in all dogs except those administered the lowest dose (1 microg). No severe side effects were observed in dogs after administration of cG-CSF.

  4. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. Results: hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. Conclusions: This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment. PMID:23748895

  5. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF): cloning, overexpression, purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vanz, Ana LS; Renard, Gaby; Palma, Mario S; Chies, Jocelei M; Dalmora, Sérgio L; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biopharmaceutical drugs are mainly recombinant proteins produced by biotechnological tools. The patents of many biopharmaceuticals have expired, and biosimilars are thus currently being developed. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine that acts on cells of the neutrophil lineage causing proliferation and differentiation of committed precursor cells and activation of mature neutrophils. Recombinant hG-CSF has been produced in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (Filgrastim) and successfully used to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Filgrastim is a 175 amino acid protein, containing an extra N-terminal methionine, which is needed for expression in E. coli. Here we describe a simple and low-cost process that is amenable to scaling-up for the production and purification of homogeneous and active recombinant hG-CSF expressed in E. coli cells. Results Here we describe cloning of the human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor coding DNA sequence, protein expression in E. coli BL21(DE3) host cells in the absence of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, efficient isolation and solubilization of inclusion bodies by a multi-step washing procedure, and a purification protocol using a single cationic exchange column. Characterization of homogeneous rhG-CSF by size exclusion and reverse phase chromatography showed similar yields to the standard. The immunoassay and N-terminal sequencing confirmed the identity of rhG-CSF. The biological activity assay, in vivo, showed an equivalent biological effect (109.4%) to the standard reference rhG-CSF. The homogeneous rhG-CSF protein yield was 3.2 mg of bioactive protein per liter of cell culture. Conclusion The recombinant protein expression in the absence of IPTG induction is advantageous since cost is reduced, and the protein purification protocol using a single chromatographic step should reduce cost even further for large

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) transiently suppresses mitogen-stimulated T-cell proliferative response

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; García-Castro, I; Esquivel, F; Hornedo, J; Cortes-Funes, H; Solovera, J; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulation factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that selectively promotes growth and maturation of neutrophils and may modulate the cytokine response to inflammatory stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of G-CSF on ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) functions. Ten patients with breast cancer were included in a clinical trial in which r-metHuG-CSF was administrered daily for 5 days to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells. Ten healthy women were also included as controls. Our data show that G-CSF treatment induces an increase in peripheral blood leucocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. We have found a modulation in the percentages of CD19+, CD45+CD14+, CD4+CD45RA+ and CD4+CD45RO+ cells in PBMC fractions during G-CSF treatment. We have also found a significant reduction in the proliferative response of PBMC to mitogenic stimulation that reverted 14 days after the fifth and the last dose of G-CSF. Furthermore, it was not associated with significant changes in the pattern of cytokine production. The mechanism of this immunoregulatory effect is probably indirect since G-CSF receptor has not been found in T lymphocytes. This mechanism and its potential clinical applications remain to be elucidated. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390001

  7. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) signaling in spinal microglia drives visceral sensitization following colitis.

    PubMed

    Basso, Lilian; Lapointe, Tamia K; Iftinca, Mircea; Marsters, Candace; Hollenberg, Morley D; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Altier, Christophe

    2017-10-02

    Pain is a main symptom of inflammatory diseases and often persists beyond clinical remission. Although we have a good understanding of the mechanisms of sensitization at the periphery during inflammation, little is known about the mediators that drive central sensitization. Recent reports have identified hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors as important regulators of tumor- and nerve injury-associated pain. Using a mouse model of colitis, we identify the proinflammatory cytokine granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF or Csf-3) as a key mediator of visceral sensitization. We report that G-CSF is specifically up-regulated in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of colitis-affected mice. Our results show that resident spinal microglia express the G-CSF receptor and that G-CSF signaling mediates microglial activation following colitis. Furthermore, healthy mice subjected to intrathecal injection of G-CSF exhibit pronounced visceral hypersensitivity, an effect that is abolished by microglial depletion. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that G-CSF injection increases Cathepsin S activity in spinal cord tissues. When cocultured with microglia BV-2 cells exposed to G-CSF, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptors become hyperexcitable. Blocking CX3CR1 or nitric oxide production during G-CSF treatment reduces excitability and G-CSF-induced visceral pain in vivo. Finally, administration of G-CSF-neutralizing antibody can prevent the establishment of persistent visceral pain postcolitis. Overall, our work uncovers a DRG neuron-microglia interaction that responds to G-CSF by engaging Cathepsin S-CX3CR1-inducible NOS signaling. This interaction represents a central step in visceral sensitization following colonic inflammation, thereby identifying spinal G-CSF as a target for treating chronic abdominal pain.

  8. Sustained in vivo activity of recombinant bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rbG-CSF) using HEPES buffer.

    PubMed

    Kasraian, K; Kuzniar, A; Earley, D; Kamicker, B J; Wilson, G; Manion, T; Hong, J; Reiber, C; Canning, P

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a long-acting injectable formulation of bG-CSF for veterinary use. However, in order to achieve sustained in vivo activity it was first necessary to stabilize the protein at the injection site. Preformulation studies, as well as literature, suggest that bG-CSF aggregates at neutral pH ranges (i.e., pH 6-8) and at temperatures of approximately 40 degrees C. Therefore, bG-CSF will not retain its activity for an extended period of time at the injection site. During this study we determined that HEPES buffer has a very significant impact on protein stability as well as on biological performance. Recombinant bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rbG-CSF) was formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer for subcutaneous injection into cows. bG-CSF formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer resulted in sustained in vivo activity of bG-CSF compared to the "control" formulation (control formulation: 5% mannitol, 10 mM acetate buffer, 0.004% tween-80, pH 4). White blood cell (WBC) count was used as a marker to evaluate in vivo activity of the formulation. WBC numbers remained above a threshold value for only 24-30 h for the control formula. However, when bG-CSF was formulated in 1 M HEPES, the WBC remained above threshold for 3 days or 72 h. Formulating bG-CSF in 1 M HEPES at pH 7.5 also resulted in greater solution stability. This was surprising since bG-CSF is intrinsically not stable at neutral pH. The effect of 1 M HEPES on the T(M) (temperature at maximum heat flow on calorimetry scan) of bG-CSF was determined by microcalorimetry. In the absence of 1 M HEPES buffer the T(M) was 48 degrees C (onset approximately 40 degrees C), while bG-CSF formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer has a T(M) of 59 degrees C (onset approximately 50 degrees C). Similar organic buffers, such as MOPS, HEPPS, TES, and tricine, also resulted in improved solution stability as well as in sustained in vivo activity. The dramatic effect of these buffers on stability and biological

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an important role in immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anne D; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant cell type in many chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, their contribution to the pathology of RA has not been widely studied. A key cytokine involved in neutrophil development and function is granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In this study we used the K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model, mimicking the effector phase of RA, to investigate the importance of G-CSF in arthritis development and its relation to neutrophils. Here, we show for the first time in this model that G-CSF levels are increased both in the serum and in inflamed paws of arthritic mice and importantly that G-CSF blockade leads to a profound reduction in arthritis severity, as well as reduced numbers of neutrophils in blood. Moreover, CXCL1 and CXCL2 levels in the arthritic joints were also lowered. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF is a pivotal driver of the disease progression in the K/BxN STA model and possibly acts in part by regulating neutrophil numbers in the circulation. Therefore, our findings suggest that G-CSF might be a suitable target in RA, and perhaps in other immune complex-driven pathologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Hosseinisadat, Robabe; Baradaran, Ramesh; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF), endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy). In G-CSF group (n=50), 300 µg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50) were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII), two pronuclei (2PN), total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27326420

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production in hemorrhagic shock requires both the ischemic and resuscitation phase.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, C; Kelly, E; Billiar, T R; Tweardy, D J

    1997-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the cytokine that is critical for polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocyte (PMN) production as well as being a potent agonist of PMN activation. We have recently reported that in the lung and the liver of rats resuscitated after hemorrhagic shock (HS) G-CSF mRNA expression is induced. It is not known if both phases of HS, the ischemic and the reperfusion phase, are required for G-CSF mRNA induction. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the upregulation of G-CSF mRNA expression is the consequence of HS followed by resuscitation and that ischemia alone is insufficient to induce G-CSF mRNA expression in the affected organs. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to resuscitated and unresuscitated shock protocols of varying severity. Control animals were subjected to anesthesia and all surgical preparations except for hemorrhage. Lungs and livers were isolated and their RNA extracted. Using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we demonstrated that G-CSF mRNA was induced in the lung and liver of shock animals above the level observed in control animals. Upregulation of G-CSF mRNA relative to controls occurred only in animals undergoing resuscitated HS and not in ones subjected to unresuscitated HS. These results indicate that G-CSF production specific for the hemorrhage component of shock is dependent on resuscitation. As a consequence, the production of this cytokine may be decreased through modifications in the resuscitation protocols.

  12. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) for stroke: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    England, Timothy J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Alasheev, Andrey M.; Belkin, Andrey A.; Kumar, Amit; Prasad, Kameshwar; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may enhance recovery from stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms if administered early, or neurorepair if given later. Several small trials suggest administration is safe but effects on efficacy are unclear. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCT) assessing G-CSF in patients with hyperacute, acute, subacute or chronic stroke, and asked Investigators to share individual patient data on baseline characteristics, stroke severity and type, end-of-trial modified Rankin Scale (mRS), Barthel Index, haematological parameters, serious adverse events and death. Multiple variable analyses were adjusted for age, sex, baseline severity and time-to-treatment. Individual patient data were obtained for 6 of 10 RCTs comprising 196 stroke patients (116 G-CSF, 80 placebo), mean age 67.1 (SD 12.9), 92% ischaemic, median NIHSS 10 (IQR 5–15), randomised 11 days (interquartile range IQR 4–238) post ictus; data from three commercial trials were not shared. G-CSF did not improve mRS (ordinal regression), odds ratio OR 1.12 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.96, p = 0.62). There were more patients with a serious adverse event in the G-CSF group (29.6% versus 7.5%, p = 0.07) with no significant difference in all-cause mortality (G-CSF 11.2%, placebo 7.6%, p = 0.4). Overall, G-CSF did not improve stroke outcome in this individual patient data meta-analysis. PMID:27845349

  13. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and outcome in patients with non-chemotherapy agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, L; Sabaté, M; Ballarín, E; Puig, R; Vidal, X; Laporte, J-R

    2008-03-01

    The use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the treatment of non-chemotherapy drug- induced agranulocytosis is controversial. We aimed at assessing the effect of G-CSF on the duration of agranulocytosis. To assess the effect of G-CSF on the duration of agranulocytosis, a Cox proportional hazard model with an estimated propensity score covariate adjusting for several prognostic factors was used. One hundred and forty-five episodes of agranulocytosis were prospectively collected from January 1994 to December 2000 in Barcelona (Spain). No differences were found in the case-fatality rate between treated (9 of 101, 8.9%) and not treated (5 of 44, 11.4%) patients. The median time to reach a neutrophil count > or =1.0 x 10(9)/L was 5 days (95%CI 5-6) in patients treated with G-CSF compared to 7 days (95%CI 6-8) in those not treated, with a hazard ratio of 1.58 (95% CI 1.1-2.3). G-CSF shortens time to recovery in patients with agranulocytosis. However, as an effect on case-fatality has not been recorded, and data on cost-effectiveness are lacking, it would be wise to restrict its use to high-risk patients. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A randomised study comparing granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) with G-CSF plus thymostimulin in the treatment of haematological toxicity in patients with advanced breast cancer after high dose mitoxantrone therapy.

    PubMed

    Sanchiz, F; Milla, A

    1996-01-01

    54 patients with advanced breast cancer were randomised into a prospective, non-blinded, controlled trial to receive: mitoxantrone 28 mg/m2 intravenous day 1 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) 5 micrograms/kg/day subcutaneously days 2 to 16 (n = 27) or the same regimen plus thymostimulin (TS) 50 mg/day intramuscular at days 2 to 16 (n = 27). The median time to reach a neutrophil count greater than 0.5 x 10(9)/l was lower in the G-CSF+TS treated group (9.13 versus 3.24 days; P < 0.0005). More patients experienced neutropenic fever in the G-CSF group than in the G-CSF+TS group (59.3% versus 22.2%, P = 0.0119). The incidence, duration and severity of clinically or bacteriologically documented infection were lower in patients who received TS. 16 patients (59.3%) in the G-CSF group contracted infection, and 4 patients (14.8%) receiving G-CSF+TS (P = 0.0016). These data indicate that the combination of G-CSF and TS is well-tolerated and may enhance haematological recovery following myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with advanced breast cancer.

  15. A comparison of treatment of canine cyclic hematopoiesis with recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), G-CSF interleukin-3, and canine G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Hammond, W P; Boone, T C; Donahue, R E; Souza, L M; Dale, D C

    1990-08-01

    Cyclic hematopoiesis in gray collie dogs is a stem cell disease in which abnormal regulation of cell production in the bone marrow causes cyclic fluctuations of blood cell counts. In vitro studies demonstrated that recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) all stimulated increases in colony formation by canine bone marrow progenitor cells. Based on these results, gray collie dogs were then treated with recombinant human (rh) GM-CSF, IL-3, or G-CSF subcutaneously to test the hypothesis that pharmacologic doses of one of these hematopoietic growth factors could alter cyclic production of cells. When recombinant canine G-CSF became available, it was tested over a range of doses. In vivo rhIL-3 had no effect on the recurrent neutropenia but was associated with eosinophilia, rhGM-CSF caused neutrophilia and eosinophilia but cycling of hematopoiesis persisted. However, rhG-CSF caused neutrophilia, prevented the recurrent neutropenia and, in the two animals not developing antibodies to rhG-CSF, obliterated periodic fluctuation of monocyte, eosinophil, reticulocyte, and platelet counts. Recombinant canine G-CSF increased the nadir neutrophil counts and amplitude of fluctuations at low doses (1 micrograms/kg/d) and eliminated all cycling of cell counts at high doses (5 and 10 micrograms/kg/d). These data suggest significant differences in the actions of these growth factors and imply a critical role for G-CSF in the homeostatic regulation of hematopoiesis.

  16. G-CSF use in patients receiving first-line chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSF) as observed in clinical practice in Italy.

    PubMed

    Vitolo, Umberto; Angrili, Francesco; DeCosta, Lucy; Wetten, Sally; Federico, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) requires chemotherapy regimens with significant risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). For patients at ≥20% FN risk, guidelines recommend primary prophylaxis (PP) with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). This study assessed whether G-CSF use in NHL was in line with recommendations in routine practice. This was a retrospective, observational study of adult NHL patients receiving first-line (R)CHOP-like chemotherapy and G-CSF support between June 2010 and 2012, in Italy. The primary outcome was whether G-CSF was provided as PP, which was defined as G-CSF initiation on days 1-3 after chemotherapy, ≥3 days' use for daily G-CSFs and continued prophylaxis from cycle 1 across all cycles. Secondary prophylaxis was defined as continued prophylaxis from cycle 2 or later, and all other use was defined as Suboptimal. The analysis included 199 patients, 61% of whom had diffuse large B cell lymphoma and 21% follicular lymphoma. (R)CHOP-21 was given to 52% of patients and (R)CHOP-14 to 32%. Overall, 29% of patients received PP, while two-thirds received Suboptimal G-CSF. Of patients receiving daily G-CSF, 3% received PP and 94% received Suboptimal use; with pegfilgrastim, 65% received PP and 26% Suboptimal use. FN occurred in 13 patients (7%) and grade 3/4 neutropenia in 43%. Chemotherapy dose delays occurred in 22% and dose reductions in 18% of patients. Delivery of G-CSF, particularly daily G-CSFs, was not in accordance with guideline or product label recommendations in a large proportion of NHL patients receiving chemotherapy in Italy.

  17. GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR (G-CSF) UPREGULATES β1 INTEGRIN AND INCREASES MIGRATION OF HUMAN TROPHOBLAST SWAN 71 CELLS VIA PI3K AND MAPK ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Furmento, Verónica A.; Marino, Julieta; Blank, Viviana C.; Cayrol, María Florencia; Cremaschi, Graciela A.; Aguilar, Rubén C.; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple cytokines and growth factors expressed at the fetal-maternal interface are involved in the regulation of trophoblast functions and placental growth, but the role of G-CSF has not been completely established. Based on our previous study showing that G-CSF increases the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the release of vascular endothelial growth factor in Swan 71 human trophoblast cells, in this work we explore the possible contribution of G-CSF to cell migration and the G-CSF-triggered signaling pathway. We found that G-CSF induced morphological changes on actin cytoskeleton consistent with a migratory cell phenotype. G-CSF also up-regulated the expression levels of β1 integrin and promoted Swan 71 cell migration. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative mutants we showed that PI3K, Erk 1/2 and p38 pathways are required for promoting Swan 71 cell motility. It was also demonstrated that PI3K behaved as an upstream regulator of Erk 1/2 and p38 MAPK. In addition, the increase of β1 integrin expression was dependent on PI3K activation. In conclusion, our results indicate that G-CSF stimulates β1 integrin expression and Swan 71 cell migration by activating PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that G-CSF should be considered as an additional regulatory factor that contributes to a successful embryo implantation and to the placenta development. PMID:26992288

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) upregulates β1 integrin and increases migration of human trophoblast Swan 71 cells via PI3K and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Furmento, Verónica A; Marino, Julieta; Blank, Viviana C; Cayrol, María Florencia; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Aguilar, Rubén C; Roguin, Leonor P

    2016-03-15

    Multiple cytokines and growth factors expressed at the fetal-maternal interface are involved in the regulation of trophoblast functions and placental growth, but the role of G-CSF has not been completely established. Based on our previous study showing that G-CSF increases the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the release of vascular endothelial growth factor in Swan 71 human trophoblast cells, in this work we explore the possible contribution of G-CSF to cell migration and the G-CSF-triggered signaling pathway. We found that G-CSF induced morphological changes on actin cytoskeleton consistent with a migratory cell phenotype. G-CSF also up-regulated the expression levels of β1 integrin and promoted Swan 71 cell migration. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative mutants we showed that PI3K, Erk 1/2 and p38 pathways are required for promoting Swan 71 cell motility. It was also demonstrated that PI3K behaved as an upstream regulator of Erk 1/2 and p38 MAPK. In addition, the increase of β1 integrin expression was dependent on PI3K activation. In conclusion, our results indicate that G-CSF stimulates β1 integrin expression and Swan 71 cell migration by activating PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that G-CSF should be considered as an additional regulatory factor that contributes to a successful embryo implantation and to the placenta development.

  19. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for sepsis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the effects of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy in non-neutropenic patients with sepsis. Methods A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted using specific search terms. A manual review of references was also performed. Eligible studies were randomized control trials (RCTs) that compared granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) therapy with placebo for the treatment of sepsis in adults. Main outcome measures were all-cause mortality at 14 days and 28 days after initiation of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy, in-hospital mortality, reversal rate from infection, and adverse events. Results Twelve RCTs with 2,380 patients were identified. In regard to 14-day mortality, a total of 9 death events occurred among 71 patients (12.7%) in the treatment group compared with 13 events among 67 patients (19.4%) in the placebo groups. Meta-analysis showed there was no significant difference in 28-day mortality when G-CSF or GM-CSF were compared with placebo (relative risks (RR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79 to 1.11, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.31, I2 = 15%). Compared with placebo, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy did not significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.69 to 1.36, P = 0.86; P for heterogeneity = 0.80, I2 = 0%). However, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy significantly increased the reversal rate from infection (RR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.62, P = 0.002; P for heterogeneity = 0.47, I2 = 0%). No significant difference was observed in adverse events between groups (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.23, P = 0.62; P for heterogeneity = 0.03, I2 = 58%). Sensitivity analysis by excluding one trial did not significantly change the results of adverse events (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.32, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.17, I2 = 36%). Conclusions There is no current evidence supporting the routine use of G-CSF or

  20. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for sepsis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bo, Lulong; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Jiali; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy in non-neutropenic patients with sepsis. A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted using specific search terms. A manual review of references was also performed. Eligible studies were randomized control trials (RCTs) that compared granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) therapy with placebo for the treatment of sepsis in adults. Main outcome measures were all-cause mortality at 14 days and 28 days after initiation of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy, in-hospital mortality, reversal rate from infection, and adverse events. Twelve RCTs with 2,380 patients were identified. In regard to 14-day mortality, a total of 9 death events occurred among 71 patients (12.7%) in the treatment group compared with 13 events among 67 patients (19.4%) in the placebo groups. Meta-analysis showed there was no significant difference in 28-day mortality when G-CSF or GM-CSF were compared with placebo (relative risks (RR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79 to 1.11, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.31, I2 = 15%). Compared with placebo, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy did not significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.69 to 1.36, P = 0.86; P for heterogeneity = 0.80, I2 = 0%). However, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy significantly increased the reversal rate from infection (RR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.62, P = 0.002; P for heterogeneity = 0.47, I2 = 0%). No significant difference was observed in adverse events between groups (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.23, P = 0.62; P for heterogeneity = 0.03, I2 = 58%). Sensitivity analysis by excluding one trial did not significantly change the results of adverse events (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.32, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.17, I2 = 36%). There is no current evidence supporting the routine use of G-CSF or GM-CSF in patients with sepsis. Large

  1. Identification and in vitro characterization of novel nanobodies against human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor to provide inhibition of G-CSF function.

    PubMed

    Bakherad, Hamid; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Aghamollaei, Hossein; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Torshabi, Maryam; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Setayesh, Neda

    2017-09-01

    It has been shown that Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has a higher expression in malignant tumors, and anti-G-CSF therapy considerably decreases tumor growth, tumor vascularization and metastasis. Thus, blocking the signaling pathway of G-CSF could be beneficial in cancer therapy. This study is aimed at designing and producing a monoclonal nanobody that could act as an antagonist of G-CSF receptor. Nanobodies are the antigen binding fragments of camelid single-chain antibodies, also known as VHH. These fragments have exceptional properties which makes them ideal for tumor imaging and therapeutic applications. We have used our previously built nanobody phage libraries to isolate specific nanobodies to the G-CSF receptor. After a series of cross-reactivity and affinity experiments, two unique nanobodies were selected for functional analysis. Proliferation assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize these nanobodies. Finally, VHH26 nanobody that was able to specifically bind G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) on the surface of NFS60 cells and efficiently block G-CSF-R downstream signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner was selected. This nanobody could be further developed into a valuable tool in tumor therapy and it forms a basis for additional studies in preclinical animal models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) blockade augments the protective effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anding; Weiss, Stefanie; Fang, Haoshu; Claus, Ralf A; Rödel, Jürgen; Dirsch, Olaf; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-05-01

    The effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on sepsis is discussed controversially in clinical studies. We previously demonstrated that G-CSF treatment induced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitization via up-regulation of LPS-binding protein (LBP). We hypothesized that the futile effect of G-CSF-treatment in sepsis might be due to its ability to up-regulate LBP. Therefore, blockade of LBP may attenuate the G-CSF-induced LPS sensitization and protect animals from polymicrobial sepsis. Endogenous LBP levels were up-regulated by pretreatment with G-CSF, and the LBP protein was blocked by administration of a specific blocking peptide-LBPK95A. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of feces slurry. Rats were monitored every 3 up to 72 h to observe the survival rate. Tissue injury, bacterial infiltration, local inflammatory response, and neutrophil infiltration at 0, 2, and 12 h after the septic insult were analyzed. The survival benefit of G-CSF pretreatment was improved when combined with LBPK95A treatment (control vs. G-CSF vs. combi: 36% vs. 56% vs. 93%; P < 0.05). Combined treatment of G-CSF and LBPK95A was associated with the minimal tissue damage. Treatment with LBPK95A significantly inhibited the neutrophil infiltration without interfering with the bacterial clearance. The G-CSF-induced inflammatory sensitization effect was inhibited by LBPK95A, indicated by the decrease of cytokines expression, and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway. In conclusion, these results suggested that the effect of prophylactic augmentation of the host's response via G-CSF pretreatment was further enhanced by inhibition of the up-regulation of LBP.

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) depresses angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro: implications for sourcing cells for vascular regeneration therapy.

    PubMed

    Tura, O; Crawford, J; Barclay, G R; Samuel, K; Hadoke, P W F; Roddie, H; Davies, J; Turner, M L

    2010-07-01

    The most common source of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) for hematopoietic reconstitution comprises granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). It has been proposed that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) share precursors with HPCs, and that EPC release may accompany HPC mobilization to the circulation following G-CSF administration. To investigate EPC activity following HPC mobilization, and the direct effects of exogenous G-CSF administration on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), using in vitro and in vivo correlates of angiogenesis. Heparinized venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers and from cord blood at parturition. G-CSF-mobilized samples were collected before administration, at apheresis harvest, and at follow-up. PBSCs were phenotyped by flow cytometry, and cultured in standard colony-forming unit (CFU)-EPC and EOC assays. The effect of exogenous G-CSF was investigated by addition of it to HUVECs and EOCs in standard tubule formation and aortic ring assays, and in an in vivo sponge implantation model. Our data show that G-CSF mobilization of PBSCs produces a profound, reversible depression of circulating CFU-EPCs. Furthermore, G-CSF administration did not mobilize CD34+CD133- cells, which include precursors of EOCs. No EOCs were cultured from any mobilized PBSCs studied. Exogenous G-CSF inhibited CFU-EPC generation, HUVEC and EOC tubule formation, microvessel outgrowth, and implanted sponge vascularization in mice. G-CSF administration depresses both endothelial cell angiogenesis and monocyte proangiogenic activity, and we suggest that any angiogenic benefit observed following implantation of cells mobilized by G-CSF may come only from a paracrine effect from HPCs.

  4. Dissociation of LPS-induced monocytic ex vivo production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and TNF-alpha in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M; Fischer, G; Barth, E; Boneberg, E; Schneider, E M; Georgieff, M; Hartung, T

    2001-01-07

    Over a 6 month period, in 192 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), a longitudinal analysis of whole blood lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ex vivo cytokine production was performed on a daily basis until discharge from the ICU or death. Twenty-one patients with proven infections were in septic shock for the first time and for at least 3 days' duration. Ex vivo LPS-inducible release of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was upregulated and that of TNF-alpha was downregulated in patients with septic shock, regardless whether they survived or died. In conclusion, LPS-induced ex vivo TNF-alpha and G-CSF cytokine release by monocytes is regulated differentially in patients with septic shock. Since upregulation of LPS-induced production of G-CSF occurred earlier in survivors than in non-survivors, rapidly elevated and sustained G-CSF responsiveness may contribute to survival in septic shock.

  5. Effect of combination therapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) and antibiotics in neutropenic mice unresponsive to antibiotics alone.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Matsubara, S; Yokota, T

    1991-09-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) in enhancing antimicrobial chemotherapy was investigated. Combined treatments of rG-CSF with cefotaxime, cefazolin, fosfomycin, gentamicin or amphotericin B were evaluated in systemic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans in leucopenic mice induced by pretreatment with cyclophosphamide. Administration of appropriate antibiotics afforded a dose-related inhibition of death from infection in normal mice and mice treated with rG-CSF after cyclophosphamide injection. In cyclophosphamide-treated mice, even larger doses of the antibiotics failed to provide protection against infection with the same inoculum size. These results suggest the possibility that rG-CSF could be of help in treatments with antimicrobial agents against infections in leucopenic patients.

  6. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) Accelerates Wound Healing in Hemorrhagic Shock Rats by Enhancing Angiogenesis and Attenuating Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Jiang, Chaoguang; Han, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Background Following severe trauma, treatment of cutaneous injuries is often delayed by inadequate blood supply. The aim of the present study was to determine whether granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) protects endothelial cells (ECs) and enhances angiogenesis in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury after resuscitation. Material/Methods The HS rats with full-thickness defects were resuscitated and randomly divided into a G-CSF group (200 μg/kg body weight), a normal saline group, and a blank control group. Histological staining was to used estimate the recovery and apoptosis of skin. Apoptosis- and angiogenesis-related factors were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot (WB). Scratch assay, tube formation, and WB experiments were performed to verify the functional effects of G-CSF on HUVECs in vitro. Results H&E staining and Masson trichrome staining showed earlier inflammation resolution and collagen synthesis in the G-CSF-treated group. Angiogenesis-related factors were elevated at mRNA and protein levels. TUNEL staining suggested fewer apoptotic cells in the G-CSF group. The apoptotic-related factors were down-regulated and anti-apoptotic factors were up-regulated in the G-CSF-treated group. Scratch assay and tube formation experiments revealed that G-CSF facilitated migration ability and angiogenic potential of HUVECs. The angiogenic and anti-apoptotic effects were also enhanced in vitro. Conclusions Our results suggest that G-CSF after resuscitation attenuates local apoptosis and accelerates angiogenesis. These findings hold great promise for improving therapy for cutaneous injury in severe trauma and ischemia diseases. PMID:28559534

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): a mediator in endometrial receptivity for a patient with polycystic ovary (PCO) undergoing in vitro maturation (IVM).

    PubMed

    Lucena, Elkin; Moreno-Ortiz, Harold

    2013-04-18

    Proliferative and secretory changes at the endometrial lining are the result of a complex intrauterine environment where sex steroid hormones and different local factors play an important role for endometrial thickening. Optimal endometrial thickness reflects an adequate maturation which is a key factor for embryo implantation. Here, we present a case of a woman with polycystic ovary who was treated using in vitro maturation (IVM) techniques. In addition, this patient showed a dyssynchrony between the endometrial phase characterised by endometrial thinning and the embryo development which had a negative impact for embryo implantation. A protocol using uterine perfusion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was performed as an alternative treatment for the unresponsive endometrium. We found that uterine infusion of G-CSF quickly increased endometrial thickness resulting in a successful pregnancy and healthy born baby. These results suggest that G-CSF is a factor that participates during endometrial remodelling enhancing the synchronisation between uterine environment and embryo development.

  8. Porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) delivered via replication-defective adenovirus induces a sustained increase in circulating peripheral blood neutrophils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising area for biotherapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease, particularly during periods of peak disease incidence. Cytokines, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), are one class of compounds that...

  9. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in Stroke Patients with Concomitant Vascular Disease—A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Duning, Thomas; Lating, Yvonne; Uhlenbrock, Jan; Schneider, Armin; Vogt, Gerhard; Laage, Rico; Koch, Winfried; Knecht, Stefan; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Background G-CSF has been shown in animal models of stroke to promote functional and structural regeneration of the central nervous system. It thus might present a therapy to promote recovery in the chronic stage after stroke. Methods Here, we assessed the safety and tolerability of G-CSF in chronic stroke patients with concomitant vascular disease, and explored efficacy data. 41 patients were studied in a double-blind, randomized approach to either receive 10 days of G-CSF (10 µg/kg body weight/day), or placebo. Main inclusion criteria were an ischemic infarct >4 months prior to inclusion, and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Primary endpoint was number of adverse events. We also explored changes in hand motor function for activities of daily living, motor and verbal learning, and finger tapping speed, over the course of the study. Results Adverse events (AEs) were more frequent in the G-CSF group, but were generally graded mild or moderate and from the known side-effect spectrum of G-CSF. Leukocyte count rose after day 2 of G-CSF dosing, reached a maximum on day 8 (mean 42/nl), and returned to baseline 1 week after treatment cessation. No significant effect of treatment was detected for the primary efficacy endpoint, the test of hand motor function. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility, safety and reasonable tolerability of subcutaneous G-CSF in chronic stroke patients. This study thus provides the basis to explore the efficacy of G-CSF in improving chronic stroke-related deficits. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00298597 PMID:21625426

  10. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for the intracranial hemorrhage in two dogs: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, M. H.; Park, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Two dogs with generalized seizures were evaluated. The dogs were diagnosed with traumatic intracranial hemorrhages based on the history, neurological examinations, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Treatment was started with oxygen, prednisolone and anticonvulsant agents. No further seizure activity was observed after treatment in both dogs, however cushing reflex was detected in case 1 and a left-sided hemi-paresis was detected in case 2. Further supportive treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) was attempted. No abnormal signs were noted in either of the dogs and no recurrence was noted 16 and 14 months later, in case 1 and 2, respectively. These cases indicate that a combination of rhG-CSF treatment with previous therapy could be used in dogs with traumatic brain injury. PMID:27656233

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): A saturated fatty acid-induced myokine with insulin-desensitizing properties in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ordelheide, Anna-Maria; Gommer, Nadja; Böhm, Anja; Hermann, Carina; Thielker, Inga; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) are important metabolic signals that acutely enhance fatty acid oxidation, thermogenesis, energy expenditure, and insulin secretion. However, if chronically elevated, they provoke inflammation, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure. Moreover, FFAs act via multiple signaling pathways as very potent regulators of gene expression. In human skeletal muscle cells differentiated in vitro (myotubes), we have shown in previous studies that the expression of CSF3, the gene encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), is markedly induced upon FFA treatment and exercise. Methods and results We now report that CSF3 is induced in human myotubes by saturated, but not unsaturated, FFAs via Toll-like receptor 4-dependent and -independent pathways including activation of Rel-A, AP-1, C/EBPα, Src, and stress kinases. Furthermore, we show that human adipocytes and myotubes treated with G-CSF become insulin-resistant. In line with this, a functional polymorphism in the CSF3 gene affects adipose tissue- and whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in human subjects with elevated plasma FFA concentrations. Conclusion G-CSF emerges as a new player in FFA-induced insulin resistance and thus may be of interest as a target for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27069870

  12. Glycosylated and non-glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF)--what is the difference?

    PubMed

    Höglund, M

    1998-12-01

    Two forms of recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) are available for clinical use: filgrastim is expressed in E coli and non-glycosylated, whereas lenograstim is derived from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and glycosylated. The function of the sugar chain, accounting for approximately 4% of the molecular weight of lenograstim (and native G-CSF), is not known. Glycosylation of the G-CSF molecule does not prolong its circulation half life. Lenograstim is more active than filgrastim (and research-use deglycosylated G-CSF) on a weight-by-weight basis in in vitro colony-forming and cell line assays. An international potency standard assigns a specific activity of 100,000 IU/microgram to filgrastim and 127,760 IU/microgram to lenograstim. Correspondingly, two randomised crossover studies in normal subjects, comparing mass equivalent doses of the two rhG-CSFs, have demonstrated a 25-30% higher concentration of blood stem cells (CD34+, CFU-GM) during lenograstim administration. No difference in side effects was observed. Results from a prospective, randomised, non-crossover trial in breast cancer patients suggest that bioequivalent doses of filgrastim and lenograstim have a similar effect on mobilisation of CD34+ cells and immature CD34+ cell subsets, respectively. Although comparisons outside the setting of stem cell mobilisation are lacking, the clinical relevance of the greater specific activity of lenograstim may thus be limited. The difference in potency between microgram identical doses of the two rhG-CSFs makes dosing in biological units (IU) rather than mass units (microgram) more appropriate.

  13. [The plasma levels and diagnostic utility of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with I and II stage of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ławicki, Sławomir; Czygier, Małgorzata; Wojtukiewicz, Marek; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) belong to hematopoetic growth factors (HGFs). Few clinical investigation have shown their autologous production both in vitro by human cell lines and in vivo by tumors, for example in breast cancer. We have investigated the plasma levels of G-CSF, GM-CSF and commonly accepted tumor marker (CA 15-3) before treatment of breast cancer patients in relation to the healthy controls. Additionally, the diagnostic criteria: sensitivity, specificity, the predictive value of positive and negative results were defined. Tested group--50 patients with breast cancer, control group--30 healthy women. G-CSF and GM-CSF were determined using ELISA method, CA 15-3--was measured by chemilumunescence immunoassay (CMIA) (ABBOTT). Median values of G-CSF, GM-CSF and CA 15-3 plasma levels were significantly higher in the II stage of breast cancer patients before surgery compared to the control group. The diagnostic sensitivity of G-CSF and GM-CSF was slightly lower than CA 15-3. The higher range of the diagnostic sensitivity of tested cytokines and CA 15-3 in more advanced breast stages was observed. The combined use of both cytokines and CA 15-3 analysis resulted also in the increased sensitivity range (69%). The diagnostic specificities of tested cytokines were high for both cytokines (equal 90%) and CA 15-3 (95%). The positive and negative predictive values were high for all tested parameters and were higher in more advanced tumor stage. This study suggests that tested cytokines, especially G-CSF, can be clinically useful in diagnostics of breast cancer patients, but further investigation and confirmation by a prospective study are necessary.

  14. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone

    PubMed Central

    Balseanu, Adrian Tudor; Buga, Ana-Maria; Catalin, Bogdan; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes; Zagrean, Ana-Maria; Reymann, Klaus; Schaebitz, Wolf; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs) in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg) or in combination with a single dose (106 cells) of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min) of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration.” However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be

  15. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone.

    PubMed

    Balseanu, Adrian Tudor; Buga, Ana-Maria; Catalin, Bogdan; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes; Zagrean, Ana-Maria; Reymann, Klaus; Schaebitz, Wolf; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs) in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg) or in combination with a single dose (10(6) cells) of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min) of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the "islet of regeneration." However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be

  16. The granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) upregulates metalloproteinase-2 and VEGF through PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 activation in human trophoblast Swan 71 cells.

    PubMed

    Furmento, V A; Marino, J; Blank, V C; Roguin, L P

    2014-11-01

    Although the expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and its receptor (G-CSFR) in placental tissues suggests that the cytokine could play a role in placental development, the relevance of G-CSF:G-CSFR interaction in trophoblast cells remains to be studied. Thus, the possible functional role of G-CSF was examined in a human trophoblast cell line (Swan 71 cells). The expression of G-CSFR was detected by immunocytochemistry and Western blot assays. G-CSF treatment exerted neither a proliferative nor a protective effect on H2O2-mediated cell death in trophoblast cells. Gelatin zymography of supernatants collected from G-CSF-treated cells showed an increment of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. We also found higher MMP-2 and VEGF expression levels in conditioned medium from cells exposed to G-CSF. In addition, it was demonstrated that G-CSF induced the activation of PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 pathways, which in turn activated NF-kB. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors, it was showed that these pathways are mediating the biological effects produced by G-CSF in Swan 71 cells. We have demonstrated for the first time that G-CSF increases MMP-2 activity and VEGF secretion in Swan 71 cells through activation of PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling pathways, both contributing to the translocation of NF-kB to the nucleus. These data suggest that G-CSF is involved in the regulation of trophoblast function, and should be considered as a locally produced cytokine probably contributing to embryo implantation and the development of a functional placenta. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine.

  18. Early applications of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can stabilize the blood-optic-nerve barrier and ameliorate inflammation in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sung-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-10-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was reported to have a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION model). However, the therapeutic window and anti-inflammatory effects of G-CSF in a rAION model have yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of G-CSF and investigate the mechanisms of G-CSF via regulation of optic nerve (ON) inflammation in a rAION model. Rats were treated with G-CSF on day 0, 1, 2 or 7 post-rAION induction for 5 consecutive days, and a control group were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials at 4 weeks post-rAION induction. The survival rate and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells were determined by FluoroGold labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. ON inflammation was evaluated by staining of ED1 and Iba1, and ON vascular permeability was determined by Evans Blue extravasation. The type of macrophage polarization was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by western blotting. A therapeutic window during which G-CSF could rescue visual function and retinal ganglion cell survival was demonstrated at day 0 and day 1 post-infarct. Macrophage infiltration was reduced by 3.1- and 1.6-fold by G-CSF treatment starting on day 0 and 1 post-rAION induction, respectively, compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). This was compatible with 3.3- and 1.7-fold reductions in ON vascular permeability after G-CSF treatment compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05). Microglial activation was increased by 3.8- and 3.2-fold in the early (beginning treatment at day 0 or 1) G-CSF-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). Immediate (within 30 mins of infarct) treatment with G-CSF also induced M2 microglia/macrophage activation. The cytokine levels were lower in the group that received immediate G-CSF treatment compared to

  19. [Granulocyte- colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) use in clinical practice in patients receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer: The Opaline Study].

    PubMed

    Jacot, William; Antoine, Eric-Charles; Hacini, Maya; Giron, Cathy; Rivière, Alain; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Cassin, Daniel; Yazbek, Gabriel; Orfeuvre, Hubert; Sakek, Nacera; Diab, Rafik; Bastit, Laurent; Mille, Dominique; Azria, David

    2015-12-01

    To describe the French routine use of G-CSF in patients treated for breast cancer as per the EORTC recommendations. A prospective multicenter observational study conducted between February 2008 and September 2009 in 869 breast cancer patients treated by chemotherapy (CT) and for whom G-CSF treatment will be delivered in primary (PP) or secondary prophylaxis. The mean age was 55 years. A total of 80.3% of CT was in neoadjuvant/adjuvant setting (NAS). PP was delivered in 78.9% of the NAS patients and 67.5% in metastatic situation. Of the 702 evaluable patients, incidences of severe (SN) and febrile neutropenias (FN) in patients who received PP were 9.3% and 4.2%, respectively. In patients who did not received G-CSF at first cycle, SN and FN were 12.4% and 7.3%, respectively. The use of PP was mainly driven by the type of CT for patients treated in the NAS and by patient or disease related risk factors in the locally advanced/metastatic setting. This study has shown that the use of G-CSF was in accordance with the 2010 updates of the EORTC recommendations. However, G-CSF appears more widely used in the routine practice. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Prognostic factors for re-mobilization using plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma previously failing mobilization with G-CSF with or without chemotherapy: the Korean multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Park, Seonyang; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Chang-Ki; Lee, Je-Jung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Kim, Won Seog; Kim, Hawk; Do, Young Rok; Moon, Joon Ho; Lee, Jihye; Suh, Cheolwon

    2016-03-01

    Plerixafor in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to improve the rates of successful peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization in patients with malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma (MM) who experienced prior failure of PBSC mobilization. We evaluated the mobilization results of re-mobilization using plerixafor and G-CSF in insufficiently mobilizing patients. Forty-four patients with lymphoma (n = 29) or MM (n = 15) were included in the study. The median age was 50 (range, 24-64) years. Previous mobilization regimens were chemotherapy with G-CSF (n = 28), including cyclophosphamide with G-CSF (n = 15), and G-CSF only (n = 16). All patients with lymphoma achieved at least partial response (PR) before the mobilization, including 13 complete responses (CRs). Eleven patients with MM achieved at least PR and four patients with MM were in stable disease before mobilization. The median number of apheresis was 3 (range, 1-6). The median yield of PBSC collections was 3.41 (0.13-38.11) × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg. Thirty-four (77.3 %) patients had successful collections defined as at least 2 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg. The rate of successful collections was not different between the two underlying diseases (79.3 % in lymphoma and 73.3 % in MM). Of the entire cohort, 38 (86.4 %) of patients went on to receive an autologous transplant. Previous long-term use of high-risk drugs (>4 cycles use of alkylating agents, platinum-containing agents, or thalidomide) (HR 10.8, 95 % CI 1.1-110.0, P = 0.043) and low platelet count (<100 × 10(9)/L) 1 day before the first apheresis (HR 27.9, 95 % CI 2.9-273.7, P = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors for predicting failure of PBSC re-mobilization using plerixafor and G-CSF. In conclusion, re-mobilization using plerixafor and G-CSF showed a success rate of 77.3 % in patients with lymphoma or MM who experienced prior failure of PBSC

  1. Establishment of the first international standard for PEGylated granulocyte colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF): Report of an international collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Bird, Chris; Dougall, Thomas; Rigsby, Peter; Bristow, Adrian; Thorpe, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of developing a suitable international reference standard for determination of in vitro biological activity of human sequence recombinant PEG-G-CSF products with a 20 kD linear PEG linked to the N-terminal methionyl residue of G-CSF (INN Filgrastim), produced using a conjugation process and coupling chemistry similar to that employed for the lead PEGfilgrastim product. Based on initial data which showed that the current WHO 2nd international standard, IS for G-CSF (09/136) or alternatively, a PEG-G-CSF standard with a unitage traceable to the G-CSF IS may potentially serve as the IS for PEG-G-CSF products, two candidate preparations of PEG-G-CSF were formulated and lyophilized at NIBSC. These preparations were tested by 23 laboratories using in vitro bioassays in a multi-centre collaborative study. Results indicated that on the basis of parallelism, the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF or any of the PEG-G-CSF samples could be used as the international standard for PEG-G-CSF preparations. However, because of the variability in potency estimates seen when PEG-G-CSF preparations were compared with the current WHO 2nd IS for G-CSF, a candidate PEG-G-CSF was suitable as the WHO IS. The preparation 12/188 was judged suitable to serve as the WHO IS based on in vitro biological activity data. Therefore, the preparation coded 12/188 was established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) in 2013 as the WHO 1st IS for human PEGylated G-CSF with an assigned in vitro bioactivity of 10,000 IU per ampoule. PMID:25450254

  2. G-CSF influences mouse skeletal muscle development and regeneration by stimulating myoblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Mie; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Shimoji, Kenichiro; Onizuka, Takeshi; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Ohno, Yohei; Arai, Takahide; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kaneda, Ruri; Kimura, Kensuke; Makino, Shinji; Sano, Motoaki

    2011-01-01

    After skeletal muscle injury, neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages infiltrate the damaged area; this is followed by rapid proliferation of myoblasts derived from muscle stem cells (also called satellite cells). Although it is known that inflammation triggers skeletal muscle regeneration, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor (G-CSFR) is expressed in developing somites. G-CSFR and G-CSF were expressed in myoblasts of mouse embryos during the midgestational stage but not in mature myocytes. Furthermore, G-CSFR was specifically but transiently expressed in regenerating myocytes present in injured adult mouse skeletal muscle. Neutralization of endogenous G-CSF with a blocking antibody impaired the regeneration process, whereas exogenous G-CSF supported muscle regeneration by promoting the proliferation of regenerating myoblasts. Furthermore, muscle regeneration was markedly impaired in G-CSFR–knockout mice. These findings indicate that G-CSF is crucial for skeletal myocyte development and regeneration and demonstrate the importance of inflammation-mediated induction of muscle regeneration. PMID:21422169

  3. Acceleration of hemopoietic recovery in dogs after extended-field partial-body irradiation by treatment with colony-stimulating factors: rhG-CSF and rhGM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, W; Kreja, L; Selig, C

    1997-03-15

    The influence of treatment with the two colony-stimulating factors, rhG-CSF and rhGM-CSF, on the hemopoietic recovery in aplastic bone marrow sites after extended-field irradiation was studied in a canine model. The dogs received irradiation of the cranial part of their body with a single dose of 11.7 Gy, comprising approximately 72% of the total bone marrow mass. Anatomically this type of exposure corresponds to upper body irradiation (UBI) as employed under clinical conditions. Treatment with both the CSFs was employed for 7 days by daily injections of 30 microg/kg, starting 24 hr after irradiation. Treatment with rhGM-CSF did not completely prevent the initial decrease of the granulocyte counts, but caused an accelerated, though incomplete, recovery in the period from day 5 to day 15. In contrast, treatment with rhG-CSF caused two phases of granulocytosis and an early recovery to normal levels at day 11 after irradiation. Treatment with rhG-CSF, but not with rhGM-CSF, was associated with a strong supra-normal increase of progenitor cells in the blood within the first 8 days and an accelerated hemopoietic recovery in the irradiated sites particularly within the first 7 days after the exposure. These results indicate that under conditions of partial-body irradiation short term treatment with G-CSF is superior to GM-CSF in initiating the hemopoietic recovery on the basis of endogenous stem cell seeding.

  4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study of response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in myelodysplasia associated with monosomy 7: Evidence for differentiation of the dysplastic clone

    SciTech Connect

    Cicilline, M.; Mark, H.F.L.; Rintels, P.

    1994-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic differentiation which may respond to the administration of cytokines with increases in the number of circulating mature neutrophils. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to investigate a young patient with myelodyplasia associated with monosomy 7 to determine whether mature appearing polymorphonuclear cells present in response to treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) were progeny of the dysplastic clone or represented stimulation of residual normal hematopoiesis. The patient is a 26 year old male with a long history of a complex stem cell disorder dating to age 5. A chromosome fragility test was negative. In October 1993 treatment was begun with G-CSF when the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) fell to 300/mm{sup 3} despite GM-CSF therapy. Cytogenetic study of bone marrow just prior to starting G-CSF revealed monosomy 7 in all metaphases. A study in July, 1992 was normal. On his most recent marrow examination (1/94), blasts had numerous dysplastic forms. FISH was performed on buffy coat smears of patient and control specimens using a biotin labelled alpha satellite probe to chromosome 7. At the time of study, the peripheral blood count was 12,500 mm{sup 3}, with 56% neutrophils, 6% bands and no circulating blasts. Cells were scored as either polymorphonuclear or mononuclear cells. In a healthy control, 22 of 190 scored as either polymorphonuclear cells (12%) contained one chromosome 7 signal, versus 193 of 200 (96.5%) in the patient. For mononuclear cells, the control demonstrated 23 of 137 nuclei (17%) with one signal, versus 300 of 511 nuclei (59%) in the patient. We conclude that G-CSF induced differentiation in the dysplastic clone in this case and did not stimulate normal hermatopoiesis.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) positive effects on muscle fiber degeneration and gait recovery after nerve lesion in MDX mice

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Gustavo F; Benitez, Suzana U; Oliveira, Alexandre L R

    2014-01-01

    Background G-CSF has been shown to decrease inflammatory processes and to act positively on the process of peripheral nerve regeneration during the course of muscular dystrophy. Aims The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of treatment of G-CSF during sciatic nerve regeneration and histological analysis in the soleus muscle in MDX mice. Methods Six-week-old male MDX mice underwent left sciatic nerve crush and were G-CSF treated at 7 days prior to and 21 days after crush. Ten and twenty-one days after surgery, the mice were euthanized, and the sciatic nerves were processed for immunohistochemistry (anti-p75NTR and anti-neurofilament) and transmission electron microscopy. The soleus muscles were dissected out and processed for H&E staining and subsequent morphologic analysis. Motor function analyses were performed at 7 days prior to and 21 days after sciatic crush using the CatWalk system and the sciatic nerve index. Results Both groups treated with G-CSF showed increased p75NTR and neurofilament expression after sciatic crush. G-CSF treatment decreased the number of degenerated and regenerated muscle fibers, thereby increasing the number of normal muscle fibers. Conclusions The reduction in p75NTR and neurofilament indicates a decreased regenerative capacity in MDX mice following a lesion to a peripheral nerve. The reduction in motor function in the crushed group compared with the control groups may reflect the cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration that occur postnatally. Thus, G-CSF treatment increases motor function in MDX mice. Nevertheless, the decrease in baseline motor function in these mice is not reversed completely by G-CSF. PMID:25328849

  6. Recovery of pulmonary structure and exercise capacity by treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Gustavo; Vidal, Daniel T A; Klein, Wilfried; Neto, Alberto; Angrizani, André; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Kaneto, Carla; Souza, Bruno Solano de Freitas; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B P; Macambira, Simone G

    2014-04-01

    Emphysema is a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease characterized abnormal dilatation of alveolar spaces, which impairs alveolar gas exchange, compromising the physical capacity of a patient due to airflow limitations. Here we tested the effects of G-CSF administration in pulmonary tissue and exercise capacity in emphysematous mice. C57Bl/6 female mice were treated with elastase intratracheally to induce emphysema. Their exercise capacities were evaluated in a treadmill. Lung histological sections were prepared to evaluate mean linear intercept measurement. Emphysematous mice were treated with G-CSF (3 cycles of 200 μg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, with 7-day intervals) or saline and submitted to a third evaluation 8 weeks after treatment. Values of run distance and linear intercept measurement were expressed as mean ± SD and compared applying a paired t-test. Effects of treatment on these parameters were analyzed applying a Repeated Measures ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post hoc analysis. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Twenty eight days later, animals ran significantly less in a treadmill compared to normal mice (549.7 ± 181.2 m and 821.7 ± 131.3 m, respectively; p < 0.01). Treatment with G-CSF significantly increased the exercise capacity of emphysematous mice (719.6 ± 200.5 m), whereas saline treatment had no effect on distance run (595.8 ± 178.5 m). The PCR cytokines genes analysis did not detect difference between experimental groups. Morphometric analyses in the lung showed that saline-treated mice had a mean linear intercept significantly higher (p < 0.01) when compared to mice treated with G-CSF, which did not significantly differ from that of normal mice. Treatment with G-CSF promoted the recovery of exercise capacity and regeneration of alveolar structural alterations in emphysematous mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hochuekkito, a Kampo (Traditional Japanese Herbal) Medicine, and its Polysaccharide Portion Stimulate G-CSF Secretion from Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tsukasa; Moriya, Michiyo; Kiyohara, Hiroaki; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Haruki

    2010-09-01

    Kampo (traditional Japanese herbal) medicines are taken orally due to which the gastric mucosal immune system may act as one of the major targets for the expression of pharmacological activity. The inner surface of the intestinal tract possesses a large area of mucosal membranes, and the intestinal epithelial cells sit at the interface between a lumen and a lymphocyte-rich lamina propria. The cross talk that occurs between these compartments serves to maintain intestinal homeostasis, and the cytokine network plays an important role in the cross talk. In this study, the effect of Hochuekkito (HET), one of Kampo medicines, on cytokine secretion of intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. When murine normal colonic epithelial cell-line MCE301 cells were stimulated with HET, the contents of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the conditioned medium were significantly increased in dose- and time-dependent manners. The enhanced G-CSF gene transcription in MCE301 cells by the stimulation of HET was observed by RT-PCR. The enhanced G-CSF secretion by HET was also observed in C3H/HeJ mice-derived primary cultured colonic epithelial cells. When the HET was fractionated, only the polysaccharide fraction (F-5) enhanced the G-CSF secretion of MCE301 cells, and the activity of F-5 lost after the treatment of periodate that can degrade the carbohydrate moiety. These results suggest that HET enhances secretion of G-CSF from colonic epithelial cells and the polysaccharide is one of the active ingredients of HET. The enhanced G-CSF secretion by HET may partly contribute to the clinically observed various pharmacological activities of HET including immunomodulating activity.

  8. [Use of filgrastim, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), in radiotherapy to reduce drop-outs because of radiogenic leukopenia].

    PubMed

    Gava, A; Bertossi, L; Ferrarese, F; Coghetto, F; Marazzato, G; Andrulli, A D; Zorat, P L

    1998-03-01

    Radiotherapy patients are at risk of developing leukopenia, which risk depends on the irradiated volume, the rate of irradiated bone marrow and the radiation dose. Radiogenic leukopenia may cause radiotherapy drop-out, with consequent effects, on local tumor control and clinical outcome. The introduction of granulocyte growth factors, such as filgrastim, has permitted to accelerate normal neutrophil count recovery in irradiation-related neutropenia both in vitro and animal models; clinical experience in humans is still lacking, relative to both indications and scheduling. In the Oncologic Radiotherapy Department of Treviso Hospital, 31 patients irradiated for Hodgkin disease, rectal cancer and other malignancies, who presented leukopenia requiring treatment discontinuation, were given filgrastim to assess its actual effect in avoiding further drop-outs and to compare two administration schedules (2 or 3 vials, 30 MIU, weekly). Filgrastim treatment was continued throughout the radiotherapy cycles, for 1 to 5 weeks. Eighteen patients had received previous chemotherapy and 11 were undergoing concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy-irradiation. A mean 203% increase in leukocyte count was observed (136% in the patients treated with 2 vials/week and 274% in those receiving 3 vials/week); this increase was more apparent in women that in men (256% versus 91%) and slightly higher in patients 50 years old and with target volumes < 5000 ml. Filgrastin treatment was well tolerated by all patients, with no discontinuations due to adverse effects; 9 patients (29%) reported skeletal pain, which was marked in 2 of them only. Eighty percent of patients completed all the radiotherapy cycles with no discontinuation, while 6 patients dropped out because leukopenia persisted. Biweekly filgrastim administration was effective to prevent unscheduled radiotherapy discontinuation in 75% of patients and triweekly administration was effective in 86% of patients. In our experience, filgrastim

  9. Ischemic cardiac complications following G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Peter M; Bertog, Stefan C; Wilson, Robert F; Henry, Timothy D

    2010-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used in bone marrow transplant donors to increase the number of circulating progenitor cells. G-CSF has also been studied following myocardial infarction, but concern has been raised about the risks of G-CSF administration in patients with coronary artery disease. We present two cases of ischemic cardiac complications that are likely to be related to administration of G-CSF and provide a contemporary overview of the literature on the cardiovascular risks of G-CSF.

  10. A 3,387 bp 5'-flanking sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene provides correct tissue-specific expression of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Serova, Irina A; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Andreeva, Ludmila E; Burkov, Ivan A; Dias, Luciene P B; Battulin, Nariman R; Smirnov, Alexander V; Serov, Oleg L

    2012-06-01

    A new expression vector containing the 1,944 bp 5'-flanking regulatory region together with exon 1 and intron 1 of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene (CSN1S1), the full-sized human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene (hGCSF) and the 3'-flanking sequence of the bovine CSN1S1, was created. The vector DNA was used for generation of four mouse transgenic lines. The transgene was integrated into chromosomes 8 and 12 of two founders as 2 and 5 copies, respectively. Tissue-specific secretion of hG-CSF into the milk of transgenic mice was in the range of 19-40 μg/ml. RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of the transgenic mice demonstrated that expression of hGCSF was detected in only the mammary gland in the progeny of all founders. Moreover, cells were shown to be positive for hG-CSF by immunofluorescent analysis in the mammary glands but not in any other tissues. There were no signs of mosaic expression in the mammary gland. Trace amounts of hG-CSF were detected in the serum of females of two transgenic lines during lactation only. However, no transgenic mice showed any changes in hematopoiesis based on the number of granulocytes in blood. Immunoblotting of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic mice revealed two forms, presumably the glycosylated and non-glycosylated forms. The hematopoietic activity of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic females is comparable to that of recombinant G-CSF. In general, the data obtained in this study show that the new expression vector is able to provide correct tissue-specific expression of hG-CSF with high biological activity in transgenic mice.

  11. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent.

  12. The transcription factor Gfi1 regulates G-CSF signaling and neutrophil development through the Ras activator RasGRP1

    PubMed Central

    de la Luz Sierra, Maria; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Gasperini, Paola; Salvucci, Ombretta; Jiang, Kan; McCormick, Peter J.; Segarra, Marta; Stone, Jim; Maric, Dragan; Zhu, Jinfang; Qian, Xiaolan; Lowy, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor growth factor independence 1 (Gfi1) and the growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) are individually essential for neutrophil differentiation from myeloid progenitors. Here, we provide evidence that the functions of Gfi1 and G-CSF are linked in the regulation of granulopoiesis. We report that Gfi1 promotes the expression of Ras guanine nucleotide releasing protein 1 (RasGRP1), an exchange factor that activates Ras, and that RasGRP1 is required for G-CSF signaling through the Ras/mitogen–activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/Erk) pathway. Gfi1-null mice have reduced levels of RasGRP1 mRNA and protein in thymus, spleen, and bone marrow, and Gfi1 transduction in myeloid cells promotes RasGRP1 expression. When stimulated with G-CSF, Gfi1-null myeloid cells are selectively defective at activating Erk1/2, but not signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) or STAT3, and fail to differentiate into neutrophils. Expression of RasGRP1 in Gfi1-deficient cells rescues Erk1/2 activation by G-CSF and allows neutrophil maturation by G-CSF. These results uncover a previously unknown function of Gfi1 as a regulator of RasGRP1 and link Gfi1 transcriptional control to G-CSF signaling and regulation of granulopoiesis. PMID:20203268

  13. Study of cytogenetic abnormalities in G-CSF stimulated peripheral blood cells and non-stimulated bone marrow cells of patients with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lozynskyy, R Y; Lozynska, M R; Hontar, Y V; Huleyuk, N L; Maslyak, Z V; Novak, V L

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to improve cytogenetic diagnostics and monitoring of myelofibrosis and to reveal the spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities in patients from Ukraine. A total of 42 patients (23 females and 19 males) with myelofibrosis was studied using different cytogenetic methods. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was added by the new method during cultivation of peripheral blood (PB) cells from 31 patients for specific stimulation of mitotic divisions. Two patients underwent examination by fluorescent in situ hybridization method. In cell cultures of PB stimulated in vitro with G-CSF and in non-stimulated bone marrow chromosome abnormalities were found in 19 (45.2%) of all the patients. The spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities of bone marrow and PB was the same in all of the patients. Aspiration of bone marrow was unsuccessful due to significant fibrosis in 10 (29.4%) of 34 patients. The study by fluorescent in situ hybridization method confirmed cytogenetic abnormalities revealed by G-method and discovered additional possibly normal subclone. Cytogenetic study of PB using in vitro G-CSF as a specific stimulant of mitosis instead of phytohemagglutinin revealed significant variety of chromosomal abnormalities in Ukrainian patients with myelofibrosis. This method could be a less invasive alternative to cytogenetic examination of bone marrow in the subgroup of patients with considerable fibrosis and consecutive changes. The usage of fluorescent in situ hybridization method supplemented karyotyping by G-banding method.

  14. G-CSF: From granulopoietic stimulant to bone marrow stem cell mobilizing agent.

    PubMed

    Bendall, Linda J; Bradstock, Kenneth F

    2014-08-01

    G-CSF was among the first cytokines to be identified and rapidly transitioned into clinical medicine. Initially used to promote the production of neutrophils in patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia it helped to revolutionize the delivery of cancer therapy. Its ability to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells from the bone marrow into the blood was subsequently exploited, changing the face of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Today the knowledge gained in unraveling the mechanisms of stem cell mobilization by G-CSF is being explored as a means to increase chemosensitivity in hematological malignancies. This review provides a brief history of G-CSF and then focuses on recent advances in our understanding of G-CSF-induced stem cell mobilization and the potential clinical application of this knowledge in chemo-sensitization. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Combined administration of G-CSF and GM-CSF stimulates monocyte-derived pro-angiogenic cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefania; Bussolati, Benedetta; Scacciatella, Paolo; Marra, Sebastiano; Sanavio, Fiorella; Tarella, Corrado; Camussi, Giovanni

    2006-04-01

    Mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells has been suggested to contribute to neo-vascularization of ischemic organs. Aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF may influence the expansion of circulating KDR+ cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). KDR+ cells significantly increased in peripheral blood of AMI patients treated with G-CSF and GM-CSF compared to untreated patients. This KDR+ cells population was CD14+ but not CD34+ or CD133+. CD14+/KDR+ cells were also obtained in vitro by culturing mononuclear cells from healthy donors in a Rotary Cell Culture System in the presence of G-CSF + GM-CSF, but not of the individual growth factors. CD14+/KDR+ cells, obtained from patients or from in vitro culture, co-expressed hematopoietic (CD45, CD14) and endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, and VE-cadherin). CD14+/KDR+, but not CD14+/KDR- cells, stimulated the organization of human microvascular endothelial cells into capillary-like structures on Matrigel both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of G-CSF and GM-CSF induced a CD14+/KDR+ cell population with potential pro-angiogenic properties.

  16. Phorbol ester-treated human acute myeloid leukemia cells secrete G-CSF, GM-CSF and erythroid differentiation factor into serum-free media in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Scher, W; Eto, Y; Ejima, D; Den, T; Svet-Moldavsky, I A

    1990-12-10

    Upon treatment with the phorbol ester, tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA), peripheral mononuclear blood cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia secrete into serum-free cell-conditioned media (PMA-CCM) at least three distinct nondialysable 'hematopoietic' factors: granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythroid differentiation factor (EDF, activin A). G-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a G-CSF-responsive cell line, NSF-60, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a G-CSF-specific monoclonal antibody (MAB). GM-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a GM-CSF-responsive line, TALL-101, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a GM-CSF-specific MAB. EDF was identified by its ability to stimulate erythroid differentiation in mouse erythroleukemia cell lines, its identical retention times to those of authentic EDF on three successive reverse-phase HPLC columns and characterization of its penultimate N-terminal residue as leucine which is the same as that of authentic EDF. Both authentic EDF and the erythroid-stimulating activity in PMA-CCM were found to act synergistically with a suboptimal inducing concentration of a well-studied inducing agent, dimethyl sulfoxide, in inducing erythroid differentiation. In addition, a fourth activity was observed in PMA-CCM: normal human fetal bone marrow cell-proliferation stimulating activity (FBMC-PSA). FBMC-PSA was identified by its ability to stimulate the growth of granulocytes and macrophages in FBMC suspension cultures, which neither recombinant G-CSF or GM-CSF were found to do.

  17. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin (RHuEpo) and Granular Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) related to mixed cryoglobulinaemia associated to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I: a case report description.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Endri; Gattei, Valter; Mazzaro, Cesare

    2014-12-01

    HCV infection is related to hepatic disease and mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC). Renal involvement is reported in one third of cryoglobulinaemic patients. The combination of HCV related MC with renal involvement has been associated with poor survival and identified as Hepatitis C Virus Risk Syndrome (HCV RS). Here we describe antiviral treatment and management of side effects (anaemia and neutropenia) with RHuEpo and G CSF in a rare case of HCV RS.

  18. Carbonic anhydrase IX promotes myeloid-derived suppressor cell mobilization and establishment of a metastatic niche by stimulating G-CSF production.

    PubMed

    Chafe, Shawn C; Lou, Yuanmei; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Vallejo, Marylou; Hamilton, Melisa J; McDonald, Paul C; Bennewith, Kevin L; Möller, Andreas; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2015-03-15

    The mobilization of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) to distant tissues before the arrival of disseminated tumor cells has been shown preclinically to facilitate metastasis through the establishment of metastatic niches. Primary tumor hypoxia has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the production of chemokines and cytokines responsible for the mobilization of these BMDCs, especially in breast cancer. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, CA9) expression is highly upregulated in hypoxic breast cancer cells through the action of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1). Preclinical evidence has demonstrated that CAIX is required for breast tumor growth and metastasis; however, the mechanism by which CAIX exerts its prometastatic function is not well understood. Here, we show that CAIX is indispensable for the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) by hypoxic breast cancer cells and tumors in an orthotopic model. Furthermore, we demonstrate that tumor-expressed CAIX is required for the G-CSF-driven mobilization of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) to the breast cancer lung metastatic niche. We also determined that CAIX expression is required for the activation of NF-κB in hypoxic breast cancer cells and constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway in CAIX-depleted cells restored G-CSF secretion. Together, these findings identify a novel hypoxia-induced CAIX-NF-κB-G-CSF cellular signaling axis culminating in the mobilization of granulocytic MDSCs to the breast cancer lung metastatic niche.

  19. Progressive inactivation of the expression of an erythroid transcriptional factor in GM- and G-CSF-dependent myeloid cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Crotta, S; Nicolis, S; Ronchi, A; Ottolenghi, S; Ruzzi, L; Shimada, Y; Migliaccio, A R; Migliaccio, G

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional binding protein NFE-1 (also called GF-1 and Ery-f1) is thought to play a necessary, but not sufficient, role in the regulation of differentiation-related gene expression in a subset of hematopoietic lineages (erythroid, megakaryocytic, and basophil-mast cell). In order to clarify the mechanism which underlies the lineage-specificity of the NFE-1 expression, as well as the relationship between the expression of this factor and growth factor responsiveness, we have evaluated the capacity of erythropoietin (Epo)-, granulomonocytic (GM)-colony stimulating factor (CSF)-, and granulocyte (G)-CSF-dependent subclones derived from the interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line 32D, to express 1) NFE-1 mRNA, 2) NFE-1-related nuclear proteins, and 3) chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) activity when transfected with a CAT gene under the control of NFE-1 cognate sequences. NFE-1 mRNA was found to be expressed not only in cells with mast cell (IL-3-dependent 32D) and erythroid (Epo-dependent 32D Epo1) phenotypes, but also in cells with predominantly granulocyte/macrophage properties, such as the GM-CSF- (early myelomonocytic) and G-CSF- (myelocytic) dependent subclones of 32D. However, a gradient of expression, correlating with the lineage, the stage of differentiation, and the growth factor responsiveness of the cell lines, was found among the different subclones: Epo greater than or equal to IL-3 greater than GM-CSF greater than G-CSF. Binding experiments demonstrated NFE-1 activity in all cell lines except the G-CSF-dependent line. Function of the NFE-1 protein was assessed by the expression of the CAT gene linked to the SV40 promoter and a mutant (-175 T----C) HPFH gamma-globin promoter. High level CAT expression was seen only in the Epo1 cells although low level expression was also seen in the parent 32D. These results demonstrate that the specificity of the expression of NFE-1 for the erythroid--megakaryocytic--mast cell lineages is obtained by

  20. Pegfilgrastim prophylaxis is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization of cancer patients than filgrastim prophylaxis: a retrospective United States claims analysis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Myelosuppressive chemotherapy can lead to dose-limiting febrile neutropenia. Prophylactic use of recombinant human G-CSF such as daily filgrastim and once-per-cycle pegfilgrastim may reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia. This comparative study examined the effect of pegfilgrastim versus daily filgrastim on the risk of hospitalization. Methods This retrospective United States claims analysis utilized 2004–2009 data for filgrastim- and pegfilgrastim-treated patients receiving chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) or breast, lung, ovarian, or colorectal cancers. Cycles in which pegfilgrastim or filgrastim was administered within 5 days from initiation of chemotherapy (considered to represent prophylaxis) were pooled for analysis. Neutropenia-related hospitalization and other healthcare encounters were defined with a “narrow” criterion for claims with an ICD-9 code for neutropenia and with a “broad” criterion for claims with an ICD-9 code for neutropenia, fever, or infection. Odds ratios (OR) for hospitalization and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by generalized estimating equation (GEE) models and adjusted for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Per-cycle healthcare utilization and costs were examined for cycles with pegfilgrastim or filgrastim prophylaxis. Results We identified 3,535 patients receiving G-CSF prophylaxis, representing 12,056 chemotherapy cycles (11,683 pegfilgrastim, 373 filgrastim). The mean duration of filgrastim prophylaxis in the sample was 4.8 days. The mean duration of pegfilgrastim prophylaxis in the sample was 1.0 day, consistent with the recommended dosage of pegfilgrastim - a single injection once per chemotherapy cycle. Cycles with prophylactic pegfilgrastim were associated with a decreased risk of neutropenia-related hospitalization (narrow definition: OR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.16–1.13; broad definition: OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.24–0.59) and all-cause hospitalization (OR

  1. Pegfilgrastim prophylaxis is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization of cancer patients than filgrastim prophylaxis: a retrospective United States claims analysis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Naeim, Arash; Henk, Henry J; Becker, Laura; Chia, Victoria; Badre, Sejal; Li, Xiaoyan; Deeter, Robert

    2013-01-08

    Myelosuppressive chemotherapy can lead to dose-limiting febrile neutropenia. Prophylactic use of recombinant human G-CSF such as daily filgrastim and once-per-cycle pegfilgrastim may reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia. This comparative study examined the effect of pegfilgrastim versus daily filgrastim on the risk of hospitalization. This retrospective United States claims analysis utilized 2004-2009 data for filgrastim- and pegfilgrastim-treated patients receiving chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or breast, lung, ovarian, or colorectal cancers. Cycles in which pegfilgrastim or filgrastim was administered within 5 days from initiation of chemotherapy (considered to represent prophylaxis) were pooled for analysis. Neutropenia-related hospitalization and other healthcare encounters were defined with a "narrow" criterion for claims with an ICD-9 code for neutropenia and with a "broad" criterion for claims with an ICD-9 code for neutropenia, fever, or infection. Odds ratios (OR) for hospitalization and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by generalized estimating equation (GEE) models and adjusted for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Per-cycle healthcare utilization and costs were examined for cycles with pegfilgrastim or filgrastim prophylaxis. We identified 3,535 patients receiving G-CSF prophylaxis, representing 12,056 chemotherapy cycles (11,683 pegfilgrastim, 373 filgrastim). The mean duration of filgrastim prophylaxis in the sample was 4.8 days. The mean duration of pegfilgrastim prophylaxis in the sample was 1.0 day, consistent with the recommended dosage of pegfilgrastim - a single injection once per chemotherapy cycle. Cycles with prophylactic pegfilgrastim were associated with a decreased risk of neutropenia-related hospitalization (narrow definition: OR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.16-1.13; broad definition: OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.24-0.59) and all-cause hospitalization (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.35-0.72) versus cycles with

  2. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) induced by donor-derived anti-HLA antibodies in aplastic anemia: possible priming effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the recipient neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Mitsuhashi, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tatsuharu

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is currently the leading cause of transfusion-related death. A 67-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia developed TRALI, consisting of acute respiratory insufficiency with severe hypoxia and diffuse pulmonary infiltration 2 hours after the transfusion of platelet concentrates. Although he required intensive respiratory support, he promptly recovered within 4 days. The presence of anti-HLA antibody (anti-HLA B52) in the donated blood product was demonstrated, and a lymphocytotoxicity test disclosed antibody-mediated cytotoxicity against the patient's cells. Furthermore, administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor was suggested to predispose the patient to TRALI by priming the neutrophils.

  3. Effects of autologous SCF- and G-CSF-mobilized bone marrow stem cells on hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in rats with ischemia-reperfusion renal injury.

    PubMed

    Bi, L Y; Zhao, D A; Yang, D S; Guo, J G; Liang, B; Zhang, R X; Zhao, J L; Bai, H T; Li, S J

    2015-04-27

    To explore the mechanism whereby stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) jointly mobilize bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and promote kidney repair, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups. In the treatment control group, rats were administered SCF (200 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) and G-CSF (50 μg·kg-1·day-1) for 5 days. In the treatment group, RIRI models were established, and 6 h later, SCF (200 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) and G-CSF (50 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) were administered for 5 days. In the model and treatment groups, tubular epithelial cell degeneration and necrosis were noticed, but the extent of repair in the treatment group was significantly better than in the model group. Five days after the operation, renal tissue CD34+ cells significantly increased in the model and treatment groups compared with the control and treatment control groups. HIF-1α, VEGF, and EPO expression in treatment groups increased significantly compared with the other groups. HIF- 1α, VEGF, EPO expression in the treatment control group increased significantly compared with the control group. Joint use of SCF and G-CSF increased the number of BMSCs in damaged kidney tissue and reduced the degree of renal tissue damage. BMSCs promote increased HIF-1α expression in renal tissue. Increased kidney tissue HIF- 1α and its target gene products VEGF and EPO expression possibly induce SCF and G-CSF to promote acute tubular necrosis repair.

  4. Do two different stem cell grafts: G-CSF stimulated and unstimulated bone marrow differ according to hematopoietic colony forming capacity?

    PubMed

    Özgüner, Meltem; Azık, Mehmet Fatih; Tavil, Betül; Bozkaya, Ikbal; Köksal, Yasin; Canal, Elif; Uçkan, Duygu; Tunç, Bahattin

    2014-06-01

    The study was designed to compare colony forming capacity of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulated bone marrow (G-BM) with standard unstimulated bone marrow (U-BM) of healthy donors of pediatric patients. CFU-Assay results of 26 healthy donors of pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were analyzed retrospectively. 13 of donors received 10 μg/kg per day of G-CSF as a single injection for 3 consecutive days and other 13 of donors had unstimulated BM. Colony forming capacity of hematopoietic stem cells evaluated with Colony Forming Unit-Assay (CFU-Assay) with in semi-solid agar culture medium after 14-18 days of culture period. CFU-Assay results of G-BM and U-BM (expressed as means) were; Burst Forming Unit-Erythroid (BFU-E): 15.20 × 10(4)/kg and 8.38 × 10(4)/kg, Colony Forming Unit-Granulocyte Macrophage (CFU-GM): 10.35 × 10(4)/kg and 5.67 × 10(4)/kg, Colony Forming Unit-Erythroid (CFU-E): 0.59 × 10(4)/kg and 0.33 × 10(4)/kg, CFU-Granulocyte Erythroid Macrophage Megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM): 0.52 × 10(4)/kg and 0.53 × 10(4)/kg respectively. BFU-E and CFU-GM capacity of G-BM was increased and statistically significantly different than standard U-BM (p ⩽ 0.01). In conclusion, increased colony forming capacity of hematopoietic stem cells of G-BM when compared with standard unstimulated BM could be a major advantage for transplantation.

  5. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Marcy B.; Singh, Vijay K.; Rhee, Juong G.; Jackson, William E.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:22843381

  6. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Grace, Marcy B; Singh, Vijay K; Rhee, Juong G; Jackson, William E; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H

    2012-11-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

  7. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-CSF stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body gamma-irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), to enhance discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematological parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery following irradiation provide a convenient means to compare efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials Male Gottingen minipigs, 4–5 months old and weighing 9–11 kg were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen®, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body gamma-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results Results indicate G-CSF enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusion These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing numbers of circulating granulocytes. PMID:23845847

  8. G-CSF loaded nanofiber/nanoparticle composite coated with collagen promotes wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tanha, Shima; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza; Abdollahi, Mohamad; Vakilian, Saeid; Esmaili, Zahra; Naraghi, Zahra Safaei; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Javar, Hamid Akbari

    2017-10-01

    Sustained release of functional growth factors can be considered as a beneficial methodology for wound healing. In this study, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated in Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers, followed by surface coating with collagen type I. Physical and mechanical properties of the PCL nanofibers containing G-CSF loaded chitosan nanoparticles PCL/NP(G-CSF) and in vivo performance for wound healing were investigated. G-CSF structural stability was evaluated through SDS_PAGE, reversed phase (RP) HPLC and size-exclusion chromatography, as well as circular dichroism. Nanofiber/nanoparticle composite scaffold was demonstrated to have appropriate mechanical properties as a wound dresser and a sustained release of functional G-CSF. The PCL/NP(G-CSF) scaffold showed a suitable proliferation and well-adherent morphology of stem cells. In vivo study and histopathological evaluation outcome revealed that skin regeneration was dramatically accelerated under PCL/NP(G-CSF) as compared with control groups. Superior fibroblast maturation, enhanced collagen deposition and minimum inflammatory cells were also the beneficial properties of PCL/NP(G-CSF) over the commercial dressing. The synergistic effect of extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous membrane and G-CSF could develop a suitable supportive substrate in order to extensive utilization for the healing of skin wounds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2830-2842, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Arecoline increases basic fibroblast growth factor but reduces expression of IL-1, IL-6, G-CSF and GM-CSF in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mafaz; Cox, Stephen; Kelly, Elizabeth; Moore, Malcolm A S; Zoellner, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Areca nut chewing is associated with oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). Raised vascular basic fibroblast growth factor may induce fibrosis. Arecoline is a muscarinic alkaloid in areca nut, which we earlier reported causes injury and necrosis of human endothelium. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to arecoline with or without tumor necrosis factor-α, and separately to acetylcholine, muscarine, or nicotine. Protein levels of basic fibroblast growth factor, as well as the inflammatory cytokines: granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, and Interleukins-6, 1-α and 1-β, were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. mRNA levels were established by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Basic fibroblast growth factor was released into the culture medium at arecoline levels causing necrosis (P < 0.05). This contrasted with an opposite effect of arecoline on levels of the inflammatory cytokines (P < 0.05). Tumor necrosis factor-α increased IL-6 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulated factor, but arecoline reduced this stimulated expression (P < 0.05). Arecoline had no effect on mRNA for basic fibroblast growth factor, although there was reduced mRNA for the separate inflammatory cytokines studied. The effect of acetylcholine, muscarine, and nicotine was minimal and dissimilar to that of arecoline. Data raise the possibility that arecoline-induced, vascular basic fibroblast growth factor contributes to OSF, by combining increased growth factor expression with endothelial necrosis, and thus driving fibroblast proliferation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Diabetes Limits Stem Cell Mobilization Following G-CSF but Not Plerixafor.

    PubMed

    Fadini, Gian Paolo; Fiala, Mark; Cappellari, Roberta; Danna, Marianna; Park, Soo; Poncina, Nicol; Menegazzo, Lisa; Albiero, Mattia; DiPersio, John; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Avogaro, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that diabetes impairs hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In this study, we tested whether the CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor, differently from G-CSF, is effective in mobilizing HSCs in patients with diabetes. In a prospective study, individuals with and without diabetes (n = 10/group) were administered plerixafor to compare CD34(+) HSC mobilization; plerixafor was equally able to mobilize CD34(+) HSCs in the two groups, whereas in historical data, G-CSF was less effective in patients with diabetes. In a retrospective autologous transplantation study conducted on 706 patients, diabetes was associated with poorer mobilization in patients who received G-CSF with/without chemotherapy, whereas it was not in patients who received G-CSF plus plerixafor. Similarly in an allogeneic transplantation study (n = 335), diabetes was associated with poorer mobilization in patients who received G-CSF. Patients with diabetes who received G-CSF without plerixafor had a lower probability of reaching >50/μL CD34(+) HSCs, independent from confounding variables. In conclusion, diabetes negatively impacted HSC mobilization after G-CSF with or without chemotherapy but had no effect on mobilization induced by G-CSF with plerixafor. This finding has major implications for the care of patients with diabetes undergoing stem cell mobilization and transplantation and for the vascular regenerative potential of bone marrow stem cells.

  11. G-CSF attenuates noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ze-tao; Lin, Ying; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jin; Wang, Ren-feng; Chen, Fu-quan; Mi, Wen-juan; Qiu, Jian-hua

    2014-03-06

    In this study, we investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the treatment of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a guinea pig model. Forty guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups: control, noise (white noise, 3 h/d for 2 days at 115 dB), noise+G-CSF (350 μg/kg/d for 5 days), and noise+saline. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were used to determine the hearing threshold and outer hair cell function, respectively, in each group. Cochlear morphology was examined to evaluate hair cell injury induced by intense noise exposure. Fourteen days after noise exposure, the noise+G-CSF group had a lower ABR value than the noise group (P<0.05) or the noise+saline group (P<0.01). At most frequencies, the DPOAE value of the noise+G-CSF group showed a significant rise (P<0.05) compared to the noise group or the noise+saline group. Neither the ABR value nor the DPOAE value differed between the noise group and the noise+saline group. The morphology of the phalloidin-stained organ of Corti was consistent with the functional measurements. In conclusion, G-CSF can preserve hearing in an experimental model of NIHL in guinea pigs, by preserving hair cells after intense noise exposure.

  12. G-CSF in Healthy Allogeneic Stem Cell Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hölig, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) in healthy volunteers with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is currently carried out at many institutions worldwide. This report presents the experience of the Dresden center regarding donor evaluation and mobilization schedule. Data regarding efficacy, short- and long-term safety of G-CSF treatment gained from 8290 PBSC collections in healthy donors are outlined. These results are discussed against the background of the available evidence from the literature. Although established as a standard procedure, G-CSF application to allogeneic donors will always be a very delicate procedure and requires the utmost commitment of all staff involved to ensure maximum donor safety. PMID:24179471

  13. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children.

    PubMed

    Meraz, José Eugenio Vázquez; Arellano-Galindo, José; Avalos, Armando Martínez; Mendoza-García, Emma; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m(2) of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 10(9)/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 10(8) (0.1-1.4), 2.25 × 10(8) (0.56-6.28), and 1.02 × 10(8) (0.34-2.5) whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 10(6)/kg (0.09-0.34), 1.04 × 10(6) (0.19-9.3), and 0.59 × 10(6) (0.17-0.87) and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 10(5) (0.31-2.12), 1.16 × 10(5) (0.64-2.97), and 1.12 × 10(5) (0.3-6.63) in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p = 0.007 and p = 0.05, resp.) and in group C versus group A (p = 0.08 and p = 0.05, resp.). The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 10(3)/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy.

  14. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Meraz, José Eugenio Vázquez; Arellano-Galindo, José; Avalos, Armando Martínez; Mendoza-García, Emma; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 109/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 108 (0.1–1.4), 2.25 × 108 (0.56–6.28), and 1.02 × 108 (0.34–2.5) whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 106/kg (0.09–0.34), 1.04 × 106 (0.19–9.3), and 0.59 × 106 (0.17–0.87) and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 105 (0.31–2.12), 1.16 × 105 (0.64–2.97), and 1.12 × 105 (0.3–6.63) in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p = 0.007 and p = 0.05, resp.) and in group C versus group A (p = 0.08 and p = 0.05, resp.). The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 103/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy. PMID:26880960

  15. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  16. Action of granulopoiesis-stimulating cytokines rhG-CSF, rhGM-CSF, and rmGM-CSF on murine haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC).

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Weiterová, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide new data to the knowledge of mechanisms by which recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) enhance the numbers of colonies growing from hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in the murine bone marrow. The in vitro technique for cultivating GM-CFC from normal bone marrow cells was used. For evaluation of stimulatory actions of the drugs studied, the factors themselves or sera of mice given these factors were added to the cultures. The factors or the sera were present in the cultures either as the only potentially stimulatory agents or acted jointly with a suboptimum concentration of recombinant murine interleukin-3 (rmIL-3). It was found that both rhG-CSF and rmGM-CSF stimulate the proliferation of GM-CFC by a combination of direct mechanisms (direct actions on the target cells) and indirect effects (effects mediated through the induction of other cytokines and/or growth factors in the murine organism). The rhGM-CSF exhibited somewhat weaker in vitro effects in comparison with the other two factors and only indirect effects were noted. Additional in vivo experiments documented that, in spite of differences in mechanisms of action of the individual drugs studied on murine bone marrow cells in vitro, equal in vivo doses of the factors induce quantitatively similar effects on the production of GM-CFC in vivo.

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 induction contributes to renoprotection by G-CSF during rhabdomyolysis-associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingqing; Hill, William D; Su, Yunchao; Huang, Shuang; Dong, Zheng

    2011-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is renoprotective during acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by ischemia and cisplatin nephrotoxicity; however, the underlying mechanism is not entirely clear. Rhabdomyolysis is another important clinical cause of AKI, due to the release of nephrotoxins (e.g., heme) from disrupted muscles. The current study has determined the effects of G-CSF on rhabdomyolysis-associated AKI using in vivo and in vitro models. In C57BL/6 mice, intramuscular injection of glycerol induced AKI, which was partially prevented by G-CSF pretreatment. Consistently, glycerol-induced renal tissue damage was ameliorated by G-CSF. In addition, animal survival following the glycerol injection was improved from ∼30 to ∼70% by G-CSF. In cultured renal tubular cells, hemin-induced apoptosis was also suppressed by G-CSF. Interestingly, G-CSF induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a critical enzyme for heme/hemin degradation and detoxification) in both cultured tubular cells and mouse kidneys. Blockade of HO-1 with protoporphyrin IX zinc(II) (ZnPP) could largely diminish the protective effects of G-CSF. Together, these results demonstrated the renoprotective effects of G-CSF in rhabdomyolysis-associated AKI. Notably, G-CSF may directly protect against tubular cell injury under the disease condition by inducing HO-1.

  18. Biosimilar G-CSF based mobilization of peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells for autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Michael; Publicover, Amy; Orchard, Kim H; Görlach, Matthias; Wang, Lei; Schmitt, Anita; Mani, Jiju; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Kuriakose, Reeba; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    The use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) biosimilars for peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSC) mobilization has stimulated an ongoing debate regarding their efficacy and safety. However, the use of biosimilar G-CSF was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for all the registered indications of the originator G-CSF (Neupogen (®) ) including mobilization of stem cells. Here, we performed a comprehensive review of published reports on the use of biosimilar G-CSF covering patients with hematological malignancies as well as healthy donors that underwent stem cell mobilization at multiple centers using site-specific non-randomized regimens with a biosimilar G-CSF in the autologous and allogeneic setting. A total of 904 patients mostly with hematological malignancies as well as healthy donors underwent successful autologous or allogeneic stem cell mobilization, respectively, using a biosimilar G-CSF (520 with Ratiograstim®/Tevagrastim, 384 with Zarzio®). The indication for stem cell mobilization in hematology patients included 326 patients with multiple myeloma, 273 with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 79 with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), and other disease. 156 sibling or volunteer unrelated donors were mobilized using biosimilar G-CSF. Mobilization resulted in good mobilization of CD34+ stem cells with side effects similar to originator G-CSF. Post transplantation engraftment did not significantly differ from results previously documented with the originator G-CSF. The side effects experienced by the patients or donors mobilized by biosimilar G-CSF were minimal and were comparable to those of originator G-CSF. In summary, the efficacy of biosimilar G-CSFs in terms of PBSC yield as well as their toxicity profile are equivalent to historical data with the reference G-CSF.

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor.

  20. G-CSF induces stabilization of ETS protein Fli-1 during myeloid cell development.

    PubMed

    Mora-Garcia, Patricia; Wei, Jolyn; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that regulates the production and function of neutrophils. G-CSF has been used to treat neutropenia in neonates, pediatric cancer patients, and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. The regulation of transcription factors mediating G-CSF activity has not been well characterized. The goal of this study was to examine the regulation of the ETS binding protein, Friend leukemia integration site 1 (Fli-1), in myeloid cells treated with G-CSF. Fli-1 has oncogenic properties in humans and mice, and plays a role in vascular and hematopoietic cell development. We previously reported that Fli-1 and the serum response factor bind at adjacent sites within the serum response element-1 of the early growth response gene-1 promoter in the murine myeloid leukemic cell line, NFS60. We also identified that Fli-1 DNA binding increased in G-CSF-treated cells compared with untreated cells. To determine whether the change in binding activity is due to increased Fli-1 transcription or protein stability, we examined endogenous Fli-1 expression in G-CSF-treated or -untreated NFS60 cells. Our results demonstrated that levels of Fli-1 protein, but not RNA, were higher in extracts from cells treated with G-CSF. The increase in Fli-1 protein was also dependent on protein synthesis. Finally, we showed that the half-life of Fli-1 is prolonged in G-CSF-treated cells compared with control-treated cells. These results suggest that G-CSF induces stabilization of Fli-1 protein in myeloid cells, thus proposing a novel mechanism by which hematopoietic growth factors regulate transcription factors.

  1. G-CSF for mobilizing transplanted bone marrow stem cells in rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Safari, Manouchehr; Jafari, Behnaz; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Sameni, Hamidreza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Mohammadi, Nasrin Khan; Ghahari, Laya

    2016-12-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used in clinical practice for the treatment of neutropenia and to stimulate generation of hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow donors. In the present study, the ability of G-CSF in mobilizing exogenous bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) from peripheral blood into the brain was tested. We for the first time injected a small amount of BMSCs through the tail vein. We choose 25 male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were lesioned by 6-OHDA injected into the left substantia nigra, pars compacta (SNpc). G-CSF (70 µg/kg/day) was given from the 7(th) day after lesion for five days. The BMSCs (2×10(5)) were injected through the dorsal tail vein on the 7(th) day after lesion. The number of rotations was significantly lower in the stem cell therapy group than in the control group. In the third test in the received G-CSF and G-CSF+stem cells groups, animals displayed significant behavioral recovery compared with the control group (P<0.05). There was a significant difference in the average of dopaminergic neurons in SNpc between the control group and G-CSF and G-CS+stem cells groups. We didn't detect any labeling stem cells in SNpc. G-CSF can't mobilize low amounts of exogenous BMSCs from the blood stream to injured SNpc. But G-CSF (70 µg/kg) is more neuroprotective than BMSCs (2×10(5) number[w1] of BMSCs). Results of our study suggest that G-CSF alone is more neuroprotective than BMSCs.

  2. Levels of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in serum are inversely correlated with circulating neutrophil counts.

    PubMed Central

    Takatani, H; Soda, H; Fukuda, M; Watanabe, M; Kinoshita, A; Nakamura, T; Oka, M

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is effective in countering chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. However, serum rhG-CSF levels cannot be maintained throughout the course of rhG-CSF therapy. The drop in serum rhG-CSF levels may vary with the duration of rhG-CSF administration or with the circulating neutrophil counts. We investigated the relationship between serum G-CSF levels and circulating neutrophil counts and the pharmacokinetics of rhG-CSF for patients with lung cancer who had been treated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy and then with subcutaneous rhG-CSF (lenograstim, 2 micrograms per kg of body weight per day). Twelve patients were randomly assigned to four groups with different rhG-CSF therapy schedules. Serum G-CSF levels were measured by an enzyme immunoassay method. Serum G-CSF levels during the rhG-CSF therapy greatly exceeded endogenous G-CSF levels and were mainly due to the presence of exogenous rhG-CSF rather than increased levels of endogenous G-CSF. Despite the duration of rhG-CSF administration, serum G-CSF levels during rhG-CSF therapy were inversely correlated with circulating neutrophil counts (r2 = 0.73, P < 0.0001). The value for the area under the concentration-time curve of rhG-CSF on the day of neutrophilia was lower than that on the day of neutropenia (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that the fall in serum G-CSF levels during rhG-CSF therapy may result from increased clearance and/or decreased absorption of rhG-CSF, two processes related to circulating neutrophil counts. PMID:8849265

  3. G-CSF displays restricted ability to promote Sca-1(+) cardiac stem cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haijian; Bassi, Giulio; Tessari, Maddalena; Yang, Zhenyu; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a controversial chemical in cardiac cell therapy. Myocardial homing of mobilized bone marrow-derived cells is thought to play a critical role in observed G-CSF-induced cardiac repair; meanwhile, the activation of proliferative potential of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) residing in the heart is a significant challenge. The present study aims to investigate whether G-CSF receptor is expressed in adult resident Sca-1(+) CSCs and determine the effect of G-CSF treatment on the proliferation of CSCs. For cardiac cells isolation, 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were anesthetized in a chamber containing 2.5% isoflurane in oxygen, euthanized by CO2 inhalation and then sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Magnetic-activated cell sorting was employed to acquire highly purified Sca-1(+) CSCs. We found that G-CSF receptor was expressed in adult resident Sca-1(+) CSCs by immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. Exposure of Sca-1(+) cells to G-CSF in the culture medium for 72 h induced time-dependent but self-limiting cell cycle acceleration with a restricted effect on the CSC proliferation. As a result, it has provided a new insight to focus on the association between cardiac G-CSF therapy and adult resident stem cell activation. It may suggest gaining a deeper insight into the mechanisms of the interaction between CSCs and G-CSF to develop a synergistic strategy based on resident stem cell and G-CSF therapy for heart disease.

  4. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV) in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants. PMID:21985646

  5. G-CSF and GM-CSF in Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Hrishikesh M.; Malandra, Michael; Corey, Seth J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) are used widely to promote the production of granulocytes or antigen presenting cells (APC). The Food and Drug Administration approved G-CSF (filgrastim) for the treatment of congenital and acquired neutropenias and for mobilization of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells for stem cell transplantation. A polyethylene glycol modified (PEGylated) form of G-CSF is approved for the treatment of neutropenias. Clinically significant neutropenia, rendering an individual immunocompromised, occurs when their number is less than 1500/µl. Current guidelines recommend their use when the risk of febrile neutropenia is greater than 20%. GM-CSF (sargramostim) is approved for neutropenia associated with stem cell transplantation. Because of its promotion of APC function, GM-CSF is being evaluated as an immunostimulatory adjuvant in a number of clinical trials. More than 20 million persons have benefited worldwide, and more than $5 billion sales occur annually in the United States. PMID:26254266

  6. Repairing the Brain by SCF+G-CSF Treatment at 6 Months Postexperimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lili; Wang, Dandan; McGillis, Sandra; Kyle, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Stroke, a leading cause of adult disability in the world, is a severe medical condition with limited treatment. Physical therapy, the only treatment available for stroke rehabilitation, appears to be effective within 6 months post-stroke. Here, we have mechanistically determined the efficacy of combined two hematopoietic growth factors, stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; SCF + G-CSF), in brain repair 6 months after cortical infarct induction in the transgenic mice carrying yellow fluorescent protein in Layer V pyramidal neurons (Thy1-YFP-H). Using a combination of live brain imaging, whole brain imaging, molecular manipulation, synaptic and vascular assessments, and motor function examination, we found that SCF + G-CSF promoted mushroom spine formation, enlarged postsynaptic membrane size, and increased postsynaptic density-95 accumulation and blood vessel density in the peri-infarct cavity cortex; and that SCF + G-CSF treatment improved motor functional recovery. The SCF + G-CSF-enhanced motor functional recovery was dependent on the synaptic and vascular regeneration in the peri-infarct cavity cortex. These data suggest that a stroke-damaged brain is repairable by SCF + G-CSF even 6 months after the lesion occurs. This study provides novel insights into the development of new restorative strategies for stroke recovery. PMID:27511907

  7. PBSC mobilization in lymphoma patients: analysis of risk factors for collection failure and development of a predictive score based on the kinetics of circulating CD34+ cells and WBC after chemotherapy and G-CSF mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giuseppe; Skert, Cristina; Morello, Enrico; Almici, Camillo; Arcaini, Luca; Basilico, Claudia; Cavalli, Lara; Botto, Barbara; Castelli, Andrea; Pica, Gianmatteo; Ripamonti, Francesco; Salvi, Flavia; Carella, Angelo M; Gaidano, Gianluca; Levis, Alessandro; Nosari, Annamaria; Russo, Domenico; Vitolo, Umberto

    2015-09-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a potentially curative treatment of lymphoma, but peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization fails in some patients. PBSC mobilizing agents have recently been proved to improve the PBSC yield after a prior mobilization failure. Predictive parameters of mobilization failure allowing for a preemptive, more cost-effective use of such agents during the first mobilization attempt are still poorly defined, particularly during mobilization with chemotherapy + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of lymphoma patients who were candidates for ASCT, to identify factors influencing PBSC mobilization outcome. Premobilization parameters-age, histology, disease status, mobilizing protocol, and previous treatments-as well as white blood cell (WBC) and PBSC kinetics, markers potentially able to predict failure during the ongoing mobilization attempt, were analyzed in 415 consecutive mobilization procedures in 388 patients. We used chemotherapy + G-CSF in 411 (99%) of mobilization attempts and PBSC collection failed (<2 × 10(6) CD34+ PBSC/kg) in 13%. Multivariable analysis showed that only a low CD34+ PBSC count and CD34+ PBSC/WBC ratio, together with the use of nonplatinum-containing chemotherapy, independently predicted mobilization failure. Using these three parameters, we established a scoring system to predict risk of failure during mobilization ranging from 2 to 90%, thus allowing a selective use of a preemptive mobilization policy.

  8. The significance of G-CSF expression and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the chemoresistance of uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Mahiru; Mabuchi, Seiji; Matsumoto, Yuri; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Ryoko; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Isobe, Aki; Sawada, Kenjiro; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Morii, Eiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-12-15

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing malignant tumor has been reported to occur in various organs, and has been associated with poor clinical outcome. The aim of this study is to investigate the significance of tumor G-CSF expression in the chemosensitivity of uterine cervical cancer. The clinical data of recurrent or advanced cervical cancer patients who were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were analyzed. Clinical samples, cervical cancer cell lines, and a mouse model of cervical cancer were employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for the development of chemoresistance in G-CSF-producing cervical cancer, focusing on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). As a result, the tumor G-CSF expression was significantly associated with increased MDSC frequencies and compromised survival. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that the increased MDSC induced by tumor-derived G-CSF is involved in the development of chemoresistance. The depletion of MDSC via splenectomy or the administration of anti-Gr-1 antibody sensitized G-CSF-producing cervical cancer to cisplatin. In conclusion, tumor G-CSF expression is an indicator of an extremely poor prognosis in cervical cancer patients that are treated with chemotherapy. Combining MDSC-targeting treatments with current standard chemotherapies might have therapeutic efficacy as a treatment for G-CSF-producing cervical cancer.

  9. Systemic G-CSF treatment does not improve long-term outcomes after neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Schlager, G W; Griesmaier, E; Wegleiter, K; Neubauer, V; Urbanek, M; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, U; Felderhoff-Mueser, U; Keller, M

    2011-07-01

    Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) is a major factor in the pathogenesis of developmental brain injury, leading to cognitive deficits and motor disabilities in preterm infants. The haematopoietic growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to exert a neuroprotective activity in rodent models of ischaemic stroke and is currently subject to phase I/II clinical trials in adults. Results of studies examining the effect of G-CSF in perinatal brain damage have been contradictory. We have previously shown that G-CSF increases NMDAR-mediated excitotoxic brain injury in the neonatal mouse brain. In this study, we evaluated the effect of G-CSF on long-term outcomes after HI. On postnatal day 5, mice pubs were first randomly assigned to a sham operation or HI and then divided into four treatment groups: i) G-CSF; ii) phosphate buffered saline (PBS) 1h after injury; iii) G-CSF and iv) PBS 60 h after injury. G-CSF (200 μg/kg BW) was administered five times within a 24h interval. Neuromotor and cognitive outcomes were assessed by open-field, novel object recognition tests and rotarod tests starting on P90, with subsequent histological analyses of brain injury. G-CSF treatment did not improve either neurobehavioural outcomes or brain injuries. Interestingly, the application of PBS and G-CSF in the acute phase increased brain damage in the hippocampus. We could not confirm the neuroprotective properties of G-CSF in neonatal HI brain damage. The exacerbation of injury by the administration of substances in the acute phase might indicate a heightened state of neurological sensitivity that is specific to mechanisms of secondary neurodegeneration and influenced by unidentified external factors possibly associated with the treatment protocol during the acute phase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Interaction between repair, disease, & inflammation."

  10. SOCS3 is a critical physiological negative regulator of G-CSF signaling and emergency granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Croker, Ben A; Metcalf, Donald; Robb, Lorraine; Wei, Wei; Mifsud, Sandra; DiRago, Ladina; Cluse, Leonie A; Sutherland, Kate D; Hartley, Lynne; Williams, Emily; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hilton, Douglas J; Nicola, Nicos A; Alexander, Warren S; Roberts, Andrew W

    2004-02-01

    To determine the importance of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) in the regulation of hematopoietic growth factor signaling generally, and of G-CSF-induced cellular responses specifically, we created mice in which the Socs3 gene was deleted in all hematopoietic cells. Although normal until young adulthood, these mice then developed neutrophilia and a spectrum of inflammatory pathologies. When stimulated with G-CSF in vitro, SOCS3-deficient cells of the neutrophilic granulocyte lineage exhibited prolonged STAT3 activation and enhanced cellular responses to G-CSF, including an increase in cloning frequency, survival, and proliferative capacity. Consistent with the in vitro findings, mutant mice injected with G-CSF displayed enhanced neutrophilia, progenitor cell mobilization, and splenomegaly, but unexpectedly also developed inflammatory neutrophil infiltration into multiple tissues and consequent hind-leg paresis. We conclude that SOCS3 is a key negative regulator of G-CSF signaling in myeloid cells and that this is of particular significance during G-CSF-driven emergency granulopoiesis.

  11. Time trends in utilization of G-CSF prophylaxis and risk of febrile neutropenia in a Medicare population receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi K; Tzivelekis, Spiros; Rothman, Kenneth J; Candrilli, Sean D; Kaye, James A

    2017-09-18

    The purpose of this study is to assess temporal trends in the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis and risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) among older women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Women aged ≥ 66 years with diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer who initiated selected adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were identified using the SEER-Medicare data from 2002 to 2012. Adjusted, calendar-year-specific proportions were estimated for use of G-CSF primary prophylaxis (PP) and secondary prophylaxis and FN risk in the first and the second/subsequent cycles during the first course of chemotherapy, using logistic regression models. calendar-year-specific mean probabilities were estimated with covariates set to modal values. Among 11,107 eligible patients (mean age 71.7 years), 74% received G-CSF in the first course of chemotherapy. Of all patients, 5819 (52%) received G-CSF PP, and among those not receiving G-CSF PP, only 5% received G-CSF secondary prophylaxis. The adjusted proportion using G-CSF PP increased from 6% in 2002 to 71% in 2012. During the same period, the adjusted risk of FN in the first cycle increased from 2% to 3%; the adjusted risk increased from 1.5% to 2.9% among those receiving G-CSF PP and from 2.3% to 3.5% among those not receiving G-CSF PP. The use of G-CSF PP increased substantially during the study period. Although channeling of higher-risk patients to treatment with G-CSF PP is expected, the adjusted risk of FN among patients treated with G-CSF PP tended to be lower than among those not receiving G-CSF PP.

  12. G-CSF treatment promotes apoptosis of autoreactive T cells to restrict the inflammatory cascade and accelerate recovery in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei

    2017-03-01

    G-CSF is a hematopoietic growth factor that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and survival of myeloid lineage cells, which has protective effects in autoimmune neuroinflammatory diseases such as EAE. Here we use EAE model treated by G-CSF to address the hypothesis that G-CSF inhibits the proliferative response of splenic T cells via the enhancement of apoptosis, and this priming effect of G-CSF depends on the cell cycle. Our results show that G-CSF administration reduced EAE frequency and severity of attacks. The inflammatory cells and demyelination areas were decreased in the CNS of G-CSF-treated mice. G-CSF treatment altered cytokine profiles in vivo to inhibit the productions of IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17 and NO, while the secretions of IL-4 and IL-10 were increased. Splenic T cells from G-CSF-treated mice showed significantly lower proliferative response to specific antigen MOG35-55 stimulation. G-CSF enhanced the percentage of a CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell subset in spleen T cells. Moreover, G-CSF promoted the G0/G1 to S phase transition of MOG35-55 autoreactive T cells inducing apoptosis and elevating Bax gene expression of apoptosis marker. These findings indicate that G-CSF treatment induces the apoptosis of MOG35-55 autoreactive T cells, which decreases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NO, suppresses the proliferation of autoreactive T cells and elevates a CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell subset to inhibit inflammatory infiltration and demyelination within CNS of EAE. The conclusions of G-CSF treatment in EAE mice suggest that G-CSF is clinically applicable and may be considered for future use in therapeutic measures for multiple sclerosis treatment.

  13. G-CSF does not influence C2C12 myogenesis despite receptor expression in healthy and dystrophic skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Craig R.; Brown, Erin L.; Della-Gatta, Paul A.; Ward, Alister C.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Russell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) increases recovery of rodent skeletal muscles after injury, and increases muscle function in rodent models of neuromuscular disease. However, the mechanisms by which G-CSF mediates these effects are poorly understood. G-CSF acts by binding to the membrane spanning G-CSFR and activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Expression of the G-CSFR within the haematopoietic system is well known, but more recently it has been demonstrated to be expressed in other tissues. However, comprehensive characterization of G-CSFR expression in healthy and diseased skeletal muscle, imperative before implementing G-CSF as a therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle conditions, has been lacking. Here we show that the G-CSFR is expressed in proliferating C2C12 myoblasts, differentiated C2C12 myotubes, human primary skeletal muscle cell cultures and in mouse and human skeletal muscle. In mdx mice, a model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), G-CSF mRNA and protein was down-regulated in limb and diaphragm muscle, but circulating G-CSF ligand levels were elevated. G-CSFR mRNA in the muscles of mdx mice was up-regulated however steady-state levels of the protein were down-regulated. We show that G-CSF does not influence C2C12 myoblast proliferation, differentiation or phosphorylation of Akt, STAT3, and Erk1/2. Media change alone was sufficient to elicit increases in Akt, STAT3, and Erk1/2 phosphorylation in C2C12 muscle cells and suggest previous observations showing a G-CSF increase in phosphoprotein signaling be viewed with caution. These results suggest that the actions of G-CSF may require the interaction with other cytokines and growth factors in vivo, however these data provides preliminary evidence supporting the investigation of G-CSF for the management of muscular dystrophy. PMID:24822049

  14. 5-AED Enhances Survival of Irradiated Mice in a G-CSF-Dependent Manner, Stimulates Innate Immune Cell Function, Reduces Radiation-induced DNA Damage and Induces Genes that Modulate Cell Cycle Progression and Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    pre-irradiation) radio- protectants and (post-irradiation) therapeutics, as recognized by civilian and military government agencies [2– 4 ]. 5-AED is...2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5-AED Enhances Survival of Irradiated Mice in a G-CSF-Dependent Manner, Stimulates Innate Immune Cell Function, Reduces...control after 4 days, but not 8 days. The time course of plasma 5-AED after buccal de- livery (60 mg/kg) was similar, but levels were significantly lower

  15. G-CSF improves CUMS-induced depressive behaviors through downregulating Ras/ERK/MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Linjuan-Li; Wang, Yaping

    2016-10-28

    Neuronal plasticity in hippocampal neurons is closely related to memory, mood and behavior as well as in the development of depression. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can promote neuronal plasticity and enhance motor skills. However, the function of G-CSF in depression remains poorly understood. In this study, we explored the biological role and potential molecular mechanism of G-CSF on depression-like behaviors. Our results showed that G-CSF was significantly downregulated in the hippocampus of chronic unexpected mild stress (CUMS) rats. Administration of G-CSF significantly reversed CUMS-induced depression-like behaviors in the open field test (OFT), sucrose preference test (SPT) and forced swimming test (FST). Moreover, G-CSF upregulated the expression of synaptic-associated proteins including polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), synaptophysin (SYN), and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) in the hippocampus and G-CSF significantly increased cell viability rate of hippocampal neurons in vitro. Further studies indicated that the renin-angiotensin system (Ras)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways was involved in the regulation of G-CSF on depressive-like behaviors and neuronal plasticity in CUMS rats. Taken together, our results showed that G-CSF improves depression-like behaviors via inhibiting Ras/ERK/MAPK signaling pathways. Our study suggests that G-CSF may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of depression.

  16. G-CSF for mobilizing transplanted bone marrow stem cells in rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Manouchehr; Jafari, Behnaz; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Sameni, Hamidreza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Mohammadi, Nasrin Khan; Ghahari, Laya

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s):: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used in clinical practice for the treatment of neutropenia and to stimulate generation of hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow donors. In the present study, the ability of G-CSF in mobilizing exogenous bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) from peripheral blood into the brain was tested. We for the first time injected a small amount of BMSCs through the tail vein. Materials and Methods: We choose 25 male Wistar rats (200–250 g) were lesioned by 6-OHDA injected into the left substantia nigra, pars compacta (SNpc). G-CSF (70 µg/kg/day) was given from the 7th day after lesion for five days. The BMSCs (2×105) were injected through the dorsal tail vein on the 7th day after lesion. Results: The number of rotations was significantly lower in the stem cell therapy group than in the control group. In the third test in the received G-CSF and G-CSF+stem cells groups, animals displayed significant behavioral recovery compared with the control group (P<0.05). There was a significant difference in the average of dopaminergic neurons in SNpc between the control group and G-CSF and G-CS+stem cells groups. We didn’t detect any labeling stem cells in SNpc. Conclusion: G-CSF can’t mobilize low amounts of exogenous BMSCs from the blood stream to injured SNpc. But G-CSF (70 µg/kg) is more neuroprotective than BMSCs (2×105 number[w1] of BMSCs). Results of our study suggest that G-CSF alone is more neuroprotective than BMSCs. PMID:28096964

  17. Translating G-CSF as an adjunct therapy to stem cell transplantation for stroke

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2015-01-01

    Among recently investigated stroke therapies, stem cell treatment holds great promise by virtue of their putative ability to replace lost cells, promote endogenous neurogenesis and produce behavioral and functional improvement through their “bystander effects.” Translating stem cell in the clinic, however, presents a number of technical difficulties. A strategy suggested to enhance therapeutic utility of stem cells is combination therapy, i.e., cotransplantation of stem cells or adjunct treatment with pharmacological agents and substrates, which is assumed to produce more profound therapeutic benefits by circumventing limitations of individual treatments, and facilitating complementary brain repair processes. We previously demonstrated enhanced functional effects of co-treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and human umbilical cord blood cell (hUCB) transplantation in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we suggest that the aforementioned combination therapy may also produce synergistic effects in stroke. Accordingly, G-CSF treatment may reduce expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhance neurogenesis rendering a receptive microenvironment for hUCB engraftment. Adjunct treatment of G-CSF with hUCB may facilitate stemness maintenance and guide neural lineage commitment of hUCB cells. Moreover, regenerative mechanisms afforded by G-CSF-mobilized endogenous stem cells, secretion of growth factors by hUCB grafts and G-CSF-recruited endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) , as well as the potential graft–host integration that may promote synaptic circuitry re-establishment could altogether produce more pronounced functional improvement in stroked rats subjected to a combination G-CSF treatment and hUCB transplantation. Nevertheless, differences in pathology and repair processes underlying TBI and stroke deserve consideration when testing effects of combinatorial G-CSF and hUCB cell transplantation for stroke treatment

  18. The effect of systemic administration of G-CSF on a full-thickness cartilage defect in a rabbit model MSC proliferation as presumed mechanism: G-CSF for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Akagi, R; Akatsu, Y; Fukawa, T; Hoshi, H; Yamamoto, Y; Enomoto, T; Sato, Y; Nakagawa, R; Takahashi, K; Yamaguchi, S; Sasho, T

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation in vitro and to determine whether pre-microfracture systemic administration of G-CSF (a bone marrow stimulant) could improve the quality of repaired tissue of a full-thickness cartilage defect in a rabbit model. MSCs from rabbits were cultured in a control medium and medium with G-CSF (low-dose: 4 μg, high-dose: 40 μg). At one, three, and five days after culturing, cells were counted. Differential potential of cultured cells were examined by stimulating them with a osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic medium.A total of 30 rabbits were divided into three groups. The low-dose group (n = 10) received 10 μg/kg of G-CSF daily, the high-dose group (n = 10) received 50 μg/kg daily by subcutaneous injection for three days prior to creating cartilage defects. The control group (n = 10) was administered saline for three days. At 48 hours after the first injection, a 5.2 mm diameter cylindrical osteochondral defect was created in the femoral trochlea. At four and 12 weeks post-operatively, repaired tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. The cell count in the low-dose G-CSF medium was significantly higher than that in the control medium. The differentiation potential of MSCs was preserved after culturing them with G-CSF.Macroscopically, defects were filled and surfaces were smoother in the G-CSF groups than in the control group at four weeks. At 12 weeks, the quality of repaired cartilage improved further, and defects were almost completely filled in all groups. Microscopically, at four weeks, defects were partially filled with hyaline-like cartilage in the G-CSF groups. At 12 weeks, defects were repaired with hyaline-like cartilage in all groups. G-CSF promoted proliferation of MSCs in vitro. The systemic administration of G-CSF promoted the repair of damaged cartilage possibly through increasing the number

  19. Potential use of G-CSF for protection against Streptococcus suis infection in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising alternative to the use of antibiotics for therapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease. We developed a replication-defective adenovirus vector that expresses porcine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) ...

  20. Hyperleucocytosis following G-CSF treatment for sulfasalazine-induced agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kenneth; Farooq, Redwan

    2015-01-01

    Agranulocytosis is a rare but serious adverse effect of sulfasalazine treatment. We present a case of a 51-year-old woman receiving sulfasalazine for inflammatory arthritis presenting with sore throat, fever, lethargy and leucopenia (white cell count 0.9×109/L). After 9 days of treatment with filgrastim (granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, G-CSF), her white cell count increased to 77.4×109/L. This case highlights the importance of recognising sulfasalazine-induced agranulocytosis and the management of hyperleucocytosis following G-CSF treatment, to prevent harmful sequelae. PMID:26178004

  1. Reduced salmonella fecal shedding in swine administered porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health, food safety and public health. Key objectives of pre-harvest food safety programs are to detect asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, reduce colonization, and prevent transmission of Salmonella to other animals and ...

  2. Pharmacokinetic and -dynamic modelling of G-CSF derivatives in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is routinely applied to support recovery of granulopoiesis during the course of cytotoxic chemotherapies. However, optimal use of the drug is largely unknown. We showed in the past that a biomathematical compartment model of human granulopoiesis can be used to make clinically relevant predictions regarding new, yet untested chemotherapy regimen. In the present paper, we aim to extend this model by a detailed pharmacokinetic and -dynamic modelling of two commonly used G-CSF derivatives Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim. Results Model equations are based on our physiological understanding of the drugs which are delayed absorption of G-CSF when applied to the subcutaneous tissue, dose-dependent bioavailability, unspecific first order elimination, specific elimination in dependence on granulocyte counts and reversible protein binding. Pharmacokinetic differences between Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim were modelled as different parameter sets. Our former cell-kinetic model of granulopoiesis was essentially preserved, except for a few additional assumptions and simplifications. We assumed a delayed action of G-CSF on the bone marrow, a delayed action of chemotherapy and differences between Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim with respect to stimulation potency of the bone marrow. Additionally, we incorporated a model of combined action of Pegfilgrastim and Filgrastim or endogenous G-CSF which interact via concurrent receptor binding. Unknown pharmacokinetic or cell-kinetic parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to available datasets of G-CSF applications, chemotherapy applications or combinations of it. Data were either extracted from the literature or were received from cooperating clinical study groups. Model predictions fitted well to both, datasets used for parameter estimation and validation scenarios as well. A unique set of parameters was identified which is valid for all scenarios

  3. Comparison of outcomes after transplantation of G-CSF-stimulated bone marrow grafts versus bone marrow or peripheral blood grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors for patients with severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Roland; Brazauskas, Ruta; Kan, Fangyu; Bashey, Asad; Bredeson, Christopher; Camitta, Bruce; Chiang, Kuang-Yueh; Frangoul, Haydar; Gale, Robert Peter; Gee, Adrian; George, Biju; Goldman, Frederick D; Gross, Thomas G; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Isola, Luis; Ispizua, Alvaro Urbano; Lazarus, Hillard; Marsh, Judith; Russell, James; Sabloff, Mitchell; Waller, Edmund K; Eapen, Mary

    2011-07-01

    We compared outcomes of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) who received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-stimulated bone marrow (G-BM) (n = 78), unstimulated bone marrow (BM) (n = 547), or peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) (n = 134) from an HLA-matched sibling. Transplantations occurred in 1997 to 2003. Rates of neutrophil and platelet recovery were not different among the 3 treatment groups. Grade 2-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) (relative risk [RR] = 0.82, P = .539), grade 3-4 aGVHD (RR = 0.74, P = .535), and chronic GVHD (cGVHD) (RR = 1.56, P = .229) were similar after G-BM and BM transplants. Grade 2-4 aGVHD (RR = 2.37, P = .012) but not grade 3-4 aGVHD (RR = 1.66, P = .323) and cGVHD (RR = 5.09, P < .001) were higher after PBPC transplants compared to G-BM. Grade 2-4 (RR = 2.90, P < .001), grade 3-4 (RR = 2.24, P = .009) aGVHD and cGVHD (RR = 3.26, P < .001) were higher after PBPC transplants compared to BM. Mortality risks were lower after transplantation of BM compared to G-BM (RR = 0.63, P = .05). These data suggest no advantage to using G-BM and the observed higher rates of aGVHD and cGVHD in PBPC recipients warrants cautious use of this graft source for SAA. Taken together, BM is the preferred graft for HLA-matched sibling transplants for SAA.

  4. G-CSF-induced sympathetic tone provokes fever and primes antimobilizing functions of neutrophils via PGE2.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuko; Fukui, Chie; Shinohara, Masakazu; Wakahashi, Kanako; Ishii, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tomohide; Sato, Mari; Asada, Noboru; Kawano, Hiroki; Minagawa, Kentaro; Sada, Akiko; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Uede, Toshimitsu; Narumiya, Shuh; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Katayama, Yoshio

    2017-02-02

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used for peripheral blood stem/progenitor mobilization. G-CSF causes low-grade fever that is ameliorated by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), suggesting the activation of arachidonic acid (AA) cascade. How G-CSF regulated this reaction was assessed. G-CSF treatment in mice resulted in fever, which was canceled in prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES-1)-deficient mice. Mobilization efficiency was twice as high in chimeric mice lacking mPGES-1, specifically in hematopoietic cells, suggesting that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from hematopoietic cells modulated the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Neutrophils from steady-state BM constitutively expressed mPGES-1 and significantly enhanced PGE2 production in vitro by β-adrenergic stimulation, but not by G-CSF, which was inhibited by an NSAID. Although neutrophils expressed all β-adrenergic receptors, only β3-agonist induced this phenomenon. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry traced β-agonist-induced PGE2 synthesis from exogenous deuterium-labeled AA. Spontaneous PGE2 production was highly efficient in Gr-1(high) neutrophils among BM cells from G-CSF-treated mice. In addition to these in vitro data, the in vivo depletion of Gr-1(high) neutrophils disrupted G-CSF-induced fever. Furthermore, sympathetic denervation eliminated both neutrophil priming for PGE2 production and fever during G-CSF treatment. Thus, sympathetic tone-primed BM neutrophils were identified as one of the major PGE2 producers. PGE2 upregulated osteopontin, specifically in preosteoblasts, to retain progenitors in the BM via EP4 receptor. Thus, the sympathetic nervous system regulated neutrophils as an indispensable PGE2 source to modulate BM microenvironment and body temperature. This study provided a novel mechanistic insight into the communication of the nervous system, BM niche components, and hematopoietic cells. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  6. [Effect of rhG-CSF on blood coagulation in beagles irradiated by 2.3 Gy neutron].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Han, Qin-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Xing, Shuang; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Xie, Ling; Zhao, Yan-Fang; Yu, Zu-Yin; Ding, Yi-Bo; Zhao, Zhen-Hu; Cong, Yu-Wen; Luo, Qing-Liang

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recombinant human granulocyte stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on blood coagulation of beagles irradiated by 2.3 Gy neutron so as to provide new therapy for blood coagulation disorder after neutron irradiation. 10 beagles were exposed to 2.3 Gy neutron, and then randomly assigned into supportive care group and rhG-CSF-treated group. The rhG-CSF-treated cohorts were injected subcutaneously with rhG-CSF (10 µg/kg·d) beginning at the day of exposure for 21 consecutive days. Peripheral blood platelet counts were examined once every two days. In vitro platelet aggregation test, thromboelastography and blood clotting tetrachoric tests were also performed. The results indicated that the blood clotting system of irradiated dogs was in hypercoagulable state in the early days after 2.3 Gy neutron irradiation, and became hypocoagulable at crisis later and were mainly on intrinsic coagulation pathway. Blood fibrinogen increased markedly during the course of disease, while platelet counts and aggregation function were decreased remarkably. rhG-CSF administered daily could correct hypercoagulable state induced by 2.3 Gy neutron irradiation at the early time post exposure, shortened the thromboplastin generation time and clotting formation, down-regulated the abnormal high fibrinogen in blood, and improved platelet aggregation function. It is concluded that rhG-CSF can improve coagulation disorders of irradiated dogs.

  7. The role of G-CSF in recurrent implantation failure: A randomized double blind placebo control trial

    PubMed Central

    Davari-tanha, Fatemeh; Shahrokh Tehraninejad, Ensieh; Ghazi, Mohadese; Shahraki, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recurrent implantation failure (RIF) is the absence of implantation after three consecutive In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) cycles with transferring at least four good quality embryos in a minimum of three fresh or frozen cycles in a woman under 40 years. The definition and management of RIF is under constant scrutiny. Objective: To investigate the effects of Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on RIF, pregnancy rate, abortion rate and implantation rates. Materials and Methods: A double blind placebo controlled randomized trial was conducted at two tertiary university based hospitals. One hundred patients with the history of RIF from December 2011 until January 2014 were recruited in the study. G-CSF 300µg/1ml was administered at the day of oocyte puncture or day of progesterone administration of FET cycle. Forty patients were recruited at G-CSF group, 40 in saline and 20 in placebo group. Results: The mean age for whole study group was 35.3±4.2 yrs (G-CSF 35.5±4.32, saline 35.3±3.98, placebo 35.4±4.01, respectively). Seventeen patients had a positive pregnancy test after embryo transfer [10 (25%) in G-CSF; 5 (12.5%) in saline; and 2 (10%) in placebo group]. The mean of abortion rates was 17.6% (3), two of them in G-CSF, one in saline group. The implantation rate was 12.3% in G-CSF, 6.1% in saline and 4.7% in placebo group. Conclusion: G-CSF may increase chemical pregnancy and implantation rate in patients with recurrent implantation failure but clinical pregnancy rate and abortion rate was unaffected. PMID:28066833

  8. Production of the Growth Factors GM-CSF, G-CSF, and VEGF by Human Peripheral Blood Cells Induced with Metal Complexes of Human Serum γ-Globulin Formed with Copper or Zinc Ions

    PubMed Central

    Cheknev, Sergey B.; Apresova, Maria A.; Moryakova, Nadezhda A.; Efremova, Irina E.; Mezdrokhina, Anna S.; Piskovskaya, Lidya S.; Babajanz, Alla A.

    2014-01-01

    As it was established in our previous studies, the proteins of human serum γ-globulin fraction could interact with copper or zinc ions distributed in the periglobular space, form metal complexes, and become able to perform effector functions differing due to the conformational shifts from those mediated by them in native conformation of their Fc regions. In the present work we have evaluated ability of the γ-globulin metal complexes formed with copper or zinc ions in the conditions like to the physiological ones to induce production or to regulate induction in the culture of freshly isolated human peripheral blood cells (PBC) of granulocyte (G) and granulocyte-macrophage (GM) colony-stimulating factors (CSF) as well as of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The γ-globulin metal complexes formed with both copper and zinc ions were found to similarly reduce production of GM-CSF, G-CSF, and VEGF induced in normal human PBC cultures by the control γ-globulins or by copper and zinc ions used alone. In context of theory and practice of inflammation the properties of the γ-globulin metal complexes might impact the basic knowledge in search of novel approaches to anti-inflammatory drugs development. PMID:25104881

  9. Chronic neutropenia. A new canine model induced by human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, W P; Csiba, E; Canin, A; Hockman, H; Souza, L M; Layton, J E; Dale, D C

    1991-01-01

    Normal dogs were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) at 10 micrograms/kg/day for 30 d, which caused an initial neutrophilia, followed by a prolonged period of chronic neutropenia. A control dog treated with recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) showed persistent neutrophilia over 3 mo. Serum from dogs during neutropenia contained an antibody to rhG-CSF, which neutralized the stimulatory effects of both rhG-CSF and rcG-CSF on dog marrow neutrophilic progenitor cell growth and on NFS-60 cell proliferation. 4 mo after discontinuation of rhG-CSF, the dogs' neutrophil counts returned to the normal range. Rechallenge with the rhG-CSF re-induced severe neutropenia in 1 wk. Neutropenia was transferred by plasma infusion from a neutropenic dog to a previously normal dog. These data suggest that human rhG-CSF immunizes normal dogs and thereby induces neutralization of endogenous canine G-CSF and neutropenia. This model system should allow more precise definition of the in vivo role of G-CSF. PMID:1704019

  10. Filgrastim (G-CSF) loaded liposomes: mathematical modeling and optimization of encapsulation efficiency and particle size

    PubMed Central

    Kiafar, Farhad; Siahi Shadbad, Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Optimization of filgrastim (G-CSF) (granulocyte colony stimulating factor) liposomes formulation prepared by the method of film hydration was the aim of this research. Methods: To study the independent variables effects in the development of filgrastim (G-CSF) liposomes, method of factorial design was applied. The molar ratio of dipalmitoyl phophatidylcholine (DPPC) per cholesterol (Chol.) and hydration time were chosen as two independent factors. The dependent variables were encapsulation efficiency percent (EE %) and particle size (PS). Ultrafiltration method was applied for separation of un-encapsulated protein. RP-HPLC method was employed for analysis of G-CSF. Results: Application of response surface methodology (RSM) in formulation of filgrastim liposomes and the obtained results for responses including particle size and EE % showed that the main effective independent variable was DPPC/Chol molar ratio. Different impacts of influencing parameters including interaction and individual effects were checked employing a mathematical method for obtaining desired liposomes. Optimum liposomal formulations were established using this method for enhancing their characteristics. Average percent errors (APEs) were 3.86% and 3.27% for predicting EE % and PS, respectively which reflect high model ability in this regard. Conclusion: It is concluded that observed and predicted values regarding PS and EE % were consistent and this model is efficient enough in prediction of the mentioned characteristics while preparing filgrastim (G-CSF) liposomes. PMID:28265535

  11. Treatment of leg ischemia with biodegradable gelatin hydrogel microspheres incorporating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Itta; Takemura, Genzou; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Watanabe, Takatomo; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Esaki, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Toshiaki; Kawaguchi, Tomonori; Goto, Kazuko; Maruyama, Rumi; Fujiwara, Takako; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2011-04-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent angiogenic factor. We hypothesized that G-CSF-immersed gelatin hydrogel microspheres (G-CSF-GHMs) injected into the ischemic legs might continuously release a small amount of G-CSF to locally stimulate angiogenesis without unfavorable systemic effects. Just after ligation of the right femoral artery of BALB/c mice, recombinant human G-CSF (100-μg/kg)-immersed GHM was injected into the right hindlimb muscles; the controls included a saline-injected group, an intramuscularly injected G-CSF group, a subcutaneously injected G-CSG group, and an empty GHM-injected group. Eight weeks later, improvement of blood perfusion to the ischemic limb was significantly augmented in the G-CSF-GHM group compared with any of the control groups. Despite there being no increase in the serum concentration of G-CSF, in peripheral granulocytes, or in circulating endothelial progenitor cells, not only capillary but also arteriolar density was significantly increased in this group. Next, we started treatment with G-CSF-GHM 4 weeks after ligation to examine whether the treatment is effective if performed during the chronic stage of ischemia. The late treatment was also found to effectively improve blood flow in the ischemic leg. In conclusion, G-CSF-GHM administration is suggested to be a promising and readily usable approach to treating peripheral artery disease, applicable even during the chronic stage.

  12. NAMPT is essential for the G-CSF-induced myeloid differentiation via a NAD+-sirtuin-1-dependent pathway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We identified nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also known as pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF), as an essential enzyme mediating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-triggered granulopoiesis in healthy individuals and in individuals with severe congenital neutropenia....

  13. G-CSF maintains controlled neutrophil mobilization during acute inflammation by negatively regulating CXCR2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Besnik; Zhu, Haiyan; Zhang, Yu C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow to circulation is a critical event in acute inflammation, but how it is accurately controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that CXCR2 ligands are responsible for rapid neutrophil mobilization during early-stage acute inflammation. Nevertheless, although serum CXCR2 ligand concentrations increased during inflammation, neutrophil mobilization slowed after an initial acute fast phase, suggesting a suppression of neutrophil response to CXCR2 ligands after the acute phase. We demonstrate that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), usually considered a prototypical neutrophil-mobilizing cytokine, was expressed later in the acute inflammatory response and unexpectedly impeded CXCR2-induced neutrophil mobilization by negatively regulating CXCR2-mediated intracellular signaling. Blocking G-CSF in vivo paradoxically elevated peripheral blood neutrophil counts in mice injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli and sequestered large numbers of neutrophils in the lungs, leading to sterile pulmonary inflammation. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury model, the homeostatic imbalance caused by G-CSF blockade enhanced neutrophil accumulation, edema, and inflammation in the lungs and ultimately led to significant lung damage. Thus, physiologically produced G-CSF not only acts as a neutrophil mobilizer at the relatively late stage of acute inflammation, but also prevents exaggerated neutrophil mobilization and the associated inflammation-induced tissue damage during early-phase infection and inflammation. PMID:27551153

  14. G-CSF maintains controlled neutrophil mobilization during acute inflammation by negatively regulating CXCR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Bajrami, Besnik; Zhu, Haiyan; Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Mondal, Subhanjan; Hou, Qingming; Geng, Guangfeng; Karatepe, Kutay; Zhang, Yu C; Nombela-Arrieta, César; Park, Shin-Young; Loison, Fabien; Sakai, Jiro; Xu, Yuanfu; Silberstein, Leslie E; Luo, Hongbo R

    2016-09-19

    Cytokine-induced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow to circulation is a critical event in acute inflammation, but how it is accurately controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that CXCR2 ligands are responsible for rapid neutrophil mobilization during early-stage acute inflammation. Nevertheless, although serum CXCR2 ligand concentrations increased during inflammation, neutrophil mobilization slowed after an initial acute fast phase, suggesting a suppression of neutrophil response to CXCR2 ligands after the acute phase. We demonstrate that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), usually considered a prototypical neutrophil-mobilizing cytokine, was expressed later in the acute inflammatory response and unexpectedly impeded CXCR2-induced neutrophil mobilization by negatively regulating CXCR2-mediated intracellular signaling. Blocking G-CSF in vivo paradoxically elevated peripheral blood neutrophil counts in mice injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli and sequestered large numbers of neutrophils in the lungs, leading to sterile pulmonary inflammation. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury model, the homeostatic imbalance caused by G-CSF blockade enhanced neutrophil accumulation, edema, and inflammation in the lungs and ultimately led to significant lung damage. Thus, physiologically produced G-CSF not only acts as a neutrophil mobilizer at the relatively late stage of acute inflammation, but also prevents exaggerated neutrophil mobilization and the associated inflammation-induced tissue damage during early-phase infection and inflammation.

  15. G-CSF induces the release of the soluble form of LR11, a regulator of myeloid cell mobilization in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Naomi; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Nishii, Keigo; Yokote, Koutaro; Iseki, Tohru; Higashi, Morihiro; Tamaru, Junichi; Schneider, Wolfgang Johann; Bujo, Hideaki

    2014-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induces the mobilization of leukocytes from the bone marrow (BM) to the circulation by a yet incompletely understood mechanism. Here, we describe that the membrane-bound receptor LR11 is highly expressed in human myeloid cells and that the shed soluble form of LR11 (sLR11) is a modifier of myeloid cell migration. In the process of leukocyte mobilization by G-CSF treatment, circulating sLR11 levels are transiently elevated in humans and mice. Moreover, following G-CSF treatment, the sLR11 levels in patients show significant positive correlation with the numbers of mobilized leukocytes. The changes of LR11 levels in BM cells and of sLR11 released into the BM fluid of mice correlate tightly with the changes in circulating sLR11 levels. G-CSF dose-dependently enhanced sLR11 release from HL-60 cells, which in turn accelerated cell migration. Finally, cooperatively with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and G-CSF, sLR11 increased the attachment of floating cells (HL-60 and U937) to endothelial cells. We propose that sLR11 is a novel candidate modifier of G-CSF-mediated mobilization of hematologic cells. Identification of sLR11 as a regulatory component of G-CSF-mediated hematologic cell mobilization may facilitate further improvement of hematologic stem cell collection for clinical applications.

  16. Translating G-CSF as an Adjunct Therapy to Stem Cell Transplantation for Stroke.

    PubMed

    Peña, Ike dela; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-12-01

    Among recently investigated stroke therapies, stem cell treatment holds great promise by virtue of their putative ability to replace lost cells, promote endogenous neurogenesis,and produce behavioral and functional improvement through their "bystander effects." Translating stem cell in the clinic, however, presents a number of technical difficulties. A strategy suggested to enhance therapeutic utility of stem cells is combination therapy, i.e., co-transplantation of stem cells or adjunct treatment with pharmacological agents and substrates,which is assumed to produce more profound therapeutic benefits by circumventing limitations of individual treatments and facilitating complementary brain repair processes. We previously demonstrated enhanced functional effects of cotreatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF)and human umbilical cord blood cell (hUCB) transplantation in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here,we suggest that the aforementioned combination therapy may also produce synergistic effects in stroke. Accordingly, G-CSF treatment may reduce expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhance neurogenesis rendering a receptive microenvironment for hUCB engraftment. Adjunct treatment of GCSF with hUCB may facilitate stemness maintenance and guide neural lineage commitment of hUCB cells. Moreover, regenerative mechanisms afforded by G-CSF-mobilized endogenous stem cells, secretion of growth factors by hUCB grafts and G-CSF-recruited endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs), as well as the potential graft–host integration that may promote synaptic circuitry re-establishment could altogether produce more pronounced functional improvement in stroked rats subjected to a combination G-CSF treatment and hUCB transplantation. Nevertheless, differences in pathology and repair processes underlying TBI and stroke deserve consideration when testing the effects of combinatorial G-CSF and hUCB cell transplantation for stroke treatment. Further

  17. G-CSF is a key modulator of MDSC and could be a potential therapeutic target in colitis-associated colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Xinghua; Chen, Yongkang; Xie, Yibin; Liu, Jiancheng; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Wei; Ma, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is an essential regulator of neutrophil trafficking and is highly expressed in multiple tumors. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) promote neoplastic progression through multiple mechanisms by immune suppression. Despite the findings of G-CSF function in colon cancer progression, the precise mechanism of G-CSF on MDSCs regulation and its blockade effects on tumor growth remains a worthy area of investigation. In this study we observed an overexpression of G-CSF in a mouse colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model, which was consistent with the accumulation of MDSCs in mouse colon tissues. Further in vitro studies demonstrated that G-CSF could promote MDSCs survival and activation through signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Moreover, compared with isotype control, anti-G-CSF mAb treatment demonstrated reduced MDSC accumulation, which led to a marked decrease in neoplasm size and number in mice. Our results indicated that G-CSF is a critical regulating molecule in the migration, proliferation and function maintenance of MDSCs, which could be a potential therapeutic target for colitis-associated cancer.

  18. Biosimilar G-CSF versus filgrastim and lenograstim in healthy unrelated volunteer hematopoietic stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Roiya; Urbanowska, Elżbieta; Zborowska, Hanna; Król, Małgorzata; Król, Maria; Torosian, Tigran; Piotrowska, Iwona; Bogusz, Krzysztof; Skwierawska, Kamila; Wiktor-Jędrzejczak, Wiesław; Snarski, Emilian

    2017-08-11

    The World Marrow Donor Organization recommends original granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the mobilization of stem cells in healthy unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. We report the comparison of a biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio) with two original G-CSFs (filgrastim and lenograstim) in mobilization in unrelated donors. We included data of 313 consecutive donors who were mobilized during the period from October 2014 to March 2016 at the Medical University of Warsaw. The primary endpoints of this study were the efficiency of CD34+ cell mobilization to the circulation and results of the first apheresis. The mean daily dose of G-CSF was 9.1 μg/kg for lenograstim, 9.8 μg/kg for biosimilar filgrastim, and 9.3 μg/kg for filgrastim (p < 0.001). The mean CD34+ cell number per microliter in the blood before the first apheresis was 111 for lenograstim, 119 for biosimilar filgrastim, and 124 for filgrastim (p = 0.354); the mean difference was even less significant when comparing CD34+ number per dose of G-CSF per kilogram (p = 0.787). Target doses of CD34+ cells were reached with one apheresis in 87% donors mobilized with lenograstim and in 93% donors mobilized with original and biosimilar filgrastim (p = 0.005). The mobilized apheresis outcomes (mean number of CD34+ cells/kg of donor collected during the first apheresis) was similar with lenograstim, biosimilar filgrastim, and filgrastim: 6.2 × 10(6), 7.6 × 10(6), and 7.3 × 10(6), respectively, p = 0.06. There was no mobilization failure in any of the donors. Biosimilar G-CSF is as effective in the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells in unrelated donors as original G-CSFs. Small and clinically irrelevant differences seen in the study can be attributed to differences in G-CSF dose and collection-related factors. Active safety surveillance concurrent to clinical use and reporting to donor outcome registry (e.g., EBMT donor outcome registry or WMDA SEAR/SPEAR) might help to evaluate

  19. Effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on glial scar formation after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joonho; Kim, Moon Hang; Yoon, Yong Je; Kim, Kil Hwan; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on glial scar formation after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats and compared the therapeutic effects between G-CSF and granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to evaluate G-CSF as a potential substitute for GM-CSF in clinical application. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: a sham-operated group (Group 1), an SCI group without treatment (Group 2), an SCI group treated with G-CSF (Group 3), and an SCI group treated with GM-CSF (Group 4). G-CSF and GM-CSF were administered via intraperitoneal injection immediately after SCI. The effects of G-CSF and GM-CSF on functional recovery, glial scar formation, and axonal regeneration were evaluated and compared. The rats in Groups 3 and 4 showed better functional recovery and more decreased cavity sizes than those in Group 2 (p < 0.05). Both G-CSF and GM-CSF suppressed intensive expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein around the cavity at 4 weeks and reduced the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (p < 0.05). Also, early administration of G-CSF and GM-CSF protected axon fibers from destructive injury and facilitated axonal regeneration. There were no significant differences in comparisons of functional recovery, glial scar formation, and axonal regeneration between G-CSF and GM-CSF. G-CSF suppressed glial scar formation after SCI in rats, possibly by restricting the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, which might facilitate functional recovery from SCI. GM-CSF and G-CSF had similar effects on glial scar formation and functional recovery after SCI, suggesting that G-CSF can potentially be substituted for GM-CSF in the treatment of SCI.

  20. The effect of systemic administration of G-CSF on a full-thickness cartilage defect in a rabbit model MSC proliferation as presumed mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, T.; Akagi, R.; Akatsu, Y.; Fukawa, T.; Hoshi, H.; Yamamoto, Y.; Enomoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Nakagawa, R.; Takahashi, K.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation in vitro and to determine whether pre-microfracture systemic administration of G-CSF (a bone marrow stimulant) could improve the quality of repaired tissue of a full-thickness cartilage defect in a rabbit model. Methods MSCs from rabbits were cultured in a control medium and medium with G-CSF (low-dose: 4 μg, high-dose: 40 μg). At one, three, and five days after culturing, cells were counted. Differential potential of cultured cells were examined by stimulating them with a osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic medium. A total of 30 rabbits were divided into three groups. The low-dose group (n = 10) received 10 μg/kg of G-CSF daily, the high-dose group (n = 10) received 50 μg/kg daily by subcutaneous injection for three days prior to creating cartilage defects. The control group (n = 10) was administered saline for three days. At 48 hours after the first injection, a 5.2 mm diameter cylindrical osteochondral defect was created in the femoral trochlea. At four and 12 weeks post-operatively, repaired tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Results The cell count in the low-dose G-CSF medium was significantly higher than that in the control medium. The differentiation potential of MSCs was preserved after culturing them with G-CSF. Macroscopically, defects were filled and surfaces were smoother in the G-CSF groups than in the control group at four weeks. At 12 weeks, the quality of repaired cartilage improved further, and defects were almost completely filled in all groups. Microscopically, at four weeks, defects were partially filled with hyaline-like cartilage in the G-CSF groups. At 12 weeks, defects were repaired with hyaline-like cartilage in all groups. Conclusions G-CSF promoted proliferation of MSCs in vitro. The systemic administration of G-CSF promoted the repair of damaged

  1. G-CSF Analogue Treatment Increases Peripheral Neutrophil Numbers in Pigs - a Potential Alternative for In-Feed Antibiotics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunomodulators is a promising area for therapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease during periods of peak disease incidence. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhances neutrophil production and release from the bone marrow and is already li...

  2. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p < 0.001) and associated with CD163+ macrophages (p < 0.0001), poorer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.021) and significantly increased numbers of TGF-α+ cells. While G-CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  3. Impact of donor hematopoietic cells mobilized with G-CSF and plerixafor on murine acute graft-versus-host-disease.

    PubMed

    Arbez, Jessy; Saas, Philippe; Lamarthée, Baptiste; Malard, Florent; Couturier, Mélanie; Mohty, Mohamad; Gaugler, Béatrice

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to characterize the immune effectors contained in the grafts from donor mice mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor and to evaluate their impact on the development of acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD). Mobilization was done with G-CSF alone or G-CSF plus plerixafor (G+P). In grafts collected after G+P mobilization, we observed a significantly higher proportion of c-kit(+)Sca-1(+) hematopoietic stem cells compared with G-CSF. A significant increase in the percentage of plasmacytoid dendritic cells was detected in the G+P graft compared with G-CSF graft. We also studied the ability of stem cell grafts mobilized with G+P to induce GVHD in a mouse model. We observed higher mortality (P < 0.001) associated with increased aGVHD clinical score (P < 0.0001) as well as higher pathology score in the intestine of mice receiving G+P as compared with G-CSF grafts (P < 0.001). Moreover, the exacerbated aGVHD severity was associated with upregulation of CCR6 expression on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from the G+P grafts, as well as on T cells from mice transplanted with G+P grafts. In conclusion, we showed that grafts mobilized with G+P exhibited functional features different from those mobilized with G-CSF alone, which increase the severity of aGVHD in the recipients. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. G-CSF prevents caspase 3 activation in Schwann cells after sciatic nerve transection, but does not improve nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frost, Hanna K; Kodama, Akira; Ekström, Per; Dahlin, Lars B

    2016-10-15

    Exogenous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has emerged as a drug candidate for improving the outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. We raised the question if exogenous G-CSF can improve nerve regeneration following a clinically relevant model - nerve transection and repair - in healthy and diabetic rats. In short-term experiments, distance of axonal regeneration and extent of injury-induced Schwann cell death was quantified by staining for neurofilaments and cleaved caspase 3, respectively, seven days after repair. There was no difference in axonal outgrowth between G-CSF-treated and non-treated rats, regardless if healthy Wistar or diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were examined. However, G-CSF treatment caused a significant 13% decrease of cleaved caspase 3-positive Schwann cells at the lesion site in healthy rats, but only a trend in diabetic rats. In the distal nerve segments of healthy rats a similar trend was observed. In long-term experiments of healthy rats, regeneration outcome was evaluated at 90days after repair by presence of neurofilaments, wet weight of gastrocnemius muscle, and perception of touch (von Frey monofilament testing weekly). The presence of neurofilaments distal to the suture line was similar in G-CSF-treated and non-treated rats. The weight ratio of ipsi-over contralateral gastrocnemius muscles, and perception of touch at any time point, were likewise not affected by G-CSF treatment. In addition, the inflammatory response in short- and long-term experiments was studied by analyzing ED1 stainable macrophages in healthy rats, but in neither case was any attenuation seen at the injury site or distal to it. G-CSF can prevent caspase 3 activation in Schwann cells in the short-term, but does not detectably affect the inflammatory response, nor improve early or late axonal outgrowth or functional recovery.

  5. Influence of repeated subcutaneous G-CSF injections on selected blood parameters relevant for monitoring programmes in sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Walpurgis, Katja; Slijepcevic, Mirjana; Wenzel, Folker; Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Franz, Stefan; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-10-01

    The use of growth factors in sports is restricted under the terms of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC). While the beneficial effects of erythropoietin (EPO) on erythropoiesis and therefore its performance-enhancing properties have been well documented and established for decades, the aim of this study was to elucidate the relevance of the cytokine G-CSF in a doping control context, particularly concerning its influence on selected blood parameters representing central aspects of the Athlete Biological Passport. For that purpose, the effect of repeated subcutaneous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) injections in therapeutic dosages (10 µg/kg/d) on white blood cells, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit and percent reticulocytes was analyzed by using commonly employed fluorescence flow cytometry-based approaches. A total of 20 people were tested (14 male, 6 female) and both white blood cell count and reticulocyte percentages were found to significantly increase following a 5-day treatment with G-CSF. Simultaneously, all other volume-dependent parameters (red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit) slightly but significantly decreased. Due to the relevance of these measurands for the validity of blood tests for doping controls and the anecdotal evidence of G-CSF being potentially misused by elite athletes, G-CSF analyses might be indicated in case of unusually altered blood profiles. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Protective role of G-CSF in dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis through generating gut-homing macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meshkibaf, Shahab; Martins, Andrew J; Henry, Garth T; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine best known for its role in promoting the generation and function of neutrophils. G-CSF is also found to be involved in macrophage generation and immune regulation; however, its in vivo role in immune homeostasis is largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of G-CSF in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis using G-CSF receptor-deficient (G-CSFR(-/-)) mice. Mice were administered with 1.5% DSS in drinking water for 5days, and the severity of colitis was measured for the next 5days. GCSFR(-/-) mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis than G-CSFR(+/+) or G-CSFR(-/+) mice. G-CSFR(-/-) mice harbored less F4/80(+) macrophages, but a similar number of neutrophils, in the intestine. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared in the presence of both G-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) (G-BMDM) expressed higher levels of regulatory macrophage markers such as programmed death ligand 2 (PDL2), CD71 and CD206, but not in arginase I, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, Ym1 (chitinase-like 3) and FIZZ1 (found in inflammatory zone 1), and lower levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CD80 and CD86 than bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared in the presence of M-CSF alone (BMDM), in response to interleukin (IL)-4/IL-13 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon (IFN)-γ, respectively. Adoptive transfer of G-BMDM, but not BMDM, protected G-CSFR(-/-) mice from DSS-induced colitis, and suppressed expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β and iNOS in the intestine. These results suggest that G-CSF plays an important role in preventing colitis, likely through populating immune regulatory macrophages in the intestine.

  7. Generation and characterization of transgenic mouse mesenchymal stem cell lines expressing hIGF-1 or hG-CSF.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gabrielle V M; Silva, Daniela N; Carvalho, Rejane H; Souza, Bruno S F; da Silva, Kátia Nunes; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Paredes, Bruno D; Nonaka, Carolina K V; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B P

    2017-09-02

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are promising tools in the fields of cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In addition to their differentiation potential, MSC have the ability to secrete bioactive molecules that stimulate tissue regeneration. Thus, the overexpression of cytokines and growth factors may enhance the therapeutic effects of MSC. Here we generated and characterized mouse bone marrow MSC lines overexpressing hG-CSF or hIGF-1. MSC lines overexpressing hG-CSF or hIGF-1 were generated through lentiviral vector mediated gene transfer. The expression of hG-CSF or hIGF-1 genes in the clones produced was quantified by qRT-PCR, and the proteins were detected in the cell supernatants by ELISA. The cell lines displayed cell surface markers and differentiation potential into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes similar to the control MSC cell lines, indicating the conservation of their phenotype even after genetic modification. IGF-1 and G-CSF transgenic cells maintained immunosuppressive activity. Finally, we performed a comparative gene expression analysis by qRT-PCR array in the cell lines expressing hIGF-1 and hG-CSF when compared to the control cells. Our results demonstrate that the cell lines generated may be useful tools for cell therapy and are suitable for testing in disease models.

  8. Effect of thrombopoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Schattner, M; Pozner, R G; Gorostizaga, A B; Lazzari, M A

    2000-07-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be administered together in aplastic patients. We evaluated the effect of both cytokines alone or combined on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional responses. TPO, G-CSF, or the combination of both cytokines, induced neither platelet nor PMN activation. TPO but not G-CSF synergized with threshold ADP concentrations to induce maximal aggregation and ATP release. The synergistic effect of TPO with ADP was not modified by the presence of G-CSF. Flow cytometry studies have shown that thrombin-induced loss of GPIb from platelet surface was significantly increased by pretreatment of platelets with TPO, G-CSF, or both cytokines. P-selectin expression induced by thrombin was augmented by TPO, but not by G-CSF. Coincubation of the cells with TPO and G-CSF did not modify the values obtained with TPO alone. Expression of CD11b on PMN surface was augmented by G-CSF or fMLP. G-CSF-treated PMN increased the effect of fMLP on CD11b expression. TPO did not modify either basal levels of CD11b or the increased expression induced by G-CSF or fMLP. Incubation of PMN with both cytokines showed no differences compared to G-CSF alone. Platelet-PMN aggregates induced by thrombin in whole blood were augmented by TPO. G-CSF alone neither synergized with thrombin nor changed the results observed with TPO. These data show that in vitro functional responses of platelets, or PMN induced by TPO or G-CSF alone, were neither further increased nor inhibited by treatment of the cells with both cytokines.

  9. Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promotes Preinvasive and Invasive Estrogen Receptor-Positive Tumor Development in MMTV-erbB2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun Ling; Zhang, Guang Ping; Xiao, Zheng Zheng; Ma, Zhi Kun; Lei, Cai Peng; Song, Shi Yuan; Feng, Ying Ying; Zhao, Ya Chao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) could promote the development of preinvasive and invasive breast cancer in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-erbB2) mice with estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Methods MMTV-erbB2 mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups with 20 mice in each group. MMTV-erbB2 mice were treated with daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle or rhG-CSF (low-rhG-CSF group, rhG-CSF 0.125 µg; vehicle-rhG-CSF group, normal saline 0.25 µg; and high-rhG-CSF group, rhG-CSF 0.25 µg) at 3 months of age. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of G-CSF action in mammary glands were investigated via immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Low, but not high, rhG-CSF doses significantly accelerated mammary tumorigenesis in MMTV-erbB2 mice. Short-term treatment with rhG-CSF could significantly promote the development of preinvasive mammary lesions. The cancer prevention effect was associated with reduced expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cluster of differentiation 34, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in mammary glands by >80%. Conclusion We found that G-CSF was regulated by rhG-CSF both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of G-CSF genes helped us further understand the mechanism by which G-CSF promotes cancer. Low doses of rhG-CSF could significantly increase tumor latency and increase tumor multiplicity and burden. Moreover, rhG-CSF effectively promotes development of both malignant and premalignant mammary lesions in MMTV-erbB2 mice. PMID:26155288

  10. Requirement of Src kinase Lyn for induction of DNA synthesis by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Corey, S J; Dombrosky-Ferlan, P M; Zuo, S; Krohn, E; Donnenberg, A D; Zorich, P; Romero, G; Takata, M; Kurosaki, T

    1998-02-06

    Treatment of cells with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins. G-CSF stimulates both the activation of protein tyrosine kinases Lyn, Jak1, and Jak2 and the association of these enzymes with the G-CSF receptor. Wild-type, lyn-deficient, and syk-deficient chicken B lymphocyte cell lines were transfected with the human G-CSF receptor, and stable transfectants were studied. G-CSF-dependent tyrosyl phosphorylation of Jak1 and Jak2 occurred in all three cell lines. Wild-type and syk-deficient transfectants responded to G-CSF in a dose-responsive fashion with increased thymidine incorporation, but none of the clones of lyn-deficient transfectants did. Ectopic expression of Lyn, but not that of c-Src, in the lyn-deficient cells restored their mitogenic responsiveness to G-CSF. Ectopic expression in wild-type cells of the kinase-inactive form of Lyn, but not of the kinase-inactive form of Jak2, inhibited thymidine incorporation in response to G-CSF. These studies show that the absence of Lyn results in the loss of mitogenic signaling in the G-CSF signaling pathway and that activation of Jak1 or Jak2 is not sufficient to cause mitogenesis.

  11. In vivo stimulation of granulopoiesis by recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.M.; Zsebo, K.M.; Inoue, H.; Hines, D.; Boone, T.C.; Chazin, V.R.; Tsai, L.; Ritch, T.; Souza, L.M.

    1987-04-01

    Osmotic pumps containing Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) were attached to indwelling jugular vein catheters and implanted subcutaneously into Golden Syrian hamsters. Within 3 days, peripheral granulocyte counts had increased > 10-fold with a concomitant 4-fold increase in total leukocytes. Microscopic examination of Wright-Giemsa-stained blood smears from rhG-CSF hamsters showed that only the neutrophil subpopulation of granulocytes had increased. After subcutaneous injection at /sup 35/S-labeled rhG-CSF doses of up to 10 ..mu..g x kg/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/ only granulocyte counts were affected. However, at higher dose levels, a transient thrombocytopenia was noted. Erythrocyte and lymphocyte/monocyte counts remained unaffected by rhG-CSF over the entire dose range studied. Total leukocyte counts increased 3-fold within 12 hr after a single s.c. injection of rhG-CSF. This early effect was associated with an increase in the total number of colony-forming cells and the percent of active cycling cells in the marrow. A sustained elevation of peripheral leukocyte and marrow progenitor counts was observed following seven daily s.c. injections of rhG-CSF. The ability of rhG-CSF to increase the production and release of granulocytes from the marrow may underlie the beneficial effect it produced on the restoration of peripheral leukocyte counts in hamsters made leukopenic by treatment with 5-fluorouracil.

  12. G-CSF and/or M-CSF accelerate differentiation of bone marrow cells into endothelial progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuming; Adachi, Yasushi; Iwasaki, Masayoshi; Minamino, Keizo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Keiji; Koike, Yasushi; Mukaide, Hiromi; Shigematsu, Akio; Kiriyama, Naoko; Li, Chunfu; Ikehara, Susumu

    2006-06-01

    It has been reported that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can mobilize endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in bone marrow cells (BMCs) into peripheral blood (PB) in vivo. Previously, we also reported that macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) can mobilize EPCs into PB, which results in the rapid recovery of blood flow in induced-ischemia limbs by augmenting the number of intramuscular capillaries in vivo. In the present study, we demonstrate that M-CSF and/or G-CSF can increase EPCs from lineage (CD3, B220, Gr-1, Mac-1, CD11c, Ter119, NK1.1 or CD31)-negative BMCs in vitro. Lineage-negative BMCs were cultured with or without M-CSF and/or G-CSF. Three days after culture with M-CSF and/or G-CSF, the number of Flk-1+/CD45-, Sca-1+/CD45-, CD31+/CD45- or CD146+/CD45- cells increased in comparison with no cytokines. When the cultured BMCs with or without G-CSF and/or M-CSF were intravenously injected into ischemia-induced hindlimbs of mice, the number of intramuscular capillaries in the ischemia-induced legs increased; BMCs cultured with G-CSF and/or M-CSF were more effective than those of cytokine non-treated BMCs. These results suggest that M-CSF and/or G-CSF can induce the differentiation of BMCs into EPCs, even in vitro.

  13. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilizing agents G-CSF, cyclophosphamide or AMD3100 have distinct mechanisms of action on bone marrow HSC niches and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, I G; Pettit, A R; Raggatt, L J; Jacobsen, R N; Forristal, C E; Barbier, V; Nowlan, B; Cisterne, A; Bendall, L J; Sims, N A; Lévesque, J-P

    2012-07-01

    The CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 is progressively replacing cyclophosphamide (CYP) as adjuvant to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for autologous transplants in patients who failed prior mobilization with G-CSF alone. It has recently emerged that G-CSF mediates HSC mobilization and inhibits bone formation via specific bone marrow (BM) macrophages. We compared the effect of these three mobilizing agents on BM macrophages, bone formation, osteoblasts, HSC niches and HSC reconstitution potential. Both G-CSF and CYP suppressed niche-supportive macrophages and osteoblasts, and inhibited expression of endosteal cytokines resulting in major impairment of HSC reconstitution potential remaining in the mobilized BM. In sharp contrast, although AMD3100 was effective at mobilizing HSC, it did not suppress osteoblasts, endosteal cytokine expression or reconstitution potential of HSC remaining in the mobilized BM. In conclusion, although G-CSF, CYP and AMD3100 efficiently mobilize HSC into the blood, their effects on HSC niches and bone formation are distinct with both G-CSF and CYP targeting HSC niche function and bone formation, whereas AMD3100 directly targets HSC without altering niche function or bone formation.

  14. Gene expression changes in spinal motoneurons of the SOD1G93A transgenic model for ALS after treatment with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Alexandre; Kastner, Stefan; Chatzikonstantinou, Eva; Pitzer, Claudia; Plaas, Christian; Kirsch, Friederike; Wafzig, Oliver; Krüger, Carola; Spoelgen, Robert; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Gretz, Norbert; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable fatal motoneuron disease with a lifetime risk of approximately 1:400. It is characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting, and death ensuing 3–5 years after diagnosis. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a drug candidate for ALS, with evidence for efficacy from animal studies and interesting data from pilot clinical trials. To gain insight into the disease mechanisms and mode of action of G-CSF, we performed gene expression profiling on isolated lumbar motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice, the most frequently studied animal model for ALS, with and without G-CSF treatment. Results: Motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice present a distinct gene expression profile in comparison to controls already at an early disease stage (11 weeks of age), when treatment was initiated. The degree of deregulation increases at a time where motor symptoms are obvious (15 weeks of age). Upon G-CSF treatment, transcriptomic deregulations of SOD1G93A motoneurons were notably restored. Discriminant analysis revealed that SOD1 mice treated with G-CSF has a transcriptom close to presymptomatic SOD1 mice or wild type mice. Some interesting genes modulated by G-CSF treatment relate to neuromuscular function such as CCR4-NOT or Prss12. Conclusions: Our data suggest that G-CSF is able to re-adjust gene expression in symptomatic SOD1G93A motoneurons. This provides further arguments for G-CSF as a promising drug candidate for ALS. PMID:25653590

  15. The effects of p38 MAPK inhibition combined with G-CSF administration on the hematoimmune system in mice with irradiation injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Deguan; Wang, Yueying; Wu, Hongying; Lu, Lu; Wang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Junling; Zhang, Heng; Fan, Saijun; Fan, Feiyue; Zhou, Daohong; Meng, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    The acute and residual (or long-term) bone marrow (BM) injury induced by ionizing radiation (IR) is a major clinic concern for patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and victims accidentally exposed to a moderate-to-high dose of IR. In this study, we investigated the effects of the treatment with the p38 inhibitor SB203580 (SB) and/or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the hematoimmune damage induced by IR in a mouse model. Specifically, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a sublethal dose (6 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) and then treated with vehicle, G-CSF, SB, and G-CSF plus SB. G-CSF (1 µg/mouse) was administrated to mice by intraperitoneal (ip) injection twice a day for six successive days; SB (15 mg/kg) by ip injection every other day for 10 days. It was found that the treatment with SB and/or G-CSF significantly enhanced the recovery of various peripheral blood cell counts and the number of BM mononuclear cells 10 and 30 days after the mice were exposed to TBI compared with vehicle treatment. Moreover, SB and/or G-CSF treatment also increased the clonogenic function of BM hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and the frequency of BM lineage -Sca1+c-kit+ cells (LSK cells) and short-term and long term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) 30 days after TBI, in comparison with vehicle treated controls. However, the recovery of peripheral blood B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was not significantly affected by SB and/or G-CSF treatment. These results suggest that the treatment with SB and/or G-CSF can reduce IR-induced BM injury probably in part via promoting HSC and HPC regeneration.

  16. Prophylactic G-CSF in patients with early-stage breast cancer: a health economic review

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, P

    2009-01-01

    Although the use of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in conjunction with myelosuppressive chemotherapy is supported by clinical research evidence and advocated by international clinical guidelines when the consequent risk of febrile neutropenia exceeds 20%, there remains doubt as to the cost-effectiveness of the practice. There are limited economic data, and the data that are available are not necessarily applicable to the management of breast cancer in a European setting. Much of the available evidence on G-CSF in the management of febrile neutropenia is partial, focusing primarily on direct costs to the health service – that is, those related to hospitalisation and drug treatment. A full assessment of the cost effectiveness of G-CSF prophylaxis needs to take account of both costs and outcomes, including mortality, quality of life and patient functioning. As febrile neutropenia has been shown to affect productivity, consideration should also be given to quantifying the indirect costs of neutropenia. PMID:19756001

  17. G-CSF ameliorates neuronal apoptosis through GSK-3β inhibition in neonatal hypoxia–ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Klebe, Damon; Doycheva, Desislava; McBride, Devin W.; Krafft, Paul R.; Flores, Jerry; Zhou, Changman; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a growth factor, has known neuroprotective effects in a variety of experimental brain injury models. Herein we show that G-CSF administration attenuates neuronal apoptosis after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) via glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibition. Ten day old Sprague-Dawley rat pups (n=157) were subjected to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2.5hrs of hypoxia or sham surgery. HI animals received control siRNA, GSK-3β siRNA (4μL/pup), G-CSF (50μg/kg), G-CSF combined with 0.1 or 0.4nM G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) siRNA, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor Wortmannin (86ng/pup), or DMSO (vehicle for Wortmannin). Pups were euthanized 48hrs post-HI to quantify brain infarct volume. G-CSFR, activated Akt (p-Akt), activated GSK-3β (p-GSK-3β), Cleaved Caspase-3 (CC3), Bcl-2, and Bax were quantified using Western blot analysis and the localizations of each was visualized via immunofluorescence staining. Neuronal cell death was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). Our results showed p-GSK-3β increased after HI until its peak at 48hrs post-ictus, and both GSK-3β siRNA and G-CSF administration reduced p-GSK-3β expression, as well as infarct volume. p-GSK-3β and CC3 were generally co-localized in neurons. Furthermore, G-CSF increased p-Akt expression and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and also decreased p-GSK-3β and CC3 expression levels in the ipsilateral hemisphere, which were all reversed by G-CSFR siRNA, Wortmannin, and GSK-3β siRNA. In conclusion, G-CSF attenuated caspase activation and reduced brain injury by inhibiting GSK-3β activity after experimental HI in rat pups. This neuroprotective effect was abolished by both G-CSFR siRNA and Wortmannin. PMID:25448005

  18. Comparison of Outcomes after Transplantation of G-CSF Stimulated Bone Marrow Grafts versus Bone Marrow or Peripheral Blood Grafts from HLA-Matched Sibling Donors for Patients with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Roland; Brazauskas, Ruta; Kan, Fangyu; Bashey, Asad; Bredeson, Christopher; Camitta, Bruce; Chiang, Kuang-Yueh; Frangoul, Haydar; Gale, Robert Peter; Gee, Adrian; George, Biju; Goldman, Frederick D.; Gross, Thomas G.; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Isola, Luis; Ispizua, Alvaro Urbano; Lazarus, Hillard; Marsh, Judith; Russell, James; Sabloff, Mitchell; Waller, Edmund K.; Eapen, Mary

    2010-01-01

    We compared outcomes of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) who received G-CSF stimulated bone marrow (G-BM) (n=78), unstimulated bone marrow (BM) (n=547), or peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) (n=134) from an HLA-matched sibling. Transplantations occurred in 1997–2003. Rates of neutrophil and platelet recovery were not different among the three treatment groups. Grade 2–4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (RR 0.82, p=0.539), grade 3–4 acute GVHD (RR 0.74, p=0.535) and chronic GVHD (RR 1.56, p=0.229) were similar after G-BM and BM transplants. Grade 2–4 acute GVHD (RR 2.37, p=0.012) but not grade 3–4 acute GVHD (RR 1.66, p=0.323) and chronic GVHD (RR 5.09, p<0.001) were higher after PBPC transplants compared to G-BM. Grade 2–4 (RR 2.90, p<0.001), grade 3–4 (RR 2.24, p=0.009) acute GVHD and chronic GVHD (RR 3.26, p<0.001) were higher after PBPC transplants compared to BM. Mortality risks were lower after transplantation of BM compared to G-BM (RR 0.63, p=0.05). These data suggest no advantage to using G-BM and the observed higher rates of acute and chronic GVHD in PBPC recipients warrants cautious use of this graft source for SAA. Taken together, BM is the preferred graft for HLA matched sibling transplants for SAA. PMID:21034842

  19. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with radiotherapy promotes tumor growth by stimulating vascularization in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Bae, Min Ji; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Chang Geun; Jo, Wol Soon; Kim, Sung Dae; Yang, Kwangmo

    2015-07-01

    Although granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used to support recovery from radiation-induced side-effects, the precise effects of G-CSF on colon cancer under radiotherapy remain poorly understood. In the present study, to investigate the effects of tumor growth following radiotherapy and G-CSF administration in a murine xenograft model of colon cancer, female BALB/c mice were injected with cells of a colon carcinoma cell line (CT26) with irradiation and G-CSF, alone or in combination. Mice received 2 Gy of focal radiation daily for 5 days and intraperitoneal injection of G-CSF (100 µg/kg/day) after irradiation for 7 days. Changes in the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase type 9 (MMP-9) and CD31 were assessed in the mouse cancer induced by injection of colon cancer cells. We observed that G-CSF increased the number of circulating neutrophils, but facilitated tumor growth. However, G-CSF treatment did not affect radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell viability in CT26 cells in vitro. Increased levels of myeloperoxidase, a neutrophil marker and those of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed in tumors with G-CSF supplementation. In addition, we found that increased levels of CD31 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were correlated with the enhanced tumor growth after G-CSF treatment. Therefore, these data suggest that G-CSF may contribute to tumor growth and decrease the antitumor effect of radiotherapy, possibly by promoting vascularization in cancer lesions.

  20. HIF-1α-stabilizing agent FG-4497 rescues human CD34(+) cell mobilization in response to G-CSF in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nowlan, Bianca; Futrega, Kathryn; Brunck, Marion E; Walkinshaw, Gail; Flippin, Lee E; Doran, Michael R; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2017-08-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used routinely in the clinical setting to mobilize hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) into the patient's blood for collection and subsequent transplantation. However, a significant proportion of patients who have previously received chemotherapy or radiotherapy and require autologous HSPC transplantation cannot mobilize the minimal threshold of mobilized HSPCs to achieve rapid and successful hematopoietic reconstitution. Although several alternatives to the G-CSF regime have been tested, few are used in the clinical setting. We have shown previously in mice that administration of prolyl 4-hydroxylase domain enzyme (PHD) inhibitors, which stabilize hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, synergize with G-CSF in vivo to enhance mouse HSPC mobilization into blood, leading to enhanced engraftment via an HSPC-intrinsic mechanism. To evaluate whether PHD inhibitors could be used to enhance mobilization of human HSPCs, we humanized nonobese, diabetic severe combined immune-deficient Il2rg(-/-) mice by transplanting them with human umbilical cord blood CD34(+) HSPCs and then treating them with G-CSF with and without co-administration of the PHD inhibitor FG-4497. We observed that combination treatment with G-CSF and FG-4497 resulted in significant mobilization of human lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(+) HSPCs and more primitive human Lin(-)CD34(+)CD38(-) HSPCs into blood and spleen, whereas mice treated with G-CSF alone did not mobilize human HSPCs significantly. These results suggest that the PHD inhibitor FG-4497 also increases human HSPC mobilization in a xenograft mouse model, suggesting the possibility of testing PHD inhibitors to boost HSPC mobilization in response to G-CSF in humans. Copyright © 2017 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 5-AED Enhances Survival of Irradiated Mice in a G-CSF-Dependent Manner, Stimulates Innate Immune Cell Function, Reduces Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Induces Genes that Modulate Cell Cycle Progression and Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-22

    cytokines [15, 24]. However, this speculation was based on correla- tions, rather than a direct test of the hypothesis by blocking hematopoietic... tested the effects of 5-AED on irradiated human hematopoietic progenitor (CD34+) cells [26]. We found that 5-AED protected CD34+ cells from radi- ation...animals, this required a direct test in vivo. We compared the effects of blocking G-CSF to blocking IL-6, since IL-6 is induced by 5-AED [24, 26], but was

  2. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Diederich, Kai; Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185-192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of febrile neutropenia prevention with primary versus secondary G-CSF prophylaxis for adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Younis, T; Rayson, D; Jovanovic, S; Skedgel, C

    2016-10-01

    The adoption of primary (PP) versus secondary prophylaxis (SP) of febrile neutropenia (FN), with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF), for adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) regimens in breast cancer (BC) could be affected by its "value for money". This systematic review examined (i) cost-effectiveness of PP versus SP, (ii) FN threshold at which PP is cost-effective including the guidelines 20 % threshold and (iii) potential impact of G-CSF efficacy assumptions on outcomes. The systematic review identified all cost-effectiveness/cost-utility analyses (CEA/CUA) involving PP versus SP G-CSF for AC in BC that met predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Five relevant CEA/CUA were identified. These CEA/CUA examined different AC regimens (TAC = 2; FEC-D = 1; TC = 2) and G-CSF formulations (filgrastim "F" = 4; pegfilgrastim "P" = 4) with varying baseline FN-risk (range 22-32 %), mortality (range 1.4-6.0 %) and utility (range 0.33-0.47). The potential G-CSF benefit, including FN risk reduction with P versus F, varied among models. Overall, relative to SP, PP was not associated with good value for money, as per commonly utilized CE thresholds, at the baseline FN rates examined, including the consensus 20 % FN threshold, in most of these studies. The value for money associated with PP versus SP was primarily dependent on G-CSF benefit assumptions including reduced FN mortality and improved BC survival. PP G-CSF for FN prevention in BC patients undergoing AC may not be a cost-effective strategy at the guidelines 20 % FN threshold.

  4. Production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by carcinomas in a dog and a cat with paraneoplastic leukocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, L C; Rosol, T J; Gröne, A; Ward, H; Steinmeyer, C

    1996-01-01

    A dog with a pulmonary papillary carcinoma and a cat with a dermal tubular adenocarcinoma had profound paraneoplastic neutrophilic leukocytosis with no clinically detectable inflammatory foci. To investigate the mechanism of the leukocytosis, oligonucleotide primers were designed from the cDNA sequences of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) of dogs. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed on tumor tissues, and specific amplification of G-CSF and GM-CSF was obtained with the tumor RNA in the dog. The tumor RNA in the cat demonstrated specific amplification of G-CSF but not GM-CSF. These findings are consistent with the production of G-CSF and/or GM-CSF by neoplasms as a mechanism for paraneoplastic leukocytosis in small animals.

  5. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  6. Long-term results of a prospective randomized trial evaluating G-CSF priming in intensive induction chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bug, Gesine; Koschmieder, Steffen; Krauter, Juergen; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Wiebe, Stefanie; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Klein, Stefan A; Wegener, Gerd; Göhring, Gudrun; Heit, Wolfgang; Hoelzer, Dieter; Ganser, Arnold; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2014-02-01

    Few studies have evaluated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming in elderly patients with intensively treated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and no data are available for genetically defined AML subgroups. We provide long-term results (median follow-up 7.6 years) of a randomized trial in which 183 patients (median age 67 years) received G-CSF prior to (G-CSF priming) or after two cycles of induction chemotherapy. CR rates with G-CSF priming and G-CSF post-chemotherapy were comparable (57 vs. 67 %, p = 0.153), with overall survival (OS) probabilities of 14 vs. 17 % at 10 years. Induction mortality was significantly higher with G-CSF priming (23 vs. 10 %, p = 0.015), primarily in normal karyotype (NK) AML. In this subgroup, a trend for better relapse-free survival (RFS) was observed with G-CSF priming (44 vs. 22 % at 10 years, p = 0.074) but did not translate into an OS benefit. G-CSF priming had no impact on AML with FLT3-ITD and NPM mutations and did not improve outcome in patients with adverse cytogenetics. In a landmark analysis, late consolidation with autologous stem cell transplantation or a second consolidation cycle significantly improved RFS compared with one consolidation cycle (21.0 vs. 12.8 months, p = 0.046). Future studies on G-CSF priming should be restricted to NK AML and used only in post-remission therapy.

  7. Influence of rhG-CSF scheduling on megakaryocytopoietic recovery following 5-fluorouracil-induced hematotoxicity in splenectomized B6D2F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Scheding, S; Media, J E; Nakeff, A

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, rhG-CSF, is widely applied to ameliorate neutropenia following chemotherapy. However, rhG-CSF can exert negative effects on megakaryocytopoiesis that might cause a delay of megakaryocyte recovery. Therefore, the present study was designed to test different rhG-CSF administration protocols with regard to their megakaryocytic inhibitory potential in a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced experimental model system. Splenectomized B6D2F1 mice received a single injection of 5-FU (150 mg/kg) on day 0 followed by 50 micrograms/kg/day rhG-CSF given daily for either zero, four, or eight days. Five days after 5-FU, bone marrow and blood hematopoiesis were reduced significantly when compared with controls, independent of whether or not animals received rhG-CSF. However, nine days after 5-FU, granulopoietic recovery from 5-FU-induced toxicity was faster for rhG-CSF-treated versus untreated mice as demonstrated by higher values for colony forming unit-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) and granulocytes (CFU-GM: 7.2 +/- 0.4 versus 5 +/- 0.6 x 10(4)/femur, granulocytes: 4.3 +/- 2 versus 1.4 +/- 0.4 x 10(5)/ml, respectively). Furthermore, significant mobilization of CFU-megakaryocyte (CFU-Meg) and CFU-GM into the peripheral blood was induced by the eight-day administration of rhG-CSF following 5-FU (day 9: 911 +/- 102 CFU-Meg/ml, 2330 +/- 152 CFU-GM/ml). However, megakaryocytic cells in these same mice were considerably lower when compared with those of animals receiving no rhG-CSF (CFU-Meg: 2.7 +/- 0.2 x 10(3) versus 4.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(3)/femur; small acetylcholinesterase positive (SAChE+) cells: 4.9 +/- 0.3 x 10(3) versus 7.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(3)/femur; megakaryocytes: 2.5 +/- 0.2 x 10(3) versus 4.1 +/- 0.7 x 10(3)/femur; platelets: 2.67 +/- 0.5 x 10(9) versus 3.1 +/- 0.5 x 10(9)/ml, respectively). On the other hand, the shortening of the rhG-CSF treatment from eight to four days caused a rapid granulopoietic recovery comparable to animals

  8. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment of resistant thin endometrium in women with frozen-thawed blastocyst transfer.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Michał; Łukaszuk, Krzysztof; Liss, Joanna; Skowrońska, Patrycja; Szczyptańska, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) effect on unresponsive thin (<7 mm) endometrium in women undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer at the blastocyst stage. A total of 62 women with thin unresponsive endometrium were included in the study, of which, 29 received a G-CSF infusion and 33 who opted out of the study served as controls. Patients in both groups had similar endometrial thickness at the time of the initial evaluation: 6.50 mm (5.50-6.80) in the G-CSF and 6.40 mm (5.50-7.0) in the control group. However, after the infusion endometrial thickness increased significantly in the G-CSF group in comparison with the controls (p=0.01), (Δ) 0.5 (0.02-1.2) (p=0.005). In the G-CSF group endometrium expanded to 7.90 mm (6.58-8.70) while in the control group to 6.90 mm (6.0-7.75). Five women in each group conceived. The clinical pregnancy rate was 5/29 (17.24%) in the G-CSF treated group and 5/33 (15.15%) in the control group (p>0.05). The live birth rate was 2/29 (6.89%) in the G-CSF group and 2/33 (6.06%) in the control group (p>0.05). We concluded that G-CSF infusion leads to an improvement in endometrium thickness but not to any improvement in the clinical pregnancy and live birth rates. Until more data is available G-CSF treatment should be considered to be of limited value in increasing pregnancy rate. G-CSF: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; M-CSF: macrophagecolony-stimulating factor; GM-CSF: granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; FET: frozen embryo transfer; IVF: in vitro fertilization.

  9. Acetylation impacts Fli-1-driven regulation of granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Lennard Richard, Mara L; Brandon, Danielle; Lou, Ning; Sato, Shuzo; Caldwell, Tomika; Nowling, Tamara K; Gilkeson, Gary; Zhang, Xian K

    2016-10-01

    Fli-1 has emerged as a critical regulator of inflammatory mediators, including MCP-1, CCL5, and IL-6. The cytokine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) regulates neutrophil precursor maturation and survival, and activates mature neutrophils. Previously, a significant decrease in neutrophil infiltration into the kidneys of Fli-1(+/-) lupus-prone mice was observed. In this study, a significant decrease in G-CSF protein expression was detected in stimulated murine and human endothelial cells when expression of Fli-1 was inhibited. The murine G-CSF promoter contains numerous putative Fli-1 binding sites and several regions within the proximal promoter are significantly enriched for Fli-1 binding. Transient transfection assays indicate that Fli-1 drives transcription from the G-CSF promoter and mutation of the Fli-1 DNA binding domain resulted in a 94% loss of transcriptional activation. Mutation of a known acetylation site, led to a significant increase in G-CSF promoter activation. The histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP and p300/CBP associated factor (PCAF) significantly decrease Fli-1 specific activation of the G-CSF promoter. Thus, acetylation appears to be an important mechanism behind Fli-1 driven activation of the G-CSF promoter. These results further support the theory that Fli-1 plays a major role in the regulation of several inflammatory mediators, ultimately affecting inflammatory disease pathogenesis.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-04-16

    This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  11. G-CSF receptor activation of the Src kinase Lyn is mediated by Gab2 recruitment of the Shp2 phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Futami, Muneyoshi; Zhu, Quan-sheng; Whichard, Zakary L.; Xia, Ling; Ke, Yuehai; Neel, Benjamin G.; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Src activation involves the coordinated regulation of positive and negative tyrosine phosphorylation sites. The mechanism whereby receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, and integrins activate Src is not known. Here, we demonstrate that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) activates Lyn, the predominant Src kinase in myeloid cells, through Gab2-mediated recruitment of Shp2. After G-CSF stimulation, Lyn dynamically associates with Gab2 in a spatiotemporal manner. The dephosphorylation of phospho-Lyn Tyr507 was abrogated in Shp2-deficient cells transfected with the G-CSF receptor but intact in cells expressing phosphatase-defective Shp2. Auto-phosphorylation of Lyn Tyr396 was impaired in cells treated with Gab2 siRNA. The constitutively activated Shp2E76A directed the dephosphorylation of phospho-Lyn Tyr507 in vitro. Tyr507 did not undergo dephosphorylation in G-CSF–stimulated cells expressing a mutant Gab2 unable to bind Shp2. We propose that Gab2 forms a complex with Lyn and after G-CSF stimulation, Gab2 recruits Shp2, which dephosphorylates phospho-Lyn Tyr507, leading to Lyn activation. PMID:21636860

  12. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes released from the bone marrow by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: intravascular behavior.

    PubMed

    Mukae, H; Zamfir, D; English, D; Hogg, J C; van Eeden, S F

    2000-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment stimulates the bone marrow and releases polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) into the circulation. This study was designed to measure the intravascular margination, demargination and survival of PMN released from the marrow by G-CSF. To trace PMN in the circulation, dividing PMN in the bone marrow of rabbits were labeled with 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and the effects of a single dose of G-CSF (12.5 microg/kg) on the behavior of these labeled cells in the circulation were measured. The results show that G-CSF induced a granulocytosis that peaked 12 h after treatment. This granulocytosis was associated with stimulation of the bone marrow characterized by shortening of the transit time of PMN through the marrow (97.3+/-2.5 h n=4 control vs 78.9+/-3.6 h n=5 G-CSF) particularly in the post-mitotic pool (P<0.01). Morphometric studies of the lung show a reduced sequestration of BrdU-labeled PMN in lung microvessels in G-CSF-treated animals (P<0.05) and a approximately 14-fold (G-CSF-group) vs a approximately 65-fold (control-group) enrichment of BrdU-labeled PMN in lung tissue if compared to circulating blood. The effect of G-CSF on demargination of PMN was measured by transferring BrdU-labeled PMN from donor animals treated with G-CSF to recipients. G-CSF did not cause demargination of intravascular PMN but delayed the clearance of G-CSF-treated PMN in the circulation. This delayed clearance was associated with inhibition of apoptosis in circulating PMN when measured both by morphology (17.7+/-2.3 vs 7.5+/-1.4%, P<0.01) and flow cytometry (16.2+/-1.1 vs 5+/-1.9%, P<0.01) using a DNA end-labeling method (control vs G-CSF group). We conclude that PMN released from the bone marrow by G-CSF sequestered less in the lung microvessels and have a prolonged intravascular life span.

  13. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during pregnancy in women with chronic neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Boxer, Laurence A; Bolyard, Audrey Anna; Kelley, Merideth L; Marrero, Tracy M; Phan, Lan; Bond, Jordan M; Newburger, Peter E; Dale, David C

    2015-01-01

    To report outcomes associated with the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to women with chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. We conducted an observational study of women of childbearing potential with congenital, cyclic, idiopathic, or autoimmune neutropenia enrolled in the Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry to determine outcomes of pregnancies, without and with chronic G-CSF therapy, 1999-2014. Treatment decisions were made by the patients' personal physicians. A research nurse conducted telephone interviews of all enrolled U.S. women of childbearing potential using a standard questionnaire. Comparisons used Fisher's exact test analysis and Student's t test. One hundred seven women reported 224 pregnancies, 124 without G-CSF therapy and 100 on chronic G-CSF therapy (median dose 1.0 micrograms/kg per day, range 0.02-8.6 micrograms/kg per day). There were no significant differences in adverse events between the groups considering all pregnancies or individual mothers, for example, spontaneous terminations (all pregnancies: no G-CSF in 27/124, G-CSF in 13/100; P=.11, Fisher's exact test), preterm labors (all pregnancies, no G-CSF in 9/124, G-CSF in 2/100, P=.12). A study with at least 300 per group would be needed to detect a difference in these events with 80% statistical power (α=0.05). Four newborns of mothers with idiopathic or autoimmune neutropenia not on G-CSF (4/101) had life-threatening infections, whereas there were no similar events (0/90) in the treated group, but this difference was also not statistically significant (P=.124). Adverse events in the neonates were similar for the two groups. This observational study showed no significant adverse effects of administration of G-CSF to women with severe chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. III.

  14. Use of Granulocyte Colony–Stimulating Factor During Pregnancy in Women With Chronic Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Laurence A.; Bolyard, Audrey Anna; Kelley, Merideth L.; Marrero, Tracy M.; Phan, Lan; Bond, Jordan M.; Newburger, Peter E.; Dale, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report outcomes associated with the administration of granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (G-CSF) to women with chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. Methods We conducted an observational study of women of child-bearing potential with congenital, cyclic, idiopathic, or autoimmune neutropenia enrolled in the Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry to determine outcomes of pregnancies, without and with chronic G-CSF therapy, 1999–2014. Treatment decisions were made by the patients’ personal physicians. A research nurse conducted telephone interviews of all enrolled U.S. women of child-bearing potential using a standard questionnaire. Comparisons utilized Fisher’s exact test analysis and Student’s t-test. Results One-hundred seven women reported 224 pregnancies, 124 without G-CSF therapy and 100 on chronic G-CSF therapy (median dose: 1.0 mcg/kg/day, range 0.02–8.6 mcg/kg/day). There were no significant differences in adverse events between the groups considering all pregnancies or individual mothers, e.g., spontaneous terminations (all pregnancies: no G-CSF 27/124, G-CSF 13/100; P=0.11, Fisher’s exact test,), preterm labors (all pregnancies, no G-CSF 9/124, G-CSF 2/100, P=0.12,). A study with at least 300 per group would be needed to detect a difference in these events with 80% statistical power (alpha=0.05). Four newborns of mothers with idiopathic or autoimmune neutropenia not on G-CSF (4/101) had life-threatening infections, whereas there were no similar events (0/90) in the treated group, but this difference was also not statistically significant. (p=0.124). Adverse events in the neonates were similar for the two groups. Conclusions This observational study showed no significant adverse effects of administration of G-CSF to women with severe chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. PMID:25560125

  15. Predicting erythroid response to recombinant erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy following a single subcutaneous bolus in patients with myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bowen, David; Hyslop, Ann; Keenan, Norene; Groves, Michael; Culligan, Dominic; Johnson, Peter; Shaw, Ann; Geddes, Fiona; Evans, Patricia; Porter, John; Cavill, Ivor

    2006-05-01

    We randomized 21 patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to receive a single subcutaneous bolus of recombinant erythropoietin (epoietin) +/- granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), or placebo and monitored erythropoietic response over 7 days. In this small study, the reticulocyte response at day 7 was highly predictive of subsequent response to a therapeutic trial of epoietin + G-CSF.

  16. Refining the role of pegfilgrastim (a long-acting G-CSF) for prevention of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia: consensus guidance recommendations.

    PubMed

    Aapro, Matti; Boccia, Ralph; Leonard, Robert; Camps, Carlos; Campone, Mario; Choquet, Sylvain; Danova, Marco; Glaspy, John; Hus, Iwona; Link, Hartmut; Sliwa, Thamer; Tesch, Hans; Valero, Vicente

    2017-08-25

    Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) causes treatment delays and interruptions and can have fatal consequences. Current guidelines provide recommendations on granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) for prevention of FN, but guidance is unclear regarding use of short- vs long-acting G-CSF (e.g., filgrastim vs pegfilgrastim/lipegfilgrastim, respectively). An international panel of experts convened to develop guidance on appropriate use of pegfilgrastim for prevention of chemotherapy-induced FN. Guidance recommendations were developed following a literature review, survey, evaluation of current practice, and an expert meeting. Consensus was established using an anonymous Delphi-based approach. Guidance recommendations for prevention of treatment-associated FN were as follows: for treatment with curative intent, maintenance of dose intensity using G-CSF to prevent dose delays/reduction should be standard of care; for treatment-associated FN risk ≥ 20%, short-acting G-CSF/pegfilgrastim should be given from cycle 1 onwards; and for treatment-associated FN risk < 20%, short-acting G-CSF/pegfilgrastim should be given if factors suggest overall risk (including treatment-related and patient-related risk factors) is ≥ 20%. It was agreed that pegfilgrastim and 11 days' filgrastim have similar efficacy and safety and that pegfilgrastim is preferred to < 11 days' filgrastim (and may be preferred to ≥ 11 days' filgrastim based on adherence and convenience); pegfilgrastim is not appropriate in weekly chemotherapy; in split-dose chemotherapy, pegfilgrastim is recommended 24 h after last chemotherapy dose; and during palliative chemotherapy, patient adherence and convenience may favor pegfilgrastim. In this era of targeted therapies, additional trials with G-CSF are still required. These recommendations should be used with existing guidelines to optimize pegfilgrastim use in clinical practice.

  17. Simplified Large-Scale Refolding, Purification, and Characterization of Recombinant Human Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Chi Ho; Lee, Seung-Bae; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that stimulates the development of committed hematopoietic progenitor cells and enhances the functional activity of mature cells. Here, we report a simplified method for fed-batch culture as well as the purification of recombinant human (rh) G-CSF. The new system for rhG-CSF purification was performed using not only temperature shift strategy without isopropyl-l-thio-β-d-galactoside (IPTG) induction but also the purification method by a single step of prep-HPLC after the pH precipitation of the refolded samples. Through these processes, the final cell density and overall yield of homogenous rhG-CSF were obtained 42.8 g as dry cell weights, 1.75 g as purified active proteins, from 1 L culture broth, respectively. The purity of rhG-CSF was finally 99% since the isoforms of rhG-CSF could be separated through the prep-HPLC step. The result of biological activity indicated that purified rhG-CSF has a similar profile to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2nd International Standard for G-CSF. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the simple purification through a single step of prep-HPLC may be valuable for the industrial-scale production of biologically active proteins. PMID:24224041

  18. pH responsive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor variants with implications for treating Alzheimer's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Systemic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has yielded encouraging results in treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Making G-CSF a viable AD therapeutic will, however, require increasing G-CSF's ability to stimulate neurons within the brain. This objective could be realized by increasing transcytosis of G-CSF across the blood brain barrier (BBB). An established correlation between G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) binding pH responsiveness and increased recycling of G-CSF to the cell exterior after endocytosis motivated development of G-CSF variants with highly pH responsive G-CSFR binding affinities. These variants will be used in future validation of our hypothesis that increased BBB transcytosis can enhance G-CSF therapeutic efficacy. Flow cytometric screening of a yeast-displayed library in which G-CSF/G-CSFR interface residues were mutated to histidine yielded a G-CSF triple His mutant (L109H/D110H/Q120H) with highly pH responsive binding affinity. This variant's KD, measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), increases ∼20-fold as pH decreases from 7.4 to below histidine's pKa of ∼6.0; an increase 2-fold greater than for previously reported G-CSF His mutants. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) enabled expression and purification of soluble, bioactive G-CSF triple His variant protein, an outcome inaccessible via Escherichia coli inclusion body refolding. This purification and bioactivity validation will enable future identification of correlations between pH responsiveness and transcytosis in BBB cell culture model and animal experiments. Furthermore, the library screening and CFPS methods employed here could be applied to developing other pH responsive hematopoietic or neurotrophic factors for treating CNS disorders.

  19. Radiation promotes invasiveness of non-small-cell lung cancer cells through granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y-H; Suh, Y; Lee, H-J; Yoo, K-C; Uddin, N; Jeong, Y-J; Lee, J-S; Hwang, S-G; Nam, S-Y; Kim, M-J; Lee, S-J

    2015-10-16

    Despite ionizing radiation (IR) is being widely used as a standard treatment for lung cancer, many evidences suggest that IR paradoxically promotes cancer malignancy. However, its molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cancer progression remain obscure. Here, we report that exposure to fractionated radiation (2 Gy per day for 3 days) induces the secretion of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that has been commonly used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. Intriguingly, radiation-induced G-CSF promoted the migratory and invasive properties by triggering the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) in non-small-cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). By irradiation, G-CSF was upregulated transcriptionally by β-catenin/TCF4 complex that binds to the promoter region of G-CSF as a transcription factor. Importantly, irradiation increased the stability of β-catenin through the activation of PI3K/AKT (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT), thereby upregulating the expression of G-CSF. Radiation-induced G-CSF is recognized by G-CSFR and transduced its intracellular signaling JAK/STAT3 (Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription), thereby triggering EMT program in NSCLCs. Taken together, our findings suggest that the application of G-CSF in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia should be reconsidered owing to its effect on cancer progression, and G-CSF could be a novel therapeutic target to mitigate the harmful effect of radiotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC.

  20. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-liang; He, Mei-qing; Han, Xiang-yu; Sun, Jing-yi; Yang, Ming-feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-lei; Li, Da-wei; Zhang, Zong-yong; Zheng, Cheng-bi; Yang, Xiao-yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  1. Key role for neutrophils in radiation-induced antitumor immune responses: Potentiation with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Pop, Laurentiu M.; Laine, Aaron; Iyengar, Puneeth; Vitetta, Ellen S.; Hannan, Raquibul

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), a major modality for treating localized tumors, can induce tumor regression outside the radiation field through an abscopal effect that is thought to involve the immune system. Our studies were designed to understand the early immunological effects of RT in the tumor microenvironment using several syngeneic mouse tumor models. We observed that RT induced sterile inflammation with a rapid and transient infiltration of CD11b+Gr-1high+ neutrophils into the tumors. RT-recruited tumor-associated neutrophils (RT-Ns) exhibited an increased production of reactive oxygen species and induced apoptosis of tumor cells. Tumor infiltration of RT-Ns resulted in sterile inflammation and, eventually, the activation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells, their recruitment into the tumor site, and tumor regression. Finally, the concurrent administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced RT-mediated antitumor activity by activating RT-Ns. Our results suggest that the combination of RT and G-CSF should be further evaluated in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:27651484

  2. Transvaginal perfusion of G-CSF for infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen ET program: A non-randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Sayadi, Mozhgan; Arabjahvani, Farideh

    2014-01-01

    Background: We often see patients with a thin endometrium in ART cycles, in spite of standard and adjuvant treatments. Improving endometrial growth in patients with a thin endometrium is very difficult. Without adequate endometrial thickness these patients, likely, would not have reached embryo transfer. Objective: We planned this study to investigate the efficacy of intrauterine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) perfusion in improving endometrium, and possibly pregnancy rates in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles. Materials and Methods: This is a non-randomized intervention clinical trial. Among 68 infertile patients with thin endometrium (-7 mm) at the 12th-13th cycle day, 34 patients received G-CSF. G-CSF (300 microgram/1mL) to improve endometrial thickness was direct administered by slow intrauterine infusion using IUI catheter. If the endometrium had not reached at least a 7-mm within 48-72 h, a second infusion was given. Endometrial thickness was assessed by serial vaginal ultrasound at the most expanded area of the endometrial stripe. Results: The cycle was cancelled in the patients with thin endometrium (endometrial thickness below 7mm) until 19th cycle day ultimately The cycle cancelation rate owing to thin endometrium was similar in G-CSF group (15.20%), followed by (15.20%) in the control group (p=1.00). The endometrial growth was not different within 2 groups, an improvement was shown between controlled and G-CSF cotreated groups, with chemical (39.30% vs. 14.30%) and clinical pregnancy rates (32.10% vs. 12.00%) although were not significant. Conclusion: Our study fails to demonstrate that G-CSF has the potential to improve endometrial thickness but has the potential to improve chemical and clinical pregnancy rate of the infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycle. PMID:25469123

  3. Regulation of LIP level and ROS formation through interaction of H-ferritin with G-CSF receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoling; Cong, Yuwen; Hao, Jing; Shan, Yajun; Zhao, Zhenhu; Wang, Shengqi; Chen, Jiapei

    2004-05-21

    A variety of hematopoietic factors including granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin 3 (IL-3) and thrombopoietin (TPO) induce a rapid increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS induces the activation of many signaling molecules, including Shc, Lck, syk, PKC, MAPK, STAT3, through inhibition of protein phosphatase. Each growth factor has a specific cell-surface receptor, which activates both unique and shared signal transduction pathways. The processes of signal transduction linking cell-surface receptor to the formation of intracellular ROS have not been elucidated fully. Ferritins are composed of two subunit types, H and L, and made of 24 subunits that sequester up to 4500 atoms of iron. When the stored iron atoms are released from H-ferritin, through iron-catalyzed reaction, they have the capacity to promote the formation of ROS. Here, the interaction of G-CSFR and H-ferritin was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid screen, mammalian two-hybrid assays, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation studies in vitro and in vivo. Additional immunofluorescence assay showed that the two proteins colocalized along the plasma membrane and partly in the cytoplasm. The binding site for H-ferritin was demonstrated to locate to the box3 motif on the C-terminal region of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR). Furthermore, we found the interaction of full-length G-CSFR with H-ferritin was dissociated at 30 minutes after G-CSF induction and then began to assemble at 45 minutes. The labile iron pool (LIP) is a pool of redox-active iron complexes, which is regulated tightly by the expression of H-ferritin. Experiments showed that the level of LIP increased significantly at 30 minutes after G-CSF stimulation and intracellular ROS formation changed in a pattern similar to LIP response to G-CSF in bone-marrow hematopoietic cells. G-CSF

  4. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Increases Cerebral Blood Flow via a NO Surge Mediated by Akt/eNOS Pathway to Reduce Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Hock-Kean; Kuo, Jon-Son; Wang, Jia-Yi; Pang, Cheng-Yoong

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) protects brain from ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthases partially reduces G-CSF protection. We thus further investigated the effects of G-CSF on ischemia-induced NO production and its consequence on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and neurological deficit. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) microinfused above middle cerebral artery caused a rapid reduction of rCBF (ischemia) which lasted for 30 minutes and was followed by a gradual recovery of blood flow (reperfusion) within the striatal region. Regional NO concentration increased rapidly (NO surge) during ischemia and recovered soon to the baseline. G-CSF increased rCBF resulting in shorter ischemic duration and an earlier onset of reperfusion. The enhancement of the ischemia-induced NO by G-CSF accompanied by elevation of phospho-Akt and phospho-eNOS was noted, suggesting an activation of Akt/eNOS. I/R-induced infarct volume and neurological deficits were also reduced by G-CSF treatment. Inhibition of NO synthesis by L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) significantly reduced the effects of G-CSF on rCBF, NO surge, infarct volume, and neurological deficits. We conclude that G-CSF increases rCBF through a NO surge mediated by Akt/eNOS, which partially contributes to the beneficial effect of G-CSF on brain I/R injury. PMID:26146654

  5. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Increases Cerebral Blood Flow via a NO Surge Mediated by Akt/eNOS Pathway to Reduce Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Liew, Hock-Kean; Kuo, Jon-Son; Wang, Jia-Yi; Pang, Cheng-Yoong

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) protects brain from ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthases partially reduces G-CSF protection. We thus further investigated the effects of G-CSF on ischemia-induced NO production and its consequence on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and neurological deficit. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) microinfused above middle cerebral artery caused a rapid reduction of rCBF (ischemia) which lasted for 30 minutes and was followed by a gradual recovery of blood flow (reperfusion) within the striatal region. Regional NO concentration increased rapidly (NO surge) during ischemia and recovered soon to the baseline. G-CSF increased rCBF resulting in shorter ischemic duration and an earlier onset of reperfusion. The enhancement of the ischemia-induced NO by G-CSF accompanied by elevation of phospho-Akt and phospho-eNOS was noted, suggesting an activation of Akt/eNOS. I/R-induced infarct volume and neurological deficits were also reduced by G-CSF treatment. Inhibition of NO synthesis by L-N(G)-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) significantly reduced the effects of G-CSF on rCBF, NO surge, infarct volume, and neurological deficits. We conclude that G-CSF increases rCBF through a NO surge mediated by Akt/eNOS, which partially contributes to the beneficial effect of G-CSF on brain I/R injury.

  6. G(AnH)MTetra, a naturally occurring 1,6-anhydro muramyl dipeptide, induces granulocyte colony-stimulating factor expression in human monocytes: a molecular analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Dokter, W H; Dijkstra, A J; Koopmans, S B; Mulder, A B; Stulp, B K; Halie, M R; Keck, W; Vellenga, E

    1994-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyl-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutam yl-m- diaminopimelyl-D-alanine [G (Anh)MTetra], a naturally occurring breakdown product of peptidoglycan from bacterial cell walls, was studied for its ability to induce granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mRNA and protein expression in human adherent monocytes. Resting monocytes did not express G-CSF mRNA or secrete G-CSF protein. In contrast, monocytes exposed to G(Anh)MTetra showed a dose-dependent increase in G-CSF mRNA accumulation, which correlates with the secretion of G-CSF protein. Maximal levels of G-CSF mRNA were reached within 2 h of activation. Expression of G-CSF was mediated by an increase in the stability of G-CSF transcripts rather than by an increase in the transcription rate of the G-CSF gene. Experiments with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide revealed that G(Anh)MTetra-induced G-CSF mRNA expression was independent of new protein synthesis. Furthermore, it was shown that the effect of G(Anh)MTetra was regulated by a protein kinase C-dependent pathway, whereas protein kinase A and tyrosine kinases were not involved. Finally, it was shown that G(Anh)MTetra also induced G-CSF mRNA expression in human endothelial cells. The data indicate that, besides lipopolysaccharide, other naturally occurring bacterial cell wall components are able to induce G-CSF expression in different hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:7516314

  7. G-CSF and GM-CSF in clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Antman, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors have now been purified, cloned, and produced in bacteria and yeast. Those that are currently in clinical study include erythropoietin, GM-CSF, G-CSF, M-CSF (also called CSF-1), and multi-CSF (also called interleukin 3). Growth factor appear likely to enhance the recovery and function of circulating white cells after standard-dose cancer therapy and high-bone-dose cancer therapy with marrow transplant and to restore leukocyte numbers and competence in the acquired immune deficiency syndromes and myelodysplastic syndromes. Phase I, II trials in AIDS, in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, in cases of myeloproliferative disease, and after bone marrow transplant have been published. The results of phase III studies are just becoming available. PMID:1705737

  8. G-CSF-mobilized Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Replenish Neural Lineages in Alzheimer's Disease Mice via CXCR4/SDF-1 Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Chun; Wang, I-Fang; Chiang, Po-Min; Wang, Liang-Chao; Shen, Che-Kun James; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2016-10-05

    Recent studies reported granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment can improve the cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice, and the mobilized hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are proposed to be involved in this recovery effect. However, the exact role of mobilized HSC/BM-MSC in G-CSF-based therapeutic effects is still unknown. Here, we report that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) chemotaxis was a key mediator in G-CSF-based therapeutic effects, which was involved in the recruitment of repair-competent cells. Furthermore, we found both mobilized HSCs and BM-MSCs were able to infiltrate into the brain, but only BM-MSCs replenished the neural lineage cells and contributed to neurogenesis in the brains of AD mice. Together, our data show that mobilized BM-MSCs are involved in the replenishment of neural lineages following G-CSF treatment via CXCR4/SDF-1 chemotaxis and further support the potential use of BM-MSCs for further autogenically therapeutic applications.

  9. Anti-Obesity Effects of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Cheng-Hu; So, Byung-Im; Park, Jun-Young; Joo, Hyun-Woo; Park, In-Hwa; Shen, Guang-Yin; Shin, Jeong-Hun; Kim, Hyuck; Ahn, You-Heon; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has molecular structures and intracellular signaling pathways that are similar to those of leptin and ciliary neurotropic factor (CNTF). It also has immune-modulatory properties. Given that leptin and CNTF play important roles in energy homeostasis and that obesity is an inflammatory condition in adipose tissue, we hypothesized that G-CSF could also play a role in energy homeostasis. We treated 12 38-week-old male Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima fatty rats (OLETF, diabetic) and 12 age-matched male Long-Evans-Tokushima rats (LETO, healthy) with 200 µg/day G-CSF or saline for 5 consecutive days. Body weight reduction was greater in G-CSF-treated OLETF (G-CSF/OLETF) than saline-treated OLETF (saline/OLETF) following 8 weeks of treatment (−6.9±1.6% vs. −3.1±2.2%, p<0.05). G-CSF treatment had no effect on body weight in LETO or on food intake in either OLETF or LETO. Body fat in G-CSF/OLETF was more reduced than in saline/OLETF (−32.2±3.1% vs. −20.8±6.2%, p<0.05). Energy expenditure was higher in G-CSF/OLETF from 4 weeks after the treatments than in saline/OLETF. Serum levels of cholesterol, triglyceride, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were lower in G-CSF/OLETF than in saline/OLETF. Uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was higher in G-CSF/OLETF than in saline/OLETF, but was unaffected in LETO. Immunofluorescence staining and PCR results revealed that G-CSF receptors were expressed in BAT. In vitro experiments using brown adipocyte primary culture revealed that G-CSF enhanced UCP-1 expression from mature brown adipocytes via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In conclusion, G-CSF treatment reduced body weight and increased energy expenditure in a diabetic model, and enhanced UCP-1 expression and decreased inflammatory cytokine levels may be associated with the effects of G-CSF treatment. PMID:25144367

  10. NF-κB is involved in brain repair by stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lili; Duchamp, Nicolas S; Boston, Dakota J; Ren, Xuefang; Zhang, Xiangjian; Hu, Heng; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stroke is the phase of brain recovery and repair generally beginning 3 months after stroke onset. No pharmaceutical approach is currently available to enhance brain repair in chronic stroke. We have previously determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone or in combination (SCF+G-CSF) in an animal model of chronic stroke and demonstrated that only SCF+G-CSF induces long-term functional recovery. However, the mechanism underlying the SCF+G-CSF-induced brain repair in chronic stroke remains largely elusive. In the present study, we determined the role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in neurovascular network remodeling and motor function improvement by SCF+G-CSF treatment in chronic stroke. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 7 days beginning 17 weeks after induction of experimental stroke. To inhibit NF-κB activation, NF-κB inhibitor was infused into the brain before SCF+G-CSF treatment. We observed that NF-κB inhibitor abolished the SCF+G-CSF-induced axonal sprouting, synaptogenesis and angiogenesis in the ipsilesional somatosensorimotor cortex. In addition, blockage of NF-κB activation resulted in elimination of the SCF+G-CSF-induced motor functional restoration in chronic stroke. These data suggest that NF-κB is required for the SCF+G-CSF-induced neuron-vascular network remodeling in the ipsilesional somatosensorimotor cortex and motor functional recovery in chronic stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Benefits of GM-CSF Versus Placebo or G-CSF in Reducing Chemotherapy-Induced Complications: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Robert W; Pinto, Lionel A; Bernal, Myriam; Badamgarav, Enkhe; Lyman, Gary H

    2004-10-01

    Unlike granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is not approved for reducing the incidence or duration of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. However, some studies have been conducted in this setting. A systematic review assessing the efficacy of GM-CSF versus placebo or G-CSF in reducing chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia and related complications was performed. Medline was reviewed for articles published between January 1987 and March 2003 that contained specific search terms. Explicit inclusion/exclusion criteria were developed for titles, abstracts, and articles. Two researchers reviewed (kappa>/= 0.7) and divided studies according to their evaluation of GM-CSF versus placebo or versus G-CSF. Nine studies were accepted: 6 randomized controlled trials compared GM-CSF versus placebo and 3 studies compared GM-CSF versus GCSF. Three placebo-controlled trials showed that GM-CSF was ineffective in reducing the risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. The remaining 3 trials reported incidence of fever and not febrile neutropenia: 2 reported a significantly increased incidence of fever in the GM-CSF group, and 1 reported that more patients receiving placebo experienced fever compared with patients in the GMCSF group (P > 0.05). The 3 studies comparing GM-CSF versus G-CSF reported fever as a primary outcome also. All 3 reported higher incidence of fever in the GM-CSF group (P < 0.05). Head-to-head trials of G-CSF and GM-CSF in reducing chemotherapy-induced complications are lacking. Identified GM-CSF studies did not show significant reduction in febrile neutropenia and fever.

  12. Autopsy of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Haruna; Eguchi, Noriaki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Matsumoto, Kenta; Azakami, Takahiro; Sumida, Tomonori; Tamura, Tadamasa; Sumii, Masaharu; Uraoka, Naohiro; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to a nearby hospital with high fever and anorexia. An abdominal tumor was detected, and he was referred to our hospital. A pancreatic tumor was detected by computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. He had high fever, leukocytosis, and high serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a tumor biopsy and histological examination revealed anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Based on the diagnosis, we initiated chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus S-1. However, the tumor rapidly progressed and he deteriorated and died 123 days after admission. As immunohistochemical study showed positive staining for G-CSF in the tumor cell, we diagnosed the tumor producing G-CSF during autopsy. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing G-CSF is very rare, with 10 cases, including ours, reported in the literature.

  13. Self-assembling nanocomposites for protein delivery: supramolecular interactions between PEG-cholane and rh-G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Stefano; Bersani, Sara; Mastrotto, Francesca; Tonon, Giancarlo; Schrepfer, Rodolfo; Genovese, Stefano; Caliceti, Paolo

    2012-08-20

    PEG(5 kDa)-cholane, PEG(10 kDa)-cholane and PEG(20 kDa)-cholane self-assembling polymers have been synthesised by the end-functionalisation of 5, 10 and 20 kDa linear amino-terminating monomethoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-NH(2)) with 5β-cholanic acid. Spectroscopic studies and isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the CMC of the PEG-cholane derivatives increased from 23.5 ± 1.8 to 60.2 ± 2.4 μM as the PEG molecular weight increased. Similarly, light scattering analysis showed that the micelle size increased from 15.8 ± 4.9 to 23.2 ± 11.1 nm with the PEG molecular weight. Gel permeation studies showed that the polymer bioconjugates associate with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rh-G-CSF) to form supramolecular nanocomposites according to multi-modal association profiles. The protein loadings obtained with PEG(5 kDa)-cholane, PEG(10 kDa)-cholane and PEG(20 kDa)-cholane were 7.4 ± 1.1, 2.7 ± 0.3 and 2.1 ± 0.4% (protein/polymer, w/w %), respectively. Scatchard and Klotz analyses showed that the protein/polymer affinity constant increased and that the number of PEG-cholane molecules associated to rh-G-CSF decreased as the PEG molecular weight increased. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the protein/polymer multi-modal association. Circular dichroism analyses showed that the polymer association alters the secondary structure of the protein. Nevertheless, in vitro studies performed with NFS-60 cells showed that the polymer interaction does not impair the biological activity of the cytokine. In vivo studies performed by intravenous and subcutaneous administrations of rh-G-CSF to rats showed that the association with PEG(5 kDa)-cholane prolongs the body exposure of the protein. After subcutaneous administration, the protein t(max) values obtained with rh-G-CSF and 1:14 and 1:21 rh-G-CSF/PEG(5 kDa)-cholane (w/w ratio) nanocomplexes were 2, 8 and 24h, respectively. The 1:21 (w/w) rh-G-CSF/PEG(5kDa)-cholane formulation

  14. G-CSF and cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease: Preventive intervention effects and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhu-Fei; Tao, Ying-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Guo, Qi-Lin; Liu, Ying-Chao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Ji, Gang; Wu, Guo-Feng; Wang, Na-Na; Yang, Hao; Yu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Jing-Chun; Zhou, Hou-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Although cognitive dysfunction is a common neurological complication in elderly patients with diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear, and effective preventive interventions have yet to be developed. Thus, this study investigated the preventive effects and mechanisms of action associated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease. This study included 40 male db/db diabetic and wild-type (WT) mice that were categorized into the following four groups at the age of 3 weeks: db/db group (DG), db/db+G-CSF group (DGG), WT group (WG), and WT+G-CSF group (WGG). The mice were fed normal diets for 4 months and then given G-CSF (75 μg/kg) via intraperitoneal injections for 1 month. At 7.5 months of age, the cognitive abilities of the mice were assessed with the Y-maze test and the Social Choice Test; body weight, blood pressure (BP), and blood glucose measurements were obtained throughout the study. Brain imaging and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging analyses were performed with a small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, autophagosome levels were detected with a transmission electron microscope (TEM), hippocampal neurons were assessed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, and protein expressions and distributions were evaluated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. (i) The body weight and blood glucose levels of the DG and DGG mice were significantly higher than those of the WG and WGG mice; (ii) social choice and spatial memory capabilities were significantly reduced in DG mice but were recovered by G-CSF in DGG mice; (iii) the MRI scans revealed multiple lacunar lesions and apparent hippocampal atrophy in the brains of DG mice, but G-CSF reduced the number of lacunar lesions and ameliorated hippocampal atrophy; (iv) the MRI-BOLD scans showed a downward trend in whole-brain activity and reductions

  15. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (<7 mm). Thirty patients with previously cancelled embryo transfers received intrauterine G-CSF in subsequent frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. Patients were divided into the G-CSF only and G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P < 0.001). Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P < 0.01; 48.1% versus 25.0%; P = 0.038, respectively). Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Similar in vitro effects and pulp regeneration in ectopic tooth transplantation by basic fibroblast growth factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, N; Hayashi, Y; Murakami, M; Alvarez, F J; Horibe, H; Iohara, K; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Nakashima, M

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to have combinatorial trophic effects with dental pulp stem cells for pulp regeneration. The aim of this investigation is to examine the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in vitro and in vivo compared with those of G-CSF and to assess the potential utility of bFGF as an alternative to G-CSF for pulp regeneration. Five different types of cells were examined in the in vitro effects of bFGF on cell migration, proliferation, anti-apoptosis, neurite outgrowth, angiogenesis, and odontogenesis compared with those of G-CSF. The in vivo regenerative potential of pulp tissue including vasculogenesis and odontoblastic differentiation was also compared using an ectopic tooth transplantation model. Basic fibroblast growth factor was similar to G-CSF in high migration, proliferation and anti-apoptotic effects and angiogenic and neurite outgrowth stimulatory activities in vitro. There was no significant difference between bFGF and G-CSF in the regenerative potential in vivo. The potential utility of bFGF for pulp regeneration is demonstrated as a homing/migration factor similar to the influence of G-CSF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Erythropoietin priming improves the vasculogenic potential of G-CSF mobilized human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeehoon; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Hur, Jin; Kang, Jin-A; Choi, Jae-Il; Ko, Seung Bum; Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Ju-Young; Hwang, In-Chang; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-10-01

    From our previous clinical trials, intracoronary infusion of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells ((mob)PBMCs) proved to be effective in improving myocardial contractility and reducing infarct volume in acute myocardial infarction. We tested the effect of priming (mob)PBMCs with erythropoietin (EPO) to augment its therapeutic efficacy. (mob)PBMCs were obtained from healthy volunteers after a 3-day subcutaneous injection of G-CSF (10 μg/kg). About 40% of (mob)PBMCs were EPO receptor (EPOR) (+) and responded to 6 h EPO-priming (10 IU/mL) by increasing the expression of vasculogenic factors (i.e. IL8, IL10, bFGF, PDGF, MMP9) and adhesion molecules (i.e. integrin αV, β1, β2, β8) through the JAK2 and Akt pathway. These responses were also observed in PBMCs from elderly patients with coronary disease. The conditioned media from EPO-primed (mob)PBMCs contained various cytokines such as IL8, IL10, TNFα, and PDGF, which enhanced the migration and tube formation capability of endothelial cells. EPO-primed (mob)PBMCs also showed increased adhesion on endothelial cells or fibronectin. Augmented vasculogenic potential of EPO-primed (mob)PBMCs was confirmed in a Matrigel plug assay, ischaemic hindlimb, and myocardial infarction models of athymic nude mice. There were two action mechanisms: (i) cellular effects confirmed by direct incorporation of human (mob)PBSCs into mouse vasculature and (ii) indirect humoral effects confirmed by the therapeutic effect of the supernatant of EPO-primed (mob)PBMCs. Brief ex vivo EPO-priming is a novel method to augment the vasculogenic potential of human (mob)PBMCs, which would help to achieve better results after intracoronary infusion in myocardial infarction patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exhibit therapeutic effects in a mouse model of CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Fagan, Austin; Duan, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yanying; Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Bin; Piao, Chun-Shu; Nelson, Lila; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a Notch3 dominant mutation-induced cerebral small vascular disease, is characterized by progressive degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of small arteries in the brain, leading to recurrent ischemic stroke, vascular dementia and death. To date, no treatment can stop or delay the progression of this disease. Herein, we determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) in a mouse model of CADASIL carrying the human mutant Notch3 gene. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 5 days and repeated 4 times with 1-4 month intervals. We found through water maze testing that SCF+G-CSF treatment improved cognitive function. SCF+G-CSF also attenuated vSMC degeneration in small arteries, increased cerebral blood vascular density, and inhibited apoptosis in CADASIL mice. We also discovered that loss of cerebral capillary endothelial cells and neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) occurred in CADASIL mice. SCF+G-CSF treatment inhibited the CADASIL-induced cell loss in the endothelia and NSCs/NPCs and promoted neurogenesis. In an in vitro model of apoptosis, SCF+G-CSF prevented apoptotic cell death in vSMCs through AKT signaling and by inhibiting caspase-3 activity. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF restricts the pathological progression of CADASIL. This study offers new insights into developing therapeutic strategies for CADASIL.

  19. Effect of Intravenous Infusion of G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells on Upper Extremity Function in Cerebral Palsy Children.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyeong Il; Lee, Young-Ho; Rah, Wee-Jin; Jo, Seung Hwi; Park, Si-Bog; Han, Seung Hoon; Koh, Hani; Suh, Jin Young; Um, Jang Soo; Choi, Eun Hye; Park, Un Jin; Kim, Mi Jung

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMC) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on upper extremity function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-seven children with CP were enrolled. Ten patients were excluded due to follow-up loss. In total, 47 patients (30 males and 17 females) were analyzed. All patients' parents provided signed consent before the start of the study. After administration of G-CSF for 5 days, mPBMC was collected and cryopreserved. Patients were randomized into two groups 1 month later. Twenty-two patients were administered mPBMC and 25 patients received normal saline as placebo. Six months later, the two groups were switched, and administered mPBMC and placebo, respectively. Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) were used to evaluate upper motor function. All subdomain and total scores of QUEST were significantly improved after mPBMC and placebo infusion, without significant differences between mPBMC and placebo groups. A month after G-CSF, all subdomain and total scores of QUEST were improved. The level of MACS remained unchanged in both mPBMC and placebo groups. In this study, intravenously infused mPBMC showed no significant effect on upper extremity function in children with CP, as compared to placebo. The effect of mPBMC was likely masked by the effect of G-CSF, which was used in both groups and/or G-CSF itself might have other neurotrophic potentials in children with CP.

  20. Effect of Intravenous Infusion of G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells on Upper Extremity Function in Cerebral Palsy Children

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMC) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on upper extremity function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods Fifty-seven children with CP were enrolled. Ten patients were excluded due to follow-up loss. In total, 47 patients (30 males and 17 females) were analyzed. All patients' parents provided signed consent before the start of the study. After administration of G-CSF for 5 days, mPBMC was collected and cryopreserved. Patients were randomized into two groups 1 month later. Twenty-two patients were administered mPBMC and 25 patients received normal saline as placebo. Six months later, the two groups were switched, and administered mPBMC and placebo, respectively. Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) were used to evaluate upper motor function. Results All subdomain and total scores of QUEST were significantly improved after mPBMC and placebo infusion, without significant differences between mPBMC and placebo groups. A month after G-CSF, all subdomain and total scores of QUEST were improved. The level of MACS remained unchanged in both mPBMC and placebo groups. Conclusion In this study, intravenously infused mPBMC showed no significant effect on upper extremity function in children with CP, as compared to placebo. The effect of mPBMC was likely masked by the effect of G-CSF, which was used in both groups and/or G-CSF itself might have other neurotrophic potentials in children with CP. PMID:28289643

  1. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stephanie; Peters, Sebastian; Pitzer, Claudia; Resch, Herbert; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor. PMID:26301221

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases the platelet volume in peripheral stem cell apheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Akihiro; Matsui, Keiko; Minami, Ryouta; Uchida, Shuzou; Ueda, Shuji; Nishiura, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the short-term influence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration on platelet counts and platelet indices in 12 donors (8 males and 4 females; median age 34 years, range 16-49) for peripheral stem cell transplantation using an automated blood cell analyzer. On day 3 (D3) compared with D0, 11 donors with normal laboratory and physical findings showed increases in platelet indices (chi(2) = 12.0, p = 0.0025). Furthermore, mean platelet volume (MPV) was significantly increased (p = 0.04). Also, platelet count decreased, and platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio were increased, but these were not significant. On the contrary, 1 donor with abnormal laboratory findings who had large platelets (MPV 11.4 fl) before G-CSF administration showed decreases in platelet indices (MPV 10.3 fl) on D3, although platelet count (18.2 x 10(4)/microl) decreased after G-CSF administration. G-CSF administration induces an inflammatory process with endothelial cell activation. This is probably the reason why platelet volume increases after G-CSF use. This is the first report showing that G-CSF administration immediately induces increases in large platelets in peripheral stem cell transplant donors before harvest.

  3. The use of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in volunteer unrelated hemopoietic stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Pamphilon, Derwood; Nacheva, Elisabeth; Navarrete, Cristina; Madrigal, Alejandro; Goldman, John

    2008-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for the mobilization of hemopoietic stem cells in healthy donors. It has a number of common side effects such as bone pain, which resolve rapidly after administration is discontinued. Recent publications have raised concern that it might act as a trigger for the development of hematologic malignancy in susceptible individuals, possibly by causing genomic instability, but to date there is no evidence that healthy volunteer donors who receive G-CSF are at any increased risk. Ongoing studies aim to confirm whether or not G-CSF can cause chromosomal abnormalities in healthy donors. In the UK, the British Bone Marrow Registry and Anthony Nolan Trust give G-CSF to donors who have agreed to donate peripheral blood stem cells. It is recommended by the UK Registries at present that all stem cell donors are given updated information explaining the current uncertainties with regard to the use of G-CSF before they give informed consent to its administration. This information is based on a statement agreed by the World Marrow Donor Association for use by individual donor registries. Further, it is our current practice that all donors who have received G-CSF, as well as marrow donors who do not, should be under regular review for at least 10 years to allow the occurrence of any long-term adverse events to be documented.

  4. Granulocyte-Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes CD34+ Cell Migration Via a Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Adriana López; Ribeiro-Fleury, Tatiana; Chabot, Valérie; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Langonné, Alain; Hérault, Olivier; Charbord, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) can be mobilized into the circulation using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), for graft collection in view of hematopoietic transplantation. This process has been related to bone marrow (BM) release of serine proteases and of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Yet, the role of these mediators in HSC egress from their niches remains questionable, because they are produced by nonstromal cells (mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) that are not a part of the niche. We show here that the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) is expressed by human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs), and that G-CSF prestimulation of MSCs enhances the in vitro trans-stromal migration of CD34+ cells. Zymography analysis indicates that pro-MMP-2 (but not pro-MMP-9) is expressed in MSCs, and that G-CSF treatment increases its expression and induces its activation at the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that G-CSF-stimulated migration depends on G-CSFR expression and is mediated by a mechanism that involves MMPs. These results suggest a molecular model whereby G-CSF infusion may drive, by the direct action on MSCs, HSPC egress from BM niches via synthesis and activation of MMPs. In this model, MMP-2 instead of MMP-9 is implicated, which constitutes a major difference with mouse mobilization models. PMID:22651889

  5. Pegfilgrastim and daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: patterns of use and neutropenia-related outcomes in cancer patients in Spain--results of the LEARN Study.

    PubMed

    Almenar, D; Mayans, J; Juan, O; Bueno, J M Garcia; Lopez, J I Jalon; Frau, A; Guinot, M; Cerezuela, P; Buscalla, E Garcia; Gasquet, J A; Sanchez, J

    2009-05-01

    Daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors [(G-CSFs); e.g. filgrastim, lenograstim] are frequently used to reduce the duration of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) and the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) in cancer patients. A pegylated formulation of filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, which is administered once per cycle, was introduced in Spain in 2003. LEARN was a multi-centre, retrospective, observational study in Spain comparing patterns of use of daily G-CSF and pegfilgrastim, and CIN-related outcomes in adults with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Outcome measures were the percentage of patients receiving G-CSF for primary prophylaxis versus secondary prophylaxis/treatment, duration of treatment with G-CSF and incidence of CIN-related complications. Medical records from consecutive patients with documented pegfilgrastim (n = 75) or daily G-CSF (n = 111) use during 2003 were included. The proportion of patients receiving primary or secondary prophylaxis was comparable between the pegfilgrastim (39 and 48% respectively) and daily G-CSF (40 and 48% respectively) groups. However, there was a trend towards less frequent use to treat a neutropenic event such as FN or neutropenia in the pegfilgrastim group (17 versus 30% with daily G-CSF). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia-related complications were less frequent in patients receiving pegfilgrastim (e.g. FN 11 versus 24% with daily G-CSF). This is the first study to show the potential benefits of pegfilgrastim over daily G-CSF in Spanish clinical practice.

  6. Pegfilgrastim and daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: patterns of use and neutropenia-related outcomes in cancer patients in Spain – results of the LEARN Study

    PubMed Central

    ALMENAR, D; MAYANS, J; JUAN, O; BUENO, JM GARCIA; LOPEZ, JI JALON; FRAU, A; GUINOT, M; CEREZUELA, P; BUSCALLA, E GARCIA; GASQUET, JA; SANCHEZ, J

    2009-01-01

    Daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors [(G-CSFs); e.g. filgrastim, lenograstim] are frequently used to reduce the duration of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) and the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) in cancer patients. A pegylated formulation of filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, which is administered once per cycle, was introduced in Spain in 2003. LEARN was a multi-centre, retrospective, observational study in Spain comparing patterns of use of daily G-CSF and pegfilgrastim, and CIN-related outcomes in adults with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Outcome measures were the percentage of patients receiving G-CSF for primary prophylaxis versus secondary prophylaxis/treatment, duration of treatment with G-CSF and incidence of CIN-related complications. Medical records from consecutive patients with documented pegfilgrastim (n = 75) or daily G-CSF (n = 111) use during 2003 were included. The proportion of patients receiving primary or secondary prophylaxis was comparable between the pegfilgrastim (39 and 48% respectively) and daily G-CSF (40 and 48% respectively) groups. However, there was a trend towards less frequent use to treat a neutropenic event such as FN or neutropenia in the pegfilgrastim group (17 versus 30% with daily G-CSF). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia-related complications were less frequent in patients receiving pegfilgrastim (e.g. FN 11 versus 24% with daily G-CSF). This is the first study to show the potential benefits of pegfilgrastim over daily G-CSF in Spanish clinical practice. PMID:19076208

  7. The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in preclinical models of infection and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John C

    2005-12-01

    The cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent endogenous trigger for the release of neutrophils from bone marrow stores and for their activation for enhanced antimicrobial activity. G-CSF has been widely evaluated in preclinical models of acute illness, with generally promising though divergent results. A recombinant G-CSF molecule has recently undergone clinical trials to assess its efficacy as an adjuvant therapy in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia, however, these studies failed to provide convincing evidence of benefit. We undertook a systematic review of the published literature reporting the effects of modulation of G-CSF in preclinical in vivo models to determine whether evidence of differential efficacy might explain the disappointing results of human studies and point to disease states that might be more likely to benefit from G-CSF therapy. G-CSF has been evaluated in 86 such studies involving a variety of different models. The strongest evidence of benefit was seen in studies involving intraperitoneal challenge with live organisms; benefit was evident whether the agent was given before or after challenge. G-CSF demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity in models of systemic challenge with viable organisms or endotoxin, but only when the agent is given before challenge; evidence of benefit after challenge was minimal. Preclinical models of intrapulmonary challenge only show efficacy when the cytokine is administered before the infectious challenge, and suggested harm in gram-negative pneumonia resulting from challenge with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella. There is little evidence for therapeutic efficacy in noninfectious models of acute illness. We conclude that the most promising populations for evaluation of G-CSF are neutropenic patients with invasive infection and patients with intra-abdominal infection, particularly those with the syndrome of tertiary, or recurrent, peritonitis. Significant variability in the design

  8. Neuroregenerative potential of intravenous G-CSF and autologous peripheral blood stem cells in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Rah, Wee-Jin; Lee, Young-Ho; Moon, Jin-Hwa; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Kang, Hye-Ryeong; Koh, Hani; Eom, Hye Jung; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Young Jun; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Yun-Young; Park, Kyeongil; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2017-01-21

    We performed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study to assess the neuroregenerative potential of intravenous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) followed by infusion of mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMCs) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Children with non-severe CP were enrolled in this study. G-CSF was administered for 5 days, then mPBMCs were collected by apheresis and cryopreserved. One month later (M1), recipients were randomized to receive either mPBMCs or a placebo infusion, and these treatment groups were switched at 7 months (M7) and observed for another 6 months (M13). We assessed the efficacy of treatment by evaluating neurodevelopmental tests, as well as by brain magnetic resonance imaging-diffusion tensor imaging (MRI-DTI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) brain positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanning to evaluate the anatomical and functional changes in the brain. Fifty-seven patients aged 4.3 ± 1.9 (range 2-10) years and weighing 16.6 ± 4.9 (range 11.6-56.0) kg were enrolled in this study. The administration of G-CSF as well as the collection and reinfusion of mPBMCs were safe and tolerable. The yield of mPBMCs was comparable to that reported in studies of pediatric donors without CP and patients with nonhematologic diseases. 42.6% of the patients responded to the treatment with higher neurodevelopmental scores than would normally be expected. In addition, larger changes in neurodevelopment test scores were observed in the 1 month after G-CSF administration (M0-M1) than during the 6 months after reinfusion with mPBMCs or placebo (M1-M7 or M7-M13). Patients who received G-CSF followed by mPBMC infusion at 7 months (T7 group) demonstrated significantly more neurodevelopmental improvement than patients who received G-CSF followed by mPBMC infusion at 1 month (T1 group). In contrast to the results of neurodevelopment tests, the results of MRI-DTI at the end of this study showed

  9. The colony-stimulating factors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2010-06-01

    The four colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) are glycoproteins that regulate the generation and some functions of infection-protective granulocytes and macrophages. Recombinant granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) have now been used to increase dangerously low white blood cell levels in many millions of cancer patients following chemotherapy. These CSFs also release haematopoietic stem cells to the peripheral blood, and these cells have now largely replaced bone marrow as more effective populations for transplantation to cancer patients who have treatment-induced bone marrow damage.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing ascending colon cancer as indicated by histopathological findings: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yushi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Takatsuka, Satoshi; Kaizaki, Ryoji; Inoue, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Various types of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing malignant tumors have been reported. However, a G-CSF-producing colorectal cancer is rare. We present a case of G-CSF-producing ascending colon cancer. An 81-year-old man was referred to our hospital with right lower abdominal pain. A colon fiberscopy revealed an ascending colon tumor, and histological examination revealed tubular adenocarcinoma. He was admitted due to worsening abdominal pain. Although laboratory data showed an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count of 17000/mm3 with 77.8% neutrophils, elevated C-reaction protein (CRP) was insignificant (1.06 mg/dL), and he was afebrile. Because computed tomography indicated that the tumor penetrated into surrounding tissue, a semi-urgent ileocecal resection was performed. An abscess was not located. The tumor was staged as T3N2aM0 and as stage IIB according to the TNM classification. Microscopically, significant neutrophil infiltration between cancer cells was observed, suggesting the presence of a G-CSF-producing tumor. Immunohistochemical staining using a G-CSF antibody revealed cytoplasmic staining in cancer cells. The serum concentration of G-CSF upon admission was 334 pg/mL. After surgical resection, the WBC count decreased to within a normal range. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of G-CSF-producing ascending colon cancer. The prognosis of G-CSF-producing tumors is considered to be poor. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment are needed for patients with G-CSF-producing tumors, and continuous careful follow-up is required.

  11. Phase II Trial of Intravenous Low-Dose Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Yamashita, Toru; Kono, Syoichiro; Nakayama, Taira; Baba, Yasuhiko; Itoh, Shinji; Asakura, Kunihiko; Niimi, Yoshiki; Asahi, Takashi; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Mutoh, Tatsuro; Kuroda, Satoshi; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Abe, Koji; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-06-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has shown neuroprotective and neurogenerative activities in experimental studies, and our previous phase I clinical study suggested the safety and potential efficacy of low-dose G-CSF in acute ischemic stroke patients. The present phase II trial is aimed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF administration on neurological function and infarct volume, compared with a placebo group. Forty-nine acute ischemic stroke patients (29 males, 20 females; 71 ± 10 years) within 24 hours after onset were recruited. Eligible patients were randomized 2:2:1 to receive G-CSF 150 µg/body/day, G-CSF 300 µg/body/day, and placebo, respectively. We evaluated clinical outcome in terms of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, and the Barthel Index at 90 days after onset, together with changes in infarct volume on magnetic resonance imaging. We found no serious adverse event, including change in leukocyte levels, which remained below 31,000/µL, at 150 and 300 µg G-CSF/body/day. Clinical outcome scores did not show any significant difference among the 3 groups. Chronological changes in infarct volume also showed no significant difference. G-CSF was well-tolerated at 150 and 300 µg/body/day in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, administration of G-CSF at both 150 and 300 µg/body/day neither contributed to functional recovery nor reduced infarct volume at 3 months after onset, compared with the control group. The apparent lack of effectiveness may have been due to the small sample size. A trial of combination therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and G-CSF is planned. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-based stem cell mobilization in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Cara; Peace, David; Rich, Elizabeth; Van Besien, Koen

    2008-06-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to exacerbate vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. It has been recommended to avoid its use for stem cell mobilization in this population, yet autologous transplant is the standard of care and at times a life-saving treatment for patients with various hematologic malignancies such as relapsed aggressive lymphoma or multiple myeloma. We report 5 cases of patients with sickle cell disease and related hemoglobinopathies who underwent granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Three of them developed manageable vaso-occlusive pain symptoms requiring parenteral narcotics alone. The 2 others had no complications. These cases demonstrate that stem cell mobilization using G-CSF, although complicated and not without risk, is feasible in patients with sickle cell syndromes.

  13. Review of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in the treatment of established febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Pérez Velasco, Román

    2011-09-01

    To assess the value of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) in promoting recovery from established episodes of febrile neutropenia (FN) after chemotherapy in cancer patients. The literature was searched using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and IPA databases. Reference lists from the retrieved papers and hand searches of relevant journals complemented the search. Eleven randomized controlled trials were selected for review. G-CSF use in established FN appears to be limited to a small reduction in neutropenia duration, length of hospitalization, and duration of antibiotic use. Overall, there are no significant reductions in time to neutrophil recovery and fever resolution. The cost analyses performed do not show significant cost savings. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) are biological agents typically used for prevention of febrile neutropenia (FN) or as adjunctive treatment with antibiotics of established FN. Most clinical guidelines discourage the general use of G-CSF for adjunctive treatment of ongoing neutropenic fever; however, its use in special situations, such as high-risk for infectious complications or adverse prognostic factors, is advised. G-CSF should be reserved for high-risk cancer patients, in accordance with the results of this review. This recommendation needs to be taken with caution in view of the disparities and methodological flaws found among trials. It is necessary to design further trials appropriately, well-powered and focused on high-risk patients. Moreover, it is necessary to perform an appropriate economic evaluation for this setting.

  14. Identification and characterization of receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on human placenta and trophoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uzumaki, Hiroya; Okabe, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Norio; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takaku, Fumimaro; Tobita, Masahito; Yasukawa, Kaoru ); Ito, Seiga ); Umezawa, Yoshimi )

    1989-12-01

    Since radioiodination of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is difficult, the authors synthesized a mutein of human G-CSF that retains full biological activity and receptor-binding capacity for at least 2 weeks after radioiodination. Receptors for human G-CSF were characterized in the plasma membrane fraction from the human term placenta (human placental membranes) and trophoblastic cells by using the {sup 125}I-labeled mutein of human G-CSF (KW-2228). The specific binding of {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 to placental membranes was pH-dependent, with maximal specific binding at pH 7.8; it increased linearly with protein to 3.7 mg of protein per ml and was both time- and temperature-dependent, with maximal binding at 4{degree}C after a 24-hr incubation. When the authors examined the ability of hematopoietic growth factors to inhibit {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, they found that KW-2228 and intact human G-CSF ihibited {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, whereas erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not. Scatchard analysis revealed a single receptor type. The human G-CSF receptors on human placental membranes were shown to consist of two molecular species that could be specifically cross-linked to {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228. Human trophoblastic cells, T3M-3, also possessed a single receptor for G-CSF. They have identified the receptor for human G-CSF on human placental membranes and trophoblastic cells.

  15. Controlled Release of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Osteoconductive and Biodegradable Properties of Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate in a Rat Calvarial Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Tomohiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Oyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yamao, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yuhei

    2014-01-01

    Autologous bone grafts remain the gold standard for the treatment of congenital craniofacial disorders; however, there are potential problems including donor site morbidity and limitations to the amount of bone that can be harvested. Recent studies suggest that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes fracture healing or osteogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether topically applied G-CSF can stimulate the osteoconductive properties of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in a rat calvarial defect model. A total of 27 calvarial defects 5 mm in diameter were randomly divided into nine groups, which were treated with various combinations of a β-TCP disc and G-CSF in solution form or controlled release system using gelatin hydrogel. Histologic and histomorphometric analyses were performed at eight weeks postoperatively. The controlled release of low-dose (1 μg and 5 μg) G-CSF significantly enhanced new bone formation when combined with a β-TCP disc. Moreover, administration of 5 μg G-CSF using a controlled release system significantly promoted the biodegradable properties of β-TCP. In conclusion, the controlled release of 5 μg G-CSF significantly enhanced the osteoconductive and biodegradable properties of β-TCP. The combination of G-CSF slow-release and β-TCP is a novel and promising approach for treating pediatric craniofacial bone defects. PMID:24829581

  16. Upfront plerixafor plus G-CSF versus cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF for stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma: efficacy and cost analysis study.

    PubMed

    Afifi, S; Adel, N G; Devlin, S; Duck, E; Vanak, J; Landau, H; Chung, D J; Lendvai, N; Lesokhin, A; Korde, N; Reich, L; Landgren, O; Giralt, S; Hassoun, H

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF (C+G-CSF) is one of the most widely used stem cell (SC) mobilization regimens for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Plerixafor plus G-CSF (P+G-CSF) has demonstrated superior SC mobilization efficacy when compared with G-CSF alone and has been shown to rescue patients who fail mobilization with G-CSF or C+G-CSF. Despite the proven efficacy of P+G-CSF in upfront SC mobilization, its use has been limited, mostly due to concerns of high price of the drug. However, a comprehensive comparison of the efficacy and cost effectiveness of SC mobilization using C+G-CSF versus P+G-CSF is not available. In this study, we compared 111 patients receiving C+G-CSF to 112 patients receiving P+G-CSF. The use of P+G-CSF was associated with a higher success rate of SC collection defined as ⩾5 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg (94 versus 83%, P=0.013) and less toxicities. Thirteen patients in the C+G-CSF arm were hospitalized owing to complications while none in the P+G-CSF group. C+G-CSF was associated with higher financial burden as assessed using institutional-specific costs and charges (P<0.001) as well as using Medicare reimbursement rates (P=0.27). Higher rate of hospitalization, increased need for salvage mobilization, and increased G-CSF use account for these differences.

  17. G-CSF Intrauterine for Thin Endometrium, and Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tehraninejad, Ensieh; Davari Tanha, Fateme; Asadi, Ebrahim; Kamali, Koorosh; Aziminikoo, Elham; Rezayof, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of G-CSF on a cancelled ART cycle due to thin endometrium. Materials and methods: In a nonrandomized clinical trial from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary university based hospitals fifteen patients undergoing embryo transfer and with the history of cycle cancellation due to thin endometrium were studied. Intrauterine infusion of G-CSF was done on the day of oocyte pick-up or 5 days before embryo transfer. The primary outcome to be measured was an endometrium thickened to at least 6 mm and the secondary outcome was clinical pregnancy rate and consequently take-home baby. All previous cycles were considered as control for each patient. Results: The G-CSF was infused at the day of oocyte retrieval or 5 days before embryo transfer. The endometrial thickness reached from 3.593±0.251 mm to 7.120 ± 0.84 mm. The mean age, gravidity, parity, and FSH were 35.13± 9.531 years, 3, 1 and 32.78 ± 31.10 mIU/ml, respectively. The clinical pregnancy rate was 20%, and there was one missed abortion, a mother death at 34 weeks, and a preterm labor at 30 weeks due to PROM. Conclusion: G-CSF may increase endometrial thickness in the small group of patients who had no choice except cycle cancellation or surrogacy. PMID:26622308

  18. Estimation of rhG-CSF absorption kinetics after subcutaneous administration using a modified Wagner-Nelson method with a nonlinear elimination model.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, N; Aso, H; Higashida, M; Kinoshita, H; Ohdo, S; Yukawa, E; Higuchi, S

    2001-05-01

    The clearance of recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is known to decrease with dose increase, and to be saturable. The average clearance after intravenous administration will be lower than that after subcutaneous administration. Therefore, the apparent absolute bioavailability with subcutaneous administration calculated from the AUC ratio is expected to be an underestimate. The absorption pharmacokinetics after subcutaneous administration was examined using the results of the bioequivalency study between two rhG-CSF formulations with a dose of 2 microg/kg. The analysis was performed using a modified Wagner-Nelson method with the nonlinear elimination model. The apparent absolute bioavailability for subcutaneous administration was 56.9 and 67.5% for each formulation, and the ratio between them was approximately 120%. The true absolute bioavailability was, however, estimated to be 89.8 and 96.9%, respectively, and the ratio was approximately 108%. The absorption pattern was applied to other doses, and the predicted clearance values for subcutaneous and intravenous administrations were then similar to the values for several doses reported in the literature. The underestimation of bioavailability was around 30%, and the amplification of difference was 2.5 times, from 8 to 20%, because of the nonlinear pharmacokinetics. The neutrophil increases for each formulation were identical, despite the different bioavailabilities. The reason for this is probably that the amount eliminated through the saturable process, which might indicate the amount consumed by the G-CSF receptor, was identical for each formulation.

  19. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic or G-CSF as Potential Countermeasures for Impaired Control of Bacterial Infection Associated with an SPE Exposure during Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Romero-Weaver, Ana L.; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew

    2015-01-01

    A major risk for astronauts during prolonged space flight is infection as a result of the combined effects of microgravity, situational and confinement stress, alterations in food intake, altered circadian rhythm, and radiation that can significantly impair the immune system and the body’s defense systems. We previously reported a massive increase in morbidity with a decrease in the ability to control a bacterial challenge when mice were maintained under hindlimb suspension (HS) conditions and exposed to solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation. HS and SPE-like radiation treatment alone resulted in a borderline significant increase in morbidity. Therefore, development and testing of countermeasures that can be used during extended space missions in the setting of exposure to SPE radiation becomes a serious need. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of enrofloxacin (an orally bioavailable antibiotic) and Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (Neulasta) on enhancing resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice subjected to HS and SPE-like radiation. The results revealed that treatment with enrofloxacin or G-CSF enhanced bacterial clearance and significantly decreased morbidity and mortality in challenged mice exposed to suspension and radiation. These results establish that antibiotics, such as enrofloxacin, and G-CSF could be effective countermeasures to decrease the risk of bacterial infections after exposure to SPE radiation during extended space flight, thereby reducing both the risk to the crew and the danger of mission failure. PMID:25793272

  20. Biophysical Characterization of Met-G-CSF: Effects of Different Site-Specific Mono-Pegylations on Protein Stability and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Natalello, Antonino; Ami, Diletta; Collini, Maddalena; D’Alfonso, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe; Tonon, Giancarlo; Scaramuzza, Silvia; Schrepfer, Rodolfo; Doglia, Silvia Maria

    2012-01-01

    The limited stability of proteins in vitro and in vivo reduces their conversion into effective biopharmaceuticals. To overcome this problem several strategies can be exploited, as the conjugation of the protein of interest with polyethylene glycol, in most cases, improves its stability and pharmacokinetics. In this work, we report a biophysical characterization of the non-pegylated and of two different site-specific mono-pegylated forms of recombinant human methionyl-granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Met-G-CSF), a protein used in chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. In particular, we found that the two mono-pegylations of Met-G-CSF at the N-terminal methionine and at glutamine 135 increase the protein thermal stability, reduce the aggregation propensity, preventing also protein precipitation, as revealed by circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopies and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Interestingly, the two pegylation strategies were found to drastically reduce the polydispersity of Met-G-CSF, when incubated under conditions favouring protein aggregation, as indicated by DLS measurements. Our in vitro results are in agreement with preclinical studies, underlining that preliminary biophysical analyses, performed in the early stages of the development of new biopharmaceutical variants, might offer a useful tool for the identification of protein variants with improved therapeutic values. PMID:22905140

  1. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor ameliorates irradiation-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Yang, Miyoung; Jang, Hyosun; Oui, Heejin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Shin, Taekyun; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Seung-Sook; Moon, Changjong

    2010-12-03

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-csf) is a member of the hematopoietic growth factor family and demonstrates neuroprotective functions in neurodegenerative diseases. This study evaluated the radioprotective effects of G-csf in the suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice undergoing irradiation. The radioprotective effects were assessed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis, including the proliferating cell marker Ki-67 and the immature progenitor neuron marker doublecortin (DCX). Acute exposure to cranial irradiation (5Gy γ-rays) induced neural apoptosis and inhibited neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment with G-csf (100μg/kg every 12h subcutaneously on three consecutive days) attenuated neural apoptosis and decreased the number of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in the DG of the irradiated mouse hippocampus. Therefore, G-csf inhibited the detrimental effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that G-csf administration has potential therapeutic utility in brain irradiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of auto-induction medium for G-CSF production by Escherichia coli using artificial neural networks coupled with genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; Liu, C; Gao, X D; Yao, W B

    2013-03-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine widely used in cancer patients receiving high doses of chemotherapeutic drugs to prevent the chemotherapy-induced suppression of white blood cells. The production of recombinant G-CSF should be increased to meet the increasing market demand. This study aims to model and optimize the carbon source of auto-induction medium to enhance G-CSF production using artificial neural networks coupled with genetic algorithm. In this approach, artificial neural networks served as bioprocess modeling tools, and genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to optimize the established artificial neural network models. Two artificial neural network models were constructed: the back-propagation (BP) network and the radial basis function (RBF) network. The root mean square error, coefficient of determination, and standard error of prediction of the BP model were 0.0375, 0.959, and 8.49 %, respectively, whereas those of the RBF model were 0.0257, 0.980, and 5.82 %, respectively. These values indicated that the RBF model possessed higher fitness and prediction accuracy than the BP model. Under the optimized auto-induction medium, the predicted maximum G-CSF yield by the BP-GA approach was 71.66 %, whereas that by the RBF-GA approach was 75.17 %. These predicted values are in agreement with the experimental results, with 72.4 and 76.014 % for the BP-GA and RBF-GA models, respectively. These results suggest that RBF-GA is superior to BP-GA. The developed approach in this study may be helpful in modeling and optimizing other multivariable, non-linear, and time-variant bioprocesses.

  3. Severe Hypoxemia in a Healthy Donor for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation after Only the First Administration of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keita; Doki, Noriko; Senoo, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Haraguchi, Kyoko; Okuyama, Yoshiki; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) in healthy donors. A few reports have shown that some healthy donors developed acute respiratory distress syndrome or capillary leak syndrome after more than several rounds of G-CSF administration or leukapheresis. Case Report We report the case of a healthy donor for allogeneic stem cell transplantation who developed severe hypoxemia 1 h after only the first administration of G-CSF. The donor was administered 10 μg/kg G-CSF (lenograstim) subcutaneously for PBSC mobilization. 1 h after the first administration of G-CSF, the donor suddenly presented with dry cough and dyspnea. The oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2) in the room air was 88%. An electrocardiogram and chest radiography revealed no abnormalities. We excluded other causes of severe hypoxemia and diagnosed the donor with hypoxemia due to G-CSF administration, which was subsequently terminated. The donor was administered 2 l/min oxygen via a nasal cannula and 100 mg hydrocortisone intravenously. He subsequently recovered, and SpO2 in the room air returned to 98% 10 h after hypoxemia. Conclusion These respiratory symptoms might be related to anaphylactoid or hypersensitivity reaction. The donors should be observed for at least 1 h after the first administration of G-CSF. PMID:27994532

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration for infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen embryo transfer program.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Pan, Ping; Chen, Xiaoli; Li, Lin; Li, Yi; Yang, Dongzi

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration for infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen embryo transfer program. Among 59 infertile patients with thin endometrium (≤7 mm), 34 patients received uterine infusion of recombinant human G-CSF (100 μg/0.6 mL) on the day of ovulation or administration of progesterone or human chorionic gonadotropin, with 40 cycles defined as G-CSF group and 49 previous cycles as self-controlled group, and 25 patients refused, with 80 cycles defined as the control group. Higher proportion of induced cycles and lower proportion of natural cycles were observed in the G-CSF group, when compared to the self-controlled group or control group (P < .05). The cycle cancellation rate was, in descending order, 69.39% in self-controlled group, 48.75% in control group, and 17.50% in G-CSF group, with significant difference (P < .05). The implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer were similar in all the groups (P > .05). Our study fails to demonstrate that G-CSF has the potential to improve embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rate of the infertile women with thin endometrium.

  5. Randomized study of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a report from the Japanese pediatric leukemia/lymphoma study group B-NHL03 study.

    PubMed

    Tsurusawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Gosho, Masahiko; Mori, Tetsuya; Mitsui, Tetsuo; Sunami, Shosuke; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Fukano, Reiji; Tanaka, Fumiko; Fujita, Naoto; Inada, Hiroko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Komada, Yoshihiro; Saito, Akiko M; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Horibe, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the primary prophylaxis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the management of childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Patients with advanced-stage mature B-NHL were randomized to receive prophylactic G-CSF (G-CSF+) or not receive G-CSF (G-CSF-) based on protocols of the B-NHL03 study. The G-CSF group received 5 μg/kg/d Lenograstim from day 2 after each course of six chemotherapy courses. Fifty-eight patients were assessable, 29 G-CSF + and 29 G-CSF-. G-CSF + patients showed a positive impact on the meantime to neutrophil recovery and hospital stay. On the other hand, they had no impact in the incidences of febrile neutropenia, serious infections, stomatitis and total cost. Our study showed that administration of prophylactic G-CSF through all six chemotherapy courses for childhood B-NHL showed no clinical and economic benefits for the management of childhood B-NHL treatment.

  6. Development and calibration of a standard for the protein content of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor products.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Rao, Chunming; Tao, Lei; Han, Chunmei; Shi, Xinchang; Wang, Lan; Fan, Wenhong; Yu, Lei; Wang, Junzhi

    2012-03-01

    This collaborative study characterizes a homogeneous standard for the protein content determination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) products with traceability of the measurement. The Kjeldahl method was used to determine the average protein content of G-CSF bulk as 2.505 mg/ml (95% C.I: 2.467-2.543 mg/ml, GCV 4.0%). Using G-CSF bulk as a traceability benchmark, the protein content of the final freeze-dried standard using reverse phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) was 215.4 μg protein per ampoule (95% C.I: 212.407-218.486 μg/ampoule, GCV 3.4%). A comparative study showed that there was no difference between using Filgrastim CRS (European Pharmacopeia G-CSF reference standard) and freeze-dried homogeneous standard when quantifying G-CSF protein content by RP-HPLC (P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences in the G-CSF protein content obtained using a serum albumin standard by Lowry assay and a G-CSF standard with RP-HPLC. Therefore, use of RP-HPLC with a freeze-dried homogeneous standard would eliminate the systematic errors introduced when using a serum albumin standard because of the differences in protein composition between the standard and the sample. It would also be helpful to use this method to compare the quality of G-CSF biosimilar products in situations where the protein content has been calibrated using various standards.

  7. Annual patient and caregiver burden of oncology clinic visits for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy in the US.

    PubMed

    Stephens, J Mark; Li, Xiaoyan; Reiner, Maureen; Tzivelekis, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is indicated for chemotherapy patients with a significant risk of febrile neutropenia. This study estimates the annual economic burden on patients and caregivers of clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US. Annual clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections (all cancers) were estimated from national cancer incidence, chemotherapy treatment and G-CSF utilization data, and G-CSF sales and pricing information. Patient travel times, plus time spent in the clinic, were estimated from patient survey responses collected during a large prospective cohort study (the Prospective Study of the Relationship between Chemotherapy Dose Intensity and Mortality in Early-Stage (I-III) Breast Cancer Patients). Economic models were created to estimate travel costs, patient co-pays and the economic value of time spent by patients and caregivers in G-CSF clinic visits. Estimated total clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US were 1.713 million for 2015. Mean (SD) travel time per visit was 62 (50) min; mean (SD) time in the clinic was 41 (68) min. Total annual time for travel to and from the clinic, plus time at the clinic, is estimated at 4.9 million hours, with patient and caregiver time valued at $91.8 million ($228 per patient). The estimated cumulative annual travel distance for G-CSF visits is 60.2 million miles, with a total transportation cost of $28.9 million ($72 per patient). Estimated patient co-pays were $61.1 million, ∼$36 per visit, $152 per patient. The total yearly economic impact on patients and caregivers is $182 million, ∼$450 per patient. Data to support model parameters were limited. Study estimates are sensitive to the assumptions used. The burden of clinic visits for G-CSF therapy is a significant addition to the total economic burden borne by cancer patients and their families.

  8. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for acute-on-chronic liver failure: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Mendiola-Pastrana, Indira; Ornelas-Arroyo, Victoria J; Noreña-Herrera, Camilo; Vidaña-Perez, Desiree; Delgado-Sanchez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with increased short and long-term mortality. Animal models of liver failure have demonstrated that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) accelerates the liver regeneration process and improves survival. However, clinical evidence regarding the use of G-CSF in ACLF remains scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits and harms of G-CSF in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. An electronic search was made in The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS up to November 2013. Randomized clinical trials comparing the use of any regimen of G-CSF against placebo or no intervention in patients with ACLF were included. Primary outcomes included overal mortality, mortality due multi-organ failure, and adverse events. Relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) were used. Two trials involving 102 patients were included. A significant reduction in short-term overall mortality was observed in patients receiving G-CSF compared to controls (RR 0.56; 95%CI 0.39,0.80). G-CSF failed to reduce mortality secondary to gastrointestinal bleeding (RR 1.45; 95%CI 0.50, 4.27). Adverse effects reported included: fever, rash, herpes zoster, headache and nausea. In conclusion, the use of G-CSF for the treatment of patients with ACLF significantly reduced short-term mortality. While the evidence is still limited, the apparent benefit observed on short-term mortality, mild adverse effects and lack of an alternative therapy make the use of G-CSF in ACLF patients a reasonable alternative when liver transplantation is contraindicated or unavailable.

  9. Phase I study of intravenous low-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in acute and subacute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yusuke; Mizuma, Atsushi; Uesugi, Tsuyoshi; Ohnuki, Yoichi; Nagata, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Wakoh; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Hiroshi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shigeharu; Takizawa, Shunya

    2013-10-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; filgrastim) may be useful for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke because of its neuroprotective and neurogenesis-promoting properties, but an excessive increase of neutrophils may lead to brain injury. We examined the safety and tolerability of low-dose G-CSF and investigated the effectiveness of G-CSF given intravenously in the acute phase (at 24 hours) or subacute phase (at 7 days) of ischemic stroke. Three intravenous dose regimens (150, 300, or 450 μg/body/day, divided into 2 doses for 5 days) of G-CSF were examined in 18 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-confirmed infarct in the territory of the middle cerebral artery. Nine patients received the first dose at 24 hours poststroke (acute group) and 9 patients received the first dose on day 7 poststroke (subacute group; n = 3 at each dose in each group). A scheduled administration of G-CSF was skipped if the patient's leukocyte count exceeded 40,000/μL. Patients received neurologic and MRI examinations. We found neither serious adverse event, drug-related platelet reduction nor splenomegaly. Leukocyte levels remained below 40,000/μL at 150 and 300 μg G-CSF/body/day, but rose above 40,000/μL at 450 μg G-CSF/body/day. Neurologic function improvement between baseline and day 90 was more marked after treatment in the acute phase versus the subacute phase (Barthel index 49.4 ± 28.1 v 15.0 ± 22.0; P < .01). Low-dose G-CSF (150 and 300 μg/body/day) was safe and well tolerated in ischemic stroke patients, and leukocyte levels remained below 40,000/μL. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impaired gut contractility following hemorrhagic shock is accompaied by IL-6 and G-CSF production and neutrophil infiltration.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, C; Kalff, J C; Chakraborty, A; Watkins, S C; Billiar, T R; Bauer, A J; Tweardy, D J

    2001-02-01

    Recovery from hemorrhagic shock (HS) is frequently accompanied by bowel stasis. The aim of this study was to examine whether or not HS initiates an inflammatory response that includes production of cytokines, specifically G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and recruitment of leukocytes within the intestinal muscularis which contribute to impaired muscle contractility. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to HS (MAP 40 mm Hg for 156 min) followed by resuscitation, and then they were killed at 4 hr. Shock animals demonstrated accumulation of PMNs in the jejunal muscularis and decreased spontaneous and bethanechol-stimulated muscle contractility. Semiquantitative RT-PCR demonstrated elevated levels of IL-6 and G-CSF mRNA in shock animals in full-thickness jejunum and in mucosa and muscularis layers compared to sham controls. Immunostaining demonstrated increased IL-6 protein production within the muscularis externa and submucosa. In situ hybridization studies localized G-CSF mRNA production to the submucosa. Gel shift assays revealed increased NF-kappaB and Stat3 activity in full-thickness jejunum and jejunal layers of shock animals. Activation of Stat3 also was demonstrated in normal muscularis tissue exposed to IL-6 and G-CSF in vitro. IL-6 and G-CSF are produced in the muscularis and mucosa layers of the gut in HS where they may contribute to PMN recruitment and smooth muscle dysfunction.

  11. Biosimilar granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor for healthy donor stem cell mobilization: need we be afraid?

    PubMed

    Bonig, Halvard; Becker, Petra S; Schwebig, Arnd; Turner, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    Biosimilars are approved biologics with comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to a reference product. Unlike generics, which are chemically manufactured copies of small-molecule drugs with relatively simple chemical structures, the biosimilar designation is applied to drugs that are produced by living organisms, implying much more difficult to control manufacturing and purification procedures. To account for these complexities, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the US Food and Drug Administration, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration, and other regulatory authorities have devised and implemented specific, markedly more demanding pathways for the evaluation and approval of biosimilars. To date, several biosimilars have been approved, including versions of somatropin, erythropoietin, and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and several biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are currently in development. The reference G-CSF product (Neupogen, Amgen) has been used for many years for prevention and treatment of neutropenia and also for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). However, concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of biosimilar G-CSF during PBSC mobilization procedures, especially in healthy donors. This article reviews the available evidence on the use of biosimilar G-CSF in this setting. Aggregate clinical evidence supports the assessment by the EMA of biosimilar and originator G-CSF as highly biologically similar, with respect to desired and undesired effects.

  12. Neuroprotection of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Tzung; Chu, Sung-Chao; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Hou, Ting-Wen; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chen, Shin-Yuan

    2017-03-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease. Both medical and surgical choices provide symptomatic treatment. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a conventional treatment for hematological diseases, has demonstrated its effectiveness in acute and chronic neurological diseases through its anti-inflammatory and antiapoptosis mechanisms. Based on previous in vitro and in vivo studies, we administered a lower dose (3.3 μg/kg) G-CSF injection for 5 days and six courses for 1 year in early-stage PD patients as a phase I trial. The four PD patient's mean unified PD rating scale motor scores in medication off status remained stable from 23 before the first G-CSF injection to 22 during the 2-year follow-up. 3,4-Dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (18F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) studies also revealed an annual 3.5% decrease in radiotracer uptake over the caudate nucleus and 7% in the putamen, both slower than those of previous reports of PD. Adverse effects included transient muscular-skeletal pain, nausea, vomiting, and elevated liver enzymes. Based on this preliminary report, G-CSF seems to alleviate disease deterioration for early stage PD patients. The effectiveness of G-CSF was possibly due to its amelioration of progressive dopaminergic neuron degeneration.

  13. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  14. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Maureen J; Peters, Frank P; Mandigers, Caroline M; Dercksen, M Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M; Nortier, Hans J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W; van Warmerdam, Laurence J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Jacobs, Esther M; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C; Smilde, Tineke J; van der Velden, Annette W; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W; van Gastel, Saskia M; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-12-01

    Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF during the first cycles of chemotherapy lead to questions about the effectiveness of continued use of G-CSF throughout later cycles of chemotherapy. In a multicenter study, patients with breast cancer who were considered fit enough to receive 3-weekly polychemotherapy, but also had > 20% risk for FN, were randomly assigned to primary G-CSF prophylaxis during the first two chemotherapy cycles only (experimental arm) or to primary G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles (standard arm). The noninferiority hypothesis was that the incidence of FN would be maximally 7.5% higher in the experimental compared with the standard arm. After inclusion of 167 eligible patients, the independent data monitoring committee advised premature study closure. Of 84 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF throughout all chemotherapy cycles, eight (10%) experienced an episode of FN. In contrast, of 83 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF during the first two cycles only, 30 (36%) had an FN episode (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.54), with a peak incidence of 24% in the third cycle (ie, first cycle without G-CSF prophylaxis). In patients with early breast cancer at high risk for FN, continued use of primary G-CSF prophylaxis during all chemotherapy cycles is of clinical relevance and thus cannot be abandoned.

  15. Negative association of donor age with CD34⁺ cell dose in mixture allografts of G-CSF-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood harvests.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chang, Yingjun; Xu, Lanping; Zhang, Xiaohui; Huang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of donor characteristics on CD34(+) cell dose remain controversial. Recently, we developed a novel haploidentical transplant protocol, in which mixture allografts of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed bone marrow (G-BM) and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood (G-PB) were used. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor characteristics on CD34(+) cell dose in mixture allografts of G-BM and G-PB. A total of 162 healthy adult donors, who underwent bone marrow harvest and peripheral blood collection between January 2009 and November 2010 in Peking University People's Hospital, were prospectively investigated. G-CSF was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 5 µg/kg once a day for 5-6 consecutive days. Bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cells were harvested on the fourth day and fifth day, respectively. A final total CD34(+) cell dose less than 2×10(6) cells/kg recipient body weight was considered a poor mobilization. Of the 162 donors, 31 (19.1%) did not attain this threshold. The obtained median CD34(+) cell doses in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and mixture allografts were 0.83×10(6)/kg, 2.40×10(6)/kg, and 3.47×10(6)/kg, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that donor age had a significant negative effect on CD34(+) cell dose in either G-BM, or G-PB, or mixture allografts of G-BM and G-PB. And a 1-year increase in age was associated with a 5.6% decrease in the odds of achieving mobilization cutoff. No significant correlation was found for donor gender, body mass index (BMI), and weight. Donor age is the only factor among the four parameters, including age, gender, weight, and BMI, that influence CD34(+) cell dose in mixture allografts of G-BM and G-PB, and younger donors should be chosen to obtain sufficient CD34(+) cells for transplantation.

  16. Case Report. Prevention of Clozapine-Induced Granulocytopenia/Agranulocytosis with Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in an Intellectually Disabled Patient with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, G.; Graham, J. G.; Haut, F. F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: While clozapine is an effective treatment for refractory schizophrenia, its use is limited by haematological side effects. Treatment options that allow continued prescription of clozapine by tackling these side effects will greatly aid patients for whom this medication is all too often their only hope of recovery. Method: In this case…

  17. Contribution of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Voest, Emile E; Chaplin, David J; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-10-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDA) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial precursor (CEP) cells could promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here, we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second-generation potent prodrug derivative of combretastatin-A4 phosphate, rapid increases in circulating plasma vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R(-/-) mice were treated with OXi-4503. We found that as opposed to wild-type controls, G-CSF-R(-/-) mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared with tumors treated in wild-type mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor, and SDF-1 were also observed in patients with VDA (combretastatin-A4 phosphate)-treated cancer. These results highlight the possible effect of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor regrowth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target.

  18. The combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for chronic stroke treatment in aged animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke occurs more frequently in the elderly population and presents the number one leading cause of persistent disability worldwide. Lack of effective treatment to enhance brain repair and improve functional restoration in chronic stroke, the recovery phase of stroke, is a challenging medical problem to be solved in stroke research. Our early study has revealed the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) on chronic stroke in young animals. However, whether this treatment is effective and safe to the aged population remains to be determined. Methods Cortical brain ischemia was produced in aged C57BL mice or aged spontaneously hypertensive rats. SCF+G-CSF or equal volume of vehicle solution was subcutaneously injected for 7 days beginning at 3–4 months after induction of cortical brain ischemia. Using the approaches of biochemistry assays, flow cytometry, pathology, and evaluation of functional outcome, several doses of SCF+G-CSF have been examined for their safety and efficiency on chronic stroke in aged animals. Results All tested doses did not show acute or chronic toxicity in the aged animals. Additionally, SCF+G-CSF treatment in chronic stroke of aged animals mobilized bone marrow stem cells and improved functional outcome in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions SCF+G-CSF treatment is a safe and effective approach to chronic stroke in the aged condition. This study provides important information needed for developing a new therapeutic strategy to improve the health of older adults with chronic stroke. PMID:23254113

  19. Immunomodulation of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang on in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, S T; Yang, S L; Hsieh, C C; Yang, M D; Wang, T F; Lin, J G

    2000-11-01

    Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (BZYQT) is a Chinese medicine, and has been used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. At present, we still do not fully understand the effects of BZYQT on the cellular physiology. Present in vitro study demonstrated that BZYQT is capable of increasing granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in healthy volunteers and patients with HCC. The productions of G-CSF and TNF-alpha by PBMC of volunteers were significantly stimulated by more than 125 microg/ml of BZYQT. G-CSF levels stimulated by PBMC of healthy volunteers were higher than in PBMC of the HCC patients when more than 625 microg/ml of BZYQT was administrated. The reason may be due to the impaired immunologic reactivity of mononuclear cells in HCC patients. However, the production levels of TNF-alpha in HCC patients can be stimulated to levels as high as those in healthy volunteers. When adding high concentration (3.125 mg/ml) of BZYQT to the cultured PBMC, the increments of G-CSF and TNF-alpha production decreased although there were no obvious changes in the number of metabolic active PBMC changed. TNF-alpha andG-CSF are known to play important roles in the biological defensive mechanism. These findings show that BZYQT is a unique formula for the stimulation of PBMC to produce G-CSF and TNF-alpha. Administration of BZYQT may be beneficial for patients with HCC to modulate these cytokines.

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves host defense to resuscitated shock and polymicrobial sepsis without provoking generalized neutrophil-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Patton, J H; Lyden, S P; Ragsdale, D N; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Proctor, K G

    1998-05-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) increases production and release of neutrophil precursors and activates multiple functions of circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). G-CSF has therapeutic effects in many experimental models of sepsis; its actions with superimposed reperfusion insults are unknown. In traumatic conditions, G-CSF could exacerbate unregulated, PMN-dependent injury to otherwise normal host tissue or, it could partially reverse trauma-induced immune suppression, which may improve long-term outcome. This study tested whether stimulating PMN proliferation and function with G-CSF during recovery from trauma+sepsis potentiated reperfusion injury or whether it improved host defense. Anesthetized swine were subjected to cecal ligation and incision, 35% hemorrhage, and 1 hr of hypotension. Resuscitation consisted of intravenous G-CSF (5 microg/kg) or placebo followed by shed blood and 40 mL/kg of lactated Ringer's solution. The control group received laparotomy only. G-CSF or placebo was given daily. Animals were killed at 4 days. Observers, blind to the protocol, graded autopsy samples for localization of infection and quality of abscess wall formation. Data included complete blood count, granulocyte oxidative burst after phorbol myristate acetate stimulation in vitro (GO2B), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell count, BAL noncellular protein, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumor necrosis factor production in whole blood in vitro (lipopolysaccharide-tumor necrosis factor), and lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO). Neutrophilia and localization of infection, were significantly improved by G-CSF. Variables altered by G-CSF, though not significantly, showed GO2B potential increased by 50%, lipopolysaccharide-tumor necrosis factor decreased by 50%, and improved survival versus placebo (100% vs. 70%). G-CSF did not increase lung MPO, BAL cell count, or BAL protein. Both arterial and venous O2 saturations were unaltered. Our data show that G-CSF

  1. Effect of endotoxin on serum granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dale, D C; Lau, S; Nash, R; Boone, T; Osborne, W

    1992-04-01

    The biologic effects of endotoxin are attributed to the release of several cytokines, including interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor, and the colony-stimulating factors. To investigate the mechanism of endotoxin-induced neutrophilia in dogs, several cell lines known to proliferate selectively in response to recombinant human colony-stimulating factors were examined to determine their responses to recombinant canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rcG-CSF) or recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF). The murine cell line NFS-60 was found to respond well to rcG-CSF and the human cell line TALL-101 to rcGM-CSF, and these responses were neutralized by antibodies to these recombinant proteins. These bioassays were then used to determine G-CSF and GM-CSF levels in dogs after intravenous endotoxin administration. G-CSF levels increased by 2 h, peaked at 4 h, and had not returned to normal by 24 h after endotoxin. In contrast, GM-CSF was not detectible before or after endotoxin administration.

  2. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling.

  3. Predictors for successful PBSC collection on the fourth day of G-CSF-induced mobilization in allogeneic stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    van Oostrum, Anja; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Croockewit, Sandra; Overdevest, Jacqueline; Fechter, Mirjam; Ruiterkamp, Bart; Brand, Anneke; Netelenbos, Tanja

    2017-01-31

    Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) used for allogeneic transplantation are collected by apheresis after pre-treatment of donors with G-CSF. Using modern apheresis devices stem cells can be collected more efficiently. It was studied whether collection on the 4th instead of the 5th day after initiation of G-CSF treatment might be feasible. Stem cell yields that could have been collected on day 4 were calculated in two cohorts treated with 10 µg/kg G-CSF once daily (n = 106, cohort I) or 5 µg/kg twice daily schedule (n = 85, cohort II). Harvests were predicted using the median collection efficiency (CE) of the apheresis machine and regarded successful when > 5.0 x10(6) CD34(+/) kg recipient body weight. Successful harvests at day 4 could have been obtained in only 22.6% and 41.2% of donors in cohort I and II respectively, while the expected successful collections on day 5 were 55.7% and 76.5%. Individual donor factors that correlated with a successful harvest on day 4 were weight, BMI, age, ratio donor/recipient weight and total G-CSF dose in cohort I, whereas ratio donor/recipient weight was the only significant predictor in cohort II. Donor weight, BMI and total G-CSF dose correlated positively with CD34(+) values in the blood on day 4 in all donors. However, donor characteristics were not able to be used as strong predictors in daily practice. In conclusion, PBSC collection on day 4 will not result in a successful harvest in most stem cell donors, however using a twice daily G-CSF scheme increases the yield.

  4. Efficacy and safety of hematopoietic stem cell remobilization with plerixafor+G-CSF in adult patients with germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, M E; Long, G; Holman, P; Libby, E; Calandra, G C; Schriber, J R

    2012-10-01

    Autologous hematopoietic SCT (auto-HSCT) can be curative for patients with germ cell tumors. Poor stem cell mobilization jeopardizes the ability to deliver this therapy. Herein, we describe a retrospective study examining safety and efficacy of plerixafor in combination with G-CSF for patients with germ cell tumors who had previously failed stem cell collection. Overall, 21 patients with germ cell tumors and previous mobilization failure were remobilized with G-CSF (10 μg/kg SC) and plerixafor (0.24 mg/kg SC) beginning the evening of day 4 of G-CSF treatment. Dosing of G-CSF and plerixafor was repeated until collection of ≥ 2 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Remobilization resulted in a median yield of 3.2 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. A total of 17 (81%) patients collected ≥ 2 × 10(6) and 9 (43%) patients collected ≥ 4 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg in a median of 2 (range 1-3) and 3 (range 1-4) days, respectively. In all, 16 (76%) patients proceeded to transplant; 8 (38%) received tandem transplants. There were no serious adverse events. In summary, the majority of patients with germ cell tumors who failed prior mobilization with growth factors ± chemotherapy were remobilized with plerixafor plus G-CSF facilitating at least one auto-HSCT. Use of plerixafor plus G-CSF can increase access of this potentially life-saving procedure to patients with high-risk germ cell tumors.

  5. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors from normal donors using the combination of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor results in fewer plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the graft and enhanced donor T cell engraftment with Th1 polarization: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lonial, Sagar; Akhtari, Mojtaba; Kaufman, Jonathan; Torre, Claire; Lechowicz, Mary J; Flowers, Christopher; Sinha, Rajni; Khoury, Hanna J; Langston, Amelia A; Waller, Edmund K

    2013-03-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) both mobilize CD34(+) stem cells into the blood when administered before apheresis but have distinct effects on dendritic cell (DC) differentiation. We previously demonstrated that the combination of GM+G-CSF results in fewer plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) when used to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation. To test the hypothesis that the content of pDCs in an allograft can be modulated with the cytokines used for mobilization, we randomized the human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling donors of 50 patients with hematological malignancies to a mobilization regimen of either GM+G-CSF (n = 25) or G-CSF alone (n = 25). Primary and secondary endpoints included the cellular constituents of the mobilized grafts, the kinetics of posttransplantation immune reconstitution, and clinical outcomes of the transplantation recipients. Grafts from donors receiving GM+G-CSF contained equivalent numbers of CD34(+) cells with fewer pDCs and T cells, with a higher fraction of Th1-polarized donor T cells than G-CSF mobilized grafts. Immune recovery was enhanced among recipients of GM+G-CSF. Survival was not significantly different between transplantation recipients in the two arms. The use of GM+G-CSF modulates immune function and recovery after allogeneic transplantation and should be explored in larger studies powered to evaluate clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for mobilizing bone marrow stem cells in subacute stroke: the stem cell trial of recovery enhancement after stroke 2 randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    England, Timothy J; Abaei, Maryam; Auer, Dorothee P; Lowe, James; Jones, D Rhodri E; Sare, Gillian; Walker, Marion; Bath, Philip M W

    2012-02-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is neuroprotective in experimental stroke and mobilizes CD34(+) peripheral blood stem cells into the circulation. We assessed the safety of G-CSF in recent stroke in a phase IIb single-center randomized, controlled trial. G-CSF (10 μg/kg) or placebo (ratio 2:1) was given SC for 5 days to 60 patients 3 to 30 days after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. The primary outcome was the frequency of serious adverse events. Peripheral blood counts, CD34(+) count, and functional outcome were measured. MRI assessed lesion volume, atrophy, and the presence of iron-labeled CD34(+) cells reinjected on day 6. Sixty patients were recruited at mean of 8 days (SD ± 5) post ictus, with mean age 71 years (± 12 years) and 53% men. The groups were well matched for baseline minimization/prognostic factors. There were no significant differences between groups in the number of participants with serious adverse events: G-CSF 15 (37.5%) of 40 versus placebo 7 (35%) of 20, death or dependency (modified Rankin Score: G-CSF 3.3 ± 1.3, placebo 3.0 ± 1.3) at 90 days, or the number of injections received. G-CSF increased CD34(+) and total white cell counts of 9.5- and 4.2-fold, respectively. There was a trend toward reduction in MRI ischemic lesion volume with respect to change from baseline in G-CSF-treated patients (P=0.06). In 1 participant, there was suggestion that labeled CD34(+) cells had migrated to the ischemic lesion. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial suggests that G-CSF is safe when administered subacutely. It is feasible to label and readminister iron-labeled CD34(+) cells in patients with ischemic stroke. URL: www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN63336619.

  7. Cost-benefit analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during CHOP antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dranitsaris, G; Altmayer, C; Quirt, I

    1997-06-01

    Several randomised comparative trials have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the duration of neutropenia, hospitalisation and intravenous antibacterial use in patients with cancer who are receiving high-dosage antineoplastic therapy. However, one area that has received less attention is the role of G-CSF in standard-dosage antineoplastic regimens. One such treatment that is considered to have a low potential for inducing fever and neutropenia is the CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective in order to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic G-CSF in this patient population. This included direct costs for hospitalisation with antibacterial support, as well as indirect societal costs, such as time off work and antineoplastic therapy delays secondary to neutropenia. The findings were then tested by a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The administration of G-CSF at a dosage of 5 micrograms/kg/day for 11 doses following CHOP resulted in an overall net cost of $Can1257. In the sensitivity analysis, lowering the G-CSF dosage to 2 micrograms/kg/day generated a net benefit of $Can6564, indicating a situation that was cost saving to society. The results of the current study suggest that the use of G-CSF in patients receiving CHOP antineoplastic therapy produces a situation that is close to achieving cost neutrality. However, low-dosage (2 micrograms/kg/day) G-CSF is an economically attractive treatment strategy because it may result in overall savings to society.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma in ascitic fluid at initial diagnosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Nao; Naito, Yoshiki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Taira, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Yoshida, Tomoko; Abe, Hideyuki; Takase, Yorihiko; Fukumitsu, Chihiro; Murata, Kazuya; Ishida, Yusuke; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Kimura, Yoshizo; Tanigawa, Masahiko; Mihara, Yutaro; Nakayama, Masamichi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Akiba, Jun; Yano, Hirohisa

    2017-02-10

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing pancreatic tumors are extremely rare. These tumors have an aggressive clinical course and no established treatment. Here, we report an autopsy case of G-CSF-production in pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma (PAC). A 72-year-old woman presented with a large pancreatic head mass and multiple liver metastases. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis (leukocyte count 113.3 × 10(3) /µL) and high serum G-CSF levels (441 pg/mL; normal range: <39.0 pg/mL). The ascitic fluid was submitted to our pathology laboratory at initial diagnosis. Cytopathology showed that smears from the ascitic fluid were highly cellular and contained numerous malignant cells, mainly in loose groupings. Occasional pseudoglandular formations and giant cells were also present. The malignant cells were round, and no spindle-shaped cells were visible. The nuclei were round to ovoid with coarsely granular chromatin and large prominent nucleoli. Upon immunocytochemistry, tumor cells were positive for G-CSF and vimentin; there was no E-cadherin expression. Histopathological examination of the tumor showed a mixed composition of adenocarcinomatous and sarcomatous regions. Upon immunohistochemistry, both components were positive for G-CSF. Few CD34-positive myeloblasts were observed in the bone marrow. Thus, we diagnosed this as a case of G-CSF production in PAC with leukocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on G-CSF expression immunocytochemically confirmed in PAC. Diagn. Cytopathol. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Phenotypic features of first-generation transgenic goats for human granulocyte-colony stimulation factor production in milk.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ribrio I T P; Melo, Carlos H S; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna M G; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Melo, Luciana M; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2014-11-01

    Human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor used in neutropenic patients. It is produced in transgenic bacteria or cultured mammalian cells. As an alternative, we now show that hG-CSF can be expressed in the mammary gland of first-generation (F1) transgenic goats during induced lactation. Despite lower milk production, transgenic females presented a similar milk composition (fat, protein and lactose) when compared to non-transgenic (p > 0.05) ones. The mean concentration (±SD) of recombinant hG-CSF in milk during lactation was 360 ± 178 µg ml(-1). All clinical parameters, as well as kidney and liver function, indicated that F1 transgenic goats were healthy. Additionally, no ectopic hG-CSF expression was detected in studied tissues of F1 transgenic males. Thus, F1 hG-CSF-transgenic goats can express the recombinant protein in milk at quantities compatible with their use as bioreactors in a commercial-scale protein-production program.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing undifferentiated carcinoma of the colon mimicking a pulmonary giant cell carcinoma: a case showing overexpression of CD44 along with highly proliferating nestin-positive tumor vessels.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Waki, Michihiko; Tsuchiya, Tomonori; Hoshi, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing tumors are known for their aggressive behavior. Only four cases of G-CSF-producing colorectal carcinoma have been previously reported. Herein, we present a case of an undifferentiated carcinoma of the descending colon showing G-CSF production and giant cell carcinoma morphology in a 93-year-old woman. A tumor with a diameter of 80 mm was identified in the descending colon via computed tomography. Descending colectomy was performed involving the abdominal wall where tumor invasion was observed. The white blood cell count, which was elevated before resection, decreased to normal levels after intervention. However, local recurrence at the resected site was detected 39 days after surgery. Upon recurrence, increased white blood cell counts and serum G-CSF were seen. The patient died because of respiratory failure 98 days after colectomy. By using immunohistochemistry, G-CSF expression was detected in tumor cells in the resected specimen, along with overexpression of CD44 and highly proliferating nestin-positive tumor vessels. The poor clinical outcome of this patient is consistent with previous reports that the expression of these three molecules predict poor prognosis. While G-CSF can be a therapeutic target considering its auto/paracrine function to induce tumor growth via the G-CSF receptor, CD44 and nestin may also be possible candidate therapeutic targets. Further studies are required to assess the efficacy of treatments targeting these three molecules.

  11. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilization on the expression patterns, clonality and signal transduction of TRAV and TRBV repertoire.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Li; Wu, Xiuli; Wu, Meiqing; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Hui; Fan, Zhiping; Sun, Jing; Liu, Qifa

    2012-08-01

    The immune modulatory effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on T cells resulted in an unexpected low incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT). Recently, αβ(+) T cells are identified as the primary effector cells for GVHD. However, whether G-CSF could influence the repertoire of αβ(+) T cells (TRAV and TRBV repertoire) and CD3 genes remains unclear. To further characterize this feature, we investigated the effect of G-CSF mobilization on the T cell receptors (TCR) of αβ(+) T cells (TRAV and TRBV repertoire) and CD3 genes, as well as the association between the changes of TCR repertoire and GVHD in patients undergoing G-CSF mobilized allo-PBSCT. We found that G-CSF mobilization had an effect on the expression patterns, clonality and signal transduction of TRAV and TRBV repertoire. This alteration might play a role in mediating GVHD in G-CSF mobilized allo-PBSCT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor after liver transplantation leads to an increased incidence and severity of ischemic biliary lesions in the rat model

    PubMed Central

    Dirsch, Olaf; Chi, Haidong; Ji, Yuan; Gu, Yan Li; Broelsch, Christoph E; Dahmen, Uta

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Recently it has been reported that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can induce hypercoagulability in healthy bone marrow donors. It is conceivable that the induction of a prothrombotic state in a recipient of an organ graft with already impaired perfusion might cause further deterioration in the transplanted organ. This study evaluated whether G-CSF treatment worsens liver perfusion following liver transplantation in the rat model. METHODS: A non-arterialized rat liver transplantation model was employed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF treatment on the liver in a syngeneic and allogeneic strain combination. Study outcomes included survival time and liver damage as investigated by liver enzymes and liver histology. Observation times were 1 d, 1 wk and 12 wk. RESULTS: Rats treated with G-CSF had increased incidence and severity of biliary damage following liver transplantation. In these animals, hepatocellular necrosis was accentuated in the centrilobular region. These lesions are indicative of impaired perfusion in G-CSF treated animals. CONCLUSION: G-CSF should be used with caution in recipients of liver transplantation, as treatment might enhance preexisting, undetected perfusion problems and ultimately lead to ischemia induced biliary complications. PMID:16937499

  13. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  14. Adjunctive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for treatment of septic shock due to melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Stephens, Dianne P; Anstey, Nicholas M; Currie, Bart J

    2004-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Risk factors for this infection have also been associated with functional neutrophil defects. Because of this, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was adopted for use in patients with septic shock due to melioidosis in December 1998. We compared the mortality rates from before and after the introduction of G-CSF therapy at the Royal Darwin Hospital (Darwin, Australia) during the period of 1989-2002. The mortality rate decreased from 95% to 10% after the introduction of G-CSF. Risk factors, the duration of illness before presentation, and the severity of illness were similar in both groups. A smaller decrease in mortality among patients in the intensive care unit who did not have melioidosis was observed, suggesting that other changes in management did not account for the magnitude of the benefit seen. We conclude that G-CSF may have contributed to the reduction in the mortality rate among patients with septic shock due to melioidosis.

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor inhibits CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling and overcomes stromal-mediated drug resistance in the HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xianfu; Zhong, Hua; Wan, Haixia; Zhong, Jihua; Chen, Fangyuan

    2016-07-01

    Combining cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has demonstrated marked efficacy in the treatment of elderly and relapsed/refractory patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the role of G-CSF remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of G-CSF to overcome stromal-mediated drug resistance and the underlying molecular mechanism. Two types of co-culture models were established in the HS-5 human bone marrow/stromal and HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines, in order to imitate the interactions between stromal and leukemia cells in vitro, which is mediated by the stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α signaling axis. In the present study, HL-60 cells were attracted and adhered to HS-5 cells using migration assay and flow cytometry, respectively; however, these interactions were inhibited by treatment with G-CSF and/or the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) antagonist, AMD3100. Co-culture with HS-5 cells, including direct and indirect contact, protected HL-60 cells against spontaneous apoptosis or drug-induced apoptosis; however, these protective effects were disrupted by treatment with G-CSF and/or AMD3100. Notably, G-CSF and/or AMD3100 did not alter cell viability or apoptosis when HL-60 cells were cultured with medium alone. In addition, G-CSF significantly reduced the expression levels of surface CXCR4 protein, total CXCR4 protein and CXCR4 mRNA, and significantly upregulated the expression of microRNA (miR)-146a. Conversely, AMD3100 significantly reduced surface CXCR4 expression levels, but not the total CXCR4, CXCR4 mRNA or miR-146a expression levels. The results of the present study suggested that interfering with the CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling axis via G-CSF inhibited the migration and adhesion of HL-60 cells to HS-5 cells and eliminated HS5 cell-mediated protective effects. Furthermore, G-CSF administration reduced CXCR4 expression levels by upregulating the expression of

  16. Use of G-CSF to hasten neutrophil recovery after auto-SCT for AML is not associated with increased relapse incidence: a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Czerw, T; Labopin, M; Gorin, N-C; Giebel, S; Blaise, D; Dumas, P-Y; Foa, R; Attal, M; Schaap, N; Michallet, M; Bonmati, C; Veelken, H; Mohty, M

    2014-07-01

    Application of G-CSF in AML is controversial as leukemic blasts may express receptors interacting with the cytokine, which may stimulate leukemia growth. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of G-CSF use to accelerate neutrophil recovery after auto-SCT on outcome. Adults with AML in first CR autografted between 1994 and 2010 were included. Nine hundred and seventy two patients were treated with G-CSF after auto-SCT whereas 1121 were not. BM and PB were used as a source of stem cells in 454 (22%) and 1639 (78%) cases, respectively. The incidence of relapse at 5 years in the BM-auto-SCT group was 38% for patients receiving post-transplant G-CSF and 43% for those not treated with G-CSF, P=0.46. In the PB-auto-SCT cohort, respective probabilities were 48% and 49%, P=0.49. No impact of the use of G-CSF could be demonstrated with respect to the probability of leukemia-free survival: in the BM-auto-SCT group, 51% for G-CSF(+) and 48% for G-CSF(-), P=0.73; in PB-auto-SCT group, 42% for G-CSF(+) and 43% for G-CSF(-), P=0.83. Although G-CSF administration significantly shortened the neutropenic phase, no beneficial effect was observed with regard to non-relapse mortality. In patients with AML, the use of G-CSF after auto-SCT is not associated with increased risk of relapse irrespective of the source of stem cells used.

  17. Plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in critical illness including sepsis and septic shock: relation to disease severity, multiple organ dysfunction, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Presneill, J J; Waring, P M; Layton, J E; Maher, D W; Cebon, J; Harley, N S; Wilson, J W; Cade, J F

    2000-07-01

    To define the circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) during critical illness and to determine their relationship to the severity of illness as measured by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, the development of multiple organ dysfunction, or mortality. Prospective cohort study. University hospital intensive care unit. A total of 82 critically ill adult patients in four clinically defined groups, namely septic shock (n = 29), sepsis without shock (n = 17), shock without sepsis (n = 22), and nonseptic, nonshock controls (n = 14). None. During day 1 of septic shock, peak plasma levels of G-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), but not GM-CSF, were greater than in sepsis or shock alone (p < .001), and were correlated among themselves (rs = 0.44-0.77; p < .02) and with the APACHE II score (rs = 0.25-0.40; p = .03 to .18). G-CSF, IL-6, and UF, and sepsis, shock, septic shock, and APACHE II scores were strongly associated with organ dysfunction or 5-day mortality by univariate analysis. However, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only septic shock remained significantly associated with organ dysfunction and only APACHE II scores and shock with 5-day mortality. Similarly, peak G-CSF, IL-6, and LIF were poorly predictive of 30-day mortality. Plasma levels of G-CSF, IL-6, and LIF are greatly elevated in critical illness, including septic shock, and are correlated with one another and with the severity of illness. However, they are not independently predictive of mortality, or the development of multiple organ dysfunction. GM-CSF was rarely elevated, suggesting different roles for G-CSF and GM-CSF in human septic shock.

  18. Stem cell mobilisation by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term results of the REVIVAL-2 trial.

    PubMed

    Steppich, Birgit; Hadamitzky, Martin; Ibrahim, Tareq; Groha, Philip; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Kastrati, Adnan; Ott, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials may suggest that treatment with G-CSF leads to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischaemic heart disease. In the REVIVAL-2 study we found that stem cell mobilisation by G-CSF does not influence infarct size, left ventricular function and coronary restenosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) that underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of G-CSF treatment on seven-year clinical outcomes from the REVIVAL-2 trial. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled REVIVAL-2 study, 114 patients with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were enrolled five days after successful reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were assigned to receive 10 µg/kg G-CSF (n=56) or placebo (n=58) for five days. The primary endpoint for this long-term outcome analysis was the composite of death, myocardial infarction or stroke seven years after randomisation. The endpoint occurred in 14.3 % of patients in the G-CSF group versus 17.2 % assigned to placebo (p=0.67). The combined incidence of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 14.3 % of the patients assigned to G-CSF and 15.5 % of the patients assigned to placebo (p=0.85). In conclusion, these long-term follow-up data show that G-CSF does not improve clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  19. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Ameliorates Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mice and Improves Proliferation of SOD1-G93A Myoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rando, Amaya; Gasco, Samanta; de la Torre, Miriam; García-Redondo, Alberto; Zaragoza, Pilar; Toivonen, Janne M; Osta, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes loss of upper and lower motor neurons as well as skeletal muscle (SKM) dysfunction and atrophy. SKM is one of the tissues involved in the development of ALS pathology, and studies in a SOD1-G93A mouse model of ALS have demonstrated alterations in SKM degeneration/regeneration marker expression in vivo and defective mutant myoblast proliferation in vitro. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to alleviate SOD1-G93A pathology. However, it is unknown whether G-CSF may have a direct effect on SKM or derived myoblasts. To investigate effects of G-CSF and its analog pegfilgrastim (PEGF) on SOD1-G93A- associated SKM markers in vivo and those of G-CSF on myoblast proliferation in vitro. The effect of PEGF treatment on hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, survival, and motor function was determined. RNA expression of SKM markers associated with mutant SOD1 expression was quantified in response to PEGF treatment in vivo, and the effect of G-CSF on the proliferation of myoblasts derived from mutant and control muscles was determined in vitro. Positive effects of PEGF on hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, survival, and functional assays in SOD1-G93A animals were confirmed. In vivo PEGF treatment augmented the expression of its receptor Csf3r and alleviated typical markers for mutant SOD1 muscle. Additionally, G-CSF was found to directly increase the proliferation of SOD1-G93A, but not wild-type primary myoblasts in vitro. Our results support the beneficial role of the G-CSF analog PEGF in a SOD1-G93A model of ALS. Thus, G-CSF and its analogs may be directly beneficial in diseases where the SKM function is compromised. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor administration among hemoglobin S trait donors: A single center experience from the Eastern Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Aslı; Tepebası, Songul; Aytan, Pelin; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoglu, Ilknur; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan

    2017-07-12

    Assessment of Hemoglobin S trait donors has gained importance together with the increased allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplant activity for sickle cell disease in the regions where the disease is prevalent. Outcomes of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) administration are obscure for hemoglobin S trait donors. This study aims at investigating the incidence of hemoglobin S carrier status and outcomes of G-CSF administration among donors who live in Eastern Mediterranean region. The cross-sectional, single-center cohort study was performed with 147 donors between January 2013 and March 2017. Prevalence of hemoglobin S trait was estimated and subjects with or without Hemogobin S trait were compared with regard to stem cell characteristics, early and late clinical outcomes after G-CSF administration. Eleven out of 147 donors (7.48%) were found as hemoglobin S trait. G-CSF administration was successfully completed and yielded good harvesting results in hemoglobin S trait donors. No statistically significant difference was found between groups with regard to early and late side effects, stem cell characteristics. Blood pressures and QTc values were within normal ranges in both groups. Groups were similar with regard to CD34 values. G-CSF seems safe in hemoglobin S trait donors. Their being eligible as donors would increase the chance of the patients for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in high prevalence regions. Further studies are required to reveal the safety profile of G-SCF in hemoglobin S carriers in different regions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Enhanced activation of B cells in a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell graft.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, H; Lapierre, V; Saas, P; Lienard, A; Sutton, L; Milpied, N; Attal, M; Cahn, J Y; Kuentz, M; Blaise, D; Hervé, P; Tiberghien, P; Robinet, E

    2001-09-01

    In a randomized study that compared human leucocyte antigen-identical allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) versus bone marrow (BM) transplantation, the expression of activation markers, CD23, CD25 and CD45RO by B cells, was compared in blood before and after G-CSF mobilization and in PBSC versus BM grafts. The fractions of CD23+ and CD25+ B cells were higher in PBSC than in BM grafts. Moreover, we observed a G-CSF-induced increase in B-cell fractions in blood as well as in PBSC grafts when compared with BM grafts. Such an enhanced B-cell activation could contribute to the accelerated kinetics of immuno-haematological reconstitution, the occurrence of acute haemolysis in the ABO minor incompatibility setting, as well as the increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease observed after PBSC transplantation.

  2. Administration of alemtuzumab and G-CSF to adults with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Isnard, Françoise; Garderet, Laurent; Ikhlef, Souhila; Corm, Selim; Quesnel, Bruno; Legrand, Ollivier; Cachanado, Marine; Rousseau, Alexandra; Laporte, Jean-Philippe

    2013-10-01

    The outlook for adults with refractory and relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is poor. CD52 is expressed in most patients with ALL. Alemtuzumab is an anti-CD52 humanized monoclonal antibody. This phase II study assessed the efficacy of alemtuzumab combined with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to boost antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity mediated by neutrophils. Twelve patients with relapsed (n = 11) or refractory (n = 1) ALL, including four relapses postallogeneic stem cell transplantation, were treated and monitored between October 2006 and January 2011. Patients received 1 wk of alemtuzumab every other day at increasing doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg to test tolerance and 30 mg three times a week for 12-18 infusions. If in complete remission (CR), patients received maintenance therapy for 1 wk, every 2 months. G-CSF was administered at 5 μg/kg per day during alemtuzumab administration. The primary endpoint was disappearance of blast cells on a marrow aspirate. CD52 was expressed in all patients. Four patients reached CR. In one additional patient, clearance of blast cells was observed in peripheral blood but not in the marrow. The most frequent adverse events during course 1 of treatment were fever and chills (n = 3), skin rash (n = 3), and bronchospasm (n = 2). Tumor lysis syndrome was observed at treatment initiation in one patient who reached CR. All patients progressed within a few months and all but one died. The surviving patient is still alive after relapse and a second allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This study shows that in relapse/refractory ALL, alemtuzumab with G-CSF can produce good responses of short duration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. G-CSF Receptor Positive Neuroblastoma Subpopulations are Enriched in Chemotherapy –Resistant or Relapsed Tumors and are Highly Tumorigenic

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Danielle M.; Agarwal, Saurabh; Benham, Ashley; Coarfa, Cristian; Trahan, Denae N.; Chen, Zaowen; Stowers, Paris N.; Courtney, Amy N.; Lakoma, Anna; Barbieri, Eveline; Metelitsa, Leonid S.; Gunaratne, Preethi; Kim, Eugene S.; Shohet, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a neural crest derived embryonal malignancy which accounts for 13% of all pediatric cancer mortality, primarily due to tumor recurrence. Therapy-resistant cancer stem cells are implicated in tumor relapse, but definitive phenotypic evidence of the existence of these cells has been lacking. In this study, we define a highly tumorigenic subpopulation in neuroblastoma with stem cell characteristics, based on the expression of CD114, which encodes the receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). CD114+ cells isolated from a primary tumor and the NGP cell line by flow cytometry were highly tumorigenic and capable of both self-renewal and differentiation to progeny cells. CD114+ cells closely resembled embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells with respect to their profiles of cell cycle, microRNA and gene expression. In addition, they reflect a primitive undifferentiated neuroectodermal/neural crest phenotype revealing a developmental hierarchy within neuroblastoma tumors. We detected this de-differentiated neural crest subpopulation in all established neuroblastoma cell lines, xenograft tumors, and primary tumor specimens analyzed. Ligand activation of CD114 by the addition of exogenous G-CSF to CD114+ cells confirmed intact STAT3 upregulation, characteristic of G-CSF receptor signaling. Together our data describe a novel distinct subpopulation within neuroblastoma with enhanced tumorigenicity and a stem-cell like phenotype, further elucidating the complex heterogeneity of solid tumors such as neuroblastoma. We propose this subpopulation may represent an additional target for novel therapeutic approaches to this aggressive pediatric malignancy. PMID:23687340

  4. G-CSF Priming, Clofarabine, and High Dose Cytarabine (GCLAC) for Upfront Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Pamela S.; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Stein, Anthony S.; Othus, Megan; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Scott, Bart L.; Hendrie, Paul C.; Gardner, Kelda M.; Pagel, John M.; Walter, Roland B.; Parks, Cynthia; Wood, Brent L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2016-01-01

    Prior study of the combination of clofarabine and high dose cytarabine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming (GCLAC) in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia resulted in a 46% rate of complete remission despite unfavorable risk cytogenetics. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the remission rate and survival with GCLAC were superior to FLAG (fludarabine, cytarabine, G-CSF) in the relapsed setting. We therefore initiated a study of the GCLAC regimen in the upfront setting in a multicenter trial. The objectives were to evaluate the rates of complete remission (CR), overall and relapse-free survival (OS and RFS), and toxicity of GCLAC. Clofarabine was administered at 30 mg/m2/day × 5 and cytarabine at 2 gm/m2/day × 5 after G-CSF priming in 50 newly-diagnosed patients ages 18–64 with AML or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Responses were assessed in the different cytogenetic risk groups and in patients with antecedent hematologic disorder. The overall CR rate was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64–88%) and the CR + CRp (CR with incomplete platelet count recovery) was 82% (95% CI 71–93%). The CR rate was 100% for patients with favorable, 84% for those with intermediate, and 62% for those with unfavorable risk cytogenetics. For patients with an antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD), the CR rate was 65%, compared to 85% for those without an AHD. The 60 day mortality was 2%. Thus, front line GCLAC is a well-tolerated, effective induction regimen for AML and advanced myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative disorders. PMID:25545153

  5. G-CSF priming, clofarabine, and high dose cytarabine (GCLAC) for upfront treatment of acute myeloid leukemia, advanced myelodysplastic syndrome or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Becker, Pamela S; Medeiros, Bruno C; Stein, Anthony S; Othus, Megan; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Forman, Stephen J; Scott, Bart L; Hendrie, Paul C; Gardner, Kelda M; Pagel, John M; Walter, Roland B; Parks, Cynthia; Wood, Brent L; Abkowitz, Janis L; Estey, Elihu H

    2015-04-01

    Prior study of the combination of clofarabine and high dose cytarabine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming (GCLAC) in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia resulted in a 46% rate of complete remission despite unfavorable risk cytogenetics. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the remission rate and survival with GCLAC were superior to FLAG (fludarabine, cytarabine, G-CSF) in the relapsed setting. We therefore initiated a study of the GCLAC regimen in the upfront setting in a multicenter trial. The objectives were to evaluate the rates of complete remission (CR), overall and relapse-free survival (OS and RFS), and toxicity of GCLAC. Clofarabine was administered at 30 mg m(-2) day(-1) × 5 and cytarabine at 2 g m(-2) day(-1) × 5 after G-CSF priming in 50 newly-diagnosed patients ages 18-64 with AML or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Responses were assessed in the different cytogenetic risk groups and in patients with antecedent hematologic disorder. The overall CR rate was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64-88%) and the CR + CRp (CR with incomplete platelet count recovery) was 82% (95% CI 71-93%). The CR rate was 100% for patients with favorable, 84% for those with intermediate, and 62% for those with unfavorable risk cytogenetics. For patients with an antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD), the CR rate was 65%, compared to 85% for those without an AHD. The 60 day mortality was 2%. Thus, front line GCLAC is a well-tolerated, effective induction regimen for AML and advanced myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative disorders.

  6. A Novel Combinatorial Therapy With Pulp Stem Cells and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Total Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications. PMID:23761108

  7. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor Producing Anaplastic Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Vinzens, Sarah; Zindel, Joel; Zweifel, Martin; Rau, Tilman; Gloor, Beat; Wochner, Annette

    2017-01-01

    We report on the case of a 67-year-old man with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Preoperative routine tests revealed an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count of 25.2 G/l, consisting almost exclusively of neutrophilic granulocytes (23.31 G/l) with a predominance of segmented neutrophils (78% of all neutrophilic granulocytes), and elevated levels of C-reactive protein at 87 mg/l. Upon surgery, local tumour infiltration was more extensive than expected from preoperative imaging. However, no peritoneal dissemination was found and curative resection was attempted. Only seven days after the operation, signs of relapse were seen upon computed tomograpy. Histology revealed an undifferentiated anaplastic carcinoma, on the basis of a poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated G-CSF and G-CSF-Receptor expression in some CD68-positive syncytial macrophages. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in serum was elevated at 5.6 pg/ml, which further raised to 43 pg/ml one week after FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy (oxaliplatin, irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil), while WBC decreased from 103.3 G/l to 59.3 G/l. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in serum was normal (<0.5 pg/ml). The patient died on postoperative day 34.

  8. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  9. Long-active granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Laszlo, Daniele; Lanza, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Peg-filgrastim (PEG-FIL), a polyethylene glycol-conjugated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), has been introduced in clinical practice and is effective in shortening the time of neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy. G-CSF has emerged as the preferred cytokine for hematopoietic progenitor cells' (HPC) mobilization. Nevertheless, data on the ability of PEG-FIL in this field have been published. We review publications in the field with the goal of providing an overview of this approach. PEG-FIL may be able to mobilize CD34(+) cells in a more timely fashion than G-CSF, with the advantages of only a single-dose administration, an earlier start and a reduction in the number of apheresis procedures. The main controversies concern the dosage of the drug and the optimal dose. In the context of chemo-mobilization, a single dose of 6 mg PEG-FIL seems effective in terms of HPC's mobilization and there is no increase in this effect if the dose is doubled to 12 mg. Steady-state mobilization requires higher doses of PEG-FIL and this approach is not cost-effective when compared with G-CSF. The experiences with PEG-FIL in the healthy donor setting are very limited.

  10. Deficiency of PI3-Kinase catalytic isoforms p110γ and p110δ in mice enhances the IL-17/G-CSF axis and induces neutrophilia.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Kirsten; Schmitt, Fee; Mothes, Benedikt; Blumendeller, Carolin; Schäll, Daniel; Piekorz, Roland; Hirsch, Emilio; Nürnberg, Bernd; Beer-Hammer, Sandra

    2017-07-19

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) and PI3Kδ are second messenger-generating enzymes with key roles in proliferation, differentiation, survival, and function of leukocytes. Deficiency of the catalytic subunits p110γ and p110δ of PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ in p110γ/δ(-/-) mice leads to defective B- and T-cell homeostasis. Here we examined the role of p110γ and p110δ in the homeostasis of neutrophils by analyzing p110γ(-/-), p110δ(-/-) and p110γ/δ(-/-) mice. Neutrophils and T cells in leukocyte suspensions from the bone marrow (BM), blood, spleen and lung were analyzed by flow cytometry. Serum concentrations of IL-17, of the neutrophilic growth factor G-CSF, and of the neutrophil mobilizing CXC chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were measured by Bio-Plex assay. Production of G-CSF and CXCL1/KC by IL-17-stimulated primary lung tissue cells were determined by ELISA, whereas IL-17-dependent signaling in lung tissue cells was analyzed by measuring Akt phosphorylation using immunoblot. We found that in contrast to single knock-out mice, p110γ/δ(-/-) mice exhibited significantly elevated neutrophil counts in blood, spleen, and lung. Increased granulocytic differentiation stages in the bone marrow of p110γ/δ(-/-) mice were paralleled by increased serum concentrations of G-CSF, CXCL1/KC, and CXCL2/MIP-2. As IL-17 induces neutrophilia via the induction of G-CSF and CXC chemokines, we measured IL-17 and IL-17-producing T cells. IL-17 serum concentrations and frequencies of IL-17(+) splenic T cells were significantly increased in p110γ/δ(-/-) mice. Moreover, IFN-γ(+), IL-4(+), and IL-5(+) T cell subsets were drastically increased in p110γ/δ(-/-) mice, suggesting that IL-17(+) T cells were up-regulated in the context of a general percentage increase of other cytokine producing T cell subsets. We found that p110γ/δ deficiency in mice induces complex immunological changes, which might in concert contribute to neutrophilia. These findings emphasize a crucial but

  11. A pilot study of continuous infusion Ara-C in combination with rhG-CSF in relapsed childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Laver, J; Shearer, P; Krance, R; Hurwitz, C A; Srivastava, D K; Weinstein, H J; Mirro, J

    1997-08-01

    Relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) following intensive chemotherapy bears a bad prognosis. We treated 18 children with relapsed AML on two separate protocols that included continuous infusion (CI) of cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) (total dose 4gr-6gr/m2) over 96-120 hours. In an attempt to increase the fraction of blasts in S-phase and render them more sensitive to cell-cycle specific agents such as ara-C, 10 patients received 5mcg/kg rhG-CSF twice daily beginning 48 hours before and continuing through the duration of the CI ara-C (POG #9192 study). The percentage of cells is S phase before and after G-CSF administration was determined. In a second group of patients (n = 8) who received ara-C alone, endogenous concentrations of G-CSF and serial blood counts were measured (St Jude's R4 study). The rationale of the St Jude's R4 was to optimize the schedule of the second course of ara-C at a time when the patient's endogenous G-CSF concentration was increased and thus maximize the percent of cells captured in S phase. Four out of 8 patients receiving CI ara-C alone and 4 out of 10 patients receiving CI ara-C with rhG-CSF achieved a complete remission (CR) after 1 cycle of therapy. Four patients in CR underwent marrow transplantation (2 allogeneic and 2 autologous). Cell cycle analysis of blast cells cultured in vitro with or without G-CSF showed a two fold increase in the percentage of cells in S phase (P = 0.03) whereas cells obtained from patients before and after G-CSF administration showed no difference in cell cycling. Correlation between G-CSF concentrations and ANC showed a negative association indicating that the regulatory mechanisms for G-CSF production remained intact. In our relatively small series, CI ara-C achieved a CR rate of 44% with rhG-CSF having no effect on the remission rate. Although in vitro rhG-CSF increased the percentage of blasts in S phase significantly, in vivo effects were not observed. Larger studies with combinations of different

  12. Attitudes of physicians toward assessing risk and using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as primary prophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy associated with an intermediate risk of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Freyer, Gilles; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Marinca, Mihai; Tonini, Giuseppe; Ng, Say Liang; Wong, Zee Wan; Salar, Antonio; Steger, Guenther; Abdelsalam, Mahmoud; DeCosta, Lucy; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-10-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a potentially fatal complication of chemotherapy. This prospective, observational study describes physicians' approaches toward assessing FN risk in patients receiving chemotherapy regimens with an intermediate (10-20 %) FN risk. In the baseline investigator assessment, physicians selected factors considered important when assessing overall FN risk and deciding on granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis (PP). Physicians then completed patient assessments using the same lists of factors. The final FN risk scores and whether G-CSF PP was planned were reported. The final analysis included 165 physicians and 944 patients. The most frequently considered factor in both assessments was chemotherapy agents in the backbone (88 % of investigator and 93 % of patient assessments). History of FN (83 %), baseline laboratory values (76 %) and age (73 %) were commonly selected at baseline, whereas tumor type (72 %), guidelines (62 %) and tumor stage (43 %) were selected most during patient assessments. Median investigator-reported FN risk threshold for G-CSF PP was 20 % (range 10-85 %). G-CSF PP was planned in 82 % of patients with an FN risk at or above this threshold; therefore, almost one-fifth of qualifying patients would not receive G-CSF PP. Physicians generally follow guidelines, but also consider individual patient characteristics when assessing FN risk and deciding on G-CSF PP. A standardized FN risk assessment may optimize the use of G-CSF PP, which may minimize the incidence of FN in patients undergoing chemotherapy with an intermediate FN risk. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01813721.

  13. Effect of G-CSF on oral mucositis and traumatic ulcers produced in the tongue of rats undergoing radiotherapy: clinical and histologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Juliana; Roithmann, Sérgio; Camilotti, Renata Stifelman; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; Zancanaro de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on oral mucositis (OM) and on the healing of traumatic ulcers produced in the tongue of rats undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Twenty-seven Wistar rats were assigned to four groups: (1) RT + traumatic ulcer + filgrastim (G-CSF analog; n = 7); (2) RT + traumatic ulcer + saline (n = 7); (3) no RT + traumatic ulcer + filgrastim (n = 7); and (4) no RT + traumatic ulcer (n = 6). The radiation dose was 30 Gy, and medication was filgrastim (10 μg/kg) for 7 days. Clinically, groups differed in the presence (Fisher's exact test: P = .008) and size of traumatic ulcers after irradiation (Kruskal-Wallis test: P = .032) and in the severity of OM (Fisher's exact test: P = .005 between the irradiated groups). Histologically, there was an increased inflammatory response in the nonirradiated groups (Fisher's exact test: P = .001). Filgrastim reduced manifestations and the severity of trauma-induced ulcers and radiation-induced OM. Significant differences were not observed histologically between the study drug and respective control groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The promotion of breast cancer metastasis caused by inhibition of CSF-1R/CSF-1 signaling is blocked by targeting the G-CSF receptor.

    PubMed

    Swierczak, Agnieszka; Cook, Andrew D; Lenzo, Jason C; Restall, Christina M; Doherty, Judy P; Anderson, Robin L; Hamilton, John A

    2014-08-01

    Treatment options are limited for patients with breast cancer presenting with metastatic disease. Targeting of tumor-associated macrophages through the inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), a key macrophage signaling pathway, has been reported to reduce tumor growth and metastasis, and these treatments are now in clinical trials. Here, we report that, surprisingly, treatment with neutralizing anti-CSF-1R and anti-CSF-1 antibodies, or with two different small-molecule inhibitors of CSF-1R, could actually increase spontaneous metastasis without altering primary tumor growth in mice bearing two independently derived mammary tumors. The blockade of CSF-1R or CSF-1 led to increased levels of serum G-CSF, increased frequency of neutrophils in the primary tumor and in the metastasis-associated lung, as well as increased numbers of neutrophils and Ly6C(hi) monocytes in the peripheral blood. Neutralizing antibody against the G-CSF receptor, which regulates neutrophil development and function, reduced the enhanced metastasis and neutrophil numbers that resulted from CSF-1R blockade. These results indicate that the role of the CSF-1R/CSF-1 system in breast cancer is far more complex than originally proposed, and requires further investigation as a therapeutic target.

  15. Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 enhances G-CSF-induced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Song, Xuguang; Ma, Sha; Wang, Xue; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Huanxin; Wu, Qingyun; Zhao, Kai; Cao, Jiang; Qiao, Jianlin; Sun, Xiaoshen; Li, Depeng; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhengyu; Xu, Kailin

    2015-01-01

    G-CSF is the most often used agent in clinical hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. However, in about 10 % of patients, G-CSF does not efficiently mobilize HSPC in clinically sufficient amounts. Cdc42 activity is involved in HSPC mobilization. In the present study, we explore the impact of Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 on G-CSF-mediated HSPC mobilization in mice. We found that the use of ML141 alone only triggered modest HSPC mobilization effect in mice. However, combination of G-CSF and ML141 significantly promoted HPSC counts and colony forming units in peripheral blood, as compared to mice treated with G-CSF alone. ML141 did not significantly alter the levels of SDF-1 and MMP-9 in the bone marrow, when used alone or in combination with G-CSF. We also found that G-CSF administration significantly increases the level of GTP-bound Cdc42, but does not alter the expression of Cdc42 in the bone marrow. Our data indicate that the Cdc42 signal is a negative regulator in G-CSF-mediated HSPC mobilization, and that inhibition of the Cdc42 signal efficiently improves mobilization efficiency. These findings may provide a new strategy for efficient HSPC mobilization, especially in patients with poor G-CSF response.

  16. G-CSF plus preemptive plerixafor vs hyperfractionated CY plus G-CSF for autologous stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma: effectiveness, safety and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Antar, A; Otrock, Z K; Kharfan-Dabaja, M A; Ghaddara, H A; Kreidieh, N; Mahfouz, R; Bazarbachi, A

    2015-06-01

    The optimal stem cell mobilization regimen for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) remains undefined. We retrospectively compared our experience in hematopoietic cell mobilization in 83 MM patients using fractionated high-dose CY and G-CSF with G-CSF plus preemptive plerixafor. All patients in the CY group (n=56) received fractionated high-dose CY (5 g/m(2) divided into five doses of 1 g/m(2) every 3 h) with G-CSF. All patients in the plerixafor group (n=27) received G-CSF and plerixafor preemptively based on an established algorithm. Compared with plerixafor, CY use was associated with higher total CD34+ cell yield (7.5 × 10(6) vs 15.5 × 10(6) cells/kg, P=0.005). All patients in both groups yielded ⩾4 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Conversely, CY use was associated with high frequency of febrile neutropenia, blood and platelet transfusions need and hospitalizations. The average total cost of mobilization in Lebanon was slightly higher in the plerixafor group ($7886 vs $7536; P=0.16). Our data indicate robust stem cell mobilization in MM patients with either fractionated high-dose CY and G-CSF or G-CSF alone with preemptive plerixafor. The chemo-mobilization approach was associated with twofold stem cell yield, slightly lower cost but significantly increased toxicity.

  17. Survival enhancement and hemopoietic regeneration following radiation exposure: Therapeutic approach using glucan and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M. )

    1990-10-01

    C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to whole-body cobalt-60 radiation and administered soluble glucan (5 mg i.v. at 1 h following exposure), recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; 2.5 micrograms/day s.c., days 3-12 following exposure), or both agents. Treatments were evaluated for their ability to enhance hemopoietic regeneration, and to increase survival after radiation-induced myelosuppression. Both glucan and G-CSF enhanced hemopoietic regeneration alone; however, greater effects were observed in mice receiving both agents. For example, on day 17 following a sublethal 6.5-Gy radiation exposure, mice treated with saline, G-CSF, glucan, or both agents, respectively, exhibited 36%, 65%, 50%, and 78% of normal bone marrow cellularity, and 84%, 175%, 152%, and 212% of normal splenic cellularity. At this same time, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) values in saline, G-CSF, glucan, or combination-treated mice, respectively, were 9%, 46%, 26%, and 57% of normal bone marrow values, and 57%, 937%, 364%, and 1477% of normal splenic values. Endogenous spleen colony formation was also increased in all treatment groups, with combination-treated mice exhibiting the greatest effects. Likewise, although both glucan and G-CSF alone enhanced survival following an 8-Gy radiation exposure, greatest survival was observed in mice treated with both agents. These studies suggest that glucan, a macrophage activator, can synergize with G-CSF to further accelerate hemopoietic regeneration and increase survival following radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  18. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor improves Parkinson's disease associated with co-morbid depression: An experimental exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ajay; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Medhi, Bikash

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by muscle and movement disorder, often associated with depression. PD is very difficult to treat. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF in PD associated with depression. Materials and Methods: Adult Wistar male rats weighing about 180-250 g were selected and divided into five groups in parallel designed method namely; control group (n = 5); sham operated group (n = 5); Vehicle group (n = 5); G-CSF group (70 μg/kg, s.c.) (n = 5) and L-DOPA group (n = 5). The rats were treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on day 0 and then treatment was continued for 14 day of L-DOPA/carbidopa, whereas G-CSF (70 μg/kg, s.c.) was given from day 1 to 6. Thereafter, adhesive removal and forced swim tests were conducted to evaluate the behavioral outcome of G-CSF treatment. The finding was correlated and analyzed with Nissl staining findings for the final conclusion. Results: The behavioral parameters were assessed and found to be ameliorate the symptoms of Parkinson's and reduced the depression like behavior in PD. The histological findings were supported the behavioral findings and showed pathological improvement. Conclusion: As a preliminary work, the present study first time suggested that G-CSF have a potential role in PD and associated depression. PMID:24347771

  19. Toxoplasma gondii Induces Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Secretion by Human Fibroblasts: Implications for Neutrophil Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Channon, Jacqueline Y.; Miselis, Kristin A.; Minns, Laurie A.; Dutta, Chaitali; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2002-01-01

    Human neutrophils are rescued from apoptosis following incubation with once-washed, fibroblast-derived Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. Both infected and uninfected neutrophils are rescued, implicating a soluble mediator. In this study we investigated the origin and identity of this soluble mediator. Neutrophils were incubated either with purified tachyzoites or with conditioned medium derived from T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. Conditioned medium was found to be a potent stimulus that delayed neutrophil apoptosis up to 72 h, whereas purified and extensively washed tachyzoites had no effect. Delayed apoptosis correlated with up-regulation of the neutrophil antiapoptotic protein, Mcl-1, and the neutrophil interleukin 3 receptor α subunit (IL-3Rα), suggesting a role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were measurable in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF and G-CSF were additive in abrogating delayed neutrophil apoptosis induced by conditioned medium. Inhibitors of Src family tyrosine kinases, Gi proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p44erk1 and p42erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Jak2 kinases partially attenuated the effect of conditioned medium, consistent with a role for G-CSF and/or GM-CSF. Hence, delayed neutrophil apoptosis is mediated by GM-CSF and G-CSF secreted by T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. This enhanced neutrophil survival may contribute to the robust proinflammatory response elicited in the T. gondii-infected host. PMID:12379681

  20. Expression cloning of a human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor: a structural mosaic of hematopoietin receptor, immunoglobulin, and fibronectin domains

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation from a placental library, of two cDNAs that can encode high affinity receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) when expressed in COS-7 cells. The cDNAs are predicted to encode integral membrane proteins of 759 and 812 amino acids in length. The predicted extracellular and membrane spanning sequences of the two clones are identical, as are the first 96 amino acids of their respective cytoplasmic regions. Different COOH termini of 34 or 87 residues are predicted for the two cDNAs, due apparently to alternate splicing. The receptor with the longer cytoplasmic domain is the closest human homologue of the murine G-CSF receptor recently described by Fukunaga et al. (Fukunaga, R., E. Ishizaka-Ikeda, Y. Seto, and S. Nagata. 1990. Cell. 61:341). A hybridization probe derived from the placental G-CSF receptor cDNA detects a approximately 3-kb transcript in RNAs isolated from placenta and a number of lymphoid and myeloid cells. The extracellular region of the G-CSF receptors is composed of four distinct types of structural domains, previously recognized in other cell surface proteins. In addition to the two domains of the HP receptor family-defining region (Patthy, L. 1990. Cell. 61:13) it incorporates one NH2-terminal Ig-like domain, and three additional repeats of fibronectin type III-like domains. The presence of both an NH2-terminal Ig-like domain and multiple membrane-proximal FN3-like domains suggests that the G-CSF receptor may be derived from an ancestral NCAM-like molecule and that the G-CSF receptor may function in some adhesion or recognition events at the cell surface in addition to the binding of G-CSF. PMID:2147944

  1. Platelet lysate and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor serve safe and accelerated expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Autologous human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) should be expanded in the animal serum-free condition within clinically relevant periods in order to secure safe and effective cell therapy for ischemic stroke. This study was aimed to assess whether the hBMSCs enhance their proliferation capacity and provide beneficial effect in the infarct brain when cultured with platelet lysate (PL) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The hBMSCs were cultured in the fetal calf serum (FCS)-, PL-, or PL/G-CSF-containing medium. Cell growth kinetics was analyzed. The hBMSCs-PL, hBMSC-PL/G-CSF, or vehicle was stereotactically transplanted into the ipsilateral striatum of the rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion 7 days after the insult. Motor function was assessed for 8 weeks, and the fate of transplanted hBMSCs was examined using immunohistochemistry. As the results, the hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF showed more enhanced proliferation than the hBMSCs-FCS and hBMSCs-PL. Transplantation of hBMSCs expanded with the PL- or PL/G-CSF-containing medium equally promoted functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. Histological analysis revealed that there were no significant differences in their migration, survival, and neural differentiation in the infarct brain between the hBMSCs-PL and hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF. These findings strongly suggest that the combination of PL and G-CSF may accelerate hBMSC expansion and serve safe cell therapy for patients with ischemic stroke at clinically relevant timing.

  2. The addition of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor shifts the dose limiting toxicity and markedly increases the maximum tolerated dose and activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor SB-743921 in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma: results of an international, multicenter phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Owen A; Gerecitano, John; Van Deventer, Henrik; Hainsworth, John; Zullo, Kelly M; Saikali, Khalil; Seroogy, Joseph; Wolff, Andrew; Escandón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This was a phase I study of SB-743921 (SB-921) in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma. Previous studies established that neutropenia was the only dose limiting toxicity (DLT). The primary objective was to determine the DLT, maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of SB-921 with and without granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Sixty-eight patients were enrolled, 42 without G-CSF, 26 with G-CSF. In the cohort without G-CSF, SB-921 doses ranged from 2 to 7 mg/m(2), with 6 mg/m(2) being the MTD. In the cohort with G-CSF support, doses of 6-10 mg/m(2) were administered, with 9 mg/m(2) being the MTD, representing a 50% increase in dose density. Fifty-six patients were evaluable for efficacy. Four of 55 patients experienced a partial response (three in Hodgkin lymphoma and one in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, all at doses ≥ 6 mg/m(2)); 19 patients experienced stable disease, 33 patients developed progression of disease. G-CSF shifted the DLT from neutropenia to thrombocytopenia, allowing for a 50% increase in dose density. Responses were seen at higher doses with G-CSF support.

  3. Effect of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Combined Conditioning in Cord Blood Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Retrospective Study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Aoki, Jun; Onishi, Yasushi; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Mori, Takehiko; Masuko, Masayoshi; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Miyamura, Kouichi; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kato, Seiko; Asano, Shigetaka; Takami, Akiyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2015-09-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) increases the susceptibility of dormant malignant or nonmalignant hematopoietic cells to cytarabine arabinoside (Ara-C) through the induction of cell cycle entry. Therefore, G-CSF-combined conditioning before allogeneic stem cell transplantation might positively contribute to decreased incidences of relapse and graft failure without having to increase the dose of cytotoxic drugs. We conducted a retrospective nationwide study of 336 adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) after single-unit cord blood transplantation (CBT) who underwent 4 different kinds of conditioning regimens: total body irradiation (TBI) ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C/G-CSF + cyclophosphamide (CY) (n = 65), TBI ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C + CY (n = 119), TBI ≥ 8 Gy + other (n = 104), or TBI < 8 Gy or non-TBI (n = 48). The TBI ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C/G-CSF + CY regimen showed significantly higher incidence of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 2.08; P = .009) and lower overall mortality (hazard ratio, .46; 95% CI, .26 to .82; P = .008) rates compared with those without a G-CSF regimen. This retrospective study shows that the G-CSF-combined conditioning regimen provides better engraftment and survival results in CBT for adults with MDS and sAML.

  4. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma patients treat in the novel therapy-era with plerixafor and G-CSF has superior efficacy but significantly higher costs compared to mobilization with low-dose cyclophosphamide and G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Lubna; Awan, Farrukh; Cumpston, Aaron; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Tse, William; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    Studies comparing the efficacy and cost of peripheral blood stem and progenitor cells mobilization with low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CY) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) against plerixafor and G-CSF, in multiple myeloma (MM) patients treated in the novel therapy-era are not available. Herein, we report mobilization outcomes of 107 patients who underwent transplantation within 1-year of starting induction chemotherapy with novel agents. Patients undergoing mobilization with LD-CY (1.5 gm/m(2)) and G-CSF (n = 74) were compared against patients receiving plerixafor and G-CSF (n = 33). Compared to plerixafor, LD-CY was associated with a significantly lower median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (68/µL vs. 36/µL, P = 0.048), and lower CD34+ cell yield on day 1 of collection (6.9 × 10(6)/kg vs. 2.4 × 10(6)/kg, P = 0.001). Six patients (8.1%) in the LD-CY group experienced mobilization failure, compared to none in the plerixafor group. The total CD34+ cell yield was significantly higher in the plerixafor group (median 11.6 × 10(6)/kg vs. 7 × 10(6)/kg; P-value = 0.001). Mobilization with LD-CY was associated with increased (albeit statistically non-significant) episodes of febrile neutropenia (5.4% vs. 0%; P = 0.24), higher use of intravenous antibiotics (6.7% vs. 3%; P = 0.45), and need for hospitalizations (9.4% vs. 3%; P = 0.24). The average total cost of mobilization in the plerixafor group was significantly higher compared to the LD-CY group ($28,980 vs. $19,626.5 P-value < 0.0001). In conclusion, in MM plerixafor-based mobilization has superior efficacy, but significantly higher mobilization costs compared to LD-CY mobilization. Our data caution against the use of LD-CY in MM patients for mobilization, especially after induction with lenalidomide-containing regimens.

  5. Effect of Periodic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Administration on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Different Monocyte Subsets in Pediatric Patients with Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Grubczak, Kamil; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Miklasz, Paula; Singh, Paulina; Radzikowska, Urszula; Kulak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle dysfunction. There is a large body of evidence indicating that angiogenesis is impaired in muscles of MD patients. Therefore, induction of dystrophic muscle revascularization should become a novel approach aimed at diminishing the extent of myocyte damage. Recently, we and others demonstrated that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) resulted in clinical improvement of patients with neuromuscular disorders. To date, however, the exact mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of G-CSF have not been fully understood. Here we used flow cytometry to quantitate numbers of CD34+ cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and different monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of pediatric MD patients treated with repetitive courses of G-CSF administration. We showed that repetitive cycles of G-CSF administration induced efficient mobilization of above-mentioned cells including cells with proangiogenic potential. These findings contribute to better understanding the beneficial clinical effects of G-CSF in pediatric MD patients. PMID:26770204

  6. Tachyplesin III and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor enhance the efficacy of tazobactam/piperacillin in a neutropenic mouse model of polymicrobial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Kamysz, Wojciech; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Mocchegiani, Federico; Di Matteo, Fabio; Kamysz, Elzbieta; Riva, Alessandra; Rocchi, Marco; Saba, Vittorio; Scalise, Giorgio; Giacometti, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of tazobactam/piperacillin (TZP), tachyplesin III and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in an experimental murine neutropenic intraabdominal infection. BALB/c male mice were rendered neutropenic by intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide on days -4 and -2 pre-infection. Septic shock was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Animals received intravenously isotonic sodium chloride solution (control group C1), 1mg/kg of tachyplesin III, 120 mg/kg of TZP, 0.1mg/kg of G-CSF, tachyplesin III plus TZP, G-CSF plus TZP and finally tachyplesin III plus G-CSF plus TZP, respectively. Lethality, bacterial growth in blood, peritoneum, spleen, liver, and mesenteric lymph nodes, endotoxin, IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations in plasma were evaluated. All compounds reduced the lethality when compared to controls. Endotoxin and cytokine plasma levels were significantly higher in TZP-treated animals compared to tachyplesin III-treated animals. Finally, all drug combinations showed to be the most effective treatment in reducing all variables measured. Interestingly, the strongest results concerning the bacterial growth inhibition, lethality and endotoxemia were obtained when the three compounds were contemporaneously administered. The presence of their positive interaction makes tachyplesin III and G-CSF potentially valuable as an adjuvant for antimicrobial chemotherapy of sepsis.

  7. [A case of bladder cancer producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-6 causing respiratory failure treated with neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy along with sivelestat].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kyosuke; Okumi, Masayoshi; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Yazawa, Koji; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Uchida, Kinya; Nonomura, Norio

    2013-07-01

    A 67-year-old man visited an urological clinic with a chief complaint of urination pain. Cystourethroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination revealed a bladder tumor (cT3bN0M0). Marked leukocytosis and respiratory distress with pleural effusion appeared. Pulse steroid therapy improved the general condition partially. The patient was sent to our hospital for further examination. Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were high and the pathological findings of bladder tumor obtained by transurethral resection (TUR) revealed an urothelial carcinoma that produced G-CSF and IL-6. Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy was performed along with use of steroid and sivelestat, which ameliorated the respiratory distress. After three courses of systemic chemotherapy, serum G-CSF and IL-6 normalized and cystoprostatectomy was performed. The patient has been in good health at 20 months after the surgery with no evidence of recurrence.

  8. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis with Crohn's disease exacerbation and vasculitis after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Manners, P; Robbins, P

    2000-10-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), of unknown etiology, is characterized by recurring non-suppurative lesions of bone in multiple sites, and has been considered to be self-limiting. Reported therapies include prolonged antibiotics, corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory medications. This case is presented to illustrate the following: 1) CRMO may be severe, on-going, and unresponsive to treatment; 2) it may be associated with Crohns' disease; 3) the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be associated with severe gastrointestinal vasculitis. A male was treated from ages 11-20 years for CRMO (manifesting as multiple bone lesions), with therapies of variable efficacy (anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, corticosteroids, gammaglobulin and methotrexate). With increasing disruption to his life, a 10-day course of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was given with benefit seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With exacerbation of symptoms one month later, G-CSF was re-commenced but ceased after 3 weeks because of abdominal pain, rectal blood loss, and progression of bone lesions with subsequent removal of portions of ileum, colon and appendix, which showed vasculitis. Months later, a colonoscopy revealed perianastomotic ulcers and continuing gastroenterological ulceration not unlike Crohn's disease. With azathioprine, gut and bone symptoms improved. We conclude that 1) CRMO may adversely affect life for years; 2) proven treatments are unavailable; 3) gastroenterological vasculitis/ Crohn's may be associated with CRMO; 4) MRI is useful for monitoring CRMO; 5) In this patient, G-CSF seemed beneficial initially, but later, vasculitis (possibly Crohn's) manifested, leading to bowel resection; 6) Crohn's disease may have been present for years, masked by corticosteroid, and unmasked by reduction of steroids and use of G-CSF.

  9. Enhancement of Umbilical Cord Blood Cell Hematopoiesis by Maitake Beta-Glucan Is Mediated by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Cheung, Sandy W. Y.; Nesin, Mirjana; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    Maitake beta-glucan (MBG) is an extract from the fruit body of the Grifola frondosa mushroom that is being widely used to treat cancer in Asia. We have previously reported that MBG enhances mouse bone marrow cell (BMC) hematopoiesis in vitro and protects BMC from doxorubicin (DOX) toxicity. In the current study, we investigated the ability of MBG to enhance hematopoiesis and to reduce the toxic effects of DOX on fresh human umbilical cord blood (CB) cells. MBG treatment significantly enhanced the colony formation unit (CFU) response of granulocytes-macrophages (CFU-GM response) over the whole dose range of 12.5 to 100 μg/ml (P < 0.05). The addition of MBG to DOX-treated CB cells significantly protected granulocyte-macrophage colony formation from the toxicity of DOX, which otherwise produced strong hematopoietic repression. MBG also partially replaced recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), as shown by a significant augmentation of the CFU-GM response in the absence of rhG-CSF. We found that MBG induces granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production in CB CD33+ monocytes, as detected by intracellular cytokine flow cytometric assessment. In contrast, we found that adult peripheral blood monocytes did not produce a significant G-CSF response to MBG, whereas both adult and CB monocytes produced G-CSF in response to lipopolysaccharide. These studies provide the first evidence that MBG induces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation of CFU-GM in umbilical CB cells and acts directly to induce G-CSF. PMID:17093103

  10. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors supports hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in sublethally irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Sefc, Ludek; Dusek, Ladislav; Vacek, Antonín; Holá, Jirina; Hoferová, Zuzana; Streitová, Denisa

    2010-08-01

    Research areas of 'post-exposure treatment' and 'cytokines and growth factors' have top priority among studies aimed at radiological nuclear threat countermeasures. The experiments were aimed at testing the ability of N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), an adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, to modulate hematopoiesis in sublethally irradiated mice, when administered alone or in a combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a two-day post-irradiation treatment regimen. A complete analysis of hematopoiesis including determination of numbers of bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and precursor cells, as well as of numbers of peripheral blood cells, was performed. The outcomes of the treatment were assessed at days 3 to 22 after irradiation. IB-MECA alone has been found to induce a significant elevation of numbers of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and peripheral blood neutrophils. IB-MECA given concomitantly with G-CSF increased significantly bone marrow GM-CFC and erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E) in comparison with the controls and with animals administered each of the drugs alone. The findings suggest the ability of IB-MECA to stimulate hematopoiesis and to support the hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in sublethally irradiated mice.

  11. Efficacy of transfusion with granulocytes from G-CSF/dexamethasone–treated donors in neutropenic patients with infection

    PubMed Central

    Boeckh, Michael; Harrison, Ryan W.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Ness, Paul M.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Nichols, W. Garrett; Hamza, Taye H.; Cushing, Melissa M.; King, Karen E.; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Williams, Eliot; McFarland, Janice; Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer; Sloan, Steven R.; Friedman, David; Parekh, Samir; Sachais, Bruce S.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Assmann, Susan F.

    2015-01-01

    High-dose granulocyte transfusion therapy has been available for 20 years, yet its clinical efficacy has never been conclusively demonstrated. We report here the results of RING (Resolving Infection in Neutropenia with Granulocytes), a multicenter randomized controlled trial designed to address this question. Eligible subjects were those with neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <500/μL) and proven/probable/presumed infection. Subjects were randomized to receive either (1) standard antimicrobial therapy or (2) standard antimicrobial therapy plus daily granulocyte transfusions from donors stimulated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone. The primary end point was a composite of survival plus microbial response, at 42 days after randomization. Microbial response was determined by a blinded adjudication panel. Fifty-six subjects were randomized to the granulocyte arm and 58 to the control arm. Transfused subjects received a median of 5 transfusions. Mean transfusion dose was 54.9 × 109 granulocytes. Overall success rates were 42% and 43% for the granulocyte and control groups, respectively (P > .99), and 49% and 41%, respectively, for subjects who received their assigned treatments (P = .64). Success rates for granulocyte and control arms did not differ within any infection type. In a post hoc analysis, subjects who received an average dose per transfusion of ≥0.6 × 109 granulocytes per kilogram tended to have better outcomes than those receiving a lower dose. In conclusion, there was no overall effect of granulocyte transfusion on the primary outcome, but because enrollment was half that planned, power to detect a true beneficial effect was low. RING was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00627393. PMID:26333778

  12. Effect of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor on Prevention and Treatment of Invasive Fungal Disease in Recipients of Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplantation: A Prospective Multicenter Randomized Phase IV Trial.

    PubMed

    Wan, Liping; Zhang, Yicheng; Lai, Yongrong; Jiang, Ming; Song, Yongping; Zhou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zhongming; Duan, Xianlin; Fu, Yuewen; Liao, Lianming; Wang, Chun

    2015-12-01

    For recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT), we hypothesized that prophylactic therapy during neutropenia with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) decreases invasive fungal disease (IFD). We randomly assigned 206 patients undergoing alloHSCT to receive once-daily subcutaneous GM-CSF (5 to 7 μg/kg per day), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; 5 to 7 μg/kg per day), or a combination of G-CSF and GM-CSF (2 to 3 μg/kg per day each). Treatment was started on day 5 after transplantation and was continued until the absolute neutrophil count was ≥ 1.5 × 10(9)/L for 2 consecutive days. The primary outcomes were 100-day incidence of proven and probable IFD and response rate of antifungal treatment. For the intent-to-treat population, there was no significant difference in 100-day incidences of proven and probable IFD among the three groups. The antifungal treatment response was better in the GM-CSF group and G-CSF+GM-CSF group than in G-CSF group from day 22 to day 100 (P = .009). The 100-day cumulative mortality after transplantation was lower in the GM-CSF group than in the G-CSF group (10.3% v 24.6%, respectively; P = .037). The GM-CSF and G-CSF+GM-CSF groups had lower 100-day transplantation-related mortality than the G-CSF group (8.8%, 8.7%, and 21.7%, respectively; P = .034). After a median follow-up of 600 days, IFD-related mortality was lower in the groups that received GM-CSF or G-CSF+GM-CSF compared with G-CSF (1.47%, 1.45%, and 11.59%, respectively; P = .016). There were no significant differences in relapse, graft-versus-host disease, or hemorrhage-related mortality among the three groups of patients. For recipients of alloHSCT, compared with G-CSF, prophylactic GM-CSF was associated with lower 100-day transplantation-related mortality, lower 100-day cumulative mortality, and lower 600-day IFD-related mortality. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Study Conformational Changes in Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor upon PEGylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui; Ahn, Joomi; Yu, Ying Qing; Tymiak, Adrienne; Engen, John R.; Chen, Guodong

    2012-03-01

    PEGylation is the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol to proteins, and it can be used to alter immunogenicity, circulating half life and other properties of therapeutic proteins. To determine the impact of PEGylation on protein conformation, we applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) to analyze granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) upon PEGylation as a model system. The combined use of HDX automation technology and data analysis software allowed reproducible and robust measurements of the deuterium incorporation levels for peptic peptides of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated G-CSF. The results indicated that significant differences in deuterium incorporation were induced by PEGylation of G-CSF, although the overall changes observed were quite small. PEGylation did not result in gross conformational rearrangement of G-CSF. The data complexity often encountered in HDX MS measurements was greatly reduced through a data processing and presentation format designed to facilitate the comparison process. This study demonstrates the practical utility of HDX MS for comparability studies, process monitoring, and protein therapeutic characterization in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  14. A randomized phase II study of stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide+G-CSF or G-CSF alone after lenalidomide-based induction in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, R; Anttila, P; Säily, M; Lundan, T; Heiskanen, J; Siitonen, T M; Kakko, S; Putkonen, M; Ollikainen, H; Terävä, V; Kutila, A; Launonen, K; Räsänen, A; Sikiö, A; Suominen, M; Bazia, P; Kananen, K; Selander, T; Kuittinen, T; Remes, K; Jantunen, E

    2016-03-01

    The most common means of mobilizing autologous stem cells is G-CSF alone or combined with cyclophosphamide (CY) to obtain sufficient CD34+ cells for one to two transplants. There are few prospective, randomized studies investigating mobilization regimens in multiple myeloma (MM), especially after lenalidomide-based induction. We designed this prospective, randomized study to compare low-dose CY 2 g/m2 +G-CSF (arm A) and G-CSF alone (arm B) after lenalidomide-based up-front induction in MM. Of the 80 initially randomized patients, 69 patients were evaluable, 34 and 35 patients in arms A and B, respectively. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving a yield of ⩾3 × 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells with 1-2 aphereses, which was achieved in 94% and 77% in arms A and B, respectively (P=0.084). The median number of aphereses needed to reach the yield of ⩾3 × 10(6)/kg was lower in arm A than in arm B (1 vs. 2, P=0.035). Two patients needed plerixafor in arm A and five patients in arm B (P=0.428). Although CY-based mobilization was more effective, G-CSF alone was successful in a great majority of patients to reach the defined collection target after three cycles of lenalidomide-based induction.

  15. A randomized phase II study of stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide+G-CSF or G-CSF alone after lenalidomide-based induction in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Silvennoinen, R; Anttila, P; Säily, M; Lundan, T; Heiskanen, J; Siitonen, T M; Kakko, S; Putkonen, M; Ollikainen, H; Terävä, V; Kutila, A; Launonen, K; Räsänen, A; Sikiö, A; Suominen, M; Bazia, P; Kananen, K; Selander, T; Kuittinen, T; Remes, K; Jantunen, E

    2016-01-01

    The most common means of mobilizing autologous stem cells is G-CSF alone or combined with cyclophosphamide (CY) to obtain sufficient CD34+ cells for one to two transplants. There are few prospective, randomized studies investigating mobilization regimens in multiple myeloma (MM), especially after lenalidomide-based induction. We designed this prospective, randomized study to compare low-dose CY 2 g/m2+G-CSF (arm A) and G-CSF alone (arm B) after lenalidomide-based up-front induction in MM. Of the 80 initially randomized patients, 69 patients were evaluable, 34 and 35 patients in arms A and B, respectively. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving a yield of ⩾3 × 106/kg CD34+ cells with 1−2 aphereses, which was achieved in 94% and 77% in arms A and B, respectively (P=0.084). The median number of aphereses needed to reach the yield of ⩾3 × 106/kg was lower in arm A than in arm B (1 vs 2, P=0.035). Two patients needed plerixafor in arm A and five patients in arm B (P=0.428). Although CY-based mobilization was more effective, G-CSF alone was successful in a great majority of patients to reach the defined collection target after three cycles of lenalidomide-based induction. PMID:26437056

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for febrile neutropenia prophylaxis following chemotherapy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Febrile neutropenia (FN) occurs following myelosuppressive chemotherapy and is associated with morbidity, mortality, costs, and chemotherapy reductions and delays. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) stimulate neutrophil production and may reduce FN incidence when given prophylactically following chemotherapy. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the effectiveness of G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim, filgrastim or lenograstim) in reducing FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. G-CSFs were compared with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis and with one another. Nine databases were searched in December 2009. Meta-analysis used a random effects model due to heterogeneity. Results Twenty studies compared primary G-CSF prophylaxis with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis: five studies of pegfilgrastim; ten of filgrastim; and five of lenograstim. All three G-CSFs significantly reduced FN incidence, with relative risks of 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.65) for pegfilgrastim, 0.57 (95% CI: 0.48 to 0.69) for filgrastim, and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.88) for lenograstim. Overall, the relative risk of FN for any primary G-CSF prophylaxis versus no primary G-CSF prophylaxis was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.62). In terms of comparisons between different G-CSFs, five studies compared pegfilgrastim with filgrastim. FN incidence was significantly lower for pegfilgrastim than filgrastim, with a relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.98). Conclusions Primary prophylaxis with G-CSFs significantly reduces FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. Pegfilgrastim reduces FN incidence to a significantly greater extent than filgrastim. PMID:21943360

  17. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on central and peripheral T lymphocyte reconstitution after sublethal irradiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxia; Guo, Mei; Sun, Xuedong; Sun, Wanjun; Hu, Hailan; Wei, Li; Ai, Huisheng

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 μg/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4 − CD8 − , CD4 + CD8 + , CD4 + CD8− and CD4 − CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3 + , CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4 + CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3 + , CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation. PMID:23001765

  18. The efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in infertile women with a thin endometrium: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Jo, Jae Dong; Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the day of ovulation triggering or oocyte retrieval in infertile women with a thin endometrium. Methods Fifty women whose endometrial thickness (EMT) was ≤8 mm at the time of triggering during at least one previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle and an index IVF cycle were selected. On the day of triggering (n=12) or oocyte retrieval (n=38), 300 µg of G-CSF was instilled into the uterine cavity. Results In the 50 index IVF cycles, the mean EMT was 7.2±0.6 mm on the triggering day and increased to 8.5±1.5 mm on the embryo transfer day (p<0.001). The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 22.0%, the implantation rate was 15.9%, and the ongoing pregnancy rate was 20%. The clinical pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 15.8%), the implantation rate (26.7% vs. 11.7%), and the ongoing pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 13.2%) were higher when G-CSF was instilled on the triggering day than when it was instilled on the retrieval day, although this tendency was likewise not statistically significant. Aspects of the stimulation process and mean changes in EMT were similar in women who became pregnant and women who did not. Conclusion Intrauterine instillation of G-CSF enhanced endometrial development and resulted in an acceptable pregnancy rate. Instillation of G-CSF on the triggering day showed better outcomes. G-CSF instillation should be considered as a strategy for inducing endometrial growth and good pregnancy results in infertile women with a thin endometrium. PMID:28090464

  19. The efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in infertile women with a thin endometrium: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dayong; Jo, Jae Dong; Kim, Seul Ki; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the day of ovulation triggering or oocyte retrieval in infertile women with a thin endometrium. Fifty women whose endometrial thickness (EMT) was ≤8 mm at the time of triggering during at least one previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle and an index IVF cycle were selected. On the day of triggering (n=12) or oocyte retrieval (n=38), 300 µg of G-CSF was instilled into the uterine cavity. In the 50 index IVF cycles, the mean EMT was 7.2±0.6 mm on the triggering day and increased to 8.5±1.5 mm on the embryo transfer day (p<0.001). The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 22.0%, the implantation rate was 15.9%, and the ongoing pregnancy rate was 20%. The clinical pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 15.8%), the implantation rate (26.7% vs. 11.7%), and the ongoing pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 13.2%) were higher when G-CSF was instilled on the triggering day than when it was instilled on the retrieval day, although this tendency was likewise not statistically significant. Aspects of the stimulation process and mean changes in EMT were similar in women who became pregnant and women who did not. Intrauterine instillation of G-CSF enhanced endometrial development and resulted in an acceptable pregnancy rate. Instillation of G-CSF on the triggering day showed better outcomes. G-CSF instillation should be considered as a strategy for inducing endometrial growth and good pregnancy results in infertile women with a thin endometrium.

  20. Timing of platelet recovery is associated with adequacy of leukapheresis product yield after cyclophosphamide and G-CSF in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, T M; Michelson, G C; Mick, R; Grinblatt, D L; Williams, S F

    1999-01-01

    A subgroup of patients with refractory Hodgkin's (HD) or non-Hodgkin's (NHL) lymphoma may be cured with high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue. To investigate the relationship of adequate leukapheresis yield and time course of platelet recovery after mobilization chemotherapy, we retrospectively analyzed the leukapheresis yields in seven patients with Hodgkin's disease and fifteen patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing high-dose chemotherapy. Our goal was to develop a rule to determine when to initiate leukapheresis and then to prospectively validate this rule. All patients were mobilized with cyclophosphamide and G-CSF (granulocyte-colony stimulating factor). A total of 144 leukaphereses were completed and analyzed. Based on the CD34 content in the initial harvest product, fifteen patients were defined as poor mobilizers (CD34 < 0.15 x 10(6)/kg) and seven were good mobilizers. The platelet count on the first day of harvesting was significantly associated with the poor mobilizers (P = .03). Age, sex, marrow involvement, disease (HD vs. NHL), prior radiation, time since last chemotherapy, and total number of cycles of prior chemotherapy were not predictive of poor mobilizers. By using a platelet count cut off of 35 x 10(9)/L, we retrospectively analyzed 144 individual leukapheresis products, to test whether CD34 yield was predicted by the peripheral blood platelet count on the day of leukapheresis. This rule had an excellent sensitivity, 91%, and a specificity of 67%. Subsequently, we validated this rule with the next twenty-four patients undergoing leukapheresis of which there were 143 leukaphereses. The prediction rule exhibited a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 68% in the validation set. There does appear to be utility in using the platelet count to guide the initiation of leukapheresis after chemotherapy and G-CSF mobilization.

  1. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  2. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  3. [Epirubicin-based combination chemotherapy combined with G-CSF for the elderly patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Miyata, A; Fujii, S; Kikuchi, T; Kibata, M

    2000-02-01

    We devised a new epirubicin-based combination chemotherapy (Epi-COP) regimen for the patients with elderly non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and have treated 30 patients aged 66 years and older who had measurable diseases. In Epi-COP therapy, epirubicin was used as a substitute for doxorubicin in the CHOP regimen, and some dose modifications were made for the other agents. Combined modality treatment (CMT; chemotherapy plus radiotherapy) was adopted for 9 patients with localized disease. Complete response was obtained in 21 of all the 30 patients (70%), 8 in 9 (89%) of the CMT group and 13 in 21 (62%) of the patients with chemotherapy only (chemotherapy group). The median follow up time is 350 days, ranging from 2 to 77 months. The 2 year survival rate was 56% in all patients, 67% in the CMT group and 52% in the chemotherapy group. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was administered when the leucocyte count decreased below 2,000/microliter, and 16 patients received it in the first course. The regimen could be repeated every three weeks in most cases. Although we encountered two early deaths, the overall toxicity level seemed to be acceptable. Even when we take account of the small number of patients and the short observation period, it might be concluded that Epi-COP was effective in inducing a good remission rate with moderate toxic effect in elderly patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and CMT should be adopted if it is localized. A randomized comparative study with the CHOP regimen is necessary.

  4. Low-dose G-CSF improves fat graft retention by mobilizing endogenous stem cells and inducing angiogenesis, whereas high-dose G-CSF inhibits adipogenesis with prolonged inflammation and severe fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junrong; Li, Bin; Liu, Kaiyang; Feng, Jingwei; Gao, Kai; Lu, Feng

    2017-09-23

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) promote fat graft survival by modulating its revascularization. The authors hypothesize that mobilization of HSCs by G-CSF will improve fat graft survival. Hence, we evaluated the effect of different doses of G-CSF on fat grafting. Male 8-week-old C57 mice received high-dose G-CSF (100 μg/kg), low-dose G-CSF (10 μg/kg), and PBS (control) intraperitoneally for 7 consecutive days right after autologous fat grafting. Grafted fat was harvested at 1, 4, and 12 weeks for examination. The low-dose G-CSF, high-dose G-CSF, and control groups had retention rates of 73.6% ± 3.1%, 51.6% ± 4.4%, and 44.5% ± 4.0%, respectively, at 12 weeks (low-dose G-CSF versus control and low-dose G-CSF versus high-dose G-CSF, both p < 0.05; no significant difference between high-dose G-CSF and control group). Both doses of G-CSF successfully mobilized HSCs into circulation and upregulated the level of blood-derived stem cells in fat grafts, contributing to improved angiogenesis. However, high-dose G-CSF caused a prolonged macrophage infiltration and elevated level of inflammation (IL-6 and TNF-α), which led to severe fibrosis and impaired adipogenesis (downregulated expression of PPAR-γ and CEBP-α). Low-dose G-CSF treatment successfully improved fat graft survival by mobilizing HSCs and inducing angiogenesis. However, high-dose G-CSF prolonged inflammation and caused severe fibrosis, leading to impaired adipogenesis and poor fat graft survival. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Efficacy of LL-37 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in a neutropenic murine sepsis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Tomasinsig, Linda; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Riva, Alessandra; Rocchi, Marco; Saba, Vittorio; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio; Giacometti, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    A promising therapeutic strategy for the management of severe Pseudomonas infection in neutropenic patients may result from the coadministration of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) that help maintain immune competence and antimicrobial peptides, a novel generation of adjunctive therapeutic agents with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. A promising peptide with these properties is LL-37, the only member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides found in humans. BALB/c male mice were rendered neutropenic by intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide on days -4 and -2 preinfection. Septic shock was induced at time 0 by intraperitoneal injection of 2x10 colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 27853. All animals were randomized to receive intravenously isotonic sodium chloride solution, 1 mg/kg of LL-37, 20 mg/kg of imipenem, 0.1 mg/kg of granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), 1 mg/kg of LL-37+0.1 mg/kg of G-CSF, or 20 mg/kg of imipenem+0.1 mg/kg of G-CSF. Lethality and bacterial growth in blood, peritoneum, spleen, liver, and kidney were evaluated. All regimens were significantly superior to controls at reducing the mouse lethality rate and bacterial burden in organs. Particularly, the combination between LL-37 and G-CSF was the most effective in protecting neutropenic mice from the onset of sepsis and in vitro significantly reduced the apoptosis of neutrophils. Combination therapy between LL-37 and G-CSF is a promising therapeutic strategy for the management of severe Pseudomonas infection complicated by neutropenia.

  6. Effectiveness of daily versus non-daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in patients with solid tumours undergoing chemotherapy: a multivariate analysis of data from current practice

    PubMed Central

    Almenar Cubells, D; Bosch Roig, C; Jiménez Orozco, E; Álvarez, R; Cuervo, JM; Díaz Fernández, N; Sánchez Heras, AB; Galán Brotons, A; Giner Marco, V; Codes M De Villena, M

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre, retrospective, observational study including patients with solid tumours (excluding breast cancer) that received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) and chemotherapy. We investigated the effectiveness of daily vs. non-daily G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim) adjusting by potential confounders. The study included 391 patients (211 daily G-CSF; 180 pegfilgrastim), from whom 47.3% received primary prophylaxis (PP) (57.8% pegfilgrastim), 26.3% secondary prophylaxis (SP: initiation after cycle 1 and no reactive treatment in any cycle) (51.5% pegfilgrastim) and 26.3% reactive treatment (19.4% pegfilgrastim). Only 42.2% of patients with daily G-CSF and 46.2% with pegfilgrastim initiated prophylaxis within 72 h after chemotherapy, and only 10.5% of patients with daily G-CSF received it for ≥7 days. In the multivariate models, daily G-CSF was associated with higher risk of grade 3-4 neutropenia (G3-4N) vs. pegfilgrastim [odds ratio (OR): 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.004–2.97]. Relative to SP, PP protected against G3-4N (OR for SP vs. PP: 6.0, 95%CI: 3.2–11.4) and febrile neutropenia (OR: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.1–8.8), and was associated to less chemotherapy dose delays and reductions (OR for relative dose intensity <85% for SP vs. PP: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.7–5.4) and higher response rate (OR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.7). Data suggest that pegfilgrastim, compared with a daily G-CSF, and PP, compared with SP, could be more effective in preventing neutropenia and its related events in the clinical practice. PMID:23331323

  7. Acute exposure to cadmium induces prolonged neutrophilia along with delayed induction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hyogo; Oguma, Etsuko

    2016-12-01

    Acute exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes systemic inflammation characterized by neutrophilia. To elucidate the mechanism of neutrophilia induced by Cd, we investigated the induction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which regulates neutrophil production, in mice with acute Cd toxicity, and compared it with mice injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an inducer of general inflammatory responses. We injected BALB/c mice with Cd at 2.5 mg/kg i.p. or LPS at 0.5 mg/kg i.p. and sampled the peripheral blood and organs at time points up to 24 h. In Cd-treated mice, the peripheral neutrophil count increased steadily up to 24 h, whereas LPS-treated mice showed a more rapid increase with a peak at 12 h. The serum G-CSF level increased gradually to reach a plateau at 12-18 h in Cd-treated mice, but LPS-treated mice showed a marked increase, reaching a peak at 2-3 h. A gradual elevation of G-CSF mRNA expression up to 24 h was detected by real-time PCR in the livers of Cd-treated mice, but in LPS-treated mice its highest expression was observed in the liver with a rapid increase at 2 h. By in situ hybridization using G-CSF RNA probes, hepatic Kupffer cells were identified as G-CSF-producing cells in the liver. These results indicated that Cd has a characteristic effect of delayed induction of G-CSF in the liver, causing systemic inflammation accompanied by prolonged neutrophilia.

  8. Efficacy of polyethylene glycol-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cows and heifers.

    PubMed

    Hassfurther, Renee L; TerHune, Terry N; Canning, Peter C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate effects of various doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (bG-CSF) on the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. 211 periparturient Holstein cows and heifers. Approximately 7 days before the anticipated date of parturition (day of parturition = day 0), healthy cattle received SC injections of sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) or PEG-bG-CSF at 5, 10, or 20 μg/kg. Cattle were commingled and housed in a pen with dirt flooring, which was kept wet to maximize the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis. Within 24 hours after parturition, each animal again received the assigned treatment. Mammary glands and milk were visually scored for abnormalities twice daily for 28 days after parturition. Milk samples were aseptically collected from mammary glands with an abnormal appearance or abnormal milk and submitted for microbial culture. Daily milk production was recorded, and milk composition was assessed on days 3, 5, 7, and 10. Cattle treated with PEG-bG-CSF at 10 and 20 μg/kg had significantly fewer cases of clinical mastitis (9/54 and 5/53, respectively), compared with control cattle (18/53). Administration of PEG -bG-CSF did not significantly affect daily milk production or milk composition. Results suggested that PEG-bG-CSF was effective for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. Further investigations of the use of PEG-bG-CSF as a potential preventative intervention should be conducted.

  9. Subcutaneous versus intravenous granulocyte colony stimulating factor for the treatment of neutropenia in hospitalized hemato-oncological patients: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mical; Ram, Ron; Kugler, Eitan; Farbman, Laura; Peck, Anat; Leibovici, Leonard; Lahav, Meir; Yeshurun, Moshe; Shpilberg, Ofer; Herscovici, Corina; Wolach, Ofir; Itchaki, Gilad; Bar-Natan, Michal; Vidal, Liat; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Raanani, Pia

    2014-03-01

    Intravenous (IV) granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) might be safer and more convenient than subcutaneous (SC) administration to hospitalized hemato-oncological patients receiving chemotherapy. To compare IV vs. SC G-CSF administration, we conducted a randomized, open-label trial. We included inpatients receiving chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma, and allogeneic or autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients were randomized to 5 mcg/kg single daily dose of IV bolus versus SC filgrastim given for its clinical indications. Patients were crossed-over to the alternate study arm on the subsequent chemotherapy course. The primary outcomes were time from initiation of filgrastim to recovery of stable neutrophil count of >500 cells/µL and a composite clinical outcome of infection or death assessed for the first course post-randomization. The study was stopped on the second interim analysis. Of 120 patients randomized, 118 were evaluated in the first treatment course. The mean time to neutropenia resolution was longer with IV G-CSF [7.9 days, 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.6-9.1] compared with SC G-CSF (5.4 days, 95% CI 4.6-6.2), log-rank P = 0.001. Longer neutropenia duration was observed in all patient subgroups, except for patients undergoing autologous HCT. There was no significant difference between groups in the occurrence of infection or death, but more deaths were observed with IV (4/57, 7%) versus SC (1/61, 1.6%) G-CSF administration, P = 0.196. Similar results were observed when all 158 courses following cross-over were analyzed. Patients reported similar pain and satisfaction scores in both groups. Bolus IV administration of G-CSF results in longer neutropenia duration than SC administration, with no difference in clinical or quality-of-life measures.

  10. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy improves survival in patients with hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xue-Zhang; Liu, Fang-Fang; Tong, Jing-Jing; Yang, Hao-Zhen; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Mao, Yuan-Li; Xin, Shao-Jie; Hu, Jin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). METHODS: Fifty-five patients with HBV-associated ACLF were randomized into two groups: the treatment group and the control group. Twenty-seven patients in the treatment group received G-CSF (5 μg/kg per day, six doses) treatment plus standard therapy, and 28 patients in the control group received standard therapy only. The peripheral CD34+ cell count was measured consecutively by flow cytometry. Circulating white blood cell count, biochemical parameters, and other clinical data of these patients were recorded and analyzed. All patients were followed up for a period of 3 mo to evaluate the changes in liver function and survival rate. RESULTS: The peripheral neutrophil and CD34+ cell counts in the G-CSF group increased on day 3 from the onset of therapy, continued to rise on day 7, and remained elevated on day 15 compared to those of the control group. Child-Turcotte-Pugh score of patients in the treatment group was improved on day 30 from the onset of G-CSF therapy, compared to that in the controls (P = 0.041). Model for End-Stage of Liver Disease score of patients in the treatment group was improved on day 7 (P = 0.004) and remained high on day 30 from the onset of G-CSF therapy (P < 0.001) compared to that in controls. After 3 mo of follow-up observation, the survival rate in the treatment group (48.1%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (21.4%) (P = 0.0181). CONCLUSION: G-CSF therapy promoted CD34+ cell mobilization in patients with HBV-associated ACLF, and improved the liver function and the survival rate of these patients. PMID:23467275

  11. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy improves survival in patients with hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xue-Zhang; Liu, Fang-Fang; Tong, Jing-Jing; Yang, Hao-Zhen; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Mao, Yuan-Li; Xin, Shao-Jie; Hu, Jin-Hua

    2013-02-21

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). Fifty-five patients with HBV-associated ACLF were randomized into two groups: the treatment group and the control group. Twenty-seven patients in the treatment group received G-CSF (5 μg/kg per day, six doses) treatment plus standard therapy, and 28 patients in the control group received standard therapy only. The peripheral CD34(+) cell count was measured consecutively by flow cytometry. Circulating white blood cell count, biochemical parameters, and other clinical data of these patients were recorded and analyzed. All patients were followed up for a period of 3 mo to evaluate the changes in liver function and survival rate. The peripheral neutrophil and CD34(+) cell counts in the G-CSF group increased on day 3 from the onset of therapy, continued to rise on day 7, and remained elevated on day 15 compared to those of the control group. Child-Turcotte-Pugh score of patients in the treatment group was improved on day 30 from the onset of G-CSF therapy, compared to that in the controls (P = 0.041). Model for End-Stage of Liver Disease score of patients in the treatment group was improved on day 7 (P = 0.004) and remained high on day 30 from the onset of G-CSF therapy (P < 0.001) compared to that in controls. After 3 mo of follow-up observation, the survival rate in the treatment group (48.1%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (21.4%) (P = 0.0181). G-CSF therapy promoted CD34(+) cell mobilization in patients with HBV-associated ACLF, and improved the liver function and the survival rate of these patients.

  12. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  13. Differential alterations in plasma colony-stimulating factor concentrations in meningococcaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Waring, P M; Presneill, J; Maher, D W; Layton, J E; Cebon, J; Waring, L J; Metcalf, D

    1995-01-01

    To determine whether circulating levels of any of the colony-stimulating factors (CSF) might contribute to the host response in severe sepsis, plasma concentrations of granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), and macrophage CSF (M-CSF) were measured by immunoassays in 20 subjects with meningococcaemia, a bloodstream infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis, that has proven to be a valuable model to study the responses of other inflammatory mediators during sepsis and septic shock in humans. Plasma G-CSF concentrations were transiently elevated in most subjects during the early phase of meningococcaemia, and were higher in subjects with septic shock (mean +/- s.d. = 165 +/- 142 ng/ml, n = 9) compared with those who remained normotensive (mean +/- s.d. = 7 +/- 2 ng/ml, n = 10) (P < 0.05). Peak plasma G-CSF concentrations > 10 ng/ml were associated with the development of septic shock (P < 0.01), disseminated intravascular coagulation (P < 0.01), fulminant infection (P < 0.05), and a fatal outcome (P < 0.01). Plasma GM-CSF concentrations > 1 ng/ml were briefly present in subjects with life-threatening septic shock (1-15 ng/ml, n = 5), and were strongly associated with fulminant meningococcaemia (P < 0.01). Plasma M-CSF concentrations were marginally elevated in all subjects, but were not associated with complications related to or arising from sepsis-induced organ injury. This study demonstrates that plasma levels of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF show very different responses during meningococcaemia, changes which presumably reflect the different roles played by these mediators in sepsis and, potentially, in septic shock. PMID:8536364

  14. NKT cell–dependent leukemia eradication following stem cell mobilization with potent G-CSF analogs

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward S.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Rowe, Vanessa; Banovic, Tatjana; Kuns, Rachel D.; Don, Alistair L.J.; Bofinger, Helen M.; Burman, Angela C.; Olver, Stuart D.; Kienzle, Norbert; Porcelli, Steven A.; Pellicci, Daniel G.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Smyth, Mark J.; Hill, Geoffrey R.

    2005-01-01

    NKT cells have pivotal roles in immune regulation and tumor immunosurveillance. We report that the G-CSF and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L) chimeric cytokine, progenipoietin-1, markedly expands the splenic and hepatic NKT cell population and enhances functional responses to α-galactosylceramide. In a murine model of allogeneic stem cell transplantation, donor NKT cells promoted host DC activation and enhanced perforin-restricted CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity against host-type antigens. Following leukemic challenge, donor treatment with progenipoietin-1 significantly improved overall survival when compared with G-CSF or control, attributable to reduced graft-versus-host disease mortality and paradoxical augmentation of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects. Enhanced cellular cytotoxicity was dependent on donor NKT cells, and leukemia clearance was profoundly impaired in recipients of NKT cell–deficient grafts. Enhanced cytotoxicity and GVL effects were not associated with Flt-3L signaling or effects on DCs but were reproduced by prolonged G-CSF receptor engagement with pegylated G-CSF. Thus, modified G-CSF signaling during stem cell mobilization augments NKT cell–dependent CD8+ cytotoxicity, effectively separating graft-versus-host disease and GVL and greatly expanding the potential applicability of allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the therapy of malignant disease. PMID:16224535

  15. A randomised study of 10 microg/kg/day (single dose) vs 2 x 5 microg/kg/day (split dose) G-CSF as stem cell mobilisation regimen in high-risk breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Carrión, R; Serrano, D; Gómez-Pineda, A; Díez-Martín, J L

    2003-09-01

    A randomised trial in breast cancer patients was designed to compare the number of peripheral blood progenitor cells collected after mobilisation with a single dose of 10 microg/kg/day granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (n=14) or a split dose of 5 microg/kg twice daily (n=14). Both groups were well balanced. No significant differences were observed between groups regarding aphereses parameters. The total number of CD34+ cells collected was higher in the split-dose group (mean of 7.1 and median of 7.4 x 10(6)/kg) than in the single-dose group (5.6 and 5.8 x 10(6)/kg, respectively) (P=0.26). The mean of CD34+ cells collected after the first apheresis procedure was 3.9 x 10(6)/kg for the split dose group and 3.1 x 10(6)/kg for the single-dose group (P=0.24). Circulating CD34+ cells before the first apheresis were higher for the split-dose group (mean 79.7 vs 59.2 x 10(6)/l) (P=0.14). All bone pain scores applied were significantly higher for the split-dose group. Our primary end point of improving the mean of total CD34+ cells collected to 2.5 x 10(6)/kg was not achieved with twice-daily G-CSF administration. Further studies evaluating different mobilisation schedules with G-CSF are needed to determine the optimal regimen.

  16. Colony-stimulating factors for the treatment of the hematopoietic component of the acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS): a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Newman, Victoria L; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest national security threats to the United States is the detonation of an improvised nuclear device or a radiological dispersal device in a heavily populated area. As such, this type of security threat is considered to be of relatively low risk, but one that would have an extraordinary high impact on health and well-being of the US citizenry. Psychological counseling and medical assessments would be necessary for all those significantly impacted by the nuclear/radiological event. Direct medical interventions would be necessary for all those individuals who had received substantial radiation exposures (e.g., >1 Gy). Although no drugs or products have yet been specifically approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) to treat the effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and pegylated G-CSF have been used off label for treating radiation accident victims. Recent threats of terrorist attacks using nuclear or radiologic devices makes it imperative that the medical community have up-to-date information and a clear understanding of treatment protocols using therapeutically effective recombinant growth factors and cytokines such as G-CSF and GM-CSF for patients exposed to injurious doses of ionizing radiation. Based on limited human studies with underlying biology, we see that the recombinants, G-CSF and GM-CSF appear to have modest, but significant medicinal value in treating radiation accident victims. In the near future, the US FDA may approve G-CSF and GM-CSF as ‘Emergency Use Authorization’ (EUA) for managing radiation-induced aplasia, an ARS-related pathology. In this article, we review the status of growth factors for the treatment of radiological/nuclear accident victims.

  17. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy for stem cell mobilization following anterior wall myocardial infarction: the CAPITAL STEM MI randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Benjamin; Hayley, Bradley; Beanlands, Robert S.; Le May, Michel; Davies, Richard; So, Derek; Marquis, Jean-François; Labinaz, Marino; Froeschl, Michael; O’Brien, Edward R.; Burwash, Ian G.; Wells, George A.; Pourdjabbar, Ali; Simard, Trevor; Atkins, Harold; Glover, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background: Small studies have yielded divergent results for administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after acute myocardial infarction. Adequately powered studies involving patients with at least moderate left ventricular dysfunction are lacking. Methods: Patients with left ventricular ejection fraction less than 45% after anterior-wall myocardial infarction were treated with G-CSF (10 μg/kg daily for 4 days) or placebo. After initial randomization of 86 patients, 41 in the placebo group and 39 in the G-CSF group completed 6-month follow-up and underwent measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction by radionuclide angiography. Results: Baseline and 6-week mean ejection fraction was similar for the G-CSF and placebo groups: 34.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 32.6%–37.0%) v. 36.4% (95% CI 33.5%–39.2%) at baseline and 39.8% (95% CI 36.2%–43.4%) v. 43.1% (95% CI 39.2%–47.0%) at 6 weeks. However, G-CSF therapy was associated with a lower ejection fraction at 6 months relative to placebo (40.8% [95% CI 37.4%–44.2%] v. 46.0% [95% CI 42.7%–44.3%]). Both groups had improved left ventricular function, but change in left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in patients treated with G-CSF than in those who received placebo (5.7 [95% CI 3.4–8.1] percentage points v. 9.2 [95% CI 6.3–12.1] percentage points). One or more of a composite of several major adverse cardiac events occurred in 8 patients (19%) within each group, with similar rates of target-vessel revascularization. Interpretation: In patients with moderate left ventricular dysfunction following anterior-wall infarction, G-CSF therapy was associated with a lower 6-month left ventricular ejection fraction but no increased risk of major adverse cardiac events. Future studies of G-CSF in patients with left ventricular dysfunction should be monitored closely for safety. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT00394498 PMID:24934893

  19. Pegylated G-CSF Inhibits Blood Cell Depletion, Increases Platelets, Blocks Splenomegaly, and Improves Survival after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation but Not after Irradiation Combined with Burn

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Juliann G.; Zhai, Min; Liao, Pei-Jyun; Bolduc, David L.; Elliott, Thomas B.; Gorbunov, Nikolai V.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation alone (radiation injury, RI) or combined with traumatic tissue injury (radiation combined injury, CI) is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological accidents. As demonstrated in animal models, CI results in greater mortality than RI. In our laboratory, we found that B6D2F1/J female mice exposed to 60Co-γ-photon radiation followed by 15% total-body-surface-area skin burns experienced an increment of 18% higher mortality over a 30-day observation period compared to irradiation alone; that was accompanied by severe cytopenia, thrombopenia, erythropenia, and anemia. At the 30th day after injury, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets still remained very low in surviving RI and CI mice. In contrast, their RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were similar to basal levels. Comparing CI and RI mice, only RI induced splenomegaly. Both RI and CI resulted in bone marrow cell depletion. It was observed that only the RI mice treated with pegylated G-CSF after RI resulted in 100% survival over the 30-day period, and pegylated G-CSF mitigated RI-induced body-weight loss and depletion of WBC and platelets. Peg-G-CSF treatment sustained RBC balance, hemoglobin levels, and hematocrits and inhibited splenomegaly after RI. The results suggest that pegylated G-CSF effectively sustained animal survival by mitigating radiation-induced cytopenia, thrombopenia, erythropenia, and anemia. PMID:24738019

  20. Tumor-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Prolong the Survival of Neutrophils Infiltrating Bronchoalveolar Subtype Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wislez, Marie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Rabbe, Nathalie; Moreau, Joelle; Cesari, Danielle; Milleron, Bernard; Mayaud, Charles; Antoine, Martine; Soler, Paul; Cadranel, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the role of the tumor environment in the regulation of apoptosis of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils, the number of which correlates negatively with outcome, in patients with adenocarcinoma of the bronchioloalveolar (BAC) subtype. We examined three different parameters of apoptosis, namely morphological aspect, annexin-V expression, and DNA fragmentation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) supernatants from patients with BAC significantly inhibited the 24-hour spontaneous apoptosis of normal peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro compared to BALF supernatants from control patients (64 ± 4% versus 90 ± 2% measured by annexin-V flow cytometry, P = 0.04). The alveolar neutrophil count correlated positively with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) concentrations in the patient’s BALF. Furthermore, neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against GM-CSF and G-CSF significantly inhibited BALF anti-apoptotic activity (15 to 40% and 34 to 63% inhibition, respectively), whereas neutralizing Abs against interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α had no significant effect. In an attempt to identify the cell origin of anti-apoptotic cytokines, we tested in vitro the effect of BAC cells (A549 cell line and primary culture derived from a patient’s BAC tumor) on the apoptosis of peripheral blood neutrophils. Cell-free supernatants from tumor cells did not inhibit neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, cell-free supernatants from tumor cells previously exposed to conditioned media from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and alveolar macrophages significantly inhibited spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis. This inhibition was partially lifted when conditioned media from mononuclear cells were previously treated with Abs against IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. As in vivo, neutralizing Abs against GM-CSF significantly inhibited the anti-apoptotic activity of cell culture supernatants

  1. Survival enhancement and hemopoietic regeneration following radiation exposure: therapeutic approach using glucan and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to whole-body cobalt-60 radiation and administered soluble glucan (5 mg i.v. at 1 h following exposure), recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or both agents. Treatments were evaluated for their ability to enhance hemopoietic regeneration, and to increase survival after radiation-induced myelosuppression. Both glucan and G-CSF enhanced hemopoietic regeneration alone; however, greater effects were observed in mice receiving both agents. For example, on day 17 following a sublethal 6.5-Gy radiation exposure, mice treated with saline, G-CSF, glucan, or both agents, respectively, exhibited 36%, 65%, 50%, and 78% of normal bone marrow cellularity, and 84%, 175%, 152%, and 212% of normal splenic cellularity.

  2. Successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells in children with cancer using plerixafor (Mozobil) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Boryana E; Yordanova, Maya N; Konstantinov, Dobrin N; Bobev, Dragan G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation in three children with malignant diseases by using plerixafor (Mozobil; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) after failed previous mobilizations. A median sixfold increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after plerixafor treatment as compared with the baseline level was observed. An optimal CD34+ cell count for transplantation with one or two leukapheresis sessions was achieved. Mobilization using plerixafor was found to be safe with no adverse events. Therefore, the combination of G-CSF and plerixafor in children results in effective increases in peripheral CD34+ cell counts and reduces the risk of mobilization failure.

  3. Successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells in children with cancer using plerixafor (Mozobil™) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Avramova, Boryana E; Yordanova, Maya N; Konstantinov, Dobrin N; Bobev, Dragan G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation in three children with malignant diseases by using plerixafor (Mozobil™; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) after failed previous mobilizations. A median sixfold increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after plerixafor treatment as compared with the baseline level was observed. An optimal CD34+ cell count for transplantation with one or two leukapheresis sessions was achieved. Mobilization using plerixafor was found to be safe with no adverse events. Therefore, the combination of G-CSF and plerixafor in children results in effective increases in peripheral CD34+ cell counts and reduces the risk of mobilization failure. PMID:21966213

  4. G-CSF Administration after the Intraosseous Infusion of Hypertonic Hydroxyethyl Starches Accelerating Wound Healing Combined with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Liu, Huiling; Song, Haijing; Jiang, Chaoguang; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of G-CSF administration after intraosseous (IO) resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury rats. Methods. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) HS with resuscitation (blank), (2) HS with resuscitation + G-CSF (G-CSF, 200 μg/kg body weight, subcutaneous injection), (3) HS with resuscitation + normal saline solution injection (normal saline), and (4) HS + G-CSF injection without resuscitation (Unres/G-CSF). To estimate the treatment effects, the vital signs of alteration were first evaluated, and then wound closure rates and homing of MSCs and EPCs to the wound skins and vasculogenesis were measured. Besides, inflammation and vasculogenesis related mRNA expressions were also examined. Results. IO infusion hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (HHES) exhibited beneficial volume expansion roles and G-CSF administration accelerated wound healing 3 days ahead of other groups under hemorrhagic shock. Circulating and the homing of MSCs and EPCs at wound skins were significantly elevated at 6 h after G-CSF treatment. Inflammation was declined since 3 d while angiogenesis was more obvious in G-CSF treated group on day 9. Conclusions. These results suggested that the synergistical application of HHES and G-CSF has life-saving effects and is beneficial for improving wound healing in HS combined with cutaneous injury rats. PMID:26989687

  5. Delayed granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment in rats attenuates mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Kato, Kei; Mannoji, Chikato; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Okawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    Animal experimental study with intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate therapeutic effects of delayed granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment for mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically for patients with hematological disorders. Previous reports showed that immediate G-CSF attenuates neuropathic pain in CCI of the sciatic nerve. However, the acute treatment for neuropathic pain prior to accurate diagnosis is not realistic in clinical settings. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to the CCI model. This model induces mechanical allodynia on the ipsilateral hind paw within the first week after the injury. One week after CCI, rats received intraperitoneal G-CSF (15.0 μg/kg) for 5 consecutive days. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using the von Frey hair test. Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p-p38MAPK) and OX-42 (a marker for activated microglia) on tissue slides from a subset of rats 2 weeks after surgery. Western blot analyses were carried out to determine protein expression level of p-p38MAPK and interleukin-1 β on spinal cord homogenates 2 weeks after CCI. Results of the von Frey filament test showed that G-CSF significantly attenuates mechanical allodynia induced by the CCI model. Immunohistochemistry revealed that G-CSF reduced the number of p-p38MAPK-positive cells in the ipsilateral dorsal horn compared with that in the vehicle group rats. Immunofluorescent double staining revealed that p-p38MAPK-expressing cells in the spinal cord dorsal horn are mainly microglia. Western blot analysis indicated that G-CSF decreased the expression levels of both p-p38MAPK and interleukin-1 β in the ipsilateral dorsal horn compared with that in the vehicle group rats. The present results indicate a beneficial effect of delayed G-CSF treatment in an animal model of peripheral nerve

  6. A phase 1 study to address the safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for the mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in active rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, D; Rawstron, A; Richards, S; Isaacs, J; Bird, H; Jack, A; Morgan, G; Emery, P

    1997-10-01

    To examine the safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone for the mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with resistant active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five patients with resistant active RA were studied. A dose of 5 microg/kg of G-CSF (Filgrastim) was given subcutaneously each day for 5 days, and the number of stem cells mobilized into the peripheral blood was assessed by daily CD34 counts. RA disease activity was assessed by standard clinical methods. The absolute numbers of peripheral blood CD34+ cells peaked on day 4, with a mean value of 0.025 x 10(9)/liter (range 0.013-0.048 x 10(9)/liter). There was no significant change in disease activity during the study or in the month following therapy. Using G-CSF alone, CD34+ progenitor peripheral blood cells were mobilized in numbers suitable for leukopheresis. G-CSF therapy was well-tolerated in patients with active RA, and was not associated with a flare during treatment or in the month following treatment.

  7. Evaluation of a biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim XM02) for peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and transplantation: a single center experience in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Hideaki; Hotta, Masaaki; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Fujita, Shinya; Nakaya, Aya; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nomura, Shosaku

    2017-01-01

    Background Biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has recently been introduced into clinical practice. G-CSFs are used to mobilize CD34+ cells and accelerate engraftment after transplantation. However, in Asia, particularly in Japan, data for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization by this biosimilar G-CSF are currently lacking. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and safety of biosimilar G-CSF for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation needs to be evaluated in a Japanese context. Materials and methods The subjects included two groups of patients with malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. All patients received chemotherapy priming for the mobilization of PBSCs. All patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by the administration of either the biosimilar G-CSF, filgrastim XM02 (FBNK), or the originators, filgrastim, or lenograstim. Results There were no significant differences among FBNK, filgrastim, and lenograstim treatments in the numbers of CD34+ cells in harvested PBSCs, the scores for granulocyte/macrophage colony forming units, or for malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients evaluated as separate or combined cohorts. In addition, there were no significant differences in safety, side effects, complications, or the time to engraftment after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conclusion Biosimilar FBNK shows the same efficacy and safety as originator G-CSFs for facilitating bone marrow recovery in Japanese malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. In addition, it is less expensive than the originators, reducing hospitalization costs. PMID:28182150

  8. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Veronica R.; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but 1 patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 106/kilogram of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 106/kilogram of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 106/kilogram of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non- hematologic toxic effects were observed. PMID:23749720

  9. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed.

  10. miR-155 Is Associated with the Leukemogenic Potential of the Class IV Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor in CD34+ Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, HaiJiao; Goudeva, Lilia; Immenschuh, Stephan; Schambach, Axel; Skokowa, Julia; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Blasczyk, Rainer; Figueiredo, Constança

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a major regulator of granulopoiesis on engagement with the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR). The truncated, alternatively spliced, class IV G-CSFR (G-CSFRIV) has been associated with defective differentiation and relapse risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. However, the detailed biological properties of G-CSFRIV in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and the potential leukemogenic mechanism of this receptor remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that G-CSFRIV–overexpressing (G-CSFRIV+) HSPCs demonstrated an enhanced proliferative and survival capacity on G-CSF stimulation. Cell cycle analyses showed a higher frequency of G-CSFRIV+ cells in the S and G2/M phase. Also, apoptosis rates were significantly lower in G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. These findings were shown to be associated with a sustained Stat5 activation and elevated miR-155 expression. In addition, G-CSF showed to further induce G-CSFRIV and miR-155 expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from AML patients. A Stat5 pharmacological inhibitor or ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference–mediated silencing of the expression of miR-155 abrogated the aberrant proliferative capacity of the G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. Hence, the dysregulation of Stat5/miR-155 pathway in the G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs supports their leukemogenic potential. Specific miRNA silencing or the inhibition of Stat5-associated pathways might contribute to preventing the risk of leukemogenesis in G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. This study may promote the development of a personalized effective antileukemia therapy, in particular for the patients exhibiting higher expression levels of G-CSFRIV, and further highlights the necessity of pre-screening the patients for G-CSFR isoforms expression patterns before G-CSF administration. PMID:25730818

  11. [Immunosuppressive therapy using antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporin A with or without human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in children with acquired severe aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zou, Yao; Wang, Shuchun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Wenyu; Zhang, Jiayuan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Tianfeng; Chen, Xiaojuan; Ruan, Min; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cai, Xiaojin; Qi, Benquan; Chang, Lixian; An, Wenbin; Guo, Ye; Chen, Yumei; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2014-02-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of four different regimens for pediatric severe aplastic anemia (SAA) with immuno-suppressive therapy (IST) with or without combined human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The authors retrospectively analyzed 105 children with SAA treated with IST with or without G-CSF in the hospital from February 2000 to September 2010. Regimen A, without G-CSF in the whole treatment, was used to treat Group A patients, n = 27; Regimen B, G-CSF, was initiated in Group B, n = 24, before the IST until hematologic recovery; Regimen C, G-CSF, was used together with the IST for Group C patients, n = 24, until hematologic recovery; Regimen D,G-CSF was used for Group D, n = 30, after the end of IST until hematologic recovery. The response rate, relapse rate, mortality, infection rate, infection-related death rate, risk of evolving into MDS/AML, survival rate, factors affecting the time of event-free survival and so on. (1) The response (CR+PR) rates 4, 6, 12 and 24 months after IST of the whole series of 105 SAA children were 50.5% (7.6%+42.9%) , 60.0% (21.9%+38.1%) , 67.6% (38.1%+29.5%) and 69.5% (40.0%+29.5%) respectively. The 2-year survival rate was 90.5%; the follow-up of the patients for 13 years showed that the whole survival rate was 87.6%. (2) The differences of the response rates 4, 6, 12 and 24 months after IST of the 4 groups were not significant (P > 0.05). (3) No significant differences were found in the mortalities 4, 6, 12 and 24 months among the 4 groups (P > 0.05). (4) Of the 105 patients, 4 children had relapsed disease in the period of time from 6 to 24 months after IST. All the four patients belonged to the groups with G-CSF. (5) The use of G-CSF could not decrease the infection period before IST (day) (P = 0.273), and it had no impact on the infection rate after IST (P = 0.066). It did not reduce the rates of septicemia and infectious shock. And to the infection-related death rate no significant conclusion can be

  12. Effect of recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on hematopoietic recovery after otherwise lethal total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nash, R A; Schuening, F G; Seidel, K; Appelbaum, F R; Boone, T; Deeg, H J; Graham, T C; Hackman, R; Sullivan-Pepe, M; Storb, R

    1994-04-01

    Recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF) was studied in normal dogs and in dogs receiving otherwise lethal total body irradiation (TBI) without marrow transplant. Five normal dogs receiving 25 micrograms/kg of rcGM-CSF by subcutaneous (SC) injection twice daily (BID) for 14 days showed increases in peripheral blood neutrophil counts of three to five times the baseline. Platelet counts decreased during administration of rcGM-CSF to a mean nadir of 52,800. Ten dogs received 400 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min from two opposing 60Co sources and no marrow graft. Within 2 hours of TBI, rcGM-CSF was begun at a dose of 50 micrograms/kg SC BID for 5 doses and then continued at 25 micrograms/kg SC BID for 21 days. Only 1 of the 10 dogs receiving rcGM-CSF survived with complete and sustained recovery of hematopoiesis. One of 13 historical control dogs survived after 400 cGy with no hematopoietic growth factor or marrow infusion. Results with rcGM-CSF were compared with previous and concurrent data with G-CSF studied in the same model. Of 10 dogs receiving G-CSF, 8 survived with complete and sustained hematopoietic recovery, a significantly better survival than that seen with rcGM-CSF (P = .006). Neutrophil counts were sustained at higher levels after TBI for the first 18 days in the G-CSF group (P < .016) and the neutrophil nadirs were higher. No differences in neutrophil nadirs were noted between the rcGM-CSF and control groups. Dogs treated with rcGM-CSF experienced a more rapid decline of platelet counts than G-CSF-treated or control dogs over the first 18 days (P < .001). The nadir of the platelet count was higher in the control group than in either the G-CSF or rcGM-CSF group and no significant difference was observed between the G-CSF and rcGM-CSF groups. After otherwise lethal TBI (400 cGy) in dogs, rcGM-CSF was not effective in promoting hematopoietic recovery or improving survival.

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor significantly decreases density of hippocampal caspase 3-positive nuclei, thus ameliorating apoptosis-mediated damage, in a model of ischaemic neonatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pastuszko, Peter; Schears, Gregory J; Kubin, Joanna; Wilson, David F; Pastuszko, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Ischaemic brain injury is a major complication in patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease, with the hippocampus being a particularly vulnerable region. We hypothesized that neuronal injury resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass and associated circulatory arrest is ameliorated by pretreatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine and an anti-apoptotic neurotrophic factor. In a model of ischaemic brain injury, 4 male newborn piglets were anaesthetized and subjected to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) (cooled to 18°C, DHCA maintained for 60 min, rewarmed and recovered for 8-9 h), while 4 animals received G-CSF (34 µg/kg, intravenously) 2 h prior to the DHCA procedure. At the end of each experiment, the animals were perfused with a fixative, the hippocampus was extracted, cryoprotected, cut and the brain sections were immunoprocessed for activated caspase 3, a pro-apoptotic factor. Immunopositive neuronal nuclei were counted in multiple counting boxes (440 × 330 µm) centred on the CA1 or CA3 hippocampal regions and their mean numbers compared between the different treatment groups and regions. G-CSF pretreatment resulted in significantly lower counts of caspase 3-positive nuclei per counting box in both the CA1 [52.2 ± 9.3 (SD) vs 61.6 ± 8.4, P < 0.001] and CA3 (41.2 ± 6.9 vs 60.4 ± 16.4, P < 0.00002) regions of the hippocampus as compared to DHCA groups. The effects of G-CSF were significant for pyramidal cells of both regions and for interneurons in the CA3 region. In an animal model of ischaemic brain injury, G-CSF reduces neuronal injury in the hippocampus, thus potentially having beneficial effect on neurologic outcomes.

  14. A granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor gene promoter element responsive to inflammatory mediators is functionally distinct from an identical sequence in the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene.

    PubMed

    Kuczek, E S; Shannon, M F; Pell, L M; Vadas, M A

    1991-04-01

    A number of mesenchymal cells produce hemopoietic growth factors in response to inflammatory mediators in vitro and in vivo. Induced transcription from the hemopoietic growth factor genes is at least partially responsible for their increased expression. We have previously identified a sequence, cytokine (CK)-1, in the granulocyte (G)-CSF gene promoter that responds to TNF-alpha and binds a transcription factor, NF-GMa. We report here that the CK-1 sequence responds in a time- and dose-dependent manner to IL-1 beta and that the mutations which affect NF-GMa binding correlate with decreased transcriptional activity after stimulation with either TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. The CK-1 sequence also responds to the human T lymphotrophic virus-1 transactivator, tax, so that this promoter element may contribute to the overall response of the G-CSF gene to these various agents. Although NF-GMa binding is seen in a number of cell types, the ability of the G-CSF CK-1 sequence to act as a transcriptional enhancer is specific for fibroblasts and not T cells. Furthermore, we show that an identical sequence in the granulocyte macrophage CSF gene, although apparently binding the same protein in vitro, cannot respond to any of these stimuli in either fibroblasts or T cells. Modification interference experiments, using the CK-1 region in the context of the granulocyte macrophage-CSF and G-CSF genes, indicated that the contact points for NF-GMa differ in each case and suggest that differences in sequences flanking the 10-bp CK-1 region probably leads to an altered DNA:protein conformation, which may explain the differential response of this conserved promoter element.

  15. Oncostatin M is a member of a cytokine family that includes leukemia-inhibitory factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, T M; Bruce, A G

    1991-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a glycoprotein of Mr approximately 28,000 produced by activated monocyte and T-lymphocyte cell lines, was previously identified by its ability to inhibit the growth of cells from melanoma and other solid tumors. We have detected significant similarities in the primary amino acid sequences and predicted secondary structures of OSM, leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Analysis of the genes encoding these proteins revealed a shared exon organization, suggesting evolutionary descent from a common ancestral gene. Using a panel of DNAs from somatic cell hybrids, we have shown that OSM, like LIF, is located on human chromosome 22. We have also demonstrated that OSM has the ability to inhibit the proliferation of murine M1 myeloid leukemic cells and can induce their differentiation into macrophage-like cells, a function shared by LIF, G-CSF, and IL-6. We propose that OSM, LIF, G-CSF, and IL-6 are structurally related members of a cytokine family that have in common the ability to modulate differentiation of a variety of cell types. Images PMID:1717982

  16. Glioblastoma-synthesized G-CSF and GM-CSF contribute to growth and immunosuppression: Potential therapeutic benefit from dapsone, fenofibrate, and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Kast, Richard E; Hill, Quentin A; Wion, Didier; Mellstedt, Håkan; Focosi, Daniele; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Heiland, Tim; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2017-05-01

    Increased ratio of circulating neutrophils to lymphocytes is a common finding in glioblastoma and other cancers. Data reviewed establish that any damage to brain tissue tends to cause an increase in G-CSF and/or GM-CSF (G(M)-CSF) synthesized by the brain. Glioblastoma cells themselves also synthesize G(M)-CSF. G(M)-CSF synthesized by brain due to damage by a growing tumor and by the tumor itself stimulates bone marrow to shift hematopoiesis toward granulocytic lineages away from lymphocytic lineages. This shift is immunosuppressive and generates the relative lymphopenia characteristic of glioblastoma. Any trauma to brain-be it blunt, sharp, ischemic, infectious, cytotoxic, tumor encroachment, or radiation-increases brain synthesis of G(M)-CSF. G(M)-CSF are growth and motility enhancing factors for glioblastomas. High levels of G(M)-CSF contribute to the characteristic neutrophilia and lymphopenia of glioblastoma. Hematopoietic bone marrow becomes entrained with, directed by, and contributes to glioblastoma pathology. The antibiotic dapsone, the lipid-lowering agent fenofibrate, and the antiviral drug ribavirin are Food and Drug Administration- and European Medicines Agency-approved medicines that have potential to lower synthesis or effects of G(M)-CSF and thus deprive a glioblastoma of some of the growth promoting contributions of bone marrow and G(M)-CSF.

  17. Herbal medicine "sho-saiko-to" induces in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashiki, M; Asakawa, M; Kayaba, Y; Kosaka, Y; Nishimura, A

    1992-01-01

    The herbal medicine "Sho-saiko-to (Xiao-Chai-Hu-Tang)" has been used in China for about 3000 years for the treatment of pyretic diseases. This medicine is now available as one of the prescribing drugs approved by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, and has also been widely used for patients with chronic viral liver disease as one of biological response modifiers in the field of Japan's Western Medicine. However, its mode of action has not been fully described. In the present in vitro study, we added "Sho-saiko-to" (TJ-9, Tsumura, Tokyo) to the culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from healthy volunteers, and observed a dose-dependent increase in the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The same experiment was conducted using other herbal medicines "Dai-saiko-to" (TJ-8) and "Saiko-keishi-to" (TJ-10) which showed similar effects, or "Sho-seiryu-to" (TJ-19) which consists of very different compounds and shows different efficacy. The increases of G-CSF production were similar when "Sho-saiko-to" (TJ-9) or one of the 2 reference drugs (TJ-8 and 10) was added, whereas the increase when the control drug "Sho-seiryu-to" (TJ-19) was added, was quite small. This result shows that G-CSF induction is not a common effect of herbal medicines, but a specific effect of TJ-8, 9, and 10. Among these 3 drugs the increase produced by "Sho-saiko-to" was the largest. Based on this result, we conclude that administration of "Sho-saiko-to" may be useful not only for the treatment of chronic liver disease, but also for malignant diseases and acute infectious diseases where G-CSF is efficacious.

  18. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following adjuvant chemotherapy with and without granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Calip, Gregory S.; Malmgren, Judith A.; Lee, Wan-Ju; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Kaplan, Henry G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) post-breast cancer treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) is not fully characterized. Our objective was to estimate MDS/AML risk associated with specific breast cancer treatments. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women ages ≥66 years with stage I-III breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database. Women were classified as receiving treatment with radiation, chemotherapy and/or G-CSF. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for MDS/AML risk. Results Among 56,251 breast cancer cases, 1.2% developed MDS/AML during median follow-up of 3.2 years. 47.1% of women received radiation and 14.3% received chemotherapy. Compared to breast cancer cases treated with surgery alone, those treated with chemotherapy (HR=1.38, 95%-CI: 0.98–1.93) and chemotherapy/radiation (HR=1.77, 95%-CI: 1.25–2.51) had increased risk of MDS/AML; but not radiation alone (HR=1.08, 95% CI: 0.86–1.36). Among chemotherapy regimens and G-CSF, MDS/AML risk was differentially associated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide-containing regimens (HR=1.86, 95%-CI: 1.33–2.61) and filgrastim (HR=1.47, 95%-CI: 1.05–2.06), but not pegfilgrastim (HR=1.10, 95%-CI: 0.73–1.66). Conclusions We observed increased MDS/AML risk among older breast cancer survivors treated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy that was enhanced by G-CSF. Although small, this risk warrants consideration when determining adjuvant chemotherapy and neutropenia prophylaxis for breast cancer patients. PMID:26450505

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Regulation of MTA1 Expression by Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arathy S.; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Subramanian, Anirudh; Chidambaram, Saravana Babu; Surabhi, Rohan Prasad; Singhal, Mahak; Bhoopalan, Hemadev; Sekar, Sathiya; Pitani, Ravi Shankar; Duvuru, Prathiba; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons of the brain, which results in insufficient synthesis and action of dopamine. Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is an upstream modulator of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, and hence MTA1 plays a significant role in PD pathogenesis. To impart functional and clinical significance to MTA1, we analyzed MTA1 and TH levels in the substantia nigra region of a large cohort of human brain tissue samples by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MTA1 and TH levels were significantly down-regulated in PD samples as compared with normal brain tissue. Correspondingly, immunohistochemistry analysis for MTA1 in substantia nigra sections revealed that 74.1% of the samples had a staining intensity of <6 in the PD samples as compared with controls, 25.9%, with an odds ratio of 8.54. Because of the clinical importance of MTA1 established in PD, we looked at agents to modulate MTA1 expression in neuronal cells, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was chosen, due to its clinically proven neurogenic effects. Treatment of the human neuronal cell line KELLY and acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model with G-CSF showed significant induction of MTA1 and TH with rescue of phenotype in the mouse model. Interestingly, the observed induction of TH was compromised on silencing of MTA1. The underlying molecular mechanism of MTA1 induction by G-CSF was proved to be through induction of c-Fos and its recruitment to the MTA1 promoter. PMID:27044752

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor expression on human transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, M.; Miyakawa, A.; Uchida, A.; Murai, M.; Eguchi, K.; Nakamura, K.; Kubo, A.; Hata, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSFRs) have been confirmed on the cell surfaces of several non-haematopoietic cell types, including bladder cancer cells. This observation has naturally led to the hypothesis that the expression of G-CSFR on these cells may enhance their growth by G-CSF. In this study, the expression of G-CSFR was determined in both established human bladder cancer cell lines and primary bladder cancers. We studied five different human bladder cancer cell lines (KU-1, KU-7, T-24, NBT-2 and KK) and 26 newly diagnosed bladder tumours. G-CSFR mRNA expressions on cultured cell lines were determined using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Furthermore, the G-CSFR binding experiments on the cultured cell lines were conducted using the Na(125)I-labelled G-CSF ligand-binding assay method. Moreover, the G-CSFR mRNA expressions on primary bladder tumour specimens were assessed using the in situ RT-PCR method. Three out of the five cultured cell lines (KU-1, NBT-2 and KK) exhibited G-CSFR mRNA signals when the RT-PCR method was used. The G-CSFR binding experiments showed an equilibrium dissociation constant (K[d]) of 490 pM for KU-1, 340 pM for NBT-2 and 103 pM for KK cells. With in situ RT-PCR, the tumour cells of 6 out of 26 primary bladder tumour specimens (23.1%) presented positive G-CSFR mRNA signals. Thus, in this study, G-CSFR expression was frequently observed on bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the clinical use of G-CSF for patients with bladder cancer should be selected with great care. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9166942

  1. Combination Therapy of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Histopathological and Motor Impairments in an Experimental Model of Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A.; Tajiri, Naoki; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Sanberg, Paul R.; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Song, Shijie; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neuro-inflammation, debilitating sensory-motor deficits, and learning and memory impairments. Cell-based therapies are currently being investigated in treating neurotrauma due to their ability to secrete neurotrophic factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines that can regulate the hostile milieu associated with chronic neuroinflammation found in TBI. In tandem, the stimulation and mobilization of endogenous stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow through granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) poses as an attractive therapeutic intervention for chronic TBI. Here, we tested the potential of a combined therapy of human umbilical cord blood cells (hUCB) and G-CSF at the acute stage of TBI to counteract the progressive secondary effects of chronic TBI using the controlled cortical impact model. Four different groups of adult Sprague Dawley rats were treated with saline alone, G-CSF+saline, hUCB+saline or hUCB+G-CSF, 7-days post CCI moderate TBI. Eight weeks after TBI, brains were harvested to analyze hippocampal cell loss, neuroinflammatory response, and neurogenesis by using immunohistochemical techniques. Results revealed that the rats exposed to TBI treated with saline exhibited widespread neuroinflammation, impaired endogenous neurogenesis in DG and SVZ, and severe hippocampal cell loss. hUCB monotherapy suppressed neuroinflammation, nearly normalized the neurogenesis, and reduced hippocampal cell loss compared to saline alone. G-CSF monotherapy produced partial and short-lived benefits characterized by low levels of neuroinflammation in striatum, DG, SVZ, and corpus callosum and fornix, a modest neurogenesis, and a moderate reduction of hippocampal cells loss. On the other hand, combined therapy of hUCB+G-CSF displayed synergistic effects that robustly dampened neuroinflammation, while enhancing endogenous neurogenesis and reducing hippocampal cell loss. Vigorous and long-lasting recovery of motor function

  2. Toward improving mucosal barrier defenses: rhG-CSF plus IgG antibody.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Aryeh; LaGamma, Edmund F

    2006-11-01

    Epithelial cell functions ultimately define the ability of the extremely low birth weight human fetus to survive outside of the uterus. These specialized epithelial cell capacities manage all human interactions with the ex utero world including: (i) lung mechanics, surface chemistry and gas exchange, (ii) renal tubular balance of fluid and electrolytes, (iii) barrier functions of the intestine and skin for keeping bacteria out and water in, plus enabling intestinal digestion, as well as (iv) maintaining an intact neuroepithelium lining of the ventricles of the brain and retina. In Part I of this two part review, the authors describe why the gut barrier is a clinically relevant model system for studying the complex interplay between innate and adaptive immunity, dendritic &epithelial cell interactions, intraepithelial lymphocytes, M-cells, as well as the gut associated lymphoid tissues where colonization after birth, clinician feeding practices, use of antibiotics as well as exposure to prebiotics, probiotics and maternal vaginal flora all program the neonate for a life-time of immune competence distinguishing "self" from foreign antigens. These barrier defense capacities become destructive during disease processes like necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) when an otherwise maturationally normal, yet dysregulated and immature, immune defense system is associated with high levels of certain inflammatory mediators like TNFa. In Part II the authors discuss the rationale for why rhG-CSF has theoretical advantages in managing NEC or sepsis by augmenting neonatal neutrophil number, neutrophil expression of Fcg and complement receptors, as well as phagocytic function and oxidative burst. rhG-CSF also has potent anti-TNFa functions that may serve to limit extension of tissue destruction while not impairing bacterial killing capacity. Healthy, non-infected neutropenic and septic neonates differ in their ability to respond to rhG-CSF; however, no neonatal clinical trials to date

  3. CEL-I, an invertebrate N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin, induces TNF-alpha and G-CSF production by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2007-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin purified from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea) showed potent cytotoxicity to several cell lines such as HeLa, MDCK and XC cells. In this study, we found that CEL-I induced increased secretion of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas this cell line was highly resistant to CEL-I cytotoxicity. The cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I was stronger than that of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA-L). A binding study using FITC-labelled CEL-I (F-CEL-I) indicated that the amount of bound F-CEL-I on RAW264.7 cells was greater than that of F-PHA-L, suggesting that the greater activity of CEL-I to induce cytokine secretion by RAW264.7 cells is partly due to the higher binding ability. Since the cell binding and cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I were partly but significantly inhibited by the specific sugar (GalNAc), it is considered that the binding of CEL-I to cell-surface-specific saccharide moieties, which may be recognized by CEL-I with higher affinity than GalNAc, is essential for the induction of cytokine secretion. The secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF from CEL-I-treated RAW264.7 cells were almost completely prevented by brefeldin A (BFA), whereas increase in mRNA levels of these cytokines were not affected by BFA. Bio-Plex beads assay suggested that temporal increase in phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase occurred at relatively early time following CEL-I treatment. Furthermore, the secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF were inhibited by specific inhibitors for these MAP kinases. These results suggest that the intracellular signal transduction through the activation of MAP kinase system is involved in CEL-I-induced cytokine secretion.

  4. Combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes the highest number of primitive haemopoietic progenitors as shown by pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, M J; Hui, C H; To, L B; Begley, C G; Basser, R L; Simmons, P J

    2000-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with poor prognosis carcinoma of the breast underwent peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization using five different regimens. The yields of primitive haemopoietic progenitors were quantified by a recently described pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay using limiting dilution analysis (LDA). Results of days 14 and 35 pre-CFU were also correlated with conventional CD34+ cell enumeration, CFU-GM (granulocyte-macrophage) and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTCIC) assays. The yield of pre-CFUs with the combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) was significantly higher than with G-CSF alone, cyclophosphamide (Cyclo) and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and GM-CSF, or Cyclo alone. No significant correlation between neutrophil engraftment and pre-CFU could be demonstrated. Furthermore, CFU-GM was shown to bear a stronger correlation with pre-CFU and LTCIC than CD34+ cell measurement; thus, CFU-GM remains a useful biological tool for haemopoietic stem cell assay. We conclude that the combination of G-CSF and SCF mobilizes the highest number of pre-CFUs as measured by functional pre-CFU assay, which provides an alternative measurement of primitive haemopoietic progenitors to the LTCIC assay.

  5. Protective effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on endotoxin shock in mice with retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toki, S; Hiromatsu, K; Aoki, Y; Makino, M; Yoshikai, Y

    1997-10-01

    Mice with retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS) were hypersensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethal shock accompanied by marked elevations of systematic interleukin 1beta (IL-beta) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) after LPS challenge. Pretreatment with 10 microg of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) protected MAIDS mice from hypersensitivity to LPS-induced lethal shock and this protection was concomitant with suppression of IFN-gamma production. Copyright 1997 Academic Press Limited.

  6. Tumor-derived G-CSF facilitates neoplastic growth through a granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Waight, Jeremy D; Hu, Qiang; Miller, Austin; Liu, Song; Abrams, Scott I

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are induced under diverse pathologic conditions, including neoplasia, and suppress innate and adaptive immunity. While the mechanisms by which MDSC mediate immunosuppression are well-characterized, details on how they develop remain less understood. This is complicated further by the fact that MDSC comprise multiple myeloid cell types, namely monocytes and granulocytes, reflecting diverse stages of differentiation and the proportion of these subpopulations vary among different neoplastic models. Thus, it is thought that the type and quantities of inflammatory mediators generated during neoplasia dictate the composition of the resultant MDSC response. Although much interest has been devoted to monocytic MDSC biology, a fundamental gap remains in our understanding of the derivation of granulocytic MDSC. In settings of heightened granulocytic MDSC responses, we hypothesized that inappropriate production of G-CSF is a key initiator of granulocytic MDSC accumulation. We observed abundant amounts of G-CSF in vivo, which correlated with robust granulocytic MDSC responses in multiple tumor models. Using G-CSF loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we demonstrated for the first time that: 1) abrogating G-CSF production significantly diminished granulocytic MDSC accumulation and tumor growth; 2) ectopically over-expressing G-CSF in G-CSF-negative tumors significantly augmented granulocytic MDSC accumulation and tumor growth; and 3) treatment of naïve healthy mice with recombinant G-CSF protein elicited granulocytic-like MDSC remarkably similar to those induced under tumor-bearing conditions. Collectively, we demonstrated that tumor-derived G-CSF enhances tumor growth through granulocytic MDSC-dependent mechanisms. These findings provide us with novel insights into MDSC subset development and potentially new biomarkers or targets for cancer therapy.

  7. rhG-CSF does not affect the phenotype of adult donor peripheral blood NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lassailly, F; Sielleur, I; Blaise, D; Chabannon, C

    2005-01-01

    Considerable evidence in preclinical models as well as in human transplantation now suggests that donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells can contribute to alloimmune recognition of recipient residual tumour cells. This makes the NK cell population an attractive target for in vitro or in vivo manipulations, in order to improve the antitumour effect of allogeneic transplantation. However, conditions in which allogeneic donor cells are collected vary; several reports have emphasised the different phenotypic and functional properties of T cells derived from marrow, cord blood or mobilised peripheral blood grafts; others have demonstrated different clinical outcomes following blood or marrow transplantation after myeloablative conditioning regimens. NK cells have been examined in this setting; the availability of new tools to study the expression of a variety of surface antigens that are involved in the control of NK cell activity offered us an opportunity to extensively characterise the phenotypic properties of NK cells from donors, before and after administration of pharmacological doses of rhG-CSF used for haematopoietic progenitor mobilisation. Our study suggests that rhG-CSF does not reproducibly alter blood NK cell phenotype in normal individuals, and thus that donor-derived cells are fully equipped to exert their potential antitumour effect.

  8. Nuclear phospholipid scramblase 1 prolongs the mitotic expansion of granulocyte precursors during G-CSF-induced granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Sowden, Mark; Zhao, Qian; Wiedmer, Therese; Sims, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    PLSCR1−/− mice exhibit normal, steady-state hematologic parameters but impaired emergency granulopoiesis upon in vivo administration of G-CSF. The mechanism by which PLSCR1 contributes to G-CSF-induced neutrophil production is largely unknown. We now report that the expansion of bone marrow myelocytes upon in vivo G-CSF treatment is reduced in PLSCR1−/− mice relative to WT. Using SCF-ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitors to examine the progression of G-CSF-driven granulocytic differentiation in vitro, we found that PLSCR1 prolongs the period of mitotic expansion of proliferative granulocyte precursors, thereby giving rise to increased neutrophil production from their progenitors. This effect of PLSCR1 is blocked by a ΔNLS-PLSCR1, which prevents its nuclear import. By contrast, mutation that prevents the membrane association of PLSCR1 has minimal impact on the role of PLSCR1 in G-CSF-induced granulopoiesis. These data imply that the capacity of PLSCR1 to augment G-CSF-dependent production of mature neutrophils from myeloid progenitors is unrelated to its reported activities at the endofacial surface of the plasma membrane but does require entry of the protein into the nucleus, suggesting that this response is mediated through the observed effects of PLSCR1 on gene transcription. PMID:21447647

  9. The hematopoietic factor GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) promotes neuronal differentiation of adult neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Carola; Laage, Rico; Pitzer, Claudia; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Schneider, Armin

    2007-10-22

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in the generation of granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells from hematopoietic progenitor cells. We have recently demonstrated that GM-CSF has anti-apoptotic functions on neurons, and is neuroprotective in animal stroke models. The GM-CSF receptor alpha is expressed on adult neural stem cells in the rodent brain, and in culture. Addition of GM-CSF to NSCs in vitro increased neuronal differentiation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by quantitative PCR, reporter gene assays, and FACS analysis. Similar to the hematopoietic factor Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), GM-CSF stimulates neuronal differentiation of adult NSCs. These data highlight the astonishingly similar functions of major hematopoietic factors in the brain, and raise the clinical attractiveness of GM-CSF as a novel drug for neurological disorders.

  10. First-line combination chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide and ifosfamide for the treatment of disseminated germ cell cancer: re-evaluation in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor era.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hajime; Yuasa, Takeshi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Sakura, Mizuaki; Urakami, Shinji; Yamamoto, Shinya; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fukui, Iwao; Yonese, Junji

    2013-01-01

    This study re-evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of cisplatin, etoposide, and ifosfamide (VIP) combination chemotherapy as an alternative first-line regimen for patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) in this granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) era. The medical records of 91 consecutive patients with previously untreated disseminated GCC who received first-line VIP between 1995 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The 5-year overall survival rates for patients with good (n = 49), intermediate (n = 22) and poor (n = 20) prognoses according to the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group classification were 100, 79 and 83%, respectively. G-CSF was given to all patients, and no treatment-related deaths due to myelosuppression occurred. The present study is the first to examine the therapeutic outcomes and safety profile of first-line VIP after routine G-CSF use. VIP might be an alternative first-line regimen for patients with disseminated GCC in this G-CSF era. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Overview of use of G-CSF and GM-CSF in the treatment of acute radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Glen

    2014-06-01

    Depression of hematopoietic elements due to significant levels of whole-body or partial-body irradiation due to radiation-induced suppression of mitosis in the stem and progenitor cells can result in life-threatening injury. Successful administration of intensive care of patients experiencing acute radiation sickness (ARS; also called acute radiation syndrome) is dependent upon the ability to stimulate the recovery of surviving hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), assuming the non-hematopoietic injuries are also survivable with treatment. To date, there have been a number of studies involving radiation accidents where patients were treated with cytokines. Although the data overall seem to indicate that the period of neutropenia is shortened and survival prolonged, so far there is no statistically significant proof that cytokine administration actually decreases mortality in radiation-injured humans. Some studies have shown no improved survival when used in a mouse model; however, studies in canines and primates have shown improved survival. CSF therapy is considered a valuable adjunct to treatment with antibiotics and strict hygiene controls in certain irradiated patients. It appears that these drugs do shorten the periods of neutropenia in irradiated patients and must be considered part of the therapeutic armamentarium in the treatment of ARS in a mass casualty situation. Based on review of the human experience with G-CSF and GM-CSF, as well as some animal studies, current consensus opinions support the prompt administration of these materials to patients suffering significant bone marrow depression from exposure to ionizing radiation.

  12. Design Rationale and Development Approach for Pegfilgrastim as a Long-Acting Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

    PubMed

    Arvedson, Tara; O'Kelly, James; Yang, Bing-Bing

    2015-06-01

    Filgrastim, a recombinant methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (r-metHuG-CSF), is efficacious in stimulating neutrophil production and maturation to prevent febrile neutropenia (FN) in response to chemotherapy. Because of its relatively short circulating half-life, daily filgrastim injections are required to stimulate neutrophil recovery. In an effort to develop a long-acting form of filgrastim that was as safe and efficacious as filgrastim but had a longer in vivo residence time, a number of strategies were considered. Ultimately, fusion of filgrastim to polyethylene glycol (PEG) was selected. Following extensive analysis of conjugation chemistries as well as in vitro and in vivo characterization of a panel of PEGylated proteins, a construct containing a 20 kDa PEG moiety covalently conjugated to the N-terminus of filgrastim was chosen for advancement as pegfilgrastim. Pegfilgrastim is primarily cleared by neutrophils and neutrophil precursors (rather than the kidneys), meaning that clearance from the circulation is self-regulating and pegfilgrastim is eliminated only after neutrophils start to recover. Importantly, addition of PEG did not alter the mechanism of action and safety profile compared to filgrastim. Clinical evaluation revealed that a single 6 mg dose effectively reduces the duration of neutropenia and risk of FN in patients receiving chemotherapy. This work demonstrates the benefit of using PEGylation to generate pegfilgrastim, which allows for once-per-chemotherapy cycle administration while maintaining similar safety and efficacy profiles as those for multiple daily administration of filgrastim. Approaches that may provide advances for therapeutic agonists of G-CSF receptor are also discussed.

  13. Basal CD34+ Cell Count Predicts Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Healthy Donors after Administration of G-CSF: a Longitudinal, Prospective, Observational, Single-Center, Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Gori, Mercedes; Pitino, Annalisa; Gentile, Massimo; Dattola, Antonia; Pontari, Antonella; Vigna, Ernesto; Moscato, Tiziana; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Barilla', Santina; Tripepi, Giovanni; Morabito, Fortunato

    2017-03-24

    A longitudinal, prospective, observational, single-center, cohort study on healthy donors (HDs) was designed to identify predictors of CD34+ cells on day 5 with emphasis on the predictive value of the basal CD34+ cell count. As potential predictors of mobilization, age, sex, body weight, height, blood volume as well as white blood cell count, peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells, platelet count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were considered. Two different evaluations of CD34+ cell counts were determined for each donor: baseline (before granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF] administration) and in PB after G-CSF administration on the morning of the fifth day (day 5). A total 128 consecutive HDs (66 males) with a median age of 43 years were enrolled. CD34+ levels on day 5 displayed a non-normal distribution with a median value of 75.5 cells/µL. To account for the non-normal distribution of the dependent variable, a quantile regression analysis to predict CD34+ on day 5 using the baseline value of CD34+ as the key predictor was performed. On crude analysis, a baseline value of CD34+ ranging from 0.5 to 1 cells/µL predicts a median value of 50 cells/µL on day 5; a value of 2 cells/µL predicts a median value of 70.7 cells/µL; a value of 3-4 cells/µL predicts a median value of 91.3 cells/µL, and a value ≥ 5 predicts a median value of 112 cells/µL. In conclusion, the baseline PB CD34+ cell count correlates with the effectiveness of allogeneic PBSC mobilization and could be useful to plan the collection.

  14. Contribution of G-CSF to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Voest, Emile E.; Chaplin, David; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C.; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow derived circulating endothelial precursor cells (CEPs) can promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second generation potent pro-drug derivative of combretastatin-A 4 phosphate (CA4P), rapid increases in circulating plasma VEGF, SDF-1, and G-CSF levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R−/− mice were treated with OXI-4503. We found that as opposed to wildtype controls, G-CSF-R−/− mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared to tumors treated in wildtype mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, VEGF, and SDF-1 were also observed in VDA (CA4P) treated cancer patients. These results highlight the possible impact of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor re-growth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target. PMID:19738066

  15. G-CSF-Associated Bone Marrow Necrosis in AML after Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Osuorji, Ikenna; Goldman, Lyle

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow necrosis (BMN) is defined as necrosis of the myeloid tissues and stroma without involvement of the cortical bone. We report a case of 66-year-old male with AML-M4 (FAB classification) who was given induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and daunorubicin. Filgrastim at 480 micrograms was administered on days 15-19 to shorten the duration of neutropenia. Consequently patient developed severe pelvic bone pain, leukoerythroblastosis, and severe leukocytosis. Repeat bone marrow aspiration and biopsy on day 21 confirmed bone marrow necrosis. These manifestations responded quickly to discontinuation of filgrastim. Subsequently, he recovered full myelopoiesis. We suggest that there may be more cases of BMN associated with G-CSF that are undiagnosed.

  16. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  17. Haploidentical, G-CSF-primed, unmanipulated bone marrow transplantation for patients with high-risk hematological malignancies: an update.

    PubMed

    Arcese, W; Picardi, A; Santarone, S; De Angelis, G; Cerretti, R; Cudillo, L; Pennese, E; Bavaro, P; Olioso, P; Dentamaro, T; Cupelli, L; Chierichini, A; Ferrari, A; Mengarelli, A; Tirindelli, M C; Testi, M; Di Piazza, F; Di Bartolomeo, P

    2015-06-01

    Ninety-seven patients affected by high-risk hematological malignancies underwent G-CSF primed, unmanipulated bone marrow (BM) transplantation from a related, haploidentical donor. All patients were prepared with an identical conditioning regimen including Thiotepa, Busilvex, Fludarabine (TBF) and antithymocyte globulin given at myeloablative (MAC = 68) or reduced (reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) = 29) dose intensity and received the same GvHD prophylaxis consisting of the combination of methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycofenolate-mofetil and basiliximab. Patients were transplanted in 1st or 2nd CR (early phase: n = 60) or in > 2nd CR or active disease (advanced phase: n = 37). With a median time of 21 days (range 12-38 days), the cumulative incidence (CI) of neutrophil engraftment was 94 ± 3%. The 100-day CI of III-IV grade acute GvHD and the 2-year CI of extensive chronic GvHD were 9 ± 3% and 12 ± 4%, respectively. Overall, at a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 0.3-5.6), 44 out of 97 (45%) patients are alive in CR. The 5-year probability of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for patients in early and advanced phase was 53 ± 7 vs 24 ± 8% (P = 0.006) and 48 ± 7 vs 22 ± 8% (P = 0.01), respectively. By comparing MAC with RIC patient groups, the transplant-related mortality was equivalent (36 ± 6 vs 28 ± 9%) while the relapse risk was lower for the MAC patients (22 ± 6 vs 45 ± 11%), who showed higher OS (48 ± 7 vs 29 ± 10%) and DFS (43 ± 7 vs 26 ± 10%). However, all these differences did not reach a statistical significance. In multivariate analysis, diagnosis and recipient age were significant factors for OS and DFS. In conclusion, this analysis confirms, on a longer follow-up and higher number of patients, our previous encouraging results obtained by using MAC and RIC TBF regimen as conditioning for G-CSF primed, unmanipulated BM transplantation from related, haploidentical donor in patients with high-risk hematological

  18. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor and Physiotherapy after Stroke: Results of a Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial: Stem Cell Trial of Recovery EnhanceMent after Stroke-3 (STEMS-3 ISRCTN16714730).

    PubMed

    Sprigg, Nikola; O'Connor, Rebecca; Woodhouse, Lisa; Krishnan, Kailash; England, Timothy J; Connell, Louise A; Walker, Marion F; Bath, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises endogenous haematopoietic stem cells and enhances recovery in experimental stroke. Recovery may also be dependent on an enriched environment and physical activity. G-CSF may have the potential to enhance recovery when used in combination with physiotherapy, in patients with disability late after stroke. A pilot 2 x 2 factorial randomised (1:1) placebo-controlled trial of G-CSF (double-blind), and/or a 6 week course of physiotherapy, in 60 participants with disability (mRS >1), at least 3 months after stroke. Primary outcome was feasibility, acceptability and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included death, dependency, motor function and quality of life measured 90 and 365 days after enrolment. Recruitment to the trial was feasible and acceptable; of 118 screened patients, 92 were eligible and 32 declined to participate. 60 patients were recruited between November 2011 and July 2013. All participants received some allocated treatment. Although 29 out of 30 participants received all 5 G-CSF/placebo injections, only 7 of 30 participants received all 18 therapy sessions. G-CSF was well tolerated but associated with a tendency to more adverse events than placebo (16 vs 10 patients, p = 0.12) and serious adverse events (SAE) (9 vs 3, p = 0.10). On average, patients received 14 (out of 18 planned) therapy sessions, interquartile range [12, 17]. Only a minority (23%) of participants completed all physiotherapy sessions, a large proportion of sessions (114 of 540, 21%) were cancelled due to patient (94, 17%) and therapist factors (20, 4%). No significant differences in functional outcomes were detected in either the G-CSF or physiotherapy group at day 90 or 365. Delivery of G-CSF is feasible in chronic stroke. However, the study failed to demonstrate feasibility for delivering additional physiotherapy sessions late after stroke therefore a definitive study using this trial design is not supported. Future work should

  19. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor and Physiotherapy after Stroke: Results of a Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial: Stem Cell Trial of Recovery EnhanceMent after Stroke-3 (STEMS-3 ISRCTN16714730)

    PubMed Central

    Sprigg, Nikola; O’Connor, Rebecca; Woodhouse, Lisa; Krishnan, Kailash; England, Timothy J.; Connell, Louise A.; Walker, Marion F.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises endogenous haematopoietic stem cells and enhances recovery in experimental stroke. Recovery may also be dependent on an enriched environment and physical activity. G-CSF may have the potential to enhance recovery when used in combination with physiotherapy, in patients with disability late after stroke. Methods A pilot 2 x 2 factorial randomised (1:1) placebo-controlled trial of G-CSF (double-blind), and/or a 6 week course of physiotherapy, in 60 participants with disability (mRS >1), at least 3 months after stroke. Primary outcome was feasibility, acceptability and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included death, dependency, motor function and quality of life measured 90 and 365 days after enrolment. Results Recruitment to the trial was feasible and acceptable; of 118 screened patients, 92 were eligible and 32 declined to participate. 60 patients were recruited between November 2011 and July 2013. All participants received some allocated treatment. Although 29 out of 30 participants received all 5 G-CSF/placebo injections, only 7 of 30 participants received all 18 therapy sessions. G-CSF was well tolerated but associated with a tendency to more adverse events than placebo (16 vs 10 patients, p = 0.12) and serious adverse events (SAE) (9 vs 3, p = 0.10). On average, patients received 14 (out of 18 planned) therapy sessions, interquartile range [12, 17]. Only a minority (23%) of participants completed all physiotherapy sessions, a large proportion of sessions (114 of 540, 21%) were cancelled due to patient (94, 17%) and therapist factors (20, 4%). No significant differences in functional outcomes were detected in either the G-CSF or physiotherapy group at day 90 or 365. Conclusions Delivery of G-CSF is feasible in chronic stroke. However, the study failed to demonstrate feasibility for delivering additional physiotherapy sessions late after stroke therefore a definitive study using this trial design

  20. Efficacy of granulocyte colony stimulating factor as a secondary prophylaxis along with full-dose chemotherapy following a prior cycle of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Seema; Singh, Pankaj K; Bhatt, Madan L B; Pant, Mohan C; Gupta, Rajeev; Negi, Mahendra P S

    2010-10-01

    Secondary prophylaxis with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is recommended where patients have experienced febrile neutropenia in an earlier chemotherapy cycle and for whom the maintenance of chemotherapy dose intensity is important; or where febrile neutropenia has not occurred but prolonged neutropenia is causing excessive dose delay or reduction, where maintenance of dose intensity is important. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of G-CSF as secondary prophylaxis when used along with full dose moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy following a prior cycle with febrile-neutropenia. Fifty-two patients aged 22-75 years with febrile neutropenia that required intravenous antibiotics following moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy were included. These patients received the next cycle of the same chemotherapy regime without dose modification but with support of filgrastim 24 h after completion of chemotherapy (300 μg/day/subcutaneously (s.c.) for weight < 60 kg, 480 μg/day/s.c. for weight > 60 kg, for at least 10 consecutive days), patients in whom neutropenia was associated with a life-threatening infection and those who developed prolonged myelosuppression were excluded. The use of the hematopoietic growth factor G-CSF was shown to shorten the neutrophil recovery time, resulting in significant reduction of incidence of febrile neutropenia, hospitalization and use of broad spectrum antibiotics. There was no drug related death or adverse events associated with either cycle. In conclusion, recombinant human G-CSF is effective and relatively safe as a secondary prophylaxis with full dose chemotherapy in patients who develop febrile neutropenia following prior cycles of moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy.

  1. Treatment of adjuvant arthritis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and peptide derived from heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed

    Brendolan, Andrea; Higuchi, Masanori; Sibley, Richard; Strober, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats is induced by the subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil, and the predominant T cell immune reactivity is against the heat shock protein 65 derived peptide 176-190. We treated Lewis rats with human recombinant G-CSF followed by (i.v) administration of peptide 176-190 after induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA), and observed decreased disease severity, joint destruction, new bone formation and joint ankylosis. Treatment with G-CSF alone was also effective, but to a lesser extent. In addition, we found that splenocytes from rats treated with G-CSF had reduced antigen presenting capacity compared with splenocytes from vehicle treated rats. Primed lymph node cells from G-CSF plus peptide treated rats showed a marked reduction in proliferation and secretion of IFN-gamma after stimulation with the heat shock protein peptide in vitro as compared to controls.

  2. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  3. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  4. Therapeutic administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor accelerates hemopoietic regeneration and enhances survival in a murine model of radiation-induced myelosuppression

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The primary cause of death after radiation exposure is infection resulting from myelosuppression. Because granulocytes play a critical role in host defense against infection and because granulocyte proliferation and differentiation are enhanced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), this agent was evaluated for the ability to accelerate hemopoietic regeneration and to enhance survival in irradiated mice. C3H/HeN mice were irradiated and G-CSF or saline was administered on days 3-12, 1-12 or 0-12 post-irradiation. Bone marrow, splenic and peripheral blood cellularity and bone marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell recoveries were evaluated in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy. Mice exposed to 8 Gy were evaluated for multipotent hemopoietic stem cell recovery (using endogenous spleen colony-forming units) and enhanced survival. Results demonstrated that therapeutic G-CSF (1) accelerates hemopoietic regeneration after radiation-induced myelosuppression, (2) enhances survival after potentially lethal irradiation and (3) is most effective when initiated 1 h following exposure.

  5. Therapeutic administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor accelerates hemopoietic regeneration and enhances survival in a murine model of radiation-induced myelosuppression

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M. )

    1990-03-01

    The primary cause of death after radiation exposure is infection resulting from myelosuppression. Because granulocytes play a critical role in host defense against infection and because granulocyte proliferation and differentiation are enhanced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), this agent was evaluated for the ability to accelerate hemopoietic regeneration and to enhance survival in irradiated mice. C3H/HeN mice were irradiated and G-CSF (2.5 micrograms/day, s.c.) or saline was administered on days 3-12, 1-12 or 0-12 post-irradiation. Bone marrow, splenic and peripheral blood cellularity, and bone marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell recoveries were evaluated in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy. Mice exposed to 8 Gy were evaluated for multipotent hemopoietic stem cell recovery (using endogenous spleen colony-forming units) and enhanced survival. Results demonstrated that therapeutic G-CSF (1) accelerates hemopoietic regeneration after radiation-induced myelosuppression, (2) enhances survival after potentially lethal irradiation and (3) is most effective when initiated 1 h following exposure.

  6. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  7. The use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor induced mobilization for isolation of dental pulp stem cells with high regenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masashi; Horibe, Hiroshi; Iohara, Koichiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Osako, Yohei; Takei, Yoshifumi; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Motoyama, Noboru; Kurita, Kenichi; Nakashima, Misako

    2013-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) contain subsets of progenitor/stem cells with high angiogenic, neurogenic and regenerative potential useful for cell therapy. It is essential to develop a safe and efficacious method to isolate the clinical-grade DPSCs subsets from a small amount of pulp tissue without using conventional flow cytometry. Thus, a method for isolation of DPSCs subsets based on their migratory response to optimized concentration of 100 ng/ml of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was determined in this study. The DPSCs mobilized by G-CSF (MDPSCs) were enriched for CD105, C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4) and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) positive cells, demonstrating stem cell properties including high proliferation rate and stability. The absence of abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype and lack of tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse were demonstrated. The conditioned medium of MDPSCs exhibited anti-apoptotic activity, enhanced migration and immunomodulatory properties. Furthermore, transplantation of MDPSCs accelerated vasculogenesis in an ischemic hindlimb model and augmented regenerated pulp tissue in an ectopic tooth root model compared to that of colony-derived DPSCs, indicating higher regenerative potential of MDPSCs. In conclusion, this isolation method for DPSCs subsets is safe and efficacious, having utility for potential clinical applications to autologous cell transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of Aggressive Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Depends on Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Secretion in Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Owens, Philip; Gorska, Agnieszka E; Chytil, Anna; Ye, Fei; Shi, Chanjuan; Weaver, Valerie M; Kalluri, Raghu; Moses, Harold L; Novitskiy, Sergey V

    2017-09-01

    The survival rate for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains low. More therapeutic options to treat this disease are needed, for the current standard of care is ineffective. Using an animal model of aggressive PDAC (Kras/p48(TGFβRIIKO)), we discovered an effect of TGFβ signaling in regulation of G-CSF secretion in pancreatic epithelium. Elevated concentrations of G-CSF in PDAC promoted differentiation of Ly6G(+) cells from progenitors, stimulated IL10 secretion from myeloid cells, and decreased T-cell proliferation via upregulation of Arg, iNOS, VEGF, IL6, and IL1b from CD11b(+) cells. Deletion of csf3 in PDAC cells or use of a G-CSF-blocking antibody decreased tumor growth. Anti-G-CSF treatment in combination with the DNA synthesis inhibitor gemcitabine reduced tumor size, increased the number of infiltrating T cells, and decreased the number of Ly6G(+) cells more effectively than gemcitabine alone. Human analysis of human datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas and tissue microarrays correlated with observations from our mouse model experiments, especially in patients with grade 1, stage II disease. We propose that in aggressive PDAC, elevated G-CSF contributes to tumor progression through promoting increases in infiltration of neutrophil-like cells with high immunosuppressive activity. Such a mechanism provides an avenue for a neoadjuvant therapeutic approach for this devastating disease. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(9); 718-29. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Characterization of buffy coat-derived granulocytes for clinical use: a comparison with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/dexamethasone-pretreated donor-derived products.

    PubMed

    van de Geer, A; Gazendam, R P; Tool, A T J; van Hamme, J L; de Korte, D; van den Berg, T K; Zeerleder, S S; Kuijpers, T W

    2017-02-01

    Buffy coat-derived granulocytes have been described as an alternative to the apheresis product from donors pretreated with dexamethasone and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The latter is - dependent on the local and national settings - obtained following a demanding and time-consuming procedure, which is undesirable in critically ill septic patients. In contrast, buffy coat-derived products have a large volume and are often heavily contaminated with red cells and platelets. We developed a new pooled buffy coat-derived product with high purity and small volume, and performed a comprehensive functional characterization of these granulocytes. We pooled ten buffy coats following the production of platelet concentrates. Saline 0·9% was added to decrease the viscosity and the product was split into plasma, red cells and a 'super' buffy coat. Functional data of the granulocytes were compared to those obtained with granulocytes from healthy controls and G-CSF/dexamethasone-pretreated donors. Buffy coat-derived granulocytes showed adhesion, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species production, degranulation, NETosis and in vitro killing of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus species comparable to control and G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Candida killing was superior compared to G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Immunophenotyping was normal; especially no signs of activation in the buffy coat-derived granulocytes were seen. Viability was reduced. Buffy coats are readily available in the regular blood production process and would take away the concerns around the apheresis product. The product described appears a promising alternative for transfusion purposes. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  10. The effect of ammonia on the O-linked glycosylation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor produced by chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, D.C.; Goochee, C.F.

    1995-07-05

    Ammonium ion concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 mM are shown to significantly reduce the sialylation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) produced by recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells. Specifically, the degree of completion of the final reaction in the O-linked glycosylation pathway, the addition of sialic acid in an {alpha}(2,6) linkage to N-acetylgalactosamine, is reduced by NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentrations of as low as 2 mM. The effect of ammonia on sialylation is rapid, sustained, and does not affect the secretion rate of G-CSF. Additionally, the effect can be mimicked using the weak base chloroquine, suggesting that the effect is related to the weak base characteristics of ammonia. In support of this hypothesis, experiments using brefeldin A suggest that the addition of sialic acid in an {alpha}(2,6) linkage to N-acetylgalactosamine occurs in the trans-Golgi compartment prior to the trans-Golgi network, which would be expected under normal conditions to have a slightly acidic pH in the range from 6.5 to 6.75. Ammonium ion concentrations of 10mM would be expected to reduce significantly the differences in pH between acidic intracellular compartments and the cytoplasm. The pH-activity profile for the CHO O-linked {alpha}(2,6)sialytransferase using monosialylated G-CSF as a substrate reveals a twofold decrease in enzymatic activity across the pH range from 6.75 to 7.0. Mathematical modeling of this sialylation reaction supports the hypothesis that this twofold decrease in sialyltransferase activity resulting from an ammonia-induced increase in trans-Golgi pH could produce the observed decrease in G-CSF sialylation.

  11. E-ring 8-isoprostanes are agonists at EP2- and EP4-prostanoid receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells and regulate the release of colony-stimulating factors by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Deborah L; Belvisi, Maria G; Hardaker, Elizabeth; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2005-02-01

    8-Isoprostanes are bioactive lipid mediators formed via the nonenzymatic peroxidation of arachidonic acid by free radicals and reactive oxygen species. However, their cognate receptors, biological actions, and signaling pathways are poorly studied. Here, we report the effect of a variety of E- and Falpha-ring 8-isoprostanes on the release of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) from human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The elaboration of GM-CSF and G-CSF by IL-1beta was inhibited and augmented, respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner by 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG) E(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2), but not by 8-iso-PGF(1alpha), 8-iso-PGF(2alpha), and 8-iso-PGF(3)alpha. AH 6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthine-2-carboxylic acid), an EP(1)-/EP(2)-/DP-receptor blocking drug, antagonized the inhibitory effect of 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2) on GM-CSF output with an affinity consistent with an interaction at prostanoid receptors of the EP(2)-subtype. In contrast, the facilitation by 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2) of G-CSF release was unaffected by AH 6809 and the selective EP(4)-receptor antagonist L-161,982 [4'-[3-butyl-5-oxo-1-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-1,5-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazol-4-ylmethyl]-biphenyl-2-sulfonic acid (3-methyl-thiophene-2-carbonyl)-amide]. However, when used in combination, AH 6809 and L-161,982 displaced 5-fold to the right the 8-iso-PGE and 8-iso-PGE concentration-response curves. The opposing (1)effect of E-ring (2)8-isoprostanes on GM-CSF and G-CSF release was mimicked by 8-bromo-cAMP and abolished in cells infected with an adenovirus vector encoding an inhibitor protein of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Together, these data demonstrate that E-ring 8-isoprostanes regulate the secretion of GM-CSF and G-CSF from HASM cells by a cAMP- and PKA-dependent mechanism. Moreover, antagonist studies revealed that 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2

  12. Granulocyte, granulocyte–macrophage, and macrophage colony-stimulating factors can stimulate the invasive capacity of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, X-H; Nakanishi, Y; Takayama, K; Bai, F; Hara, N

    1999-01-01

    We and other researchers have previously found that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), which generally include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), promote invasion by lung cancer cells. In the present study, we studied the effects of these CSFs on gelatinase production, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) production and their activity in human lung cancer cells. Gelatin zymographs of conditioned media derived from human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed two major bands of gelatinase activity at 68 and 92 kDa, which were characterized as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 respectively. Treatment with CSFs increased the 68- and 92-kDa activity and converted some of a 92-kDa proenzyme to an 82-kDa enzyme that was consistent with an active form of the MMP-9. Plasminogen activator zymographs of the conditioned media from the cancer cells showed that CSF treatment resulted in an increase in a 48–55 kDa plasminogen-dependent gelatinolytic activity that was characterized as human uPA. The conditioned medium from the cancer cells treated with CSFs stimulated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, providing a direct demonstration of the ability of enhanced uPA to increase plasmin-dependent proteolysis. The enhanced invasive behaviour of the cancer cells stimulated by CSFs was well correlated with the increase in MMPs and uPA activities. These data suggest that the enhanced production of extracellular matrix-degrading proteinases by the cancer cells in response to CSF treatment may represent a biochemical mechanism which promotes the invasive behaviour of the cancer cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408691

  13. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  14. Increased susceptibility to liver injury after hemorrhagic shock in rats chronically fed ethanol: role of nuclear factor-kappa B, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masafumi; Yu, Bi; Hardison, Edith G; Mastrangelo, Mary-Ann A; Tweardy, David J

    2004-06-01

    Chronic ethanol use preceding severe trauma and hemorrhagic shock (HS) is associated with an increased incidence of multiorgan failure (MOF) and death; however, the molecular basis for this increased susceptibility is unknown. We previously demonstrated that production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), mediated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), each make essential contributions to organ injury and inflammation in a rodent model of controlled HS, and we proposed in this study to examine the hypothesis that the increased susceptibility to MOF after shock/trauma in the setting of chronic ethanol use is due to an exaggerated activation of NF-kappa B and production of these proinflammatory cytokines. We observed increased HS-induced liver injury 4 h after resuscitation in rats fed the ethanol-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks compared with rats fed the control liquid diet (3-fold increase in serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT], P = 0.008, and 2-fold increase in focal liver necrosis, P = 0.005). The increased liver injury in the ethanol-fed HS rats was accompanied by a 70% increase in liver NF-kappa B activation (P < 0.05), a 3- to 5-fold increase in hepatocyte and Kupffer cell production of IL-6 and G-CSF (P < 0.05 for each), and a 2-fold increase in neutrophil infiltration (P < 0.005) compared with the control diet-fed HS rats. Thus, increased susceptibility to HS-induced liver injury in the setting of chronic ethanol use may be mediated, at least in part, by increased NF-kappa B activation resulting in increased local production of IL-6 and G-CSF and increased infiltration of neutrophils, which can damage liver cells directly and contribute to impaired sinusoidal blood flow.

  15. Effects of priming with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on conditioning regimen for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing human leukocyte antigen-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a multicenter randomized controlled study in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wen, Qin; Chen, Xinghua; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Li; Kong, Peiyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Li, Yunlong; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qingyu; Su, Yi; Wang, Chunsen; Wang, Sanbin; Zeng, Yun; Sun, Aihua; Du, Xin; Zeng, Dongfeng; Liu, Hong; Peng, Xiangui; Zhang, Xi

    2014-12-01

    HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) is an effective and immediate treatment for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (HR-AML) patients lacking matched donors. Relapse remains the leading cause of death for HR-AML patients after haplo-HSCT. Accordingly, the prevention of relapse remains a challenge in the treatment of HR-AML. In a multicenter randomized controlled trial in southwestern China, 178 HR-AML patients received haplo-HSCT with conditioning regimens involving recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) or non-rhG-CSF. The cumulative incidences of relapse and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), 2-year leukemia-free survival (LFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. HR-AML patients who underwent the priming conditioning regimen with rhG-CSF had a lower relapse rate than those who were treated with non-rhG-CSF (38.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 28.1% to 48.3% versus 60.7%, 95% CI, 50.5% to 70.8%; P < .01). The cumulative incidences of acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, transplantation-related toxicity, and infectious complications appeared to be equivalent. In total, 53 patients in the rhG-CSF-priming group and 31 patients in the non-rhG-CSF-priming group were still alive at the median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 24 to 80 months). The 2-year probabilities of LFS and OS in the rhG-CSF-priming and non-rhG-CSF-priming groups were 55.1% (95% CI, 44.7% to 65.4%) versus 32.6% (95% CI, 22.8% to 42.3%) (P < .01) and 59.6% (95% CI, 49.4% to 69.7%) versus 34.8% (95% CI, 24.9% to 44.7%) (P < .01), respectively. Multivariate analyses indicated that the 2-year probability of LFS of patients who achieved complete remission (CR) before transplantation was better than that of patients who did not achieve CR. The 2-year probability of LFS of patients with no M4/M5/M6 subtype was better than that of patients with the M4/M5/M6 subtype in the G-CSF-priming group (67.4%; 95% CI, 53.8% to 80.9% versus 41.9%; 95% CI, 27

  16. G-CSF therapy and catheter-related Gram-positive sepsis increase serum IL-2 receptor α level and may falsely suggest a relapse in children with soft tissue sarcomas unless serum beta2-microglobulin, lactate dehydrogenase and C-reactive protein levels are determined concomitantly.

    PubMed

    Bien, Ewa; Balcerska, Anna; Niedzwiecki, Maciej; Krawczyk, Malgorzata; Rapala, Malgorzata; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Stepinski, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Many components of oncologic treatment increase serum sIL-2Rα level, which may falsely suggest a relapse. We tried to establish whether granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and central vein catheter (CVC)-related sepsis increase serum sIL-2Rα level to values on relapse of childhood soft tissue sarcomas (STS) and how to distinguish real relapse from a "false" one. Serum sIL-2Rα, B2-M, LDH, CRP and ESR levels and rates of markers' elevated values were determined prospectively in 18 STS children: pre-treatmently (ST1), in complete remission (CR; ST2), in CR during G-CSF therapy (ST3), in CR during CVC-related sepsis (ST4), on relapse (ST5) and after treatment (ST6) and once in 50 healthy pediatric controls. It appeared that pre-treatment serum sIL-2Rα, LDH, CRP and ESR but not B2-M declined significantly with remission (ST2) achievement. At ST5 sIL-2Rα, B2-M, LDH and CRP increased from ST2 to ST1 values. SIL-2Rα levels at ST3 and ST4 rose significantly in all patients from ST2 to ST1 and ST5 values. At ST3 also serum LDH and B2-M increased to values at ST1 and ST5 and exceeded significantly those at ST2 and ST4. At ST4 CRP but not B2-M and LDH, rose significantly in most patients to values at ST1 and ST5. Thus, serum sIL-2Rα monitoring in pediatric STS reflects well response to chemotherapy unless samples are collected during G-CSF therapy or CVC-related sepsis. Determination of serum B2-M, LDH and CRP together with sIL-2Rα may help to distinguish between "real" relapse and "false" sIL-2Rα increase due to G-CSF administration or CVC-related sepsis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biweekly docetaxel and vinorelbine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support for patients with anthracycline-resistant metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bernal, Amalia; Cruz, Juan Jesús; Olaverri, Amaya; Arizcun, Alberto; Martín, Teresa; Rodríguez, Cesar A; Martín, Germán; Fonseca, Emilio; Sánchez, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    This phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 plus docetaxel 60 mg2/m administered on day 1, every 2 weeks with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support (G-CSF, 5 microg/kg/day, days 3-7) as primary prophylaxis in patients with histologically confirmed metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and previously treated with anthracyclines in the adjuvant or in the first-line setting. A total of 48 patients received 352 cycles (median 8, range 2-10). All patients were included in the efficacy and safety evaluation on an intent-to-treat analysis. Eight patients (17%) showed a complete response and 14 patients (29%) showed a partial response. Overall response rate was 46% [95% confidence interval (CI) 33-60]. The median duration of response was 10.0 months. With a median follow-up of 18.0 months, the median time to progression was 11.9 months and the median overall survival was 27.1 months. The most frequently reported grade 3/4 hematological toxicity was neutropenia (19% of patients, 4% of cycles). Febrile neutropenia was reported in six patients (13%) and 7 cycles (2%), but no toxic deaths were reported. The most common grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicity was asthenia (17% of patients, 6% of cycles) and nail toxicity (15% of patients, 3% of cycles). In conclusion, biweekly docetaxel plus vinorelbine with G-CSF support is active and well tolerated as chemotherapy for patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines. G-CSF support is recommended for lowering the incidence and severity of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia.

  18. Combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin improves outcomes of patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kedarisetty, Chandan Kumar; Anand, Lovkesh; Bhardwaj, Ankit; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Kumar, Guresh; Vyas, Ashish Kumar; David, Paul; Trehanpati, Nirupama; Rastogi, Archana; Bihari, Chhagan; Maiwall, Rakhi; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Vashishtha, Chitranshu; Kumar, Manoj; Bhatia, Vikram; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Patients with decompensated cirrhosis have significantly reduced survival without liver transplantation. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to increase survival in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, and erythropoietin promoted hepatic regeneration in animal studies. We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether co-administration of these growth factors improved outcomes for patients with advanced cirrhosis. In a prospective study, consecutive patients with decompensated cirrhosis seen at the Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi (from May 2011 through June 2012) were randomly assigned to groups given subcutaneous G-CSF (5 μg/kg/d) for 5 days and then every third day (12 total doses), along with subcutaneous darbopoietin α(40 mcg/wk) for 4 weeks (GDP group, n = 29), or only placebos (control group, n = 26). All patients also received standard medical therapy and were followed for 12 months. Histology was performed on liver biopsies. The primary end point was survival at 12 months. Baseline characteristics of patients were comparable; alcohol intake was the most common etiology of cirrhosis. A higher proportion of patients in the GDP group than controls survived until 12 months (68.6% vs 26.9%; P = .003). At 12 months, Child-Turcotte Pugh scores were reduced by 48.6% in the GDP group and 39.1% in the control group, from baseline (P = .001); Model for End Stage Liver Disease scores were reduced by 40.4% and 33%, respectively (P = .03). The need for large-volume paracentesis was significantly reduced in GDP group, compared with controls (P < .05). A lower proportion of patients in the GDP group developed septic shock (6.9%) during follow-up compared with controls (38.5%; P = .005). No major adverse events were observed in either group. In a single-center randomized trial, a significantly larger proportion of patients with decompensated cirrhosis given a combination of G-CSF and

  19. Risk of Neutropenia-Related Hospitalization in Patients Who Received Colony-Stimulating Factors With Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Agiro, Abiy; Ma, Qinli; Acheson, Anupama Kurup; Wu, Sze-Jung; Patt, Debra A; Barron, John J; Malin, Jennifer L; Rosenberg, Alan; Schilsky, Richard L; Lyman, Gary H

    2016-09-19

    To describe outcomes after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis in patients with breast cancer who received chemotherapy regimens with low-to-intermediate risk of induction of neutropenia-related hospitalization. We identified 8,745 patients age ≥ 18 years from a medical and pharmacy claims database for 14 commercial US health plans. This retrospective analysis included patients with breast cancer who began first-cycle chemotherapy from 2008 to 2013 using docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC); docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab (TCH); or doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (conventional-dose AC) regimens. Primary prophylaxis (PP) was defined as G-CSF administration within 5 days of beginning chemotherapy. Outcome was neutropenia, fever, or infection-related hospitalization within 21 days of initiating chemotherapy. Multivariable regressions and number-needed-to-treat analyses were used. A total of 4,815 patients received TC (2,849 PP; 1,966 no PP); 2,292 patients received TCH (1,444 PP; 848 no PP); and 1,638 patients received AC (857 PP; 781 no PP) regimen. PP was associated with reduced risk of neutropenia-related hospitalization for TC (2.0% PP; 7.1% no PP; adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.29; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.39) and TCH (1.3% PP; 7.1% no PP; AOR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.30), but not AC (4.7% PP; 3.8% no PP; AOR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.93) regimens. For the TC regimen, 20 patients (95% CI, 16 to 26) would have to be treated for 21 days to avoid one neutropenia-related hospitalization; with the TCH regimen, 18 patients (95% CI, 13 to 25) would have to be treated. Primary G-CSF prophylaxis was associated with low-to-modest benefit in lowering neutropenia-related hospitalization in patients with breast cancer who received TC and TCH regimens. Further evaluation is needed to better understand which patients benefit most from G-CSF prophylaxis in this setting. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following adjuvant chemotherapy with and without granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Calip, Gregory S; Malmgren, Judith A; Lee, Wan-Ju; Schwartz, Stephen M; Kaplan, Henry G

    2015-11-01

    Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) post-breast cancer treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) is not fully characterized. Our objective was to estimate MDS/AML risk associated with specific breast cancer treatments. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women aged ≥66 years with stage I-III breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Women were classified as receiving treatment with radiation, chemotherapy, and/or G-CSF. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for MDS/AML risk. Among 56,251 breast cancer cases, 1.2 % developed MDS/AML during median follow-up of 3.2 years. 47.1 % of women received radiation and 14.3 % received chemotherapy. Compared to breast cancer cases treated with surgery alone, those treated with chemotherapy (HR = 1.38, 95 %-CI 0.98-1.93) and chemotherapy/radiation (HR = 1.77, 95 %-CI 1.25-2.51) had increased risk of MDS/AML, but not radiation alone (HR = 1.08, 95 % CI 0.86-1.36). Among chemotherapy regimens and G-CSF, MDS/AML risk was differentially associated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide-containing regimens (HR = 1.86, 95 %-CI 1.33-2.61) and filgrastim (HR = 1.47, 95 %-CI 1.05-2.06), but not pegfilgrastim (HR = 1.10, 95 %-CI 0.73-1.66). We observed increased MDS/AML risk among older breast cancer survivors treated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy that was enhanced by G-CSF. Although small, this risk warrants consideration when determining adjuvant chemotherapy and neutropenia prophylaxis for breast cancer patients.

  1. Increased efficacy of intermediate-dose cytarabine + G-CSF compared to DHAP + G-CSF for stem cell mobilization in patients with lymphoma: an analysis by the polish lymphoma research group.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Sebastian; Sadus-Wojciechowska, Maria; Halaburda, Kazimierz; Drozd-Sokolowska, Joanna; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Najda, Jacek; Mendrek, Wlodzimierz; Sobczyk-Kruszelnicka, Malgorzata; Nowicki, Mateusz; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Czerw, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Salvage regimens, like DHAP (dexamethasone, cytarabine, and cisplatin) are frequently used for stem cell mobilization in lymphoma. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of DHAP + G-CSF with intermediate-dose cytarabine (ID-AraC) + G-CSF, recently proposed as an alternative schedule. Consecutive patients with Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin lymphoma who had received at least 2 lines of chemotherapy, mobilized with either DHAP (n = 51) or ID-AraC (n = 50) + G-CSF were included in the analysis. AraC was administered at the dose of 400 mg/m [1] bid intravenously for 2 days followed by filgrastim starting from day 5. In the AraC group, 96 % of patients collected at least 2 × 10 [2] CD34(+) cells/kg compared to 71 % in the DHAP group (p = 0.0006). The CD34(+) cell yield was 9.3 (0-30.3) × 10 [2]/kg vs. 5.6 (0-24.8) × 10 [2]/kg, respectively (p = 0.006). A single apheresis was sufficient to achieve the threshold number of CD34(+) cells in 82 % of the cases after AraC compared to 45 % after DHAP (p = 0.001). We conclude that stem cell mobilization using ID-AraC is associated with a significantly higher efficacy than DHAP, allowing for collection of the transplant material in almost all patients with lymphoma. Our observation suggests that ID-AraC + G-CSF may be a preferable mobilization regimen in this setting.

  2. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor reduces brain injury in a cardiopulmonary bypass-circulatory arrest model of ischemia in a newborn piglet

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszko, Peter; Schears, Gregory J.; Greeley, William J.; Kubin, Joanna; Wilson, David F.; Pastuszko, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic brain injury continues to be of major concern in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery for congenital heart disease. Striatum and hippocampus are particularly vulnerable to injury during these processes. Our hypothesis is that the neuronal injury resulting from CPB and the associated circulatory arrest can be at least partly ameliorated by pre-treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Material and Methods Fourteen male newborn piglets were assigned to three groups: deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), DHCA with G-CSF, and sham-operated. The first two groups were placed on CPB, cooled to 18°C, subjected to 60 min of DHCA, re-warmed and recovered for 8-9 hrs. At the end of experiment, the brains were perfused, fixed and cut into 10 μm transverse sections. Apoptotic cells were visualized by in-situ DNA fragmentation assay (TUNEL), with the density of injured cells expressed as a mean number ± SD per mm2. Results The number of injured cells in the striatum and CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus increased significantly following DHCA. In the striatum, the increase was from 0.46±0.37 to 3.67±1.57 (p=0.002); in the CA1, from 0.11±0.19 to 5.16±1.57 (p=0.001), and in the CA3, from 0.28±0.25 to 2.98±1.82 (p=0.040). Injection of G-CSF prior to bypass significantly reduced the number of injured cells in the striatum and CA1 region, by 51% and 37%, respectively. In the CA3 region, injured cell density did not differ between the G-CSF and control group. Conclusion In a model of hypoxic brain insult associated with CPB, G-CSF significantly reduces neuronal injury in brain regions important for cognitive functions, suggesting it can significantly improve neurological outcomes from procedures requiring DHCA. PMID:25082120

  3. Randomized Prospective Controlled Trial of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor as Adjunctive Therapy for Limb-Threatening Diabetic Foot Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Lalla, Fausto; Pellizzer, Giampietro; Strazzabosco, Marco; Martini, Zeno; Du Jardin, Giovanni; Lora, Luciano; Fabris, Paolo; Benedetti, Paolo; Erle, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Adult diabetic patients admitted to our Diabetes Center from September 1996 to January 1998 for severe, limb-threatening foot infection were consecutively enrolled in a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study aimed at assessing the safety and efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (lenograstim) as an adjunctive therapy for the standard treatment of diabetic foot infection. Forty patients, all of whom displayed evidence of osteomyelitis and long-standing ulcer infection, were randomized 1:1 to receive either conventional treatment (i.e., antimicrobial therapy plus local treatment) or conventional therapy plus 263 μg of G-CSF subcutaneously daily for 21 days. The empiric antibiotic treatment (a combination of ciprofloxacin plus clindamycin) was further adjusted, when necessary, according to the results of cultures and sensitivity testing. Microbiologic assessment of foot ulcers was performed by both deep-tissue biopsy and swab cultures, performed at enrollment and on days 7 and 21 thereafter. Patients were monitored for 6 months; the major endpoints (i.e., cure, improvement, failure, and amputation) were blindly assessed at weeks 3 and 9. At enrollment, both patient groups were comparable in terms of both demographic and clinical data. None of the G-CSF-treated patients experienced either local or systemic adverse effects. At the 3- and 9-week assessments, no significant differences between the two groups could be observed concerning the number of patients either cured or improved, the number of patients displaying therapeutic failure, or the species and number of microorganisms previously yielded from cultures at day 7 and day 21. Conversely, among this small series of patients the cumulative number of amputations observed after 9 weeks of treatment appeared to be lower in the G-CSF arm; in fact, only three patients (15%) in this group had required amputation, whereas nine patients (45%) in the other group had

  4. FDA review summary: Mozobil in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells to the peripheral blood for collection and subsequent autologous transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brave, Michael; Farrell, Ann; Ching Lin, Sue; Ocheltree, Terrance; Pope Miksinski, Sarah; Lee, Shwu-Luan; Saber, Haleh; Fourie, Jeanne; Tornoe, Christoffer; Booth, Brian; Yuan, Weishi; He, Kun; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    On December 15, 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration approved plerixafor (Mozobil; Genzyme Corp.), a new small-molecule inhibitor of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, for use in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to the peripheral blood for collection and subsequent autologous transplantation in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM). This summary reviews the database supporting this approval. The safety and efficacy of plerixafor were demonstrated by 2 multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled studies in patients with NHL and MM who were eligible for autologous HSC transplantation. The primary efficacy end points were the collection of > or = 5 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg from the peripheral blood in 4 or fewer apheresis sessions in patients with NHL or > or = 6 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg from the peripheral blood in 2 or fewer apheresis sessions in patients with MM. The 2 randomized studies combined enrolled 600 patients (298 with NHL and 302 with MM). Fifty-nine percent of patients with NHL who were mobilized with G-CSF and plerixafor had peripheral blood HSC collections of > or = 5 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg in 4 or fewer apheresis sessions, compared with 20% of patients with NHL who were mobilized with G-CSF and placebo (p < 0.001). Seventy-two percent of patients with MM who were mobilized with Mozobil and G-CSF had peripheral blood HSC collections of > or = 6 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg in 2 or fewer apheresis sessions, compared with 34% of patients with MM who were mobilized with placebo and G-CSF (p < 0.001). Common adverse reactions included diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flatulence, injection site reactions, fatigue, arthralgia, headache, dizziness, and insomnia. This report describes the Food and Drug Administration review supporting the approval of plerixafor. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  6. Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from Injured Primary Afferent Induces Proliferation of Spinal Microglia and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Masamichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Dai, Yi; Kanda, Hirosato; Yagi, Hideshi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord, which can contribute to neuropathic pain conditions. However, candidate molecules for proliferation of spinal microglia after injury in rats remain unclear. We focused on the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) that are involved in the proliferation of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. We examined the expression of mRNAs for macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and IL-34 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord after spared nerve injury (SNI) in rats. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that M-CSF and IL-34, but not GM- or G-CSF, mRNAs were constitutively expressed in the DRG, and M-CSF robustly increased in injured-DRG neurons. M-CSF receptor mRNA was expressed in naive rats and increased in spinal microglia following SNI. Intrathecal injection of M-CSF receptor inhibitor partially but significantly reversed the proliferation of spinal microglia and in early phase of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of recombinant M-CSF induced microglial proliferation and mechanical allodynia. Here, we demonstrate that M-CSF is a candidate molecule derived from primary afferents that induces proliferation of microglia in the spinal cord and leads to induction of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in rats. PMID:27071004

  7. Expression of CD163 prevents apoptosis through the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Hiromi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Lei; Yuzawa, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Masumi; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Background CD163 is a 130-kDa transmembrane protein expressed in human monocytes and macrophages, and the aberrant expression of CD163 in breast and colorectal cancer associated with patients' poor prognosis was reported. Here, we analyzed the expression of CD163 in meningioma, a common intracranial tumor, and its molecular mechanism in association with meningioma progression. Methods First, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using 50 human meningioma specimens. Next, we established CD163-overexpressing human meningioma cell lines and investigated its roles in tumor progression in vitro and in vivo. Results Immunohistochemically, 26 of 50 human meningioma specimens (52.0%) were positive for CD163 in tumor cells, including benign grade I (48.5%) and grade II (71.4%) cases. Furthermore, CD163 expression was correlated with histological atypical parameters that directly predict the prognosis of meningioma. CD163-overexpressing meningioma cells showed significant suppression of apoptosis and accelerated tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, unexpected splenomegaly affiliated with the xenograft predicted tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production, which was confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates CD163 expression in meningioma not only by immunohistochemistry but also by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, using primary culture cells, and provides the novel molecular function of CD163 to prevent apoptosis through the production of G-CSF in meningioma. PMID:23539121

  8. Expression of CD163 prevents apoptosis through the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hiromi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Lei; Yuzawa, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Masumi; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Shinya

    2013-07-01

    CD163 is a 130-kDa transmembrane protein expressed in human monocytes and macrophages, and the aberrant expression of CD163 in breast and colorectal cancer associated with patients' poor prognosis was reported. Here, we analyzed the expression of CD163 in meningioma, a common intracranial tumor, and its molecular mechanism in association with meningioma progression. First, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using 50 human meningioma specimens. Next, we established CD163-overexpressing human meningioma cell lines and investigated its roles in tumor progression in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemically, 26 of 50 human meningioma specimens (52.0%) were positive for CD163 in tumor cells, including benign grade I (48.5%) and grade II (71.4%) cases. Furthermore, CD163 expression was correlated with histological atypical parameters that directly predict the prognosis of meningioma. CD163-overexpressing meningioma cells showed significant suppression of apoptosis and accelerated tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, unexpected splenomegaly affiliated with the xenograft predicted tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production, which was confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates CD163 expression in meningioma not only by immunohistochemistry but also by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, using primary culture cells, and provides the novel molecular function of CD163 to prevent apoptosis through the production of G-CSF in meningioma.

  9. Effects of low-dose G-CSF formulation on hematology in healthy horses after long-distance transportation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yoshiro; Hobo, Seiji; Korosue, Kenji; Ootsuka, Kenji; Kitauchi, Akira; Kikkawa, Risa; Hidaka, Yuichi; Hagio, Mitsuyoshi; Tsuzuki, Nao

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of single-dose filgrastim on hematology in 16 healthy horses after long-distance transportation. Horses were assigned to receive filgrastim (0.23 µg/kg, SC, once; G-CSF group; n=8) or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (0.3 ml, SC, once; control group; n=8) ≤ 1 hr before transportation. Horses were transported 2,530 km using commercial vans over the course of approximately 44 hr. Clinical examinations and hematologic analyses were performed on all horses before and after transportation. Because the post-transportation white blood cell counts and bacillary neutrophil to segmented neutrophil ratio were significantly higher in the G-CSF group, filgrastim may have promoted the mobilization of neutrophils from marrow. Filgrastim deserves a further study for efficacy in preventing horse shipping fever.

  10. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  11. The synthesis of Rantes, G-CSF, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12 and IL-13 in human whole-blood cultures is modulated by an extract from Eleutherococcus senticosus L. roots.

    PubMed

    Schmolz, M W; Sacher, F; Aicher, B

    2001-05-01

    An ethanol extract derived from the roots of Eleutherococcus senticosus was found to influence markedly the cytokine synthesis of activated whole blood cultures of ten healthy volunteers. Whereas the synthesis of Rantes was increased over a wide range of concentrations, the release of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-12 was significantly inhibited. An inhibition at higher concentrations, switching to a stimulation at lower doses of the extract was seen with G-CSF, IL-6 and IL-13. From these particular immuno-pharmacological effects of Eleutherococcus senticosus we suggest this herbal preparation possesses immuno-modulatory potency, rather than just being immuno-suppressive or -stimulating.

  12. Impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on some key parameters and production of rhG-CSF in batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Krishna Rao, Dasari V; Ramu, Chatadi T; Rao, Joginapally V; Narasu, Mangamoori L; Bhujanga Rao, Adibhatla Kali S

    2008-09-01

    The impact of different levels of agitation speed, carbondioxide and dissolved oxygen concentration on the key parameters and production of rhG-CSF in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)PLysS were studied. Lower carbondioxide concentrations as well as higher agitation speeds and dissolved oxygen concentrations led to reduction in the acetate concentrations, and enhanced the cell growth, but inhibited plasmid stability and rhG-CSF expression. Similarly, higher carbondioxide concentrations and lower agitation speeds as well as dissolved oxygen concentrations led to enhanced acetate concentrations, but inhibited the cell growth and protein expression. To address the bottlenecks, a two-stage agitation control strategy (strategy-1) and two-stage dissolved oxygen control strategy (strategy-2) were employed to establish the physiological and metabolic conditions, so as to improve the expression of rhG-CSF. By adopting strategy-1 the yields were improved 1.4-fold over constant speed of 550 rpm, 1.1-fold over constant dissolved oxygen of 45%, respectively. Similarly, using strategy-2 the yields were improved 1.6-fold over constant speed of 550 rpm, 1.3-fold over constant dissolved oxygen of 45%, respectively.

  13. Management and cost analysis of cancer patients treated with G-CSF: a cohort study based on the French national healthcare insurance database.

    PubMed

    Tilleul, Patrick; Jacot, William; Emery, Corinne; Lafuma, Antoine; Gourmelen, Julie

    2017-09-04

    To describe the management and costs associated with G-CSF therapy in cancer patients in France. This study analyzed a representative random population sample from the French national healthcare insurance database, focusing on 1,612 patients with hematological or solid malignancies who were reimbursed in 2013 or 2014 for at least one G-CSF treatment dispensed in a retail pharmacy. Patient characteristics and treatment costs were analyzed according to the type of cancer. Then the costs and characteristics of patients associated with the use of different G-CSF products were analyzed in the sub-set of breast cancer patients. The most frequent malignancies in the database population were breast cancer (23.3%), hematological malignancies (22.2%), and lung cancer (12.4%). The reimbursed G-CSF was pegfilgrastim in 34.1% of cases, lenograstim in 26.7%, and filgrastim in 17.9%. More than one G-CSF product was reimbursed to 21.3% of patients. The total annual reimbursed health expenses per patient, according to the type of G-CSF, were €27,001, €24,511, and €20,802 for patients treated with filgrastim, lenograstim, and pegfilgrastim, respectively. Ambulatory care accounted for, respectively, 35%, 38%, and 41% of those costs. In patients with breast cancer, ambulatory care cost was €7,915 with filgrastim, €7,750 with lenograstim, and €6,989 with pegfilgrastim, and the respective cost of G-CSF was €1,733, €1,559, and €3,668. All available G-CSF products have been shown to be effective in cancer patients, and both daily G-CSFs and pegylated G-CSF are recommended in international guidelines. Nevertheless, this analysis of G-CSF reimbursement indicates that the choice of product can markedly affect the total cost of ambulatory care.

  14. Mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor blocks medullar erythropoiesis by depleting F4/80(+)VCAM1(+)CD169(+)ER-HR3(+)Ly6G(+) erythroid island macrophages in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Rebecca N; Forristal, Catherine E; Raggatt, Liza J; Nowlan, Bianca; Barbier, Valerie; Kaur, Simranpreet; van Rooijen, Nico; Winkler, Ingrid G; Pettit, Allison R; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Similarly to other tissues, the bone marrow contains subsets of resident tissue macrophages, which are essential to maintain bone formation, functional hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches, and erythropoiesis. Pharmacologic doses of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilize HSC in part by interfering with the HSC niche-supportive function of BM resident macrophages. Because bone marrow macrophages are key to both maintenance of HSC within their niche and erythropoiesis, we investigated the effect of mobilizing doses of G-CSF on erythropoiesis in mice. We now report that G-CSF blocks medullar erythropoiesis by depleting the erythroid island macrophages we identified as co-expressing F4/80, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, CD169, Ly-6G, and the ER-HR3 erythroid island macrophage antigen. Both broad macrophage depletion, achieved by injecting clodronate-loaded liposomes, and selective depletion of CD169(+) macrophages, also concomitantly depleted F4/80(+)VCAM-1(+)CD169(+)ER-HR3(+)Ly-6G(+) erythroid island macrophages and blocked erythropoiesis. This more precise phenotypic definition of erythroid island macrophages will enable studies on their biology and function in normal settings and on diseases associated with anemia. Finally, this study further illustrates that macrophages are a potent relay of innate immunity and inflammation on bone, hematopoietic, and erythropoietic maintenance. Agents that affect these macrophages, such as G-CSF, are likely to affect these three processes concomitantly. Copyright © 2014 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Late reperfusion of a totally occluded infarct-related artery increases granulocyte-colony stimulation factor and reduces stroma-derived factor-1alpha blood levels in patients with ongoing ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Tang; Chen, Shih-Jen; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yang, Ning-I; Lee, Chen-Chin; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Verma, Subodh; Wang, Chao-Hung

    2009-07-01

    After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), reopening of a totally occluded infarct-related artery (IRA) at a subacute stage is still controversial in symptom-free patients. However, in patients with persistent ischemic symptoms and inadequate collaterals to the infarct area, recanalization is thought to provide beneficial effects. In addition to augmenting myocardial perfusion, we hypothesized that the benefit of recanalization involves the manipulation of circulating stem cell-mobilizing cytokines. This study included 30 patients with a totally occluded IRA and ongoing ischemic symptoms (the study group) and 30 patients with a partially occluded IRA (the control group). All patients underwent successful angioplasty and/or stenting. Before and immediately after the coronary intervention, blood granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), stem-cell factor (SCF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1alpha) were measured. After recanalization, G-CSF levels significantly increased in the study group compared to the control group (P=0.03). SDF-1alpha levels in the study group decreased relative to the controls (P=0.02). However, no significant changes in VEGF or SCF levels between the two groups were found. In the multivariate analysis, reopening of a totally occluded IRA was independently and significantly associated with changes in G-CSF and SDF-1alpha levels after recanalization. In conclusion, our data suggest that the benefits of late reperfusion of a totally occluded IRA in patients with ongoing myocardial ischemia may involve mechanisms associated with stem cell-mobilizing and plaque-stabilizing cytokines. This study provides the rationale to investigate serial changes in cytokines and the numbers of circulating progenitors after reperfusion in the future.

  16. Weekly CODE chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tsuchiya, S; Minato, K; Sunaga, N; Ishihara, S I; Makimoto, T; Naruse, I; Hoshino, H; Watanabe, S; Saitoh, R; Mori, M

    2000-01-01

    We used cisplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide (CODE) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) weekly for salvage chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We reviewed the medical charts of patients between January 1993 and December 1996 at the National Nishi-Gunma Hospital. Twenty patients were treated with salvage chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 55.0%. The median survival time of extensive disease patients from the start of CODE therapy was 23 weeks and the 1-year survival rate was 21.0%. Toxicities were severe, especially in myelosuppression. CODE could be selected as a salvage therapy for chemotherapy- relapsed SCLC cases.

  17. Safety and efficacy of G-CSF mobilization and collection of autologous peripheral blood stem cells in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jin-Hwa; Kim, Mi Jung; Song, Soon-Young; Lee, Young-Jun; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young-Ho

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) could be useful for treating neurological impairments and therefore assessed the safety of administering G-CSF followed by collecting PBSC in children with cerebral palsy (CP). G-CSF (10 μg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously for 5 days, and apheresis was performed to collect PBSC via central venous catheter. G-CSF-related events occurred in 3 patients (fever in 2, irritability in 1). No catheter-related complications were reported. None of the patients needed platelet transfusion or calcium replacement during apheresis. Mobilization with G-CSF followed by PBSC collection appears to be safe and feasible in CP children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of short-term administration of G-CSF (filgrastim) on bone marrow progenitor cells: analysis of serial marrow samples from normal donors.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Rozman, M; Rovira, M; Marín, P; Montfort, N; Carreras, E; Montserrat, E

    1999-01-01

    To determine the effect of G-CSF administration on both the total number of CD34+ cells and the primitive CD34+ subsets in bone marrow (BM), we have analyzed BM samples serially obtained from 10 normal donors in steady-state and during G-CSF treatment. Filgrastim was administered subcutaneously at a dosage of 10 microg/kg/day (n = 7) or 10 microg/kg/12 h (n = 3) for 4 consecutive days. Peripheral blood sampling and BM aspirates were performed on day 1 (just before G-CSF administration), day 3 (after 2 days of G-CSF), and day 5 (after 4 days of G-CSF). During G-CSF administration, a significant increase in the total number of BM nucleated cells was observed. The percentage (range) of CD34+ cells decreased in BM from a median of 0.88 (0.47-1.44) on day 1 to 0.57 (0.32-1.87), and to 0.42 (0.16-0.87) on days 3 and 5, respectively. We observed a slight increase in the total number of BM CD34+ cells on day 3 (0.66 x 10(9)/l (0.13-0.77)), and a decrease on day 5 (0.23 x 10(9)/l (0.06-1.23)) as compared with steady-state (0.40 x 10(9)/l (0.06-1.68)). The proportion of primitive BM hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34+CD38-, CD34+HLA-DR-, CD34+CD117-) decreased during G-CSF administration. In parallel, a significant increase in the total number of CD34+ cells in peripheral blood was observed, achieving the maximum value on day 5. These results suggest that in normal subjects the administration of G-CSF for 5 days may reduce the number of progenitor cells in BM, particularly the most primitive ones.

  19. Incidence of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and current practice of prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in cancer patients in Spain: a prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Jolis, L; Carabantes, F; Pernas, S; Cantos, B; López, A; Torres, P; Funes, C; Caballero, D; Benedit, P; Salar, A

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to describe the incidence of neutropenia in breast cancer and lymphoma patients and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) use in clinical practice. We conducted a multicentre, prospective, observational study including breast cancer and lymphoma patients initiating chemotherapy (≥ 10% febrile neutropenia risk). We included 734 patients with breast cancer and 291 with lymphoma. Over the first four chemotherapy cycles, patients had an incidence of 11.0% grade 3-4 neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1.0 × 10(9) /L) and 4.3% febrile neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <0.5 × 10(9) /L and fever ≥ 38 °C) in the breast cancer cohort, and 40.5% and 14.8% in the lymphoma cohort. Full dose on schedule (>85% of planned chemotherapy dose and ≤ 3 days delay) was achieved by 85.6% of breast cancer and 68.9% of lymphoma patients. Hospitalisation due to febrile neutropenia was required in 2.0% and 12.0% of breast cancer and lymphoma patients respectively. G-CSF was administered to 70.0% of breast cancer and 83.8% of lymphoma patients, and initiated from the first chemotherapy cycle (primary prophylaxis) in 60.6% and 64.2% of cases. Severe neutropenia affects approximately one in 10 breast cancer patients and one in two lymphoma patients receiving chemotherapy with moderate or greater risk of febrile neutropenia. Most patients received treatment with G-CSF in Spanish clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Identification of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Interleukin-6 as Candidate Biomarkers of CBLB502 Efficacy as a Medical Radiation Countermeasure

    PubMed Central

    Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Shakhov, Alexander N.; Singh, Vijay K.; Bone, Frederick; Kononov, Yevgeniy; Shyshynova, Inna; Cheney, Alec; Maitra, Ratan K.; Purmal, Andrei; Whitnall, Mark H.; Feinstein, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Given an ever-increasing risk of nuclear and radiological emergencies, there is a critical need for development of medical radiation countermeasures (MRCs) that are safe, easily administered, and effective in preventing and/or mitigating the potentially lethal tissue damage caused by acute high-dose radiation exposure. Because the efficacy of MRCs for this indication cannot be ethically tested in humans, development of such drugs is guided by the Food and Drug Administration's Animal Efficacy Rule. According to this rule, human efficacious doses can be projected from experimentally established animal efficacious doses based on the equivalence of the drug's effects on efficacy biomarkers in the respective species. Therefore, identification of efficacy biomarkers is critically important for drug development under the Animal Efficacy Rule. CBLB502 is a truncated derivative of the Salmonella flagellin protein that acts by triggering Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) signaling and is currently under development as a MRC. Here, we report identification of two cytokines, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), as candidate biomarkers of CBLB502's radioprotective/mitigative efficacy. Induction of both G-CSF and IL-6 by CBLB502 1) is strictly TLR5-dependent, 2) occurs in a CBLB502 dose-dependent manner within its efficacious dose range in both nonirradiated and irradiated mammals, including nonhuman primates, and 3) is critically important for the ability of CBLB502 to rescue irradiated animals from death. After evaluation of CBLB502 effects on G-CSF and IL-6 levels in humans, these biomarkers will be useful for accurate prediction of human efficacious CBLB502 doses, a key step in the development of this prospective radiation countermeasure. PMID:22837010

  1. Low-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor overcomes neutropenia in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with higher cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takeshi; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Kasahara, Senji; Kanemura, Nobuhiro; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Goto, Naoe; Kojima, Yasushi; Yamada, Toshiki; Sawada, Michio; Takahashi, Takeshi; Oyama, Masami; Tomita, Eiichi; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2005-12-01

    To facilitate more economical medical care, we carried out a prospective study of whether a THP-COP regimen (cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) with low-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) would effectively treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). From April 2003 through March 2004, we enrolled 19 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed NHL treated at our hospital. The patients were divided into young and elderly groups. Each patient underwent chemotherapy with 8 courses of a THP-COP regimen with a 50-microg dose of lenograstim. Age- and sex-matched historical control patients (n = 141) received NHL diagnoses between 1998 and 2003. Each patient in the control group underwent the same chemotherapy and received a 100-microg dose of lenograstim. The mean (+/-SD) total amounts of G-CSF per cycle of chemotherapy were 332 +/- 103 microg (young patients) and 345 +/- 128 microg (elderly patients) in the low-dose group and 594 +/- 439 microg (young) and 730 +/- 551 microg (elderly) in the control group. The duration of fever in 1 cycle of chemotherapy was 0.3 +/- 1.0 days (young) and 0.1 +/- 0.8 days (elderly) in the low-dose group and 0.5 +/- 1.3 days (young) and 0.8 +/- 2.0 days (elderly) in the control group. A THP-COP regimen with low-dose G-CSF could be administered to NHL patients with safety. Administration of a 50-microg dose of lenograstim is sufficient and recommended for the treatment of NHL.

  2. Plerixafor on-demand combined with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: significant improvement in peripheral blood stem cells mobilization and harvest with no increase in costs.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Martino, Massimo; Spadaro, Andrea; Leotta, Salvatore; Di Marco, Annalia; Scalzulli, Potito; Cupri, Alessandra; Di Martina, Valentina; Schinocca, Elena; Spina, Eleonora; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To date, no prospective study on Plerixafor 'on-demand' in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported. We present an interim analysis of the first prospective study in which Plerixafor was administered on-demand in patients affected by multiple myeloma and lymphoma who received high dose cyclophosphamide or DHAP (dexamethasone, cytarabine, cisplatin) plus G-CSF to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). One hundred and two patients were evaluable for response. A cohort of 240 patients receiving the same mobilizing chemotherapy was retrospectively studied. Failure to mobilize CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood was reduced by 'on-demand' strategy compared to conventional mobilization; from 13·0 to 3·0% (P = 0·004). Failure to harvest CD34(+) cells 2 × 10(6) /kg decreased from 20·9 to 4·0% (P = 0·0001). The on-demand Plerixafor strategy also resulted in a lower rate of mobilization failure (P = 0·03) and harvest failure (P = 0·0008) when compared to a 'bias-adjusted set of controls'. Evaluation of economic costs of the two strategies showed that the overall cost of the two treatments were comparable when salvage mobilizations were taken into account. When in combination with cyclophosphamide or DHAP plus G-CSF, the 'on-demand' use of Plerixafor showed, in comparison to conventionally treated patients, a significant improvement in mobilization of PBSC with no increase in overall cost.

  3. G-CSF preferentially supports the generation of gut-homing Gr-1high macrophages in M-CSF-treated bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Meshkibaf, Shahab; Gower, Mark William; Dekaban, Gregory A; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2014-10-01

    The G-CSF is best known for its activity in the generation and activation of neutrophils. In addition, studies on G-CSF(-/-) or G-CSFR(-/-) mice and BMC cultures suggested a role of G-CSF in macrophage generation. However, our understanding on the role of G-CSF in macrophage development is limited. Here, using in vitro BMC models, we demonstrated that G-CSF promoted the generation of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophage-like cells in M-BMCs, likely through suppressing cell death and enhancing generation of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophage-like cells. These Gr-1(high) macrophage-like cells produced "M2-like" cytokines and surface markers in response to LPS and IL-4/IL-13, respectively. Adoptive transfer of EGFP-expressing (EGFP(+)) M-BMCs showed a dominant, gut-homing phenotype. The small intestinal lamina propria of G-CSFR(-/-) mice also harbored significantly reduced numbers of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophages compared with those of WT mice, but levels of Gr-1(+)/F4/80(-) neutrophil-like cells were similar between these mice. Collectively, these results suggest a novel function of G-CSF in the generation of gut-homing, M2-like macrophages.

  4. Combined Therapy of Pegylated G-CSF and Alxn4100TPO Improves Survival and Mitigates Acute Radiation Syndrome after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation alone and Followed by Wound Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Juliann G; Zhai, Min; Bolduc, David L; Smith, Joan T; Anderson, Marsha N; Ho, Connie; Lin, Bin; Jiang, Suping

    2017-08-29

    Exposure to ionizing radiation alone or combined with traumatic tissue injury is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological incidents. Radiation injuries occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue and systemic levels; their mechanisms, however, remain largely unclear. Exposure to radiation combined with skin wounding, bacterial infection or burns results in greater mortality than radiation exposure alone in dogs, pigs, rats, guinea pigs and mice. In the current study we observed that B6D2F1/J female mice exposed to (60)Co gamma photon radiation followed by 15% total-body-surface-area skin wounds experienced an increment of 25% higher mortality over a 30-day observation period compared to those subjected to radiation alone. Radiation exposure delayed wound healing by approximately 14 days. On day 30 post-injury, bone marrow and ileum in animals from both groups (radiation alone or combined injury) still displayed low cellularity and structural damage. White blood cell counts, e.g., neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and platelets, still remained very low in surviving irradiated alone animals, whereas only the lymphocyte count was low in surviving combined injury animals. Likewise, in surviving animals from radiation alone and combined injury groups, the RBCs, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets remained low. We observed, that animals treated with both pegylated G-CSF (a cytokine for neutrophil maturation and mobilization) and Alxn4100TPO (a thrombopoietin receptor agonist) at 4 h postirradiation, a 95% survival (vehicle: 60%) over the 30-day period, along with mitigated body-weight loss and significantly reduced acute radiation syndrome. In animals that received combined treatment of radiation and injury that received pegylated G-CSF and Alxn4100TPO, survival was increased from 35-55%, but did not accelerate wound healing. Hematopoiesis and ileum showed significant improvement in animals from both groups (irradiation alone

  5. Long-term results of dose-intensive chemotherapy with G-CSF support (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a review of 59 consecutive cases treated at a single institute.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Miyuki; Tsunoda, Saburo; Izumi, Tohru; Tanaka, Masaru; Katano, Susumu; Inoue, Koichi; Igarashi, Seiji; Hirabayashi, Kaoru; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ohmine, Ken; Sato, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Keiya; Kirito, Keita; Nagashima, Takahiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Kano, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of very dose-intensive chemotherapy (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma, in which an eight-cycle regimen with 11 drugs was given with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support (total 18 weeks). Fifty-nine patients were treated during February 1, 1991 and March 31, 2001 (median age: 48 years). Forty-three patients (73%) were in a high-intermediate risk or high-risk group (HI/H) according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (aa-IPI). Forty-six patients received 7 or 8 cycles of therapy. Ten of 15 patients over age 60 stopped before 7 cycles. Forty-three patients with an initial bulky mass or a residual mass received involved-field radiation. Overall, 56 patients (95%) achieved complete remission (CR). Grade 4 hematotoxicity was observed in all patients. With a median follow-up of 128 months, the 10-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 76% and 61%, respectively. Neither aa-IPI risk factors nor the index itself was associated with response, OS, or PFS. One patient died of sepsis during the therapy and one died of secondary leukemia. This retrospective study suggests that the TCC-NHL-91 regimen achieves high CR, OS, and PFS in patients with advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma up to 60 years old and may be a valuable asset in the management of this disease. Further evaluation and prospective studies of the TCC-NHL-91 are warranted.

  6. [Comparison of different G-CSF treatment effectiveness in experiments on irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M; Shchegoleva, R A; Deshevoĭ, Iu B; Lisina, N I; Titov, B A

    2012-01-01

    In the experiments on F1 (CBA x C57BL) and BALB mice irradiated by 137Cs gamma-rays, preparations of unglycosilated G-SCF such as Neupogen and their domestic analogs Leucostim and Neupomax were investigated. The tests such as 9-day bone marrow cellularity (BMC) and endogenous CFUs, the neutrophile number restoration, the 30-day survival index have shown that all three preparations have an approximately equal effectiveness relating to acute radiation disease treatment and granulopoiesis stimulation after a 5-10 day consecutive administration following irradiation of mice at lethal and sublethal doses. We have come to the conclusion that Leucostim and Neupomax can be regarded as adequate substitutes for Neupogen.

  7. Neutrophil biology and the next generation of myeloid growth factors.

    PubMed

    Dale, David C

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the body's critical phagocytic cells for defense against bacterial and fungal infections; bone marrow must produce approximately 10 x 10(9) neutrophils/kg/d to maintain normal blood neutrophil counts. Production of neutrophils depends on myeloid growth factors, particularly granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). After the original phase of development, researchers modified these growth factors to increase their size and delay renal clearance, increase their biologic potency, and create unique molecules for business purposes. Pegylated G-CSF is a successful product of these efforts. Researchers have also tried to identify small molecules to serve as oral agents that mimic the parent molecules, but these programs have been less successful. In 2006, the European Medicines Agency established guidelines for the introduction of new biologic medicinal products claimed to be similar to reference products that had previously been granted marketing authorization in the European community, called bio-similars. Globally, new and copied versions of G-CSF and other myeloid growth factors are now appearing. Some properties of the myeloid growth factors are similar to other agents, offering opportunities for the development of alternative drugs and treatments. For example, recent research shows that hematopoietic progenitor cells can be mobilized with a chemokine receptor antagonist, chemotherapy, G-CSF, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Advances in neutrophil biology coupled with better understanding and development of myeloid growth factors offer great promise for improving the care of patients with cancer and many other disorders.

  8. Sodium caseinate induces secretion of macrophage colony-stimulating factor from neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Osorio, E; Mora, L; Bautista, M; Montesinos, J J; Martínez, I; Ramos-Mandujano, G; Zambrano, R; Monroy-García, A; Weiss-Steider, B; Ledesma-Martínez, E; Aguiñiga, I

    2010-04-01

    In this work we provide evidence that granulocytes produce macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the band cell stage and secrete it upon sodium caseinate-mediated differentiation to polymorphonuclear cells. We identified M-CSF in an enriched population of myeloid band cells from murine bone marrow using a chromophore-labeled monoclonal anti-M-CSF antibody. An ELISA assay was then used to detect secreted M-CSF in culture supernatants of enriched band cells differentiated to mature neutrophils using sodium caseinate. Colony formation in vitro by the supernatants from differentiating band cells was blocked by anti-M-CSF, thus suggesting that this factor is the only one responsible for this activity. Our data imply that casein can modulate hematopoiesis possibly via M-CSF production. Finally we discuss the possibility whether this M-CSF in concert with G-CSF could establish a cellular communication network between macrophages and granulocytes allowing them to simultaneously arrive at the inflammatory site. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic outcomes of transplanting autologous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilised peripheral mononuclear cells in diabetic patients with critical limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, L; Samedanifard, S H; Keshavarzi, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Larijani, B; Ghavamzadeh, A; Ahmadi, A S; Shojaeifard, A; Ostadali, M R; Sharifi, A M; Amini, M R; Mahmoudian, A; Fakhraei, H; Aalaa, M; Mohajeri-Tehrani, M R

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of transplanting autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), from granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilised peripheral blood, was investigated in diabetic patients with critical limb ischaemia (CLI). After 3 months, the transplanted group of patients (n=7) showed a significant improvement in ischaemia manifestations, including pain and neurological signs, wound healing and the rate of lower-limb amputation, compared to the control group of patients (n=14). Pain was significantly reduced in the transplanted group compared to controls (P=0.014). The ankle-brachial index (ABI) and the pulse strength within ischaemic tissues of the transplanted group were significantly improved (P=0.035 and P=0.01, respectively). Importantly, 50% of the control group (7/14 patients) faced major amputation of a limb at the study's conclusion, compared to none of 7 patients in the transplanted group (P=0.047). The safety of transplantation was confirmed by observing no adverse reactions among the transplanted group, including infection and immunological rejection. Hence, this study provides further evidence that transplantation of autologous peripheral blood MSCs, mobilised by G-CSF, induces angiogenesis and improves the wound healing process in diabetic patients with CLI.

  10. Case Report: Combination Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Case of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Saberi, Hooshang; Tayebi Meybodi, Keyvan; Taghvaei, Mohammad; Arjmand, Babak; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Kohan, Amir Hassan; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Rahmani, Shahrokh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various neuroregenerative procedures have been recently employed along with neurorehabilitation programs to promote neurological function after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), and recently most of them have focused on the acute stage of spinal cord injury. In this report, we present a case of acute SCI treated with neuroprotective treatments in conjunction with conventional rehabilitation program. Methods: A case of acute penetrative SCI (gunshot wound), 40 years old, was treated with intrathecal bone marrow derived stem cells and parenteral Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) along with rehabilitation program. The neurological outcomes as well as safety issues have been reported. Results: Assessment with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), showed neurological improvement, meanwhile he reported neuropathic pain, which was amenable to oral medication. Discussion: In the acute setting, combination therapy of G-CSF and intrathecal Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) was safe in our case as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation programs. Further controlled studies are needed to find possible side effects, and establish net efficacy. PMID:26649168

  11. Sulfasalazine-induced DRESS and severe agranulocytosis successfully treated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Rached, Salaheddine; Hachfi, Wissem; Letaief, Amel; Ben Salem, Chaker

    2015-08-01

    A drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) is a severe and rare adverse-drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The evolution of DRESS is unpredictable and haematological abnormalities may occur in 50 % of cases. Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is rarely associated with DRESS. Agranulocytosis is a rare but recognized side-effect to SSZ. Both DRESS and agranulocytosis were not reported previously with SSZ. We report a case of SSZ-induced DRESS followed by severe agranulocytosis occurring in a 25-year-old man. The patient's general condition and laboratory tests gradually improved after the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF). In our patient, the co-occurrence of DRESS and agranulocytosis is unlikely to be coincidental. Immunological mechanisms may play an important role in drug associated agranulocytosis in patients presenting DRESS. According to the Naranjo's algorithm the likelihood that our patient's DRESS and agranulocytosis occurred as a result of therapy with SSZ is probable. G-CSF was found to be useful in shortening the duration of granulocyte recovery in drug-induced agranulocytosis. Careful monitoring of neutrophil counts is required on SSZ therapy as well as in the course of DRESS.

  12. Colony-stimulating factors for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Rahul; Clark, Otavio Augusto Camara; Lyman, Gary; Engel Ayer Botrel, Tobias; Morganti Paladini, Luciano; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-10-30

    Febrile neutropenia is a frequent adverse event experienced by people with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, and is a potentially life-threatening situation. The current treatment is supportive care plus antibiotics. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), such as granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), are cytokines that stimulate and accelerate the production of one or more cell lines in the bone marrow. Clinical trials have addressed the question of whether the addition of a CSF to antibiotics could improve outcomes in individuals diagnosed with febrile neutropenia. However, the results of these trials are conflicting. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding G-CSF or GM-CSF to standard treatment (antibiotics) when treating chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in individuals diagnosed with cancer. We conducted the search in March 2014 and covered the major electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and SCI. We contacted experts in hematology and oncology and also scanned the citations from the relevant articles. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adults and children. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We performed meta-analysis of the selected studies using Review Manager 5 software. Fourteen RCTs (15 comparisons) including a total of 1553 participants addressing the role of CSF plus antibiotics in febrile neutropenia were included. Overall mortality was not improved by the use of CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone (hazard ratio (HR) 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.16) P = 0.19; 13 RCTs; 1335 participants; low quality evidence). A similar finding was seen for infection-related mortality (HR 0.75 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.20) P = 0.23; 10 RCTs; 897

  13. Factors Associated with Speech-Sound Stimulability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lof, Gregory L.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined stimulability in 30 children (ages 3 to 5) with articulation impairments. Factors found to relate to stimulability were articulation visibility, the child's age, the family's socioeconomic status, and the child's overall imitative ability. Perception, severity, otitis media history, language abilities, consistency of…

  14. Factors Associated with Speech-Sound Stimulability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lof, Gregory L.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined stimulability in 30 children (ages 3 to 5) with articulation impairments. Factors found to relate to stimulability were articulation visibility, the child's age, the family's socioeconomic status, and the child's overall imitative ability. Perception, severity, otitis media history, language abilities, consistency of…

  15. Race and ethnicity influences collection of G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells from unrelated donors, a CIBMTR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jack W.; Wingard, John R.; Logan, Brent R.; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Akpek, Gorgun; Anderlini, Paolo; Artz, Andrew S.; Bredeson, Chris; Goldstein, Steven; Hale, Gregory; Hematti, Pieman; Joshi, Sarita; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; O'Donnell, Paul V.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Savani, Bipin; Schears, Raquel M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Confer, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Little information exists on the effect of race and ethnicity on collection of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) for allogeneic transplantation. We studied 10776 donors from the National Marrow Donor Program who underwent PBSC collection from 2006-2012. Self-reported donor race/ethnic information included Caucasian, Hispanic, Black/African American (AA), Asian/Pacific Islander (API), and Native American (NA). All donors were mobilized with subcutaneous filgrastim (G-CSF) at an approximate dose of 10 µg/kg/d for 5 days. Overall, AA donors had the highest median yields of mononuclear cells (MNC)/L and CD34+ cells/L blood processed (3.1 × 109 and 44 × 106 respectively) while Caucasians had the lowest median yields at 2.8 × 109 and 33.7 × 106 respectively. Multivariate analysis of CD34+/L mobilization yields using Caucasians as the comparator and controlling for age, gender, body mass index, and year of apheresis revealed increased yields in overweight and obese AA and API donors. In Hispanic donors, only male obese donors had higher CD34+/L mobilization yields compared to Caucasian donors. No differences in CD34+/L yields were seen between Caucasian and NA donors. Characterization of these differences may allow optimization of mobilization regimens to allow enhancement of mobilization yields without compromising donor safety. PMID:25316111

  16. Clinical grade isolation of regulatory T cells from G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood improves with initial depletion of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pritesh; Mahmud, Dolores; Park, Youngmin; Yoshinaga, Kazumi; Mahmud, Nadim; Rondelli, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Clinical isolation of circulating CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is usually performed by CD4(+) cell negative selection followed by CD25(+) cell positive selection. Although G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood (G-PBSC) contains a high number of Tregs, a high number of monocytes in G-PBSC limits Treg isolation. Using a small scale device (MidiMACS, Miltenyi) we initially demonstrated that an initial depletion of monocytes would be necessary to obtaina separation of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)CD127(-) cells from G-PBSC (G-Tregs) with a consistent purity >70% and inhibitory activity of T cell alloreactivity in-vitro. We then validated the same approach in a clinical scale setting by separating G-Tregs with clinically available antibodies to perform a CD8(+)CD19(+)CD14(+) cell depletion followed by CD25(+) cell selection (2-step process) or by adding an initial CD14(+) cell depletion (3-step process) using a CliniMACS column. The 3-step approach resulted in a better purity (81±12% vs. 35±33%) and yield (66% vs. 39%). Clinically isolated G-Tregs were also FoxP3(+)CD127(dim) and functionally suppressive in-vitro. Our findings suggest that a better and more consistent purity of Tregs can be achieved from G-PBSC by an initial single depletion of monocytes prior to selection of CD4(+)CD25(+) cells.

  17. Clinical grade isolation of regulatory T cells from G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood improves with initial depletion of monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pritesh; Mahmud, Dolores; Park, Youngmin; Yoshinaga, Kazumi; Mahmud, Nadim; Rondelli, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Clinical isolation of circulating CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is usually performed by CD4+ cell negative selection followed by CD25+ cell positive selection. Although G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood (G-PBSC) contains a high number of Tregs, a high number of monocytes in G-PBSC limits Treg isolation. Using a small scale device (MidiMACS, Miltenyi) we initially demonstrated that an initial depletion of monocytes would be necessary to obtaina separation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127- cells from G-PBSC (G-Tregs) with a consistent purity >70% and inhibitory activity of T cell alloreactivity in-vitro. We then validated the same approach in a clinical scale setting by separating G-Tregs with clinically available antibodies to perform a CD8+CD19+CD14+ cell depletion followed by CD25+ cell selection (2-step process) or by adding an initial CD14+ cell depletion (3-step process) using a CliniMACS column. The 3-step approach resulted in a better purity (81±12% vs. 35±33%) and yield (66% vs. 39%). Clinically isolated G-Tregs were also FoxP3+CD127dim and functionally suppressive in-vitro. Our findings suggest that a better and more consistent purity of Tregs can be achieved from G-PBSC by an initial single depletion of monocytes prior to selection of CD4+CD25+ cells. PMID:27069755

  18. Sulfur Mustard-induced Neutropenia: Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    pegylated G-CSF ( peg -G-CSF) Hematological data from rats exposed to HD by inhalation have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as...study was to determine the phocytes, at 24 hours after exposure. 4 Gold and Scharfd re- effectiveness of G-CSF and peg -G-CSF in ameliorating HD-in- ported...includ- exposure, G-CSF therapy (10 Ag/kg per day for 21 days) was ing nitrogen mustard, also induce severe neutropenia," an ex- initiated. Peg -G-CSF

  19. Impaired Functionality of Antiviral T Cells in G-CSF Mobilized Stem Cell Donors: Implications for the Selection of CTL Donor

    PubMed Central

    Varanasi, Pavankumar R.; Tischer, Sabine; Figueiredo, Constança; Immenschuh, Stephan; Kalinke, Ulrich; Köhl, Ulrike; Goudeva, Lilia; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Ganser, Arnold; Blasczyk, Rainer; Weissinger, Eva M.; Eiz-Vesper, Britta

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antiviral T cells enhances immune reconstitution and decreases infectious complications after stem cell transplantation. Information on number and function of antiviral T cells in stem cell grafts is scarce. We investigated (1) immunomodulatory effects of G-CSF on antiviral T cells, (2) the influence of apheresis, and (3) the optimal time point to collect antiviral cells. CMV-, EBV- and ADV-specific T cells were enumerated in 170 G-CSF-mobilized stem cell and 24 non-mobilized platelet donors using 14 HLA-matched multimers. T-cell function was evaluated by IFN-γ ELISpot and granzyme B secretion. Immunophenotyping was performed by multicolor flow cytometry. G-CSF treatment did not significantly influence frequency of antiviral T cells nor their in vitro expansion rate upon antigen restimulation. However, T-cell function was significantly impaired, as expressed by a mean reduction in secretion of IFN-γ (75% in vivo, 40% in vitro) and granzyme B (32% target-independent, 76% target-dependent) as well as CD107a expression (27%). Clinical follow up data indicate that the first CMV-reactivation in patients and with it the need for T-cell transfer occurs while the donor is still under the influence of G-CSF. To overcome these limitations, T-cell banking before mobilization or recruitment of third party donors might be an option to optimize T-cell production. PMID:24324576

  20. Therapeutic use of recombinant human G-CSF (RHG-CSF) in a canine model of sublethal and lethal whole-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Macvittie, T.J.; Monroy, R.L.; Patchen, M.L.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The short biologic half-life of the peripheral neutrophil (PMN) requires an active granulopoietic response to replenish functional PMSs and to remain a competent host defence in irradiated animals. Recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) was studied for its ability to modulate hemopoiesis in normal dogs as well as to decrease therapeutically the severity and duration of neutropenia in sublethally and lethally irradiated dogs. For the normal dog, subcutaneous administration of rhG-CSF induced neutrophilia within hours after the first injection; total PMSs continued to increase (with plateau phases) to mean peak values of 1000 per cent of baseline at the end of the treatment period (12-14 days). Bone-marrow-derived granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (GM-CFC) increased significantly during treatment. For a sublethal 200 cGy dose, treatment with rhG-CSF for 14 consecutive days decreased the severity and shortened the duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The radiation-induced lethality of 60 per cent after a dose of 350 cGy was associated with marrow-derived GM-CFC survival of 1 per cent.

  1. Role of SDF-1 (CXCL12) in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells traffic into the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis induced by G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ.

    PubMed

    Mendt, Mayela; Cardier, Jose E

    2015-12-01

    The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) plays an essential role in the homing of hematopoietic stem and progeni