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Sample records for stm

  1. Intrusive STM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger-Lewandowski, Nicolas; Rochefort, Alain

    2011-03-01

    An interactive scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) simulator has been designed to efficiently compute the effects of chemical and structural modifications of adsorbed species on resulting STM images. Our general approach is based on first-order perturbation theory that takes into account different tip geometries. In our intrusive STM imaging strategy, we consider small variations such as substitutions, vacancies, functionalizations, and molecular reorganizations from a reference system. First, we show that our perturbation theory approach can provide STM images that are qualitatively similar to those of a more rigorous electron scattering technique based on the Landauer-Büttiker formalism for the case of adsorbed tetracyanoethylene on a Cu(100) single crystal. Second, we demonstrate that the efficiency of Bardeen and Tersoff-Hamann approaches to generate STM images can be substantially improved by exploiting different algorithms to evaluate the tunnel current and to deal with large-scale eigenvalue problems. Following our general intrusive strategy, we have reduced the computing time to generate an STM image of a modified system by about an order of magnitude with respect to the reference image. The shape and position of the contrasts of the STM image evaluated in the context of intrusion are virtually identical to an image computed without intrusive features but within a considerably smaller computing time.

  2. STM of DNA in UHV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, M. G.; Driscoll, R. J.; Coley, T. R.; Goddard, W. A.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.

    1991-12-01

    Images of DNA obtained in a scanning tunneling microscope operating under ultra-high vacuum are described, and a contrast mechanism for STM imaging of weakly-bound adsorbates is proposed. The capability of the STM for atom-scale imaging of DNA is demonstrated through comparison of STM data with the accepted structure of A-DNA derived from x-ray crystallography; seven different structural elements of the molecule are identified and used to support the data interpretation. The contrast mechanism proposed invokes the Pauli-principle based interference of the adsorbate with the substrate wavefunction vacuum tail. The adsorbate wavefunctions themselves lie far from the Fermi level and are unlikely to support electron conduction; their interaction with substrate wavefunction tail, however, enhances the tip-substrate electron tunneling probability at the adsorption site. The suggested mechanism is supported with ab initio calculations. The paper summarizes a talk presented at the Engineering Foundation conference ``Scanned Probe Microscopies: STM and Beyond.''

  3. The Sounds of Nanoscience: Acoustic STM Analogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euler, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    A hands-on model of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is presented. It uses near-field imaging with sound and computer assisted visualization to create acoustic mappings of resonator arrangements. Due to the (partial) analogy of matter and sound waves the images closely resemble STM scans of atoms. Moreover, the method can be extended to build…

  4. Nt_STM: A step forward in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magoga, Michaël; Archambault, Fabien; Cerdá, Jorge I.

    2012-06-01

    We present the Nt_STM software suite designed to help analysis and interpretation of Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) images, via the simulation of STM data under different tip and bias conditions and facilitating their comparison against the experimental ones. The Nt_STM package includes two components: (i) an intuitive and directive Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed to build a precise model of the STM set-up and analyze the simulation results and, (ii) a powerful simulation engine (GREEN) allowing an efficient, yet accurate, calculation of the tunneling current necessary to generate current or topographic images, I(V) spectra as well as various properties such as band structures, Local Density Of State (LDOS), etc. The Nt_STM package, at its current version 2.0, gives the opportunity to access parallel computation, a new collection of objects and new Extended Hückel parameters.

  5. Restructuring STM (Science, Technology, and Mathematics) Education for Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezeudu, F. O.; Ofoegbu, T. O.; Anyaegbunnam, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discussed the need to restructure STM (science, technology, and mathematics) education to reflect entrepreneurship. This is because the present STM education has not achieved its aim of making graduates self-reliant. Entrepreneurship education if introduced in the STM education will produce graduate who can effectively manage their…

  6. SSE software test management STM capability: Using STM in the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Long, D.; Hartenstein, Ray; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1992-01-01

    This report is one of a series discussing configuration management (CM) topics for Space Station ground systems software development. It provides a description of the Software Support Environment (SSE)-developed Software Test Management (STM) capability, and discusses the possible use of this capability for management of developed software during testing performed on target platforms. This is intended to supplement the formal documentation of STM provided by the SEE Project. How STM can be used to integrate contractor CM and formal CM for software before delivery to operations is described. STM provides a level of control that is flexible enough to support integration and debugging, but sufficiently rigorous to insure the integrity of the testing process.

  7. Near-Field Imaging with Sound: An Acoustic STM Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euler, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The invention of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) 30 years ago opened up a visual window to the nano-world and sparked off a bunch of new methods for investigating and controlling matter and its transformations at the atomic and molecular level. However, an adequate theoretical understanding of the method is demanding; STM images can be…

  8. LT-STM/STS studies of clean armchair edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Zheng; Zhang, Wenhan; Wu, Weida; Weida Wu Team

    It was predicted and observed that the passivated zigzag edges of graphene host highly localized edge state. This edge state is predicted to be spin-polarized, which is appealing for spintronic applications. In contrast, no edge state was expected at passivated armchair graphene edge. Here we report low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) studies of electronic properties of clean monoatomic step edges on cleaved surface of HOPG. Most of step edges are armchair edges, in agreement with previous STM results. We observed only (√{ 3} ×√{ 3}) R30° superstructure near armchair edges, which has been reported in previous STM studies. On the other hand, no honeycomb superstructure was observed in our STM data. In addition, our STM results reveal an intriguing localized electronic state at clean armchair edges. Spectroscopic and spatial evolution of this edge state will be presented. This work is supported by NSF DMR-1506618.

  9. Tomography of Majorana fermions with STM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallier, Denis; Klinovaja, Jelena

    2016-07-01

    We investigate numerically the possibility to detect the spatial profile of Majorana fermions (MFs) by using STM tips that are made of either normal or superconducting material. In both cases, we are able to resolve the localization length and the oscillation period of the MF wave function. We show that the tunneling between the substrate and the tip, necessary to get the information on the wave-function oscillations, has to be weaker in the case of a superconducting probe. In the strong tunneling regime, the differential conductance saturates making it more difficult to observe the exponential decay of MFs. The temperature broadening of the profile is strongly suppressed in the case of the superconducting tip resulting, generally, in better resolution.

  10. STM2209-STM2208 (opvAB): A Phase Variation Locus of Salmonella enterica Involved in Control of O-Antigen Chain Length

    PubMed Central

    Cota, Ignacio; Blanc-Potard, Anne Béatrice; Casadesús, Josep

    2012-01-01

    STM2209 and STM2208 are contiguous loci annotated as putative protein-coding genes in the chromosome of Salmonella enterica. Lack of homologs in related Enterobacteria and low G+C content suggest that S. enterica may have acquired STM2209-STM2208 by horizontal transfer. STM2209 and STM2208 are co-transcribed from a promoter upstream STM2209, and their products are inner (cytoplasmic) membrane proteins. Analysis with the bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid system suggests that STM2209 and STM2208 may interact. Expression of STM2209-STM2208 is subjected to phase variation in wild type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Switching frequencies in LB medium are 6.1×10−5 (OFF→ON) and 3.7×10−2 (ON→OFF) per cell and generation. Lack of DNA adenine methylation locks STM2209-STM2208 in the ON state, and lack of the LysR-type factor OxyR locks STM2209-STM2208 in the OFF state. OxyR-dependent activation of STM2209-STM2208 expression is independent of the oxidation state of OxyR. Salmonella cultures locked in the ON state show alteration of O-antigen length in the lipopolysaccharide, reduced absorption of bacteriophage P22, impaired resistance to serum, and reduced proliferation in macrophages. Phenotypic heterogeneity generated by STM2209-STM2208 phase variation may thus provide defense against phages. In turn, formation of a subpopulation unable to proliferate in macrophages may restrain Salmonella spread in animal organs, potentially contributing to successful infection. PMID:22606300

  11. STM and MBE: one of the best combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jin-Feng; Ma, Xucun; Chen, Xi; Sakurai, T.; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2011-11-01

    It has been 30 years since the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented by G Binnig and H Rohrer. Rapid developments have made STM increasingly powerful as an extremely versatile technique for many disciplines in condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology and other areas. As a state-of-the-art growth method, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is a gifted technique for epitaxial growth with atomic-level control. In this paper, by giving several examples, we will show that an STM-MBE combined system is more powerful and unique for studies on low-dimensional and new functional materials.

  12. STM CONTROL OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS: Single-Molecule Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hla, Saw-Wai; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2003-10-01

    The fascinating advances in single atom/molecule manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip allow scientists to fabricate atomic-scale structures or to probe chemical and physical properties of matters at an atomic level. Owing to these advances, it has become possible for the basic chemical reaction steps, such as dissociation, diffusion, adsorption, readsorption, and bond-formation processes, to be performed by using the STM tip. Complete sequences of chemical reactions are able to induce at a single-molecule level. New molecules can be constructed from the basic molecular building blocks on a one-molecule-at-a-time basis by using a variety of STM manipulation schemes in a systematic step-by-step manner. These achievements open up entirely new opportunities in nanochemistry and nanochemical technology. In this review, various STM manipulation techniques useful in the single-molecule reaction process are reviewed, and their impact on the future of nanoscience and technology are discussed.

  13. Collective Surface Diffusion Measurements with the STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringides, Michael C.

    1996-03-01

    Time dependent processes in surface overlayers at finite coverage are described in terms of the collective diffusion coefficient D_c. Dc can be measured from the time dependent correlation function C(t), of an initial concentration fluctuation formed in a probe area A. C(t) follows a characteristic 1/D_ct time dependence at long times. The STM can be easily used^1 to measure C(t) and, therefore, Dc by monitoring the current fluctuations with the tip fixed over a location (i.e, by suspending the scanning process). The probe area A is defined by the tunneling region. Experiments on O/Si(111) at low coverage will be described that show a dramatic increase of the current fluctuations (when compared to the clean surface) with the addition of oxygen. The analysis of the current fluctuations obtained at different temperatures is consistent with the 1/D_ct form of the correlation function. This method of measuring collective surface diffusion has the unique advantage of ultrafast speed (limited only by the electronics) and can be used to test predictions about the statistical mechanics of surface diffusion in an ensemble of particles. * Ames Laboratory is operated for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-82. 1. M. L. Lozano and M. C. Tringides, Europhys. Lett. 30 , 537 (1995).

  14. Near-Field Imaging with Sound: An Acoustic STM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2012-10-01

    The invention of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) 30 years ago opened up a visual window to the nano-world and sparked off a bunch of new methods for investigating and controlling matter and its transformations at the atomic and molecular level. However, an adequate theoretical understanding of the method is demanding; STM images can be considered quantum theory condensed into a pictorial representation. A hands-on model is presented for demonstrating the imaging principles in introductory teaching. It uses sound waves and computer visualization to create mappings of acoustic resonators. The macroscopic simile is made possible by quantum-classical analogies between matter and sound waves. Grounding STM in acoustic experience may help to make the underlying quantum concepts such as tunneling less abstract to students.

  15. Theoretical framework for the interpretation of STM images of adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, V M; Biscarini, F; Bustamante, C

    1992-07-01

    A theoretical formalism for the interpretation of STM images of adsorbates is developed by approaching the calculation of the observed current as a transport problem in quantum statistical mechanics. The STM configuration is treated as a system of three groups of states--the substrate, the adsorbate and the tip--in contact with a thermal reservoir, with which it exchanges energy. A new definition of current is introduced, and shown to be related to that given in the traditional transfer Hamiltonian approach. The transport instrument used for the description is the stochastic Liouville equation, known to have the advantage of allowing the incorporation of thermal effects as well as arbitrary degree of coherence in the quantum transport. Some preliminary calculations of STM images of simple adsorbate models are presented.

  16. Chemisorption of benzene and STM dehydrogenation products on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N.; Hedouin, M. F.; Palmer, R. E.; Persson, M.

    2003-10-01

    Modification of individual chemisorbed benzene molecules on Cu(100) has recently been performed in atomic manipulation experiments [J. Phys. Chem. A. 104, 2463 (2000); Surf. Sci 451, 219 (2000)]. Benzene dissociates under controlled voltage pulses in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) junction. The reaction is characterized as a dehydrogenation process and the fragments are identified as benzyne, C6H4. Here we present a density functional theory investigation of the chemisorption of benzene on the Cu(100) surface, the nature of the bonding and its effect on the STM images. The fragments phenyl and benzyne formed after one-fold and two-fold dehydrogenation of chemisorbed benzene are studied in the same manner. The stability of the fragments is explored via their chemisorption energy, their electronic structure on the surface and their affinity for hydrogen. Benzyne fragments seem to be the most stable, in agreement with the conclusion of the aforementioned STM experiments.

  17. Use of STM for analysis of surfaces of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permjakov, N. K.; Ananyan, M. A.; Luskinovich, P. N.; Sorokovoi, V. I.; Saveliev, S. V.

    1999-04-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) was used to image the cell surfaces of the olfactory organ of the shark Carcharhinus longimanus and ectoderm of the frog Xenopus laevis blastulae of 1024 stages, as well as human low-density lipoproteins surface. The samples from two of these objects were prepared by using traditional techniques for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The lipoprotein samples were prepared by drying in the air. A comparison of the STM images with the earlier obtained SEM images indicates that there are some earlier unknown details of the surface structures of receptor microvilli and support cell membranes of the olfactory organ of the shark. There was found a fold of membrane on the surface of the ectodermal frog embryo cells, which covered yolk granules. STM images of the lipoprotein surface were obtained without increasing conductivity treatment.

  18. STM fingerprints of point defects in graphene: a theoretical prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Amara, Hakim; Latil, Sylvain; Meunier, Vincent; Lambin, Philippe; Charlier, Jean Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is one of the most appropriate techniques to investigate the atomic structure of carbon nanomaterials. However, the experimental identification of topological and nontopological modifications of the hexagonal network of sp{sup 2} carbon nanostructures remains a great challenge. The goal of the present theoretical work is to predict the typical electronic features of a few defects that are likely to occur in sp{sup 2} carbon nanostructures, such as atomic vacancy, divacancy, adatom, and Stone-Wales defect. The modifications induced by those defects in the electronic properties of the graphene sheet are investigated using first-principles calculations. In addition, computed constant-current STM images of these defects are calculated within a tight-binding approach in order to facilitate the interpretation of STM images of defected carbon nanostructures.

  19. NSS5/SP-STM2 Joint International Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Saw-Wai Hla

    2009-05-03

    The NSS5/SP-STM2 conference was held in Athens, Ohio July 15-19, 2008. The conference brought together a prestigious group of scientists from all over the globe to focus for 3 ½ days on a variety of nanoscience topics, particularly on nanoscale spectroscopy and spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. The conference was attended by many young scientists as well as senior scientists. Attendees to the conference were drawn from more than 10 countries and included 28 invited speakers, who are the leading scientists in their respective research areas. Included among the invited speakers were 4 plenary speakers - eminent scientists in their fields. The conference was divided into two parallel sessions – the NSS5 session and the SP-STM2 session.

  20. STM study on the structures of SnSe surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang-Ui; Thi Ly, Trinh; Duong, Anh Tuan; Cho, Sunglae; Rhim, S. H.; Kim, Jungdae

    SnSe is a 2 dimensional layered material, and each layer is coupled by van deer Waals forces allowing very easy cleaving though the layer surfaces. SnSe has been studied for various potential applications because of its high stability and elemental abundance in earth. Recently, it was also reported that bulk SnSe has an excellent thermoelectric property of ZT =2.6 at 923 K along the b axis (Zhao et al., Nature 508 373 (2014)). The surface of a single crystal SnSe was studied via a home-built low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Clear atomic images of SnSe surfaces were observed at the filled and empty state measurements, and detail atomic structures were analyzed by comparing with DFT simulations. We found that the atomic image of SnSe surfaces measured by STM is not trivial to understand. Only Sn atoms were visible on STM topographic images for the both of filled and empty state probing. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) [Nos. NRF-2013R1A1A1008724, NRF-2009-0093818, and NRF-2014R1A4A1071686].

  1. STM Studies of Iron Phthalocyanine on Fe(110) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, Andreas; Dougherty, Dan; Rowe, J. E. (Jack)

    2011-03-01

    We have observed molecular-scale-resolution arrays of Iron Phthalocyanine (FePc) molecules which we adsorbed at room temperature on thin (~ 5-10 ML) films of Fe(110). These molecular layers were grown in a UHV Omicron/AFM/STM/ multi-probe system at NC State in the Physics Department at pressures of ~ 10-10 torr. Our results indicate a strong inter-molecular interaction that produces well-ordered films at monolayer coverage. For lower coverage (~ 0.2 -- 0.6 ML) the FePc-Fe substrate interaction strongly dominates and the STM image morphology has only small clusters of 2-6 molecules. Our data clearly shown that the FePc molecules are lying flat on the surface in the ordered ~ 1 ML samples since we see evidence of the carbon-ring ligands in some images. We discuss the possibility of spin-dependent effects between the molecular Fe and the substrate Fe as an example of potential molecular-modified spin-based devices. Initial STM-spectroscopy including both I vs. V and Z vs. V results are consistent with our structural observations. Supported in part by the NSF Chemical Centers for Innovation program (Grant CHE-0943975).

  2. Physical Modeling of Contact Processes on the Cutting Tools Surfaces of STM When Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, V. A.; Uteshev, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes how to create an optimization model of the process of fine turning of superalloys and steel tools from STM on CNC machines, flexible manufacturing units (GPM), machining centers. Creation of the optimization model allows you to link (unite) contact processes simultaneously on the front and back surfaces of the tool from STM to manage contact processes and the dynamic strength of the cutting tool at the top of the STM. Established optimization model of management of the dynamic strength of the incisors of the STM in the process of fine turning is based on a previously developed thermomechanical (physical, heat) model, which allows the system thermomechanical approach to choosing brands STM (domestic and foreign) for cutting tools from STM designed for fine turning of heat resistant alloys and steels.

  3. Surface oxides on Pd(111): STM and density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klikovits, J.; Napetschnig, E.; Schmid, M.; Seriani, N.; Dubay, O.; Kresse, G.; Varga, P.

    2007-07-01

    The formation of one-layer surface oxides on Pd(111) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT). Besides the Pd5O4 structure determined previously, structural details of six different surface oxides on Pd(111) will be presented. These oxides are observed for preparation in oxygen-rich conditions, approaching the thermodynamic stability limit of the PdO bulk oxide at an oxygen chemical potential of -0.95to-1.02eV ( 570-605K , 5×10-4mbar O2 ). Sorted by increasing oxygen fraction in the primitive unit cell, the stoichiometry of the surface oxides is Pd5O4 , Pd9O8 , Pd20O18 , Pd23O21 , Pd19O18 , Pd8O8 , and Pd32O32 . All structures are one-layer oxides, in which oxygen atoms form a rectangular lattice, and all structures follow the same rules of favorable alignment of the oxide layer on the Pd(111) substrate. DFT calculations were used to simulate STM images as well as to determine the stability of the surface oxide structures. Simulated and measured STM images are in excellent agreement, indicating that the structural models are correct. Since the newly found surface oxides are clearly less stable than Pd5O4 , we conclude that Pd5O4 is the only thermodynamically stable phase, whereas all newly found structures are only kinetically stabilized. We also discuss possible mechanisms for the formation of these oxide structures.

  4. STM observation of nitrided-Ga on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, Y.; Miwa, S.; Okumura, H. |

    1997-12-31

    To investigate the initial stage of GaN growth on Si, 0.2 Ga monolayers (ML) on Si (111) was nitrided and then the nitrided surfaces were observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). An aggregation of islands whose longest edges had a direction rotated 15{degree} from Si [1{bar 1}0] direction was observed. The shape of islands looked like a pentagon. Surface roughness was estimated for several nitrided conditions. It was found that surface roughness becomes larger as the nitridation process proceeds.

  5. Space simulation techniques and facilities for SAX STM test campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giordano, Pietro; Raimondo, Giacomo; Messidoro, Piero

    1994-01-01

    SAX is a satellite for X-Ray astronomy. It is a major element of the overall basic Science Program of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and is being developed with the contribution of the Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programs (NIVR). The scientific objectives of SAX are to carry out systematic and comprehensive observations of celestial X-Ray sources over the 0.1 - 300 KeV energy range with special emphasis on spectral and timing measurements. The satellite will also monitor the X-Ray sky to investigate long-term source variability and to permit localization and study of X-Ray transients. Alenia Spazio is developing the satellite that is intended for launch in the second half of 1995 in a low, near-equatorial Earth orbit. At system level a Structural Thermal Model (STM) has been conceived to verify the environmental requirements by validating the mechanical and thermal analytical models and qualifying satellite structure and thermal control. In particular, the following tests have been carried out in Alenia Spazio, CEA/CESTA and ESTEC facilities: Modal Survey, Centrifuge, Acoustic, Sinusoidal/Random Vibration and Thermal Balance. The paper, after a short introduction of the SAX satellite, summarizes the environmental qualification program performed on the SAX STM. It presents test objectives, methodologies and relevant test configurations. Peculiar aspects of the test campaign are highlighted. Problems encountered and solutions adopted in performing the tests are described as well. Furthermore, test results are presented and assessed.

  6. Chemically Sensitive Imaging of MgP with STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Greg; Ho, Wilson

    2014-03-01

    Since its invention, the STM has been limited by its lack of sensitivity to chemical structures in molecules. Recent advances in scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as non-contact AFM and scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy have enabled imaging of the internal structure and bonding of aromatic molecules such as pentacene and PTCDA. Here, we present a novel method of using the STM to image magnesium porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Au(110) with chemical sensitivity. In our previous study, we have shown that hydrogen molecules weakly adsorb on Au(110), exhibiting both vibrational and rotational IETS spectra. Exploiting the sensitivity of the vibrational and rotational mode energies to the local chemical environment, we perform dI/dV and d2I/dV2 imaging at different bias voltages, highlighting the various parts of the MgP molecule. In particular, we are able to image the positions of the nitrogen atoms in MgP. d2I/dV2 spectral mapping reveals that the origin of the chemical sensitivity comes from an energy shift of the rotational peak as the tip is scanned across the molecule, indicating a changing potential landscape for the H2. Similar d2I/dV2 imaging with a CO terminated tip reveals no chemical sensitivity to nitrogen.

  7. Space simulation techniques and facilities for SAX STM test campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Pietro; Raimondo, Giacomo; Messidoro, Piero

    1994-11-01

    SAX is a satellite for X-Ray astronomy. It is a major element of the overall basic Science Program of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and is being developed with the contribution of the Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programs (NIVR). The scientific objectives of SAX are to carry out systematic and comprehensive observations of celestial X-Ray sources over the 0.1 - 300 KeV energy range with special emphasis on spectral and timing measurements. The satellite will also monitor the X-Ray sky to investigate long-term source variability and to permit localization and study of X-Ray transients. Alenia Spazio is developing the satellite that is intended for launch in the second half of 1995 in a low, near-equatorial Earth orbit. At system level a Structural Thermal Model (STM) has been conceived to verify the environmental requirements by validating the mechanical and thermal analytical models and qualifying satellite structure and thermal control. In particular, the following tests have been carried out in Alenia Spazio, CEA/CESTA and ESTEC facilities: Modal Survey, Centrifuge, Acoustic, Sinusoidal/Random Vibration and Thermal Balance. The paper, after a short introduction of the SAX satellite, summarizes the environmental qualification program performed on the SAX STM. It presents test objectives, methodologies and relevant test configurations. Peculiar aspects of the test campaign are highlighted. Problems encountered and solutions adopted in performing the tests are described as well. Furthermore, test results are presented and assessed.

  8. Iodine adsorption on Ni(111): STM and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, N. S.; Pavlova, T. V.; Andryushechkin, B. V.

    2016-09-01

    Iodine adsorption on the Ni(111) surface has been studied in ultra-high vacuum conditions with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At the first stage of adsorption, iodine was found to form a simple commensurate (√{ 3 } ×√{ 3 }) R 30∘ structure at the coverage of 0.33 ML. According to DFT calculations, all iodine atoms in the (√{ 3 } ×√{ 3 }) R 30∘ structure occupy fcc hollow sites. Increase of the coverage in the range of (0.333 ML <θ < 0.364 ML) results in the uniaxial compression of the iodine lattice and the formation of the high-order commensurate structure (11 ×√{ 3 } R 30∘). The mechanism of compression involves the formation and the development of the striped super-heavy domain wall network. Further iodine dosing gives rise to nucleation and growth of flat 2D islands of surface nickel iodide. Atomic resolution STM images of iodide islands, in addition to atomic modulation, exhibit clear visible moiré-like superstructures with a period about 26 Å. The origin of the moiré-patterns was explained by the incommensurability of lattices of the surface nickel iodide and underlying Ni(111).

  9. Women's Education in Science Technology and Mathematics (STM) Challenges for National Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguele, Lawrence I.; Idialu, Ethel E.; Aluede, Oyaziwo

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents Science, Technology and Mathematics (STM) as the bedrock of the development of any nation. It emphasizes the role of women in national development. To achieve meaningful advancement in national development, the paper emphasizes the need to give priority to the education of women in STM. It recommended that deliberate efforts be…

  10. Single Crystal Synthesis and STM Studies of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrientos, Alfonso

    1997-01-01

    This is a final report for the work initiated in September of 1994 under the grant NAG8-1085 - NASA/OMU, on the fabrication of bulk and single crystal synthesis, specific heat measuring and STM studies of high temperature superconductors. Efforts were made to fabricate bulk and single crystals of mercury based superconducting material. A systematic thermal analysis on the precursors for the corresponding oxides and carbonates were carried out to synthesized bulk samples. Bulk material was used as seed in an attempt to grow single crystals by a two-step self flux process. On the other hand bulk samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility, We studied the specific heat behavior in the range from 80 to 300 K. Some preliminary attempts were made to study the atomic morphology of our samples. As part of our efforts we built an ac susceptibility apparatus for measuring the transition temperature of our sintered samples.

  11. Kondo effect and STM spectroscopy of Dirac electrons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Krishnendu

    2011-03-01

    We show that graphene, whose low-energy quasiparticles display Dirac like behavior, may exhibit a two-channel Kondo effect in the presence of magnetic impurities. We present a large N analysis for a generic spin S local moment coupled to Dirac electrons in graphene and demonstrate that the corresponding Kondo temperature can be tuned by an experimentally controllable applied gate voltage. We also study the STM spectra of these Dirac electrons in the presence of such impurities and demonstrate that such spectra depend qualitatively on the position of the impurity atom in the graphene matrix. More specifically, for impurity atoms atop the hexagon center, the zero-bias tunneling conductance, as measured by a STM, shows a peak; for those atop a graphene site, it shows a dip. We provide a qualitative theoretical explanation of this phenomenon and show that this unconventional behavior is a consequence of conservation/breaking of pseudospin symmetry of the Dirac quasiparticles by the impurity. We also predict that tuning the Fermi energy to zero by a gate voltage would not lead to qualitative change in the shape of the conductance spectra when the impurity is atop the hexagon center. A similar tuning of the Fermi energy for the impurity atop a site, however, would lead to a change in the tunneling conductance from a dip to a peak via an antiresonance. We discuss some recent experiments on a doped graphene sample that seem to have qualitative agreement with our theory and suggest further experiments to test our predictions. DST, India.

  12. Type II Secretion-Dependent Degradative and Cytotoxic Activities Mediated by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Serine Proteases StmPr1 and StmPr2

    PubMed Central

    DuMont, Ashley L.; Karaba, Sara M.

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging opportunistic pathogen that primarily causes pneumonia and bacteremia in immunocompromised individuals. We recently reported that S. maltophilia strain K279a encodes the Xps type II secretion system and that Xps promotes rounding, actin rearrangement, detachment, and death in the human lung epithelial cell line A549. Here, we show that Xps-dependent cell rounding and detachment occur with multiple human and murine cell lines and that serine protease inhibitors block Xps-mediated rounding and detachment of A549 cells. Using genetic analysis, we determined that the serine proteases StmPr1 and StmPr2, which were confirmed to be Xps substrates, are predominantly responsible for secreted proteolytic activities exhibited by strain K279a, as well as the morphological and cytotoxic effects on A549 cells. Supernatants from strain K279a also promoted the degradation of type I collagen, fibrinogen, and fibronectin in a predominantly Xps- and protease-dependent manner, although some Xps-independent degradation of fibrinogen was observed. Finally, Xps, and predominantly StmPr1, degraded interleukin 8 (IL-8) secreted by A549 cells during coculture with strain K279a. Our findings indicate that while StmPr1 and StmPr2 are predominantly responsible for A549 cell rounding, extracellular matrix protein degradation, and IL-8 degradation, additional Xps substrates also contribute to these activities. Altogether, our data provide new insight into the virulence potential of the S. maltophilia Xps type II secretion system and its StmPr1 and StmPr2 substrates. PMID:26169274

  13. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  14. Acidic pH induced STM1485 gene is essential for intracellular replication of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Allam, Uday Sankar; Krishna, M Gopala; Sen, Minakshi; Thomas, Rony; Lahiri, Amit; Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2012-01-01

    During the course of infection, Salmonella has to face several potentially lethal environmental conditions, one such being acidic pH. The ability to sense and respond to the acidic pH is crucial for the survival and replication of Salmonella. The physiological role of one gene (STM1485) involved in this response, which is upregulated inside the host cells (by 90- to 113-fold) is functionally characterized in Salmonella pathogenesis. In vitro, the ΔSTM1485 neither exhibited any growth defect at pH 4.5 nor any difference in the acid tolerance response. The ΔSTM1485 was compromised in its capacity to proliferate inside the host cells and complementation with STM1485 gene restored its virulence. We further demonstrate that the surface translocation of Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2) encoded translocon proteins, SseB and SseD were reduced in the ΔSTM1485. The increase in co-localization of this mutant with lysosomes was also observed. In addition, the ΔSTM1485 displayed significantly reduced competitive indices (CI) in spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes in murine typhoid model when infected by intra-gastric route. Based on these results, we conclude that the acidic pH induced STM1485 gene is essential for intracellular replication of Salmonella.

  15. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems

    PubMed Central

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07811.001 PMID:26623515

  16. STM Images of Atomic-Scale Carbon Nanotube Defects Produced by Ar+ Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Osvath, Z.; Vertesy, G.; Tapaszto, L.; Weber, F.; Horvath, Z.E.; Gyulai, J.; Biro, L.P.

    2005-09-27

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed on graphite (HOPG) substrate were irradiated with Ar+ ions of 30 keV, using a low-dose of D 5x1011 ions/cm2. The irradiated samples were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ambient conditions. Atomic resolution STM images reveal individual nanotube defects, which appear as hillocks of 1-2 angstroms in height, due to the locally changed electronic structure. After annealing at 450 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere, the irradiated MWCNTs were investigated again by STM. The effect of the heat treatment on the irradiation-induced nanotube defects is also discussed.

  17. Direct STM investigation of cinchona alkaloid adsorption on Cu(III).

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing-Min; Wang, Dong; Han, Mei-Juan; Wan, Li-Jun; Bai, Chun-Li

    2004-04-13

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) combined with cyclic voltammetry has been employed to investigate the adsorption of cinchonine on Cu(111). Similar to cinchonidine, cinchonine forms a long-range ordered adlayer with (4 x 4) symmetry on the substrate. The structural details on molecular adsorption were obtained by high-resolution STM images. On the basis of the previous results and obtained STM images, the quinoline ring is proposed to lie parallel to Cu(111) and serve as an anchoring group. The chiral quinuclidine moiety extends out of the surface to facilitate the interaction with the prochiral reactants.

  18. Ba termination of Ge(001) studied with STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curson, Neil; Koczorowski, Wojciech; Grzela, Tomasz; Radny, Marian; Schofield, Steven; Capellini, Giovanni; Czajka, Ryszard; Schroeder, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We use controlled annealing to tune the interfacial properties of a sub-monolayer and monolayer coverages of Ba atoms deposited on Ge(001), enabling the generation of either of two fundamentally distinct interfacial phases, as revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Firstly we identify the two key structural phases associated with this adsorption system, namely on-top adsorption and surface alloy formation, by performing a deposition and annealing experiment at a coverage low enough (0.15 ML) such that isolated Ba-related features can be individually resolved. Subsequently we investigate the monolayer coverage case, of interest for passivation schemes of future Ge based devices, for which we find that thermal evaporation of Ba onto a Ge(001) surface at room temperature results in on-top adsorption. This separation (lack of intermixing) between Ba and Ge layers is retained through successive annealing steps up to 770 K with a gradual ordering of the Ba layer at 570 K and above and a decrease in Ba layer density. Annealing above 770 K produces the 2-D surface alloy phase accompanied by strain relief through monolayer height trench formation. At 1070 K the surface morphology changes again but remains a 2-D surface alloy. WK and NJC acknowledge EPSRC grant EP/I02865X/1. WK, MWR and R.C. acknowledge the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education for support (Project No. N-N202-195840).

  19. Ferromagnetic STM tip operating as a Spin-diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Poliana H.; Souza, Fabricio M.; Seridonio, Antônio C.; Coutinho, Renato M.; Vernek, Edson; Egues, J. Carlos

    2011-03-01

    We study spin-dependent transport in a system composed of a ferromagnetic STM tip coupled to an adsorbed atom (adatom) and to a host metallic (non-magnetic) surface. Electrons can tunnel directly from the tip to the surface or through the adatom. Our calculation is based on the nonequilibrium Green functions technique (Keldysh formalism). We self-consistently calculate the adatom spin occupation and its magnetization as a function of the tip position. We find that the adatom becomes magnetized when the tip approaches it; this magnetization switches sign as the voltage changes from forward to reverse bias. We also calculate the spin-resolved currents. If the tip is near the adatom, we obtain the spin-diode effect [PRB 75, 165303 (2007)] - i. e., unpolarized current for positive bias and polarized current for reverse bias - when the adatom is singly occupied. We also observe Friedel oscillations in the current as the tip-adatom distance increases [F. M. Souza, P. H. Penteado, et al. - to be submitted]. This work was supported by the funding agencies CNPq, CAPES, FAPEMIG and FAPESP.

  20. Magnetic dipole-dipole sensing at atomic scale using electron spin resonance STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, T.; Paul, W.; Rolf-Pissarczyk, S.; MacDonald, A.; Yang, K.; Natterer, F. D.; Lutz, C. P.; Heinrich, A. J.

    Magnetometry having both high magnetic field sensitivity and atomic resolution has been an important goal for applications in diverse fields covering physics, material science, and biomedical science. Recent development of electron spin resonance STM (ESR-STM) promises coherent manipulation of spins and studies on magnetic interaction of artificially built nanostructures, leading toward quantum computation, simulation, and sensors In ESR-STM experiments, we find that the ESR signal from an Fe atom underneath a STM tip splits into two different frequencies when we position an additional Fe atom nearby. We measure an ESR energy splitting that decays as 1/r3 (r is the separation of the two Fe atoms), indicating that the atoms are coupled through magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. This energy and distance relation enables us to determine magnetic moments of atoms and molecules on a surface with high precision in energy. Unique and advantageous aspects of ESR-STM are the atom manipulation capabilities, which allow us to build atomically precise nanostructures and examine their interactions. For instance, we construct a dice cinque arrangement of five Fe atoms, and probe their interaction and energy degeneracy. We demonstrate the ESR-STM technique can be utilized for quantum magnetic sensors.

  1. The EAL-like protein STM1697 regulates virulence phenotypes, motility and biofilm formation in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Irfan; Wigren, Edvard; Le Guyon, Soazig; Vekkeli, Santtu; Blanka, Andrea; El Mouali, Youssef; Anwar, Naeem; Chuah, Mary Lay; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Frank, Ronald; Rhen, Mikael; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Lindqvist, Ylva; Römling, Ute

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquitous second messenger c-di-GMP regulates the switching of bacterial lifestyles from motility to sessility and acute to chronic virulence to adjust bacterial fitness to altered environmental conditions. Conventionally, EAL proteins being c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases promote motility and acute virulence phenotypes such as invasion into epithelial cells and inhibit biofilm formation. We report here that in contradiction, the EAL-like protein STM1697 of Salmonella typhimurium suppresses motility, invasion into HT-29 epithelial cell line and secretion of the type three secretion system 1 effector protein SipA, whereas it promotes rdar biofilm formation and CsgD expression. STM1697 can, however, functionally replace the EAL-like protein STM1344 and vice versa, whereby both proteins neither degrade nor bind c-di-GMP. Like STM1344, STM1697 suppresses the transcription of class 2 and class 3 flagella regulon genes by binding to FlhD, a component of the master regulator of the flagella regulon FlhD4 C2 and act additively under numerous conditions. Interestingly, the interaction interface of STM1697 with FlhD2 is distinct from its paralogue STM1344. We predict that the stand alone EAL domain proteins STM1697 and STM1344 belong to a subclass of EAL domain proteins in S. typhimurium, which are all involved in motility, biofilm and virulence regulation through interaction with proteins that regulate flagella function.

  2. Imaging the buried MgO/Ag interface: Formation mechanism of the STM contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashevich, Andrei; Altman, Eric I.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2014-10-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) provides real-space electronic state information at the atomic scale that is most commonly used to study materials surfaces. An intriguing extension of the method is to attempt to study the electronic structure at an insulator/conductor interface by performing low-bias imaging above the surface of an ultrathin insulating layer on the conducting substrate. We use first-principles theory to examine the physical mechanisms giving rise to the formation of low-bias STM images in the MgO/Ag system. We show that the main features of the low-bias STM contrast are completely determined by the atoms on the surface of MgO which overcomes prior ambiguities in assigning observed STM features to atomic positions of the substrate or thin film in such an epitaxial thin film system. Hence, the low-bias contrast is formed by states at the Fermi level in the Ag that propagate evanescently through the lattice and atomic orbitals of the MgO on their way to the surface. We develop a number of analysis techniques based on an ab initio tight-binding representation that allows identification of the origin of the STM contrast in cases where previous approaches have proven ambiguous.

  3. Adsorption of atomic hydrogen on ZnO(1010): STM study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiu-Li; Birkner, Alexander; Hänel, Kathrin; Löber, Thomas; Köhler, Ulrich; Wöll, Christof

    2006-04-01

    The adsorption of atomic hydrogen on a single crystal ZnO(1010) surface has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. High resolution STM images indicate that a well-ordered (1x1) H adlayer is formed on the ZnO(1010) surface. The STM data strongly indicate that the hydrogen adsorbs on top of the oxygen atoms forming hydroxyl species. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) studies reveal a H atom induced metallization at room temperature. In contrast to the clean surface for the hydrogen-covered surface distinct defects structures consisting of missing O and Zn atoms could be identified.

  4. Subsurface structure of epitaxial rare-earth silicides imaged by STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogero, C.; Martín-Gago, J. A.; Cerdá, J. I.

    2006-09-01

    We combine scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images, density functional theory total energy calculations, and STM simulations to conclusively determine the surface structure of the Y3Si5(0001) silicide epitaxially grown on Si(111) . We observe, for the same sample, two different types of atomic resolution images exhibiting either p3m or p6 symmetry, in analogy with previous works on similar rare-earth silicide surfaces. We elucidate the long-standing controversy regarding the interpretation of these images by showing that they are mainly related to the registry of the surfacemost Si bilayer with respect to the Si vacancy network located two layers below the surface and, therefore, to the existence of two different buried structural domains. Our results demonstrate an unsual STM depth sensitivity—up to 5Å —for metallic systems.

  5. Chen's derivative rule revisited: Role of tip-orbital interference in STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Palotás, Krisztián

    2015-04-01

    On the occasion of its 25th anniversary, we revise Chen's derivative rule for electron tunneling [C. J. Chen, Phys. Rev. B 42, 8841 (1990), 10.1103/PhysRevB.42.8841] for the purpose of computationally efficient simulations of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) based on first-principles electronic structure data. The revised model allows the weighting of tunneling matrix elements of different tip-orbital characters by an arbitrary energy-independent choice or based on energy-dependent weighting coefficients obtained by an expansion of the tip single-electron wave functions/density of states projected onto the tip-apex atom. Tip-orbital interference in the STM junction is included in the model by construction and can be analyzed quantitatively. As a further advantage, arbitrary tip geometrical orientations are included in the revised model by rotating the coordinate system of the tip apex using Euler angles and redefining the weighting coefficients of the tunneling matrix elements. We demonstrate the reliability of the model by applying it to two functionalized surfaces of recent interest where quantum interference effects play an important role in the STM imaging process: N-doped graphene and a magnetic Mn2H complex on the Ag(111) surface. We find that the proposed tunneling model is 25 times faster than the Bardeen method concerning computational time, while maintaining good agreement. Our results show that the electronic structure of the tip has a considerable effect on STM images, and the Tersoff-Hamann model does not always provide sufficient results in view of quantum interference effects. For both studied surfaces, we highlight the importance of interference between s and pz tip orbitals that can cause a significant contrast change in the STM images. Our method, thus, provides a fast and reliable tool for calculating STM images based on Chen's derivative rule, taking into account the electronic structure and local geometry of the tip apex.

  6. Synthetic peptide monolayers: Probing structure, attachment, and hydration conduction with STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, David Joseph

    2000-10-01

    Although the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been used in many studies of proteins and other biological molecules, the interpretation of the data has been hampered by a limited understanding of image contrast and tip-sample interactions. It has been recognized that adsorbed water can carry the currents necessary for STM imaging, and it has been speculated that the mechanism of charge transport is based on the exchange of protons along hydrogen-bonded networks. While a water film facilitates the imaging of proteins, it hampers efforts to use STM to probe the electronic structure of redox proteins. The physics of charge transfer in proteins and the intricacies of imaging large molecules with STM can be studied using synthetic proteins. A protein designed with engineerable electron transfer properties, a hydrophilic exterior and mechanisms for attachment to surfaces has been studied using both STM and fixed-electrode conductivity measurements. The effects of immobilization strategy on image quality were investigated by preparing monolayers using self-assembly, Langmuir-Blodgett and monolayer insertion techniques and imaging these films in both humid air and vacuum. The molecules were easily imaged in humid air due to the adsorbed water film, but dehydration in vacuum introduced a conductance gap which prevented the proteins from being imaged within a wide voltage range. The molecules were subjected to large forces when the tip scanned over them without retracting from the surface and peptides were displaced in ways which reflected the strength of their attachment to the surface. In the course of these studies, new STM imaging phenomena have been observed including meniscus-limited lateral resolution, and intermittent imaging of covalently attached molecules. The conductivity of protein films deposited between fixed electrodes depended strongly on hydration, and the experimental arrangement provides a platform for further study of the mechanism of conduction

  7. Growth of Sn on Mo(110) studied by AES and STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupski, A.

    2011-07-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) have been used to investigate the growth behavior of ultra-thin Sn films on a Mo(110) surface at room temperature. An analysis of STM and AES measurements indicates that layer-by-layer growth (Frank-van der Merwe mode) for the first two layers of Sn is observed. For submonolayer coverage, tin prefers to nucleate randomly and creates one atom high islands on Mo terraces. In the completed first and second layer, no ordered regions were observed. As the sample is post-annealed to 800 K, the rearrangement of an existing film suggests a Sn-Mo surface alloy formation.

  8. Techniques Use by Science, Technology and Mathematics (STM) Teachers for Controlling Undesirable Classroom Behaviours in Anambra State Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinelo, Okigbo Ebele; Nwanneka, Okoli Josephine

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the techniques used by secondary school Science Technology and Mathematics (STM) teachers in controlling undesirable behaviours in their classrooms. It adopted descriptive survey design in which 178 Anambra State teachers teaching STM subjects in senior secondary were involved in the research. Two sections of questionnaire…

  9. What Do We Know about Explanations for Drop out/Opt out among Young People from STM Higher Education Programmes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulriksen, Lars; Madsen, Lene Moller; Holmegaard, Henriette T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of the literature on understandings of drop out/opt out from science, technology and mathematics (STM) higher education programmes. After outlining the literature on students leaving higher education programmes in general, we then explore the research on drop out/opt out from STM programmes in particular, with…

  10. Short-Term Memory (STM) Constraints in Children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI): Are There Differences between Receptive and Expressive SLI?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickisch, Andreas; von Kries, Rudiger

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Specific language impairment (SLI) is assumed to be causally related to deficits in auditory short-term memory (STM). Although verbal STM deficits have been consistently found in SLI, the results of visual STM tests are inconsistent. Do these inconsistencies reflect different study populations of expressive SLI (ELI) and…

  11. Innovations in Scholarly Electronic Journals: The Challenge from Nontraditional STM Publishers (SIG PUB, SIG STI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panagopoulos, Beata; Chu, Heting

    2000-01-01

    Presents an abstract of a planned session on costs of STM (scientific, technical and medical) journals and how the Web is providing alternative, nontraditional publishing options. Highlights include the impact on libraries; pricing and licensing; additional services such as selective dissemination of information; and archival, publishing,…

  12. Fano Profiles in STM Spectroscopy of Single and Corraled Kondo Adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzuk, J. W.; Plihal, M.

    2001-03-01

    Resonance tunneling STM studies of transition metal atoms adsorbed on noble metal surfaces have produced spatially-dependent differential conductance versus voltage spectra, frequently observed to be asymmetric Fano lineshapes. The basic ideas behind the Fano profile of isolated atoms have been adapted to a theory of STM spectroscopy of atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The state of the tunneling electron within an STM tip biased with respect to the surface is regarded as the initially excited state. The atom on the surface plays the role of Fano’s discrete state embedded in the continuum. The normalized differential conductivity associated with the resonance, the STM equivalent of a spectral lineshape, is described by an expression that is related to, but more complicated than the Fano formula. It also contains more information, particularly that which is relevant to electron surface transport and scattering from artificially-synthesized surface nanostructures such as quantum corrals. Theoretical temperature and tip-position-dependent tunneling characteristics for Kondo systems such as single and “corraled” Co or Ce adsorbed on Au(111) will be presented and discussed.

  13. Atomically resolved STM imaging with a diamond tip: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Grushko, V; Lübben, O; Chaika, A N; Novikov, N; Mitskevich, E; Chepugov, A; Lysenko, O; Murphy, B E; Krasnikov, S A; Shvets, I V

    2014-01-17

    The spatial resolution of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) can be enhanced using light element-terminated probes with spatially localized electron orbitals at the apex atom. Conductive diamond probes can provide carbon atomic orbitals suitable for STM imaging with sub-Ångström lateral resolution and high apex stability crucial for the small tunneling gaps necessary for high-resolution experiments. Here we demonstrate that high spatial resolution can be achieved in STM experiments with single-crystal diamond tips, which are generally only considered for use as probes for atomic force microscopy. The results of STM experiments with a heavily boron-doped, diamond probe on a graphite surface; density functional theory calculations of the tip and surface electronic structure; and first-principles tunneling current calculations demonstrate that the highest spatial resolution can be achieved with diamond tips at tip-sample distances of 3-5 Å when frontier p-orbitals of the tip provide their maximum contribution to the tunneling current. At the same time, atomic resolution is feasible even at extremely small gaps with very high noise in the tunneling current.

  14. Recoding between Two Types of STM Representation Revealed by the Dynamics of Memory Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leszczynski, Marcin; Myers, Nicholas E.; Akyurek, Elkan G.; Schubo, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Visual STM (VSTM) is thought to be related to visual attention in several ways. Attention controls access to VSTM during memory encoding and plays a role in the maintenance of stored information by strengthening memorized content. We investigated the involvement of visual attention in recall from VSTM. In two experiments, we measured…

  15. S182 and STM2 gene missense mutations in sporadic alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Susumu; Matsushita, Sachio; Hasegawa, Yoshio; Muramatsu, Taro

    1996-07-26

    The linkage of genes S182 and STM2 to early-onset or late-onset sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) was not found in a group of 97 clinically-diagnosed AD patients and 46 autopsy-confirmed AD cases, using PCR-RFLP methods. 7 refs.

  16. Arbitrary tip orientation in STM simulations: 3D WKB theory and application to W(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Nagy, Norbert; Palotás, Krisztián

    2013-11-01

    We extend the orbital-dependent electron tunnelling model implemented within the three-dimensional (3D) Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) atom-superposition approach for simulating scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) by including arbitrary tip orientations. The orientation of the tip is characterized by a local coordinate system centred on the tip apex atom obtained by a rotation with respect to the sample coordinate system. The rotation is described by the Euler angles. Applying our method, we highlight the role of the real-space shape of the electron orbitals involved in the tunnelling, and analyse the convergence and the orbital contributions of the tunnelling current above the W(110) surface depending on the orientation of a model tungsten tip. We also simulate STM images at constant-current condition, and find that their quality depends very much on the tip orientation. Some orientations result in protrusions on the images that do not occur above W atoms. The presence of such apparent atom positions makes it difficult to identify the exact position of surface atoms. It is suggested that this tip orientation effect should be considered in the evaluation of experimental STM images on other surfaces as well. The presented computationally efficient tunnelling model could prove to be useful for obtaining more information on the local tip geometry and orientation by comparing STM experiments to a large number of simulations with systematically varied tip orientations.

  17. Arbitrary tip orientation in STM simulations: 3D WKB theory and application to W(110).

    PubMed

    Mándi, Gábor; Nagy, Norbert; Palotás, Krisztián

    2013-11-01

    We extend the orbital-dependent electron tunnelling model implemented within the three-dimensional (3D) Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) atom-superposition approach for simulating scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) by including arbitrary tip orientations. The orientation of the tip is characterized by a local coordinate system centred on the tip apex atom obtained by a rotation with respect to the sample coordinate system. The rotation is described by the Euler angles. Applying our method, we highlight the role of the real-space shape of the electron orbitals involved in the tunnelling, and analyse the convergence and the orbital contributions of the tunnelling current above the W(110) surface depending on the orientation of a model tungsten tip. We also simulate STM images at constant-current condition, and find that their quality depends very much on the tip orientation. Some orientations result in protrusions on the images that do not occur above W atoms. The presence of such apparent atom positions makes it difficult to identify the exact position of surface atoms. It is suggested that this tip orientation effect should be considered in the evaluation of experimental STM images on other surfaces as well. The presented computationally efficient tunnelling model could prove to be useful for obtaining more information on the local tip geometry and orientation by comparing STM experiments to a large number of simulations with systematically varied tip orientations.

  18. WUS and STM-based reporter genes for studying meristem development in poplar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the development of a reporter system for monitoring meristem initiation in poplar using promoters of poplar homologs to the meristem-active regulatory genes WUSCHEL (WUS) and SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM). When ~3 kb of the 5’ flanking regions of close homologs were used to drive expression o...

  19. The Impact of Pointing on the Short-Term Memory (STM) of Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaknin-Nusbaum, Vered; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This study entailed two short-term memory (STM) experiments investigating the importance of vowel diacritics for the temporary retention of three distinct Hebrew word list types: heterophonic homographs, non-homographs and homophonic homographs. Eighty university students participated in each experiment, with half of them tested with word lists…

  20. STM investigations of Au(1 1 1) electrodes coated with vitamin B 12 derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőcs, E.; Durrer, L.; Luginbühl, R.; Simic, N.; Viana, A. S.; Abrantes, L. M.; Keese, R.; Siegenthaler, H.

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin B 12 derivatives immobilized at flame-annealed Au(1 1 1) electrode surfaces have been investigated in close correlation with their structural properties and spatial arrangement at the electrode substrate by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in air and in aqueous 0.1 M NaClO 4 solution. The investigated compounds were symmetrical (B 12C 10S-SC 10B 12) and nonsymmetrical (B 12C 10S-SC 10) dialkyl disulfide derivatives of vitamin B 12, attached to the electrode surfaces by the S-Au bond. The ex situ and in situ STM experiments show the formation of a surface layer, whose packing density and structure is presumably controlled by the spatial arrangement of the large cobyrinate head groups. In presence of the symmetrical B 12 compound, a disordered surface layer is observed. Voltammetric investigations show that, in 0.1 M NaClO 4, this layer becomes unstable at potentials approximately ⩽ -1000 mV vs. MSE and is almost completely removed at more negative potentials. The STM imaging properties of the nonsymmetrical B 12 surface layer show a significant dependence on the tunneling distance. In particular, at small tunneling distances, a highly regular hexagonal surface pattern is observed that suggests strongly the presence of an ordered surface assembly. Modeling of the B 12 head group has been performed to provide information for a structure-related interpretation of the high-resolution STM images. The investigations are first STM results obtained at such B 12 modified electrodes.

  1. X-ray STM: Nanoscale elemental analysis & Observation of atomic track.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Furudate, Y; Kusui, Y; Saito, T; Akai-Kasaya, M; Tanaka, Y; Tamasaku, K; Kohmura, Y; Ishikawa, T; Kuwahara, Y; Aono, M

    2014-11-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) combined with brilliant X-rays from synchrotron radiation (SR) can provide various possibilities of original and important applications, such as the elemental analysis on solid surfaces at an atomic scale. The principle of the elemental analysis is based on the inner-shell excitation of an element-specific energy level "under STM observation". A key to obtain an atomic locality is to extract the element-specific modulation of the local tunneling current (not emission that can damage the spatial resolution), which is derived from the inner-shell excitation [1]. On this purpose, we developed a special SR-STM system and smart tip. To surmount a tiny core-excitation efficiency by hard X-rays, we focused two-dimensionally an incident beam having the highest photon density at the SPring-8.After successes in the elemental analyses by SR-STM [1,2] on a semiconductor hetero-interface (Ge on Si) and metal-semiconductor interface (Cu on Ge), we succeeded in obtaining the elemental contrast between Co nano-islands and Au substrate. The results on the metallic substrate suggest the generality of the method and give some important implications on the principle of contrast. For all cases of three samples, the spatial resolution of the analysis was estimated to be ∼1 nm or less, and it is worth noting that the measured surface domains had a deposition thickness of less than one atomic layer (Fig. 1, left and center).jmicro;63/suppl_1/i14-a/DFU045F1F1DFU045F1Fig. 1.(left) Topographic image and (center) beam-induced tip current image of Ge(111)-Cu (-2V, 0.2 nA). (right) X-ray- induced atomic motion tracks on Ge(111) that were newly imaged by the Xray-STM. On the other hand, we found that the "X-ray induced atomic motion" can be observed directly with atomic scale using the SR-STM system effectively under the incident photon density of ∼2 x10(15) photon/sec/mm(2) [3]. SR-STM visualized successfully the track of the atomic motion (Fig. 1, right

  2. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) using a photoexcited low-temperature-grown gallium arsenide tip

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, G.P.; Some, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1998-08-01

    In the quest for atomic spatial and picosecond temporal resolutions, several groups have integrated an STM tip with an ultrafast optoelectronic switch that gates the tunneling current from the tip. The authors report a novel ultrafast STM tip consisting of a cleaved GaAs substrate with a 1-{micro}m thick epilayer of low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs) deposited on the face. since LT-GaAs has a carrier lifetime of 1 ps, the photo-excitatin of the tip with an ultrafast above-bandgap pulse provides carriers for the tunneling current and photoconductively gates the current from the tip with picoseconds time resolution. The authors use this tip to detect picosecond voltage transients on a coplanar stripline.

  3. Hot STM of nanostructure dynamics on SrTiO(3)(001).

    PubMed

    Marsh, H L; Deak, D S; Silly, F; Kirkland, A I; Castell, M R

    2006-07-28

    The dynamics of nanostructured surface phases on SrTiO(3)(001) have been analysed using in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) above 800 degrees C. During high-temperature annealing, the formation, growth and ordering of the nanostructures has been observed. Dilines, with a width of approximately 1 nm, are formed from a TiO(2)-rich intermediary at 800 degrees C. STM during annealing at 825 degrees C has enabled us to follow both the growth and dissolution of dilines. Following extended annealing, trilines with a width of approximately 2 nm and ordered two-dimensional (2D) nano-arrays form from the diline domains. Our observations of diline dissolution implies random nucleation and growth, followed by rearrangement at elevated temperature to form domains. PMID:19661602

  4. Thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase gene (STM): Localization to human chromosome 16p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, I.A.; Her, C.; Weinshilboum, M.

    1994-09-01

    Thermolabile (TL) phenol sulfotransferase (PST) catalyzes the sulfate conjugation of phenolic monoamine neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. We recently cloned a cDNA for human liver TL PST and expressed it in COS-1 cells. We now report the chromosomal localization of the human TL PST gene (STM) as well as its partial sequence. DNA from NIGMS Human/Rodent Somatic Cell Hybrid Mapping Panels 1 and 2 was screened by use of the PCR, and the STM gene was mapped to chromosome 16. Regional localization to 16p11.2 was performed by PCR analysis of a high-resolution mouse/human somatic cell hybrid panel that contained defined portions of human chromosome 16. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Ab initio calculations on twisted graphene/hBN: Electronic structure and STM image simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, J. D.; Cisternas, E.

    2016-09-01

    By performing ab initio calculations we obtained theoretical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and studied the electronic properties of graphene on a hexagonal boron-nitrite (hBN) layer. Three different stack configurations and four twisted angles were considered. All calculations were performed using density functional theory, including van der Waals interactions as implemented in the SIESTA ab initio package. Our results show that the electronic structure of graphene is preserved, although some small changes are induced by the interaction with the hBN layer, particularly in the total density of states at 1.5 eV under the Fermi level. When layers present a twisted angle, the density of states shows several van Hove singularities under the Fermi level, which are associated to moiré patterns observed in theoretical STM images.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Functionalized molecules studied by STM: motion, switching and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Leonhard

    2008-02-01

    Functionalized molecules represent the central issue of molecular nanotechnology. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is a powerful method to investigate such molecules, because it allows us to image them with sub-molecular resolution when adsorbed on a surface and can be used at the same time as a tool to manipulate single molecules in a controlled way. Such studies permit deep insight into the conformational, mechanical and electronic structure and thus functionalities of the molecules. In this review, recent experiments on specially designed molecules, acting as model systems for molecular nanotechnology, are reviewed. The presented studies focus on key functionalities: lateral rolling and hopping motion on a supporting surface, the switching behaviour of azobenzene derivatives by using the STM tip and the controlled reactivity of molecular side groups, which enable the formation of covalently bound molecular nanoarchitectures.

  7. Liquid fueled external heating system for STM4-120 Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meijer, R. J.; Ziph, B.; Godett, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    The STM4-120 Stirling engine, currently under development at Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., is a 40 kW variable stroke engine with indirect heating using a sodium heat pipe. The engine is functionally separated into an application independent Energy Conversion Unit (ECU) consisting of the Stirling cycle and drive heated by condensing sodium and the application dependent External Heating System (EHS), designed to supply the ECU with sodium vapor heated by the particular energy source, connected by tubes with mechanical couplings. This paper describes an External Heating System for the STM4-120 ECU designed for the combustion of liquid fuel, comprised of a recuperative preheater, a combustion chamber, and a heat exchanger/evaporator where heat is transferred from the flue gas to the sodium causing it to evaporate. The design concept and projected performance are described and discussed.

  8. Nanomanipulation and nanofabrication with multi-probe STM: From individual atoms to nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Wang, Zhouhang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The wide variety of nanoscale structures and devices demands novel tools for handling, assembly, and fabrication at nanoscopic positioning precision. The manipulation tools should allow for in situ characterization and testing of fundamental building blocks, such as nanotubes and nanowires, as they are built into functional devices. In this paper, a bottom-up technique for nanomanipulation and nanofabrication is reported by using a 4-probe scanning tunneling microscope (STM) combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The applications of this technique are demonstrated in a variety of nanosystems, from manipulating individual atoms to bending, cutting, breaking carbon nanofibers, and constructing nanodevices for electrical characterizations. The combination of the wide field of view of SEM, the atomic position resolution of STM, and the flexibility of multiple scanning probes is expected to be a valuable tool for rapid prototyping in the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  9. Characterization and Optimization of Quartz Tuning Fork-Based Force Sensors for Combined STM/AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Agraït, Nicolás; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino

    This chapter will be divided in two main parts. In the first one, we will show a detailed analysis of the dynamics of quartz tuning fork resonators which are being increasingly used in scanning probe microscopy as force sensors. We will also show that a coupled harmonic oscillators model, which includes a finite coupling between the prongs, is in remarkable agreement with the observed motion of the tuning forks. Relevant parameters for the tuning fork performance such as the effective spring constant can be obtained from our analysis. In the second one, we will present an implementation of a quartz tuning fork supplemented with optimized tips based on carbon fibers. The remarkable electrical and mechanical properties of carbon fiber make these tips more suitable for combined and/or simultaneous STM and AFM than conventional metallic tips. The fabrication and the characterization of these carbon fiber tips as well as their performance in STM/AFM will be detailed.

  10. Morphological analysis of stainless steel scale like surface morphology using STM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Vignal, V.; Olive, J.M.; Desjardins, D.; Roux, J.C.; Genton, V.

    1997-12-19

    A combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation of stainless steel like surface morphology formed either in electropolishing bath or in HNO{sub 3} medium is reported. A new numerical technique using the Nanoscope III software is proposed. The dimension, slope and orientation of scales can be easily determined. Moreover, grain boundaries structure and probable oxides present in the upper part of the film can be deduced.

  11. Enhancement of the spin transfer torque efficiency in magnetic STM junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palotás, Krisztián; Mándi, Gábor; Szunyogh, László

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a method for a combined calculation of charge and vector spin transport of elastically tunneling electrons in magnetic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The method is based on the three-dimensional Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (3D-WKB) approach combined with electronic structure calculations using first-principles density functional theory. As an application, we analyze the STM contrast inversion of the charge current above the Fe/W(110) surface depending on the bias voltage, tip-sample distance, and relative magnetization orientation between the sample and an iron tip. For the spin transfer torque (STT) vector we find that its in-plane component is generally larger than the out-of-plane component, and we identify a longitudinal spin current component, which, however, does not contribute to the torque. Our results suggest that the torque-current relationship in magnetic STM junctions follows the power law rather than a linear function. Consequently, we show that the ratio between the STT and the spin-polarized charge current is not constant, and more importantly, it can be tuned by the bias voltage, tip-sample distance, and magnetization rotation. We find that the STT efficiency can be enhanced by about a factor of seven by selecting a proper bias voltage. Thus, we demonstrate the possible enhancement of the STT efficiency in magnetic STM junctions, which can be exploited in technological applications. We discuss our results in view of the indirect measurement of the STT above the Fe/W(110) surface reported by S. Krause et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 186601 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.186601].

  12. [Optimal design of portable ambulatory blood pressure monitor based on STM32L].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengxing; Zhou, Lechuan; Huang, Chao; Ye, Shuming; Chen, Hang

    2014-09-01

    Based on the 32-bit ultra low power microcontroller STM32L151RBT6 using ARM Cortex-M3 kernel, the portable ambulatory blood pressure monitor powered by two AA batteries was designed. In order to insure the stability of power supply and prevent overpressure of cuff, super capacitor technology and new kind of safety logic circuits were used. The experimental result shows that: this solution is accurate and stable, which has high safety coefficient and a great clinical application value.

  13. Toward quantitative STM: Scanning tunneling microscopy study of structure and dynamics of adsorbates on transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dunphy, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    STM was applied to chemisorbed S layers on Re(000l) and Mo(100) surfaces. As function of coverage on both these surfaces, S orders into several different overlayer structures, which have been studied by dynamic LEED. STM images of all these structures were obtained. Approximate location of S atoms in the structures was determined by inspecting the images, especially the regions containing defects. Results are in agreement with LEED except for the p(2{times}l) overlayer of sulfur on Mo(100). The STM images were compared to calculations made with Electron Scattering Quantum Chemistry (ESQC) theory. Variation of contrast in experimental images is explained as a result of changes in STM tip termination structure. STM image contrast is a result of changes in the interference between different paths for the tunneling electrons. The simplest structure on the Mo(100) surface was used as a model for developing and testing a method of quantitative structure determination with the STM. Experimental STM images acquired under a range of tunneling conditions were compared to theoretical calculations of the images as a function of surface structure to determine the structure which best fit. Results matched within approximately 0.1 Angstroms a LEED structural determination. At lower S coverage, diffusion of S atoms over the Re(0001) surface and the lateral interaction between these atoms were investigated by application of a new image analysis technique. The interaction between the S and a coadsorbed CO layer was also studied, and CO was found to induce compression of the S overlayer. A similar result was found for Au deposited on the sulfur covered Mo(100) surface. The interaction between steps on the Mo surface was found to be influenced by S adsorption and this observation was interpreted with the theory of equilibrium crystal shape. Design of an STM instrument which operates at cryogenic and variable sample temperatures, and its future applications, are described.

  14. How to simultaneously scan connected tips in a dual-tip STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wan-Ting; Dreyer, Michael; Anderson, James; Lobb, Christopher; Wellstood, Frederick

    Starting with a dual independent-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) design, we have connected the two tips by a short (~3 mm) flexible Nb foil strip that was patterned by a laser. To enable simultaneous imaging with both tips, we move both tips to within tunneling distance of a surface and modulate one tip's z-piezo at ~ 5 kHz and the other at ~10 kHz. The resulting combined tunneling current from the system has modulation at both frequencies, which we detect using two lock-in amplifiers. The two outputs (dI/dz1 and dI/dz2) are feedback to individual STM electronic controllers to allow simultaneous topographic imaging using both tips. We tested our setup at room temperature using Pt-Ir tips on Au/Mica and HOPG samples. The next step is to operate this dual-tip STM at 30 mK on a superconducting sample so that the device forms a novel type of scanning SQUID. Holding one of the tips fixed as a reference junction, the other tip will be scanned to image the gauge-invariant phase difference of a superconductor at the atomic scale.

  15. Genomic structure and expression of STM2, the chromosome 1 familial Alzheimer disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Lahad, E.; Wang, Kai; Fu, Ying Hui

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the gene STM2 result in autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer disease. To screen for mutations and to identify regulatory elements for this gene, the genomic DNA sequence and intron-exon structure were determined. Twelve exons including 10 coding exons were identified in a genomic region spanning 23, 737 bp. The first 2 exons encode the 5{prime}-untranslated region. Expression analysis of STM2 indicates that two transcripts of 2.4 and 2.8 kb are found in skeletal muscle, pancreas, and heart. In addition, a splice variant of the 2.4-kb transcript was identified that is the result of the use of an alternative splice acceptor site located in exon 10. The use of this site results in a transcript lacking a single glutamate. The promotor for this gene and the alternatively spliced exons leading to the 2.8-kb form of the gene remain to be identified. Expression of STM2 was high in skeletal muscle and pancreas, with comparatively low levels observed in brain. This expression pattern is intriguing since in Alzheimer disease, pathology and degeneration are observed only in the central nervous system. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of CNT-Based Smart Tips for Synchrotron Assisted STM

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Hui; Cummings, Marvin; Camino, Fernando; Xu, Weihe; Lu, Ming; Tong, Xiao; Shirato, Nozomi; Rosenmann, Daniel; Rose, Volker; Nazaretski, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    Determination of chemical composition along with imaging at the atomic level provides critical information towards fundamental understanding of the surface of materials and, hence, yields the capability to design new materials by tailoring their ultimate functionalities. Synchrotron X-ray assisted scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM) is a promising new technique to achieve real space chemically specific atomic mapping. Chemical sensitivity of SX-STM relies on excitation of core electrons by incident X-rays when their energy is tuned to an absorption edge of a particular element. However, along with core-level electrons, photoelectrons are also excited, which yield additional current and interfere with the tunnelingmore » current. To reduce the background photoelectron current and to improve ultimate resolution of SX-STM, we have developed and fabricated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) based “smart tips” using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and focused ion beam milling. The newly developed CNT-based smart tips, characterized step by step by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) during the fabrication process, demonstrate good performance and provide opportunity for realizing atomic chemical mapping.« less

  17. Oxygen adsorption on the Al₉Co₂(001) surface: first-principles and STM study.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, S Alarcón; Loli, L N Serkovic; Ledieu, J; Fournée, V; Gille, P; Dubois, J-M; Gaudry, E

    2013-09-01

    Atomic oxygen adsorption on a pure aluminum terminated Al9Co2(001) surface is studied by first-principle calculations coupled with STM measurements. Relative adsorption energies of oxygen atoms have been calculated on different surface sites along with the associated STM images. The local electronic structure of the most favourable adsorption site is described. The preferential adsorption site is identified as a 'bridge' type site between the cluster entities exposed at the (001) surface termination. The Al-O bonding between the adsorbate and the substrate presents a covalent character, with s-p hybridization occurring between the states of the adsorbed oxygen atom and the aluminum atoms of the surface. The simulated STM image of the preferential adsorption site is in agreement with experimental observations. This work shows that oxygen adsorption generates important atomic relaxations of the topmost surface layer and that sub-surface cobalt atoms strongly influence the values of the adsorption energies. The calculated Al-O distances are in agreement with those reported in Al2O and Al2O3 oxides and for oxygen adsorption on Al(111). PMID:23883551

  18. Oxygen adsorption on the Al₉Co₂(001) surface: first-principles and STM study.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, S Alarcón; Loli, L N Serkovic; Ledieu, J; Fournée, V; Gille, P; Dubois, J-M; Gaudry, E

    2013-09-01

    Atomic oxygen adsorption on a pure aluminum terminated Al9Co2(001) surface is studied by first-principle calculations coupled with STM measurements. Relative adsorption energies of oxygen atoms have been calculated on different surface sites along with the associated STM images. The local electronic structure of the most favourable adsorption site is described. The preferential adsorption site is identified as a 'bridge' type site between the cluster entities exposed at the (001) surface termination. The Al-O bonding between the adsorbate and the substrate presents a covalent character, with s-p hybridization occurring between the states of the adsorbed oxygen atom and the aluminum atoms of the surface. The simulated STM image of the preferential adsorption site is in agreement with experimental observations. This work shows that oxygen adsorption generates important atomic relaxations of the topmost surface layer and that sub-surface cobalt atoms strongly influence the values of the adsorption energies. The calculated Al-O distances are in agreement with those reported in Al2O and Al2O3 oxides and for oxygen adsorption on Al(111).

  19. Probing correlated current and force effects of nanoparticle charge states by hybrid STM-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Y.; Trudeau, P.-E.; Dhirani, A.-A.

    2002-12-01

    By using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever as a substrate for a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we can simultaneously probe currents I and forces F in a tunnel junction as a function of bias voltage V. Measurements performed using gold-nanoparticle (NP) coated cantilevers under ambient conditions reveal correlated kinks in both I-V and F-V curves. Changes in background charge distributions, which have been problematic in controlling single charges in such systems, can be readily detected by the hybrid STM-AFM. To test whether we can statistically attribute observed kinks to Coulomb staircase phenomena, we have performed measurements using NP’s of different sizes. NP’s 4.8 and 2.5 nm in diameter exhibit kinks spaced on average 0.22 and 0.52 V apart, respectively. These values are in good agreement with a metallic sphere flat surface model for the STM tip NP capacitance and the orthodox model for single-electron tunneling.

  20. The ReactorSTM: atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb, C T; van der Tuijn, P C; Roobol, S B; Navarro, V; Bakker, J W; Liu, Q; Stoltz, D; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Verdoes, G; van Spronsen, M A; Bergman, M; Crama, L; Taminiau, I; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2014-08-01

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  1. The ReactorSTM: Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Herbschleb, C. T.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Roobol, S. B.; Navarro, V.; Bakker, J. W.; Liu, Q.; Stoltz, D.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Verdoes, G.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Bergman, M.; Crama, L.; Taminiau, I.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2014-08-15

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  2. The ReactorSTM: Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbschleb, C. T.; van der Tuijn, P. C.; Roobol, S. B.; Navarro, V.; Bakker, J. W.; Liu, Q.; Stoltz, D.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Verdoes, G.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Bergman, M.; Crama, L.; Taminiau, I.; Ofitserov, A.; van Baarle, G. J. C.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2014-08-01

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  3. The ReactorSTM: atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb, C T; van der Tuijn, P C; Roobol, S B; Navarro, V; Bakker, J W; Liu, Q; Stoltz, D; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Verdoes, G; van Spronsen, M A; Bergman, M; Crama, L; Taminiau, I; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2014-08-01

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions. PMID:25173272

  4. STM sustains stem cell function in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem and controls KNOX gene expression independently of the transcriptional repressor AS1.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Simon; Dewitte, Walter; Murray, James Ah

    2014-04-28

    The Arabidopsis KNOX gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) is required for both the development and the sustained function of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and can induce de novo meristem formation when expressed ectopically. STM acts through induction of cytokinin (CK) synthesis to inhibit cellular differentiation and additionally functions to organize undifferentiated cells into a self-sustaining meristem. STM has been shown to positively regulate the related KNOX genes KNAT1/BP and KNAT2, and it has been proposed that this is mediated through repression of the ARP-type transcriptional repressor ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1). Here we investigate the role of STM in SAM organization, stem cell maintenance and the regulation of KNOX gene expression. We show that culture of stm mutant explants in high CK conditions does not restore proper sustained shoot growth, supporting the idea of STM having CK-independent roles in meristem function. Furthermore, we show that STM is required for continued stem cell function in the SAM by sustaining expression of the stem cell-promoting factor WUS and preventing cells of the meristem organizing center from adopting lateral organ-specific fates. We also demonstrate that transcriptional activation of class-1 KNOX genes by STM is independent of AS1, since AS1 transcript levels are not reduced in response to STM and STM is able to transactivate expression of both KNAT1/BP and KNAT2 in the as1 mutant background.

  5. Contrast stability and 'stripe' formation in scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: the role of STM-tip orientations.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is an important substrate in many technological applications and is routinely used as a standard in Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) calibration, which makes the accurate interpretation of the HOPG STM contrast of great fundamental and applicative importance. We demonstrate by STM simulations based on electronic structure obtained from first principles that the relative local orientation of the STM-tip apex with respect to the HOPG substrate has a considerable effect on the HOPG STM contrast. Importantly for experimental STM analysis of HOPG, the simulations indicate that local tip-rotations maintaining a major contribution of the d(3z(2)-r(2)) tip-apex state to the STM current affect only the secondary features of the HOPG STM contrast resulting in 'stripe' formation and leaving the primary contrast unaltered. Conversely, tip-rotations leading to enhanced contributions from m ≠ 0 tip-apex electronic states can cause a triangular-hexagonal change in the primary contrast. We also report a comparison of two STM simulation models with experiments in terms of bias-voltage-dependent STM topography brightness correlations and discuss our findings for the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in combination with tungsten tip models of different sharpnesses and terminations.

  6. Contrast stability and ‘stripe’ formation in scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: the role of STM-tip orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is an important substrate in many technological applications and is routinely used as a standard in Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) calibration, which makes the accurate interpretation of the HOPG STM contrast of great fundamental and applicative importance. We demonstrate by STM simulations based on electronic structure obtained from first principles that the relative local orientation of the STM-tip apex with respect to the HOPG substrate has a considerable effect on the HOPG STM contrast. Importantly for experimental STM analysis of HOPG, the simulations indicate that local tip-rotations maintaining a major contribution of the d3z^2-r^2 tip-apex state to the STM current affect only the secondary features of the HOPG STM contrast resulting in ‘stripe’ formation and leaving the primary contrast unaltered. Conversely, tip-rotations leading to enhanced contributions from m ≠ 0 tip-apex electronic states can cause a triangular-hexagonal change in the primary contrast. We also report a comparison of two STM simulation models with experiments in terms of bias-voltage-dependent STM topography brightness correlations and discuss our findings for the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in combination with tungsten tip models of different sharpnesses and terminations.

  7. Key Role of M.G. Nakhodkin’s Insight and Inspiration in Development of UHV STM-Related Techniques and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2015-02-15

    In this contribution I briefly describe my joint efforts and experiences with M.G. Nakhodkin in the field of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) including a construction of the home-built microscopes, application of this technique in various scientific endevours, as well as fruitfull and enlightening discusions. Our co-operation was focused on the novel aspects of STM probes preparation and conditioning, coupling the STM junction with laser irradiation, STM-based nanolithography, and also on collaboration at the international scale with M.G. Nakhodkin and members of his scientific group.

  8. Structural characterization and comparison of iridium, platinum and gold/palladium ultra-thin film coatings for STM of biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sebring, R.; Arendt, P.; Imai, B.; Bradbury, E.M.; Gatewood, J.; Panitz, J.; Yau, P.

    1997-10-30

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is capable of atomic resolution and is ideally suited for imaging surfaces with uniform work function. A biological sample on a conducting substrate in air does not meet this criteria and requires a conductive coating for stable and reproducible STM imaging. In this paper, the authors describe the STM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of ultra-thin ion-beam sputtered films of iridium and cathode sputtered gold/palladium and platinum films on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) which were developed for use as biomolecule coatings. The goals were the development of metal coatings sufficiently thin and fine grained that 15--20 {angstrom} features of biological molecules could be resolved using STM, and the development of a substrate/coating system which would allow complementary TEM information to be obtained for films and biological molecules. The authors demonstrate in this paper that ion-beam sputtered iridium on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has met both these goals. The ion-beam sputtered iridium produced a very fine grained (< 10 {angstrom}) continuous film at 5--6 {angstrom} thickness suitable for stable air STM imaging. In comparison, cathode sputtered platinum produced 16 {angstrom} grains with the thinnest continuous film at 15 {angstrom} thickness, and the sputtered gold/palladium produced 25 {angstrom} grains with the thinnest continuous film at 18 {angstrom} thickness.

  9. In-Situ TEM-STM Observations of SWCNT Ropes/Tubular Transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sola, F.; Lebron-Colon, M.; Ferreira, P. J.; Fonseca, L. F.; Meador, M. A.; Marin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) prepared by the HiPco process were purified using a modified gas phase purification technique. A TEM-STM holder was used to study the morphological changes of SWCNT ropes as a function of applied voltage. Kink formation, buckling behavior, tubular transformation and eventual breakdown of the system were observed. The tubular formation was attributed to a transformation from SWCNT ropes to multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) structures. It is likely mediated by the patching and tearing mechanism which is promoted primarily by the mobile vacancies generated due to current-induced heating and, to some extent, by electron irradiation.

  10. STM study of the atomic structure of the icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, T.; Fournée, V.; Lograsso, T.; Ross, A.; Thiel, P. A.

    2002-04-01

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the atomic structure of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Studies show that large, atomically flat terraces feature many ten-petal ``flowers'' with internal structure. The observed flower patterns can be associated with features on Al rich dense atomic planes generated from two-dimensional cuts of bulk models based on x-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The results confirm that the fivefold surface of i-Al-Cu-Fe corresponds to a bulk-terminated plane.

  11. Tunable Dirac-point resonance induced by a STM-coupled Anderson impurity on a topological insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction effect between the surface states of a topological insulator (TI) and a STM-coupled Anderson impurity is studied by using equations of motion of the Green’s functions. Remarkably, we show that when a coupling between the Anderson impurity and the STM tip is included, the tunneling resonance and the Kondo peak can be tuned to be exactly at the Dirac point, by adjusting the impurity level and Fermi energy, such that the local density of states at the Dirac point is significantly enhanced. This is in contrast to the case of a STM-decoupled Anderson impurity, where both resonances are always fully suppressed at the Dirac point. Our finding suggests a pathway to experimentally control the fundamental properties of the electrons on a TI surface.

  12. Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics Lecture: The Inner Machinery of Single Molecules: resolving the unresolved with the STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wilson

    2013-03-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a unique instrument that can probe and induce changes in a molecule with atomic scale resolution. Its operation is based on the current that flows between the tip and the substrate with the molecule sandwiched in between. Therefore, the STM can be used to understand the coupling of electrons to the different states and excitations in the molecule and to investigate the influence on them by its environment. From the spatial and energy dependences of the coupling to the charge, spin, and nuclear motions in the molecule, verification of and new insights into the quantum mechanical properties of molecules can be obtained, including the discovery of new conduction and energy transfer mechanisms. This understanding of electron-molecule interactions with the STM enables rational ways to control chemistry and the exploration of novel physical technologies based on molecules.

  13. Application of Machine Learning tools to recognition of molecular patterns in STM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksov, Artem; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu; Higashibayashi, Shuhei; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Kalinin, Sergei; Sumpter, Bobby

    The ability to utilize individual molecules and molecular assemblies as data storage elements has motivated scientist for years, concurrent with the continuous effort to shrink a size of data storage devices in microelectronics industry. One of the critical issues in this effort lies in being able to identify individual molecular assembly units (patterns), on a large scale in an automated fashion of complete information extraction. Here we present a novel method of applying machine learning techniques for extraction of positional and rotational information from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of π-bowl sumanene molecules on gold. We use Markov Random Field (MRF) model to decode the polar rotational states for each molecule in a large scale STM image of molecular film. We further develop an algorithm that uses a convolutional Neural Network combined with MRF and input from density functional theory to classify molecules into different azimuthal rotational classes. Our results demonstrate that a molecular film is partitioned into distinctive azimuthal rotational domains consisting typically of 20-30 molecules. In each domain, the ``bowl-down'' molecules are generally surrounded by six nearest neighbor molecules in ``bowl-up'' configuration, and the resultant overall structure form a periodic lattice of rotational and polar states within each domain. Research was supported by the US Department of Energy.

  14. Non-magnetic impurity effects in LiFeAs studied by STM/STS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaguri, T.; Khim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Bumsung; Kim, Kee Hoon; Kitagawa, K.; Matsubayashi, K.; Mazaki, Y.; Uwatoko, Y.; Takigawa, M.; Takagi, H.

    2012-02-01

    Detecting the possible sign reversal of the superconducting gap in iron-based superconductors is highly non-trivial. Here we use non-magnetic impurity as a sign indicator. If the sign of the superconducting gap is positive everywhere in momentum space, in-gap bound state should not be observed near the impurity site unless it is magnetic. On the other hand, if there is a sign-reversal in the gap, even non-magnetic impurity may create in-gap bound state [1]. We performed STM/STS experiments on self-flux and Sn-flux grown LiFeAs crystals and examined the effects of Sn impurity. In STM images of Sn-flux grown samples, we found a ring-like object which may represent Sn. Tunneling spectrum taken at this defect site exhibits in-gap bound state. Together with flat-bottom superconducting gap observed far from the defects, sign-reversing s-wave gap is the most plausible gap structure in LiFeAs. [1] T. Kariyado and M. Ogata, JPSJ 79, 083704 (2010).

  15. Self-assembly of α-6T Molecule on Ag(100) and Related STM Induced Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liu-guo; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Rui; Dong, Zhen-chao

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the self-assembly and light emission properties of organic α-sexithiophene (α-6T) molecules on Ag(100) under different coverage by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At very low coverage, the α-6T molecules form a unique enantiomer by grouping four molecules into a windmill supermolecular structure. As the coverage is increased, α-6T molecules tend to pack side by side into a denser stripe structure. Further increase of the coverage will lead to the layer-by-layer growth of molecules on Ag(100) with the lower-layer stripe pattern serving as a template. Molecular fluorescence for α-6T molecules on Ag(100) at a coverage of five monolayers has been detected by light excitations, which indicates a well decoupled electronic states for the top-layer α-6T molecules. However, the STM induced luminescent spectra for the same sample reveal only plasmonic-like emission. The absence of intramolecular fluorescence in this case suggests that the electronic decoupling is not a sufficient condition for generating photon emission from molecules. For intramolecular fluorescence to occur, the orientation of the dynamic dipole moment of molecules and the energy-level alignment at the molecule-metal interface are also important so that molecules can be effectively excited through efficient dipolar coupling with local plasmons and by injecting holes into the molecules.

  16. XPS and STM studies of the oxidation of hydrogen chloride at Cu(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altass, Hatem; Carley, Albert F.; Davies, Philip R.; Davies, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The dissociative chemisorption of HCl on clean and oxidized Cu(100) surfaces has been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Whereas the dissociation of HCl at the clean surface is limited to the formation of a (√ 2 × √ 2)-R45° Cl(a) monolayer, the presence of surface oxygen removes this barrier, leading to chlorine coverages up to twice that obtained at the clean surface. Additional features in the STM images that appear at these coverages are tentatively assigned to the nucleation of CuCl islands. The rate of reaction of the HCl was slightly higher on the oxidized surface but unaffected by the initial oxygen concentration or the availability of clean copper sites. Of the two distinct domains of adsorbed oxygen identified at room temperature on the Cu(100) surfaces, the (√ 2 × √ 2)-R45° structure reacts slightly faster with HCl than the missing row (√ 2 × 2 √ 2)-R45° O(a) structure. The results address the first stages in the formation of a copper chloride and present an interesting comparison with the HCl/O(a) reaction at Cu(110) surfaces, where oxygen also increased the extent of HCl reactions. The results emphasize the importance of the exothermic reaction to form water in the HCl/O(a) reaction on copper.

  17. Water adsorption on O(2x2)/Ru(0001) from STM experiments andfirst-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera-Sanfelix, P.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Mugarza, A.; Shimizu,T.K.; Salmeron, M.; Arnau, A.

    2007-10-15

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of water adsorption on Ru(0001) pre-covered with 0.25 monolayers (ML) of oxygen forming a (2 x 2) structure. Several structures were analyzed by means of Density Functional Theory calculations for which STM simulations were performed and compared with experimental data. Up to 0.25 monolayers the molecules bind to the exposed Ru atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell via the lone pair orbitals. The molecular plane is almost parallel to the surface with its H atoms pointing towards the chemisorbed O atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell forming hydrogen bonds. The existence of these additional hydrogen bonds increases the adsorption energy of the water molecule to approximately 616 meV, which is {approx}220 meV more stable than on the clean Ru(0001) surface with a similar configuration. The binding energy shows only a weak dependence on water coverage, with a shallow minimum for a row structure at 0.125 ML. This is consistent with the STM experiments that show a tendency of the molecules to form linear rows at intermediate coverage. Our calculations also suggest the possible formation of water dimers near 0.25 ML.

  18. HREELS, STM, and STS study of CH3-terminated Si(111)-(1×1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Taro; Kawai, Maki; Wawro, Andrzej; Suto, Shozo; Kasuya, Atsuo

    2004-12-01

    An ideally (1×1)-CH3(methyl)-terminated Si(111) surface was composed by Grignard reaction of photochlorinated Si(111) and the surface structure was for the first time confirmed by Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). HREELS revealed the vibration modes associated to the CH3-group as well as the C-Si bond. STM discerned an adlattice with (1×1) periodicity on Si(111) composed of protrusions with internal features, covering all surface terraces. The surface structure was confirmed to be stable at temperatures below 600 K. STS showed that an occupied-state band exists at gap voltage of -1.57 eV, generated by the surface CH3 adlattice. This CH3:Si(111)-(1×1) adlayer with high stability and unique electronic property is prospective for applications such as nanoscale lithography and advanced electrochemistry.

  19. A method to study short-term memory (STM) in the goldfish.

    PubMed

    Ryback, R S

    1976-04-01

    Twenty-one common goldfish (13-15.5 cm long) were randomly divided into alcohol (A) and nonalcohol (NA) groups and were trained in an alcohol solution of 400 mg/100 ml or in water, respectively. All alcohol fish were placed in an alcohol solution of 400 mg/100 ml for 3 hr before training in the same alcohol concentration. Fish were trained on a position discrimination task for 2 consecutive days. The door used for training was that opposite to each fish's spontaneous preference. Savings in relearning on Day 2 was taken as a measure of long term memory strength. Only fish which reached criterion on both days were immediately given 10 forced reversal trails in the opposite direction (i.e., a fish trained on right door was forced to choose the left door.) A and NA subjects were then tested after a 5 min (STM) delay, respectively, in a free choice situation for 10 trails (i.e., neither door was blocked). The results suggest that alcohol facilitates the STM of the forced reversal information.

  20. A novel STM-assisted microwave microscope with capacitance and loss imaging capability.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Atif; Anlage, Steven M

    2003-04-01

    We report a new technique of scanning capacitance microscopy at microwave frequencies. A near field scanning microwave microscope probe is kept at a constant height of about 1 nm above the sample with the help of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) feedback. The microwaves are incident onto the sample through a coaxial resonator that is terminated at one end with a sharp tip (the same tip is used to conduct STM), and capacitively coupled to a feedback circuit and microwave source at the other end. The feedback circuit keeps the source locked onto the resonance frequency of the resonator and outputs the frequency shift and quality factor change due to property variations of the sample. The spatial resolution due to capacitance variations is congruent with 2.5 nm. The microwave microscope is sensitive to sample sheet resistance, as demonstrated through measurements on a doped silicon sample. We develop a quantitative transmission line model treating the tip to sample interaction as a series combination of capacitance and sheet resistance in the sample.

  1. Atomistic simulations of negatively charged donor states probed in STM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankasala, Archana; Salfi, Joe; Rogge, Sven; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rahman, Rajib

    A single donor in silicon binding two electrons (D-) is important for electron spin readout and two-qubit operations in a donor based silicon (Si) quantum computer, and has recently been probed in Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) experiments for sub-surface dopants. In this work, atomistic configuration interaction technique is used to compute the two-electron states of the donor taking into account the geometry of the STM-vacuum-silicon-reservoir device. While 45 meV charging energy is obtained for D- in bulk Si, the electrostatics of the device reduces the charging energy to 30 meVs. It is also shown that the reduced charging energy enables spin triplet states to be bound to the donor. The exchange splitting between the singlet and triplet states can be tuned by an external electric field. The computed wavefunctions of the D- state helps to understand how the contribution of the momentum space valley states change with donor depth and electric field.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: A review and outlook for an anomaly of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM): superlattices on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Wing-Tat; Durkan, Colm

    2005-11-01

    Since its invention in 1981, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is well-known for its supreme imaging resolution enabling one to observe atomic-scale structures, which has led to the flourishing of nanoscience. As successful as it is, there still remain phenomena which are observed using STM but are beyond our understanding. Graphite is one of the surfaces which have been most extensively studied using STM. However, there are a number of unusual properties of graphite surfaces. First reported in the 1980s, superlattices on graphite have since been observed many times and by many groups, but as yet our understanding of this phenomenon is quite limited. Most of the observed superlattice phenomena are widely believed to be the result of a Moiré rotation pattern, arising from the misorientation between two graphite layers, as verified experimentally. A Moiré pattern is a lattice with larger periodicity resulting from the overlap of two lattices with smaller periodicities. As graphite layers are composed of hexagonal lattices with a periodicity of 0.246 nm, as observed using STM, when there are misoriented graphite layers overlapping each other, a Moiré pattern with larger periodicity, depending on the misorientation angle, will be produced and appear as a superperiodic hexagonal structure on top of the graphite atomic lattice of the topmost surface layer. It is important to study graphite superlattices because, firstly, knowledge of this phenomenon will enable us to properly interpret STM images; secondly, it helps us to understand the correlation between electronic structures and atomic-structure rearrangement of graphite which is of tremendous aid for engineering material properties; thirdly, and perhaps most importantly, the observation of the phenomenon exhibits the capability of STM to produce images indicating the nature of internal defects which are below the surface. Over recent years, experimental and modelling techniques have been developed to study this

  3. Correlating STM Contrast and Atomic-Scale Structure by Chemical Modification: Vacancy Dislocation Loops on FeO/Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Knudsen, Jan; Grabow, Lars C.; Vang, Ronnie T.; Laegsgaard, E.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2008-11-28

    By chemically modifying the FeO(111) thin film on Pt(111), we show that it is possible to unambiguously correlate its STM morphology with its underlying structure without recourse to STM simulations. Partial reduction of the oxide surface leads to the formation of triangularly-shaped oxygen vacancy dislocation loops at specific sites in the moiré structure of the film. Their presence allows unambiguous identification of the high-symmetry domains of the moiré structure, whose differing chemical properties govern the templating effect on adsorbed metal atoms, clusters and molecules.

  4. Quantum transport theory for nanostructures: Application to STM-tip-induced quantum dots and MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Mihail

    The subject of the thesis is electron transport in advanced semiconductor devices with focus on two classes of devices: nanoscale metal-oxide field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and scanning-tunneling microscope (STM)-tip-induced quantum dots. The first part of the work is devoted to the investigation of the electron quantum transport in nanoscale transistors. Si-based MOSFETs with typical sizes about 100 nm have found an application in highly integrated systems. The mechanism of the electron transport in these devices differs from that in devices with sizes of 50 nm and below. The conventional devices are described by the Boltzmann transport equation. This theory focuses on scattering-dominant transport, which typically occurs in long-channel devices. On the contrary, in a structure with a characteristic size of the order of the mean free path, the electron transport is essentially ballistic. Downscaling MOSFETs to their limiting sizes is a key challenge for the semiconductor industry. Detailed simulations that capture the physics of carrier transport and the quantum mechanical effects that occur in these devices complements experimental work in addressing this challenge. Furthermore, a conceptual view of the nanoscale transistor is needed to support the interpretation of the simulations and experimental data as well as to guide further experimental work. The objective of this part of the work is to provide such a view by formulating a detailed quantum-mechanical transport model and performing extensive numerical simulations. We have developed a model along these lines for the nanosize MOSFETs with different device geometries. In this work two types of transistors are investigated: single-gate and double-gate structures. It is shown that an ultra-thin double-gate silicon-on-insulator MOSFET demonstrates the capability of delivering a remarkably high saturation current as compared with a single-gate structure. The results of the investigation of the electron quantum

  5. Simultaneous noncontact AFM and STM of Ag:Si(111)-(3×3)R30∘

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, Adam; Stannard, Andrew; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-02-01

    The Ag:Si(111)-(3×3)R30∘ surface structure has attracted considerable debate concerning interpretation of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) images. In particular, the accepted interpretation of atomic resolution images in NC-AFM has been questioned by theoretical and STM studies. In this paper, we use combined NC-AFM and STM to conclusively show that the inequivalent trimer (IET) configuration best describes the surface ground state. Thermal-averaging effects result in a honeycomb-chained-trimer (HCT) appearance at room temperature, in contrast to studies suggesting that the IET configuration remains stable at higher temperatures [Zhang, Gustafsson, and Johansson, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.74.201304 74, 201304(R) (2006) and J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.1742-658810.1088/1742-6596/61/1/264 61, 1336 (2007)]. We also comment on results obtained at an intermediate temperature that suggest an intriguing difference between the imaging mechanisms of NC-AFM and STM on structurally fluctuating samples.

  6. Structural aspects of the fivefold quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe surface from STM and dynamical LEED Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, T.; Shi, F.; Shen, Z.; Gierer, M.; Goldman, A.I.; Kramer, M.J.; Jenks, C.J.; Lograsso, T.A.; Delaney, D.W.; Thiel, P.A.; Van, M.A.

    2001-04-15

    We investigate the atomic structure of the fivefold surface of an icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe alloy, using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and a special dynamical low energy-electron diffraction (LEED) method. STM indicates that the step heights adopt (primarily) two values in the ratio of tau, but the spatial distribution of these two values does not follow a Fibonacci sequence, thus breaking the ideal bulk-like quasicrystalline layer stacking order perpendicular to the surface. The appearance of screw dislocations in the STM images is another indication of imperfect quasicrystallinity. On the other hand, the LEED analysis, which was successfully applied to Al-Pd-Mn in a previous study, is equally successful for Al-Cu-Fe. Similar structural features are found for both materials, in particular for interlayer relaxations and surface terminations. Although there is no structural periodicity, there are clear atomic planes in the bulk of the quasicrystal, some of which can be grouped in recurring patterns. The surface tends to form between these grouped layers in both alloys. For Al-Cu-Fe, the step heights measured by STM are consistent with the thicknesses of the grouped layers favored in LEED. These results suggest that the fivefold Al-Cu-Fe surface exhibits a quasicrystalline layering structure, but with stacking defects.

  7. Insight into STM image contrast of n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane molecules on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Miao; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Ke; Yu, Ai-Fang; Hao, Yan-Zhong; Xie, Si-Shen; Sun, Jie-Lin

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional ordered patterns of n-tetradecane (n-C14H30) and n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) molecules at liquid/graphite interface have been directly imaged using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) under ambient conditions. STM images reveal that the two different kinds of molecules self-organize into ordered lamellar structures in which alkane chains of the molecules extend along one of three equivalent lattice axes of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) basal plane. For n-C14H30 molecules, the molecular axes are observed to tilt by 60° with respect to inter-lamellar trough lines and the carbon backbones of the alkane chains are perpendicular to the HOPG basal plane in an all-trans conformation. However, for n-C16H34 molecules, the molecular axes are perpendicular to lamellar borders (90°) and the planes of the all-trans carbon skeletons are parallel to the graphite basal plane. The results clearly indicate that outmost hydrogen atoms of the alkane chains dominate atom-scaled features of the STM images. That is, in the case of long-chain alkane molecules, topographic effects dominantly determine STM image contrast of the methylene regions of the alkane chains that are adsorbed on HOPG.

  8. STM Studies of Near-Optimal Doped Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8 delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2010-04-05

    In this paper we summarize our STM studies of the density of electronic states in nearly optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8 + {delta}} in zero field. We report on the inhomogeneity of the gap structure, density of states modulations with four-lattice constant period, and coherence peak modulation.

  9. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Garah, M.; Santana Bonilla, A.; Ciesielski, A.; Gualandi, A.; Mengozzi, L.; Fiorani, A.; Iurlo, M.; Marcaccio, M.; Gutierrez, R.; Rapino, S.; Calvaresi, M.; Zerbetto, F.; Cuniberti, G.; Cozzi, P. G.; Paolucci, F.; Samorì, P.

    2016-07-01

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices.Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to

  10. Design of mine-used DC carrier telephone based on STM32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Goufan; Zhou, Hui; Zhan, Minhua; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abide by the design principles of mine intrinsically safe circuit, according to the need of underground communication in coal mine, the paper proposed a design scheme of DC carrier telephone which can dial. The design circuit of the telephone is introduced in detail. The telephone's voice signals are generated by the microphone. After enlarged then the voice signals are modulated to frequency signals by LM567 chip. The frequency signals are coupled by transformer and then transmitted by 12V DC power supply line to the other voice terminals. In the voice terminal the signals are demodulated by LM567 demodulation circuit and enlarged by LM386, then, the amplified audio signals are output from a speaker. The dialing circuit is designed based on the STM32 MCU. The dial information is transmitted to the other telephone terminals by CAN bus. The measured distance calls is greater than 2000m, volume is larger than 85dB, good results.

  11. Defects in Thin-Film FeSe/SrTiO3: STM and DFT Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dennis; Webb, Tatiana A.; Song, Can-Li; Chang, Cui-Zu; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    A single-layer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO3 exhibits an order-of-magnitude enhancement of its superconducting transition temperature compared to bulk FeSe. This dramatic effect is curiously absent in a second layer of FeSe deposited on the heterostructure, leading to many questions concerning the role of the interface structure, electron doping and phonon coupling. Here, we approach these questions by using STM to characterize and compare native defects that appear in multi-layer and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 grown by MBE under excess Se flux. We use DFT to explore candidate defect configurations, formation energies and diffusion barriers, in order to gain atomic-scale insights into the growth and structure of these film heterostructures. Work supported by NSF DMR-1231319 (STC CIQM) and Moore Foundation EPiQS GBMF4536. Computations run on Harvard RC Odyssey.

  12. XPS/STM study of model bimetallic Pd-Au/HOPG catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V.; Prosvirin, Igor P.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2016-03-01

    The preparation of model bimetallic Pd-Au/HOPG catalysts has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Initially, model "core-shell" type Pd-Au/HOPG catalysts with similar particle size distribution (5-8 nm), but with different densities of particle locations on the HOPG surface and Pd/Au atomic ratios are prepared. Further, their thermal stability is studied within a temperature range of 50-500 °C at UHV conditions. It has been shown that annealing the model catalysts at a temperature range of 300-400 °C leads to formation of Pd-Au alloyed particles. Enhancement of heating temperature up to 500 °C results in sintering of bimetallic nanoparticles. Contribution of different parameters controlling the properties of Pd-Au alloyed particles has been discussed.

  13. Image potential states mediated STM imaging of cobalt phthalocyanine on NaCl/Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qinmin, Guo; Zhihui, Qin; Min, Huang; Vladimir, N. Mantsevich; Gengyu, Cao

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption and electronic properties of isolated cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecule on an ultrathin layer of NaCl have been investigated. High-resolution STM images give a detailed picture of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of an isolated CoPc. It is shown that the NaCl ultrathin layer efficiently decouples the interaction of the molecules from the underneath metal substrate, which makes it an ideal substrate for studying the properties of single molecules. Moreover, strong dependence of the appearance of the molecules on the sample bias in the region of relatively high bias (> 3.1 V) is ascribed to the image potential states (IPSs) of NaCl/Cu(100), which may provide us with a possible method to fabricate quantum storage devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21203239 and 21311120059) and RFBR (Grant No. 13-02-91180).

  14. Diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) studied by STM and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Bartels, Ludwig; Einstein, Theodore

    2014-03-01

    Substituted anthracenes have drawn attention due to their ability to diffuse uniaxially on a Cu(111) surface. We compare anthracene to three of its derivatives whose 9,10 hydrogens are replaced by elements of the chalcogen group that act as linkers binding the molecules to a Cu(111) substrate. DFT calculations shed light on STM imaging and diffusion studies on the three substituted species. We present an analysis of the DFT results in which energetic contributions to the diffusion barriers are partitioned among the Kohn-Sham orbitals, allowing us to make assignments as to how each orbital affects diffusion for each species and draw comparisons between them. Present address: Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD.

  15. Automated Tracking of Nanometer-Scale Feature Evolution Using an STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Russell; Dean, Adam; Maheswaranathan, Niru; Sosolik, Chad

    2007-03-01

    Time-resolved measurements of vacancy pits and adatom islands on monatomic metallic surfaces (e.g. Ag(111) [1]) have provided valuable insight into the underlying atomic diffusion processes that drive dynamics at nanometer length scales. Utilizing our variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope or STM, we are extending this probing method to more complex systems, such as the AuCu and NiAl alloys. To increase the rate of successful data acquisition for these measurements, we have developed automated tracking routines that allow for the continuous monitoring of evolving surface features with minimal operator involvement. Post-acquisition image analysis is further enhanced utilizing feature detection algorithms. Current proof-of-concept results spanning several hours of acquisition time on single crystal metal surfaces are presented. [1] K. Morgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. B 63, 045412 (2001).

  16. Automated Tracking of Nanometer-Scale Feature Evolution Using an STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Russell; Dean, Adam; Maheswaranathan, Niru; Sosolik, Chad

    2006-11-01

    Time-resolved measurements of vacancy pits and adatom islands on monatomic metallic surfaces (e.g. Ag(111) [1]) have provided valuable insight into the underlying atomic diffusion processes that drive dynamics at nanometer length scales. Utilizing our variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope or STM, we are extending this probing method to more complex systems, such as the AuCu and NiAl alloys. To increase the rate of successful data acquisition for these measurements, we have developed automated tracking routines that allow for the continuous monitoring of evolving surface features with minimal operator involvement. Post-acquisition image analysis is further enhanced utilizing feature detection algorithms. Current proof-of-concept results spanning several hours of acquisition time on single crystal metal surfaces are presented. [1] K. Morgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. B 63, 045412 (2001).

  17. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    El Garah, M; Santana Bonilla, A; Ciesielski, A; Gualandi, A; Mengozzi, L; Fiorani, A; Iurlo, M; Marcaccio, M; Gutierrez, R; Rapino, S; Calvaresi, M; Zerbetto, F; Cuniberti, G; Cozzi, P G; Paolucci, F; Samorì, P

    2016-07-14

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices.

  18. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    El Garah, M; Santana Bonilla, A; Ciesielski, A; Gualandi, A; Mengozzi, L; Fiorani, A; Iurlo, M; Marcaccio, M; Gutierrez, R; Rapino, S; Calvaresi, M; Zerbetto, F; Cuniberti, G; Cozzi, P G; Paolucci, F; Samorì, P

    2016-07-14

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices. PMID:27376633

  19. HRLEED and STM study of misoriented Si(100) with and without a Te overlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Yala, S.; Montano, P.A. |

    1996-12-01

    The growth of high quality Te on misoriented Si(100) is important as an intermediate phase for epitaxial growth of CdTe. The misorientation angle plays a key role in the growth quality of CdTe/Si(100); this incited the curiosity to investigate the effect of the misorientation angle on the topography of the surface structure of Si(100). The main goal is to show the relation between the misorientation angle, the terrace width and the step height distributions. HRLEED (High Resolution Low Energy Electron Diffraction) provides information in reciprocal space while STM gives real space topographic images of the surface structure. STM and HRLEED measurements were performed on Si(100) with misorientation angle {var_theta} = 0.5{degree}, 1.5{degree} and 8{degree} towards the [110] direction and {var_theta} = 4{degree} towards the [130] direction. Except for the 8{degree} misorientation in which case a regular step array with diatomic step height was observed, for the other misorientations the terrace width was variable. The average terrace width decreased with increasing misorientation angle. A mixture of diatomic and monatomic step heights was observed on the 0.5{degree} and 1.5{degree} misoriented Si(100) samples. It proves that one can not assume purely monatomic step height for low misorientation angles. The results do not agree with the belief that at low miscut angle A and B terraces are equal and that as the misorientation angle increases the B terrace tends to be wider than the A terrace. In fact, pairing of terraces was not observed at all. Te was deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 C. The authors observed a significant reduction in the terrace widths for all miscut angles.

  20. The Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission (S-3 STM): Level 2 SAR Ocean Retracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, S.; Lucas, B.; Benveniste, J.

    2015-12-01

    The SRAL Radar Altimeter, on board of the ESA Mission Sentinel-3 (S-3), has the capacity to operate either in the Pulse-Limited Mode (also known as LRM) or in the novel Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode. Thanks to the initial results from SAR Altimetry obtained exploiting CryoSat-2 data, lately the interest by the scientific community in this new technology has significantly increased and consequently the definition of accurate processing methodologies (along with validation strategies) has now assumed a capital importance. In this paper, we present the algorithm proposed to retrieve from S-3 STM SAR return waveforms the standard ocean geophysical parameters (ocean topography, wave height and sigma nought) and the validation results that have been so far achieved exploiting the CryoSat-2 data as well as the simulated data. The inversion method (retracking) to extract from the return waveform the geophysical information is a curve best-fitting scheme based on the bounded Levenberg-Marquardt Least-Squares Estimation Method (LEVMAR-LSE). The S-3 STM SAR Ocean retracking algorithm adopts, as return waveform’s model, the “SAMOSA” model [Ray et al, 2014], named after the R&D project SAMOSA (led by Satoc and funded by ESA), in which it has been initially developed. The SAMOSA model is a physically-based model that offers a complete description of a SAR Altimeter return waveform from ocean surface, expressed in the form of maps of reflected power in Delay-Doppler space (also known as stack) or expressed as multilooked echoes. SAMOSA is able to account for an elliptical antenna pattern, mispointing errors in roll and yaw, surface scattering pattern, non-linear ocean wave statistics and spherical Earth surface effects. In spite of its truly comprehensive character, the SAMOSA model comes with a compact analytical formulation expressed in term of Modified Bessel functions. The specifications of the retracking algorithm have been gathered in a technical document (DPM

  1. Electronic Structure of the Cuprate Superconducting and Pseudogap Phases from Spectroscopic Imaging STM

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Schmidt, A.R.; Fujita, K.; Kim, E.-A.; Lawler, M.J.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lee, D.-H.

    2011-06-21

    We survey the use of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) to probe the electronic structure of underdoped cuprates. Two distinct classes of electronic states are observed in both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor, existing below a lower energy scale E = {Delta}{sub 0}. We find that the Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) signatures of delocalized Cooper pairing are restricted to a k-space arc, which terminates near the lines connecting k = {+-}({pi}/a{sub 0},0) to k = {+-}(0,{pi}/a{sub 0}). This arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density such that Luttinger's theorem could be satisfied if it represents the front side of a hole-pocket that is bounded behind by the lines between k = {+-}({pi}/a{sub 0},0) and k = {+-}(0,{pi}/a{sub 0}). In both phases, the only broken symmetries detected for the |E| < {Delta}{sub 0} states are those of a d-wave superconductor. The second class of states occurs proximate to the PG energy scale E = {Delta}{sub 1}. Here the non-dispersive electronic structure breaks the expected 90{sup o}-rotational symmetry of electronic structure within each unit cell, at least down to 180{sup o}-rotational symmetry. This electronic symmetry breaking was first detected as an electronic inequivalence at the two oxygen sites within each unit cell by using a measure of nematic (C{sub 2}) symmetry. Incommensurate non-dispersive conductance modulations, locally breaking both rotational and translational symmetries, coexist with this intra-unit-cell electronic symmetry breaking at E = {Delta}{sub 1}. Their characteristic wavevector Q is determined by the k-space points where Bogoliubov QPI terminates and therefore changes continuously with doping. The distinct broken electronic symmetry states (intra-unit-cell and finite Q) coexisting at E {approx} {Delta}{sub 1} are

  2. XPS, LEED and STM study of thin oxide films formed on Cr(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, V.; Cadot, S.; Marcus, P.

    2000-06-01

    The growth, thickness, composition and structure of chromium oxide thin films formed by exposing Cr(110) single-crystal surfaces to gaseous oxygen at 300 and 625 K have been investigated by XPS, LEED and STM measurements. The oxide films formed at the two temperatures are significantly different. At 300 K, a granular and non-crystalline oxide is formed, which grows with a constant ˜Cr 2O 3 stoichiometry up to a limiting thickness of 0.9 nm. The film is hydrated with a water content of 10-20%, which decreases upon annealing. Nuclei of oxide with a lateral dimension of ˜0.7 nm and a height of ˜0.2 nm have been observed in the nucleation stage. These nuclei grow predominantly laterally and coalesce to fully cover the substrate surface prior to the thickening stage. At 625 K, a first stage of oxygen adsorption is observed in which stripes 1.5-2.3 nm wide and parallel to the Cr[001] direction are observed after annealing in UHV. They correspond to narrow segments of mixed and close-packed planes of O atoms and ions having a geometry and orientation similar to those of the anions planes in the oxide crystals. Rows of adatoms, possibly Cr 3+ ions of oxide nuclei, are observed above the stripes. Thickening at 625 K leads to the formation of a non-crystalline oxide, which grows up to a limiting thickness of 4.6 nm. The presence of Cr 3+ vacancies related to a significant cation transport through the oxide film in this temperature regime is detected. After UHV annealing at 825 or 925 K, the film is anhydrous. The Cr 3+ vacancies are accumulated at the metal/oxide film interface. The film crystallizes in epitaxy with the substrate in the following orientation: α-Cr 2O 3(0001)‖Cr(110) and α-Cr 2O 3[213¯0]‖Cr[001]. The STM measurements of the unit cell of the α-Cr 2O 3(0001) surface are consistent with a termination by a cation plane and show three tunneling sites assigned to the various possible locations of the Cr 3+ ions at room temperature due to surface

  3. Performance mapping of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine using a statistical design of experiments method

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    A kinetic Stirling cycle engine, the Stirling Thermal Motors (STM) STM4-120, was tested at the Sandia National Laboratories Engine Test Facility (ETF) from March 1989--August 1992. Sandia is interested in determining this engine's potential for solar-thermal-electric applications. The last round of testing was conducted from July--August 1992 using Sandia-designed gas-fired heat pipe evaporators as the heat input system to the engine. The STM4-120 was performance mapped over a range of sodium vapor temperatures, cooling water temperatures, and cycle pressures. The resulting shaft power output levels ranged from 5--9 kW. The engine demonstrated high conversion efficiency (24--31%) even though the power output level was less than 40% of the rated output of 25 kW. The engine had been previously derated from 25 kW to 10 kW shaft power due to mechanical limitations that were identified by STM during parallel testing at their facility in Ann Arbor, MI. A statistical method was used to design the experiment, to choose the experimental points, and to generate correlation equations describing the engine performance given the operating parameters. The testing was trunacted due to a failure of the heat pipe system caused by entrainment of liquid sodium in the condenser section of the heat pipes. Enough data was gathered to generate the correlations and to demonstrate the experimental technique. The correlation is accurate in the experimental space and is simple enough for use in hand calculations and spreadsheet-based system models. Use of this method can simplify the construction of accurate performance and economic models of systems in which the engine is a component. The purpose of this paper is to present the method used to design the experiments and to analyze the performance data.

  4. Effect of Cholesterol and Equex-STM Addition to an Egg Yolk Extender on Pure Spanish Stallion Cryopreserved Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Lidia; Galindo-Cardiel, Iván; Malo, C.; González, N.; Álvarez, C.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol and Equex-STM are frequently added to different commercial and experimental extenders improving postthawing sperm quality. Doses of 125–150 mM of cholesterol from pig liver and 0.5–0.7% of Equex-STM were evaluated in a standard eggyolk extender (Martin et al., 1979). Six ejaculates per stallion from six pure Spanish stallions (6–8 years old) were collected in Martin's extender (B) and different mixtures of 125 mM-0.5% (I), 125 mM-0.7% (II), 150 mM-0.5% (III), and 150 mM-0.7% (IV) were added to original Martin's extender. Samples were frozen in 0.5 mL straws (100 × 106 spermatozoa) and thawed (21 s., 37°C water bath). After thawing the following parameters were evaluated: viability (V), motility (computer assisted sperm analysis, CASA; % nonprogressive NP; % progressive MP), hipoosmotic swelling test (HOST), acrosome integrity (A), fluorescence test (FL), and resistance test (RT). Sperm quality was significantly affected by stallion (in the parameters V, VI, NP, MP, HOST, A, FL, and RT), extraction (VI, NP, MP, HOST, A, and FL), and the different combinations of Equex-STM-cholesterol (FL). We concluded that 0.5% of Equex-STM mixed with 125 mM of cholesterol has obtained better sperm quality results than those of original Martin's extender, showing a simple and economic improvement of this home-made practical seminal extender. PMID:24416597

  5. STM observation of damage on HOPG induced by energetic ions escaped from thick botanic samples*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Sixue; Yan, Sha; Zhao, Weijiang

    2001-05-01

    The target samples of 30-100 μm thick slices of kidney bean dry seeds and 8 and 72 μm ethylene terephthalate (PET) films were irradiated by 40 keV N + ion beam. The current density was 8 μA/cm 2 and the fluency was in the range of 0.3-3×10 17 ions/cm 2. During ion irradiation, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were placed behind the target samples to receive energetic ions. After irradiation, through scanning tunneling microscope (STM) observation, statistic number density of protrusion-like damage on HOPG surfaces have been obtained. The experimental results show that for 30 and 50 μm thick botanic slice samples, the number densities are 1.0-5.0×10 11 and 0.6-2×10 10/cm 2, respectively. It demonstrates that 40 keV N + ion irradiation can cause evident damage at a depth of 50 μm in dry kidney bean seed slices. Before and after low-energy ion irradiation, transmission spectra of MeV proton with low fluency rate were applied to examine those botanic samples and study the possible escaping mechanism of the energetic ions from them in the low-energy ion irradiation.

  6. In-situ STM study of sulfide adsorption on Au(100) in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaup, Christian; Wandelt, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of sulfide on a Au(100) electrode from a 0.01 M NaOH + 0.5 mM Na2S electrolyte was studied by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Starting with a sulfur free electrode surface at low potentials the subsequent formation of a p(2 × 2)-S, a c(2 × 6)-S and a c(2 × 2)-S phase was observed during potential increase. Only the p(2 × 2)-S (ΘS = 0.25 ML) phase appears as a single species phase; the c(2 × 6)-S (ΘS = 0.33 ML) and the c(2 × 2)-S (ΘS = 0. 5 ML) phase are accompanied by the simultaneous appearance of additional "dimer" particles. Concomitant changes of the step morphology and the results of the electrochemical characterization strongly suggest that these additional particles contain both, sulfur and gold atoms. Upon further potential increase the formation of a phase consisting of ring-like units was found, which is well known for Au(111) surfaces in the presence of sulfur. This phase is, by analogy, interpreted as a gold sulfide compound formed under electrochemical conditions.

  7. Relaxation Oscillations in Josephson STM Junctions at mK Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Roychowdhurry, Anita; Dana, Rami; Li, Wanting; Liao, Shu-Chu

    2015-03-01

    Small Josephson junctions can exhibit relaxation oscillations between the superconducting and normal state. The switching time depends on the charging time of the junction capacitance and the R-L time constant of the electrical connections, usually in the μs range. We observed similar oscillations in the tunnel current between a Nb sample and a Nb tip in our STM operated at 30 mK. The oscillations occur in two forms, either of which is triggered by lowering the gap resistance. The first type occurs in voltage ranges where the I(V) curves show negative differential conductance, which in turn is caused by coupling to the electrical environment [4]. The oscillations span only a fraction of the superconducting gap and run at maximum frequencies below 10 kHz. The possible existence of ``minor'' loops was already mentioned in the original article, though thought to be a result of an applied in plane magnetic field. The second type appears at lower gap resistances and affects the whole bias range. The frequency was too high to be determined by our current setup, and thus could be due to a conventional relaxation oscillation.Our results will be discussed in detail. Partially funded by NSF.

  8. STM investigation of the superconducting state of BSCCO 2212 and borocarbide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Iavarone, M. |; Guptasarma, P.; Hinks, D.G.

    1997-10-01

    We present spectroscopic Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) measurements performed at 4.2 K on BSCCO 2212 single crystals and Y, Lu and Er based borocarbide compounds. The conductance versus voltage spectra on BSCCO 2212 reveal a reproducible dip feature near e{vert_bar}V{vert_bar} = 2{Delta}, for both voltage polarities pointing to a strong coupling origin of the feature. The conductance spectra obtained on YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C thin films and LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C single crystals are similar and correspond to a BCS ratio of 3.2 indicating weak coupling superconductivity in these compounds. On Er Ni{sub 2}B{sub 2}C single crystals, the conductance spectra show a pronounced broadening compared to the spectra obtained on LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C and YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, which is attributed to the pair-breaking effect due to the Er magnetic ions.

  9. FI-STM study of hydrogen adsorption on Si(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lu; Xiang-dong, Wang; Motai, K.; Hashizume, T.; Sakurai, T.

    1992-11-01

    Chemisorption of atomic hydrogen on the Si(100)2 × 1 surface has been investigated in detail by using a field ion-scanning tunneling microscope (FI-STM). The results showed that the adsorption geometry changed from the 2 × 1 monohydride phase to the 1 × 1 dihydride phase with increasing exposure of hydrogen. The data of desorption of the hydrogen-saturated Si surface showed that on annealing at 670 K the surface becomes highly disordered: the 1 × 1 dihydride structure is eliminated and the 2 × 1 reconstructed monohydride is also hardly to identify. When the temperature rises to as high as 730 K, the surface is dominated by the 2 × 1 structure with missing dimer rows, and some adatom chains occur on the Si substrate terraces. We attribute the formation of these atomic chains to an epitaxial growth of Si atoms which are formed by the dissociation of SiHx (x = 1, 2, 3 or 4) compounds on the Si surface.

  10. Ambient STM Study of Long Chain Hydrophobic Thiol SAMs on HOPG and Au-capped HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Mackenzie; Bowers, Alexis; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2015-03-01

    Thiol-based self-assembled monolayers (SAM) surfaces are ubiquitous in many device applications including sensor engineering. The conductivity characteristics and surface molecular structure and orientation of these SAMs are important as physiochemical properties are dependent on the surface arrangement. This study attempts to quantify and model long chain -R terminated (hydrophobic) 1-dodecanethiol on both Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and thermally annealed Au thin films capped on HOPG substrates. Study uses Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), contact angle measurements and reflective spectroscopy to assess the SAM layered surface. 5mM concentrated solutions of 1-dodecanethiol dissolved in 200 proof ethanol were prepared for the self-assembly process. These solutions were used in developing SAMs on freshly cleaved HOPG. Au thin layers were sputter deposited on HOPG and subsequently annealed. Data indicated Au deposition changes the surface consistency. Uniqueness of this study is the ambient conditions under which data was obtained. Surface structure, consistency and possible thiol molecular arrangement of the SAM layer will be discussed.

  11. Silicon nanoscale 2D donor devices fabricated by UHV-STM lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. S.; Shen, T.-C.; Yang, C.; Liu, Y.

    2005-03-01

    We developed a scheme to fabricate nanoscale electronic devices by patterning 2D shallow donors into single crystal silicon. The goal of this approach is to seamlessly integrate nano- and microelectronics. In this approach, we pattern the devices on H terminated Si(100)-2x1 surfaces via UHV-STM. Phosphine molecules selectively adsorb onto the patterned areas to define conduction pathways. Low temperature Si MBE is used to encapsulate the dopants in the Si lattice. Two-terminal electrical connection to the outside-world is provided by a template structure formed by conventional microfabrication. A third terminal used for gate modulation of the device is formed by silicon nitride jet vapor deposition and metallization. Low temperature electrical characterization of conducting wires show significant departure from Ohmic conduction for width < 50nm. Electro and magnetotransport properties will be discussed. Tunnel junction and single electron transistor fabrication are currently underway. The low charged-defect density provided by complete encapsulation could allow the fabrication of a solid state quantum computer.

  12. Two-dimensional boron based nanomaterials: electronic, vibrational, Raman, and STM signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massote, Daniel V. P.; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Meunier, Vincent

    Because boron has only three electrons on its outer shell, planar mono-elemental boron nanostructures are expected to be much more challenging to assemble than their carbon counterparts. Several studies proposed schemes in which boron is stabilized to form flat semiconducting sheets consisting of a hexagonal lattice of boron atoms with partial hexagon filling (PRL 99 115501, ACSNano 6 7443-7453) . Other structures were proposed based on results from an evolutionary algorithm (PRL 112 085502). These structures are metallic and one even features a distorted Dirac cone near the Fermi level. Experimental evidence for 2D boron is still lacking but the recently proposed molecular synthesis of a flat all-boron molecule is a promising route to achieve this goal (Nat.Comms. 5 3113). Our research aims at providing a first-principles based description of these materials' properties to help in their identification. DFT is used to calculate phonon dispersion and associated Raman scattering spectra. We report some marked discrepancy between our findings and results from the recent literature and address the deviation using two methods for phonon dispersion. We also simulated STM images at various bias potentials to reveal the electronic symmetry of each material.

  13. Supramolecular order and structural dynamics: A STM study of 2H-tetraphenylporphycene on Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Michael; Träg, Johannes; Ditze, Stefanie; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus; Brenner, Wolfgang; Jux, Norbert

    2015-03-14

    The adsorption of 2H-tetraphenylporphycene (2HTPPc) on Cu(111) was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At medium coverages, supramolecular ordered islands are observed. The individual 2HTPPc molecules appear as two pairs of intense protrusions which are separated by an elongated depression. In the islands, the molecules are organized in rows oriented along one of the close packed Cu(111) substrate rows; the structure is stabilized by T-type interactions of the phenyl substituents of neighboring molecules. Two types of rows are observed, namely, highly ordered rows in which all molecules exhibit the same orientation, and less ordered rows in which the molecules exhibit two perpendicular orientations. Altogether, three different azimuthal orientations of 2HTPPc are observed within one domain, all of them rotated by 15° ± 1° relative to one closed packed Cu direction. The highly ordered rows are always separated by either one or two less ordered rows, with the latter structure being the thermodynamically more stable one. The situation in the islands is highly dynamic, such that molecules in the less ordered rows occasionally change orientation, also complete highly ordered rows can move. The supramolecular order and structural dynamics are discussed on the basis of the specific molecule-substrate and molecule-molecule interactions.

  14. A practical distributed Fiber Bragg grating temperature sensor system based on STM32 processor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun; Cheng, Yongxin; Wang, Guangyu; Zhang, Yanjun

    2015-10-01

    A practical distributed FBG temperature sensor system based on STM32 processor platform is presented in this paper and this FBG sensing system can realize single-channel and multi-point temperature measurement. Because the measured area has been divided into several parts, every part has several fiber Bragg gratings with the same wavelength. There is no need to get the temperature of each point, just get the temperature field information of the parts. In other words, if the temperature of points is varied, the largest varied temperature of the points in one part can be obtained as the temperature of this part. So in the system only use one light source, but more FBGs can be implanted in a fiber, which can effectively reduce costs and complexity. In signal processing system, the FFP-TF control circuit cans precise control without distortion of FFP-TF; high precision photoelectric detection circuit can achieve nW level optical power detection; wavelength demodulation algorithm can achieve system synchronization. The PC monitoring software based on VC++ is used to display the monitoring interface. The experiment results indicated that temperature precision is 1°C and the linearity is over 99.6%. All experiments can be reproducible. It has been seen in experiments that the system has the characteristics of the high measured stable, good reliability, low cost and can meet the needs of the engineering measurements.

  15. A Method for Studying Atomic Diffusion by STM Tip-Crash Induced Vacancy Island Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, R. E.; Lange, A. P.; Ray, M. P.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2007-11-01

    The study of vacancy and adatom island motion on single crystal metals with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has explained many of the underlying atomic diffusion mechanisms responsible for movement of atoms on a surface. We present a new method for vacancy island creation at room temperature using a controlled mechanical tip-surface interaction. The method allows us to control the relative positions and initial sizes of vacancy islands with respect to one another and to surface defects. Complicated and closely spaced vacancy island configurations can also be engineered. This enhances our ability to collect statistics on the movement of the macro-scale vacancy islands and distinguish between mass transport channels. To demonstrate the technique, time series analysis of coalescence events on the surface of Ag(111) is presented. Diffusion coefficients of the Ag surface atoms obtained with this method are in general agreement with previous stochastic methods for creating vacancy islands such as low-dose sputtering [1]. [1] M. Eßer, K. Morgenstern, G. Rosenfeld, G. Comsa, Surf. Sci. 402-404, 341 (1998).

  16. Structure and magnetism of cobalt intercalated graphene/Ir(111) via spin-polarized STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Regis; Brede, Jens; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Caciuc, Vasile; Bluegel, Stefan; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2013-03-01

    The presence of intercalation compounds in graphite, i.e. impurities or layer(s) trapped between carbon sheets, can lead to changes in the transport, optical and catalytic properties compared to bulk graphite, or even superconductivity. Here, we present the local structure and magnetic properties of graphene on a magnetic substrate, resolved by spin-polarized STM. The magnetic substrate is obtained by the intercalation of a cobalt layer between graphene and an Ir(111) surface. The atomic structure of the graphene layer is dominated by a highly corrugated Moiré pattern, which arises due to the incommensurability and/or twisting angle of the graphene lattice and the Co/Ir(111) surface. Within the Moiré unit cell three different regions, i.e. top, fcc, and hcp regions are identified. Interestingly, these regions show very different electronic and magnetic signatures in the experiments, defining an atomic-scale magnetic Moiré pattern. The observed spin polarization is compared to density functional theory calculations. The calculations reveal that the bonding between the graphene layer and intercalated Co layer varies from weak to strong within the Moiré unit cell. Moreover, the interaction between the graphene and the intercalated cobalt layer leads to a spin dependent charge rearrangement, which induces magnetism in graphene as observed in experiment.

  17. Beam tests of CALET with BBM electronics and STM at CERN-SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Tadahisa

    We have been developing flight hardware of CALET (CALorimetric Electron Telescope) to observe electrons, gamma rays, and nuclei at the Japanese Experiment Module “Kibo” Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) on the International Space Station (ISS). The main calorimeter of CALET consists of a charge detector (CHD) to identify particles by charge, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) to determine incident angles and shower starting points, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) to measure energies and to discriminate electromagnetic particles from nuclei. We carried out beam experiments at CERN-SPS to confirm consistency between our simulation and beam test data. It is important for performance check and flight data analyses. We assembled a Beam Test Model detector by using BBM (Bread Board Model) of front end electronics and STM (Structure and Thermal Model) of CHD, IMC, and TASC for electron/proton runs in 2012. We made ion runs mainly to test CHD readout with BBM front end electronics in 2013. Basic results of the beam tests will be reported here.

  18. Highly Ordered Organic Molecular Thin Films on Silicon Studied by STM and LEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sean; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2014-03-01

    Achieving growth of long-range ordered organic molecular thin films on inorganic substrates continues to be a significant challenge for organic electronics applications. Here, we report the growth of highly ordered zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) thin films both in-plane and out-of-plane on the deactivated Si(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). By adjusting the substrate temperature during deposition, the anisotropic step-flow growth mode can be accessed causing a reduction in the substrate symmetry which allows for the long-range in-plane ordering as well as the decrease of grain boundary density. Additionally, the ZnPc molecules are able to maintain a highly ordered configuration in multi-layers despite a gradual decrease in the molecule-substrate interaction, which is attributed to the strong interlayer π- π interaction. We appreciate the fruitful discussion with Prof. Richard Lunt. This research is funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program (Grant number DE-SC0006400) through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. STM Studies of Mn12-Ph on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaves, K.; Kim, K.; Iwaya, K.; Hitosugi, T.; Kim, Y. G.; Itaya, K.; Zhao, H.; Dunbar, K. R.; Katzgraber, H. G.; Teizer, W.

    2012-02-01

    Mn12-Ph displays tunneling of quantized magnetization below 3K. In other Mn12 ligand variants this magnetic behavior can alter the electronic behavior of the molecule making it a good candidate for a molecular logic gate. Mn12O12(C6H5COO)16 (Mn12-Ph) has a Mn12 core and 16 Phenyl ligands and is deposited onto the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The samples are then studied via scanning tunneling microscopy in air at 300K and in ultra high vacuum at 300K and 4.2K. At 300K, film formation is studied to optimize samples for subsequent low-temperature studies. Isolated objects are observed via STM on the surface, clearly distinct from the underlying graphite lattice. Topographic data are analyzed in an attempt to correlate apparent features to the internal molecular structure of Mn12-Ph. Voltage spectra of locations thought to be associated with the molecular core are compared to other locations thought to be the HOPG and Phenyl. Spectroscopic data indicate a bias voltage dependence at locations associated with the internal molecular structure thought to be related to the metallic-core of the molecules.

  20. Os layers spontaneously deposited on the Pt(111) electrode : XPS, STM and GIF-XAS study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, C. K.; Wakisaka, M.; Tolmachev, Y.; Johnston, C.; Haasch, R.; Attenkofer, K.; Lu, G. Q.; You, H.; Wieckowski, A.; Univ. of Illinois Champaigh-Urbana

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterized adlayers of spontaneously deposited osmium on a Pt(111) electrode were investigated using ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and in-situ grazing incidence fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (GIF-XAS). After a single spontaneous deposition, monoatomic (or nearly monoatomic) nanoislands of osmium are formed. The island diameter varies from 2 to 5 nm depending on the Os coverage, which in turn is adjusted by varying the concentration of the Os precursor salt (OsCl3) in the deposition bath and/or by the deposition time. XPS reveals three oxidation states: a metallic Os (the 4f7/2 core level binding energy of 50.8 eV), Os(IV) (51.5 eV) and Os(VIII) (52.4 eV). The metallic osmium exists at potentials below 500 mV (vs. RHE) while above 500 mV osmium is oxidized to Os(IV). Electrodissolution of osmium begins above 900 mV and occurs simultaneously with platinum oxidation. At ca. 1200 mV V versus the RHE reference, the oxidation state of some small amounts of osmium that survive dissolution is the Os(VIII). We demonstrate, for the first time, that mixed or odd valencies of osmium exist on the platinum surface at potentials higher that 800 mV. In-situ GIF-XAS measurements of an Os LIII edge also reveal the presence of three Os oxidation states. Namely, below the electrode potential of 400 mV, the X-ray fluorescent energy at maximum absorption is 10.8765 keV, and is characteristic of the metallic Os. In the potential range between 500 and 1000 mV this energy is gradually shifted to higher values, assignable to higher valencies of osmium, like Os(IV). This tendency continues to higher potentials consistent with the third, highly oxidized osmium form present, most likely Os(VIII). The variation of the 'raw edge jump height' of Os with the electrode potential, which is equivalent to a drop in osmium surface concentration, demonstrates that the electrochemical stripping of Os begins below 1.0 V versus RHE, as

  1. Growth of nanocrystalline MoO3 on Au(111) studied by in-situ STM

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Schalek, R; Friend, C M

    2004-04-22

    The growth of nanocrystalline MoO{sub 3} islands on Au(111) using physical vapor deposition of Mo has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The growth conditions affect the shape and distribution of the MoO{sub 3} nanostructures, providing a means of preparing materials with different percentages of edge sites that may have different chemical and physical properties than atoms in the interior of the nanostructures. MoO{sub 3} islands were prepared by physical vapor deposition of Mo and subsequent oxidation by NO{sub 2}exposure at temperatures between 450 K and 600 K. They exhibit a crystalline structure with a c(4x2) periodicity relative to unreconstructed Au(111). While the atomic-scale structure is identical to that of MoO{sub 3} islands prepared by chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate that the distribution of MoO{sub 3} islands on the Au(111) surface reflects the distribution of Mo clusters prior to oxidation although the growth of MoO{sub 3} involves long-range mass transport via volatile MoO{sub 3} precursor species. The island morphology is kinetically controlled at 450 K, whereas an equilibrium shape is approached at higher preparation temperatures or after prolonged annealing at the elevated temperature. Mo deposition at or above 525 K leads to the formation of a Mo-Au surface alloy as indicated by the observation of embedded MoO{sub 3} islands after oxidation by NO{sub 2}. Au vacancy islands, formed when Mo and Au dealloy to produce vacancies, are observed for these growth conditions.

  2. Pd(1 1 0) surface oxide structures investigated by STM and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, M.; Pertram, T.; Seriani, N.; Mittendorfer, F.; Krupski, A.; Becker, C.; Wandelt, K.

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a Pd(1 1 0) surface has been studied with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The particular emphasis was given to the preparation of low oxygen coverages with the well known c(2 × 4)-O oxygen phase as a starting structure in the experiments. The oxygen content, surface morphology and structure were changed by annealing the sample to temperatures below the onset of oxygen desorption. The surface was characterized after cool-down to room temperature or temperatures in the range 100-140 K. At low temperatures we found a new oxygen adsorption structure characterized by a (3 × 2) periodicity. We also calculate the O/Pd(1 1 0) surface phase diagram by first-principles thermodynamics. For small coverages, near the low-coverage end of the large stability region of the c(2 × 4)-O structure it was found that a (2 × 3)-deep-O and a (2 × 3)-1D-O structures, which are degenerate in energy, are most stable. Conversely, at high chemical potentials, i.e. high coverages, a (7 × √3)-O structure becomes more stable. The formation of the metastable (3 × 2)-O phase is explained in terms of partial deoxidation via the interaction with residual hydrogen and by quenching of other types of restructuring at low temperatures since the (3 × 2)-O phase can be derived from the c(2 × 4)-O phase by slight rearrangement of oxygen atoms after the oxygen content was lowered from 1/2 to 1/3 of a monolayer. This is not the case with more stable structures of the same coverage which require an additional rearrangement of palladium atoms.

  3. STM images of subsurface Mn atoms in GaAs: evidence of hybridization of surface and impurity states.

    PubMed

    Jancu, J-M; Girard, J-Ch; Nestoklon, M O; Lemaître, A; Glas, F; Wang, Z Z; Voisin, P

    2008-11-01

    We show that scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of subsurface Mn atoms in GaAs are formed by hybridization of the impurity state with intrinsic surface states. They cannot be interpreted in terms of bulk-impurity wave-function imaging. Atomic-resolution images obtained using a low-temperature apparatus are compared with advanced, parameter-free tight-binding simulations accounting for both the buckled (110) surface and vacuum electronic properties. Splitting of the acceptor state due to buckling is shown to play a prominent role.

  4. Self-organization of surfactant molecules on solid surface: an STM study of sodium alkyl sulfonates [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiu-Li; Wan, Li-Jun; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Yu, Jia-Yong

    2005-02-01

    Adsorption and self-organization of sodium alkyl sulfonates (STS and SHS) on HOPG have been studied by using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both SHS and STS molecules adsorb on HOPG surface and form long-range well-ordered monolayers. The molecular rows and the axes of alkyl chain of the molecules cross each other at angles of 60° and 90° in the STS and SHS layers, respectively. Molecular details such as sulfonate functional group (head) and alkyl chain are clearly imaged. The neighboring molecules in different rows form a "head to head" configuration. Structural models for the molecular arrangement of the two adlayers are proposed.

  5. STM probe on the surface electronic states of spin-orbit coupled materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenwen

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is the interaction of an electron's intrinsic angular momentum (spin) with its orbital momentum. The strength of this interaction is proportional to Z4 where Z is the atomic number, so generally it is stronger in atoms with higher atomic number, such as bismuth (Z=83) and iridium (Z=77). In materials composed of such heavy elements, the prominent SOC can be sufficient to modify the band structure of the system and lead to distinct phase of matter. In recent years, SOC has been demonstrated to play a critical role in determining the unusual properties of a variety of compounds. SOC associated materials with exotic electronic states have also provided a fertile platform for studying emergent phenomena as well as new physics. As a consequence, the research on these interesting materials with any insight into understanding the microscopic origin of their unique properties and complex phases is of great importance. In this context, we implement scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to explore the surface states (SS) of the two major categories of SOC involved materials, Bi-based topological insulators (TI) and Ir-based transition metal oxides (TMO). As a powerful tool in surface science which has achieved great success in wide variety of material fields, STM/STS is ideal to study the local density of states of the subject material with nanometer length scales and is able to offer detailed information about the surface electronic structure. In the first part of this thesis, we report on the electronic band structures of three-dimensional TIs Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se 3. Topological insulators are distinct quantum states of matter that have been intensely studied nowadays. Although they behave like ordinary insulators in showing fully gapped bulk bands, they host a topologically protected surface state consisting of two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions which exhibits metallic behavior. Indeed, this unique gapless surface state is a

  6. In Situ Studies of Surface Mobility on Noble Metal Model Catalysts Using STM and XPS at Ambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Derek Robert

    2010-06-01

    High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (HP-STM) and Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used to study the structural properties and catalytic behavior of noble metal surfaces at high pressure. HP-STM was used to study the structural rearrangement of the top most atomic surface layer of the metal surfaces in response to changes in gas pressure and reactive conditions. AP-XPS was applied to single crystal and nanoparticle systems to monitor changes in the chemical composition of the surface layer in response to changing gas conditions. STM studies on the Pt(100) crystal face showed the lifting of the Pt(100)-hex surface reconstruction in the presence of CO, H2, and Benzene. The gas adsorption and subsequent charge transfer relieves the surface strain caused by the low coordination number of the (100) surface atoms allowing the formation of a (1 x 1) surface structure commensurate with the bulk terminated crystal structure. The surface phase change causes a transformation of the surface layer from hexagonal packing geometry to a four-fold symmetric surface which is rich in atomic defects. Lifting the hex reconstruction at room temperature resulted in a surface structure decorated with 2-3 nm Pt adatom islands with a high density of step edge sites. Annealing the surface at a modest temperature (150 C) in the presence of a high pressure of CO or H2 increased the surface diffusion of the Pt atoms causing the adatom islands to aggregate reducing the surface concentration of low coordination defect sites. Ethylene hydrogenation was studied on the Pt(100) surface using HP-STM. At low pressure, the lifting of the hex reconstruction was observed in the STM images. Increasing the ethylene pressure to 1 Torr, was found to regenerate the hexagonally symmetric reconstructed phase. At room temperature ethylene undergoes a structural rearrangement to form ethylidyne. Ethylidyne preferentially binds at the three-fold hollow sites, which

  7. Faradaic phase transition of dibenzyl viologen on an HOPG electrode surface studied by in situ electrochemical STM and electroreflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tomohiro; Shigemitsu, Yasuhiro; Sagara, Takamasa

    2011-11-15

    Phase transitions of an adsorption layer of dibenzyl viologen (dBV) as a typical diaryl viologen on a basal plane of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode are described using voltammetry, in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), and electroreflectance (ER) spectroscopy. A monolayer redox process at less negative potential than the bulk redox process was found to be the first-order faradaic phase transition between a gaslike adsorption layer of dication (dBV(2+)) and a 2D condensed monolayer of radical cation (dBV(•+)). Comparison of the results of cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry was made with those of heptyl viologen (HV), which also undergoes a faradaic phase transition of the first order. It suggested that the contribution of intermolecular π-π interaction between benzyl groups of dBV to the phase transition is minor and apparently equivalent to interchain interaction between the heptyl chains of HV. In situ EC-STM images of the 2D condensed monolayer demonstrated stripe patterns of the rows of dBV(•+) molecules forming 3-fold rotationally symmetric domains. The results of the ER measurements also revealed that the orientation of the longitudinal molecular axis of the bipyridinium moiety of dBV(•+) molecules lying flat on the HOPG electrode surface, most likely with a side-on configuration.

  8. Electronic-Excitation-Induced Enhancement in Metallicity on HOPG and Si Surfaces: In Situ STM/STS Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Kanjilal, D.

    Surfaces of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and hydrogen passivated H-Si(111) after swift heavy ion (200MeV Au+13 and Ag+14 ions) irradiation have been investigated by home made in-situ high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) techniques attached with the materials science beam line at the 15 MV Pelletron accelerator. The STM topographic images show the delocalization of the electronic states after swift h eavy ion irradiation. A (2x1) phase transformation has been observed on H-Si(111) surface after 200MeV Ag+14 irradiation at 5x1012 ions cm2 fluence. The spectroscopy results show approximately linear variation of tunneling current with bias voltage for irradiated HOPG surface whereas it retain the non-linear characteristics for H-Si(111) after irradiation. The Ohmic behaviour of I-V curve along with the delocalization of the covalent bonded electronic wavefunctions suggests the enhancement of the metallicity of the covalent bonds on these surfaces after irradiation. This is attributed to the electronic excitation induced instability in lattice phonons.

  9. STM/STS Study of Surface Modification Effect on Bandgap Structure of Ti2C with -OH, -F, and -H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seong Jun; Lai, Shen; Jeong, Taehwan; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    In this presentation, we present Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Spectroscopy (STS) study of bandgap structures of surface-modified Ti2C with -OH, -F, and -O in atomic scale. Since the discovery of new two dimensional (2D) materials like graphene, various 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) have been intensively investigated. There are, however, still scientific issues to apply them to the device fabrications for controlling the appropriate bandgap structure with high field effect mobility. Recently another 2D materials of transition metal carbide (TMC), Ti2CTx with modifiable surface group Tx(-OH, -F, and -O) was suggested. [S. Lai et. al, Nanoscale (2015), DOI: 10.1039/C5NR06513E]. This 2D material shows that the mobility at room temperature is less sensitive to the measured transport bandgap, which can imply that Ti2CTx can be a strong candidate of 2D TMC for application to the future electronic devices. Surface modification on the electronic structure of Ti2C by -OH, -F, and -O is, therefore, investigated by STM and STS in atomic scale. More scientific results will be further discussed in the presentation. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Korean government (Grant Numbers: 2015R1A1A1A05027585, 2011­0030046, IBS- R011­D1, 2014M3C1A3053024 and 2015M3A7B4050455).

  10. High resolution electrochemical STM : new structural results for underpotentially deposited Cu on Au(111) in acid sulfate solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, Karl; Vasiljevic, Natasa; Viyannalage, L.K.T.; Dimitrov, Nikolay

    2007-09-01

    Adsorption of sulfate assists Cu monolayer underpotential deposition (upd) on Au(111) in a unique way, rendering two distinct structural stages: (i) formation of a low-density Cu phase at coverage of 2/3 ML known as the ({radical}3 x {radical}3) R30{sup o} or honeycomb phase; (ii) formation of a complete monolayer, i.e., Cu-(1 x 1) phase pseudomorphic with respect to underlying Au(111) substrate. In this paper we present new structural in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) results for this system. We show and discuss the STM imaging of the copper honeycomb superstructure probed underneath the co-adsorbed ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} sulfate adlayer in the low-density phase. High resolution imaging during the phase transition from the low to high density copper phase unambiguously shows the existence of an ordered sulfate structure p(2 x 2) on the pseudomorphic Cu-(1 x 1) layer. The new structure is seen during the co-existence of two copper phases as well as upon completion of the Cu-(1 x 1) monolayer. While supported by earlier chronocoulometric measurements in the same system, the new structural results raise questions that need to be addressed in a future work.

  11. Development of a toolbox of organic synthetic reactions that can be induced on individual molecules by STM

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig Bartels

    2003-09-25

    OAK B262 Final Report DOE Grant No.: DE-FG03-01ER15263 ''Development of a toolbox of organic synthetic reactions that can be induced on individual molecules by STM'' Abstract Bommisetty V. Rao, Ki-Young Kwon, Robert Perry, Luke Nysen, Gregory Pavin, Qibin Zhang, Casey Dugger and Ludwig Bartels University of California at Riverside, Pierce Hall, Riverside, CA92521, email: Ludwig.Bartels@ucr.edu The key scientific objective of this project is the development of a set of reliable techniques for the addressal of specific bonds of individual molecules in order to assemble functional molecules on a metal surface at single-atom precision. Success in this direction will open up a conceptually novel route to single molecule chemistry, which can provide its products at any desired surface location without involving any lithographic steps at all. In the course of this project a number of halo-substituted aryls and alkyls where investigated with special concern to two properties: clean deposition of the reactants from the gas phase on metallic surfaces and STM-based addressability of individual substituents of them. In order to prevent contamination of the sample by deposition of solvent residue, a special depositions source was developed that uses a skimmed molecular beam. Exemplary substances studied were 1,3-iodobromobenzene (IBB), 3 bromopropionitrile (BPN) and 4,4'-dibromobiphenyl (DBB). In STM-induced reactions, IBB shows concerted activation of both halogens, which does not allow the individual addressal of one bond at a time. The concept of individual addressabilities of bonds in bi-substituted molecule was confirmed by use of BPN. This reactant is, however, strongly bound to the substrate and, hence, not very suitable for the assembly of larger aggregates, even if the nitrile group could be activated. We found individual activation of one of the bromines of DBB. This molecule lies flat on the surface and it is a promising candidate for the assembly of larger molecular

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium mesoamericanum STM3625, a Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiont of Mimosa pudica Isolated in French Guiana (South America)

    PubMed Central

    Mornico, Damien; Melkonian, Rémy; Klonowska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium mesoamericanum STM3625 is a Mimosa pudica symbiont isolated in French Guiana. This strain serves as a model bacterium for comparison of adaptation to mutualism (symbiotic traits, bacterial genetic programs for plant infection) between alpha and beta rhizobial symbionts of Mimosa pudica. PMID:23405314

  13. Yeast-based screening to identify modulators of G-protein signaling using uncontrolled cell division cycle by overexpression of Stm1.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Won, Misun; Lee, Jung-Joon; Ahn, Jiwon; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook

    2007-05-01

    Stm1, a G-protein coupled receptor, which senses nutritional state drives cells to stop the proliferative cell cycle and enter meiosis under nutritionally deficient conditions in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. It was shown that overexpression of Stm1 led growth inhibition and uncontrolled mitotic haploidization presumably by the premature initiation of mitosis. Sty1 and Gpa2 seem to play important roles for Stm1 to deliver starvation signal to induce downstream function. Based on the observation that conversion of diploid to haploid by overexpression of Stm1 can be easily detected as pink or red colonies in the media containing low adenine, HTS drug screening system to identify modulators of GPCR was established and tested using 413 compounds. Four very potent modulators of GPCR including Biochanin A, which possess strong inhibitory activity against uncontrolled cell division, were identified in this screening. This study provides the yeast-based platform that allows robust cellular assays to identify novel modulators of G-protein signaling and MAP kinase pathway. PMID:17346842

  14. Computing Ro in a population with heterogeneity in sexual activity and proportionate mixing using a STM-solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez A., Natalia A.

    2014-06-01

    A model to determinate the reproductive basic number, detonated Ro, for the case of population with heterogeneity in sexual activity and proportionate mixing is solved using computer algebra and SMT solvers. Specifically Maple and Z3 were used. The code for the solution of the model was written in Z3-Python, but it can also be played by Z3-SMT-Lib. Ro represents an algebraic synthesis of every epidemiological parameter. Numerical simulations were done to prove the effectiveness of the model and the code. The algebraic structure of Ro suggests the possible control measurements that should be implemented to avoid the propagation of the sexual transmitted diseases. The obtained results are important on the computational epidemiology field. As a future investigation, it is suggested to apply the STM solvers to analyze models for other kinds of epidemic diseases.

  15. Characteristics, finite element analysis, test description, and preliminary test results of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

    1991-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program has as one of its program elements the development and evaluation of conversion device technologies applicable to dish-electric systems. The primary research and development combines a conversion device (heat engine), solar receiver, and generator mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. The Stirling-cycle heat engine was identified as the conversion device for dish-electric with the most potential for meeting the program's goals for efficiency, reliability, and installed cost. To advance the technology toward commercialization, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. The engine is being bench-tested at Sandia's Engine Test Facility and will be combined later with a solar receiver for on-sun evaluation. This report presents the engine characteristics, finite element analyses of critical engine components, test system layout, instrumentation, and preliminary performance results from the bench test.

  16. STM studies of the self-assembly of manganese porphyrin catalysts at the Au(111)-n-tetradecane interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsken, Bas; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Gerritsen, Jan W.; Khoury, Tony; Crossley, Maxwell J.; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Speller, Sylvia

    2009-08-01

    The precise structure of monolayers of catalytic manganese porphyrins at the interface of an Au(111)-surface and an n-tetradecane liquid has been determined in a liquid-cell scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Before the addition of the manganese porphyrins, an ordered monolayer of lamellae of n-tetradecane molecules on the Au(111) surface could be imaged. It was found that only domain boundaries in this monolayer were correlated to the underlying gold surface, but not the orientation of the n-tetradecane lamellae and the molecules within them. Both the reconstruction of the Au(111) surface and the ordering of the first layer of n-tetradecane can direct the ordering of the manganese porphyrins that are subsequently added to the liquid phase.

  17. Modeling STM tips by single absorbed atoms on W(100) films: 3d and 4d transition-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, W. A.; Redinger, J.; Podloucky, R.

    2001-09-01

    In order to provide comprehensive data on the electronic structure of realistic STM tips we have studied tungsten (100) films with adsorbed single 3d and 4d transition-metal atoms by ab initio molecular-dynamics and full potential methods. Molecular dynamics using ultrasoft pseudopotentials has been used to determine the relaxation of adsorbate and surface layers. Subsequently the electronic structure of the relaxed model tip has been calculated with an all-electron full potential method. The results suggest that the chemical nature of the tip apex to a high degree determines achievable corrugations and that results for current and corrugation values in a perturbation approach might be considerably improved by including the electronic structure of the tip.

  18. Intermolecular vs molecule–substrate interactions: A combined STM and theoretical study of supramolecular phases on graphene/Ru(0001)

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Michael; Uhl, Benedikt; Künzel, Daniela; Hoster, Harry E; Groß, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Summary The competition between intermolecular interactions and long-range lateral variations in the substrate–adsorbate interaction was studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and force field based calculations, by comparing the phase formation of (sub-) monolayers of the organic molecules (i) 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(6-(pyridin-3-yl)-4-(pyridin-3-yl)pyridin-2-yl)pyrimidine (3,3'-BTP) and (ii) 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on graphene/Ru(0001). For PTCDA adsorption, a 2D adlayer phase was formed, which extended over large areas, while for 3,3'-BTP adsorption linear or ring like structures were formed, which exclusively populated the areas between the maxima of the moiré structure of the buckled graphene layer. The consequences for the competing intermolecular interactions and corrugation in the adsorption potential are discussed and compared with the theoretical results. PMID:22003444

  19. Intermolecular vs molecule-substrate interactions: A combined STM and theoretical study of supramolecular phases on graphene/Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Roos, Michael; Uhl, Benedikt; Künzel, Daniela; Hoster, Harry E; Groß, Axel; Behm, R Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The competition between intermolecular interactions and long-range lateral variations in the substrate-adsorbate interaction was studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and force field based calculations, by comparing the phase formation of (sub-) monolayers of the organic molecules (i) 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(6-(pyridin-3-yl)-4-(pyridin-3-yl)pyridin-2-yl)pyrimidine (3,3'-BTP) and (ii) 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on graphene/Ru(0001). For PTCDA adsorption, a 2D adlayer phase was formed, which extended over large areas, while for 3,3'-BTP adsorption linear or ring like structures were formed, which exclusively populated the areas between the maxima of the moiré structure of the buckled graphene layer. The consequences for the competing intermolecular interactions and corrugation in the adsorption potential are discussed and compared with the theoretical results.

  20. Road-Mapping the Way Forward for Sentinel-3 STM SAR-Mode Waveform Retracking over Water Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jérôme; Cotton, David; Dinardo, Salvatore; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Martin-Puig, Cristina; Ray, Chris; Clarizia, Maria Paola; Gommenginger, Christine

    2013-04-01

    . However, since the ultimate goal of the SAMOSA project is to deliver to the Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission Product and Algorithm Development (S-3 STM PAD) a Detailed Processing Model of a SAR ocean waveform re-tracker based on the best SAMOSA model to operationally re-track Sentinel-3 STM SAR-Mode L1b waveforms, the need for the full mathematical complexity of the SAMOSA2 model was re-evaluated. With this in mind, the SAMOSA team assessed a number of simplifications that can transform the SAMOSA2 model into a lighter, computationally more efficient, purely analytical formulation for input into the SAR re-tracker scheme for the Sentinel-3 STM PAD. The simplifications that have been considered involve the omission in the model of second order effects such as non-linear terms in the model, ocean surface skewness, and electromagnetic bias. Their impact has been evaluated. This SAMOSA3 model has the advantage to be a pure analytical solution, expressed by means of modified Bessel functions of first and second kind and returns no singularities for the full range of the gate bins. An extensive validation was performed. First equivalence between SAMOSA3, SAMOSA2 & SAMOSA1 models was confirmed and then a a sensitivity study on the input parameters and the re-tracking approach was carried out. Finally, the SAMOSA3 Model and re-tracker was applied to Cryosat-2 L1B SAR waveforms and the performance was studied as well as the sensitivity to mispointing. Two areas were chosen as representative of the high and low ocean dynamics regions, respectively the South Norwegian Sea and the Caspian Sea. Finally the SAMOSA3 output was validated against in situ wave buoy measurements. An overview of these results will be shown here.

  1. Inferring effective interactions from the local density of states: application to STM data from Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8 delta

    SciTech Connect

    Jamei, R.

    2010-04-06

    While the influence of impurities on the local density of states (LDOS) in a metal is notoriously non-local due to interference effects, low order moments of the LDOS in general can be shown to depend only on the local structure of the Hamiltonian. Specifically, we show that an analysis of the spatial variations of these moments permits one to 'work backwards' from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) data to infer the local structure of the underlying effective Hamiltonian. Applying this analysis to STM data from the high temperature superconductor, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}, we find that the variations of the electro-chemical potential are remarkably small (i.e., the disorder is, in a sense, weak) but that there are large variations in the local magnitude of the d-wave gap parameter.

  2. Design, testing, and commercialization plans for the SAIC/STM 20 kW{sub e} solar dish/Stirling system

    SciTech Connect

    Beninga, K.J.; Davenport, R.L.; Johansson, S.N.

    1995-12-31

    As a part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Utility-Scale Joint-Venture Program, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and Stirling Thermal Motors (STM) have teamed to produce a solar dish/Stirling system for utility electricity generation. The 90 m{sup 2} dish concentrator consists of 16 stretched membrane mirror facets on a truss structure with an azimuth/elevation gear drive. The design modifies a faceted stretched membrane dish design developed previously by SAIC and WGA, Inc. in order to simplify the structure and reduce manufacturing costs, The Stirling engine used in the system is the STM 4-120 kinematic Stirling engine. It features variable swash plate control and a direct absorption solar receiver with hydrogen as the operating fluid. A prototype dish/Stirling system has been installed at a test site near Golden, Colorado and is now undergoing tests. The optical and thermal performance of the dish is being characterized using a Coldwater calorimeter and the optical Beam Characterization System (BCS) developed by Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. After completion of the dish characterization tests, the STM engine will be installed on the dish and system power generation and efficiency will be measured. This paper presents a summary of the SAIC/STM dish/Stirling system design and gives results from initial testing of the system. Also described are SAIC`s plans for manufacturing and commercialization of the dish/Stirling system to utilities and other markets in the US and abroad.

  3. The in vitro quality of frozen-thawed Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) spermatozoa in semen supplemented with Equex STM paste and oxytocin during and after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Buranaamnuay, Kakanang; Mahasawangkul, Sittidet; Saikhun, Kulnasan

    2013-06-01

    The effects of Equex STM paste (Equex) and oxytocin (OT) on the in vitro quality of frozen-thawed Asian elephant sperm were investigated in the study. The viability of frozen-thawed sperm was significantly higher in the Equex-treated (1 and 2%) groups than in the control group. There were no differences in the examined sperm parameters among the control and OT-treated (0.05-5IU) groups. PMID:23719124

  4. New sub-family of lysozyme-like proteins shows no catalytic activity: crystallographic and biochemical study of STM3605 protein from Salmonella Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Michalska, Karolina; Brown, Roslyn N.; Li, Hui; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Phage viruses that infect prokaryotes integrate their genome into the host chromosome; thus, microbial genomes typically contain genetic remnants of both recent and ancient phage infections. Often phage genes occur in clusters of atypical G+C content that reflect integration of the foreign DNA. However, some phage genes occur in isolation without other phage gene neighbors, probably resulting from horizontal gene transfer. In these cases, the phage gene product is unlikely to function as a component of a mature phage particle, and instead may have been co-opted by the host for its own benefit. The product of one such gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, STM3605, encodes a protein with modest sequence similarity to phage-like lysozyme (N-acetylmuramidase) but appears to lack essential catalytic residues that are strictly conserved in all lysozymes. Close homologs in other bacteria share this characteristic. The structure of the STM3605 protein was characterized by X-ray crystallography, and functional assays showed that it is a stable, folded protein whose structure closely resembles lysozyme. However, this protein is unlikely to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Instead, STM3605 is presumed to have evolved an alternative function because it shows some lytic activity and partitions to micelles.

  5. Self-assembled monolayer of o-aminothiophenol on Fe(1 1 0) surface: a combined study by electrochemistry, in situ STM, and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, De-Sheng; Yuan, Shi-Ling; Sun, Yu-Xi; Yu, Zhang-Yu

    2004-12-01

    Electrochemical measurements, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation, and molecular mechanics (MM) simulations were performed to study the physiochemical properties such as the corrosion-inhibition effect and the optimal packing structure of o-aminothiophenol (OATP) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed on Fe(1 1 0) surface in 0.1 M NaClO 4 solution. The formation of OATP SAMs drastically depressed the Faradaic processes at the Fe(1 1 0) surface and reduced the electrical double-layer capacitance at the electrode/electrolyte interface, revealing the anticorrosion property and the blocking behavior of OATP adlayers. Two-dimensional ordered molecular arrays of OATP on Fe(1 1 0) surface with a p(2 × 2) commensurate structure were observed by STM measurements. MM calculations showed that the p(2 × 2) packing pattern is indeed the preferable structure for OATP molecules adsorbed on Fe(1 1 0), in accordance with STM experiments. The OATP SAM on Fe(1 1 0) is ≈0.50 nm in thickness and with a dielectric constant of ˜7.0.

  6. Transmission measurement based on STM observation to detect the penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Sixue; Du, Guanhua; Zhao, Weijiang

    2003-01-01

    The penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples was detected with a new transmission measurement. In the measurement, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) pieces were placed behind the botanic samples with certain thickness. During the irradiation of heavy ions with energy of tens of keV, the energetic particles transmitted from those samples were received by the HOPG pieces. After irradiation, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to observe protrusion-like damage induced by these transmitted ions on the surface of the HOPG. The statistical average number density of protrusions and the minimum transmission rate of the low-energy heavy ions can be obtained. The detection efficiency of the new method for low-energy heavy ions was about 0.1-1 and the background in the measurement can be reduced to as low as 1.0 x 10(8) protrusions/cm2. With this method, the penetration depth of the energetic particles was detected to be no less than 60 micrometers in kidney bean slices when the slices were irradiated by 100 keVAr+ ion at the fluence of 5 x 10(16) ions/cm2. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bandgap opening in graphene templates on Ru(0001) from subsurface hydrogen effects studied by STM, LEED, and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Maxwell; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Valovcin, Darren; Hagelberg, Frank; Pohl, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has aroused tremendous interest due to its remarkable electronic and mechanical properties. Graphene's optical properties, conductance, and the fact that it can be transferred to many substrates make it an ideal candidate for use in nanoelectronic devices and organic photoelectric devices. The lack of a bandgap, however, causes a serious challenge for implementing graphene as a material for electrical switches and therefore creative ways of inducing this bandgap are needed. We will present a STM/LEED/DFT study of the single layer graphene on Ru(0001) system in the presence of hydrogen. Structural studies show arrays of moiré superlattices with sizes ranging from 0.9 to 3.0 nm in the presence of hydrogen on the compact surface of ruthenium. First principle calculations help explain the appearance of these arrays of graphene reconstructions driven by the H presence at the Ru(0001) interface, and furthermore, predict the appearance of a bandgap with values correlated with the moiré superstructure sizes in the presence of hydrogen. Control over moiré superstructure size can aid in future work using graphene as a nanotemplate for self assembled growth of nanoelectronic devices an organic photovoltaics. This work was supported by the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (NSF NSEC-425826) and NSF DMR-1006863

  8. Characterizing the electronic ground states of single-layer NbSe2 via STM/STS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Ugeda, Miguel; Bradley, Aaron; Zhang, Yi; Onishi, Seita; Ruan, Wei; Ojeda-Aristizabal, Claudia; Ryu, Hyejin; Edmonds, Mark; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Riss, Alexander; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Lee, Dunghai; Zettl, Alex; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Crommie, Michael

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are ideal systems for exploring collective electronic phases such as charge density wave (CDW) order and superconductivity. In bulk NbSe2 the CDW sets in at TCDW = 33K and superconductivity sets in at Tc = 7.2K. Below Tc these electronic states coexist but their microscopic formation mechanisms remain controversial. Here we present an electronic characterization study of a single 2D layer of NbSe2 by means of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and electrical transport measurements. We demonstrate that the CDW order remains intact in 2D and exhibits a robust 3 x 3 superlattice. Superconductivity also still occurs but its onset is depressed to 1.6K. Our STS measurements at 5K reveal a CDW gap of Δ = 4 meV at the Fermi energy, which is accessible via STS due to the removal of bands crossing the Fermi surface in the 2D limit. Our observations are consistent with the predicted simplified (compared to bulk) electronic structure of single-layer NbSe2, thus providing new insight into CDW formation and superconductivity in this model strongly-correlated system.

  9. STM study of short chain hydrophobic thiol SAMs on HOPG and Au capped HOPG under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Alexis; Maurer, Mackenzie; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2015-03-01

    Self-assembled monolayer(SAM) surfaces provide common architecture in many device applications including sensor engineering. The conductivity characteristics and surface molecular structure and orientation of these SAM are important as physiochemical properties are dependent on the surface arrangement. SAMs used in this study are short chain -R terminated (hydrophobic) 1-Butanethiol on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surface and on thermally annealed Au thin film capped on HOPG. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), contact angle measurements and reflective spectroscopy are used to assess the SAM layered surfaces. Solutions of 1-Butanethiol, dissolved in 200 proof Ethanol with 5mM concentration were prepared for the self-assembly process. These solutions were used in developing SAMs on purchased, freshly cleaved HOPG substrates. Au thin layers were sputter deposited on HOPG and subsequently annealed. Initial data shows low Au deposition yields rougher inconsistent surfaces. Ambient conditions under which data was obtained impose fresh surfaces for each investigation. Tentative surface structure, consistency and thiol molecular arrangement of the SAM layer on HOPG and Au capped HOPG will be discussed. National Science Foundation.

  10. 1,3,5-Benzenetribenzoic Acid on Cu(111) and Graphene/Cu(111): A Comparative STM Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of 1,3,5-benzenetribenzoic acid (BTB) molecules on both Cu(111) and epitaxial graphene grown on Cu(111) were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. On Cu(111), the BTB molecules were found to mainly arrange in close-packed structures through H-bonding between the (partially) deprotonated carboxylic acid groups. In addition, porous structures formed by intact BTB molecules-and also based on H-bonding-were observed. On graphene grown on Cu(111) the BTB molecules mainly form porous structures accompanied by small patches of disordered close-packed structures. Upon annealing, BTB adsorbed on Cu(111) is fully deprotonated and arranges in the close-packed structure while in contrast on graphene/Cu(111) the porous network is exclusively formed. This shows that the molecular self-assembly behavior is highly dependent on the first substrate layer: one graphene layer is sufficient to considerably alter the interplay of molecule substrate and intermolecular interactions in favor of the latter interactions. PMID:27588158

  11. Studies of Mn12-Ph Single Molecule Magnets by LT-STM and Modeling of Magnetic Stability Under Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaves, K.; Han, P.; Iwaya, K.; Hitosugi, T.; Packwood, D.; Katzgraber, H. G.; Zhao, H.; Dunbar, K. R.; Kim, K.; Teizer, W.

    2014-03-01

    We study Mn12O12(C6H5COO)16 (H2O)4 (Mn12-Ph) single-molecule magnets on a Cu(111) surface using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, LT-STM. We report the observation of Mn12-Ph in isolation and in thin films, deposited through vacuum spray deposition onto clean Cu(111). The local tunneling current observed within the molecular structure shows a strong bias voltage dependency, which is distinct from that of the Cu surface. Furthermore, we identify an internal inhomogeneity in the bias behavior within a single molecule. To further understand the stability of the magnetic properties of the molecules while on the surface, we develop a theoretical model to study the stability of the net magnetic moment under deformation of the spin-spin interaction graph. We develop a spin Hamiltonian-type model to predict magnetic moments that are intrinsically robust under random shape deformations to the spin-graph structure. This spin moment is shown to be a weak topological invariant for molecules with sufficiently many spin centers, approximately 20 to 50. We thank the WPI program for financial and research support.

  12. Characteristics, finite element analysis, test description, and preliminary test results of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

    1991-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program has as one of its program elements the development and evaluation of conversion device technologies applicable to dish-electric systems. The primary research and development combines a conversion device (heat engine), solar receiver, and generator mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. The Stirling-cycle heat engine was identified as the conversion device for dish-electric with the most potential for meeting the program`s goals for efficiency, reliability, and installed cost. To advance the technology toward commercialization, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. The engine is being bench-tested at Sandia`s Engine Test Facility and will be combined later with a solar receiver for on-sun evaluation. This report presents the engine characteristics, finite element analyses of critical engine components, test system layout, instrumentation, and preliminary performance results from the bench test.

  13. STM studies of an atomic-scale gate electrode formed by a single charged vacancy in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghun; Daughton, David; Gupta, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Electric-field control of spin-spin interactions at the atomic level is desirable for the realization of spintronics and spin-based quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the realization of an atomic-scale gate electrode formed by a single charged vacancy on the GaAs(110) surface[1]. We can position these vacancies with atomic precision using the tip of a home-built, low temperature STM. Tunneling spectroscopy of single Mn acceptors is used to quantify the electrostatic field as a function of distance from the vacancy. Single Mn acceptors are formed by substituting Mn adatoms for Ga atoms in the first layer of the p-GaAs(110) surface[2]. Depending on the distance, the in-gap resonance of single Mn acceptors can shift as much as 200meV. Our data indicate that the electrostatic field decays according to a screened Coulomb potential. The charge state of the vacancy can be switched to neutral, as evidenced by the Mn resonance returning to its unperturbed position. Reversible control of the local electric field as well as charged states of defects in semiconductors can open new insights such as realizing an atomic-scale gate control and studying spin-spin interactions in semiconductors. http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/sim jgupta [1] D. Lee and J.A. Gupta (in preparation) [2] D. Kitchen et al., Nature 442, 436-439 (2006)

  14. A combined STM and SPA-LEED study of the "explosive" nucleation and collective diffusion in Pb/Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattab, H.; Hupalo, M.; Hershberger, M. T.; Horn von Hoegen, M.; Tringides, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A novel type of very fast nucleation was recently found in Pb/Si(111) with 4- to 7-layer high islands becoming crystalline in an "explosive" way, when the Pb deposited amount in the wetting layer is compressed to θc ~ 1.22 ML, well above the metallic Pb(111) density. This "explosive" nucleation is very different from classical nucleation when island growth is more gradual and islands grow in size by single adatom aggregation [8]. In order to identify the key parameters that control the nucleation we used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). It was found that the number and duration of steps in iterative deposition used to approach θc and the flux rate have dramatic effects on the crystallization process. Larger depositions over shorter times induce greater spatial coverage fluctuations, so local areas can reach the critical coverage θc easier. This can trigger the collective motion of the wetting layer from far away to build the Pb islands "explosively". The SPA-LEED experiments show that even low flux experiments in iterative deposition experiments can trigger transfer of material to the superstable 7-layer islands, as seen from the stronger satellite rings close to the (00) spot.

  15. Controllable strain fields in multimonolayer 2D-layered TiO2 (110) crystals studied by STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhisheng; Potapenko, Denis; Osgood, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Strain of crystal lattice can change the electronic property of materials, such as oxides and semiconductors, significantly. However, experimental studies of lattice effects in oxides are limited especially in atomic scale, due to the difficulty of generating strain field experimentally. In this work, we generate a strain field in multiple monolayer sample of at TiO2 (110) by very low energy bombardment of single crystal TiO2 samples with argon ions at 1000oC. The interstitial argon diffuses so as to form nanometer scale regions of local exfoliated TiO2 layers. These layers retain their unstressed surface reconstruction although the top-most surface layers have a convex morphology. We use STM studies along with a continuum model to show the strain field. Our studies also show that the strained surface layers are free of oxygen vacancies and that the adsorption energy of hydrogen is altered by the local strain field. The authors gratefully acknowledge support of this work by the Basic Energy Sciences Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-FG02-90ER14104.

  16. Features of Superconducting Gaps Revealed by STM/STS in Iron Based Superconductors With and Without Hole Pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hai-Hu; Hai-Hu Wen Team

    The pairing mechanism and gap structure in iron based superconductors (IBS) remains unresolved. We have conducted extensive STM/STS study on the Na(Fe1-xTx) As (T =Co, Cu, Mn), Ba1-xKxFe2As2KFe2As2, and Li1-xFexOHFeSe single crystals. We found the clear evidence of the in-gap quasi-particle states induced by the non-magnetic Cu impurities in Na(Fe0.97- x Co0.03Cux) As, giving strong evidence of the S+/- pairing. Furthermore, we show the presence of the bosonic mode with the energy identical to that of the neutron resonance and a simple linear relation Ω/kBTc ~ 4.3, being explained a consequence of the S+/-pairing. The STS spectrum in Li1-x FexOHFeSe clearly indicates the presence of double superconducting gaps with Δ1 ~ 14.3 meV and Δ2 ~ 8.6 meV. Further analysis based on QPI allows us to assign the larger (smaller) gap to the outer (inner) hybridized electron pockets. The huge value 2Δ1/kBTc = 8.7 discovered here undoubtedly proves the strong coupling mechanism. This work was supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  17. Using STM tip as electrochemical sensor for the characterization of bond vibration frequencies of a chemical analyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuai; Gupta, Chaitanya; Howe, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Traditional electrochemical interfaces are comprised of an electrically biased electrode-electrolyte interface, where charge exchange occurs between electronic energy levels of the electrode and a redox-active ion in the electrolyte. Much of the recent progress in electrochemical sensing technology has focused on enhancing the detection limit of such sensing platforms. However, much of the molecular-level chemical information describing the non-redox active species that may also be present in the electrolyte, which is encoded in the acquired current/voltage signal, is lost as background information. In this talk, a design methodology is proposed for electrochemical interfaces that are engineered from STM tips specifically to transduce information about the intra-molecular bond vibrational frequencies of non-redox active molecular analytes. A quantum statistical model of a generalized charge transfer process, developed by the authors, will be presented as the underpinning for the design method. Minimization of electronic and nuclear entropy will be derived from the presented model, as the necessary condition required for resolving vibrational frequency information, and we will also describe select experimental strategies that may be implemented for total entropy minimization.

  18. Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermann, Laura Butler

    2009-09-01

    , their vibration spectra was more extensively studied. The thermal vibration spectra of Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles was measured under both ambient and low-vacuum conditions. The operational deflection shapes of the vibrating Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles was also measured, allowing confirmation of the eigenmodes of vibration. The modulus of the crystalline nanoneedles was 84.3 {+-} 1.0 GPa. Gas damping is the dominate mechanism of energy loss for nanowires oscillating under ambient conditions. The measured quality factors, Q, of oscillation are in line with theoretical predictions of air damping in the free molecular gas damping regime. In the free molecular regime, Q{sub gas} is linearly proportional to the density and diameter of the nanowire and inversely proportional to the air pressure. Since the density of the Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles is three times that of the MWNTs, the Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles have greater Q at atmospheric pressures. Our initial measurements of Q for Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles in low-vacuum (10 Torr) suggest that the intrinsic Q of these nanoneedles may be on the order of 1000. The epitaxial carbon that grows after heating (000{bar 1}) silicon carbide (SiC) to high temperatures (1450-1600) in vacuum was also studied. At these high temperatures, the surface Si atoms sublime and the remaining C atoms reconstruct to form graphene. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to characterize the quality of the few-layer graphene (FLG) surface. The XPS studies were useful in confirming the graphitic composition and measuring the thickness of the FLG samples. STM studies revealed a wide variety of nanometer-scale features that include sharp carbon-rich ridges, moire superlattices, one-dimensional line defects, and grain boundaries. By imaging these features with atomic scale resolution, considerable insight into the growth mechanisms of FLG on the carbon-face of SiC is obtained.

  19. The structure and reactivity of adsorbates on stepped Rh and Pt surfaces investigated by LEED, HREELS, TPD, XPS and STM

    SciTech Connect

    Batteas, J.D. |

    1995-06-01

    Defects on surfaces such as steps play an important role in surface chemistry. In order to obtain an understanding of the influence of steps in surface chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of small molecules (O{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}S, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) on atomically stepped surfaces of RH and Pt have been investigated. The detailed structures of CO and oxygen bonded to the Rh(110) surface were determined. The CO molecules bond near the short bridge sites with the CO molecular axis tilted approximately 24{degree} from the surface normal. Oxygen atoms are bound asymmetrically in the 3-fold fcc hollow-sites to the (111) facets of the steps. The interactions of CO and oxygen on the Rh(311) surface were examined. The reaction of CO with the ordered phases of O shows two distinct reaction channels, a low temperature reaction limited channel (200 K) and a high temperature diffusion limited channel (350 K). Models of the reaction geometry and dynamics are proposed. The thermal decomposition of ethylene was examined on the Rh(311) surface. The stable decomposition species (C{sub 2}H, CH and C{sub 2}) are formed near 300 K, approximately 100 K lower on the stepped Rh(311) than on the flatter Rh(111) surface. The formation of these species at lower temperatures is attributed to the stepped nature of the surface. Finally, in situ STM was used to examine surface structural changes of a stepped Pt(111) crystal under coadsorption of sulfur and CO. This is the first direct evidence for a new mechanism by which a surface covered with an unreactive, strongly chemisorbed overlayer can form new sites, for bonding and reactions to occur, by massive surface restructuring at the step edges. This new surface phenomenon answers some of the puzzles of metal surface catalysis and its implications are described. 278 refs.

  20. Salmonella methylglyoxal detoxification by STM3117-encoded lactoylglutathione lyase affects virulence in coordination with Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 and phagosomal acidification.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sangeeta; Chaudhuri, Debalina; Balakrishnan, Arjun; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2014-09-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) manipulate their host cells through the interplay of various virulence factors. A multitude of such virulence factors are encoded on the genome of S. Typhimurium and are usually organized in pathogenicity islands. The virulence-associated genomic stretch of STM3117-3120 has structural features of pathogenicity islands and is present exclusively in non-typhoidal serovars of Salmonella. It encodes metabolic enzymes predicted to be involved in methylglyoxal metabolism. STM3117-encoded lactoylglutathione lyase significantly impacts the proliferation of intracellular Salmonella. The deletion mutant of STM3117 (Δlgl) fails to grow in epithelial cells but hyper-replicates in macrophages. This difference in proliferation outcome was the consequence of failure to detoxify methylglyoxal by Δlgl, which was also reflected in the form of oxidative DNA damage and upregulation of kefB in the mutant. Within macrophages, the toxicity of methylglyoxal adducts elicits the potassium efflux channel (KefB) in the mutant which subsequently modulates the acidification of mutant-containing vacuoles (MCVs). The perturbation in the pH of the MCV milieu and bacterial cytosol enhances the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 translocation in Δlgl, increasing its net growth within macrophages. In epithelial cells, however, the maturation of Δlgl-containing vacuoles were affected as these non-phagocytic cells maintain less acidic vacuoles compared to those in macrophages. Remarkably, ectopic expression of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 on epithelial cells partially restored the survival of Δlgl. This study identified a novel metabolic enzyme in S. Typhimurium whose activity during intracellular infection within a given host cell type differentially affected the virulence of the bacteria.

  1. Diguanylate Cyclases AdrA and STM1987 Regulate Salmonella enterica Exopolysaccharide Production during Plant Colonization in an Environment-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, Kimberly N.; Willis, David K.; Engel, Tyler N.; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that despite exposure to harsh environmental stresses, Salmonella enterica successfully persists on plants, utilizing fresh produce as a vector to animal hosts. Among the important S. enterica plant colonization factors are those involved in biofilm formation. S. enterica biofilm formation is controlled by the signaling molecule cyclic di-GMP and represents a sessile lifestyle on surfaces that protects the bacterium from environmental factors. Thus, the transition from a motile, planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle may represent a vital step in bacterial success. This study examined the mechanisms of S. enterica plant colonization, including the role of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), the enzymes involved in cyclic di-GMP metabolism. We found that two biofilm components, cellulose and curli, are differentially required at distinct stages in root colonization and that the DGC STM1987 regulates cellulose production in this environment independent of AdrA, the DGC that controls the majority of in vitro cellulose production. In addition, we identified a new function for AdrA in the transcriptional regulation of colanic acid and demonstrated that adrA and colanic acid biosynthesis are associated with S. enterica desiccation tolerance on the leaf surface. Finally, two PDEs with known roles in motility, STM1344 and STM1697, had competitive defects in the phyllosphere, suggesting that regulation of motility is crucial for S. enterica survival in this niche. Our results indicate that specific conditions influence the contribution of individual DGCs and PDEs to bacterial success, perhaps reflective of differential responses to environmental stimuli. PMID:26655751

  2. Transformation of self-assembly of a TTF derivative at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface studied by STM-from a nanoporous network to a linear structure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Xiao, Xunwen; Deng, Ke; Zeng, Qingdao

    2016-01-21

    The self-assembly of a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative (EDTTF) and a 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy)-benzene (TCDB) heterobilayer nanostructure at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface under ambient conditions has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). EDTTF and TCDB could co-assemble into a brand new hexagonal network with one of the largest nano-cavities. Finally, the nanoporous network would transform into a more stable linear structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to reveal the formation mechanism.

  3. Cannabidiol-2',6'-dimethyl ether stimulates body weight gain in apolipoprotein E-deficient BALB/c. KOR/Stm Slc-Apoe(shl) mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Hirota, Rena; Teradaira, Sari; Takeda-Imoto, Masumi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Toda, Akihisa; Aramaki, Hironori

    2015-12-01

    The biological activities of cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotropic constituent of the fiber-type cannabis plant, have been examined in detail (e.g., CBD modulation of body weight in mice and rats). However, few studies have investigated the biological activities of cannabidiol-2',6'-dimethyl ether (CBDD), a dimethyl ether derivative of the parent CBD. We herein focused on the effects of CBDD on body weight changes in mice, and demonstrated that it stimulated body weight gain in apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-deficient BALB/c. KOR/Stm Slc-Apoe(shl) mice, especially between 10 and 20 weeks of age.

  4. Epitaxial deposition of silver ultra-fine nano-clusters on defect-free surfaces of HOPG-derived few-layer graphene in a UHV multi-chamber by in situ STM, ex situ XPS, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, Gebhu F; Roos, Wiets D; Wang, Zhiming M; Asante, Joseph Ko; Mashapa, Matete G; Jafta, Charl J; Mwakikunga, Bonex W; Hillie, Kenneth T

    2012-01-01

    The growth of three-dimensional ultra-fine spherical nano-particles of silver on few layers of graphene derived from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in ultra-high vacuum were characterized using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in conjunction with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The energetics of the Ag clusters was determined by DFT simulations. The Ag clusters appeared spherical with size distribution averaging approximately 2 nm in diameter. STM revealed the preferred site for the position of the Ag atom in the C-benzene ring of graphene. Of the three sites, the C-C bridge, the C-hexagon hollow, and the direct top of the C atom, Ag prefers to stay on top of the C atom, contrary to expectation of the hexagon-close packing. Ab initio calculations confirm the lowest potential energy between Ag and the graphene structure to be at the exact site determined from STM imaging.

  5. Epitaxial deposition of silver ultra-fine nano-clusters on defect-free surfaces of HOPG-derived few-layer graphene in a UHV multi-chamber by in situ STM, ex situ XPS, and ab initio calculations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The growth of three-dimensional ultra-fine spherical nano-particles of silver on few layers of graphene derived from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in ultra-high vacuum were characterized using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in conjunction with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The energetics of the Ag clusters was determined by DFT simulations. The Ag clusters appeared spherical with size distribution averaging approximately 2 nm in diameter. STM revealed the preferred site for the position of the Ag atom in the C-benzene ring of graphene. Of the three sites, the C-C bridge, the C-hexagon hollow, and the direct top of the C atom, Ag prefers to stay on top of the C atom, contrary to expectation of the hexagon-close packing. Ab initio calculations confirm the lowest potential energy between Ag and the graphene structure to be at the exact site determined from STM imaging. PMID:22395057

  6. Local density of states measurements via STM and TS on clean fresh cleaved HOPG and Gold thin films on HOPG under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morean, Casey; Marijczuk, Roman; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has many applications in physics and engineering thus understanding affiliated physical and chemical phenomena is important. This also makes HOPG an important and interesting system to study. This is an investigation of surfaces of HOPG and Au thin films (ranging about 20nm) via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Tunneling Spectroscopy (TS) with a Pt-Ir tip equipped Nanosurf Naio STM. In this investigation, clean fresh cleaved HOPG substrates were used. Surfaces of HOPG and Au sputter deposited at different film thicknesses were imaged via constant current mode to assess the surface consistency and roughness. Consistent atomic resolution images were obtained. The systems were then investigated via TS by applied tip voltage (V) vs. tunneling current (I) curves. These spectroscopic data were then used to assess the local density of states (LDOS) and the surface variation of LDOS. The discussion will attempt to assess the surface electronic environment of these systems in relation to the Au deposition and variation of Au thicknesses on HOPG. Since measurements were carried out in ambient conditions this adds to the complexity which will also be discussed. Lock Haven University Nanotechnology Program.

  7. Work function measurements via STM and TS on clean fresh cleaved HOPG and Gold thin films on HOPG under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marijczuk, Roman; Morean, Casey; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    Stability and homogeneity of HOPG has enabled it to be used as a platform for various applications in understanding many physical and chemical phenomena. Novel emergence of graphene as a derivative of graphite also makes HOPG an interesting system to study. This is an ambient investigation of HOPG and Au thin films (ranging about 20nm) surfaces via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Tunneling Spectroscopy (TS) with a Pt-Ir tip equipped Nanosurf Naio STM. In this investigation, clean fresh cleaved HOPG substrates were used. Surfaces of HOPG and Au sputter deposited at different film thicknesses were imaged via constant current mode to assess the surface consistency and roughness. Consistent atomic resolution images were obtained. The same systems were then investigated via TS by tunneling current (I) vs. height (z) curves. These spectroscopic data were then used to assess the localized work function measurements and surface variation of the work function. The discussion will attempt to assess the surface electronic environment of these systems in relation to the Au deposition and variation of Au thickness on HOPG. Ambient measurements will inherently complicate these measurements and the complexities will also be discussed. Lock Haven University Nanotechnology Program.

  8. Transformation of self-assembly of a TTF derivative at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface studied by STM--from a nanoporous network to a linear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Xiao, Xunwen; Deng, Ke; Zeng, Qingdao

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative (EDTTF) and a 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy)-benzene (TCDB) heterobilayer nanostructure at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface under ambient conditions has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). EDTTF and TCDB could co-assemble into a brand new hexagonal network with one of the largest nano-cavities. Finally, the nanoporous network would transform into a more stable linear structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to reveal the formation mechanism.The self-assembly of a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative (EDTTF) and a 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy)-benzene (TCDB) heterobilayer nanostructure at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface under ambient conditions has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). EDTTF and TCDB could co-assemble into a brand new hexagonal network with one of the largest nano-cavities. Finally, the nanoporous network would transform into a more stable linear structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to reveal the formation mechanism. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07345f

  9. The spatial distributions of large gap-like structure on Fe(Se,Te) single crystals observed by STM/STS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Akira; Sakai, Yuta; Nagasaka, Kouhei; Ekino, Toshikazu

    2015-11-01

    The nanoscale spatial distributions of large gap-like structure on superconducting FeSe1-xTex were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). The STM topography shows regular atomic lattice arrangements with the lattice spacing ∼0.38 nm, together with the randomly distributed large spots due to the excess Fe atoms. From the STS measurements, the small gap structures of Δ ∼ 7 meV were partly observed. On the other hand, the high-bias dI/dV curves exhibit the broad peak structures at the negative biases of VPG = -200 to -400 mV in the measured whole surface area. The average of these large gaps is |VPGave| ∼ 305 mV with the standard deviation of σ ∼ 48 mV. The spatial distributions of the VPG exhibit the domain structures consisting of the relatively smaller gaps (<250 meV), which correspond to the excess Fe positions. The small gap Δ ∼ 7 meV is also observed at those positions, suggesting that the excess Fe affects the electronic structures of FeSe1-xTex.

  10. Growth and analysis of polymorphic graphene with STM and LEEM-IV for applications in molecular self-assembly and organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Maxwell; Ohta, Taisuke; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Dai, Zhongwei; Pohl, Karsten

    Graphene has aroused tremendous interest due to its remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, and is of interest for use in organic electronic devices such as organic photovoltaic cells. We present an analysis of a novel graphene system grown on Ru (0001) in the presence of atomic hydrogen and carbon vapor using STM and LEEM-IV. Structural studies completed with STM show a wide array of moire superlattice sizes ranging from 0.9 to 3.0 nm. Preliminary LEEM and LEEM-IV results confirm the presence of ordered graphene atop the Ru (0001) surface. Investigation using LEEM-IV provides information about the carbon layer thickness; also, micro-LEED-IV determines the precise atomic reconstruction of the interface region. In this regard, we believe the hydrogen present in the system to be interstitial at the carbon-ruthenium interface thus passivating the ruthenium surface, decoupling, and lifting the carbon layer from the substrate. The structural polymorphism displayed by this system is of interest for the study of directed self-assembly. Control over moire size can aid in future work using graphene as a template for self-assembled growth of organic electronics. This work was performed in part at CINT (DE-AC04-94AL85000). Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US DOE NNSA (DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  11. Clustering effects in a low coverage deposition of gold on the GaAs( 0 0 1 )-β2(2×4) surface: an STM-UHV and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amore Bonapasta, A.; Scavia, G.; Buda, F.

    2002-11-01

    A comparative study of gold deposition on the GaAs(0 0 1)-β2(2×4) surface based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)-ultra high vacuum (UHV) and Car-Parrinello calculations has been carried out. The theoretical results show that the preferential reactive sites of an isolated Au adatom on the GaAs surface drive a self-organizing process of further Au adatoms onto the surface, thus determining an Au clusterization onto the two-As-dimer cell. On the other hand, STM-UHV images reveal, for Au depositions <1 ML, a decorating effect of gold towards the GaAs(0 0 1)-β2(2×4) unit cell. In detail, gold clusters tend to cover the two-As-dimer cell without modifying the (2×4) reconstruction, in agreement with the theoretical results. Moreover, a fine comparison between the STM images of gold clusters and the theoretical results reveals that each of these clusters can be composed of four Au adatoms directly interacting with the two As dimers of the GaAs unit cell. An STM-UHV analysis of the surface for a deposition >1 ML suggests that gold clusterizes into 3D clusters rather than forming a 2D layer.

  12. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815, a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, Lionel; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Caroline, Bournaud; Booth, Kristina; Vriezen, Jan A.C.; Melkonian, Remy; James, Euan; Young, Peter W.; Bena, Gilles; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Bristow, James; Riley, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815T, was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp).

  13. STM, QCM, and the windshield wiper effect: a joint theoretical-experimental study of adsorbate mobility and lubrication at high sliding rates.

    PubMed

    Abdelmaksoud, M; Lee, S M; Padgett, C W; Irving, D L; Brenner, D W; Krim, J

    2006-11-01

    We have observed that when mobile adsorbed films of benzene, tricresyl phosphate, and tertiary-butyl phenyl phosphate are present on the surface electrode of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), oscillation of the QCM produces clearer scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of the electrode surface. This is in contrast to an immobile overlayer of iodobenzene, where oscillation of the QCM does not affect image quality. This observation is attributed to a "windshield wiper effect", where at MHz frequencies the tip motion maintains a region of the surface where the absorbate concentration is reduced, which leads to a clearer image. A straightforward model is presented that supports this conclusion and that provides guidelines for effective lubrication of contacts operating at MHz frequencies. PMID:17073486

  14. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815T, a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, Lionel; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Caroline, Bournaud; Booth, Kristina; Vriezen, Jan A.C.; Melkonian, Rémy; James, Euan K.; Young, J. Peter W.; Bena, Gilles; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Bristow, Jim; Riley, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815T, was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp). PMID:25197461

  15. The evaluation of surface diffusion coefficients of gold and platinum atoms at electrochemical interfaces from combined STM-SEM imaging and electrochemical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.; Salvarezza, R.C.; Vara, J.M.; Arvia, A.J. ); Vazquez, L.; Bartolome, A.; Baro, A.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A simple method is presented for measuring the surface diffusion coefficients of Au and Pt atoms at electrodispersed electrodes of the same metals in contact with 0.5{ital M} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The technique is based upon the time dependence of the surface roughness factor of electrodispersed metal overlayers. The method requires a model for the surface roughness of the metal structure. The model is deduced from microscopic measurements by a STM integrated into a conventional SEM microscope. This allows the relationship between the roughness factor and the area of the surface structure to be obtained. For Au and Pt in contact with an electrolyte solution, the values of our diffusion coefficients are higher than those reported in vacuum at the same temperature.

  16. A size, shape and concentration controlled self-assembling structure with host-guest recognition at the liquid-solid interface studied by STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mengqi; Luo, Zhouyang; Zhang, Siqi; Wang, Shuai; Cao, Lili; Geng, Yanfang; Deng, Ke; Zhao, Dahui; Duan, Wubiao; Zeng, Qingdao

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, we reported the fabrication of host networks formed by two newly prepared phenanthrene-butadiynylene macrocycles (PBMs) at the liquid-solid interface. Size, shape and concentration controlled experiments have been performed to investigate the PBMs/coronene (COR) host-guest system with the structural polymorphism phenomenon. Initially, PBM1 could form a regular linear network structure and PBM2 form a well-ordered nanoporous network structure. When the COR molecules were introduced, the self-assembled structure of PBM1 remained unchanged, while COR could be entrapped into the cavities of the PBM2 nanoporous network, and the co-assembly of the PBM2/COR host-guest systems underwent a structural transformation with the increase of concentration of COR. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are utilized to reveal the formation mechanism of the molecular nanoarrays controlled by the solution concentration.In the present investigation, we reported the fabrication of host networks formed by two newly prepared phenanthrene-butadiynylene macrocycles (PBMs) at the liquid-solid interface. Size, shape and concentration controlled experiments have been performed to investigate the PBMs/coronene (COR) host-guest system with the structural polymorphism phenomenon. Initially, PBM1 could form a regular linear network structure and PBM2 form a well-ordered nanoporous network structure. When the COR molecules were introduced, the self-assembled structure of PBM1 remained unchanged, while COR could be entrapped into the cavities of the PBM2 nanoporous network, and the co-assembly of the PBM2/COR host-guest systems underwent a structural transformation with the increase of concentration of COR. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are utilized to reveal the formation mechanism of the molecular nanoarrays controlled by the solution

  17. New model catalysts (platinum nanoparticles) and new techniques (SFG and STM) for studies of reaction intermediates and surface restructuring at high pressures during catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somorjai, G. A.

    1997-11-01

    Single-crystal surfaces have long served us well as model catalysts; however, a new type of model catalyst has been prepared using electron beam lithography. Ordered arrays of platinum nano-particles in the 2.5-50 nm size range are deposited on oxide substrates (silica, alumina, and titania) of 1 cm 2 surface area, and are used in catalyzed surface reactions at high pressures (atmospheres). Their preparation, cleaning, and reactivity is discussed. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and vibrational spectroscopy by sum frequency generation (SFG) can be utilized to monitor the substrate and adsorbate structure, respectively, over a fourteen order of magnitude pressure range (10 -10-10 4 Torr). As a consequence, we can monitor the surface structure and reaction intermediates during high pressure catalytic reactions. An STM that operates at both high pressure (atmosphere) and high temperature has been constructed and utilized to monitor platinum (111) and (110) surface structure during chemisorption of H 2, O 2 and CO, and during catalytic reactions of olefin hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis. Changes of surface structure upon chemisorption and during reactions have been monitored. Catalysis by the platinum tip was also detected in the presence of H 2 or O 2 at high pressures and 300 K, leading to hydrogenation or oxidation of carbonaceous deposits with nanometer spatial resolution. Vibrational spectroscopy using SFG has been used to monitor pressure dependent changes in the chemisorption of CO and NO over Pt(111). Bonding — which is similar to that in Pt m(CO) n (where n/m > 1 ) clusters and for an incommensurate CO overlayer — is observed above 100 Torr. Reaction intermediates that form during ethylene, propylene, and isobutene hydrogenation, as well as CO oxidation, at atmospheric pressures and 300 K were monitored by SFG. The dominant reacting species that hydrogenate are the weakly π-bonded olefins, while the strongly chemisorbed alkylidyne and di-σ bonded

  18. Isolation of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+, or Salmonella Java, from Indonesia and alteration of the d-tartrate fermentation phenotype by disrupting the ORF STM 3356.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyung Ho; Choi, Seon Young; Lee, Je Hee; Lee, Hyejon; Shin, Eun Hee; Agtini, Magdarina D; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Ochiai, R Leon; Clemens, John D; Wain, John; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Lee, Bok Kwon; Song, Manki; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Wook

    2006-12-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Paratyphi B [O1,4,(5),12 : Hb : 1,2] can cause either an enteric fever (paratyphoid fever) or self-limiting gastroenteritis in humans. The d-tartrate non-fermenting variant S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT- (S. Paratyphi B) is the causative agent of paratyphoid fever, and the d-tartrate fermenting variant S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+ (S. Paratyphi B dT+; formerly called Salmonella Java) causes gastroenteritis. S. Java is currently recognized as an emerging problem worldwide. Twelve dT+ S. Java isolates were collected in Indonesia between 2000 and 2002. One-third of them contained Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1), which gives the multidrug-resistant phenotype to the bacteria. In this study, a PCR-based method to detect a single nucleotide difference responsible for the inability to ferment d-tartrate, reported elsewhere, was validated. The d-tartrate fermenting phenotype of S. Java was converted to the non-fermenting phenotype by the disruption of the ORF STM 3356, and the d-tartrate non-fermenting phenotype of the ORF STM 3356-disrupted strain and the dT- reference strain was changed to the dT+ phenotype by complementing ORF STM 3356 in trans. The results show that the dT+ phenotype requires a functional product encoded by STM 3356, and support the use of the PCR-based discrimination method for S. Paratyphi B and S. Java as the standard differentiation method.

  19. Interaction of 2-mercaptopyrimidine and 4,4'-bipyridine and competition experiments between bipyridines and 1,10'-phenanthroline for the thiol layer on Au(1 1 1) by STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, L. S.; Temperini, M. L. A.

    2001-02-01

    STM was employed to study the coadsorption of 4,4'-bipyridine (4bipy) and 2-mercaptopyrimidine (2MPy) on Au(1 1 1). The adsorption of 4bipy as a single layer was also analyzed. For the single layer STM reveals a molecular structure made of parallel periodic chains with a repeat distance of 11.5-11.7 Å. The mixed layer is formed with a ratio of two molecules of 2MPy to one of 4bipy. 4bipy assumes two different positions in relation to the 2MPy dimer. Competition between 4bipy, 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10'-phenanthroline was investigated to obtain a qualitative view of the preference of the 2MPy assembly for these molecules. The mixed layers were grown on Au(1 1 1) from ternary molecular solutions containing either 2MPy+4bipy+2bipy or 2MPy+4bipy+phen. STM shows that the resulting layers are made of the 2MPy dimeric assembly plus one of the oligopyridines. A split of the 2MPy dimer or the formation of mixed domains with the three molecules present in the stock solution was not found.

  20. A combined STM and SPA-LEED study of the “explosive” nucleation and collective diffusion in Pb/Si(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Hattab, H.; Hupalo, M.; Hershberger, M. T.; Horn von Hoegen, M.; Tringides, M. C.

    2015-08-20

    A novel type of very fast nucleation was recently found in Pb/Si(111) with 4- to 7-layer high islands becoming crystalline in an “explosive” way, when the Pb deposited amount in the wetting layer is compressed to θc ~ 1.22 ML, well above the metallic Pb(111) density. This “explosive” nucleation is very different from classical nucleation when island growth is more gradual and islands grow in size by single adatom aggregation [8]. In order to identify the key parameters that control the nucleation we used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). It was foundmore » that the number and duration of steps in iterative deposition used to approach θc and the flux rate have dramatic effects on the crystallization process. Larger depositions over shorter times induce greater spatial coverage fluctuations, so local areas can reach the critical coverage θc easier. This can trigger the collective motion of the wetting layer from far away to build the Pb islands “explosively”. Here, the SPA-LEED experiments show that even low flux experiments in iterative deposition experiments can trigger transfer of material to the superstable 7-layer islands, as seen from the stronger satellite rings close to the (00) spot.« less

  1. A combined STM and SPA-LEED study of the “explosive” nucleation and collective diffusion in Pb/Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Hattab, H.; Hupalo, M.; Hershberger, M. T.; Horn von Hoegen, M.; Tringides, M. C.

    2015-08-20

    A novel type of very fast nucleation was recently found in Pb/Si(111) with 4- to 7-layer high islands becoming crystalline in an “explosive” way, when the Pb deposited amount in the wetting layer is compressed to θc ~ 1.22 ML, well above the metallic Pb(111) density. This “explosive” nucleation is very different from classical nucleation when island growth is more gradual and islands grow in size by single adatom aggregation [8]. In order to identify the key parameters that control the nucleation we used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). It was found that the number and duration of steps in iterative deposition used to approach θc and the flux rate have dramatic effects on the crystallization process. Larger depositions over shorter times induce greater spatial coverage fluctuations, so local areas can reach the critical coverage θc easier. This can trigger the collective motion of the wetting layer from far away to build the Pb islands “explosively”. Here, the SPA-LEED experiments show that even low flux experiments in iterative deposition experiments can trigger transfer of material to the superstable 7-layer islands, as seen from the stronger satellite rings close to the (00) spot.

  2. Adsorption of the ionic liquid [BMP][TFSA] on Au(111) and Ag(111): substrate effects on the structure formation investigated by STM.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Benedikt; Buchner, Florian; Alwast, Dorothea; Wagner, Nadja; Behm, R Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In order to resolve substrate effects on the adlayer structure and structure formation and on the substrate-adsorbate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, we investigated the adsorption of thin films of the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium-bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [BMP][TFSA] on the close-packed Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy, under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the temperature range between about 100 K and 293 K. At room temperature, highly mobile 2D liquid adsorbate phases were observed on both surfaces. At low temperatures, around 100 K, different adsorbed IL phases were found to coexist on these surfaces, both on silver and gold: a long-range ordered ('2D crystalline') phase and a short-range ordered ('2D glass') phase. Both phases exhibit different characteristics on the two surfaces. On Au(111), the surface reconstruction plays a major role in the structure formation of the 2D crystalline phase. In combination with recent density functional theory calculations, the sub-molecularly resolved STM images allow to clearly discriminate between the [BMP](+) cation and [TFSA](-) anion. PMID:24367760

  3. Coulomb blockade and charge ordering in a few layers of TTF-TCNQ investigated by low-temperature STM/STS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seokmin; Maksymovych, Petro

    In contrast to the vast effort on bulk crystal phases of the prototypical organic charge-transfer complex, TTF-TCNQ, study of low-dimensional phases has been limited to monolayer phases on substrates. In this state, however, none of the physics of the bulk phase is observed owing to the overwhelming effect of the substrate. We investigate the molecular structure and electronic properties of a few layers of TTF-TCNQ grown on Au(111) and Ag(111) using STM/STS at 4.3 K. By decoupling the molecular electronic state from the metal surface, we have made the first observation of the effect of confinement on the electronic properties of TTF-TCNQ. STS reveals a plethora of sharp features due to molecular orbitals, each influenced by charge-transfer between the molecules. We hypothesize the existence of a Mott-insulator state in 3-layer islands, with a Coulomb gap of ~1 eV. In contrast, the corresponding bulk phase is a Peierls insulator with a gap of ~20 meV. The root cause of the nanoscale phase is traced to simultaneous electron confinement and structural frustration, which dramatically modify the energy balance of self-ionization allowing for integer charge transfer. These studies open broad opportunities to explore correlated electron physics in molecular systems. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  4. Electronic and geometric properties of Au nanoparticles on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

    PubMed

    Lopez-Salido, Ignacio; Lim, Dong Chan; Dietsche, Rainer; Bertram, Nils; Kim, Young Dok

    2006-01-26

    Au nanoparticles grown on mildly sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surfaces were studied using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared with those of Ag nanoparticles on the same substrate. By varying the defect densities of HOPG and the Au coverages, one can create Au nanoparticles in various sizes. At high Au coverages, the structures of the Au films significantly deviate from the ideal truncated octahedral form: the existence of many steps between different Au atomic layers can be observed, most likely due to a high activation barrier of the diffusion of Au atoms across the step edges. This implies that the particle growth at room temperature is strongly limited by kinetic factors. Hexagonal shapes of Au structures could be identified, indicating preferential growth of Au nanostructures along the (111) direction normal to the surface. In the case of Au, XPS studies reveal a weaker core level shift with decreasing particle size compared to the 3d level in similarly sized Ag particles. Also taking into account the Auger analysis of the Ag particles, the core level shifts of the metal nanoparticles on HOPG can be understood in terms of the metal/substrate charge transfer. Ag is (partially) positively charged, whereas Au negatively charged on HOPG. It is demonstrated that XPS can be a useful tool to study metal-support interactions, which plays an important role for heterogeneous catalysis, for example.

  5. The PGPR strain Phyllobacterium brassicacearum STM196 induces a reproductive delay and physiological changes that result in improved drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bresson, Justine; Varoquaux, Fabrice; Bontpart, Thibaut; Touraine, Bruno; Vile, Denis

    2013-10-01

    Understanding how biotic interactions can improve plant tolerance to drought is a challenging prospect for agronomy and ecology. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are promising candidates but the phenotypic changes induced by PGPR under drought remain to be elucidated. We investigated the effects of Phyllobacterium brassicacearum STM196 strain, a PGPR isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape, on two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana with contrasting flowering time. We measured multiple morphophysiological traits related to plant growth and development in order to quantify the added value of the bacteria to drought-response strategies of Arabidopsis in soil conditions. A delay in reproductive development induced by the bacteria resulted in a gain of biomass that was independent of the accession and the watering regime. Coordinated changes in transpiration, ABA content, photosynthesis and development resulted in higher water-use efficiency and a better tolerance to drought of inoculated plants. Our findings give new insights into the ecophysiological bases by which PGPR can confer stress tolerance to plants. Rhizobacteria-induced delay in flowering time could represent a valuable strategy for increasing biomass yield, whereas rhizobacteria-induced improvement of water use is of particular interest in multiple scenarios of water availability.

  6. STM-Induced Void Formation at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni{sub 3}Al(111) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Magtoto, N.P.; Niu, C.; Anzaldura, M.; Kelber, J.A.; Jennison, D.R.

    2000-09-21

    Under UHV conditions at 300 K, the applied electric field and/or resulting current from an STM tip creates nanoscale voids at the interface between an epitaxial, 7.0 {angstrom} thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film and a Ni{sub 3}Al(111) substrate. This phenomenon is independent of tip polarity. Constant current (1 nA) images obtained at +0.1 V bias and +2.0 bias voltage (sample positive) reveal that voids are within the metal at the interface and, when small, are capped by the oxide film. Void size increases with time of exposure. The rate of void growth increases with applied bias/field and tunneling current, and increases significantly for field strengths >5 MV/cm, well below the dielectric breakdown threshold of 12 {+-} 1 MV/cm. Slower rates of void growth are, however, observed at lower applied field strengths. Continued growth of voids, to {approximately}30 {angstrom} deep and {approximately}500 {angstrom} wide, leads to the eventual failure of the oxide overlayer. Density Functional Theory calculations suggest a reduction-oxidation (REDOX) mechanism: interracial metal atoms are oxidized via transport into the oxide, while oxide surface Al cations are reduced to admetal species which rapidly diffuse away. This is found to be exothermic in model calculations, regardless of the details of the oxide film structure; thus, the barriers to void formation are kinetic rather than thermodynamic. We discuss our results in terms of mechanisms for the localized pitting corrosion of aluminum, as our results suggest nanovoid formation requires just electric field and current, which are ubiquitous in environmental conditions.

  7. STM Studies of the Growth of Ni and Cu Islands on TiO_2(110)-(1x1): Controlling Island Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Donna; Zhou, Jing; Kang, Yong-Cheol

    2003-03-01

    We have investigated the growth of Cu and Ni islands on rutile TiO_2(110)-(1x1) surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both Cu and Ni islands grow 3-dimensionally at room temperature even at low coverages. The narrowness of the size distributions for both Ni and Cu islands are controlled by the diffusion (D) to deposition flux (F) ratios, with the smallest values for D/F corresponding to most uniform size distributions. Increasing the deposition flux resulted in smaller islands with higher island densities, while increasing the diffusion rate at elevated deposition temperatures produced larger islands with lower island densities. As the metal coverage is increased, the island density increases even up to coverages as high as 2-3 ML, whereas the island diameters do not change much throughout entire coverage range. Islands do grow with increasing coverage, but this growth is mainly due to an increase in island height. Based on the stronger admetal-oxide interaction for Ni compared to Cu, it was expected that the Ni islands might have smaller aspect ratios compared to the Cu islands. Furthermore, the stronger admetal-oxide interactions could result in decreased diffusion rates for Ni compared to Cu. However, we found that Ni islands do not grow flatter on the surface compared to Cu, and there is no evidence for slower Ni adatom diffusion at room temperature. A major difference between Ni and Cu island growth is that the sintering of Ni islands occurs at much higher temperatures. We have shown that the rate limiting step in the sintering of Ni and Cu islands is adatom detachment, not adatom diffusion. Therefore, the slower sintering of Ni islands compared to Cu can be explained by the stronger metal-metal bond strength for Ni.

  8. Gold deposition on pyrite and the common sulfide minerals: An STM/STS and SR-XPS study of surface reactions and Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhlin, Yuri L.; Romanchenko, Alexander S.

    2007-12-01

    Gold species spontaneously deposited on pyrite and chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena, sphalerite from HAuCl 4 solutions at room temperature, as well as the state of the reacted mineral surfaces have been characterized using synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS), scanning tunneling microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy (STM/STS). The deposition of silver from 10 -4 M AgNO 3 has been examined for comparison. Gold precipitates as metallic nanoparticles (NPs) from about 3 nm to 30 nm in diameter, which tends to aggregate forming larger particles, especially on pyrite. The Au 4f binding energies increase up to 1 eV with decreasing size of individual Au 0 NPs, probably due to the temporal charging in the final state. Concurrently, a positive correlation between the tunneling current and the particle size was found in STS. Both these size effects were observed for unusually large, up to 20 nm Au particles. In contrast, silver deposited on the minerals as nanoparticles of semiconducting sulfide showed no shifts of photoelectron lines and different tunneling spectra. The quantity of gold deposited on pyrite and other minerals increased with time; it was lower for fracture surfaces and it grew if minerals were moderately pre-oxidized, while the preliminary leaching in Fe(III)-bearing media inhibited the following Au deposition. After the contact of polished minerals with 10 -4 M AuCl4- solution (pH 1.5) for 10 min, the gold uptake changed in the order CuFeS 2 > ZnS > PbS > FeAsS > FeS 2 > Fe 7S 8. It was noticed that the open circuit (mixed) potentials of the minerals varied in approximately the same order, excepting chalcopyrite. We concluded that the potentials of minerals were largely determined by Fe(II)/Fe(III) couple, whereas the reduction of gold complexes had a minor effect. As a result, the deposition of gold, although it proceeded via the electrochemical mechanism, increased with decreasing potential. This suggests, in particular, that the

  9. Surface morphologies, electronic structures, and Kondo effect of lanthanide(III)-phthalocyanine molecules on Au(111) by using STM, STS and FET properties for next generation devices.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Keiichi; Komeda, Tadahiro; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2010-05-28

    The crystal structures of double-decker single-molecule magnets (SMMs) LnPc(2) (Ln = Tb(III) and Dy(III); Pc = phthalocyanine) and non-SMM YPc(2) were determined by using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds are isomorphous to each other. The compounds have metal-centers (M(3+) = Tb, Dy, and Y) sandwiched by two Pc ligands via eight isoindole-nitrogen atoms in a square-antiprism fashion. The twist angle between the two Pc ligands is 41.4 degrees. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was used to investigate the compounds adsorbed on a Au(111) surface, deposited by using thermal evaporation in ultra-high vacuum. Both MPc(2) with eight-lobes and MPc with four-lobes, which has lost one Pc ligand, were observed. In the scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) images of TbPc molecules at 4.8 K, a Kondo peak with a Kondo temperature (T(K)) of approximately 250 K was observed near the Fermi level (V = 0 V). On the other hand, DyPc, YPc and MPc(2) exhibited no Kondo peak. In order to understand the observed Kondo effect, the energy splitting of sublevels in a crystal field should be taken into consideration. As the next step in our studies on the SMM/Kondo effect in Tb-Pc derivatives, we investigated the electronic transport properties of Ln-Pc molecules as the active layer in top- and bottom-contact thin-film organic field effect transistor (OFETs) devices. Tb-Pc molecule devices exhibit p-type semiconducting properties with a hole mobility (mu(H)) of approximately 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Interestingly, the Dy-Pc based devices exhibited ambipolar semiconducting properties with an electron mobility (mu(e)) of approximately 10(-5) and a hole mobility (mu(H)) of approximately 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This behavior has important implications for the electronic structure of the molecules. PMID:20396817

  10. STM studies of Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Gyenis, Andras; Oh, Seong Woo; Li, Jian; Wang, Zhi Jun; Bernevig, Andrei; Ni, Ni; Yazdani, Ali

    Weyl semimetal exhibits a new gapless topological phase, which is characterized by an even number of band touching points of two non-degenerate bands in the bulk, called Weyl nodes. The surfaces of these compounds are expected to harbor topologically protected surface states with disconnected Fermi surfaces, called Fermi arcs, which connect surface projections of the Weyl nodes with opposing Chern numbers. Among the theoretically predicted Weyl semimetals, there have been several experimental reports on the presence of Fermi arcs in inversion-symmetry-broken monoarsenides, such as TaAs. In this talk, we will present atomic-scale imaging and spectroscopic mapping of the electronic properties of TaAs and other Weyl semimetal candidates. Such measurements have the potential to directly visualize the Fermi arc surface states of these compounds and to probe their properties. This work is supported by ARO and NSF.

  11. STM images of a superconducting Cu-O plane and the corresponding tunneling spectrum in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, M.; Manabe, C.; Ido, M.

    1996-02-01

    Clear atomic images of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} cleaved surfaces have been observed at {ital T}=6 and 300 K by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The atomic images taken for bias voltages much lower than the Bi-O plane semiconducting gap {ital E}{sub g}{approximately}100 meV, corresponding to the Cu-O plane, indicate that the conduction electrons exist mainly in the Cu 3{ital d}{sub {ital x}{sup 2}{minus}{ital y}{sup 2}} and O 2{ital p}{sub {sigma}} orbitals. Tunneling spectra have been also measured in the same processes as in the Cu-O plane STM image observations at {ital T}=6 K. The low-temperature spectra are in good agreement with that in a {ital d}-wave superconductor with an anisotropic Fermi surface on which the normal density of states {ital N}({bold k}{sub {ital F}}) is largest ({ital N}{sub max}) for the maximum gap directions and decreases to {approximately}{ital N}{sub max}/2 for the node directions. This, combined with the result on the {ital N}({bold k}{sub {ital F}}) anisotropy in photoemission experiments, is consistent with a {ital d}{sub {ital x}{sup 2}{minus}{ital y}{sup 2}} superconducting gap. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Postscript: Through TCM, STM Shines Bright

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davelaar, Eddy J.; Usher, Marius; Haarmann, Henk J.; Goshen-Gottstein, Yonatan

    2008-01-01

    We find the reply by Kahana, Sederberg, and Howard helpful in clarifying the temporal-context model (TCM) function, in particular with regard to the elimination of the recency effect by a difficult distractor under parameters that still enable long-term contiguity effects to emerge. We agree with Kahana et al. that what matters most to the…

  13. STM/STS observation of polyoxoanions on HOPG surfaces: the wheel-shaped [Cu20Cl(OH)24(H2O)12(P8W48O184)]25- and the ball-shaped [{Sn(CH3)2(H2O)}24{Sn(CH3)2}12(A-PW9O34)12]36-.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad S; Dremov, Viacheslav; Müller, Paul; Postnikov, Andrei V; Mal, Sib Sankar; Hussain, Firasat; Kortz, Ulrich

    2006-04-01

    A combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) techniques have been performed on the wheel-shaped [Cu20Cl(OH)24(H2O)12(P8W48O184)]25- and the ball-shaped [{Sn(CH3)2(H2O)}24{Sn(CH3)2}12(A-PW9O34)12]36- deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces. Small, regular molecule clusters, as well as separated single molecules, were observed. The size of the molecules is in agreement with the data determined by X-ray crystallography. In STS measurements, we found a rather large contrast at the expected location of the Cu metal centers in our molecules, i.e., the location of the individual Cu ions in their organic matrix is directly addressable by STS.

  14. The electronic properties of microbial nanowires: An STM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veazey, Josh; Steidl, Becky; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart

    2009-03-01

    Geobacter species of bacteria present the prospect of an interesting physical system through the expression of pili that act as electrically conductive nanowires. These nanowires serve the biological role of transporting metabolically generated electrons outside the cell body to electron acceptors in the organism's native environment. We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on Geobacter sulferreducens in an effort to elucidate the mechanism of conductivity. Understanding this system may lead to the enhancement in the effectiveness of Geobacter species' roles in microbial fuel cells and the bioremediation of hazardous waste, such as uranium and petroleum.

  15. Spin Parity effects in STM single magnetic atom manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Fernando; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquín

    2012-02-01

    Recent experimental work shows that a spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy tip can be used both to read and write the spin orientation of a single magnetic spin [1]. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) shows that spin of the magnetic atom is quantized [2], like the spin of a molecular magnet. Here we discuss two fundamental problems that arise when a bit of classical information is stored on a quantized spin: quantum spin tunneling and back-action of the readout process. Quantum tunneling is responsible of the loss of information due to the relaxation of the spin coupled to the environment, while the detection induced back-action leads to an unwanted modification of the spin state. We find that fundamental differences exist between integer and semi-integer spins when it comes to both, read and write classical information in a quantized spin.[4pt] [1] S. Loth et al, Nature Physics 6, 340 (2010).[0pt] [2] C. Hirjibehedin et al, Science 317, 1199 (2007).

  16. Zn effect on STM imaging of brass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiame, Frédéric; Islam, Mazharul M.; Salgın, Bekir; Światowska, Jolanta; Costa, Dominique; Diawara, Boubakar; Maurice, Vincent; Marcus, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The surface of brass has been characterized by combined experimental and theoretical approaches. The experimental scanning tunneling microscopy study performed on a Cu0.7Zn0.3(111) surface at room temperature showed terraces of up to several tens of nanometers in width, separated by monoatomic steps. Depending on the tunneling conditions, a disordered pattern or a sharp atomically-resolved hexagonal lattice was observed. The disordered pattern is attributed to the superposition of Friedel oscillations at the surface induced by the presence of Zn atoms. Comparison of simulated images, based on a simple model of randomly distributed point defects, shows a good agreement with experimental results. At atomic resolution, a chemical contrast has been demonstrated between Zn and Cu atoms at the surface showing the random distribution of isolated Zn atoms into the hexagonal lattice.

  17. STM imaging of vortex cores states in superconducting graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yu; Ovadia, Maoz; Hoffman, Jennifer; Lee, Gil-Ho; Philip Kim Collaboration; Wenjing Fang Collaboration

    Graphene becomes superconducting via the proximity effect when it comes in good contact with a superconductor. In the presence of a magnetic field, superconducting vortices will form and will each contain Andreev bound states. If the normal electrons in the vortices have a Dirac dispersion and they are surface bound states, the zero modes of the Dirac dispersion are then Majorana fermions. We investigate the electronic properties of graphene on superconducting NbN and search for these vortex bound states using our home built low temperature scanning tunneling microscope. Harvard University.

  18. Donor wave functions in Si gauged by STM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraiva, A. L.; Salfi, J.; Bocquel, J.; Voisin, B.; Rogge, S.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Calderón, M. J.; Koiller, Belita

    2016-01-01

    The triumph of effective mass theory in describing the energy spectrum of dopants does not guarantee that the model wave functions will withstand an experimental test. Such wave functions have recently been probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, revealing localized patterns of resonantly enhanced tunneling currents. We show that the shape of the conducting splotches resembles a cut through Kohn-Luttinger (KL) hydrogenic envelopes, which modulate the interfering Bloch states of conduction electrons. All the nonmonotonic features of the current profile are consistent with the charge density fluctuations observed between successive {001 } atomic planes, including a counterintuitive reduction of the symmetry—a heritage of the lowered point group symmetry at these planes. A model-independent analysis of the diffraction figure constrains the value of the electron wave vector to k0=(0.82 ±0.03 ) (2 π /aSi) . Unlike prior measurements, averaged over a sizable density of electrons, this estimate is obtained directly from isolated electrons. We further investigate the model-specific anisotropy of the wave function envelope, related to the effective mass anisotropy. This anisotropy appears in the KL variational wave function envelope as the ratio between Bohr radii b /a . We demonstrate that the central-cell-corrected estimates for this ratio are encouragingly accurate, leading to the conclusion that the KL theory is a valid model not only for energies but for wave functions as well.

  19. Theoretical interpretation of donor wavefunctions STM images in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiller, Belita; Saraiva, A. L.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Calderón, M. J.,; Salfi, J.; Voisin, B.; Bocquel, J.; Rogge, S.

    Single dopant wavefunctions in Si have recently been probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, revealing localized patterns of resonantly enhanced tunneling currents. We show that the shapes of the conducting splotches resemble cuts through Kohn-Luttinger (KL) hydrogenic envelopes, which modulate the interfering Bloch states of conduction electrons. All the non-monotonic features of the current profile are consistent with the charge density fluctuations observed between successive { 001 } atomic planes, including a counter-intuitive reduction of the symmetry - a heritage of the lowered point group symmetry at these planes. A model-independent analysis of the diffraction figure constrains the value of the electron wavevector to k0 = (0 . 82 +/- 0 . 03) (2 π /aSi) . Unlike prior measurements, averaged over a sizeable density of electrons, this estimate is obtained directly from isolated electrons. We further investigate the model-specific anisotropy of the wave function envelope, related to the effective mass anisotropy. This anisotropy appears in the KL variational wave function envelope as the ratio between Bohr radii b / a . Authors thank partial support by CNPq, FAPERJ in Bazil, by FIS2012-33521, MINECO in Spain and by ARC CE110001027 and ARO W911NF-08-1-0527 in Australia.

  20. STM imaging of impurity resonances on Bi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Alpichshev, Zhanybek; Biswas, Rudro R; Balatsky, Alexander V; Analytis, J G; Chu, J-H; Fisher, I R; Kapitulnik, A

    2012-05-18

    In this Letter we present detailed study of the density of states near defects in Bi2Se3. In particular, we present data on the commonly found triangular defects in this system. While we do not find any measurable quasiparticle scattering interference effects, we do find localized resonances, which can be well fitted by theory [R. R. Biswas and A. V. Balatsky, Phys. Rev. B 81, 233405(R) (2010)] once the potential is taken to be extended to properly account for the observed defects. The data together with the fits confirm that while the local density of states around the Dirac point of the electronic spectrum at the surface is significantly disrupted near the impurity by the creation of low-energy resonance state, the Dirac point is not locally destroyed. We discuss our results in terms of the expected protected surface state of topological insulators.

  1. Unraveling the electron pairing mechanism of FeSe by MBE and STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Canli

    Studies of high-transition-temperature superconductivity usually suffer from various imperfections in materials. Here we apply the state-of-the-art molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to prepare controllably high-quality FeSe films on various substrates, and explore their superconducting properties using cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Single impurities, twin boundaries as well as strain are found in the MBE-grown FeSe films on graphene, and invariably suppress the superconductivity. Meanwhile, electronic nematicity and signatures of a bosonic mode, whose energy also decreases with strain, were identified. More significantly, we observed two disconnected superconducting domes at alkali-metal potassium (K)-dosed FeSe surface, stepping towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors. Our results are clarifying the secret of high-Tc superconductivity in FeSe-related superconductors, and by implications, in other unconventional superconductors, and guiding how to enhance Tc by interface engineering. This work was nancially supported by National Science Foundation and Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  2. Resonant coupling and negative differential resistance in metal/ferrocenyl alkanethiolate/STM structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuchun; Lu, Wenchang; Zhao, Qingzhong; Bernholc, J.

    2006-11-01

    Recent experimental studies demonstrated that self-assembled molecules sandwiched between metallic contacts can perform logic functions based on negative differential resistance (NDR). To understand the mechanism of NDR, the electronic structure and transport properties of one such junction, ferrocenyl alkanethiolate attached to a gold surface and probed with a scanning tunneling microscope tip, are investigated by large scale ab initio calculations. The I-V characteristics show strong NDR features at both positive and negative biases, in good agreement with the experimental data. The voltage-dependent transmission, potential drop profile, and molecular level alignment under bias suggest that the ferrocenyl group acts like a quantum dot and that the NDR features are due to resonant coupling between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the density of states of gold leads. The strength of the individual NDR peaks can be tuned by changing the tunneling distance or using suitable spacer layers.

  3. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Botaya, Luis; Coromina, Xavier; Samitier, Josep; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs) and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution) with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current-voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips. PMID:27231911

  4. STM and STS Observation on Titanium-Carbide Metallofullerenes:. TI2C2@C78

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, N.; Moribe, H.; Umemoto, H.; Shinohara, H.; Suwa, Y.; Heike, S.; Fujimori, M.; Hashizume, T.

    2009-06-01

    A metallofullerene Ti2C2@C78, in which two titanium atoms and C2 cluster are encapsulated, is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Measurements of Ti2C2@C78 on Cu(111) surface reveal that their cage symmetry is C78-D3h. There is a preferential orientation of Ti2C2@C78 resulting from electrostatic interaction same as other metallofullerene.

  5. Single Molecule Switches and Molecular Self-Assembly: Low Temperature STM Investigations and Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Violeta

    2006-08-01

    This dissertation is devoted to single molecule investigations and manipulations of two porphyrin-based molecules, chlorophyll-a and Co-popphyrin. The molecules are absorbed on metallic substrates and studied at low temperatures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the molecules are investigated in detail with atomic level precision. Chlorophyll-a is the key ingredient in photosynthesis processes while Co-porphyrin is a magnetic molecule that represents the recent emerging field of molecular spintronics. Using the scanning tunneling microscope tip and the substrate as electrodes, and the molecules as active ingredients, single molecule switches made of these two molecules are demonstrated. The first switch, a multiple and reversible mechanical switch, is realized by using chlorophyll-a where the energy transfer of a single tunneling electron is used to rotate a C-C bond of the molecule's tail on a Au(111) surface. Here, the det

  6. STM studies of topological phase transition in (Bi,In)2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenhan; Wang, Xueyun; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Wu, Weida; Weida Wu Team; Sang-Wook Cheong Collaboration

    Topological insulators (TI) are a class of materials with insulating bulk and metallic surface state, which is the result of band inversion induced by strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The transition from topological phase to non-topological phase is of great significance. In theory, topological phase transition is realized by tuning SOC strength. It is characterized by the process of gap closing and reopening. Experimentally it was observed in two systems: TlBi(S1-xSex)2 and (Bi1-xInx)2 Se3 where the transition is realized by varying isovalent elements doping concentration. However, none of the previous studies addressed the impact of disorder, which is inevitable in doped systems. Here, we present a systematic scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy study on (Bi1-xInx)2 Se3 single crystals with different In concentrations across the transition. Our results reveal an electronic inhomogeneity due to the random distribution of In defects which locally suppress the topological surface states. Our study provides a new angle of understanding the topological transition in the presence of strong disorders. This work is supported by NSF DMR-1506618.

  7. Attention and Modality Effects in STM: A Second Look. Occasional Paper No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Thomas; Byers, Joe

    The auditory/verbal short-term memory of 64 college students was examined across a wide range of retention intervals (5 seconds to 60 seconds). High attention during interpolated processing was ensured by monitoring rehearsal with a combination of methods, and errors were analyzed for evidence of proactive and intra-unit interference. Recall of…

  8. Adsorption and thermal treatments of 1-dodecene on Si(100) investigated by STM

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, H. W.; Fujikawa, Y.; Sadowski, J. T.; Xue, Q. -K.; Sakurai, T.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the atomic behaviour of long-chain 1-dodecene adsorbed on Si(100) using a scanning tunnelling microscope with an exposure of 30 to 2.4 Langmuirs. Unlike previous reports on short-chain molecules, remarkable self-ordered assembly of molecules is not observed at room temperature, which is possibly attributed to the asymmetric molecular structure with long chains of 1-dodecene. After annealing at 500–580 °C, ordered patterns form with a c(4 × 4) structure, accompanied with thermal decomposition of molecules.

  9. The impact of information technology and networks: new perspectives for scientific, technical and medical (STM) publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kemp, Arnoud

    This contribution is a strongly abbreviated notation of a much longer presentation at the Workshop on Strategies and Techniques of Information for Astronomy, organized by the European Science Foundation in Strasbourg on 21/22 June 1996. The process of publishing will undergo dramatic changes due to the influences of information technology and networks. The publishing business as a whole will shift from traditional print- and paper-based organisations to a fully digital workflow from author to end-user. Electronic publishing has moved from pre-print activities to digital preprints on a variety of servers, but still most scientific documentation is printed and not only for archival purposes. In this short contribution, a plea is made for new rules in scientific communication that authors, editors, publishers, societies, libraries and users can recognize. In addition, in the electronic age we need more security for copyright, transactions over networks and against misuse in general.

  10. STM study of C60F18 high dipole moment molecules on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairagi, K.; Bellec, A.; Chumakov, R. G.; Menshikov, K. A.; Lagoute, J.; Chacon, C.; Girard, Y.; Rousset, S.; Repain, V.; Lebedev, A. M.; Sukhanov, L. P.; Svechnikov, N. Yu.; Stankevich, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of C60F18 molecules deposited on Au(111) are reported and compared to C60 molecules both at liquid helium temperature and room temperature (RT). Whereas adsorption and electronic properties of C60F18 single molecules were studied at low temperature (LT), self-assemblies were investigated at RT. In both cases, the fluorine atoms of the C60F18 molecules are pointed towards the surface. Individual C60F18 molecules on Au(111) have a HOMO-LUMO gap of 2.9 eV. The self-assembled islands exhibit a close-packed hexagonal lattice with amorphous borders. The comparison with C60 molecules clearly demonstrates the influence of the C60F18 electric dipole moment (EDM) on the electronic properties of single molecules and on the thermodynamics of self-assembled islands. Besides, the apparent height value of a separate molecule increases in a self-assembly environment as a result of a depolarization phenomenon.

  11. 3D equilibrium crystal shapes in the new light of STM and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzel, H. P.

    2003-10-01

    A systematic study of 3D equilibrium crystal shapes (ECS) can yield important surface energetic quantities, such as step, kink, surface and step-step interaction free energies. Observations of the ECS, especially of flat facets and adjacent vicinal regions, will provide primarily relative step and surface free energies. An advanced goal is to determine absolute step free energies, kink formation and step interaction energies. Absolute values of these energies are important in governing crystal growth morphologies, high temperature phase changes and kinetic processes associated with shape changes. Furthermore, absolute step and kink energies are the key to absolute surface free energies of well defined low-index orientations. We review new experiments where sections of the ECS are monitored as a function of temperature to extract characteristic morphological parameters, yielding absolute surface energetic quantities. Attention will be paid to the question of attaining true 3D equilibrium of an ensemble of crystallites. The special role of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopies will be stressed. New ways of overcoming the problem of the activation barrier for facet growth (or shrinkage) through the study of dislocated crystallites will be demonstrated. In the general context of 3D crystallites, the study of 2D nano-crystals, in the form of adatom or vacancy islands on extended flat surfaces, will be discussed. In particular, the connection between the temperature dependent shape of 2D islands and the absolute step and kink formation energies of the bounding steps, complementary to facet shape changes of 3D crystallites, has emerged as an important topic of recent research. Finally, high temperature phase changes, such as surface roughening and surface melting, as they have been observed by scanning electron microscopy on 3D crystallites, will be briefly reviewed.

  12. Se adlattices formed on Au(100), studies by LEED, AES, STM and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Baoming M.; Lister, Tedd E.; Stickney, John L.

    1997-12-01

    Ordered selenium atomic layers have been formed electrochemically on Au(100) at a series of coverages. Cyclic voltammetry and coulometry were used to study the deposition process, and to determine the corresponding coverages of a number of Se structures. Structures, with Se coverages of 0.25, 0.33, 0.5, and 0.89 monolayers, were identified using ultra high vacuum — electrochemical techniques as well as scanning tunneling microscopy. The corresponding unit cells of those structures were: p(2 × 2), (2 × √10), c(2 × 2), and a mostly (3 × √10), composed of close-packed Se 8 rings. Pit formation, associated with the formation of the densely packed Se 8 ring structure, was observed. They are reminiscent of pits observed in self-assembled monolayers of alkane thiols on Au surfaces. The pits disappeared as the structure, composed of Se rings, was converted to lower coverage structures, such as the 0.25 monolayer p(2 × 2), via anodic stripping. Se atomic layers were formed electrochemically in three ways: direct reduction from a HSeO -3 solution; anodic stripping of previously formed bulk Se; or cathodic stripping of previously formed bulk Se. All three methods resulted in equivalent atomic layer structures on the Au(100) surface, but with some variation in the homogeneity and distribution of particular structures.

  13. Atomic-scale STM experiments on semiconductor surfaces: towards molecular nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Comtet, G; Dujardin, G; Hellner, L; Lastapis, M; Martin, M; Mayne, A J; Riedel, D

    2004-06-15

    The electronic or quantum control of individual molecules with the scanning tunnelling microscope offers exciting perspectives on operating molecular nanomachines. This implies the use of semiconductor surfaces rather than metallic surfaces which would rapidly quench the electronic excitations. We review recent results illustrating the state of the art and the main problems which need to be solved: the choice, design and properties of functionalized organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces; the control of the inelastic electronic channels through a single molecule; and the search for well-controlled atomic-scale wide-band-gap semiconductor surfaces.

  14. STM analysis of defects at the GaAs(001)-c(4 × 4) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhn, Thomas; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Esser, Norbert; Vogt, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Atomic structure models of semiconductor surfaces consider usually ideal models based on density functional theory calculations. In reality, however, semiconductor surfaces exhibit a variety of defects which deviate from this ideal surface structure. Depending on their specific nature and amount, these defects can contribute significantly to the total energy of the surface. Furthermore, the electronic properties and consequently their specific reactivity towards adsorption processes can be modified significantly due to the existence of surface defects. Here, we present an analysis of different kinds of defects at the GaAs(001)-c(4 × 4) surface reconstruction. The surfaces were prepared by thermal decapping of GaAs(001) epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy and capped by an amorphous As cap. High resolution measurements with scanning tunneling microscopy were performed at room temperature and allowed the identification and atomic analysis of several different kinds of surface defects. Apart from other defects we found indications that approximately 3% of the surface dimers are incomplete, consisting only of one As atom instead of two.

  15. Embedded image processing engine using ARM cortex-M4 based STM32F407 microcontroller

    SciTech Connect

    Samaiya, Devesh

    2014-10-06

    Due to advancement in low cost, easily available, yet powerful hardware and revolution in open source software, urge to make newer, more interactive machines and electronic systems have increased manifold among engineers. To make system more interactive, designers need easy to use sensor systems. Giving the boon of vision to machines was never easy, though it is not impossible these days; it is still not easy and expensive. This work presents a low cost, moderate performance and programmable Image processing engine. This Image processing engine is able to capture real time images, can store the images in the permanent storage and can perform preprogrammed image processing operations on the captured images.

  16. A detailed study on the thermal endurance of Kapton HNTM and Upilex STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltzel, S.; Semprimoschnig, C. O. A.

    2003-09-01

    Assessing the thermal endurance by isothermal testing in a Thermogravimetric Analyser (TGA) is a time consuming method. A quicker method is to perform kinetic modelling on several decomposition curves. Four temperature scans at different heating rates were recorded with the TGA for two thermal control foils, Kapton HN and Upilex S. Two methods of kinetic modelling were used to calculate the activation energy, i.e. the ASTM E 1641 and the approach of Model Free Kinetics (MFK). The first assumes a constant value for the activation energy whereas the latter calculates it as a function of the conversion. With the activation energy it is possible to make a lifetime prediction that indicates the mass loss that occurs at a certain temperature for a certain duration. The lifetime predictions are used to compare the two materials and also the two modelling methods. The modelling is verified by comparing the results to isothermal TGA tests and thermal ageing of samples in high vacuum chambers at 350°C for durations up to half a year and in combination with UV irradiation screening tests. All the performed experiments indicate that Upilex S has a better thermal endurance than Kapton HN. The results of the kinetic modelling are in good agreement with the isothermal experiments in the TGA and in the vacuum facilities. The MFK approach for kinetic modelling was found to be more adequate than the ASTM method.

  17. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Botaya, Luis; Coromina, Xavier; Samitier, Josep; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs) and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution) with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current–voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips. PMID:27231911

  18. Stabilizing forces acting on ZnO polar surfaces: STM, LEED, and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Dong, L.; Shi, X. Q.; Van Hove, M. A.; Ho, W. K.; Lin, N.; Wu, H. S.; Tong, S. Y.

    2014-06-01

    New understanding has been reached on competing forces acting to stabilize the polar surfaces of intrinsic ZnO. To compensate an accumulating dipole moment normal to ionic planes, the Madelung electrostatic force and the bonding ability of undercoordinated Zn ions compete to deplete more Zn atoms from the (0001) face and more O atoms from the (0001¯) face. In this competition, the former mechanism wins because it provides very low energy binding sites for O ions at face-centered-cubic registries on both surfaces. On the Zn-face, a distorted tetrahedral structure is formed, while on the O-face, a vertical Y structure is formed. In both structures, O ions form the topmost atomic plane. The reconstructed polar surfaces containing these novel structures have cleavage energy of 2.36 J/m2, comparable to that of nonpolar surfaces and in agreement with experimental observation. An earlier structure found on the Zn-face annealed at below 1000 K is stabilized mainly by the Madelung electrostatic force and is a metastable structure of that surface.

  19. STM Studies of TbTe3: Evidence for a Fully Incommensurate Charge Density Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, A.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; Kapitulnik, A.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-02-15

    We observe unidirectional charge density wave ordering on the cleaved surface of TbTe{sub 3} with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope at {approx}6 K. The modulation wave-vector q{sub CDW} as determined by Fourier analysis is 0.71 {+-} 0.02 x2{pi}/c. Where c is one edge of the in-plane 3D unit cell. Images at different tip-sample voltages show the unit cell doubling effects of dimerization and the layer below. Our results agree with bulk X-ray measurements, with the addition of (1/3) x2{pi}/a ordering perpendicular to the CDW. Our analysis indicates that the CDW is incommensurate.

  20. Low-temperature STM studies of electronic properties of microbial nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Kathy; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart

    2013-03-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens expresses pili that act as electrically conductive nanowires. These microbial nanowires transport metabolically generated electrons outside the cell body to electron acceptors in the organism's environment. We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on these pili in an endeavor to elucidate the mechanism of conductivity. In particular, we will discuss spectroscopy curves acquired at a temperature of 77 K. This work supported by the NSF-MCB Grant No. 1021948 and a Strategic Partnership Grant from the Michigan State University Foundation. K.W. acknowledges support from a U.S. Department of Education GAANN fellowship.

  1. Theory of Fano Resonances in Graphene: The Kondo effect probed by STM

    SciTech Connect

    Wehling, T.O.

    2010-06-02

    We consider the theory of Kondo effect and Fano factor energy dependence for magnetic impurity (Co) on graphene. We have performed a first principles calculation and find that the two dimensional E{sub 1} representation made of d{sub xz}, d{sub yz} orbitals is likely to be responsible for the hybridization and ultimately Kondo screening for cobalt on graphene. There are few high symmetry sites where magnetic impurity atom can be adsorbed. For the case of Co atom in the middle of hexagon of carbon lattice we find anomalously large Fano q-factor, q {approx} 80 and strongly suppressed coupling to conduction band. This anomaly is a striking example of quantum mechanical interference related to the Berry phase inherent to graphene band structure.

  2. Adsorption and thermal treatments of 1-dodecene on Si(100) investigated by STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. W.; Fujikawa, Y.; Sadowski, J. T.; Xue, Q.-K.; Sakurai, T.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the atomic behaviour of long-chain 1-dodecene adsorbed on Si(100) using a scanning tunnelling microscope with an exposure of 30 to 2.4 Langmuirs. Unlike previous reports on short-chain molecules, remarkable self-ordered assembly of molecules is not observed at room temperature, which is possibly attributed to the asymmetric molecular structure with long chains of 1-dodecene. After annealing at 500-580 °C, ordered patterns form with a c(4 × 4) structure, accompanied with thermal decomposition of molecules.

  3. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: STM, TEM and electron channeling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The original thrust of this grant was to apply newly developed techniques in scanning tunneling and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the mechanism of brittle fracture. This grant spun-off several new directions in that some of the findings on bulk structural materials could be utilized on thin films or intermetallic single crystals. Modeling and material evaluation efforts in this grant are represented in a figure. Out of this grant evolved the field the author has designated as Contact Fracture Mechanics. By appropriate modeling of stress and strain distribution fields around normal indentations or scratch tracks, various measures of thin film fracture or decohesion and brittle fracture of low ductility intermetallics is possible. These measures of fracture resistance in small volumes are still evolving and as such no standard technique or analysis has been uniformly accepted. For brittle ceramics and ceramic films, there are a number of acceptable analyses such as those published by Lawn, Evans and Hutchinson. For more dissipative systems involving metallic or polymeric films and/or substrates, there is still much to be accomplished as can be surmised from some of the findings in the present grant. In Section 2 the author reviews the funding history and accomplishments associated mostly with bulk brittle fracture. This is followed by Section 3 which covers more recent work on using novel techniques to evaluate fracture in low ductility single crystals or thin films using micromechanical probes. Basically Section 3 outlines how the recent work fits in with the goals of defining contact fracture mechanics and gives an overview of how the several examples in Section 4 (the Appendices) fit into this framework.

  4. STM excitation of individual biphenyl molecules on Si(1 0 0) surface: DIET or DIEF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranney, M.; Mayne, A. J.; Laikhtman, A.; Comtet, G.; Dujardin, G.

    2005-11-01

    We have studied the excitation of individual biphenyl molecules adsorbed on Si(1 0 0)-(2 × 1) surface by using a scanning tunnelling microscope in ultra-high vacuum at room-temperature. Exciting these molecules in their unstable state with a voltage pulse can stabilise them. We have investigated in detail this transformation in order to determine the reaction mechanisms induced by the pulse: is it due to an electronic excitation or is it an effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample during the pulse? It is quite difficult to distinguish between the dynamics induced by electronic transition (DIET) and the dynamics induced by electric field (DIEF): when increasing the number and the energy of electrons for electronic excitation (DIET), the electric field under the tip can be strong enough to induce reaction by lowering the energy barrier (DIEF). By using a program to compute the electric field in three dimensions, we conclude that the transformation of the unstable configuration into the stable one is due to an electronic excitation.

  5. Superconducting-Tip STM on Cobaltates as a Platform for Exploring Topological Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contryman, Alex W.; Niestemski, Francis; Chen, Yulin; Hesjedal, Thorsten; Parra, Carolina; Chung, Suk Bum; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Shen, Z. X.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Manoharan, Hari C.

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, NaxCoO2 has attracted much attention for its unconventional superconductivity and antiferromagnetic phases. More recently it has been proposed that inducing superconductivity into the stoichiometric compound through the proximity effect could lead to topological superconductivity where Majorana physics might be accessed. We first explore this surface state with standard scanning tunneling spectroscopy and tuning fork-based atomic force microscopy, and then investigate the proximity effect scenario by introducing a superconducting tip to probe the superconductor-vacuum-topological junction. Supported by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515. Alex W. Contryman is supported by a Dr. Robert N. Noyce Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  6. Single molecule switches and molecular self-assembly: Low temperature STM investigations and manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancu, Violeta

    This dissertation is devoted to single molecule investigations and manipulations of two porphyrin-based molecules, chlorophyll-a and Co-porphyrin. The molecules are adsorbed on metallic substrates and studied at low temperatures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the molecules are investigated in detail with atomic level precision. Chlorophyll-a is the key ingredient in photosynthesis processes while Co-porphyrin is a magnetic molecule that represents the recent emerging field of molecular spintronics. Using the scanning tunneling microscope tip and the substrate as electrodes, and the molecules as active ingredients, single molecule switches made of these two molecules are demonstrated. The first switch, a multiple and reversible mechanical switch, is realized by using chlorophyll-a where the energy transfer of a single tunneling electron is used to rotate a C-C bond of the molecule's tail on a Au(111) surface. Here, the detailed underlying switching mechanisms are uncovered from the statistical analyses conducted over 1200 switching events together with the support of geometrically relaxed parametric calculations. The second switch, a spintronic switch, uses Co-porphyrin conformational changes to tune the spin-electron interaction between the Co atom and Cu(111) electrons. A change in the molecular conformation, from saddle to planar, leads to enhanced spin-electron coupling strength, and consequently, elevated Kondo temperatures. Self-assembly process is exploited for both the molecules and the analyses reveal important information regarding the layer growth and the electronic differences that appear due to the modified molecule-substrate environment.

  7. Low Temperature STM Study of Adsoption of Nitric Oxide on Silicon(111)-7x7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M. A.; Stipe, B. C.; Ho, W.

    1997-03-01

    We have constructed a variable temperature (30 K to 300 K) scanning tunneling microscope for use in ultra high vacuum. In contrast to studies at room temperature and above, thermally induced dissociation can be minimized at low temperatures. The adsorption of nitric oxide on silicon(111)-7x7 at 32 K revealed several species in different sites on the surface. When the surface is scanned at 2 volt sample bias and 1 nA of tunneling current, all but one species are stable. This metastable species is observed to desorb. At -2 volts sample bias and 1 nA, we can induce changes in the bonding of other species on the surface. The dependence of the observed changes on the polarity of the sample bias suggests the need to consider both the empty and filled states of adsorbed NO-surface complex.

  8. Photoassisted spatially resolved STM measurements of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Volker; Knoll, Wolfgang; Kreiter, Maximilian; Dürr, Michael; Yasuda, Akio; Nelles, Gabriele

    2007-04-01

    Photoassisted scanning tunneling microscopy was used to investigate photoinduced currents in a dye-sensitized nanoporous TiO2 network in a locally resolved experiment. The light-induced tunneling current (LITC) was studied with respect to its dependence on the modulation frequency of the exciting light as well as on the externally applied bias. By this, two main contributions to the LITC were identified and assigned to both a tunneling current of photoelectrons from the TiO2 conduction band to the tip and a tunneling current driven by a photoinduced change of the voltage drop over the tunneling gap. Additionally, the observed frequency dependence of the LITC components is in agreement with the time scales expected for a hopping transport via localized energy states. Lateral variations in the LITC signal are found between aggregates of TiO2 particles, directly reflecting different electronic properties. These results might be important for further optimization of porous materials in applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells.

  9. STM study of the preparation of clean Ta(110) and the subsequent growth of two-dimensional Fe islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eelbo, T.; Zdravkov, V. I.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-11-01

    This report deals with the preparation of a clean Ta(110) surface, investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy as well as by low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The surface initially exhibits a surface reconstruction induced by oxygen contamination. This reconstruction can be removed by annealing at high temperatures under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The reconstruction-free surface reveals a surface resonance at a bias voltage of about -500 mV. The stages of the transformation are presented and discussed. In a next step, Fe islands were grown on top of Ta(110) and investigated subsequently. An intermixing regime was identified for annealing temperatures of (550-590) K.

  10. Generation of constant-amplitude radio-frequency sweeps at a tunnel junction for spin resonance STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, William; Baumann, Susanne; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the measurement and successful compensation of the radio-frequency transfer function of a scanning tunneling microscope over a wide frequency range (15.5-35.5 GHz) and with high dynamic range (>50 dB). The precise compensation of cabling resonances and attenuations is critical for the production of constant-voltage frequency sweeps for electric-field driven electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. We also demonstrate that a well-calibrated tunnel junction voltage is necessary to avoid spurious ESR peaks that can arise due to a non-flat transfer function.

  11. Effects of spin-orbit coupling and many-body correlations in STM transport through copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Benjamin; Donarini, Andrea; Grifoni, Milena

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of exchange correlations and spin-orbit interaction (SOI) on the many-body spectrum of a copper phtalocyanine (CuPc) molecule and their signatures in transport are investigated. We first derive a minimal model Hamiltonian in a basis of frontier orbitals that is able to reproduce experimentally observed singlet-triplet splittings. In a second step SOI effects are included perturbatively. Major consequences of the SOI are the splitting of former degenerate levels and a magnetic anisotropy, which can be captured by an effective low-energy spin Hamiltonian. We show that scanning tunneling microscopy-based magnetoconductance measurements can yield clear signatures of both these SOI-induced effects.

  12. Effects of spin–orbit coupling and many-body correlations in STM transport through copper phthalocyanine

    PubMed Central

    Donarini, Andrea; Grifoni, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Summary The interplay of exchange correlations and spin–orbit interaction (SOI) on the many-body spectrum of a copper phtalocyanine (CuPc) molecule and their signatures in transport are investigated. We first derive a minimal model Hamiltonian in a basis of frontier orbitals that is able to reproduce experimentally observed singlet–triplet splittings. In a second step SOI effects are included perturbatively. Major consequences of the SOI are the splitting of former degenerate levels and a magnetic anisotropy, which can be captured by an effective low-energy spin Hamiltonian. We show that scanning tunneling microscopy-based magnetoconductance measurements can yield clear signatures of both these SOI-induced effects. PMID:26885457

  13. Growth of Pb nanowires on the Si(111)-In (4x1) a combined STM and SPALEED study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupalo, Myron; Yakes, Michael; Tringides, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Due to the combined effect of QSE and the anisotropic strain potential of the substrate, Pb deposited on Si(111)-In (4x1) at 180K grows in nanowires of uniform 4-layer height and controllable uniform width of 5w0 { (}where w0=1.33nm is the width of the reconstruction unit cell along [1&_slash;1&_slash;2] direction). SPA-LEED studies confirm this selected 4-layer height (from Intensity vs Kz variation) which is unusually stable because it is unchanged even after annealing to room temperature. The same selected 4-layer height is observed on a different interface Si(111)-In √ 31x√ 31 which independently confirms the unusual 4-layer stability. Differences in the observed corrugation on the tops of the nanowires due to the Moir'{e} pattern at the metal/semiconductor interface confirm the strain anisotropy on the reconstructed substrate. Further Pb deposition on top of the nanowires results in the completion of the Pb layer with unusually atomically flat film interfaces over mesoscopic distances.

  14. Metal dependent motif transition in a self-assembled monolayer of bipyridine derivatives via coordination: An STM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Yuan, Qunhui; Xu, Hongbo; Zhu, Xuefeng; Gan, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Low-dimensional molecular motifs with diversity developed via the on-surface chemistry are attracting growing interest for their potential in advanced nanofabrication. In this work, scanning tunneling microscopy was employed to investigate the in situ and ex situ metal coordinations between 4,4'-ditetradecyl-2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and Zn(ii) or Cu(ii) ions at a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)/1-phenyloctane interface under ambient conditions. The results demonstrate that the bpy adopts a flat-lying orientation with its substituted alkyl chains in a tail-to-tail arrangement in a bpy monolayer. For the in situ coordination, the bpy/Zn(ii) and bpy/Cu(ii) complexes are aligned in edge-on fashions, wherein the bpy stands vertically on the HOPG surface and interdigitates at the alkyl chains. In the two-dimensional arrays of ex situ coordinated complexes, metal dependent motifs have been observed with Zn(ii) and Cu(ii), wherein the bipyridine moieties are parallel to the graphite surface. These results suggest that the desired on-surface coordination architectures may be achieved by the intentional selection of the metal centers.

  15. STM-induced light emission from thin films of perylene derivatives on the HOPG and Au substrates.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Aya; Miyake, Yusuke; Oshikane, Yasushi; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the emission properties of N,N'-diheptyl-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide thin films by the tunneling-electron-induced light emission technique. A fluorescence peak with vibronic progressions with large Stokes shifts was observed on both highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and Au substrates, indicating that the emission was derived from the isolated-molecule-like film condition with sufficient π-π interaction of the perylene rings of perylenetetracarboxylic diimide molecules. The upconversion emission mechanism of the tunneling-electron-induced emission was discussed in terms of inelastic tunneling including multiexcitation processes. The wavelength-selective enhanced emission due to a localized tip-induced surface plasmon on the Au substrate was also obtained.

  16. Adsorption orientation and STM imaging of meta-benzyne resolved by scanning tunnelling microscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simic-Milosevic, Violeta; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Morgenstern, Karina

    2009-08-01

    Dissociative adsorption of doubly substituted benzene molecules leads to a molecule with two missing hydrogen atoms. We use scanning tunnelling microscopy at 5 K and density functional theory to investigate these benzyne molecules on Cu(1 1 1). Benzyne is either imaged as a depression, as a ring-shaped protrusion, or as a circular protrusion at different tunnelling parameters. Submolecular resolution and ab initio calculations give information on the adsorption properties about the in-situ formed biradical species.

  17. Exploration of complex multilayer film growth morphologies: STM analysis and predictive atomistic modeling for Ag on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Chung, P.W.; Cox, E.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Evans, J.W.

    2008-01-03

    Scanning tunneling microscopy studies are integrated with development of a realistic atomistic model to both characterize and elucidate the complex mounded morphologies formed by deposition of Ag on Ag(111) at 150 and 180 K. Threefold symmetric lateral shapes of islands and mounds are shown to reflect the influence of a nonuniform step edge barrier inhibiting interlayer transport. Modeling of structure at the mound peaks leads to a sensitive estimate of the magnitude of this large barrier.

  18. Design, fabrication, and testing of a sodium evaporator for the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, K. S.; Adkins, D. R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a compact heat-pipe heat exchanger kW(e) designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases. The liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine, where energy is transferred to the engine's helium working fluid. Tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm times 13 cm times 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15 kW(t) of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760 C. Four of these prototype units were eventually used to power a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this report.

  19. STM-mediated atom motion: a Co atom and mixed CoCun chains on a Cu(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Renzhong; Sun, Yusuning; Du, Cuicui; Gao, Tianfu; Wu, Yuxi; Stepanyuk, Valeris

    2013-10-01

    Performing atomic scale simulations, we study the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on atom motion on a metal surface at zero bias voltage. We concentrate on a Co atom and mixed CoCu n ( n ⩽ 68) chains on a Cu(111) surface. It is revealed that the atom motion can be tuned by adjusting the tip-substrate distance. The change in the potential landscape induced by the tip is found to depend on the tip height. In the presence of the tip, the Co atom can freely jump from the fcc site to the hcp site or vice versa when putting the tip above the adatom at a certain height. For the mixed CoCu n chains on the Cu(111) surface, the diffusion barrier of the end Co atom from the fcc site to the nearby hcp site increases with the increasing chain length and reaches the limit when the chain length is beyond CoCu7 without the tip. Especially, the short chains can perform a collective motion with the help of the tip. The importance of the relaxation induced by the tip-adatom interaction is demonstrated.

  20. Effects of spin-orbit coupling and many-body correlations in STM transport through copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Benjamin; Donarini, Andrea; Grifoni, Milena

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of exchange correlations and spin-orbit interaction (SOI) on the many-body spectrum of a copper phtalocyanine (CuPc) molecule and their signatures in transport are investigated. We first derive a minimal model Hamiltonian in a basis of frontier orbitals that is able to reproduce experimentally observed singlet-triplet splittings. In a second step SOI effects are included perturbatively. Major consequences of the SOI are the splitting of former degenerate levels and a magnetic anisotropy, which can be captured by an effective low-energy spin Hamiltonian. We show that scanning tunneling microscopy-based magnetoconductance measurements can yield clear signatures of both these SOI-induced effects. PMID:26885457

  1. Generation of constant-amplitude radio-frequency sweeps at a tunnel junction for spin resonance STM.

    PubMed

    Paul, William; Baumann, Susanne; Lutz, Christopher P; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the measurement and successful compensation of the radio-frequency transfer function of a scanning tunneling microscope over a wide frequency range (15.5-35.5 GHz) and with high dynamic range (>50 dB). The precise compensation of cabling resonances and attenuations is critical for the production of constant-voltage frequency sweeps for electric-field driven electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. We also demonstrate that a well-calibrated tunnel junction voltage is necessary to avoid spurious ESR peaks that can arise due to a non-flat transfer function. PMID:27475577

  2. Design, fabrication, and testing of a sodium evaporator for the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlinson, K.S.; Adkins, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a compact heat-pipe heat exchanger kW(e) designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases. The liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine, where energy is transferred to the engine`s helium working fluid. Tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15 kW(t) of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760 C. Four of these prototype units were eventually used to power a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this report.

  3. Nano-scale characterization of binary self-assembled monolayers under an ambient condition with STM and TERS.

    PubMed

    Horimoto, Noriko N; Tomizawa, Shigeru; Fujita, Yasuhiko; Kajimoto, Shinji; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Gold surfaces were modified by benzyl-mercaptan (BM) and then partly replaced with benzenethiol (BT), which formed binary self-assembled monolayers (SAM). Initially BT randomly replaced BM in the monolayer, but at long exchange times >15 nm radius domains were observed with specific relative composition of BT and BM.

  4. Force field analysis suggests a lowering of diffusion barriers in atomic manipulation due to presence of STM tip.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, Matthias; Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Huber, Ferdinand; Weymouth, Alfred J; Okabayashi, Norio; Giessibl, Franz J

    2015-04-10

    We study the physics of atomic manipulation of CO on a Cu(111) surface by combined scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy at liquid helium temperatures. In atomic manipulation, an adsorbed atom or molecule is arranged on the surface using the interaction of the adsorbate with substrate and tip. While previous experiments are consistent with a linear superposition model of tip and substrate forces, we find that the force threshold depends on the force field of the tip. Here, we use carbon monoxide front atom identification (COFI) to characterize the tip's force field. Tips that show COFI profiles with an attractive center can manipulate CO in any direction while tips with a repulsive center can only manipulate in certain directions. The force thresholds are independent of bias voltage in a range from 1 to 10 mV and independent of temperature in a range of 4.5 to 7.5 K. PMID:25910137

  5. Force Field Analysis Suggests a Lowering of Diffusion Barriers in Atomic Manipulation Due to Presence of STM Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmrich, Matthias; Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Huber, Ferdinand; Weymouth, Alfred J.; Okabayashi, Norio; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2015-04-01

    We study the physics of atomic manipulation of CO on a Cu(111) surface by combined scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy at liquid helium temperatures. In atomic manipulation, an adsorbed atom or molecule is arranged on the surface using the interaction of the adsorbate with substrate and tip. While previous experiments are consistent with a linear superposition model of tip and substrate forces, we find that the force threshold depends on the force field of the tip. Here, we use carbon monoxide front atom identification (COFI) to characterize the tip's force field. Tips that show COFI profiles with an attractive center can manipulate CO in any direction while tips with a repulsive center can only manipulate in certain directions. The force thresholds are independent of bias voltage in a range from 1 to 10 mV and independent of temperature in a range of 4.5 to 7.5 K.

  6. Potential Dependent Adlayer Structures of a Sulfur-Covered Au(111) Electrode in Alkaline Solution: An in Situ STM Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaup, C.; Friebel, D.; Broekmann, P.; Wandelt, K.; /Bonn U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-05-11

    A sulfur-covered Au(1 1 1) electrode ({Theta}{sub S} = 0.33 ML) subjected to potential increases in an S-free NaOH solution, i.e., at a fixed S coverage, leads to the reversible formation of a rhombic phase at anodic potentials. The local S coverage increase which is required for the formation of the rhombic phase results from a coverage decrease within the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} regions, where single-S-atom-defects and, in later stages, S vacancy islands are formed. Due to the high potential induced S-Au bond strength, it was possible for the first time to retain islands of this incomplete ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} S layer in the 2D solid state. Furthermore, a Au mass transport was observed during the growth of the rhombic phase. This clearly calls for a reinterpretation of its chemical nature.

  7. A comparative STM study of Ru nanoparticles deposited on HOPG by mass-selected gas aggregation versus thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, R. M.; Murphy, S.; Strebel, C.; Johansson, M.; Nielsen, J. H.; Chorkendorff, I.

    2009-12-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to compare the morphologies of Ru nanoparticles deposited onto highly-oriented graphite surfaces using two different physical vapour deposition methods; (1) pre-formed mass-selected Ru nanoparticles with diameters between 2 nm and 15 nm were soft-landed onto HOPG surfaces using a gas-aggregation source and (2) nanoparticles were formed by e-beam evaporation of Ru films onto HOPG. The particles generated by the gas-aggregation source are round in shape with evidence of facets resolved on the larger particles. Annealing these nanoparticles when they are supported on unsputtered HOPG resulted in the sintering of smaller nanoparticles, while larger particles remained immobile. Nanoparticles deposited onto sputtered HOPG surfaces were found to be stable against sintering when annealed. The size and shape of nanoparticles deposited by e-beam evaporation depend to a large extent on the state of the graphite support and the temperature. Ru deposition onto unsputtered HOPG is characterised by bimodal growth with large flat particles formed on the substrate terraces and smaller diameter particles aligned along the substrate steps. Evaporation onto sputtered HOPG results in the formation of 2 nm round particles with a narrow size distribution. Finally, thermal deposition onto both sputtered and unsputtered HOPG at 660 °C results in larger particles showing a flat Ru(0 0 0 1) top facet.

  8. Structures of a 17,19-hexatriacontadiyne and sashlike polydiacetylene monolayer on MoS2(0001) studied by UHV-STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, O.; Sera, T.; Suhara, M.; Ozaki, H.; Mazaki, Y.

    2008-03-01

    We have observed a 17,19-hexatriacontadiyne (HTDY) monolayer on MoS2(0001) and sashlike polydiacetylene atomic sash (AS) molecules derived from the monolayer by scanning tunnelling microscopy under ultrahigh vacuum. HTDY molecules adsorbed at 150 K start to move around on the surface above 240 K to form relatively unstable columnar structures. The column is converted into the AS by UV irradiation. In most AS molecules on MoS2(0001), the alkyl chains are in all-trans conformation but their carbon planes are tilted to the polydiacetylene backbone. This conformer, which is one of the most stable structures for an isolated AS molecule, appears on MoS2(0001) because of very weak molecule-substrate interactions.

  9. STM study of electrical transport properties of one dimensional contacts between MnSi(~1.7) nanowires and Si(111) and (110) substrates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zou, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate the formation of contact barriers at the interfaces between MnSi1.7 nanowires (NWs) and Si substrates by the current-voltage (I-V) curves measured by scanning tunneling microscope with the tip contacting the NWs. The NWs on Si(110) exhibit linear reverse bias I-V curves, which suggests a parallel Ohmic surface state conductance of the Si(110) surface. The NWs on Si(111) exhibit nonlinear reverse bias I-V behavior, which indicates a considerable amount of minority carrier recombination-generation current. The NW length-dependence study of the forward bias current clearly shows that the quantitative change in NW length leads to a qualitative change in electrical transport properties. We derive a characteristic length LC ≈ 200 nm and the corresponding aspect ratio of ∼12-18 for MnSi1.7 NWs according to the variation of current density with the NW length.

  10. STM study of electrical transport properties of one dimensional contacts between MnSi˜1.7 nanowires and Si(111) and (110) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zou, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the formation of contact barriers at the interfaces between MnSi1.7 nanowires (NWs) and Si substrates by the current-voltage (I-V) curves measured by scanning tunneling microscope with the tip contacting the NWs. The NWs on Si(110) exhibit linear reverse bias I-V curves, which suggests a parallel Ohmic surface state conductance of the Si(110) surface. The NWs on Si(111) exhibit nonlinear reverse bias I-V behavior, which indicates a considerable amount of minority carrier recombination-generation current. The NW length-dependence study of the forward bias current clearly shows that the quantitative change in NW length leads to a qualitative change in electrical transport properties. We derive a characteristic length LC ≈ 200 nm and the corresponding aspect ratio of ˜12-18 for MnSi1.7 NWs according to the variation of current density with the NW length.

  11. Epitaxial growth of CeO{sub 2}(111) film on Ru(0001): Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Tomo; Shahed, Syed Mohammad Fakruddin; Sainoo, Yasuyuki; Beniya, Atsushi; Isomura, Noritake; Watanabe, Yoshihide; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-28

    We formed an epitaxial film of CeO{sub 2}(111) by sublimating Ce atoms on Ru(0001) surface kept at elevated temperature in an oxygen ambient. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement revealed a decrease of Ce{sup 4+}/Ce{sup 3+} ratio in a small temperature window of the growth temperature between 1070 and 1096 K, which corresponds to the reduction of the CeO{sub 2}(111). Scanning tunneling microscope image showed that a film with a wide terrace and a sharp step edge was obtained when the film was grown at the temperatures close to the reduction temperature, and the terrace width observed on the sample grown at 1060 K was more than twice of that grown at 1040 K. On the surface grown above the reduction temperature, the surface with a wide terrace and a sharp step was confirmed, but small dots were also seen in the terrace part, which are considerably Ce atoms adsorbed at the oxygen vacancies on the reduced surface. This experiment demonstrated that it is required to use the substrate temperature close to the reduction temperature to obtain CeO{sub 2}(111) with wide terrace width and sharp step edges.

  12. SU-F-BRE-16: VMAT Commissioning and Quality Assurance (QA) of An Elekta Synergy-STM Linac Using ICOM Test HarnessTM

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A; Rajaguru, P; He, R; Yang, C; Kaurin, D; Paul, T; Plowman, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a set of tests based on the iCOM software that can be used to commission and perform periodic QA of VMAT delivery on the Elekta Synergy-S, commonly known as the Beam Modulator (BM). Methods: iCOM is used to create and deliver customized treatment fields to characterize the system in terms of 1) MLC positioning accuracy under static and dynamic delivery with full gantry rotation, 2) MLC positioning with known errors, 3) Maximum dose rate, 4) Maximum MLC speed, 5) Maximum gantry speed, 6) Synchronization: gantry speed versus dose rate, and 7) Synchronization: MLC speed versus dose rate. The resulting images were captured on the iView GT and exported in DICOM format to Dosimetry Check™ system for visual and quantitative analysis. For the initial commissioning phase, the system tests described should be supplemented with extensive patient QAs covering all clinically relevant treatment sites. Results: The system performance test suite showed that on our Synergy-S, MLC positioning was accurate under both static and dynamic deliveries. Intentional errors of 1 mm were also easily identified on both static and dynamic picket fence tests. Maximum dose rate was verified with stop watch to be consistently between 475-480 MU/min. Maximum gantry speed and MLC speed were 5.5 degree/s and 2.5 cm/s respectively. After accounting for beam flatness, both synchronization tests, gantry versus dose rate and MLC speed versus dose rate, were successful as the fields were uniform across the strips and there were no obvious cold/hot spots. Conclusion: VMAT commissioning and quality assurance should include machine characterization tests in addition to patient QAs. Elekta iCOM is a valuable tool for the design of customized VMAT field with specific MU, MLC leaf positions, dose rate, and indirect control of MLC and gantry speed at each of its control points.

  13. Efficient Synthesis of Ir-Polyoxometalate Cluster Using a Continuous Flow Apparatus and STM Investigation of Its Coassembly Behavior on HOPG Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong; Chang, Shaoqing; Suryanto, Bryan H R; Gong, Chunhua; Zeng, Xianghua; Zhao, Chuan; Zeng, Qingdao; Xie, Jingli

    2016-06-01

    Taking advantage of a continuous-flow apparatus, the iridium(III)-containing polytungstate cluster K12Na2H2[Ir2Cl8P2W20O72]·37H2O (1) was obtained in a reasonable yield (13% based on IrCl3·H2O). Compound 1 was characterized by Fourier transform IR, UV-visible, (31)P NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and thermogravimetric analysis measurements. (31)P NMR, ESI-MS, and elemental analysis all indicated 1 was a new polytungstate cluster compared with the reported K14[(IrCl4)KP2W20O72] compound. Intriguingly, the successful isolation of 1 relied on the custom-built flow apparatus, demonstrating the uniqueness of continuous-flow chemistry to achieve crystalline materials. The catalytic properties of 1 were assessed by investigating the activity on catalyzing the electro-oxidation of ruthenium tris-2,2'-bipyridine [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+). The voltammetric behavior suggested a coupled catalytic behavior between [Ru(bpy)3](3+/2+) and 1. Furthermore, on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy) benzene (TCDB) was used as the two-dimensional host network to coassemble cluster 1; the surface morphology was observed by scanning tunneling microscope technique. "S"-shape of 1 was observed, indicating that the cluster could be accommodated in the cavity formed by two TCDB host molecules, leading to a TCDB/cluster binary structure.

  14. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  15. Multistage nucleation of two-dimensional Si islands on Si(111)-7x7 during MBE growth: STM experiments and extended rate-equation model

    SciTech Connect

    Filimonov, Sergey; Cherepanov, Vasily; Voigtlaender, Bert; Hervieu, Yuri

    2007-07-15

    The submonolayer density of two-dimensional (2D) islands in Si/Si(111)-7x7 molecular beam epitaxy is measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. At a relatively low deposition temperature of 673 K, the density of 2D islands is a power function of the deposition flux N{sub 2D}{proportional_to}F{sup {chi}} with the exponent {chi}=0.24 being smaller than that predicted by the standard nucleation theory. The nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density is explained by the multistage character of the nucleation process on the Si(111)-7x7 surface which involves consecutive stages of formation of stable Si clusters, formation of pairs of clusters, and transformation of the cluster pairs to 2D islands. Using an extended rate-equation model, we analyze the temperature and growth rate dependencies of the density of single clusters, cluster pairs, and 2D islands and show that an activation barrier of {approx}1.26 eV delays the transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands. The delayed transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands is the reason for the nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density observed at low deposition temperatures.

  16. Epitaxial growth of CeO2(111) film on Ru(0001): Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomo; Shahed, Syed Mohammad Fakruddin; Sainoo, Yasuyuki; Beniya, Atsushi; Isomura, Noritake; Watanabe, Yoshihide; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    We formed an epitaxial film of CeO2(111) by sublimating Ce atoms on Ru(0001) surface kept at elevated temperature in an oxygen ambient. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement revealed a decrease of Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio in a small temperature window of the growth temperature between 1070 and 1096 K, which corresponds to the reduction of the CeO2(111). Scanning tunneling microscope image showed that a film with a wide terrace and a sharp step edge was obtained when the film was grown at the temperatures close to the reduction temperature, and the terrace width observed on the sample grown at 1060 K was more than twice of that grown at 1040 K. On the surface grown above the reduction temperature, the surface with a wide terrace and a sharp step was confirmed, but small dots were also seen in the terrace part, which are considerably Ce atoms adsorbed at the oxygen vacancies on the reduced surface. This experiment demonstrated that it is required to use the substrate temperature close to the reduction temperature to obtain CeO2(111) with wide terrace width and sharp step edges.

  17. An investigation of thin Zr films on 6H-SiC(0001) and GaN(0001) surfaces by XPS, LEED, and STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idczak, K.; Mazur, P.; Zuber, S.; Markowski, L.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the results of the growth of zirconium films deposited under the ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on the 6H-SiC(0001) and GaN(0001) surfaces were studied. Observed changes in the chemical composition, bonding environment, and surface reconstruction, and the effects of high-temperature annealing of the film are presented and discussed as well. In the performed experiment, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy were used. The results show that for both investigated substrates, the grown films have eminently rich and varied compositions. Besides the metallic zirconium, there are also zirconium oxides, zirconium carbides, or zirconium nitrides. The growth process proceeds according to the Volmer-Weber mode. Moreover, the zirconium-semiconductor interface does not form typical Schottky contact, but some paths with a quasi-ohmic conduction character can be observed.

  18. Sharp organic interface of molecular C60 chains and a pentacene derivative SAM on Au(788): A combined STM & DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Tang, Jian-Ming; Larson, Amanda M.; Miller, Glen P.; Pohl, Karsten

    2013-12-01

    Controlling the molecular structure of the donor-acceptor interface is essential to overcoming the efficiency bottleneck in organic photovoltaics. We present a study of self-assembled fullerene (C60) molecular chains on perfectly ordered 6,13-dichloropentacene (DCP) monolayers forming on a vicinal Au(788) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. DCP is a novel pentacene derivative optimized for photovoltaic applications. The molecules form a brick-wall patterned centered rectangular lattice with the long axis parallel to the monatomic steps that separate the 3.9 nm wide Au(111) terraces. The strong interaction between the C60 molecules and the gold substrate is well screened by the DCP monolayer. At submonolayer C60 coverage, the fullerene molecules form long parallel chains, 1.1 nm apart, with a rectangular arrangement instead of the expected close-packed configuration along the upper step edges. The perfectly ordered DCP structure is unaffected by the C60 chain formation. The controlled sharp highly-ordered organic interface has the potential to improve the conversion efficiency in organic photovoltaics.

  19. Quantum phase transition in Fe1 +x(Te,Se) induced by Single-atomic Impurities studied by STM/S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. X.; Wu, Zheng; Huang, Xiong; Ye, Z. Y.; Wu, Rui; Liang, X. J.; Mao, H. Q.; Li, Jian; Ting, C.-S.; Hu, J. P.; Wang, Z. Q.; Hor, P.-H.; Ding, Hong; Pan, S. H.

    Previously we discovered a robust zero-energy bound state at an interstitial Fe impurity (IFIs) in Fe1 +x(Te,Se), which resembles the Majorana mode (Nature Physics 11, 543, (2015)). Here we report our comprehensive study, using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy technique, of the global effect of IFIs on the ground state of Fe1 +x(Te,Se) over a wide range of IFI concentration x. Our high resolution tunneling spectroscopy and quasi-particle interference data at very low temperature demonstrate that IFIs do not affect the electron pairing strength, while they cause significant dephasing effect, which eventually drives the ground state of the system from strong-coupling-superconductivity to diffusive-Bose-metal.

  20. Atom-specific forces and defect identification on surface-oxidized Cu(100) with combined 3D-AFM and STM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Todorović, Milica; Mönig, Harry; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Ünverdi, Özhan; Rodrigo, Lucia; Altman, Eric I.; Pérez, Rubén; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2013-04-01

    The influence of defects on the local structural, electronic, and chemical properties of a surface oxide on Cu(100) were investigated using atomic resolution three-dimensional force mapping combined with tunneling current measurements and ab initio density functional theory. Results reveal that the maximum attractive force between tip and sample occurs above the oxygen atoms; theory indicates that the tip, in this case, terminates in a Cu atom. Meanwhile, simultaneously acquired tunneling current images emphasize the positions of Cu atoms, thereby, providing species-selective contrast in the two complementary data channels. One immediate outcome is that defects due to the displacement of surface copper are exposed in the current maps, even though force maps only reflect a well-ordered oxygen sublattice. The exact nature of the defects is confirmed by the simulations, which also reveal that the arrangement of the oxygen atoms is not disrupted by the copper displacement. In addition, the experimental force maps uncover a position-dependent modulation of the attractive forces between the surface oxygen and the copper-terminated tips, which is found to reflect the surface's inhomogeneous chemical and structural environment. As a consequence, the demonstrated method has the potential to directly probe how defects affect surface chemical interactions.

  1. Efficient Synthesis of Ir-Polyoxometalate Cluster Using a Continuous Flow Apparatus and STM Investigation of Its Coassembly Behavior on HOPG Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong; Chang, Shaoqing; Suryanto, Bryan H R; Gong, Chunhua; Zeng, Xianghua; Zhao, Chuan; Zeng, Qingdao; Xie, Jingli

    2016-06-01

    Taking advantage of a continuous-flow apparatus, the iridium(III)-containing polytungstate cluster K12Na2H2[Ir2Cl8P2W20O72]·37H2O (1) was obtained in a reasonable yield (13% based on IrCl3·H2O). Compound 1 was characterized by Fourier transform IR, UV-visible, (31)P NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and thermogravimetric analysis measurements. (31)P NMR, ESI-MS, and elemental analysis all indicated 1 was a new polytungstate cluster compared with the reported K14[(IrCl4)KP2W20O72] compound. Intriguingly, the successful isolation of 1 relied on the custom-built flow apparatus, demonstrating the uniqueness of continuous-flow chemistry to achieve crystalline materials. The catalytic properties of 1 were assessed by investigating the activity on catalyzing the electro-oxidation of ruthenium tris-2,2'-bipyridine [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+). The voltammetric behavior suggested a coupled catalytic behavior between [Ru(bpy)3](3+/2+) and 1. Furthermore, on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy) benzene (TCDB) was used as the two-dimensional host network to coassemble cluster 1; the surface morphology was observed by scanning tunneling microscope technique. "S"-shape of 1 was observed, indicating that the cluster could be accommodated in the cavity formed by two TCDB host molecules, leading to a TCDB/cluster binary structure. PMID:27163481

  2. Preparation of Chemically Etched Tips for Ambient Instructional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaccardi, Margot J.; Winkelmann, Kurt; Olson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    A first-year laboratory experiment that utilizes concepts of electrochemical tip etching for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is described. This experiment can be used in conjunction with any STM experiment. Students electrochemically etch gold STM tips using a time-efficient method, which can then be used in an instructional grade STM that…

  3. The heterogeneity of verbal short-term memory impairment in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Majerus, Steve; Attout, Lucie; Artielle, Marie-Amélie; Van der Kaa, Marie-Anne

    2015-10-01

    Verbal short-term memory (STM) impairment represents a frequent and long-lasting deficit in aphasia, and it will prevent patients from recovering fully functional language abilities. The aim of this study was to obtain a more precise understanding of the nature of verbal STM impairment in aphasia, by determining whether verbal STM impairment is merely a consequence of underlying language impairment, as suggested by linguistic accounts of verbal STM, or whether verbal STM impairment reflects an additional, specific deficit. We investigated this question by contrasting item-based STM measures, supposed to depend strongly upon language activation, and order-based STM measures, supposed to reflect the operation of specific, serial order maintenance mechanisms, in a sample of patients with single-word processing deficits at the phonological and/or lexical level. A group-level analysis showed robust impairment for both item and serial order STM aspects in the aphasic group relative to an age-matched control group. An analysis of individual profiles revealed an important heterogeneity of verbal STM profiles, with patients presenting either selective item STM deficits, selective order STM deficits, generalized item and serial order STM deficits or no significant STM impairment. Item but not serial order STM impairment correlated with the severity of phonological impairment. These results disconfirm a strong version of the linguistic account of verbal STM impairment in aphasia, by showing variable impairment to both item and serial order processing aspects of verbal STM.

  4. The heterogeneity of verbal short-term memory impairment in aphasia.

    PubMed

    Majerus, Steve; Attout, Lucie; Artielle, Marie-Amélie; Van der Kaa, Marie-Anne

    2015-10-01

    Verbal short-term memory (STM) impairment represents a frequent and long-lasting deficit in aphasia, and it will prevent patients from recovering fully functional language abilities. The aim of this study was to obtain a more precise understanding of the nature of verbal STM impairment in aphasia, by determining whether verbal STM impairment is merely a consequence of underlying language impairment, as suggested by linguistic accounts of verbal STM, or whether verbal STM impairment reflects an additional, specific deficit. We investigated this question by contrasting item-based STM measures, supposed to depend strongly upon language activation, and order-based STM measures, supposed to reflect the operation of specific, serial order maintenance mechanisms, in a sample of patients with single-word processing deficits at the phonological and/or lexical level. A group-level analysis showed robust impairment for both item and serial order STM aspects in the aphasic group relative to an age-matched control group. An analysis of individual profiles revealed an important heterogeneity of verbal STM profiles, with patients presenting either selective item STM deficits, selective order STM deficits, generalized item and serial order STM deficits or no significant STM impairment. Item but not serial order STM impairment correlated with the severity of phonological impairment. These results disconfirm a strong version of the linguistic account of verbal STM impairment in aphasia, by showing variable impairment to both item and serial order processing aspects of verbal STM. PMID:26275964

  5. Explaining Semantic Short-Term Memory Deficits: Evidence for the Critical Role of Semantic Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Paul; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with apparently selective short-term memory (STM) deficits for semantic information have played an important role in developing multi-store theories of STM and challenge the idea that verbal STM is supported by maintaining activation in the language system. We propose that semantic STM deficits are not as selective as previously thought…

  6. Intrinsically disordered and pliable Starmaker-like protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes) controls the formation of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed.

  7. Intrinsically Disordered and Pliable Starmaker-Like Protein from Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Controls the Formation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed. PMID:25490041

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolated from RAW 264.7 Macrophages: identification of a novel protein that contributes to the replication of serovar Typhimurium inside macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Adkins, Joshua N.; Coleman, James R.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Manes, Nathan P.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wang, Haixing H.; Forbes, John; Gros, Philippe; Uzzau, Sergio; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-09-01

    ABSTRACT: To evade host resistance mechanisms, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM), a facultative intracellular pathogen, must alter its proteome following macrophage infection. To identify new colonization and virulence factors that mediate STM pathogenesis, we have isolated STM cells from RAW 264.7 macrophages at various time-points following infection and used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomic approach to detect the changes in STM protein abundances. Because host resistance to STM infection is strongly modulated by the expression of a functional host resistant regulator, i.e., natural resistance associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1, also called Slc11a1), we have also examined the effects of Nramp1 activity on the changes of STM protein abundances. A total of 315 STM proteins have been identified from isolated STM cells, which are largely house-keeping proteins whose abundances remain relatively constant during the time-course of infection. However, 39 STM proteins are strongly induced after infection, suggesting their involvement in modulating colonization and infection. Of the 39 induced proteins, 6 proteins are specifically modulated by Nramp1 activity, including STM3117, as well as STM3118-3119 whose time-dependent abundance changes were confirmed using Western blot analysis. Deletion of the gene encoding STM3117 resulted in a dramatic reduction in the ability of STM to colonize wild-type RAW 264.7 macrophages, demonstrating a critical involvement of STM3117 in promoting the replication of STM inside macrophages. The predicted function common for STM3117-3119 is biosynthesis and modification of the peptidoglycan layer of STM cell wall, emphasizing their important roles in the colonization of macrophages by Salmonella.

  9. Order short-term memory is not impaired in dyslexia and does not affect orthographic learning

    PubMed Central

    Staels, Eva; Van den Broeck, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This article reports two studies that investigate short-term memory (STM) deficits in dyslexic children and explores the relationship between STM and reading acquisition. In the first experiment, 36 dyslexic children and 61 control children performed an item STM task and a serial order STM task. The results of this experiment show that dyslexic children do not suffer from a specific serial order STM deficit. In addition, the results demonstrate that phonological processing skills are as closely related to both item STM and serial order STM. However, non-verbal intelligence was more strongly involved in serial order STM than in item STM. In the second experiment, the same two STM tasks were administered and reading acquisition was assessed by measuring orthographic learning in a group of 188 children. The results of this study show that orthographic learning is exclusively related to item STM and not to order STM. It is concluded that serial order STM is not the right place to look for a causal explanation of reading disability, nor for differences in word reading acquisition. PMID:25294996

  10. Impaired short-term memory for order in adults with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Trecy, Martinez Perez; Steve, Majerus; Martine, Poncelet

    2013-07-01

    Verbal short-term memory (STM) deficits are consistently associated with dyslexia, but the nature of these deficits remains poorly understood. This study used the distinction between item and order retention processes to achieve a better understanding of STM deficits in adults with dyslexia. STM for item information has been shown to depend on the quality of underlying phonological representations, and hence should be impaired in dyslexia, which is characterized by poorly developed phonological representations. On the other hand, STM for order information is considered to reflect core STM processes, which are independent from language processing. Thirty adults with dyslexia and thirty control participants matched for age, education, vocabulary, and IQ were presented STM tasks, which distinguished item and order STM capacities. We observed not only impaired order STM in adults with dyslexia, but this impairment was independent of item STM impairment. This study shows that adults with dyslexia present a deficit in core verbal STM processes, a deficit which cannot be accounted for by the language processing difficulties that characterize dyslexia. Moreover, these results support recent theoretical accounts considering independent order STM and item STM processes, with a potentially causal involvement of order STM processes in reading acquisition.

  11. Order short-term memory is not impaired in dyslexia and does not affect orthographic learning.

    PubMed

    Staels, Eva; Van den Broeck, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This article reports two studies that investigate short-term memory (STM) deficits in dyslexic children and explores the relationship between STM and reading acquisition. In the first experiment, 36 dyslexic children and 61 control children performed an item STM task and a serial order STM task. The results of this experiment show that dyslexic children do not suffer from a specific serial order STM deficit. In addition, the results demonstrate that phonological processing skills are as closely related to both item STM and serial order STM. However, non-verbal intelligence was more strongly involved in serial order STM than in item STM. In the second experiment, the same two STM tasks were administered and reading acquisition was assessed by measuring orthographic learning in a group of 188 children. The results of this study show that orthographic learning is exclusively related to item STM and not to order STM. It is concluded that serial order STM is not the right place to look for a causal explanation of reading disability, nor for differences in word reading acquisition. PMID:25294996

  12. Nanofabrication with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Shedd, G.M.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Precision Engineering Center has recently begun a research program into applications of STM to Nanotechnology. Few tools permit humans to control events and processes at the manometer level, and of those, the STM is the most well-suited to the task. A versatile new ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) STM is being built to study the use of STM for the manipulation of nanometer-scale particles. Part of the STM`s usefulness will be due to its being positioned directly beneath the focused ion beam (FIB). The interface of the STM with the FIB will allow the STM to take advantage of the FIB for long-range imaging and as a particle source; the FIB can in turn use the STM for in situ, high-resolution imaging of micromachined features.

  13. The Importance of Memory Span and Training in Reasoning Ability. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whimbey, Arthur

    Five studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between short term memory (STM) and long term memory (LTM), and the relationship between STM and problem solving. In study I, the necessity of postulating separate learning processes for tasks which are traditionally classified as STM tasks as opposed to LTM tasks was investigated.…

  14. Transcriptional, Posttranscriptional, and Posttranslational Regulation of SHOOT MERISTEMLESS Gene Expression in Arabidopsis Determines Gene Function in the Shoot Apex1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Martínez, José Antonio; Uchida, Naoyuki; Townsley, Brad; West, Donnelly Ann; Yanez, Andrea; Lynn, Nafeesa; Kimura, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    The activity of SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) is required for the functioning of the shoot apical meristem (SAM). STM is expressed in the SAM but is down-regulated at the site of leaf initiation. STM is also required for the formation of compound leaves. However, how the activity of STM is regulated at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels is poorly understood. We previously found two conserved noncoding sequences in the promoters of STM-like genes across angiosperms, the K-box and the RB-box. Here, we characterize the function of the RB-box in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The RB-box, along with the K-box, regulates the expression of STM in leaf sinuses, which are areas on the leaf blade with meristematic potential. The RB-box also contributes to restrict STM expression to the SAM. We identified FAR1-RELATED SEQUENCES-RELATED FACTOR1 (FRF1) as a binding factor to the RB-box region. FRF1 is an uncharacterized member of a subfamily of four truncated proteins related to the FAR1-RELATED SEQUENCES factors. Internal deletion analysis of the STM promoter identified a region required to repress the expression of STM in hypocotyls. Expression of STM in leaf primordia under the control of the JAGGED promoter produced plants with partially undifferentiated leaves. We further found that the ELK domain has a role in the posttranslational regulation of STM by affecting the nuclear localization of STM. PMID:25524441

  15. Evidence for a Specific Impairment of Serial Order Short-Term Memory in Dyslexic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Trecy Martinez; Majerus, Steve; Mahot, Aline; Poncelet, Martine

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the nature of verbal short-term memory (STM) deficits in dyslexic children, the present study used the distinction between item and serial order retention capacities in STM tasks. According to recent STM models, storage of verbal item information depends very directly upon the richness of underlying phonological and…

  16. Functional Alterations in Order Short-Term Memory Networks in Adults With Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Martinez Perez, Trecy; Poncelet, Martine; Salmon, Eric; Majerus, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Dyslexia is characterized not only by reading impairment but also by short-term memory (STM) deficits, and this particularly for the retention of serial order information. Here, we explored the functional neural correlates associated with serial order STM performance of adults with dyslexia for verbal and visual STM tasks. Relative to a group of age-matched controls, the dyslexic group showed abnormal activation in a network associated with order STM encompassing the right intraparietal and superior frontal sulcus, and this for both verbal and visual order STM conditions. This study highlights long-lasting alterations in non-language neural substrates and processes in dyslexia. PMID:27043828

  17. Explaining semantic short-term memory deficits: Evidence for the critical role of semantic control

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Paul; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with apparently selective short-term memory (STM) deficits for semantic information have played an important role in developing multi-store theories of STM and challenge the idea that verbal STM is supported by maintaining activation in the language system. We propose that semantic STM deficits are not as selective as previously thought and can occur as a result of mild disruption to semantic control processes, i.e., mechanisms that bias semantic processing towards task-relevant aspects of knowledge and away from irrelevant information. We tested three semantic STM patients with tasks that tapped four aspects of semantic control: (i) resolving ambiguity between word meanings, (ii) sensitivity to cues, (iii) ignoring irrelevant information and (iv) detecting weak semantic associations. All were impaired in conditions requiring more semantic control, irrespective of the STM demands of the task, suggesting a mild, but task-general, deficit in regulating semantic knowledge. This mild deficit has a disproportionate effect on STM tasks because they have high intrinsic control demands: in STM tasks, control is required to keep information active when it is no longer available in the environment and to manage competition between items held in memory simultaneously. By re-interpreting the core deficit in semantic STM patients in this way, we are able to explain their apparently selective impairment without the need for a specialised STM store. Instead, we argue that semantic STM patients occupy the mildest end of spectrum of semantic control disorders. PMID:21195105

  18. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  19. Sequential Acquisition of T Cells and Antibodies to Nontyphoidal Salmonella in Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Nyirenda, Tonney S.; Gilchrist, James J.; Feasey, Nicholas A.; Glennie, Sarah J.; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Gordon, Melita A.; MacLennan, Calman A.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Salmonella Typhimurium (STm) remain a prominent cause of bacteremia in sub-Saharan Africa. Complement-fixing antibodies to STm develop by 2 years of age. We hypothesized that STm-specific CD4+ T cells develop alongside this process. Methods. Eighty healthy Malawian children aged 0–60 months were recruited. STm-specific CD4+ T cells producing interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 2 were quantified using intracellular cytokine staining. Antibodies to STm were measured by serum bactericidal activity (SBA) assay, and anti-STm immunoglobulin G antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Between 2006 and 2011, STm bacteremias were detected in 449 children <5 years old. STm-specific CD4+ T cells were acquired in infancy, peaked at 14 months, and then declined. STm-specific SBA was detectable in newborns, declined in the first 8 months, and then increased to a peak at age 35 months. Acquisition of SBA correlated with acquisition of anti–STm–lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immunoglobulin G (r = 0.329 [95% confidence interval, .552–.062]; P = .01) but not anti–STm–outer membrane protein or anti–STm-flagellar protein (FliC). Conclusions. Acquisition of STm-specific CD4+ T cells in early childhood is consistent with early exposure to STm or cross-reactive protein antigens priming this T-cell development. STm-specific CD4+ T cells seem insufficient to protect against invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease, but sequential acquisition of SBA to STm LPS is associated with a decline in its incidence. PMID:24443544

  20. Serial position encoding of signs.

    PubMed

    Miozzo, Michele; Petrova, Anna; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Peressotti, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Reduced short-term memory (STM) capacity has been reported for sign as compared to speech when items have to be recalled in a specific order. This difference has been attributed to a more precise and efficient serial position encoding in verbal STM (used for speech) than visuo-spatial STM (used for sign). We tested in the present investigation whether the reduced STM capacity with signs stems from a lack of positional encoding available in verbal STM. Error analyses reported in prior studies have revealed that positions are defined in verbal STM by distance from both the start and the end of the sequence (both-edges positional encoding scheme). Our analyses of the errors made by deaf participants with finger-spelled letters revealed that the both-edges positional encoding scheme underlies the STM representation of signs. These results indicate that the cause of the STM disadvantage is not the type of positional encoding but rather the difficulties in binding an item in visuo-spatial STM to its specific position in the sequence. Both-edges positional encoding scheme could be specific of sign, since it has not been found in visuo-spatial STM tasks conducted with hearing participants. PMID:27244095

  1. Development of Novel System Combining Scanning Tunneling Microscope-Based Cathodoluminescence and Electroluminescence Nanospectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Katayama, Ryuji; Onabe, Kentaro; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2011-08-01

    Novel system equipped with conductive optical fiber probe scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and bipolar sample holder is a powerful tool to characterize light-emitting devices by several STM-based techniques at the same sample position, which can realize photoluminescence (PL), cathodoluminescence (CL), electroluminescence (EL), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements with higher spatial resolutions than conventional techniques. In this study, we developed a STM-CL/EL system which combines STM-CL technique for high CL excitation power and high spatial resolution and STM-EL technique for local EL collection. We demonstrated spatially resolved STM-CL/EL spectroscopy of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure (110) cross-sections.

  2. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Li, An-Ping; Jianxing, Ma; Shen, Jian

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  3. A combined apparatus of scanning reflection electron microscope and scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, S.; Nakahara, H.; Fujita, S.; Watanabe, H.; Kusumi, Y.; Ichikawa, M.

    1997-01-01

    A scanning reflection electron microscope (SREM) combined with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been developed for the purpose of nanoscale structure fabrication under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A STM unit consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner and an inch runner for coarse and fine approach of a STM tip. A sample holder and the STM unit have six drive axes relative to an electron gun for simultaneous observation by SREM and STM. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy equipment is also installed for surface sensitive elemental analysis. It has been demonstrated that on a Si(111)7×7 surface atomic steps and 7×7 unit, cells can be observed in the SREM and STM images, respectively, and that surface elements with less than 1 ML thickness are detectable.

  4. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  5. Luminescence induite par un microscope à effet tunnel comme sonde nanophotonique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silly, Fabien; Charra, Fabrice

    The luminescence of nanostructured systems can be excited highly locally by the tip of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). We first present briefly the principles of this STM-induced luminescence. Then we present a review of selected results in STM-induced luminescence from the point of view of nano-scale photonics. We illustrate various contrast mechanisms with different examples of nanostructured systems. To cite this article: F. Silly, F. Charra, C. R. Physique 3 (2002) 493-500.

  6. Atom world based on nano-forces: 25 years of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morita, Seizo

    2011-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has opened up the new nanoworlds of scanning probe microscopy. STM is the first-generation atomic tool that can image, evaluate and manipulate individual atoms and consequently can create nanostructures by true bottom-up methods based on atom-by-atom manipulation. Atomic force microscopy is a second-generation atomic tool that has followed the footsteps of STM, and which is now opening doors to a new atom world based on using nanoscale forces.

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy of chromium-filled carbon nanotubes: Tip effects and related topographic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, F.-X.; Czerw, R.; Carroll, D. L.; Kohler-Redlich, Ph.; Wei, B.-Q.; Loiseau, A.; Roth, S.

    2000-02-01

    We have used ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study chromium (Cr)-filled carbon nanotubes. STM micrographs show filled tubes to be less than 1 nm in height, while transmission electron microscopy indicates that Cr-filled naotubes are multiwalled with diameters generally over 10 nm. In this paper, we demonstrate that the small apparent heights are due to the STM tip status, which also accounts for the topographic anomalies observed.

  8. The Nature of Verbal Short-Term Impairment in Dyslexia: The Importance of Serial Order

    PubMed Central

    Majerus, Steve; Cowan, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Verbal short-term memory (STM) impairment is one of the most consistent associated deficits observed in developmental reading disorders such as dyslexia. Few studies have addressed the nature of this STM impairment, especially as regards the ability to temporarily store serial order information. This question is important as studies in typically developing children have shown that serial order STM abilities are predictors of oral and written language development. Associated serial order STM deficits in dyslexia may therefore further increase the learning difficulties in these populations. In this mini review, we show that specific serial order STM impairment is frequently reported in both dyslexic children and adults with a history of dyslexia. Serial order STM impairment appears to occur for the retention of both verbal and visuo-spatial sequence information. Serial order STM impairment is, however, not a characteristic of every individual dyslexic subject and is not specific to dyslexia. Future studies need to determine whether serial order STM impairment is a risk factor which, in association with phonological processing deficits, can lead to dyslexia or whether serial order STM impairment reflects associated deficits causally unrelated to dyslexia. PMID:27752247

  9. Two proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) paralogs from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus): Molecular characterization and inducible expression with immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Sun, Hongyan; Qian, Jing; Hu, Chaoqun; Wang, Yanhong

    2016-09-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a multifunctional protein that widely exists in eukaryotic species. In this study, two PCSK9 paralogs, named StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2, were identified from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The cDNAs of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 are 1330 kb and 1508 kb in size, respectively. The open reading frames (ORF) for StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 cDNAs are 1128 and 1167 bp in length, encoding the proteins of 375 and 388 amino acids with the deduced molecular weights of 38.76 and 41.07 kDa, respectively. In accord with other members in PCSK9 family, the two StmPCSK9 paralogs possessed the inhibitor_I9 and peptidase_S8 functional domains, seven active sites, a catalytic triad and two calcium binding sites. For the gene structure, the splicing of the two StmPCSK9 paralogs was relatively conserved. In addition, the mRNA expression of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 was only detected in the sea cucumber intestine and coelomocytes, and the expression levels of both the two StmPCSK9 paralogs were higher in intestine. Moreover, StmPCSK9-2 was found to be a cytoplasm protein without signal peptide, and show no response to the immune challenge. On the contrary, StmPCSK9-1 was a secreted protein and the transcriptional expression of StmPCSK9-1 was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) treatment and slightly down-regulated by polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [Poly (I:C)] challenge in in vitro experiments performed in the cultural primary coelomocytes, suggesting that the StmPCSK9-1 may play critical roles in the innate immune defense of sea cucumber, S. monotuberculatus, against bacterial and/or viral infections. PMID:27426522

  10. Two proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) paralogs from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus): Molecular characterization and inducible expression with immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Sun, Hongyan; Qian, Jing; Hu, Chaoqun; Wang, Yanhong

    2016-09-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a multifunctional protein that widely exists in eukaryotic species. In this study, two PCSK9 paralogs, named StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2, were identified from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The cDNAs of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 are 1330 kb and 1508 kb in size, respectively. The open reading frames (ORF) for StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 cDNAs are 1128 and 1167 bp in length, encoding the proteins of 375 and 388 amino acids with the deduced molecular weights of 38.76 and 41.07 kDa, respectively. In accord with other members in PCSK9 family, the two StmPCSK9 paralogs possessed the inhibitor_I9 and peptidase_S8 functional domains, seven active sites, a catalytic triad and two calcium binding sites. For the gene structure, the splicing of the two StmPCSK9 paralogs was relatively conserved. In addition, the mRNA expression of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 was only detected in the sea cucumber intestine and coelomocytes, and the expression levels of both the two StmPCSK9 paralogs were higher in intestine. Moreover, StmPCSK9-2 was found to be a cytoplasm protein without signal peptide, and show no response to the immune challenge. On the contrary, StmPCSK9-1 was a secreted protein and the transcriptional expression of StmPCSK9-1 was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) treatment and slightly down-regulated by polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [Poly (I:C)] challenge in in vitro experiments performed in the cultural primary coelomocytes, suggesting that the StmPCSK9-1 may play critical roles in the innate immune defense of sea cucumber, S. monotuberculatus, against bacterial and/or viral infections.

  11. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

    PubMed

    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α. PMID:26375447

  12. Task-evoked pupillometry provides a window into the development of short-term memory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Miller Singley, Alison T.; Peckham, Andrew D.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to keep multiple items in short-term memory (STM) improves over childhood and provides the foundation for the development of multiple cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to measure the extent to which age differences in STM capacity are related to differences in task engagement during encoding. Children (n = 69, mean age = 10.6 years) and adults (n = 54, mean age = 27.5 years) performed two STM tasks: the forward digit span test from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and a novel eyetracking digit span task designed to overload STM capacity. Building on prior research showing that task-evoked pupil dilation can be used as a real-time index of task engagement, we measured changes in pupil dilation while participants encoded long sequences of digits for subsequent recall. As expected, adults outperformed children on both STM tasks. We found similar patterns of pupil dilation while children and adults listened to the first six digits on our STM overload task, after which the adults' pupils continued to dilate and the children's began to constrict, suggesting that the children had reached their cognitive limits and that they had begun to disengage from the task. Indeed, the point at which pupil dilation peaked at encoding was a significant predictor of WISC forward span, and this relationship held even after partialing out recall performance on the STM overload task. These findings indicate that sustained task engagement at encoding is an important component of the development of STM. PMID:24659980

  13. Verbal Short-Term Memory Reflects the Organization of Long-Term Memory: Further Evidence from Short-Term Memory for Emotional Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majerus, Steve; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Many studies suggest that long-term lexical-semantic knowledge is an important determinant of verbal short-term memory (STM) performance. This study explored the impact of emotional valence on word immediate serial recall as a further lexico-semantic long-term memory (LTM) effect on STM. This effect is particularly interesting for the study of…

  14. A Closer Look at Phonology as a Predictor of Spoken Sentence Processing and Word Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Suzanne; Robertson, Erin K.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to tease apart the roles of phonological awareness (pA) and phonological short-term memory (pSTM) in sentence comprehension, sentence production, and word reading. Children 6- to 10-years of age (N = 377) completed standardized tests of pA ("Elision") and pSTM ("Nonword Repetition") from the…

  15. Two-Step Regulation of a Meristematic Cell Population Acting in Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Caihuan; Wang, Jin; Xu, Tengfei; Xu, Yan; Ohno, Carolyn; Sablowski, Robert; Heisler, Marcus G.; Theres, Klaus; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Shoot branching requires the establishment of new meristems harboring stem cells; this phenomenon raises questions about the precise regulation of meristematic fate. In seed plants, these new meristems initiate in leaf axils to enable lateral shoot branching. Using live-cell imaging of leaf axil cells, we show that the initiation of axillary meristems requires a meristematic cell population continuously expressing the meristem marker SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). The maintenance of STM expression depends on the leaf axil auxin minimum. Ectopic expression of STM is insufficient to activate axillary buds formation from plants that have lost leaf axil STM expressing cells. This suggests that some cells undergo irreversible commitment to a developmental fate. In more mature leaves, REVOLUTA (REV) directly up-regulates STM expression in leaf axil meristematic cells, but not in differentiated cells, to establish axillary meristems. Cell type-specific binding of REV to the STM region correlates with epigenetic modifications. Our data favor a threshold model for axillary meristem initiation, in which low levels of STM maintain meristematic competence and high levels of STM lead to meristem initiation. PMID:27398935

  16. Transfer of Information from Short- to Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modigliani, Vito; Seamon, John G.

    1974-01-01

    The present study examined current hypotheses concerning information transfer from short-term memory (STM) to long-term memory (LTM) using a Peterson STM task with word triplets presented over retention intervals of 0, 3, 6, 9, and 18 sec. (Editor)

  17. Turning Simple Span into Complex Span: Time for Decay or Interference from Distractors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowsky, Stephan; Geiger, Sonja M.; Morrell, Daniel B.; Oberauer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the duration and type of to-be-articulated distractors during encoding of a verbal list into short-term memory (STM). Distractors and to-be-remembered items alternated during list presentation, as in the complex-span task that underlies much of working-memory research. According to an interference model of STM, known…

  18. Short-term memory treatment: patterns of learning and generalisation to sentence comprehension in a person with aphasia.

    PubMed

    Salis, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Auditory-verbal short-term memory deficits (STM) are prevalent in aphasia and can contribute to sentence comprehension deficits. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel STM treatment in improving STM (measured with span tasks) and sentence comprehension (measured with the Token Test and the Test for the Reception of Grammar, TROG) in a person with severe aphasia (transcortical motor). In particular, the research questions were: (1) Would STM training improve STM? (2) Would improvements from the STM training generalise to improvements in comprehension of sentences? STM was trained using listening span tasks of serial word recognition. No other language or sentence comprehension skills were trained. Following treatment, STM abilities improved (listening span, forward digit span). There was also evidence of generalisation to untreated sentence comprehension (only on the TROG). Backward digit span, phonological processing and single word comprehension did not improve. Improvements in sentence comprehension may have resulted from resilience to rapid decay of linguistic representations within sentences (words and phrases). This in turn facilitated comprehension.

  19. In Situ Observation and Selective Electrochemical Deposition of Polypyrrole by Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Kazunori; Kaneto, Keiichi

    1993-06-01

    Electrodeposition of polypyrrole and its selective deposition on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate was observed in situ by means of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in an electrochemical cell. The results indicated that the STM can be used to manipulate the electrodeposition of conducting polymers.

  20. Relations between Short-term Memory Deficits, Semantic Processing, and Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Corinne M.; Martin, Randi C.; Martin, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested separable short-term memory (STM) buffers for the maintenance of phonological and lexical-semantic information, as some patients with aphasia show better ability to retain semantic than phonological information and others show the reverse. Recently, researchers have proposed that deficits to the maintenance of semantic information in STM are related to executive control abilities. Aims The present study investigated the relationship of executive function abilities with semantic and phonological short-term memory (STM) and semantic processing in such patients, as some previous research has suggested that semantic STM deficits and semantic processing abilities are critically related to specific or general executive function deficits. Method and Procedures 20 patients with aphasia and STM deficits were tested on measures of short-term retention, semantic processing, and both complex and simple executive function tasks. Outcome and Results In correlational analyses, we found no relation between semantic STM and performance on simple or complex executive function tasks. In contrast, phonological STM was related to executive function performance in tasks that had a verbal component, suggesting that performance in some executive function tasks depends on maintaining or rehearsing phonological codes. Although semantic STM was not related to executive function ability, performance on semantic processing tasks was related to executive function, perhaps due to similar executive task requirements in both semantic processing and executive function tasks. Conclusions Implications for treatment and interpretations of executive deficits are discussed. PMID:22736889

  1. A Single Brief Burst Induces GluR1-Dependent Associative Short-Term Potentiation: A Potential Mechanism for Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Martha A.; Maramara, Lauren A.; Lisman, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent work showed that short-term memory (STM) is selectively reduced in GluR1 knockout mice. This raises the possibility that a form of synaptic modification dependent on GluR1 might underlie STM. Studies of synaptic plasticity have shown that stimuli too weak to induce long-term potentiation induce short-term potentiation (STP), a phenomenon…

  2. Short-Term Memory Effects in Four Learning Modes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furukawa, James M.; And Others

    The effect of three levels of short-term memory (STM) and four learning modes (control, chunking organizational strategy, programmed instruction, and adjunct questions) on prose learning and recall was studied. The participants in this study were educational psychology students at Towson State College in Maryland. Significant STM and learning mode…

  3. A Comparison of Short-Term Memory Tests as Predictors of Reading Achievement for Learning-Disabled and Educable Mentally Retarded Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Kirk R.; Rattan, Gurmal

    1991-01-01

    Examined nine measures of short-term memory (STM) used by school psychologists with group of learning-disabled (n=48) and educable mentally retarded (n=34) special education students. Results indicated that not all STM tasks were significant predictors of reading. Sentence memory task was best predictor for learning-disabled students; letter…

  4. Ultra-Compact Multitip Scanning Probe Microscope with an Outer Diameter of 50 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, Vasily; Zubkov, Evgeny; Junker, Hubertus; Korte, Stefan; Blab, Marcus; Coenen, Peter; Voigtländer, Bert

    We present a multitip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) where four independent STM units are integrated on a diameter of 50 mm. The coarse positioning of the tips is done under the control of an optical microscope or an SEM in vacuum. The heart of this STM is a new type of piezoelectric coarse approach called Koala Drive which can have a diameter greater than 2.5 mm and a length smaller than 10 mm. Alternating movements of springs move a central tube which holds the STM tip or AFM sensor. This new operating principle provides a smooth travel sequence and avoids shaking which is intrinsically present for nanopositioners based on inertial motion with saw tooth driving signals. Inserting the Koala Drive in a piezo tube for xyz-scanning integrates a complete STM inside a 4 mm outer diameter piezo tube of <10 mm length. The use of the Koala Drive makes the scanning probe microscopy design ultra-compact and accordingly leads to a high mechanical stability. The drive is UHV, low temperature, and magnetic field compatible. The compactness of the Koala Drive allows building a four-tip STM as small as a single-tip STM with a drift of <0.2 nm/min and lowest resonance frequencies of 2.5 (xy) and 5.5 kHz (z). We present examples of the performance of the multitip STM designed using the Koala Drive.

  5. Phonological and Sensory Short-Term Memory Are Correlates and Both Affected in Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laasonen, Marja; Virsu, Veijo; Oinonen, Suvi; Sandbacka, Mirja; Salakari, Anita; Service, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether poor short-term memory (STM) in developmental dyslexia affects the processing of sensory stimulus sequences in addition to phonological material. STM for brief binary non-verbal stimuli (light flashes, tone bursts, finger touches, and their crossmodal combinations) was studied in 20 Finnish adults with dyslexia and 24…

  6. Short Term Memory, Working Memory, and Syntactic Comprehension in Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, David; Michaud, Jennifer; Hufford, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Sixty one people with aphasia were tested on ten tests of short term memory (STM) and for the ability to use syntactic structure to determine the meanings of eleven types of sentences in three tasks – object manipulation, picture matching and picture matching with self-paced listening. Multilevel models showed relationships between measures of the ability to retain and manipulate item and order information in STM and accuracy and RT, and a greater relationship between these STM measures and accuracy and RT for several more complex sentence types in individual tasks. There were no effects of measures of STM that reflect the use of phonological codes or rehearsal on comprehension. There was only one effect of STM measures on self-paced listening times. There were double dissociations between performance on STM and individual comprehension tasks, indicating that normal STM is not necessary to perform normally on these tasks. The results are most easily related to the view that STM plays a facilitatory role in supporting the use of the products of the comprehension process to accomplish operations related to tasks. PMID:23865692

  7. Working Memory Capacity and Its Relation to Stroop Interference and Facilitation Effects in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Jee Eun; Kim, Jin Hee; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kang, Heejin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of the study were to investigate (a) the task-specific differences in short-term memory (STM) and working memory capacity (WMC) in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal elderly adults (NEAs), (b) the Stroop interference and facilitation effects, and (c) the relationship of STM and WMC to the Stroop…

  8. "We Actually Saw Atoms with Our Own Eyes": Conceptions and Convictions in Using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope in Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margel, Hannah; Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Scherz, Zahava

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility and the potential contribution of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in junior high school (JHS) as an instructional tool for learning the particulate nature of matter is described. The use and power of new technologies can probably be demonstrated by the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM).

  9. Auditory Short-Term Memory Capacity Correlates with Gray Matter Density in the Left Posterior STS in Cognitively Normal and Dyslexic Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Ramsden, Sue; Ellis, Caroline; Burnett, Stephanie; Megnin, Odette; Catmur, Caroline; Schofield, Tom M.; Leff, Alex P.; Price, Cathy J.

    2011-01-01

    A central feature of auditory STM is its item-limited processing capacity. We investigated whether auditory STM capacity correlated with regional gray and white matter in the structural MRI images from 74 healthy adults, 40 of whom had a prior diagnosis of developmental dyslexia whereas 34 had no history of any cognitive impairment. Using…

  10. Task-evoked pupillometry provides a window into the development of short-term memory capacity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth L; Miller Singley, Alison T; Peckham, Andrew D; Johnson, Sheri L; Bunge, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to keep multiple items in short-term memory (STM) improves over childhood and provides the foundation for the development of multiple cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to measure the extent to which age differences in STM capacity are related to differences in task engagement during encoding. Children (n = 69, mean age = 10.6 years) and adults (n = 54, mean age = 27.5 years) performed two STM tasks: the forward digit span test from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and a novel eyetracking digit span task designed to overload STM capacity. Building on prior research showing that task-evoked pupil dilation can be used as a real-time index of task engagement, we measured changes in pupil dilation while participants encoded long sequences of digits for subsequent recall. As expected, adults outperformed children on both STM tasks. We found similar patterns of pupil dilation while children and adults listened to the first six digits on our STM overload task, after which the adults' pupils continued to dilate and the children's began to constrict, suggesting that the children had reached their cognitive limits and that they had begun to disengage from the task. Indeed, the point at which pupil dilation peaked at encoding was a significant predictor of WISC forward span, and this relationship held even after partialing out recall performance on the STM overload task. These findings indicate that sustained task engagement at encoding is an important component of the development of STM.

  11. Short-Term and Working Memory Skills in Primary School-Aged Children with Specific Language Impairment and Children with Pragmatic Language Impairment: Phonological, Linguistic and Visuo-Spatial Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Jenny; Lockton, Elaine; Adams, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children with specific language impairment (CwSLI) are consistently reported to have short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) difficulties. Aim: To compare STM and WM abilities in CwSLI with children with pragmatic language impairment (CwPLI). Methods & Procedures: Primary school-aged CwSLI (n = 12) and CwPLI (n = 23) were…

  12. Nonverbal Visual Short-Term Memory as a Function of Age and Dimensionality in Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Lee

    Evaluated with two age groups (mean age 8.1 years or 10.6 years) totaling 22 learning disabled children was whether there is an age related increase in recognition for visual nonverbal short term memory (STM) and the effects on STM of stimulus dimensionality, primacy, recency, and second choice responses. A serial recognition task was used to…

  13. Visuospatial Support for Verbal Short-Term Memory in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Cintia Perez; Covre, Priscila; Braga, Ana Claudia; de Macedo, Elizeu Coutinho

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) tend to have impaired verbal short-term memory (STM), which persists even when visual support is provided for carrying out verbal tasks. Objective: The current study aims to investigate whether visuospatial support, rather than just visual, can compensate for verbal STM deficits in these individuals. The…

  14. Molecular pharmacological dissection of short- and long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Luciana A; Barros, Daniela M; Vianna, Monica R M; Coitinho, Adriana; deDavid e Silva, Tiago; Choi, Humberto; Moletta, Beatriz; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2002-06-01

    1. It has been discussed for over 100 years whether short-term memory (STM) is separate from, or just an early phase of, long-term memory (LTM). The only way to solve this dilemma is to find out at least one treatment that blocks STM while keeping LTM intact for the same task in the same animal. 2. The effect of a large number of treatments infused into the hippocampus, amygdala, and entorhinal, posterior parietal or prefrontal cortex on STM and LTM of a one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance task was studied. The animals were tested at 1.5 h for STM, and again at 24 h for LTM. The treatments were given after training. 3. Eleven different treatments blocked STM without affecting LTM. Eighteen treatments affected the two memory types differentially, either blocking or enhancing LTM alone. Thus, STM is separate from, and parallel to the first hours of processing of, LTM of that task. 4. The mechanisms of STM are different from those of LTM. The former do not include gene expression or protein synthesis; the latter include a double peak of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, accompanied by the phosphorylation of CREB, and both gene expression and protein synthesis. 5. Possible cellular and molecular events that do not require mRNA or protein synthesis should account for STM. These might include a hyperactivation of glutamate AMPA receptors, ribosome changes, or the exocytosis of glycoproteins that participate in cell addition.

  15. Improving resolution of public health surveillance for human Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection: 3 years of prospective multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prospective typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) can assist in identifying clusters of STM cases that might otherwise have gone unrecognised, as well as sources of sporadic and outbreak cases. This paper describes the dynamics of human STM infection in a prospective study of STM MLVA typing for public health surveillance. Methods During a three-year period between August 2007 and September 2010 all confirmed STM isolates were fingerprinted using MLVA as part of the New South Wales (NSW) state public health surveillance program. Results A total of 4,920 STM isolates were typed and a subset of 4,377 human isolates was included in the analysis. The STM spectrum was dominated by a small number of phage types, including DT170 (44.6% of all isolates), DT135 (13.9%), DT9 (10.8%), DT44 (4.5%) and DT126 (4.5%). There was a difference in the discriminatory power of MLVA types within endemic phage types: Simpson's index of diversity ranged from 0.109 and 0.113 for DTs 9 and 135 to 0.172 and 0.269 for DTs 170 and 44, respectively. 66 distinct STM clusters were observed ranging in size from 5 to 180 cases and in duration from 4 weeks to 25 weeks. 43 clusters had novel MLVA types and 23 represented recurrences of previously recorded MLVA types. The diversity of the STM population remained relatively constant over time. The gradual increase in the number of STM cases during the study was not related to significant changes in the number of clusters or their size. 667 different MLVA types or patterns were observed. Conclusions Prospective MLVA typing of STM allows the detection of community outbreaks and demonstrates the sustained level of STM diversity that accompanies the increasing incidence of human STM infections. The monitoring of novel and persistent MLVA types offers a new benchmark for STM surveillance. A part of this study was presented at the MEEGID × (Molecular Epidemiology

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kun; Lv, Yan-Feng; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Ma, Xucun; Chen, Xi; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2014-10-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), with surface sensitivity, is an ideal tool to probe the intriguing properties of the surface state of topological insulators (TIs) and topological crystalline insulators (TCIs). We summarize the recent progress on those topological phases revealed by STM studies. STM observations have directly confirmed the existence of the topological surface states and clearly revealed their novel properties. We also discuss STM work on magnetic doped TIs, topological superconductors and crystalline symmetry-protected surface states in TCIs. The studies have greatly promoted our understanding of the exotic properties of the new topological phases, as well as put forward new challenges. STM will continue to play an important role in this rapidly growing field from the point view of both fundamental physics and applications.

  17. Submolecular imaging of chloronitrobenzene isomers on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Eeva; Simic-Milosevic, Violeta; Morgenstern, Karina; Korventausta, Antti; Paavilainen, Sami; Nieminen, Jouko

    2006-11-01

    We compare computer simulations to experimental scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of chloronitrobenzene molecules on a Cu(111) surface. The experiments show that adsorption induced isomerization of the molecules takes place on the surface. Furthermore, not only the submolecular features can be seen in the STM images, but different isomers can also be recognized. The Todorov-Pendry approach to tunneling produces simulated STM images which are in good accordance with the experiments. Alongside with STM simulations in a tight-binding basis, ab initio calculations are performed in order to analyze the symmetry of relevant molecular orbitals and to consider the nature of tunneling channels. Our calculations show that while the orbitals delocalized to the phenyl ring create a relatively transparent tunneling channel, they also almost isolate the orbitals of the substitute groups at energies which are relevant in STM experiments. These features of the electronic structure are the key ingredients of the accurate submolecular observations.

  18. Cortical and Subcortical Contributions to Short-Term Memory for Orienting Movements.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Charles D; Erlich, Jeffrey C; Brunton, Bingni W; Deisseroth, Karl; Brody, Carlos D

    2015-10-21

    Neural activity in frontal cortical areas has been causally linked to short-term memory (STM), but whether this activity is necessary for forming, maintaining, or reading out STM remains unclear. In rats performing a memory-guided orienting task, the frontal orienting fields in cortex (FOF) are considered critical for STM maintenance, and during each trial display a monotonically increasing neural encoding for STM. Here, we transiently inactivated either the FOF or the superior colliculus and found that the resulting impairments in memory-guided orienting performance followed a monotonically decreasing time course, surprisingly opposite to the neural encoding. A dynamical attractor model in which STM relies equally on cortical and subcortical regions reconciled the encoding and inactivation data. We confirmed key predictions of the model, including a time-dependent relationship between trial difficulty and perturbability, and substantial, supralinear, impairment following simultaneous inactivation of the FOF and superior colliculus during memory maintenance.

  19. The impact of aging and hearing status on verbal short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Clémence; Collette, Fabienne; Majerus, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the impact of hearing status on age-related decrease in verbal short-term memory (STM) performance. This was done by administering a battery of verbal STM tasks to elderly and young adult participants matched for hearing thresholds, as well as to young normal-hearing control participants. The matching procedure allowed us to assess the importance of hearing loss as an explanatory factor of age-related STM decline. We observed that elderly participants and hearing-matched young participants showed equal levels of performance in all verbal STM tasks, and performed overall lower than the normal-hearing young control participants. This study provides evidence for recent theoretical accounts considering reduced hearing level as an important explanatory factor of poor auditory-verbal STM performance in older adults. PMID:24007209

  20. Measurement of shear strength for HOPG with scanning tunneling microscopy by thermal excitation method.

    PubMed

    Ding, X D; Wang, Y Z; Xiong, X M; Du, X S; Zhang, J X

    2012-04-01

    An experimental observation of force interactions in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented. A technique for measuring force interactions between a conventional STM probe and a sample by spectra analysis of its thermal fluctuations from tunneling current in STM is developed theoretically and experimentally. Thermally excited fluctuation of the STM probe is exactly discerned in air and then force gradient is determined from its corresponding eigen-frequency with a formula similar to that for a small-amplitude atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observed force interactions are consistent with forces in dynamic AFM. Shear strength of 7 GPa for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) under compressive stress is obtained from the experiment and using the elastic theory. We believe that this technique is of scientific significance as it enables accurate measurement of short-range force interactions at atomic scale under true STM conditions.

  1. Atomic-scale imaging of surfaces and interfaces. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, volume 295

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegelsen, David K.; Smith, David J.; Tong, S. Y.

    The gap between imagining and imaging is getting ever smaller. The Atomic-Scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces, Symposium W at the 1992 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, brought together researchers using state-of-the-art imaging techniques capable of resolving atomic features. Methods represented were scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), transmission (TEM) and reflection (REM) electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM or POSAP), high and low energy external source electron holographies, and internal source electron holographies. Some highlights from the STM papers included discussions of the limitations and future potential of STM as well as current findings. Several papers presented work with STM at elevated temperatures. Jene Golovchenko reviewed STM work showing cooperative diffusion events (Pb on Ge) involving many tens of substrate atoms. Don Eigler focused on atomic manipulation and some of its uses to enable fundamental studies of small atomic clusters.

  2. Energetics and bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy images of Si ad-dimers on Ge(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, S. V.; Kulkarni, R. V.; Stroud, D.; Wilkins, J. W.

    1999-08-01

    We report an ab initio study of the energetics and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of Si ad-dimers on Ge(001) and energetics of Ge ad-dimers on Si(001). As in the case of Si dimers on Si(001), we find for both systems that the D dimer configuration, lying between the substrate dimer rows and parallel to them, is highest in energy. Conversely, recent STM experiments for Si ad-dimers on Ge(001) deduce the D configuration to be most stable. Our theoretical STM images for this system find that both the D and C configurations (the latter also between the rows) have similar STM images for the experimental voltages. We propose an experimental test (low-bias STM imaging) which would unambiguously distinguish between the D and C configurations.

  3. Proteome of Salmonella Enterica SerotypeTyphimurium Grown in a Low Mg2+/pH Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Ansong, Charles; Smallwood, Heather S.; Rommereim, Leah M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Gustin, Jean K.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-09-01

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) must replicate within host macrophages in order to establish systemic infection in susceptible mice. In an effort to identify new STM proteins that help the bacterium colonize macrophages, we have cultured STM cells with a low pH/low magnesium medium (MgM) under two different conditions termed MgM-Shock and MgM-Dilution and investigated the impacts of these culturing conditions on the STM proteome by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. LC-MS/MS results showed that alteration of culturing conditions affected a group of STM proteins differently. Compared to MgM-Shock, MgM-Dilution induced more proteins of the Salmonella-pathogenecity island 2-type III secretion system (SPI2-T3SS). The abundances of the proteins used for cobalamin biosynthesis increased under MgM-Shock condition but decreased under MgM-Dilution condition, while those proteins used for thiamine or biotin biosynthesis were not affected under the former condition but increased under the latter condition. Western-blot (WB) analysis confirmed the LC-MS/MS results. Because cobalamin, thiamine and biotin play different roles in STM metabolism, differential induction of the proteins involved in their biosyntheses suggests that the metabolic states of STM cells under these conditions differ considerably. WB analysis also showed that the abundances of SPI2-T3SS proteins SsaQ and SseE and biotin biosynthesis proteins BioB and BioD increased after STM infection of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Deletion of the gene encoding BioB reduced the ability of STM to replicate inside the macrophages, demonstrating for the first time the involvement of a biotin synthesis protein in STM colonization of macrophages.

  4. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Development ofTips for Contrast Enhanced Imaging and Imaging of Mixed Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingery, David Patrick

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is a powerful tool for surface analysis which provides atomic resolution of samples. Of particular interest is the adsorption behavior of alkane and alkane derivatives on graphite substrates. Such studies are limited by the lack of chemical information provided by STM. Chemically Selective STM, wherein STM tips are chemically modified in order to provide enhanced contrast of chemicals on a surface is a solution to this limitation. While extremely promising this method has several limitations barring it from wider application. These limitations include the low population of modified tips that provide contrast enhancement and limited useful tip lifetime. Chapter 1 presents a general introduction to the materials and methods employed in this work. In Chapter 2 growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on STM tips is explored as a new route to chemically modified STM tips. Growth of CNTs on tungsten followed by electrodeposition of ruthenium oxide to create a conductive path led to a working CNT STM tip. Chapter 3 presents a study of gold nanoparticle deposition on carbon nanotubes by thermal evaporation. Nanoparticles supported on CNTs are of interest in various area of study including catalysis and electrochemistry. It is demonstrated that evaporation is an effective route to CNT supported gold nanoparticles. Chapter 4 focuses on development of a new single-step electrochemical etching method for producing gold STM tips. Sharp gold STM tips are critical for chemically selective STM performed with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified tips. It is demonstrated that electrochemical etching in low concentrations of perchloric acid in aqueous sodium chloride solutions produces high quality tips. Chapter 5 discusses an in-situ voltage pulse treatment for inducing chemical contrast enhancement in STM images. This method, applied for the first time to a hydrogen bond donor, allows chemical contrast enhancement in STM images to be switched on or

  5. Identification and functional analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium PmrA-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Rita; Prouty, Angela M; Gunn, John S

    2005-02-01

    The PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is activated in vivo and plays an important role in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Resistance is partly mediated by modifications to the lipopolysaccharide. To identify new PmrA-regulated genes, microarray analysis was undertaken comparing cDNA derived from PmrA-constitutive and PmrA-null strains. A combination of RT-PCR and transcriptional analysis confirmed the inclusion of six new loci in the PmrA-PmrB regulon: STM1253, STM1269, STM4118, STM0459, STM3968 and STM4568. These loci did not affect the ability to grow in high iron conditions, the ability to modify lipid A with aminoarabinose, or virulence. STM4118, a putative phosphoethanolamine phosphotransferase, had a minor effect on polymyxin resistance, whereas the remaining genes had no role in polymyxin resistance. Although several of the identified loci lacked the consensus PmrA binding site, PmrA was demonstrated to bind the promoter of a PmrA-activated gene lacking the consensus site. A more complete definition of the PmrA-PmrB regulon will provide a better understanding of its role in host and non-host environments.

  6. Relational and conjunctive binding functions dissociate in short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mario A; Fabi, Katia; Luzzi, Simona; Cubelli, Roberto; Hernandez Valdez, Maria; Della Sala, Sergio

    2015-02-01

    Remembering complex events requires binding features within unified objects (conjunctions) and holding associations between objects (relations). Recent studies suggest that the two functions dissociate in long-term memory (LTM). Less is known about their functional organization in short-term memory (STM). The present study investigated this issue in patient AE affected by a stroke which caused damage to brain regions known to be relevant for relational functions both in LTM and in STM (i.e., the hippocampus). The assessment involved a battery of standard neuropsychological tasks and STM binding tasks. One STM binding task (Experiment 1) presented common objects and common colors forming either pairs (relations) or integrated objects (conjunctions). Free recall of relations or conjunctions was assessed. A second STM binding task used random polygons and non-primary colors instead (Experiment 2). Memory was assessed by selecting the features that made up the relations or the conjunctions from a set of single polygons and a set of single colors. The neuropsychological assessment revealed impaired delayed memory in AE. AE's pronounced relational STM binding deficits contrasted with his completely preserved conjunctive binding functions in both Experiments 1 and 2. Only 2.35% and 1.14% of the population were expected to have a discrepancy more extreme than that presented by AE in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Processing relations and conjunctions of very elementary nonspatial features in STM led to dissociating performances in AE. These findings may inform current theories of memory decline such as those linked to cognitive aging.

  7. A cryogen-free variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di; Wu, Shiwei

    While low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has become an indispensable research tool in surface science, its versatility is yet limited by the shortage or high cost of liquid helium. The makeshifts include the use of alternative cryogen (such as liquid nitrogen) at higher temperature or the development of helium liquefier system usually at departmental or campus wide. The ultimate solution would be the direct integration of a cryogen-free cryocooler based on GM or pulse tube closed cycle in the STM itself. However, the nasty mechanical vibration at low frequency intrinsic to cryocoolers has set the biggest obstacle because of the known challenges in vibration isolation required to high performance of STM. In this talk, we will present the design and performance of our home-built cryogen-free variable temperature STM at Fudan University. This system can obtain atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra comparable to state-of-the-art low temperature STMs, but with no limitation on running hours. Moreover, we demonstrated the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy (STM-IETS) on a single CO molecule with a cryogen-free STM for the first time.

  8. A cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di; Wu, Shiwei

    2016-06-01

    The design and performance of a cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) housed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are reported. The cryogen-free design was done by directly integrating a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler to a Besocke-type STM, and the vibration isolation was achieved by using a two-stage rubber bellow between the cryocooler and a UHV-STM interface with helium exchange gas cooling. A base temperature of 15 K at the STM was achieved, with a possibility to further decrease by using a cryocooler with higher cooling power and adding additional low temperature stage under the exchange gas interface. Atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra on various samples were demonstrated. Furthermore, we reported the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy on a single carbon monoxide molecule adsorbed on Ag(110) surface with a cryogen-free STM for the first time. Being totally cryogen-free, the system not only saves the running cost significantly but also enables uninterrupted data acquisitions and variable temperature measurements with much ease. In addition, the system is capable of coupling light to the STM junction by a pair of lens inside the UHV chamber. We expect that these enhanced capabilities could further broaden our views to the atomic-scale world.

  9. The commonality of neural networks for verbal and visual short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Majerus, Steve; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Martinez Perez, Trecy; Belayachi, Sanaâ; Van der Linden, Martial; Collette, Fabienne; Salmon, Eric; Seurinck, Ruth; Fias, Wim; Maquet, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared neural correlates supporting verbal and visual STM. We hypothesized that networks involved in attentional and executive processes, as well as networks involved in serial order processing, underlie STM for both verbal and visual list information, with neural specificity restricted to sensory areas involved in processing the specific items to be retained. Participants were presented sequences of nonwords or unfamiliar faces, and were instructed to maintain and recognize order or item information. For encoding and retrieval phases, null conjunction analysis revealed an identical fronto-parieto-cerebellar network comprising the left intraparietal sulcus, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral cerebellum, irrespective of information type and modality. A network centered around the right intraparietal sulcus supported STM for order information, in both verbal and visual modalities. Modality-specific effects were observed in left superior temporal and mid-fusiform areas associated with phonological and orthographic processing during the verbal STM tasks, and in right hippocampal and fusiform face processing areas during the visual STM tasks, wherein these modality effects were most pronounced when storing item information. The present results suggest that STM emerges from the deployment of modality-independent attentional and serial ordering processes toward sensory networks underlying the processing and storage of modality-specific item information.

  10. Selective short-term memory deficits arise from impaired domain-general semantic control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Paul; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Ehsan, Sheeba; Hopper, Samantha; Ralph, Matthew A Lambon

    2009-01-01

    Semantic short-term memory (STM) patients have a reduced ability to retain semantic information over brief delays but perform well on other semantic tasks; this pattern suggests damage to a dedicated buffer for semantic information. Alternatively, these difficulties may arise from mild disruption to domain-general semantic processes that have their greatest impact on demanding STM tasks. In this study, mild semantic processing impairments were demonstrated in 2 semantic STM patients. They performed well on untimed semantic tasks but were deficient in accuracy and reaction times on speeded tasks. Demanding semantic production tasks were also affected. These patients were compared with a case series of individuals with semantic aphasia whose multimodal semantic difficulties stemmed from poor cognitive control. STM and semantic performance were more impaired in this group, but there were qualitative similarities to the semantic STM patients. The difference between the 2 patient types may be a matter of degree. In semantic aphasia, severe disruption to semantic control leads to global semantic impairments, whereas in semantic STM milder disruption might impact mainly on STM tests because of the high control demands of these tasks. PMID:19210086

  11. A cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di; Wu, Shiwei

    2016-06-01

    The design and performance of a cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) housed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are reported. The cryogen-free design was done by directly integrating a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler to a Besocke-type STM, and the vibration isolation was achieved by using a two-stage rubber bellow between the cryocooler and a UHV-STM interface with helium exchange gas cooling. A base temperature of 15 K at the STM was achieved, with a possibility to further decrease by using a cryocooler with higher cooling power and adding additional low temperature stage under the exchange gas interface. Atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra on various samples were demonstrated. Furthermore, we reported the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy on a single carbon monoxide molecule adsorbed on Ag(110) surface with a cryogen-free STM for the first time. Being totally cryogen-free, the system not only saves the running cost significantly but also enables uninterrupted data acquisitions and variable temperature measurements with much ease. In addition, the system is capable of coupling light to the STM junction by a pair of lens inside the UHV chamber. We expect that these enhanced capabilities could further broaden our views to the atomic-scale world. PMID:27370453

  12. Gaussian process style transfer mapping for historical Chinese character recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jixiong; Peng, Liangrui; Lebourgeois, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Historical Chinese character recognition is very important to larger scale historical document digitalization, but is a very challenging problem due to lack of labeled training samples. This paper proposes a novel non-linear transfer learning method, namely Gaussian Process Style Transfer Mapping (GP-STM). The GP-STM extends traditional linear Style Transfer Mapping (STM) by using Gaussian process and kernel methods. With GP-STM, existing printed Chinese character samples are used to help the recognition of historical Chinese characters. To demonstrate this framework, we compare feature extraction methods, train a modified quadratic discriminant function (MQDF) classifier on printed Chinese character samples, and implement the GP-STM model on Dunhuang historical documents. Various kernels and parameters are explored, and the impact of the number of training samples is evaluated. Experimental results show that accuracy increases by nearly 15 percentage points (from 42.8% to 57.5%) using GP-STM, with an improvement of more than 8 percentage points (from 49.2% to 57.5%) compared to the STM approach.

  13. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ∼10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  14. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Tao, Franklin; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ˜10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  15. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ~10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  16. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ∼10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified. PMID:23556828

  17. Scanning tunneling microscope design with a confocal small field permanent magnet.

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, P.; Pearson, J.; Vasserman, I.; Sasaki, S.; Moog, E.; Fradin, F.

    2008-09-01

    The field of ultra-sensitive measurements with scanning probes requires the design and construction of novel instruments. For example, the combination of radio frequency detection and scanning probe can be exploited to measure thermal properties and mechanical resonances at a very low scale. Very recent results by Komeda and Manassen (2008 Appl. Phys. Lett. 92 212506) on the detection of spin noise with the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) have further expanded previous results reported by one of the authors of this manuscript (Messina et al 2007 J. Appl. Phys. 101 053916). In a previous publication, one of the authors used a new STM instrument (Messina et al J. Appl. Phys. 2007 101 053916 and Mannini et al 2007 Inorg. Chim. Acta 360 3837-42) to obtain the detection of electron spin noise (ESN) from individual paramagnetic adsorbates. The magnetic field homogeneity at the STM tip-sample region was limited. Furthermore, vacuum operation of the STM microscope was limited by the heat dissipation at the electromagnet and the radio frequency (RF) recovery electronics. We report here on a new STM head that incorporates a specially designed permanent magnet and in-built RF amplification system. The magnet provides both a better field homogeneity and freedom to operate the instrument in vacuum. The STM microscope is vacuum compatible, and vertical stability has been improved over the previous design (Messina et al 2007 J. Appl. Phys. 101 053916), despite the presence of a heat dissipative RF amplifier in the close vicinity of the STM tip.

  18. Neural networks for short-term memory for order differentiate high and low proficiency bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Majerus, S; Belayachi, S; De Smedt, B; Leclercq, A L; Martinez, T; Schmidt, C; Weekes, B; Maquet, P

    2008-10-01

    Short-term memory (STM) for order information, as compared to STM for item information, has been shown to be a critical determinant of language learning capacity. The present fMRI study asked whether the neural substrates of order STM can serve as markers for bilingual language achievement. Two groups of German-French bilinguals differing in second language proficiency were presented STM tasks probing serial order or item information. During order STM but not item STM tasks, the high proficiency group showed increased activation in the lateral orbito-frontal and the superior frontal gyri associated with updating and grouped rehearsal of serial order information. Functional connectivity analyses for order encoding showed a functional network involving the left IPS, the right IPS and the right superior cerebellum in the high proficiency group while the low proficiency group showed enhanced connectivity between the left IPS and bilateral superior temporal and temporo-parietal areas involved in item processing. The present data suggest that low proficiency bilinguals activate STM networks for order in a less efficient and differentiated way, and this may explain their poorer storage and learning capacity for verbal sequences.

  19. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  20. Sensing Current and Forces with SPM

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Y.; Maier, Sabine; Hendriksen, Bas; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-07-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are well established techniques to image surfaces and to probe material properties at the atomic and molecular scale. In this review, we show hybrid combinations of AFM and STM that bring together the best of two worlds: the simultaneous detection of atomic scale forces and conduction properties. We illustrate with several examples how the detection of forces during STM and the detection of currents during AFM can give valuable additional information of the nanoscale material properties.

  1. Single molecule and single atom sensors for atomic resolution imaging of chemically complex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kichin, Georgy; Weiss, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2011-10-26

    Individual Xe atoms as well as single CO and CH(4) molecules adsorbed at the tip apex of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) function as microscopic force sensors that change the tunneling current in response to the forces acting from the surface. An STM equipped with any of these sensors is able to image the short-range Pauli repulsion and thus resolve the inner structure of large organic adsorbate molecules. Differences in the performance of the three studied sensors suggest that the sensor functionality can be tailored by tuning the interaction between the sensor particle and the STM tip.

  2. 1Surface structure of cleaved (001) USB2 single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2crystals cleave on the (00 I) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most ofthe density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography only cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

  3. Surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping

    2008-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2 crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography alone cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

  4. Does stimulus complexity determine whether working memory storage relies on prefrontal or sensory cortex?

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Tyler D; Hockley, William E; Servos, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Traditionally, working and short-term memory (WM/STM) have been believed to rely on storage systems located in prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, recent experimental and theoretical efforts have suggested that, in many cases, sensory or other task-relevant cortex is the actual storage substrate for WM/STM. What factors determine whether a given WM/STM task relies on PFC or sensory cortex? In the present article, we outline recent experimental findings and suggest that the dimensionality or complexity of the to-be-remembered property or properties of a stimulus can be a determining factor.

  5. Recording Intramolecular Mechanics during the Manipulation of a Large Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresco, Francesca; Meyer, Gerhard; Rieder, Karl-Heinz; Tang, Hao; Gourdon, André; Joachim, Christian

    2001-08-01

    The technique of single atom manipulation by means of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) applies to the controlled displacement of large molecules. By a combined experimental and theoretical work, we show that in a constant height mode of manipulation the STM current intensity carries detailed information on the internal mechanics of the molecule when guided by the STM tip. Controlling and time following the intramolecular behavior of a large molecule on a surface is the first step towards the design of molecular tunnel-wired nanorobots.

  6. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) − 2 × 1 surface

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takayuki Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide

    2015-03-14

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) − 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si—O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si—C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption.

  7. Nano-localized desorption and time-of-flight mass analysis using solely optical enhancement in the proximity of a scanning tunneling microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yu; Micheletto, Ruggero; Okazaki, Satoshi; Otsuka, Koji

    2003-04-01

    The combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with time-of-flight mass system (TOF-MS) adds new information to STM imaging. In this study, an STM system has been combined with laser excitation and was used for desorption and ionization of surface molecules, without the use of any other external stimulus. Desorbed ions from confined areas were accelerated and detected by a TOF chamber. We demonstrate in this paper that the technique proposed enables desorption of superficial structures within a small area of approximately 5 nm diameter and simultaneous mass spectroscopy of the desorbed atoms.

  8. Recording intramolecular mechanics during the manipulation of a large molecule.

    PubMed

    Moresco, F; Meyer, G; Rieder, K H; Tang, H; Gourdon, A; Joachim, C

    2001-08-20

    The technique of single atom manipulation by means of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) applies to the controlled displacement of large molecules. By a combined experimental and theoretical work, we show that in a constant height mode of manipulation the STM current intensity carries detailed information on the internal mechanics of the molecule when guided by the STM tip. Controlling and time following the intramolecular behavior of a large molecule on a surface is the first step towards the design of molecular tunnel-wired nanorobots.

  9. Molecular Photography in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Identification of Functional Groups Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancarlo, Leanna C.; Fang, Hongbin; Avila, Luis; Fine, Leonard W.; Flynn, George W.

    2000-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) investigation of bare graphite and 11-bromoundecanol adsorbed on graphite has been performed in the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory at Columbia University. In addition to collecting substrate (surface) and adsorbate (molecule) images, students compare their experimental STM topographs with the shapes of the frontier molecular orbitals of a structurally similar brominated alcohol generated using the Spartan computation program. This investigation stresses the use of the STM as a "molecular camera" with which students can visualize large-scale molecular assemblies and identify chemically significant portions of the molecules. Further, it demonstrates an area where theoretical calculations can be coupled with experimental measurements in a unified setting.

  10. Spatial metrology of dopants in silicon with exact lattice site precision.

    PubMed

    Usman, M; Bocquel, J; Salfi, J; Voisin, B; Tankasala, A; Rahman, R; Simmons, M Y; Rogge, S; Hollenberg, L C L

    2016-09-01

    Scaling of Si-based nanoelectronics has reached the regime where device function is affected not only by the presence of individual dopants, but also by their positions in the crystal. Determination of the precise dopant location is an unsolved problem in applications from channel doping in ultrascaled transistors to quantum information processing. Here, we establish a metrology combining low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging and a comprehensive quantum treatment of the dopant-STM system to pinpoint the exact coordinates of the dopant in the Si crystal. The technique is underpinned by the observation that STM images contain atomic-sized features in ordered patterns that are highly sensitive to the STM tip orbital and the absolute dopant lattice site. The demonstrated ability to determine the locations of P and As dopants to 5 nm depths will provide critical information for the design and optimization of nanoscale devices for classical and quantum computing applications. PMID:27271965

  11. The word superiority effect: Dependence on short-term memory factors.

    PubMed

    Appelman, I B

    1976-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test whether the word superiority effect, that letters in words are perceived more accurately than letters in nonwords, could be attributed to short-term memory (STM) factors. One hypothesis attributed the word superiority effect to superior maintenance of words in STM. Another hypothesis was that letters in STM have considerable positional uncertainty which is overcome by the orthographic characteristics of the words. Both experiments utilized a simultaneous same-different task, where subjects compared two four-letter strings, one on top of the other, which were presented tachistoscopically. In Experiment I, the two presented strings were either both words or both nonwords and a word superiority effect was obtained. This result was interpreted as disconfirming the STM maintenance hypothesis. In Experiment II, letters were removed from one of the two letter strings, making the serial position of the comparison unambiguous. The word superiority effect disappeared. This result was interpreted as supporting the positional uncertainty hypothesis.

  12. Moiré pattern induced by the electronic coupling between 1-octanol self-assembled monolayers and graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Silly, Fabien

    2012-06-01

    Two-dimensional self-assembly of 1-octanol molecules on a graphite surface is investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the solid/liquid interface. STM images reveal that this molecule self-assembles into a compact hydrogen-bonded herringbone nanoarchitecture. Molecules are preferentially arranged in a head-to-head and tail-to-tail fashion. A Moiré pattern appears in the STM images when the 1-octanol layer is covering the graphite surface. The large Moiré stripes are perpendicular to the 1-octanol lamellae. Interpretation of the STM images suggests that the Moiré periodicity is governed by the electronic properties of the graphite surface and the 1-octanol layer periodicity. PMID:22572595

  13. Correlation-Mediated Processes for Electron-Induced Switching between Néel States of Fe Antiferromagnetic Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Yaro, Simeón Moisés; Cartoixà, Xavier; Lorente, Nicolás

    2013-02-01

    The controlled switching between two quasistable Néel states in adsorbed antiferromagnetic Fe chains has recently been achieved by Loth et al. [Science 335, 196 (2012)SCIEAS0036-8075] using tunneling electrons from an STM tip. In order to rationalize their data, we evaluate the rate of tunneling electron-induced switching between the Néel states. Good agreement is found with the experiment, permitting us to identify three switching mechanisms: (i) low STM voltage direct electron-induced transitions, (ii) intermediate STM voltage switching via spin-wave-like excitation, and (iii) high STM voltage transitions mediated by domain-wall formation. Spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic chains are the switching driving force, leading to a marked chain-size dependence.

  14. Cleaved thin-film probes for scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siahaan, T; Kurnosikov, O; Barcones, B; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-01-22

    We introduce an alternative type of probe for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Instead of using a needle-like tip made from a piece of metallic wire, a sharp-edged cleaved insulating substrate, which is initially covered by a thin conductive film, is used. The sharp tip is formed at the intersection of the two cleaved sides. Using this approach a variety of materials for STM probes can be used, and functionalization of STM probes is possible. The working principle of different probes made of metallic (Pt, Co, and CoB), indium-tin oxide, as well as Cu/Pt and Co/Pt multilayer films are demonstrated by STM imaging of clean Cu(001) and Cu(111) surfaces as well as the epitaxial Co clusters on Cu(111). PMID:26636763

  15. A nanoscale gigahertz source realized with Josephson scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jäck, Berthold Eltschka, Matthias; Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R.; Hardock, Andreas; Kern, Klaus

    2015-01-05

    Using the AC Josephson effect in the superconductor-vacuum-superconductor tunnel junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we demonstrate the generation of GHz radiation. With the macroscopic STM tip acting as a λ/4-monopole antenna, we first show that the atomic scale Josephson junction in the STM is sensitive to its frequency-dependent environmental impedance in the GHz regime. Further, enhancing Cooper pair tunneling via excitations of the tip eigenmodes, we are able to generate high-frequency radiation. We find that for vanadium junctions, the enhanced photon emission can be tuned from about 25 GHz to 200 GHz and that large photon flux in excess of 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} is reached in the tunnel junction. These findings demonstrate that the atomic scale Josephson junction in an STM can be employed as a full spectroscopic tool for GHz frequencies on the atomic scale.

  16. Vibronic motion with joint angstrom-femtosecond resolution observed through Fano progressions recorded within one molecule.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonhee; Perdue, Shawn M; Rodriguez Perez, Alejandro; Apkarian, Vartkess Ara

    2014-01-28

    Electroluminescence (EL) in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which enables spectroscopy with submolecular spatial resolution, is shown to be due to radiative ionization with vibronic shape resonances that carry Fano line profiles. Since Fano progressions retain phase information, the spectra can be transformed to the time domain to reconstruct the vibronic motion. In effect, measurements within a molecule are accessible with joint space-time resolution at the Å-fs limit. We demonstrate this through EL-STM on the Jahn-Teller-active Zn-etioporphyrin radical anion and visualize the orbiting motion of scattered electrons upon sudden reduction and oxidation. We discuss the elements that enable spectroscopy with submolecular spatial resolution through EL-STM and the closely related STM-Raman process.

  17. Self-assembly of an asymmetrically functionalized [6]helicene at liquid/solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Balandina, Tatyana; van der Meijden, Maarten W; Ivasenko, Oleksandr; Cornil, David; Cornil, Jérôme; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Kellogg, Richard M; De Feyter, Steven

    2013-03-18

    STM brings to light chirality aspects of the self-assembly of a functionalized helicene at the interface between a liquid and the solid substrates, gold and graphite. This reveals conditions for conglomerate formation.

  18. Structure of a zinc oxide ultra-thin film on Rh(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhara, J.; Kato, D.; Matsui, T.; Mizuno, S.

    2015-11-07

    The structural parameters of ultra-thin zinc oxide films on Rh(100) are investigated using low-energy electron diffraction intensity (LEED I–V) curves, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the analysis of LEED I–V curves and DFT calculations, two optimized models A and B are determined. Their structures are basically similar to the planer h-BN ZnO(0001) structure, although some oxygen atoms protrude from the surface, associated with an in-plane shift of Zn atoms. From a comparison of experimental STM images and simulated STM images, majority and minority structures observed in the STM images represent the two optimized models A and B, respectively.

  19. Spatial metrology of dopants in silicon with exact lattice site precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, M.; Bocquel, J.; Salfi, J.; Voisin, B.; Tankasala, A.; Rahman, R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2016-09-01

    Scaling of Si-based nanoelectronics has reached the regime where device function is affected not only by the presence of individual dopants, but also by their positions in the crystal. Determination of the precise dopant location is an unsolved problem in applications from channel doping in ultrascaled transistors to quantum information processing. Here, we establish a metrology combining low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging and a comprehensive quantum treatment of the dopant-STM system to pinpoint the exact coordinates of the dopant in the Si crystal. The technique is underpinned by the observation that STM images contain atomic-sized features in ordered patterns that are highly sensitive to the STM tip orbital and the absolute dopant lattice site. The demonstrated ability to determine the locations of P and As dopants to 5 nm depths will provide critical information for the design and optimization of nanoscale devices for classical and quantum computing applications.

  20. 50 CFR Table 14a to Part 679 - Port of Landing Codes 1, Alaska

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DUT Chefornak 189 CHF Chignik 113 CHG Cordova 115 COR Craig 116 CRG Dillingham 117 DIL Douglas 136 JNU... 168 SIT Skagway 169 SKG Soldotna 318 SOL St. George 170 STG St. Mary 319 STM St. Paul 172 STP...

  1. 77 FR 42483 - Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... nanoscale science. This instrument is specialized for creating artificial nanoscale structures on an atom-by... measurements of tunneling current and force signals at an atomic scale, STM scanner with q-Plus tuning...

  2. Spatial metrology of dopants in silicon with exact lattice site precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, M.; Bocquel, J.; Salfi, J.; Voisin, B.; Tankasala, A.; Rahman, R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2016-09-01

    Scaling of Si-based nanoelectronics has reached the regime where device function is affected not only by the presence of individual dopants, but also by their positions in the crystal. Determination of the precise dopant location is an unsolved problem in applications from channel doping in ultrascaled transistors to quantum information processing. Here, we establish a metrology combining low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging and a comprehensive quantum treatment of the dopant–STM system to pinpoint the exact coordinates of the dopant in the Si crystal. The technique is underpinned by the observation that STM images contain atomic-sized features in ordered patterns that are highly sensitive to the STM tip orbital and the absolute dopant lattice site. The demonstrated ability to determine the locations of P and As dopants to 5 nm depths will provide critical information for the design and optimization of nanoscale devices for classical and quantum computing applications.

  3. Structure of a zinc oxide ultra-thin film on Rh(100).

    PubMed

    Yuhara, J; Kato, D; Matsui, T; Mizuno, S

    2015-11-01

    The structural parameters of ultra-thin zinc oxide films on Rh(100) are investigated using low-energy electron diffraction intensity (LEED I-V) curves, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the analysis of LEED I-V curves and DFT calculations, two optimized models A and B are determined. Their structures are basically similar to the planer h-BN ZnO(0001) structure, although some oxygen atoms protrude from the surface, associated with an in-plane shift of Zn atoms. From a comparison of experimental STM images and simulated STM images, majority and minority structures observed in the STM images represent the two optimized models A and B, respectively. PMID:26547176

  4. Structure of a zinc oxide ultra-thin film on Rh(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhara, J.; Kato, D.; Matsui, T.; Mizuno, S.

    2015-11-01

    The structural parameters of ultra-thin zinc oxide films on Rh(100) are investigated using low-energy electron diffraction intensity (LEED I-V) curves, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the analysis of LEED I-V curves and DFT calculations, two optimized models A and B are determined. Their structures are basically similar to the planer h-BN ZnO(0001) structure, although some oxygen atoms protrude from the surface, associated with an in-plane shift of Zn atoms. From a comparison of experimental STM images and simulated STM images, majority and minority structures observed in the STM images represent the two optimized models A and B, respectively.

  5. Selective scanning tunneling microscope light emission from rutile phase of VO2.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Joe; Kuwahara, Masashi; Hotsuki, Masaki; Katano, Satoshi; Uehara, Yoichi

    2016-09-28

    We observed scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) induced by a tunneling current at the gap between an Ag tip and a VO2 thin film, in parallel to scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) profiles. The 34 nm thick VO2 film grown on a rutile TiO2 (0 0 1) substrate consisted of both rutile (R)- and monoclinic (M)-structure phases of a few 10 nm-sized domains at room temperature. We found that STM-LE with a certain photon energy of 2.0 eV occurs selectively from R-phase domains of VO2, while no STM-LE was observed from M-phase. The mechanism of STM-LE from R-phase VO2 was determined to be an interband transition process rather than inverse photoemission or inelastic tunneling processes. PMID:27460183

  6. Selective scanning tunneling microscope light emission from rutile phase of VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Joe; Kuwahara, Masashi; Hotsuki, Masaki; Katano, Satoshi; Uehara, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    We observed scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) induced by a tunneling current at the gap between an Ag tip and a VO2 thin film, in parallel to scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) profiles. The 34 nm thick VO2 film grown on a rutile TiO2 (0 0 1) substrate consisted of both rutile (R)- and monoclinic (M)-structure phases of a few 10 nm-sized domains at room temperature. We found that STM-LE with a certain photon energy of 2.0 eV occurs selectively from R-phase domains of VO2, while no STM-LE was observed from M-phase. The mechanism of STM-LE from R-phase VO2 was determined to be an interband transition process rather than inverse photoemission or inelastic tunneling processes.

  7. Two stochastic mean-field polycrystal plasticity methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we develop two mean-field polycrystal plasticity models in which the L{sup c} are approximated stochastically. Through comprehensive CPFEM analyses of an idealized tantalum polycrystal, we verify that the L{sup c} tend to follow a normal distribution and surmise that this is due to the crystal interactions. We draw on these results to develop the STM and the stochastic no-constraints model (SNCM), which differ in the manner in which the crystal strain rates D{sup c} are prescribed. Calibration and validation of the models are performed using data from tantalum compression experiments. Both models predict the compression textures more accurately than the FCM, and the SNCM predicts them more accurately than the STM. The STM is extremely computationally efficient, only slightly more expensive than the FCM, while the SNCM is three times more computationally expensive than the STM.

  8. Modulation of embryo-forming capacity in culture through the expression of Brassica genes involved in the regulation of the shoot apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Tahir, Muhammad; Gulden, Robert H; Khamiss, Khalil; Stasolla, Claudio

    2010-09-01

    Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis is achieved by culturing bending-cotyledon embryos on a 2,4-D-containing induction medium for 14 d followed by a transfer on to a hormone-free development medium. Several genes orthologous to Arabidopsis SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM), CLAVATA 1 (CLV1), and ZWILLE (ZLL) were isolated from Brassica oleracea (Bo), B. rapa (Br), and B. napus (Bn), and ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis to assess their effects on somatic embryogenesis. Ectopic expression of BoSTM, BrSTM, and BnSTM increased the number of somatic embryos, whereas a different effect was observed in lines overexpressing BnCLV1 in which somatic embryo formation was severely repressed. The introduction of BnZLL did not have any effects on Arabidopsis somatic embryogenesis. The increased embryo-forming capacity observed in lines overexpressing Brassica STM was associated with a lower requirement for the inductive signal 2,4-D, and a higher expression of WUSCHEL (WUS) which demarcates the formation of embryogenic cells. This was in contrast to the 35S::BnCLV1 lines which showed the highest requirement for exogenous 2,4-D and a reduced WUS expression. Microarray studies were conducted to monitor global changes in transcript levels during Arabidopsis somatic embryogenesis between the wild-type (WT) line and a BoSTM-overexpressing line, which showed the most pronounced enhancement of somatic embryo yield. The introduction of BoSTM affected the expression of many genes involved in hormone perception and signalling, as well as genes encoding DNA methyltransferases and enzymes of glutathione metabolism. Pharmacological experiments performed to confirm some of the microarray results showed that Arabidopsis somatic embryogenesis is encouraged by a global hypomethylation of the DNA during the induction phase and by a switch of the glutathione pool towards an oxidized state during the subsequent development phase. Both events occurred in the 35S::BoSTM line, but not in the WT line

  9. Modulation of embryo-forming capacity in culture through the expression of Brassica genes involved in the regulation of the shoot apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Tahir, Muhammad; Gulden, Robert H; Khamiss, Khalil; Stasolla, Claudio

    2010-09-01

    Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis is achieved by culturing bending-cotyledon embryos on a 2,4-D-containing induction medium for 14 d followed by a transfer on to a hormone-free development medium. Several genes orthologous to Arabidopsis SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM), CLAVATA 1 (CLV1), and ZWILLE (ZLL) were isolated from Brassica oleracea (Bo), B. rapa (Br), and B. napus (Bn), and ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis to assess their effects on somatic embryogenesis. Ectopic expression of BoSTM, BrSTM, and BnSTM increased the number of somatic embryos, whereas a different effect was observed in lines overexpressing BnCLV1 in which somatic embryo formation was severely repressed. The introduction of BnZLL did not have any effects on Arabidopsis somatic embryogenesis. The increased embryo-forming capacity observed in lines overexpressing Brassica STM was associated with a lower requirement for the inductive signal 2,4-D, and a higher expression of WUSCHEL (WUS) which demarcates the formation of embryogenic cells. This was in contrast to the 35S::BnCLV1 lines which showed the highest requirement for exogenous 2,4-D and a reduced WUS expression. Microarray studies were conducted to monitor global changes in transcript levels during Arabidopsis somatic embryogenesis between the wild-type (WT) line and a BoSTM-overexpressing line, which showed the most pronounced enhancement of somatic embryo yield. The introduction of BoSTM affected the expression of many genes involved in hormone perception and signalling, as well as genes encoding DNA methyltransferases and enzymes of glutathione metabolism. Pharmacological experiments performed to confirm some of the microarray results showed that Arabidopsis somatic embryogenesis is encouraged by a global hypomethylation of the DNA during the induction phase and by a switch of the glutathione pool towards an oxidized state during the subsequent development phase. Both events occurred in the 35S::BoSTM line, but not in the WT line

  10. Preparation of gold tips suitable for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and light emission by electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bin; Picardi, Gennaro; Pettinger, Bruno

    2004-04-01

    We describe a method of preparing gold scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips by direct current electrochemical etching in concentrated HCl and ethanol solution. Gold tips with tip apex radius lower than 30 nm can be reproducibly prepared by this method. The influence of the solution composition, etching voltage on the surface structure, and sharpness has been investigated. These tips can be efficiently used for STM imaging, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and light emission investigations on the same sample.

  11. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and High PressureX-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure,Composition and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions on A Model SingleCrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Max O.

    2006-01-01

    Our research focuses on taking advantage of the ability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to operate at high-temperatures and high-pressures while still providing real-time atomic resolution images. We also utilize high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HPXPS) to monitor systems under identical conditions thus giving us chemical information to compare and contrast with the structural and dynamic data provided by STM.

  12. Multiple neural states of representation in short-term memory? It's a matter of attention.

    PubMed

    Larocque, Joshua J; Lewis-Peacock, Jarrod A; Postle, Bradley R

    2014-01-01

    Short-term memory (STM) refers to the capacity-limited retention of information over a brief period of time, and working memory (WM) refers to the manipulation and use of that information to guide behavior. In recent years it has become apparent that STM and WM interact and overlap with other cognitive processes, including attention (the selection of a subset of information for further processing) and long-term memory (LTM-the encoding and retention of an effectively unlimited amount of information for a much longer period of time). Broadly speaking, there have been two classes of memory models: systems models, which posit distinct stores for STM and LTM (Atkinson and Shiffrin, 1968; Baddeley and Hitch, 1974); and state-based models, which posit a common store with different activation states corresponding to STM and LTM (Cowan, 1995; McElree, 1996; Oberauer, 2002). In this paper, we will focus on state-based accounts of STM. First, we will consider several theoretical models that postulate, based on considerable behavioral evidence, that information in STM can exist in multiple representational states. We will then consider how neural data from recent studies of STM can inform and constrain these theoretical models. In the process we will highlight the inferential advantage of multivariate, information-based analyses of neuroimaging data (fMRI and electroencephalography (EEG)) over conventional activation-based analysis approaches (Postle, in press). We will conclude by addressing lingering questions regarding the fractionation of STM, highlighting differences between the attention to information vs. the retention of information during brief memory delays.

  13. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  14. Discovery of Salmonella Virulence Factors Translocated via Outer Membrane Vesicles to Murine Macrophages.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    We have previously shown that the regulators SpvR, FruR, IHF, PhoP/PhoQ, SsrA/SsrB, SlyA, Hnr, RpoE, SmpB, CsrA, RpoS, Crp, OmpR/EnvZ, and Hfq are essential for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in mice. Here we use quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics profiling of in-frame deletion mutants of these 14 regulators to identify proteins that are coordinately regulated by these virulence regulators and are thus presumably novel factors contributing to Salmonella pathogenesis. Putative candidate proteins from proteomics analysis were determined, which exhibited similar abundance profiles to those of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 type III secretion system (TTSS) proteins. A subset of 5 proteins including STM0082, STM1548, PdgL, STM1633, and STM3595 was selected for further analysis. All 5 proteins were expressed inside macrophage cells and STM0082 (SrfN) was secreted into host cytoplasm. Furthermore, deletion of STM0082 attenuated virulence in mice when administered intraperitoneally as determined by competitive index. srfN transcription was positively regulated by SsrAB, however, secretion was independent of SPI-2 TTSS as well as SPI-1 TTSS and flagella. Proteins including PagK and STM2585A, which are positively regulated by PhoP/PhoQ, have sec signal peptides as predicted for SrfN and were secreted into macrophage cytoplasm regardless of SPI-2 TTSS. Isolation of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) revealed the presence of SrfN, PagK, and STM2585A inside vesicle compartments. This result is the first case showing delivery of virulence effectors via OMVs in S. Typhimurium. Moreover, Hfq regulation of SrfN translation suggests that small non-coding RNAs may be responsible for regulating effector protein expression.

  15. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  16. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-06-29

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  17. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  18. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-10-27

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  19. Open bibliography for science, technology, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard; Macgillivray, Mark; Murray-Rust, Peter; Pitman, Jim; Sefton, Peter; O'Steen, Ben; Waites, William

    2011-10-14

    The concept of Open Bibliography in science, technology and medicine (STM) is introduced as a combination of Open Source tools, Open specifications and Open bibliographic data. An Openly searchable and navigable network of bibliographic information and associated knowledge representations, a Bibliographic Knowledge Network, across all branches of Science, Technology and Medicine, has been designed and initiated. For this large scale endeavour, the engagement and cooperation of the multiple stakeholders in STM publishing - authors, librarians, publishers and administrators - is sought.

  20. Proteomic Investigation of the Time Course Responses of RAW 264.7 Macrophages to Infection with Salmonella enterica

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Mottaz-Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; McDermott, Jason E.; Clauss, Therese RW; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-08-01

    Macrophages plan important roles in controlling Salmonella-mediated systemic infection. To investigate the responses of macrophages to Salmonella infection, we infected RAW 264.7 macrophages with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) and then performed a comparative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry [LC-MS(/MS)]-based proteomics analysis of the infected macrophages. A total of 1006 macrophage and 115 STM proteins were indentified from this study. Most of STM proteins were found at late stage of the time course of infection, consistent with the fact that STM proliferates inside RAW 264.7 macrophages. Majority of the identified macrophage proteins were house keeping-related, including cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), whose peptide abundances were relatively constant during the time course of infection. Compared to those in no infection control, the peptide abundances of 244 macrophage proteins (or 24% of total indentified macrophage proteins) changed considerably after STM infection. The functions of these STM infection-affected macrophage proteins were diverse and ranged from production of antibacterial nitric oxide (i.e., inducible nitric oxide synthase or iNOS) or production of prostaglandin H2 (i.e., prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, also know as cyclooxygenase-2 or COX-2) to regulation of intracellular traffic (e.g., sorting nexin or SNX 5, 6 and 9), demonstrating a global impact of STM infection on macrophage proteome. Western-blot analysis not only confirmed the LC-MS(/MS) results of SOD1, COX-2 and iNOS, but also revealed that the protein abundances of mitochondrial SOD2 increased after STM infection, indicating an infection-induced oxidative stress in mitochondria.

  1. Memory integration in amnesia: prior knowledge supports verbal short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Race, Elizabeth; Palombo, Daniela J; Cadden, Margaret; Burke, Keely; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-04-01

    Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) have traditionally been considered cognitively distinct. However, it is known that STM can improve when to-be-remembered information appears in contexts that make contact with prior knowledge, suggesting a more interactive relationship between STM and LTM. The current study investigated whether the ability to leverage LTM in support of STM critically depends on the integrity of the hippocampus. Specifically, we investigated whether the hippocampus differentially supports between-domain versus within-domain STM-LTM integration given prior evidence that the representational domain of the elements being integrated in memory is a critical determinant of whether memory performance depends on the hippocampus. In Experiment 1, we investigated hippocampal contributions to within-domain STM-LTM integration by testing whether immediate verbal recall of words improves in MTL amnesic patients when words are presented in familiar verbal contexts (meaningful sentences) compared to unfamiliar verbal contexts (random word lists). Patients demonstrated a robust sentence superiority effect, whereby verbal STM performance improved in familiar compared to unfamiliar verbal contexts, and the magnitude of this effect did not differ from that in controls. In Experiment 2, we investigated hippocampal contributions to between-domain STM-LTM integration by testing whether immediate verbal recall of digits improves in MTL amnesic patients when digits are presented in a familiar visuospatial context (a typical keypad layout) compared to an unfamiliar visuospatial context (a random keypad layout). Immediate verbal recall improved in both patients and controls when digits were presented in the familiar compared to the unfamiliar keypad array, indicating a preserved ability to integrate activated verbal information with stored visuospatial knowledge. Together, these results demonstrate that immediate verbal recall in amnesia can benefit from two

  2. ADHD Subtype Differences in Reinforcement Sensitivity and Visuospatial Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Dovis, Sebastiaan; Van der Oord, Saskia; Wiers, Reinout W; Prins, Pier J M

    2015-01-01

    Both cognitive and motivational deficits are thought to give rise to the problems in the combined (ADHD-C) and inattentive subtype (ADHD-I) of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In both subtypes one of the most prominent cognitive weaknesses appears to be in visuospatial working memory (WM), which is composed of short-term memory (STM) and a central executive (CE). In children with ADHD-C, both STM and the CE seem impaired, and together with motivational impairments, give rise to their deficits in visuospatial WM. In children with ADHD-I, no studies investigated these WM components and their interplay with motivational impairments. Effects of a standard (feedback only) and a high level of reinforcement (feedback + 10 euros) on visuospatial WM-, STM-, and CE performance were examined in 27 children with ADHD-I (restrictive-subtype), 70 children with ADHD-C, and 40 typically developing controls (aged 9-12). In both ADHD-subtypes CE and WM performance was worse than in controls. STM performance of children with ADHD-I was, in contrast to that of children with ADHD-C, not different from controls. STM and WM performance was worse in ADHD-C than in ADHD-I, whereas CE-related performance did not differ. High reinforcement improved STM and WM performance in both subtypes but not in controls. This improvement was equally pronounced in both subtypes. High reinforcement did not improve CE-related performance. Both subtypes have equally pronounced motivational deficits, which have detrimental effects on their visuospatial STM and WM performance. In contrast to children with ADHD-C, children with ADHD-I seem unimpaired on visuospatial STM; only an impaired CE and motivational impairments give rise to their deficits in visuospatial WM.

  3. What part of working memory is not working in ADHD? Short-term memory, the central executive and effects of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Dovis, Sebastiaan; Van der Oord, Saskia; Wiers, Reinout W; Prins, Pier J M

    2013-08-01

    Deficits in Working Memory (WM) are related to symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In children with ADHD visuospatial WM is most impaired. WM is composed of Short-Term Memory (STM) and a Central Executive (CE). Therefore, deficits in either or both STM and the CE may account for WM impairments in children with ADHD. WM-component studies investigating this find deficits in both STM and the CE. However, recent studies show that not only cognitive deficits, but also motivational deficits give rise to the aberrant WM performance of children with ADHD. To date, the influence of these motivational deficits on the components of WM has not been investigated. This study examined the effects of a standard (feedback-only) and a high level of reinforcement (feedback + 10 euros) on the visuospatial WM-, visuospatial STM-, and the CE performance of 86 children with ADHD and 62 typically-developing controls. With standard reinforcement the STM, CE, and WM performance of children with ADHD was worse than that of controls. High reinforcement improved STM and WM performance more in children with ADHD than in controls, but was unable to normalize their performance. High reinforcement did not appear to improve the CE-related performance of children with ADHD and controls. Motivational deficits have a detrimental effect on both the visuospatial WM performance and the STM performance of children with ADHD. Aside from motivational deficits, both the visuospatial STM and the CE of children with ADHD are impaired, and give rise to their deficits in visuospatial WM.

  4. In-Situ Characterization of Electrode-Solution Interfacial Processes by Atomic-Resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoping

    1992-01-01

    The author's research is directed towards the atomic-molecular-level understanding of electrochemical interfacial processes, utilizing in-situ atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The majority of this research effort has focussed on a systematic STM study of potential -induced surface reconstruction of gold single crystal electrodes and combined atomic-resolution STM and surface vibrational spectroscopy as in-situ probes of molecular adsorption and electrooxidation on metal electrodes. We have demonstrated for the first time that truly atomic-resolution STM images of gold surface reconstruction and molecular transformation can be observed at electrochemical interfaces under potential control conditions. The findings illustrate in a more general vein the power of STM for elucidating previously unobtainable details of surface atomic structure at electrochemical interfaces. The STM study shows that Au(111), (100), (110), (311), and (533) are observed to undergo reconstruction at the potentials corresponding to small (ca. 10-15 muc cm^{-2}) negative electrode charges. Some information regarding the mechanisms of the changes in atomic density required for reconstruction can be obtained from time- and potential -dependent sequences of STM images. In-situ potential-dependent STM studies of electrochemical processes of sulfide and iodide on Au(111), carbon monoxide on Rh(111) and (110) in aqueous solutions have been carried out and compared with SER spectra or infrared spectra. The details of potential-dependent adlayer structures and the formation of electrooxidation products, such as S _8 rings, polyiodide chains and crystal films, were observed and the results are in good agreement with the surface vibrational spectra. The orientation of adsorbed benzene and monosubstituted benzenes on gold electrodes have also been studied using SER spectroscopy. The results provide strong evidence that SERS selection

  5. Contrasting early visual cortical activation states causally involved in visual imagery and short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Vecchi, Tomaso; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Silvanto, Juha

    2009-10-01

    Whether visual imagery and visual short-term memory (STM) share the same neural resources, and the extent to which the early visual cortex (V1/V2) is involved in these processes, has been the subject of much debate. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in two separate experiments to contrast the neural states associated with visual imagery and visual STM in the early visual cortex. In Experiment 1, we investigated V1/V2 activation states at the end of the retention phase in a visual imagery and a visual STM task. V1/V2 TMS facilitated performance in both tasks; the finding that imagery and STM interacted with TMS in the same way suggests that the two processes have similar effects on early visual cortical excitability. In Experiment 2, we investigated V1/V2 activation states at the beginning of the retention phase. V1/V2 TMS impaired performance in the visual STM task, whereas it had no effect on the imagery task. Taken together, our findings show that the late phases of the early visual cortical activation state associated with visual imagery and visual STM are similar; differences between the two processes are apparent in the early phases of the tasks. Our results also suggest that the causal role of the early visual cortex in visual STM includes both the initial translation of the visual input into working memory and the subsequent maintenance of the mental representation. Finally, our findings indicate that visual STM sensory recruitment in working memory might act via excitability modulation of V1/V2 neurons.

  6. How do subvocal rehearsal and general attentional resources contribute to verbal short-term memory span?

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Whether rehearsal has a causal role in verbal STM has been controversial in the literature. Recent theories of working memory emphasize a role of attentional resources, but leave unclear how they contribute to verbal STM. Two experiments (with 49 and 102 adult participants, respectively) followed up previous studies with children, aiming to clarify the contributions of attentional capacity and rehearsal to verbal STM. Word length and presentation modality were manipulated. Experiment 1 focused on order errors, Experiment 2 on predicting individual differences in span from attentional capacity and articulation rate. Structural equation modeling showed clearly a major role of attentional capacity as a predictor of verbal STM span; but was inconclusive on whether rehearsal efficiency is an additional cause or a consequence of verbal STM. The effects of word length and modality on STM were replicated; a significant interaction was also found, showing a larger modality effect for long than short words, which replicates a previous finding on children. Item errors occurred more often with long words and correlated negatively with articulation rate. This set of findings seems to point to a role of rehearsal in maintaining item information. The probability of order errors per position increased linearly with list length. A revised version of a neo-Piagetian model was fit to the data of Experiment 2. That model was based on two parameters: attentional capacity (independently measured) and a free parameter representing loss of partly-activated information. The model could partly account for the results, but underestimated STM performance of the participants with smaller attentional capacity. It is concluded that modeling of verbal STM should consider individual and developmental differences in attentional capacity, rehearsal rate, and (perhaps) order representation. PMID:25798114

  7. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-11-10

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  8. Memory integration in amnesia: prior knowledge supports verbal short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Race, Elizabeth; Palombo, Daniela J; Cadden, Margaret; Burke, Keely; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-04-01

    Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) have traditionally been considered cognitively distinct. However, it is known that STM can improve when to-be-remembered information appears in contexts that make contact with prior knowledge, suggesting a more interactive relationship between STM and LTM. The current study investigated whether the ability to leverage LTM in support of STM critically depends on the integrity of the hippocampus. Specifically, we investigated whether the hippocampus differentially supports between-domain versus within-domain STM-LTM integration given prior evidence that the representational domain of the elements being integrated in memory is a critical determinant of whether memory performance depends on the hippocampus. In Experiment 1, we investigated hippocampal contributions to within-domain STM-LTM integration by testing whether immediate verbal recall of words improves in MTL amnesic patients when words are presented in familiar verbal contexts (meaningful sentences) compared to unfamiliar verbal contexts (random word lists). Patients demonstrated a robust sentence superiority effect, whereby verbal STM performance improved in familiar compared to unfamiliar verbal contexts, and the magnitude of this effect did not differ from that in controls. In Experiment 2, we investigated hippocampal contributions to between-domain STM-LTM integration by testing whether immediate verbal recall of digits improves in MTL amnesic patients when digits are presented in a familiar visuospatial context (a typical keypad layout) compared to an unfamiliar visuospatial context (a random keypad layout). Immediate verbal recall improved in both patients and controls when digits were presented in the familiar compared to the unfamiliar keypad array, indicating a preserved ability to integrate activated verbal information with stored visuospatial knowledge. Together, these results demonstrate that immediate verbal recall in amnesia can benefit from two

  9. Scanning Tunneling Microscope Data Acquistion and Control System

    1995-02-01

    SHOESCAN is a PC based code that acquires and displays data for Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (STM). SHOESCAN interfaces with the STM through external electronic feedback and raster control circuits that are controlled by I/O boards on the PC bus. Data is displayed on a separate color monitor that is interfaced to the PC through an additional frame-grabber board. SHOESCAN can acquire a wide range of surface topographic information as well as surface electronic structure information.

  10. Development and application of multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tomonobu; Kubo, Osamu; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Higuchi, Seiji; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Okuda, Taichi; Kuwahara, Yuji; Takami, Kazuhiro; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-04-01

    In the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  11. The first echinoderm poly-U-binding factor 60 kDa (PUF60) from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus): Molecular characterization, inducible expression and involvement of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Sun, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiao; Hu, Chaoqun; Qian, Jing; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-11-01

    Poly-U-binding factor 60 kDa (PUF60), also known as Ro RNA binding protein (RoBPI) and FBP interacting repressor (FIR), is a multifunctional protein that is involved in a variety of nuclear processes including pre-mRNA splicing, apoptosis and transcription regulation. In this study, the first echinoderm PUF60 named StmPUF60 was identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The StmPUF60 cDNA is 4503 bp in length, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 34 bp, a 3'-UTR of 2963 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1506 bp that encoding a protein of 501 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 54.15 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 5.15. The putative StmPUF60 protein possesses all the main characteristics of known PUF60 proteins, including two RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2), a C-terminal PUMP domain and two conserved nucleic acid-binding ribonucleoprotein sequences (RNP1 and RNP2). For the gene structure, StmPUF60 contains nine exons separated by eight introns. In addition, the highest level of StmPUF60 mRNA expression was noticed in the gonad, followed by coelomocytes, intestine, respiratory tree and body wall. In in vivo experiments, the expression of StmPUF60 mRNA in coelomocytes and intestine was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenge, suggesting that the sea cucumber PUF60 might play critical roles in the innate immune defense against bacterial infections. Moreover, we further confirmed that overexpressed StmPUF60 could induce apoptosis, and this function of StmPUF60 may be one of the innate immune defense mechanisms for sea cucumber against pathogen infections.

  12. Open Bibliography for Science, Technology, and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The concept of Open Bibliography in science, technology and medicine (STM) is introduced as a combination of Open Source tools, Open specifications and Open bibliographic data. An Openly searchable and navigable network of bibliographic information and associated knowledge representations, a Bibliographic Knowledge Network, across all branches of Science, Technology and Medicine, has been designed and initiated. For this large scale endeavour, the engagement and cooperation of the multiple stakeholders in STM publishing - authors, librarians, publishers and administrators - is sought. PMID:21999661

  13. Visual processing in reading disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and its contribution to basic reading ability

    PubMed Central

    Kibby, Michelle Y.; Dyer, Sarah M.; Vadnais, Sarah A.; Jagger, Audreyana C.; Casher, Gabriel A.; Stacy, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Whether visual processing deficits are common in reading disorders (RD), and related to reading ability in general, has been debated for decades. The type of visual processing affected also is debated, although visual discrimination and short-term memory (STM) may be more commonly related to reading ability. Reading disorders are frequently comorbid with ADHD, and children with ADHD often have subclinical reading problems. Hence, children with ADHD were used as a comparison group in this study. ADHD and RD may be dissociated in terms of visual processing. Whereas RD may be associated with deficits in visual discrimination and STM for order, ADHD is associated with deficits in visual-spatial processing. Thus, we hypothesized that children with RD would perform worse than controls and children with ADHD only on a measure of visual discrimination and a measure of visual STM that requires memory for order. We expected all groups would perform comparably on the measure of visual STM that does not require sequential processing. We found children with RD or ADHD were commensurate to controls on measures of visual discrimination and visual STM that do not require sequential processing. In contrast, both RD groups (RD, RD/ADHD) performed worse than controls on the measure of visual STM that requires memory for order, and children with comorbid RD/ADHD performed worse than those with ADHD. In addition, of the three visual measures, only sequential visual STM predicted reading ability. Hence, our findings suggest there is a deficit in visual sequential STM that is specific to RD and is related to basic reading ability. The source of this deficit is worthy of further research, but it may include both reduced memory for order and poorer verbal mediation. PMID:26579020

  14. A l-Lysine Transporter of High Stereoselectivity of the Amino Acid-Polyamine-Organocation (APC) Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Olkhova, Elena; Malviya, Viveka Nand; Grell, Ernst; Michel, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins of the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily transport amino acids and amines across membranes and play an important role in the regulation of cellular processes. We report the heterologous production of the LysP-related transporter STM2200 from Salmonella typhimurium in Escherichia coli, its purification, and functional characterization. STM2200 is assumed to be a proton-dependent APC transporter of l-lysine. The functional interaction between basic amino acids and STM2200 was investigated by thermoanalytical methods, i.e. differential scanning and isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of l-lysine to STM2200 in its solubilized monomer form is entropy-driven. It is characterized by a dissociation constant of 40 μm at pH 5.9 and is highly selective; no evidence was found for the binding of l-arginine, l-ornithine, l-2,4-diaminobutyric acid, and l-alanine. d-Lysine is bound 45 times more weakly than its l-chiral form. We thus postulate that STM2200 functions as a specific transport protein. Based on the crystal structure of ApcT (Shaffer, P. L., Goehring, A., Shankaranarayanan, A., and Gouaux, E. (2009) Science 325, 1010–1014), a proton-dependent amino acid transporter of the APC superfamily, a homology model of STM2200 was created. Docking studies allowed identification of possible ligand binding sites. The resulting predictions indicated that Glu-222 and Arg-395 of STM2200 are markedly involved in ligand binding, whereas Lys-163 is suggested to be of structural and functional relevance. Selected variants of STM2200 where these three amino acid residues were substituted using single site-directed mutagenesis showed no evidence for l-lysine binding by isothermal titration calorimetry, which confirmed the predictions. Molecular aspects of the observed ligand specificity are discussed. PMID:24257746

  15. Visual processing in reading disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and its contribution to basic reading ability.

    PubMed

    Kibby, Michelle Y; Dyer, Sarah M; Vadnais, Sarah A; Jagger, Audreyana C; Casher, Gabriel A; Stacy, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Whether visual processing deficits are common in reading disorders (RD), and related to reading ability in general, has been debated for decades. The type of visual processing affected also is debated, although visual discrimination and short-term memory (STM) may be more commonly related to reading ability. Reading disorders are frequently comorbid with ADHD, and children with ADHD often have subclinical reading problems. Hence, children with ADHD were used as a comparison group in this study. ADHD and RD may be dissociated in terms of visual processing. Whereas RD may be associated with deficits in visual discrimination and STM for order, ADHD is associated with deficits in visual-spatial processing. Thus, we hypothesized that children with RD would perform worse than controls and children with ADHD only on a measure of visual discrimination and a measure of visual STM that requires memory for order. We expected all groups would perform comparably on the measure of visual STM that does not require sequential processing. We found children with RD or ADHD were commensurate to controls on measures of visual discrimination and visual STM that do not require sequential processing. In contrast, both RD groups (RD, RD/ADHD) performed worse than controls on the measure of visual STM that requires memory for order, and children with comorbid RD/ADHD performed worse than those with ADHD. In addition, of the three visual measures, only sequential visual STM predicted reading ability. Hence, our findings suggest there is a deficit in visual sequential STM that is specific to RD and is related to basic reading ability. The source of this deficit is worthy of further research, but it may include both reduced memory for order and poorer verbal mediation.

  16. Design and Analysis of Complex D-Regions in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yindeesuk, Sukit

    2009-01-01

    STM design provisions, such as those in Appendix A of ACI318-08, consist of rules for evaluating the capacity of the load-resisting truss that is idealized to carry the forces through the D-Region. These code rules were primarily derived from test data on simple D-Regions such as deep beams and corbels. However, these STM provisions are taken as…

  17. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  18. Development and Application of Multiple-Probe Scanning Probe Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Kubo, O.; Shingaya, Y.; Higuchi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Jiang, C. S.; Okuda, T.; Kuwahara, Y.; Takami, K.; Aono, M.

    2012-04-03

    the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  19. Salmonella contamination of cereal ingredients for animal feeds.

    PubMed

    Davies, R H; Wales, A D

    2013-10-25

    Cereal ingredients for animal feedstuffs may become contaminated by Salmonella on their farms of origin. This is often concentrated in multiple foci, owing to contamination by rodents and other wildlife which may be missed by routine sampling, and may involve serovars of particular public health significance, such as Salmonella Typhimurium (STM). The study examined such contamination in domestically-produced cereal ingredients in the United Kingdom. Cereal-producing farms with associated cattle or pig enterprises (43) and feedmills (6) were investigated, following the isolation of STM from their premises (feedmills) or STM DT104 from their livestock (farms) by routine surveillance. Cereal samples from feedmills yielded two STM isolates from the same premises, of the same phage types as were isolated from wild bird faeces at ingredient intake and product loading areas. Farm investigations identified numerous Salmonella serovars, including STM, on grain harvesting and handling equipment, in grain storage areas, and in wildlife samples. Mice were removed from one pig farm and shed Salmonella Derby and Salmonella Bovismorbificans for 10 months afterwards. Grain stores more than one kilometre away from livestock areas were rarely found to be contaminated with STM. The principal issues with Salmonella contamination of cereals appeared to be the use of livestock areas as temporary grain stores on cattle farms, and access to stored grain by wildlife and domestic animals. PMID:23915993

  20. Quantitative analysis of scanning tunneling microscopy images of mixed-ligand-functionalized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, Fabio; Ong, Quy Khac; Albonetti, Cristiano; Liscio, Fabiola; Longobardi, Maria; Mali, Kunal S; Ciesielski, Artur; Reguera, Javier; Renner, Christoph; De Feyter, Steven; Samorì, Paolo; Stellacci, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Ligand-protected gold nanoparticles exhibit large local curvatures, features rapidly varying over small scales, and chemical heterogeneity. Their imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can, in principle, provide direct information on the architecture of their ligand shell, yet STM images require laborious analysis and are challenging to interpret. Here, we report a straightforward, robust, and rigorous method for the quantitative analysis of the multiscale features contained in STM images of samples consisting of functionalized Au nanoparticles deposited onto Au/mica. The method relies on the analysis of the topographical power spectral density (PSD) and allows us to extract the characteristic length scales of the features exhibited by nanoparticles in STM images. For the mixed-ligand-protected Au nanoparticles analyzed here, the characteristic length scale is 1.2 ± 0.1 nm, whereas for the homoligand Au NPs this scale is 0.75 ± 0.05 nm. These length scales represent spatial correlations independent of scanning parameters, and hence the features in the PSD can be ascribed to a fingerprint of the STM contrast of ligand-protected nanoparticles. PSD spectra from images recorded at different laboratories using different microscopes and operators can be overlapped across most of the frequency range, proving that the features in the STM images of nanoparticles can be compared and reproduced.

  1. Atomic scale study of corrugating and anticorrugating states on the bare Si(1 0 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yengui, Mayssa; Pinto, Henry P.; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Riedel, Damien

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we study the origin of the corrugating and anticorrugating states through the electronic properties of the Si(1 0 0) surface via a low-temperature (9 K) scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Our study is based on the analysis of the STM topographies corrugation variations when related to the shift of the local density of states (LDOS) maximum in the [1 \\bar{{1}} 0] direction. Our experimental results are correlated with numerical simulations using the density-functional theory with hybrid Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional to simulate the STM topographies, the projected density of states variations at different depths in the silicon surface as well as the three dimensional partial charge density distributions in real-space. This work reveals that the Si(1 0 0) surface exhibits two anticorrugating states at +0.8 and +2.8 V that are associated with a phase shift of the LDOS maximum in the unoccupied states STM topographies. By comparing the calculated data with our experimental results, we have been able to identify the link between the variations of the STM topographies corrugation and the shift of the LDOS maximum observed experimentally. Each surface voltage at which the STM topographies corrugation drops is defined as anticorrugating states. In addition, we have evidenced a sharp jump in the tunnel current when the second LDOS maximum shift is probed, whose origin is discussed and associated with the presence of Van Hove singularities.

  2. Analysis of Two Complementary Single-Gene Deletion Mutant Libraries of Salmonella Typhimurium in Intraperitoneal Infection of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A.; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C.; Desai, Prerak; Valenzuela, Camila; Porwollik, Steffen; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A.; McClelland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Two pools of individual single gene deletion (SGD) mutants of S. Typhimurium 14028s encompassing deletions of 3,923 annotated non-essential ORFs and sRNAs were screened by intraperitoneal (IP) injection in BALB/c mice followed by recovery from spleen and liver 2 days post infection. The relative abundance of each mutant was measured by microarray hybridization. The two mutant libraries differed in the orientation of the antibiotic resistance cassettes (either sense-oriented KanR, SGD-K, or antisense-oriented CamR, SGD-C). Consistent systemic colonization defects were observed in both libraries and both organs for hundreds of mutants of genes previously reported to be important after IP injection in this animal model, and for about 100 new candidate genes required for systemic colonization. Four mutants with a range of apparent fitness defects were confirmed using competitive infections with the wild-type parental strain: ΔSTM0286, ΔSTM0551, ΔSTM2363, and ΔSTM3356. Two mutants, ΔSTM0286 and ΔSTM2363, were then complemented in trans with a plasmid encoding an intact copy of the corresponding wild-type gene, and regained the ability to fully colonize BALB/c mice systemically. These results suggest the presence of many more undiscovered Salmonella genes with phenotypes in IP infection of BALB/c mice, and validate the libraries for application to other systems. PMID:26779130

  3. Analysis of Two Complementary Single-Gene Deletion Mutant Libraries of Salmonella Typhimurium in Intraperitoneal Infection of BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Desai, Prerak; Valenzuela, Camila; Porwollik, Steffen; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A; McClelland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two pools of individual single gene deletion (SGD) mutants of S. Typhimurium 14028s encompassing deletions of 3,923 annotated non-essential ORFs and sRNAs were screened by intraperitoneal (IP) injection in BALB/c mice followed by recovery from spleen and liver 2 days post infection. The relative abundance of each mutant was measured by microarray hybridization. The two mutant libraries differed in the orientation of the antibiotic resistance cassettes (either sense-oriented Kan(R), SGD-K, or antisense-oriented Cam(R), SGD-C). Consistent systemic colonization defects were observed in both libraries and both organs for hundreds of mutants of genes previously reported to be important after IP injection in this animal model, and for about 100 new candidate genes required for systemic colonization. Four mutants with a range of apparent fitness defects were confirmed using competitive infections with the wild-type parental strain: ΔSTM0286, ΔSTM0551, ΔSTM2363, and ΔSTM3356. Two mutants, ΔSTM0286 and ΔSTM2363, were then complemented in trans with a plasmid encoding an intact copy of the corresponding wild-type gene, and regained the ability to fully colonize BALB/c mice systemically. These results suggest the presence of many more undiscovered Salmonella genes with phenotypes in IP infection of BALB/c mice, and validate the libraries for application to other systems. PMID:26779130

  4. Structural and electronic properties of graphite and graphite intercalation compounds MC[sub 8] (M = K, Rb, Cs) governing their scanning tunneling microscopy images

    SciTech Connect

    Whangbo, M.H.; Liang, W.; Ren, J. ); Magonov, S.N.; Wawkuschewski, A. )

    1994-08-04

    Several puzzling observations in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and its intercalation compounds MC[sub 8] (M = K, Rb, Cs) were investigated on the basis of atom-atom potential and Coulombic interaction energy calculations. The charge or spin density wave state of a graphite monolayer is found inconsistent with an identical peak registry of the HOPG STM images obtained at plus and minus bias voltages. Simultaneous STM/AFM measurements of HOPG show the STM and AFM images to have an identical peak registry, which implies that the local hardness of the surface monolayer is larger at the B-site than at the A-site. We confirm this implication by estimating the local hardness in the surface monolayer of a graphite bilayer in terms of atom-atom potential calculations. The essential characteristics of the Moire STM images of HOPG are correctly predicted by the local hardness map obtained for the surface monolayer of a graphite bilayer in terms of atom-atom potential calculations. This supports the notion that the tip-force-induced topography change in the surface monolayer is generally responsible for Moire STM patterns in layered materials. 29 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Short-Term Memory Depends on Dissociable Medial Temporal Lobe Regions in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Das, Sandhitsu R; Mancuso, Lauren; Olson, Ingrid R; Arnold, Steven E; Wolk, David A

    2016-05-01

    Short-term memory (STM) has generally been thought to be independent of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in contrast to long-term memory (LTM). Prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a condition in which the MTL is a major early focus of pathology and LTM is thought disproportionately affected relative to STM. However, recent studies have suggested a role for the MTL in STM, particularly hippocampus, when binding of different elements is required. Other work has suggested involvement of extrahippocampal MTL structures, particularly in STM tasks that involve item-level memory. We examined STM for individual objects, locations, and object-location conjunctions in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), often associated with prodromal AD. Relative to age-matched, cognitively normal controls, MCI patients not only displayed impairment on object-location conjunctions but were similarly impaired for non-bound objects and locations. Moreover, across all participants, these conditions displayed dissociable correlations of cortical thinning along the long axis of the MTL and associated cortical nodes of anterior and posterior MTL networks. These findings support the role of the MTL in visual STM tasks and the division of labor of MTL in support of different types of memory representations, overlapping with findings in LTM.

  6. Thalamo-Cortical Disruption Contributes to Short-Term Memory Deficits in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Damage.

    PubMed

    Voets, Natalie L; Menke, Ricarda A L; Jbabdi, Saad; Husain, Masud; Stacey, Richard; Carpenter, Katherine; Adcock, Jane E

    2015-11-01

    Short-term (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) have largely been considered as separate brain systems reflecting fronto-parietal and medial temporal lobe (MTL) functions, respectively. This functional dichotomy has been called into question by evidence of deficits on aspects of working memory in patients with MTL damage, suggesting a potentially direct hippocampal contribution to STM. As the hippocampus has direct anatomical connections with the thalamus, we tested the hypothesis that damage to thalamic nuclei regulating cortico-cortical interactions may contribute to STM deficits in patients with hippocampal dysfunction. We used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging-based tractography to identify anatomical subdivisions in patients with MTL epilepsy. From these, we measured resting-state functional connectivity with detailed cortical divisions of the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Whereas thalamo-temporal functional connectivity reflected LTM performance, thalamo-prefrontal functional connectivity specifically predicted STM performance. Notably, patients with hippocampal volume loss showed thalamic volume loss, most prominent in the pulvinar region, not detected in patients with normal hippocampal volumes. Aberrant thalamo-cortical connectivity in the epileptic hemisphere was mirrored in a loss of behavioral association with STM performance specifically in patients with hippocampal atrophy. These findings identify thalamo-cortical disruption as a potential mechanism contributing to STM deficits in the context of MTL damage.

  7. Thalamo-Cortical Disruption Contributes to Short-Term Memory Deficits in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Damage

    PubMed Central

    Voets, Natalie L.; Menke, Ricarda A. L.; Jbabdi, Saad; Husain, Masud; Stacey, Richard; Carpenter, Katherine; Adcock, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Short-term (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) have largely been considered as separate brain systems reflecting fronto-parietal and medial temporal lobe (MTL) functions, respectively. This functional dichotomy has been called into question by evidence of deficits on aspects of working memory in patients with MTL damage, suggesting a potentially direct hippocampal contribution to STM. As the hippocampus has direct anatomical connections with the thalamus, we tested the hypothesis that damage to thalamic nuclei regulating cortico-cortical interactions may contribute to STM deficits in patients with hippocampal dysfunction. We used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging-based tractography to identify anatomical subdivisions in patients with MTL epilepsy. From these, we measured resting-state functional connectivity with detailed cortical divisions of the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Whereas thalamo-temporal functional connectivity reflected LTM performance, thalamo-prefrontal functional connectivity specifically predicted STM performance. Notably, patients with hippocampal volume loss showed thalamic volume loss, most prominent in the pulvinar region, not detected in patients with normal hippocampal volumes. Aberrant thalamo-cortical connectivity in the epileptic hemisphere was mirrored in a loss of behavioral association with STM performance specifically in patients with hippocampal atrophy. These findings identify thalamo-cortical disruption as a potential mechanism contributing to STM deficits in the context of MTL damage. PMID:26009613

  8. Thalamo-Cortical Disruption Contributes to Short-Term Memory Deficits in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Damage.

    PubMed

    Voets, Natalie L; Menke, Ricarda A L; Jbabdi, Saad; Husain, Masud; Stacey, Richard; Carpenter, Katherine; Adcock, Jane E

    2015-11-01

    Short-term (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) have largely been considered as separate brain systems reflecting fronto-parietal and medial temporal lobe (MTL) functions, respectively. This functional dichotomy has been called into question by evidence of deficits on aspects of working memory in patients with MTL damage, suggesting a potentially direct hippocampal contribution to STM. As the hippocampus has direct anatomical connections with the thalamus, we tested the hypothesis that damage to thalamic nuclei regulating cortico-cortical interactions may contribute to STM deficits in patients with hippocampal dysfunction. We used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging-based tractography to identify anatomical subdivisions in patients with MTL epilepsy. From these, we measured resting-state functional connectivity with detailed cortical divisions of the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Whereas thalamo-temporal functional connectivity reflected LTM performance, thalamo-prefrontal functional connectivity specifically predicted STM performance. Notably, patients with hippocampal volume loss showed thalamic volume loss, most prominent in the pulvinar region, not detected in patients with normal hippocampal volumes. Aberrant thalamo-cortical connectivity in the epileptic hemisphere was mirrored in a loss of behavioral association with STM performance specifically in patients with hippocampal atrophy. These findings identify thalamo-cortical disruption as a potential mechanism contributing to STM deficits in the context of MTL damage. PMID:26009613

  9. Neural evidence for a 3-state model of visual short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Nee, Derek Evan; Jonides, John

    2013-07-01

    Recent research has suggested that short-term memory (STM) can be partitioned into three distinct states. By this model, a single item is held in the focus of attention making it available for immediate processing (focus of attention), a capacity-limited set of additional items is actively maintained for future processing (direct access region), and other recently presented information is passively active, but can nevertheless influence ongoing cognition (activated portion of long-term memory). While there is both behavioral and neural support for this 3-state model in verbal STM, it is unclear whether the model generalizes to non-verbal STM. Here, we tested a 3-state model of visual STM using fMRI. We found a triple dissociation of regions involved in the access of each hypothesized state. The inferior parietal cortex mediated access to the focus of attention, the medial temporal lobe (MTL) including the hippocampus mediated access to the direct access region, and the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) mediated access to the activated portion of long-term memory. Direct comparison with previously collected verbal STM data revealed overlapping neural activations involved in the access of each state across different forms of content suggesting that mechanisms of access are domain general. These data support a 3-state model of STM.

  10. Salmonella contamination of cereal ingredients for animal feeds.

    PubMed

    Davies, R H; Wales, A D

    2013-10-25

    Cereal ingredients for animal feedstuffs may become contaminated by Salmonella on their farms of origin. This is often concentrated in multiple foci, owing to contamination by rodents and other wildlife which may be missed by routine sampling, and may involve serovars of particular public health significance, such as Salmonella Typhimurium (STM). The study examined such contamination in domestically-produced cereal ingredients in the United Kingdom. Cereal-producing farms with associated cattle or pig enterprises (43) and feedmills (6) were investigated, following the isolation of STM from their premises (feedmills) or STM DT104 from their livestock (farms) by routine surveillance. Cereal samples from feedmills yielded two STM isolates from the same premises, of the same phage types as were isolated from wild bird faeces at ingredient intake and product loading areas. Farm investigations identified numerous Salmonella serovars, including STM, on grain harvesting and handling equipment, in grain storage areas, and in wildlife samples. Mice were removed from one pig farm and shed Salmonella Derby and Salmonella Bovismorbificans for 10 months afterwards. Grain stores more than one kilometre away from livestock areas were rarely found to be contaminated with STM. The principal issues with Salmonella contamination of cereals appeared to be the use of livestock areas as temporary grain stores on cattle farms, and access to stored grain by wildlife and domestic animals.

  11. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, Michael George

    Advances in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) instrumentation and applications are presented. An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope incorporating computer-controlled two-dimensional sample translation and in vacuo tip and sample transfer was developed. Its performance is documented through large-area and atomic -resolution imaging of highly stepped Si(111) 7 x 7 reconstructed surfaces and physisorbed clusters on graphite. An STM with automated approach and intra-Dewar spring suspension was developed for operation in cryogenic liquids. A high performance digital signal processor (DSP) based control system was constructed, and software with advanced spectroscopic imaging and data processing capabilities was developed. The feasibility of individual-molecule vibrational spectroscopy via STM-detected inelastic electron tunneling is assessed. In preliminary experiments, a low-temperature STM was used for energy gap and phonon spectroscopy of superconducting Pb films. The first STM observation of phonon density of states effects in a superconductor is reported. A systematic UHV STM imaging and spectroscopy study of 2H-MoS_2 was conducted. Atom -resolved images from three distinct imaging modes are presented. Occasional appearance of negative differential resistance (NDR) in I vs. V measurements is traced to changing tip electronic structure rather than localized surface states. Other potential NDR mechanisms are discussed including electron trap charging and resonant tunneling through a double-barrier quantum well structure arising from layer separation in the MoS_2 crystal. DNA was imaged at atomic resolution with a UHV STM. Images show double-helical structure, base pairs, and atomic-scale substructure. Experimental STM profiles have atom-for-atom correlation with the A-DNA van der Waals surface. This work demonstrates the potential of the STM for characterization of large biomolecular structures. Impurity-pinned steps on silicon and gold surfaces

  12. Remediation of language processing in aphasia: Improving activation and maintenance of linguistic representations in (verbal) short-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Kalinyak-Fliszar, Michelene; Kohen, Francine; Martin, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Background Verbal short-term memory (STM) impairments are invariably present in aphasia. Word processing involves a minimal form of verbal STM, i.e., the time course over which semantic and phonological representations are activated and maintained until they are comprehended, produced, or repeated. Thus it is reasonable that impairments of word processing and verbal STM may co-occur. The co-occurrence of language and STM impairments in aphasia has motivated an active area of research that has revealed much about the relationship of these two systems and the effect of their impairment on language function and verbal learning (Freedman & Martin, 2001; Martin & Saffran, 1999; Trojano & Grossi, 1995). In keeping with this view a number of researchers have developed treatment protocols to improve verbal STM in order to improve language function (e.g., Koenig-Bruhin & Studer-Eichenberger, 2007). This account of aphasia predicts that treatment of a fundamental ability, such as STM, which supports language function, should lead to improvements that generalise to content and tasks beyond those implemented in treatment. Aims We investigated the efficacy of a treatment for language impairment that targets two language support processes: verbal short-term memory (STM) and executive processing, in the context of a language task (repetition). We hypothesised that treatment of these abilities would improve repetition abilities and performance on other language tasks that require STM. Method A single-participant, multiple-baseline, multiple-probe design across behaviours was used with a participant with conduction aphasia. The treatment involved repetition of words and nonwords under three “interval” conditions, which varied the time between hearing and repeating the stimulus. Measures of treatment effects included acquisition, maintenance, and follow-up data, effect sizes, and pre- and post-treatment performance on a test battery that varies the STM and executive function

  13. Imaging soft materials with scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Woodward, J T; Zasadzinski, J A

    1996-01-01

    By modifying freeze-fracture replication, a standard electron microscopy fixation technique, for use with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), a variety of soft, non-conductive biomaterials can be imaged at high resolution in three dimensions. Metal replicas make near ideal samples for STM in comparison to the original biological materials. Modifications include a 0.1 micron backing layer of silver and mounting the replicas on a fine-mesh silver filters to enhance the rigidity of the metal replica. This is required unless STM imaging is carried out in vacuum; otherwise, a liquid film of contamination physically connects the STM tip with the sample. This mechanical coupling leads to exaggerated height measurements; the enhanced rigidity of the thicker replica eliminates much of the height amplification. Further improvement was obtained by imaging in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Calibration and reproducibility were tested with replicas of well characterized bilayers of cadmium arachidate on mica that provide regular 5.5 nm steps. We have used the STM/replica technique to examine the ripple shape and amplitude in the P beta phase of dimyristoylphosphatidyl-choline (DMPC) in water. STM images were analyzed using a cross-correlation averaging program to eliminate the effects of noise and the finite size and shapes of the metal grains that make up the replica. The correlation averaging allowed us to develop a composite ripple profile averaged over hundreds of individual ripples and different samples. The STM/replica technique is sufficiently general that it can be used to examine a variety of hydrated lipid and protein samples at a lateral resolution of about 1 nm and a vertical resolution of about 0.3 nm. PMID:9601535

  14. High-stability cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope based on a closed-cycle cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Jason D.; Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Beaman, Daniel K.; Nazin, George V.; Ulrich, Stefan

    2014-10-15

    We report on the design and operation of a cryogenic ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope (STM) coupled to a closed-cycle cryostat (CCC). The STM is thermally linked to the CCC through helium exchange gas confined inside a volume enclosed by highly flexible rubber bellows. The STM is thus mechanically decoupled from the CCC, which results in a significant reduction of the mechanical noise transferred from the CCC to the STM. Noise analysis of the tunneling current shows current fluctuations up to 4% of the total current, which translates into tip-sample distance variations of up to 1.5 picometers. This noise level is sufficiently low for atomic-resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces. To demonstrate this, atomic-resolution images of Au(111) and NaCl(100)/Au(111) surfaces, as well as of carbon nanotubes deposited on Au(111), were obtained. Thermal drift analysis showed that under optimized conditions, the lateral stability of the STM scanner can be as low as 0.18 Å/h. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy measurements based on the lock-in technique were also carried out, and showed no detectable presence of noise from the closed-cycle cryostat. Using this cooling approach, temperatures as low as 16 K at the STM scanner have been achieved, with the complete cool-down of the system typically taking up to 12 h. These results demonstrate that the constructed CCC-coupled STM is a highly stable instrument capable of highly detailed spectroscopic investigations of materials and surfaces at the atomic scale.

  15. The first echinoderm gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus).

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Luo, Xing; Wang, Yanhong; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been described as a key enzyme that facilitating the processing and presentation of major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted antigen in mammals. In this study, the first echinoderm GILT named StmGILT was identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The StmGILT cDNA is 1529 bp in length, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 87 bp, a 3'-UTR of 674 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 768 bp that encoding a protein of 255 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 27.82 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 4.73. The putative StmGILT protein possesses all the main characteristics of known GILT proteins, including a signature sequence, a reductase active site CXXC, twelve conserved cysteines, and two potential N-linked glycosylation sites. For the gene structure, StmGILT contains four exons separated by three introns. In the promoter region of StmGILT gene, an NF-κB binding site and an IFN-γ activation site were found. The thiol reductase activity of recombinant StmGILT protein was also demonstrated in this study. In addition, the highest level of mRNA expression was noticed in coelomocytes of S. monotuberculatus. In in vitro experiments performed in coelomocytes, the expression of StmGILT mRNA was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), inactivated bacteria or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] challenge, suggested that the sea cucumber GILT might play critical roles in the innate immune defending against bacterial and viral infections.

  16. What is the orientation of the tip in a scanning tunneling microscope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2015-05-01

    The atomic structure and electronic properties of the tip apex can strongly affect the contrast of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. This is a critical issue in STM imaging given the, to date unsolved, experimental limitations in precise control of the tip apex atomic structure. Definition of statistically robust procedures to indirectly obtain information on the tip apex structure is highly desirable as it would open up for more rigorous interpretation and comparison of STM images from different experiments. To this end, here we introduce a statistical correlation analysis method to obtain information on the local geometry and orientation of the tip used in STM experiments based on large scale simulations. The key quantity is the relative brightness correlation of constant-current topographs between experimental and simulated data. This correlation can be analyzed statistically for a large number of modeled tip orientations and geometries. Assuming a stable tip during the STM scans and based on the correlation distribution, it is possible to determine the tip orientations that are most likely present in an STM experiment, and exclude other orientations. This is especially important for substrates such as highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) since its STM contrast is strongly tip dependent, which makes interpretation and comparison of STM images very challenging. We illustrate the applicability of our method considering the HOPG surface in combination with tungsten tip models of two different apex geometries and 18,144 different orientations. We calculate constant-current profiles along the < 1 1 bar 0 0 > direction of the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in the | V | ⩽ 1V bias voltage range, and compare them with experimental data. We find that a blunt tip model provides better correlation with the experiment for a wider range of tip orientations and bias voltages than a sharp tip model. Such a combination of experiments and large scale simulations opens up

  17. Determination of surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features associated with vacancies were observed in the STM win be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites

  18. Structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features observed in the STM will be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites) and the presence of contaminants

  19. Adlayer structures of anthracenthiol on Au(111) after removal of covering multilayers with probe scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Waleed

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of anthracene-2-thiol (AnT) on Au(111) have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A preparation of AnT-SAMs from ethanolic solutions results in a deposition of multilayer films. As a result, the general features that have been frequently observed for different systems of thiol-modified gold surfaces are hidden in AnT-SAMs. The thin overlayers on top of the chemisorbed anthracenethiolate monolayer are removed by the STM-tip after a repetitive scanning over the same part of the SAM at nondestructive imaging conditions. After ∼2 h of consecutive and continuous STM scanning, smooth AnT-SAM surfaces were formed. The polished surfaces contain vacancy depressions rather than the elevated gold islands which are typically formed after the adsorption of purely aromatic thiols such as AnT on Au(111). The STM data showed the coexistence of two distinct stable commensurate phases, namely, α and β. High-resolution STM images revealed a (√{ 3 } × 8) structure for the α phase and a (√{ 7 } × 4) R11° structure for the β phase whose unit cells contain, respectively, four and two molecules. The β phase was found to be 50% less densely packed than the α phase. The lower molecular density of the β phase should be correlated with a significantly larger tilt angle of the AnT molecular backbone with respect to the surface normal.

  20. Refinement of Strut-and-Tie Model for Reinforced Concrete Deep Beams.

    PubMed

    Panjehpour, Mohammad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Voo, Yen Lei

    2015-01-01

    Deep beams are commonly used in tall buildings, offshore structures, and foundations. According to many codes and standards, strut-and-tie model (STM) is recommended as a rational approach for deep beam analyses. This research focuses on the STM recommended by ACI 318-11 and AASHTO LRFD and uses experimental results to modify the strut effectiveness factor in STM for reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams. This study aims to refine STM through the strut effectiveness factor and increase result accuracy. Six RC deep beams with different shear span to effective-depth ratios (a/d) of 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75, and 2.00 were experimentally tested under a four-point bending set-up. The ultimate shear strength of deep beams obtained from non-linear finite element modeling and STM recommended by ACI 318-11 as well as AASHTO LRFD (2012) were compared with the experimental results. An empirical equation was proposed to modify the principal tensile strain value in the bottle-shaped strut of deep beams. The equation of the strut effectiveness factor from AASHTTO LRFD was then modified through the aforementioned empirical equation. An investigation on the failure mode and crack propagation in RC deep beams subjected to load was also conducted.

  1. Analysis and Prediction of Ice Shedding for a Full-Scale Heated Tail Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Work, Andrew; Douglass, Rebekah; Gazella, Matthew; Koster, Zakery; Turk, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    When helicopters are to fly in icing conditions, it is necessary to consider the possibility of ice shed from the rotor blades. In 2013, a series of tests were conducted on a heated tail rotor at NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The tests produced several shed events that were captured on camera. Three of these shed events were captured at a sufficiently high frame rate to obtain multiple images of the shed ice in flight that had a sufficiently long section of shed ice for analysis. Analysis of these shed events is presented and compared to an analytical Shedding Trajectory Model (STM). The STM is developed and assumes that the ice breaks off instantly as it reaches the end of the blade, while frictional and viscous forces are used as parameters to fit the STM. The trajectory of each shed is compared to that predicted by the STM, where the STM provides information of the shed group of ice as a whole. The limitations of the model's underlying assumptions are discussed in comparison to experimental shed events.

  2. Structural changes in a Schiff base molecular assembly initiated by scanning tunneling microscopy tip.

    PubMed

    Tomak, A; Bacaksiz, C; Mendirek, G; Sahin, H; Hur, D; Görgün, K; Senger, R T; Birer, Ö; Peeters, F M; Zareie, H M

    2016-08-19

    We report the controlled self-organization and switching of newly designed Schiff base (E)-4-((4-(phenylethynyl) benzylidene) amino) benzenethiol (EPBB) molecules on a Au (111) surface at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) were used to image and analyze the conformational changes of the EPBB molecules. The conformational change of the molecules was induced by using the STM tip while increasing the tunneling current. The switching of a domain or island of molecules was shown to be induced by the STM tip during scanning. Unambiguous fingerprints of the switching mechanism were observed via STM/STS measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering was employed, to control and identify quantitatively the switching mechanism of molecules in a monolayer. Density functional theory calculations were also performed in order to understand the microscopic details of the switching mechanism. These calculations revealed that the molecular switching behavior stemmed from the strong interaction of the EPBB molecules with the STM tip. Our approach to controlling intermolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more sophisticated molecular machines. PMID:27378765

  3. Tip induced mechanical deformation of epitaxial graphene grown on reconstructed 6H-SiC(0001) surface during scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Meza, José Antonio Morán; Lubin, Christophe; Thoyer, François; Cousty, Jacques

    2015-01-26

    The structural and mechanical properties of an epitaxial graphene (EG) monolayer thermally grown on top of a 6H-SiC(0001) surface were studied by combined dynamic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). Experimental STM, dynamic STM and AFM images of EG on 6H-SiC(0001) show a lattice with a 1.9 nm period corresponding to the (6 × 6) quasi-cell of the SiC surface. The corrugation amplitude of this (6 × 6) quasi-cell, measured from AFM topographies, increases with the setpoint value of the frequency shift Δf (15-20 Hz, repulsive interaction). Excitation variations map obtained simultaneously with the AFM topography shows that larger dissipation values are measured in between the topographical bumps of the (6 × 6) quasi-cell. These results demonstrate that the AFM tip deforms the graphene monolayer. During recording in dynamic STM mode, a frequency shift (Δf) map is obtained in which Δf values range from 41 to 47 Hz (repulsive interaction). As a result, we deduced that the STM tip, also, provokes local mechanical distortions of the graphene monolayer. The origin of these tip-induced distortions is discussed in terms of electronic and mechanical properties of EG on 6H-SiC(0001).

  4. Gold nanoparticle-based enzyme-linked antibody-aptamer sandwich assay for detection of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenhe; Li, Jun; Pan, Dun; Li, Jiang; Song, Shiping; Rong, Mingge; Li, Zixi; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provides a convenient means for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM), which is important for rapid diagnosis of foodborne pathogens. However, conventional ELISA is limited by antibody-antigen immunoreactions and suffers from poor sensitivity and tedious sample pretreatment. Therefore, development of novel ELISA remains challenging. Herein, we designed a comprehensive strategy for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of STM with high specificity by gold nanoparticle-based enzyme-linked antibody-aptamer sandwich (nano-ELAAS) method. STM was captured and preconcentrated from samples with aptamer-modified magnetic particles, followed by binding with detector antibodies. Then nanoprobes carrying a large amount of reporter antibodies and horseradish peroxidase molecules were used for colorimetric signal amplification. Under the optimized reaction conditions, the nano-ELAAS assay had a quantitative detection range from 1 × 10(3) to 1 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1), a limit of detection of 1 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1), and a selectivity of >10-fold for STM in samples containing other bacteria at higher concentration with an assay time less than 3 h. In addition, the developed nanoprobes were improved in terms of detection range and/or sensitivity when compared with two commercial enzyme-labeled antibody signal reporters. Finally, the nano-ELAAS method was demonstrated to work well in milk samples, a common source of STM contamination.

  5. Chronic sleep deprivation differentially affects short and long-term operant memory in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Harini C; Noakes, Eric J; Lyons, Lisa C

    2016-10-01

    The induction, formation and maintenance of memory represent dynamic processes modulated by multiple factors including the circadian clock and sleep. Chronic sleep restriction has become common in modern society due to occupational and social demands. Given the impact of cognitive impairments associated with sleep deprivation, there is a vital need for a simple animal model in which to study the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, with its simple nervous system, nocturnal sleep pattern and well-characterized learning paradigms, to assess the effects of two chronic sleep restriction paradigms on short-term (STM) and long-term (LTM) associative memory. The effects of sleep deprivation on memory were evaluated using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible, in which the animal associates a specific netted seaweed with failed swallowing attempts. We found that two nights of 6h sleep deprivation occurring during the first or last half of the night inhibited both STM and LTM. Moreover, the impairment in STM persisted for more than 24h. A milder, prolonged sleep deprivation paradigm consisting of 3 consecutive nights of 4h sleep deprivation also blocked STM, but had no effect on LTM. These experiments highlight differences in the sensitivity of STM and LTM to chronic sleep deprivation. Moreover, these results establish Aplysia as a valid model for studying the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and associative memory paving the way for future studies delineating the mechanisms through which sleep restriction affects memory formation. PMID:27555235

  6. High-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 structure and intrinsic molecular states.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiming; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-jun

    2014-10-01

    We review our achievements in exploring the high resolution imaging of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on the surface and adsorbates in a ultra-high vacuum system, by modifying the STM tip or introducing a decoupled layer onto the substrate. With an ultra-sharp tip, the highest resolution of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 reconstruction can be achieved, in which all the rest atoms and adatoms are observed simultaneously with high contrast. Further functionalization of STM tips can realize selective imaging of inherent molecular states. The electronic states of perylene and metal-phthalocyanine molecules are resolved with special decorated tips on metal substrates at low temperature. Moreover, we present two kinds of buffer layer: an organic molecular layer and epitaxially grown graphene to decouple the molecular electronic structure from the influence of the underlying metallic substrate and allow the direct imaging of the intrinsic orbitals of the adsorbed molecules. Theoretical calculations and STM simulations, based on first-principle density function theory, are performed in order to understand and verify the mechanism of high-resolution images. We propose that our results provide impactful routes to pursue the goal of higher resolution, more detailed information and extensive properties for future STM applications.

  7. High-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 structure and intrinsic molecular states.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiming; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-jun

    2014-10-01

    We review our achievements in exploring the high resolution imaging of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on the surface and adsorbates in a ultra-high vacuum system, by modifying the STM tip or introducing a decoupled layer onto the substrate. With an ultra-sharp tip, the highest resolution of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 reconstruction can be achieved, in which all the rest atoms and adatoms are observed simultaneously with high contrast. Further functionalization of STM tips can realize selective imaging of inherent molecular states. The electronic states of perylene and metal-phthalocyanine molecules are resolved with special decorated tips on metal substrates at low temperature. Moreover, we present two kinds of buffer layer: an organic molecular layer and epitaxially grown graphene to decouple the molecular electronic structure from the influence of the underlying metallic substrate and allow the direct imaging of the intrinsic orbitals of the adsorbed molecules. Theoretical calculations and STM simulations, based on first-principle density function theory, are performed in order to understand and verify the mechanism of high-resolution images. We propose that our results provide impactful routes to pursue the goal of higher resolution, more detailed information and extensive properties for future STM applications. PMID:25214483

  8. Marvels and Shadows: Science and Education at the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine under the Auspices of Columbia University: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Santana, Raúl; Rabionet, Silvia E; Peña-Carro, Lucy; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2016-06-01

    This essay introduces a series of five historical articles on the scientific and educational contributions of the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine (STM), under the auspices of Columbia University (1926-1949), to the fields of tropical medicine and public health. The articles will appear in several consecutive issues, and will address various themes as follows: 1) historical antecedents of the STM, particularly institutional precedents; 2) the educational legacy of the STM; 3) a history of the STM scientific journal ("The Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine"); 4) the scientific practices and representations that prevailed at the institution; and, 5) a brief sociocultural history of malaria in Puerto Rico, mainly from the perspective of the STM's scientific and public health activities. The authors have systematically and comprehensively studied a wide variety of documents from different sources based on multiple archives in Puerto Rico, the United States and England. The authors treat the fluid meanings of the examined historical encounters from a research perspective that privilege complex reciprocal interactions, multiple adaptations and elaborate sociocultural constructs present in a collaborative exemplar of the modernity of medical science in a neocolonial tropical context.

  9. Complex regulatory network encompassing the Csr, c-di-GMP and motility systems of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N; Ahmad, Irfan; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Ojar

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial survival depends on the ability to switch between sessile and motile lifestyles in response to changing environmental conditions. In many species, this switch is governed by (3'-5')-cyclic-diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a signalling molecule, which is metabolized by proteins containing GGDEF and/or EAL domains. Salmonella Typhimurium contains 20 such proteins. Here, we show that the RNA-binding protein CsrA regulates the expression of eight genes encoding GGDEF, GGDEF-EAL and EAL domain proteins. CsrA bound directly to the mRNA leaders of five of these genes, suggesting that it may regulate these genes post-transcriptionally. The c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase STM3611, which reciprocally controls flagella function and production of biofilm matrix components, was regulated by CsrA binding to the mRNA, but was also indirectly regulated by CsrA through the FlhDC/FliA flagella cascade and STM1344. STM1344 is an unconventional (c-di-GMP-inactive) EAL domain protein, recently identified as a negative regulator of flagella gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CsrA directly downregulates expression of STM1344, which in turn regulates STM3611 through fliA and thus reciprocally controls motility and biofilm factors. Altogether, our data reveal that the concerted and complex regulation of several genes encoding GGDEF/EAL domain proteins allows CsrA to control the motility-sessility switch in S. Typhimurium at multiple levels.

  10. Developmental delays in phonological recoding among children and adolescents with Down syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Henrik; Henry, Lucy; Messer, David; Carney, Daniel P J; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the development of phonological recoding in short-term memory (STM) span tasks among two clinical groups with contrasting STM and language profiles: those with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS). Phonological recoding was assessed by comparing: (1) performance on phonologically similar and dissimilar items (phonological similarity effects, PSE); and (2) items with short and long names (word length effects, WLE). Participant groups included children and adolescents with DS (n=29), WS (n=25) and typical development (n=51), all with average mental ages around 6 years. The group with WS, contrary to predictions based on their relatively strong verbal STM and language abilities, showed no evidence for phonological recoding. Those in the group with DS, with weaker verbal STM and language abilities, showed positive evidence for phonological recoding (PSE), but to a lesser degree than the typical group (who showed PSE and WLE). These findings provide new information about the memory systems of these groups of children and adolescents, and suggest that STM processes involving phonological recoding do not fit with the usual expectations of the abilities of children and adolescents with WS and DS. PMID:27043367

  11. Marvels and Shadows: Science and Education at the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine under the Auspices of Columbia University: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Santana, Raúl; Rabionet, Silvia E; Peña-Carro, Lucy; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2016-06-01

    This essay introduces a series of five historical articles on the scientific and educational contributions of the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine (STM), under the auspices of Columbia University (1926-1949), to the fields of tropical medicine and public health. The articles will appear in several consecutive issues, and will address various themes as follows: 1) historical antecedents of the STM, particularly institutional precedents; 2) the educational legacy of the STM; 3) a history of the STM scientific journal ("The Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine"); 4) the scientific practices and representations that prevailed at the institution; and, 5) a brief sociocultural history of malaria in Puerto Rico, mainly from the perspective of the STM's scientific and public health activities. The authors have systematically and comprehensively studied a wide variety of documents from different sources based on multiple archives in Puerto Rico, the United States and England. The authors treat the fluid meanings of the examined historical encounters from a research perspective that privilege complex reciprocal interactions, multiple adaptations and elaborate sociocultural constructs present in a collaborative exemplar of the modernity of medical science in a neocolonial tropical context. PMID:27232864

  12. Theoretical study of carbon-based tips for scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C.; Abad, E.; Dappe, Y. J.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present here a detailed theoretical analysis of the use of carbon-based conductive tips in scanning tunnelling microscopy. In particular, we employ ab initio methods based on density functional theory to explore a graphitic, an amorphous carbon and two diamond-like tips for imaging with a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM), and we compare them with standard metallic tips made of gold and tungsten. We investigate the performance of these tips in terms of the corrugation of the STM images acquired when scanning a single graphene sheet. Moreover, we analyse the impact of the tip-sample distance and show that it plays a fundamental role in the resolution and symmetry of the STM images. We also explore in depth how the adsorption of single atoms and molecules in the tip apexes modifies the STM images and demonstrate that, in general, it leads to an improved image resolution. The ensemble of our results provides strong evidence that carbon-based tips can significantly improve the resolution of STM images, as compared to more standard metallic tips, which may open a new line of research in scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  13. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a summary of the research, citations of publications resulting from the research and abstracts of such publications. We have made no inventions in the performance of the work in this project. The main goals of the project were to set up a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond growth system attached to an UltraHigh Vacuum (UHV) atomic resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) system and carry out experiments aimed at studying the properties and growth of diamond films using atomic resolution UHV STM. We successfully achieved these goals. We observed, for the first time, the atomic structure of the surface of CVD grown epitaxial diamond (100) films using UHV STM. We studied the effects of atomic hydrogen on the CVD diamond growth process. We studied the electronic properties of the diamond (100) (2x1) surface, and the effect of alkali metal adsorbates such as Cs on the work function of this surface using UHV STM spectroscopy techniques. We also studied, using STM, new electronic materials such as carbon nanotubes and gold nanostructures. This work resulted in four publications in refereed scientific journals and five publications in refereed conference proceedings.

  14. Chronic sleep deprivation differentially affects short and long-term operant memory in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Harini C; Noakes, Eric J; Lyons, Lisa C

    2016-10-01

    The induction, formation and maintenance of memory represent dynamic processes modulated by multiple factors including the circadian clock and sleep. Chronic sleep restriction has become common in modern society due to occupational and social demands. Given the impact of cognitive impairments associated with sleep deprivation, there is a vital need for a simple animal model in which to study the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, with its simple nervous system, nocturnal sleep pattern and well-characterized learning paradigms, to assess the effects of two chronic sleep restriction paradigms on short-term (STM) and long-term (LTM) associative memory. The effects of sleep deprivation on memory were evaluated using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible, in which the animal associates a specific netted seaweed with failed swallowing attempts. We found that two nights of 6h sleep deprivation occurring during the first or last half of the night inhibited both STM and LTM. Moreover, the impairment in STM persisted for more than 24h. A milder, prolonged sleep deprivation paradigm consisting of 3 consecutive nights of 4h sleep deprivation also blocked STM, but had no effect on LTM. These experiments highlight differences in the sensitivity of STM and LTM to chronic sleep deprivation. Moreover, these results establish Aplysia as a valid model for studying the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and associative memory paving the way for future studies delineating the mechanisms through which sleep restriction affects memory formation.

  15. Theoretical study of carbon-based tips for scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    González, C; Abad, E; Dappe, Y J; Cuevas, J C

    2016-03-11

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present here a detailed theoretical analysis of the use of carbon-based conductive tips in scanning tunnelling microscopy. In particular, we employ ab initio methods based on density functional theory to explore a graphitic, an amorphous carbon and two diamond-like tips for imaging with a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM), and we compare them with standard metallic tips made of gold and tungsten. We investigate the performance of these tips in terms of the corrugation of the STM images acquired when scanning a single graphene sheet. Moreover, we analyse the impact of the tip-sample distance and show that it plays a fundamental role in the resolution and symmetry of the STM images. We also explore in depth how the adsorption of single atoms and molecules in the tip apexes modifies the STM images and demonstrate that, in general, it leads to an improved image resolution. The ensemble of our results provides strong evidence that carbon-based tips can significantly improve the resolution of STM images, as compared to more standard metallic tips, which may open a new line of research in scanning tunnelling microscopy. PMID:26861537

  16. Specification of reproductive meristems requires the combined function of SHOOT MERISTEMLESS and floral integrators FLOWERING LOCUS T and FD during Arabidopsis inflorescence development.

    PubMed

    Smith, Harley M S; Ung, Nolan; Lal, Shruti; Courtier, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In Arabidopsis floral meristems are specified on the periphery of the inflorescence meristem by the combined activities of the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-FD complex and the flower meristem identity gene LEAFY. The floral specification activity of FT is dependent upon two related BELL1-like homeobox (BLH) genes PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) which are required for floral evocation. PNY and PNF interact with a subset of KNOTTED1-LIKE homeobox proteins including SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). Genetic analyses show that these BLH proteins function with STM to specify flowers and internodes during inflorescence development. In this study, experimental evidence demonstrates that the specification of flower and coflorescence meristems requires the combined activities of FT-FD and STM. FT and FD also regulate meristem maintenance during inflorescence development. In plants with reduced STM function, ectopic FT and FD promote the formation of axillary meristems during inflorescence development. Lastly, gene expression studies indicate that STM functions with FT-FD and AGAMOUS-LIKE 24 (AGL24)-SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONTANS1 (SOC1) complexes to up-regulate flower meristem identity genes during inflorescence development.

  17. Phonological short-term memory in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia and mild Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aaron M; Snider, Sarah F; Campbell, Rachael E; Friedman, Rhonda B

    2015-10-01

    It has been argued that individuals with logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA) have an impairment of the phonological loop, which is a component of the short-term memory (STM) system. In contrast, this type of impairment is not thought to be present in mild typical Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, one would predict that people with lvPPA would score significantly lower than a matched AD group on tasks that require phonological STM. In the current study, an lvPPA group was compared with a mild AD group that was matched on age, education, and general cognitive functioning. For a subset of the tasks that involved pseudowords, the AD and lvPPA groups were compared to a healthy control group that was matched on age and education. The lvPPA group was more impaired than the AD group on all of the tasks that required phonological STM, including the pseudoword tasks, but there were no significant differences between these groups on tasks that required visuospatial STM. Compared to the healthy controls, the lvPPA group performed significantly worse on the repetition and reading of pseudowords, while the AD group did not differ significantly from the controls on these tasks. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that phonological STM is impaired in lvPPA.

  18. Attenuated mutant strain of Salmonella Typhimurium lacking the ZnuABC transporter contrasts tumor growth promoting anti-cancer immune response

    PubMed Central

    Chirullo, Barbara; Ammendola, Serena; Leonardi, Leonardo; Falcini, Roberto; Petrucci, Paola; Pistoia, Claudia; Vendetti, Silvia; Battistoni, Andrea; Pasquali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium has been shown to be highly effective as antitumor agent. The aim of this study was to investigate the tumor targeting efficacy and the mechanism of action of a specific attenuated mutant strain of Salmonella Typhimurium (STM) devoid of the whole operon coding for the high-affinity zinc transporter ZnuABC, which is required for bacterial growth in environments poor in zinc and for conferring full virulence to different Gram-negative pathogens. We showed that STM is able to penetrate and replicate into tumor cells in in vitro and in vivo models. The subcutaneous administration of STM in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model led to both reduction of tumor growth and increase in life expectancy of STM treated mice. Moreover, investigating the potential mechanism behind the favorable clinical outcomes, we provide evidence that STM stimulates a potent inflammatory response and a specific immune pattern, recruiting a large number of innate and adaptive immune cells capable to contrast the immunosuppressive environment generated by tumors. PMID:26158862

  19. Phonological Short-Term Memory in Logopenic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia and Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Aaron M.; Snider, Sarah F.; Campbell, Rachael E.; Friedman, Rhonda B.

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that individuals with logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA) have an impairment of the phonological loop, which is a component of the short-term memory (STM) system. In contrast, this type of impairment is not thought to be present in mild typical Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thus, one would predict that people with lvPPA would score significantly lower than a matched AD group on tasks that require phonological STM. In the current study, an lvPPA group was compared with a mild AD group that was matched on age, education, and general cognitive functioning. For a subset of the tasks that involved pseudowords, the AD and lvPPA groups were compared to a healthy control group that was matched on age and education. The lvPPA group was more impaired than the AD group on all of the tasks that required phonological STM, including the pseudoword tasks, but there were no significant differences between these groups on tasks that required visuospatial STM. Compared to the healthy controls, the lvPPA group performed significantly worse on the repetition and reading of pseudowords, while the AD group did not differ significantly from the controls on these tasks. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that phonological STM is impaired in lvPPA. PMID:26232551

  20. Refinement of Strut-and-Tie Model for Reinforced Concrete Deep Beams

    PubMed Central

    Panjehpour, Mohammad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Voo, Yen Lei

    2015-01-01

    Deep beams are commonly used in tall buildings, offshore structures, and foundations. According to many codes and standards, strut-and-tie model (STM) is recommended as a rational approach for deep beam analyses. This research focuses on the STM recommended by ACI 318-11 and AASHTO LRFD and uses experimental results to modify the strut effectiveness factor in STM for reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams. This study aims to refine STM through the strut effectiveness factor and increase result accuracy. Six RC deep beams with different shear span to effective-depth ratios (a/d) of 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75, and 2.00 were experimentally tested under a four-point bending set-up. The ultimate shear strength of deep beams obtained from non-linear finite element modeling and STM recommended by ACI 318-11 as well as AASHTO LRFD (2012) were compared with the experimental results. An empirical equation was proposed to modify the principal tensile strain value in the bottle-shaped strut of deep beams. The equation of the strut effectiveness factor from AASHTTO LRFD was then modified through the aforementioned empirical equation. An investigation on the failure mode and crack propagation in RC deep beams subjected to load was also conducted. PMID:26110268

  1. Refinement of Strut-and-Tie Model for Reinforced Concrete Deep Beams.

    PubMed

    Panjehpour, Mohammad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Voo, Yen Lei

    2015-01-01

    Deep beams are commonly used in tall buildings, offshore structures, and foundations. According to many codes and standards, strut-and-tie model (STM) is recommended as a rational approach for deep beam analyses. This research focuses on the STM recommended by ACI 318-11 and AASHTO LRFD and uses experimental results to modify the strut effectiveness factor in STM for reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams. This study aims to refine STM through the strut effectiveness factor and increase result accuracy. Six RC deep beams with different shear span to effective-depth ratios (a/d) of 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75, and 2.00 were experimentally tested under a four-point bending set-up. The ultimate shear strength of deep beams obtained from non-linear finite element modeling and STM recommended by ACI 318-11 as well as AASHTO LRFD (2012) were compared with the experimental results. An empirical equation was proposed to modify the principal tensile strain value in the bottle-shaped strut of deep beams. The equation of the strut effectiveness factor from AASHTTO LRFD was then modified through the aforementioned empirical equation. An investigation on the failure mode and crack propagation in RC deep beams subjected to load was also conducted. PMID:26110268

  2. Quasi-one-dimensional structures on the Si(1 1 1) surface induced by Ba adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geunseop

    2008-09-01

    Ba-induced quasi-one-dimensional reconstructions of the Si(1 1 1) surface have been investigated by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). While the 3 × '2' surface shows double-periodicity along the stripes in STM images consistent with half-order streaks observed in LEED patterns, no sign of the double-periodicity along the chain direction was detected for the 5 × 1 surface. The 5× stripes in STM images show internal structures with multiple rows. The two rows comprising the boundaries of a 5× stripe in the filled-state STM image are found to have 3 a × √3/2 spacing across the stripe. The observation of the successive 3× and 2× spacings between the boundary rows supports a structural model proposed for the Ba-induced 5 × 1 Si reconstruction composed of honeycomb chains and Seiwatz chains. The highest coverage 2 × 8 surface does not reveal a quasi-1D row structure in STM images.

  3. Tip-Dependent Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Imaging of Ultrathin FeO Films on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Grabow, Lars C.; Peng, Guowen; Knudsen, Jan; Zeuthen, Helene; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Porsgaard, Soeren; Laegsgaard, E.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2011-02-10

    High-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of moire-structured FeO films on Pt(111) were obtained in a number of different tip-dependent imaging modes. For the first time, the STM images are distinguished and interpreted unambiguously with the help of distinct oxygen- vacancy dislocation loops in the FeO moire structure. The experimental STM results are compared with the results of electronic structure calculations within the DFTþUscheme for a realistic (√91 x √ 91)R5.2º moire FeO unit cell supported on Pt(111) as well as with the results from previous studies. We find that one type of STM imaging mode, showing both Fe and O atoms, agrees well with simulated STM images, indicating that the simple Tersoff-Hamann theory is partially valid for this imaging mode. In addition, we identify other distinct, element-specific imaging modes which reveal a strong dependence on the specific tip apex state and likely result from specific tip-sample chemical interactions. From the present STMresults we show that several of the previously published conclusions for the FeO system have to be revisited.

  4. The Historical Antecedents of the UPR School of Tropical Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Santana, Raúl; Peña-Carro, Lucy; Rabionet, Silvia E

    2016-06-01

    This article deals with the historical antecedents of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) School of Tropical Medicine (STM) under the auspices of Columbia University. It presents a general view of the social, institutional and conceptual factors that were correlated with the establishment of the STM. The authors start by examining the historical continuities and discontinuities present during the imperial transitions between Spanish colonial and U.S. military medicine at the turn of the 20th century. The clarification of these changes is important for the proper understanding of the emergence of tropical medicine in Puerto Rico, marked by the identification of the biological determinant of the so called "peasants' anemia." The essay focuses on two institutional precursor events: the Puerto Rico Anemia Commissions (1904-1908) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (1912-1914). Their nature and work paved the way for the establishment of the STM. The notions of tropical medicine and diseases are considered as historical concepts. The support of the Rockefeller Foundation to several significant public health activities in Puerto Rico is also examined. Finally, the social and health conditions which prevailed at the time of the creation of the STM have been summarized. In general, the article provides a sense of historical context deemed essential to understand the emergence and evolution of the STM.

  5. Structural changes in a Schiff base molecular assembly initiated by scanning tunneling microscopy tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomak, A.; Bacaksiz, C.; Mendirek, G.; Sahin, H.; Hur, D.; Görgün, K.; Senger, R. T.; Birer, Ö.; Peeters, F. M.; Zareie, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the controlled self-organization and switching of newly designed Schiff base (E)-4-((4-(phenylethynyl) benzylidene) amino) benzenethiol (EPBB) molecules on a Au (111) surface at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) were used to image and analyze the conformational changes of the EPBB molecules. The conformational change of the molecules was induced by using the STM tip while increasing the tunneling current. The switching of a domain or island of molecules was shown to be induced by the STM tip during scanning. Unambiguous fingerprints of the switching mechanism were observed via STM/STS measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering was employed, to control and identify quantitatively the switching mechanism of molecules in a monolayer. Density functional theory calculations were also performed in order to understand the microscopic details of the switching mechanism. These calculations revealed that the molecular switching behavior stemmed from the strong interaction of the EPBB molecules with the STM tip. Our approach to controlling intermolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more sophisticated molecular machines.

  6. Theoretical study of carbon-based tips for scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    González, C; Abad, E; Dappe, Y J; Cuevas, J C

    2016-03-11

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present here a detailed theoretical analysis of the use of carbon-based conductive tips in scanning tunnelling microscopy. In particular, we employ ab initio methods based on density functional theory to explore a graphitic, an amorphous carbon and two diamond-like tips for imaging with a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM), and we compare them with standard metallic tips made of gold and tungsten. We investigate the performance of these tips in terms of the corrugation of the STM images acquired when scanning a single graphene sheet. Moreover, we analyse the impact of the tip-sample distance and show that it plays a fundamental role in the resolution and symmetry of the STM images. We also explore in depth how the adsorption of single atoms and molecules in the tip apexes modifies the STM images and demonstrate that, in general, it leads to an improved image resolution. The ensemble of our results provides strong evidence that carbon-based tips can significantly improve the resolution of STM images, as compared to more standard metallic tips, which may open a new line of research in scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  7. Musical and verbal memory in Alzheimer's disease: a study of long-term and short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Marie-Claude; Belleville, Sylvie

    2009-10-01

    Musical memory was tested in Alzheimer patients and in healthy older adults using long-term and short-term memory tasks. Long-term memory (LTM) was tested with a recognition procedure using unfamiliar melodies. Short-term memory (STM) was evaluated with same/different judgment tasks on short series of notes. Musical memory was compared to verbal memory using a task that used pseudowords (LTM) or syllables (STM). Results indicated impaired musical memory in AD patients relative to healthy controls. The deficit was found for both long-term and short-term memory. Furthermore, it was of the same magnitude for both musical and verbal domains whether tested with short-term or long-term memory tasks. No correlation was found between musical and verbal LTM. However, there was a significant correlation between verbal and musical STM in AD participants and healthy older adults, which suggests that the two domains may share common mechanisms. PMID:19398148

  8. Scanning tunneling microscope with two-dimensional translator.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J; Ng, K-W

    2011-01-01

    Since the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), it has been a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of materials. Typically STM designs capable of obtaining resolution on the atomic scale are limited to a small area which can be probed. We have built an STM capable of coarse motion in two dimensions, the z- and x-directions which are, respectively, parallel and perpendicular to the tip. This allows us to image samples with very high resolution at sites separated by macroscopic distances. This device is a single unit with a compact design making it very stable. It can operate in either a horizontal or vertical configuration and at cryogenic temperatures. PMID:21280836

  9. Bayesian spatial transformation models with applications in neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Michelle F.; Zhu, Hongtu; Ibrahim, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this paper is to develop a class of spatial transformation models (STM) to spatially model the varying association between imaging measures in a three-dimensional (3D) volume (or 2D surface) and a set of covariates. Our STMs include a varying Box-Cox transformation model for dealing with the issue of non-Gaussian distributed imaging data and a Gaussian Markov Random Field model for incorporating spatial smoothness of the imaging data. Posterior computation proceeds via an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Simulations and real data analysis demonstrate that the STM significantly outperforms the voxel-wise linear model with Gaussian noise in recovering meaningful geometric patterns. Our STM is able to reveal important brain regions with morphological changes in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:24128143

  10. Adsorbed states of chlorophenol on Cu(110) and controlled switching of single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, H.; Kitaguchi, Y.; Hattori, T.; Ueda, Y.; Ferrer, N. G.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.

    2016-06-01

    A molecular junction of substituted benzene (chlorophenol) is fabricated and controlled by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Prior to the junction formation, the bonding geometry of the molecule on the surface is characterized by STM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS shows that the OH group of chlorophenol is dissociated on Cu(110) and that the molecule is bonded nearly flat to the surface via an O atom, with the Cl group intact. We demonstrate controlled contact of an STM tip to the "available" Cl group and lift-up of the molecule while it is anchored to the surface via an O atom. The asymmetric bonding motifs of the molecule to the electrodes allow for reversible control of the junction.

  11. Direct evidence for charge ordering and electronic phase separation in Bi xSr 1-xMnO 3 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Samanta, S. B.; Awana, V. P. S.; Kishan, H.; Awasthi, A. M.; Bhardwaj, S.; Narlikar, A. V.; Frontera, C.; Garcia-Munoz, J. L.

    2005-12-01

    We present a study of charge ordering and electronic phase separation (EPS) phenomenon in Bi xSr 1-xMnO 3, for an exhaustive range of x (0.25⩽ x⩽0.75), by STM/STS at room temperature (RT) and specific heat measurements at high temperatures (350-650 K). Atomically resolved STM images of the samples, in real space, show the presence of stripe-like charge-ordered (CO) phase coexisting with charge-disordered (CD) phase. The STM images further reveal that the fraction of CO phase increases with an increase in x. The conductance spectra of these phases measured at nano level by STS are discussed. The transition to CO phase above RT is corroborated by specific heat measurements in all samples, giving a TCO( x) phase diagram for this system.

  12. Development of micro-four-point probe in a scanning tunneling microscope for in situ electrical transport measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jian-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Long; Gao, Chun-Lei; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua E-mail: jfjia@sjtu.edu.cn; Jia, Jin-Feng E-mail: jfjia@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Electrons at surface may behave differently from those in bulk of a material. Multi-functional tools are essential in comprehensive studies on a crystal surface. Here, we developed an in situ microscopic four-point probe (4PP) transport measurement system on the basis of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). In particular, convenient replacement between STM tips and micro-4PPs enables systematic investigations of surface morphology, electronic structure, and electrical transport property of a same sample surface. Performances of the instrument are demonstrated with high-quality STM images, tunneling spectra, and low-noise electrical I-V characteristic curves of a single-layer FeSe film grown on a conductive SrTiO{sub 3} surface.

  13. Oriented cluster formation of endohedral Y@C{sub 82} metallofullerenes on clean surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Hisanori; Inakuma, Masayasu; Kishida, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Souichi; Hashizume, Tomihiro; Sakurai, Toshio

    1995-09-21

    An oriented head-to-tail cluster formation of an endohedral yttrium metallofullerene, Y@C{sub 82}, on a Cu(111)I x 1 clean surface has been observed directly by the use of a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. The STM observation reveals that the Y@C{sub 82} molecules preferentially form dimers and one-dimensional clusters at the step edge of the Cu(111) surface. The observed intermolecular distance (11.2 {+-} 0.5 A) is smaller than that of the simple Y@C{sub 82}, Y@C{sub 82} van der Waals distance (11.4 A), indicating the presence of a strong interfullerene interaction. The STM results suggest the presence of strong dipole-dipole and charge-transfer interactions among Y@C{sub 82} fullerenes. Such a molecule has a great similarity to the `superatom` features proposed theoretically in a semiconductor heterostructure. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  14. NaCl multi-layer islands grown on Au(111)-([Formula: see text]) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaonan; Felicissimo, Marcella P; Rudolf, Petra; Silly, Fabien

    2008-12-10

    The growth of multi-layer NaCl islands on Au(111)-([Formula: see text]) surfaces was investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We observed that the aspect of the NaCl islands drastically differs depending on the tunneling conditions. It is therefore possible to observe the layers forming an NaCl island or to image the gold reconstruction below the first NaCl layer. Atomically resolved STM images obtained on the first NaCl layer demonstrate that NaCl grows as an epitaxial crystalline film on Au(111)-([Formula: see text]). STM images also suggest that some NaCl layers can be non-crystalline. PMID:21730671

  15. Interfacial electrochemical electron transfer in biology - towards the level of the single molecule.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Hansen, Allan G; Jensen, Palle S; Salvatore, Princia; Ulstrup, Jens

    2012-03-01

    Physical electrochemistry has undergone a remarkable evolution over the last few decades, integrating advanced techniques and theory from solid state and surface physics. Single-crystal electrode surfaces have been a core notion, opening for scanning tunnelling microscopy directly in aqueous electrolyte (in situ STM). Interfacial electrochemistry of metalloproteins is presently going through a similar transition. Electrochemical surfaces with thiol-based promoter molecular monolayers (SAMs) as biomolecular electrochemical environments and the biomolecules themselves have been mapped with unprecedented resolution, opening a new area of single-molecule bioelectrochemistry. We consider first in situ STM of small redox molecules, followed by in situ STM of thiol-based SAMs as molecular views of bioelectrochemical environments. We then address electron transfer metalloproteins, and multi-centre metalloenzymes including applied single-biomolecular perspectives based on metalloprotein/metallic nanoparticle hybrids.

  16. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Spin Glass-like Behavior in Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown Chromium Telluride Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anupam; Guchhait, Samaresh; Dey, Rik; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Rai, Amritesh; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2015-04-28

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), vibrating sample magnetometry, and other physical property measurements are used to investigate the structure, morphology, magnetic, and magnetotransport properties of (001)-oriented Cr2Te3 thin films grown on Al2O3(0001) and Si(111)-(7×7) surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy. Streaky RHEED patterns indicate flat smooth film growth on both substrates. STM studies show the hexagonal arrangements of surface atoms. Determination of the lattice parameter from the atomically resolved STM image is consistent with the bulk crystal structures. Magnetic measurements show the film is ferromagnetic, having a Curie temperature of about 180 K, and a spin glass-like behavior was observed below 35 K. Magnetotransport measurements show the metallic nature of the film with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy along the c-axis.

  17. Probing the limits of Si:P δ-doped devices patterned by a scanning tunneling microscope in a field-emission mode

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, M.; Carr, S. M.; Ten Eyck, G.; Dominguez, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Bussmann, E.; Subramania, G.; Lilly, M. P.; Pluym, T.

    2014-10-20

    Recently, a single atom transistor was deterministically fabricated using phosphorus in Si by H-desorption lithography with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). This milestone in precision, achieved by operating the STM in the conventional tunneling mode, typically utilizes slow (∼10{sup 2} nm{sup 2}/s) patterning speeds. By contrast, using the STM in a high-voltage (>10 V) field-emission mode, patterning speeds can be increased by orders of magnitude to ≳10{sup 4} nm{sup 2}/s. We show that the rapid patterning negligibly affects the functionality of relatively large micron-sized features, which act as contacting pads for these devices. For nanoscale structures, we show that the resulting electrical transport is consistent with the donor incorporation chemistry constraining the electrical dimensions to a scale of 10 nm even though the pattering spot size is 40 nm.

  18. Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-26

    The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

  19. Adlayer structure of octa-alkoxy-substituted copper(II) phthalocyanine on Au(111) by electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Ou-Yang, Liangyue; Yau, Shueh-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) has been used to examine the adlayer of octa-alkoxy-substituted copper(II) phthalocyanines (CuPc(OC(8)H(17))(8)) on Au(111) in 0.1 M HClO(4), where the molecular adlayer was prepared by spontaneous adsorption from a benzene solution containing this molecule. Topography STM scans revealed long-range ordered, interweaved arrays of CuPc(OC(8)H(17))(8) with coexistent rectangular and hexagonal symmetries. High-quality STM molecular resolution yielded the internal molecular structure and the orientation of CuPc(OC(8)H(17))(8) admolecules. These STM results could shed insight into the method of generating ordered molecular assemblies of phthalocyanine molecules with long-chained substitutes on metal surface.

  20. Effects of strain on carbon donors and acceptors in hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Saito, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We present first-principles density functional calculations that clarify the electronic properties of carbon defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN) monolayers under biaxially applied strains. We find that strain can control the ionization energies of both donor and acceptor states. Furthermore, we also find that strain can lead to the dramatic change in conduction channel properties of donor states due to the interchange of the conduction-band-minimum state with the nearly-free-electron state. We also report the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of carbon defects in h -BN monolayers for experimental identification of those defects. We show that the STM images strongly reflect distinctive spatial distributions of local density of states around carbon defects depending on the substitution sites and thereby they could be identified by using STM experiments.

  1. Evidence against a charge density wave on Bi(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, T. K.; Wells, J.; Kirkegaard, C.; Li, Z.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Gayone, J. E.; Fernandez-Torrente, I.; Häberle, P.; Pascual, J. I.; Moore, K. T.; et al

    2005-08-18

    The Bi(111) surface was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) in order to verify the existence of a recently proposed surface charge density wave (CDW). The STM and TEM results to not support a CDW scenario at low temperatures. Thus the quasiparticle interference pattern observed in STM confirms the spin-orbit split character of the surface states which prevents the formation of a CDW, even in the case of good nesting. The dispersion of the electronic states observed with ARPES agrees well with earlier findings. In particular, the Fermi contour of the electronmore » pocket at the centre of the surface Brillouin zone is found to have a hexagonal shape. However, no gap opening or other signatures of a CDW phase transition can be found in the temperature-dependent data.« less

  2. Acetone-Assisted Oxygen Vacancy Diffusion on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yaobiao; Zhang, Bo; Ye, Jingyun; Ge, Qingfeng; Zhang, Zhenrong

    2012-10-18

    We have studied the dynamic relationship between acetone and bridge-bonded oxygen (Ob) vacancy (VO) defect sites on the TiO2(110)-1 × 1 surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density function theory (DFT) calculations. We report an adsorbate-assisted VO diffusion mechanism. The STM images taken at 300 K show that acetone preferably adsorbs on the VO site and is mobile. The sequential isothermal STM images directly show that the mobile acetone effectively migrates the position of VO by a combination of two acetone diffusion channels: one is the diffusion along the Ob row and moving as an alkyl group, which heals the initial VO; another is the diffusion from the Ob row to the fivecoordinated Ti4+ row and then moving along the Ti4+ row as an acetone, which leaves a VO behind. The calculated acetone diffusion barriers for the two channels are comparable and agree with experimental results.

  3. A high-stability scanning tunneling microscope achieved by an isolated tiny scanner with low voltage imaging capability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Junting; Lu, Qingyou; Hou, Yubin

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high quality atomic resolution. It is equipped with a small but powerful GeckoDrive piezoelectric motor which drives a miniature and detachable scanning part to implement coarse approach. The scanning part is a tiny piezoelectric tube scanner (industry type: PZT-8, whose d{sub 31} coefficient is one of the lowest) housed in a slightly bigger polished sapphire tube, which is riding on and spring clamped against the knife edges of a tungsten slot. The STM so constructed shows low back-lashing and drifting and high repeatability and immunity to external vibrations. These are confirmed by its low imaging voltages, low distortions in the spiral scanned images, and high atomic resolution quality even when the STM is placed on the ground of the fifth floor without any external or internal vibration isolation devices.

  4. Temperature-dependent self-assembly of adenine derivative on HOPG.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhongcheng; Rubner, Oliver; Bamler, Markus; Blömker, Tobias; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard; Heuer, Andreas; Fuchs, Harald; Chi, Lifeng

    2013-08-27

    Temperature-dependent self-assembly formed by the adsorption of the nucleobase adenine derivative on a graphite surface were investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The high-resolution STM images reveal two types of structures, α phase and β phase, which are mainly driven by either hydrogen bonding or aromatic π-π interactions between adenine bases, respectively, as well as the interactions of alkyl chains. α-Phase structures can be transformed into β-phase structures by increasing temperature. The reverse is true for decreasing temperature. This reflects structural stabilities resulting from the different interactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to characterize possible arrangements of adjacent adenine moieties systematically in terms of binding energies and structural properties. Via a systematic search algorithm, all possible network structures were determined on a microscopic level. In this way, it is possible to rationalize the structural parameters as found in the STM images.

  5. Single-molecule chemistry and physics explored by low-temperature scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Swart, Ingmar; Gross, Leo; Liljeroth, Peter

    2011-08-28

    It is well known that scanning probe techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely offer atomic scale information on the geometric and the electronic structure of solids. Recent developments in STM and especially in non-contact AFM have allowed imaging and spectroscopy of individual molecules on surfaces with unprecedented spatial resolution, which makes it possible to study chemistry and physics at the single molecule level. In this feature article, we first review the physical concepts underlying image contrast in STM and AFM. We then focus on the key experimental considerations and use selected examples to demonstrate the capabilities of modern day low-temperature scanning probe microscopy in providing chemical insight at the single molecule level.

  6. The differential reactivity of octahydridosilsesquioxane on Si(100) and Si(111): A comparative scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Bradford

    2003-03-01

    The synthesis and characterization of well-defined Si-SiO2 model interfaces may provide a better understanding of this technologically important interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in conjunction with X-ray photoemission (XPS) and reflection-absorption infrared (RAIRS) spectroscopy, has been used to probe the reactivity of octahydridosilsesquioxane (H_8Si_8O_12) clusters on both the Si(100)-2X1 and Si(111)-7X7 reconstructed surfaces. The clusters exhibit a markedly different reactivity upon exposure to the clean silicon surfaces. STM data is presented that conclusively determines the bonding orientation of an individually attached, intact cluster on the Si(100)-2X1 surface. Conversely, STM data of a Si(111)-7X7 surface subject to a saturation exposure of H_8Si_8O_12 is presented that is highly suggestive of cluster decomposition on the surface.

  7. A high-stability scanning tunneling microscope achieved by an isolated tiny scanner with low voltage imaging capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Hou, Yubin; Wang, Junting; Lu, Qingyou

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high quality atomic resolution. It is equipped with a small but powerful GeckoDrive piezoelectric motor which drives a miniature and detachable scanning part to implement coarse approach. The scanning part is a tiny piezoelectric tube scanner (industry type: PZT-8, whose d31 coefficient is one of the lowest) housed in a slightly bigger polished sapphire tube, which is riding on and spring clamped against the knife edges of a tungsten slot. The STM so constructed shows low back-lashing and drifting and high repeatability and immunity to external vibrations. These are confirmed by its low imaging voltages, low distortions in the spiral scanned images, and high atomic resolution quality even when the STM is placed on the ground of the fifth floor without any external or internal vibration isolation devices.

  8. Dopant-Induced Nanoscale Electronic Inhomogeneities in Ca2-xSrxRuO4

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiandi; Ismail, #; Moore, R. G.; Wang, S. -C.; Ding, H.; Jin, Rongying; Mandrus, David; Plummer, E Ward

    2006-01-01

    Ca{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}RuO{sub 4} single crystals with 0.1 {le} x {le} 2.0 have been studied systematically using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). In contrast with the well-ordered lattice structure, the local density of states at the surface clearly shows a strong doping dependent nanoscale electronic inhomogeneity, regardless of the fact of isovalent substitution. Remarkably, the surface electronic roughness measured by STM and the inverse spectral weight of quasiparticle states determined by ARPES are found to vary with x in the same manner as the bulk in-plane residual resistivity, following the Nordheim rule. For the first time, the surface measurements - especially those with STM - are shown to be in good agreement with the bulk transport results, all clearly indicating a doping-induced electronic disorder in the system.

  9. Structure of high-index GaAs surfaces - the discovery of the stable GaAs(2511) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, K.; Geelhaar, L.; Márquez, J.

    We present a brief overview of surface structures of high-index GaAs surfaces, putting emphasis on recent progress in our own laboratory. By adapting a commercial scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to our molecular beam epitaxy and ultra high vacuum analysis chamber system, we have been able to atomically resolve the GaAs( {1} {1} {3})B(8 ×1), (114)Aα2(2×1), (137), (3715), and (2511) surface structures. In cooperation with P. Kratzer and M. Scheffler from the Theory Department of the Fritz-Haber Institute we determined the structure of some of these surfaces by comparing total-energy calculations and STM image simulations with the atomically resolved STM images. We present the results for the {112}, {113}, and {114} surfaces. Then we describe what led us to proceed into the inner parts of the stereographic triangle and to discover the hitherto unknown stable GaAs(2511) surface.

  10. Method to characterize the vibrational response of a beetle type scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Behler, S.; Rose, M.K.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method for analyzing the external vibrations and intrinsic mechanical resonances affecting scanning probe microscopes by using the microscope as an accelerometer. We show that clear correlations can be established between the frequencies of mechanical vibrational modes and the frequencies of peaks in the tunnel current noise power spectrum. When this method is applied to our {open_quotes}beetle{close_quotes} type scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we find unexpected low frequency {open_quotes}rattling resonances{close_quotes} in the 500{endash}1700 Hz range that depend on the exact lateral position of the STM, in addition to the expected mechanical resonances of the STM above 4 kHz which are in good agreement with theoretical estimates. We believe that these rattling resonances may be a general problem for scanning probe microscopes that use some type of kinetic motion for coarse positioning. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Phylogenetic and symbiotic characterization of rhizobial bacteria nodulating Argyrolobium uniflorum in Tunisian arid soils.

    PubMed

    Mahdhi, M; de Lajudie, P; Mars, M

    2008-03-01

    Forty-two bacterial isolates from root nodules of Argyrolobium uniflorum growing in the arid areas of Tunisia were characterized by phenotypic features, RFLP, and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. The isolates were found to be phenotypically diverse. The majority of the isolates tolerated 3% NaCl and grew at temperatures up to 40 degrees C. Phylogenetically, the new isolates were grouped in the genera Sinorhizobium (27), Rhizobium (13), and Agrobacterium (2). Except for the 2 Agrobacterium isolates, all strains induced nodulation on Argyrolobium uniflorum, but the number of nodules and nitrogen fixation efficiency varied among them. Sinorhizobium sp. strains STM 4034, STM 4036, and STM 4039, forming the most effective symbiosis, are potential candidates for inoculants in revegetalisation programs.

  12. Optothermal response of plasmonic nanofocusing lens under picosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Z.; Chen, C.; Traverso, L.; Xu, X.; Pan, L.; Chao, I.-H.; Lavine, A. S.

    2014-03-01

    This work studied the optothermal response of plasmonic nanofocusing structures under picosecond pulsed laser irradiation. The surface plasmon polariton is simulated to calculate the optical energy dissipation as the Joule heating source and the thermal transport process is studied using a two temperature model (TTM). At the picosecond time scale that we are interested in, the Fourier heat equation is used to study the electron thermal transport and the hyperbolic heat equation is used to study the lattice thermal transport. For comparison, the single temperature model (STM) is also studied. The difference between TTM and STM indicates that TTM provides more accurate estimates in the picosecond time scale and the STM results are only reliable when the local electron and lattice temperature difference is negligible.

  13. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PH x (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible.

  14. Atomic species identification at the (101) anatase surface by simultaneous scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Todorović, Milica; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Moreno, César; Ryan, James William; León, Carmen Pérez; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Palomares, Emilio; Matolín, Vladimír; Fujita, Daisuke; Perez, Ruben; Custance, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Anatase is a pivotal material in devices for energy-harvesting applications and catalysis. Methods for the accurate characterization of this reducible oxide at the atomic scale are critical in the exploration of outstanding properties for technological developments. Here we combine atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), supported by first-principles calculations, for the simultaneous imaging and unambiguous identification of atomic species at the (101) anatase surface. We demonstrate that dynamic AFM-STM operation allows atomic resolution imaging within the material's band gap. Based on key distinguishing features extracted from calculations and experiments, we identify candidates for the most common surface defects. Our results pave the way for the understanding of surface processes, like adsorption of metal dopants and photoactive molecules, that are fundamental for the catalytic and photovoltaic applications of anatase, and demonstrate the potential of dynamic AFM-STM for the characterization of wide band gap materials. PMID:26118408

  15. EDITORIAL: Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Three decades ago, with a tiny tip of platinum, the scientific world saw the real space imaging of single atoms with unprecedented spatial resolution. This signalled the birth of one of the most versatile surface probes, based on the physics of quantum mechanical tunnelling: the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Invented in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer of IBM, Zurich, it led to their award of the 1986 Nobel Prize. Atoms, once speculated to be abstract entities used by theoreticians for mere calculations, can be seen to exist for real with the nano-eye of an STM tip that also gives real-space images of molecules and adsorbed complexes on surfaces. From a very fundamental perspective, the STM changed the course of surface science and engineering. STM also emerged as a powerful tool to study various fundamental phenomena relevant to the properties of surfaces in technological applications such as tribology, medical implants, catalysis, sensors and biology—besides elucidating the importance of local bonding geometries and defects, non-periodic structures and the co-existence of nano-scale phases. Atom-level probing, once considered a dream, has seen the light with the evolution of STM. An important off-shoot of STM was the atomic force microscope (AFM) for surface mapping of insulating samples. Then followed the development of a flurry of techniques under the general name of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). These techniques (STM, AFM, MFM, PFM etc) designed for atomic-scale-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, have led to brand new developments in surface analysis. All of these novel methods enabled researchers in recent years to image and analyse complex surfaces on microscopic and nanoscopic scales. All of them utilize a small probe for sensing the surface. The invention of AFM by Gerd Binnig, Calvin Quate and Christopher Gerber opened up new opportunities for characterization of a variety of materials, and various industrial applications could be

  16. Real-space visualization of conformation-independent oligothiophene electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, Benjamen N.; Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Gervasi, Christian F.; Mills, Jon M.; Rosenfield, Ariel E.; Zhang, Lei; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Prell, James S.; Briseno, Alejandro L.; Nazin, George V.

    2016-05-01

    We present scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) investigations of the electronic structures of different alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes on the Au(111) surface. STM imaging showed that on Au(111), oligothiophenes adopted distinct straight and bent conformations. By combining STS maps with STM images, we visualize, in real space, particle-in-a-box-like oligothiophene molecular orbitals. We demonstrate that different planar conformers with significant geometrical distortions of oligothiophene backbones surprisingly exhibit very similar electronic structures, indicating a low degree of conformation-induced electronic disorder. The agreement of these results with gas-phase density functional theory calculations implies that the oligothiophene interaction with the Au(111) surface is generally insensitive to molecular conformation.

  17. Graphene ripples as a realization of a two-dimensional Ising model: A scanning tunneling microscope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoelz, J. K.; Xu, P.; Meunier, V.; Kumar, P.; Neek-Amal, M.; Thibado, P. M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ripples in pristine freestanding graphene naturally orient themselves in an array that is alternately curved-up and curved-down; maintaining an average height of zero. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to apply a local force, the graphene sheet will reversibly rise and fall in height until the height reaches 60%-70% of its maximum at which point a sudden, permanent jump occurs. We successfully model the ripples as a spin-half Ising magnetic system, where the height of the graphene plays the role of the spin. The permanent jump in height, controlled by the tunneling current, is found to be equivalent to an antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition. The thermal load underneath the STM tip alters the local tension and is identified as the responsible mechanism for the phase transition. Four universal critical exponents are measured from our STM data, and the model provides insight into the statistical role of graphene's unusual negative thermal expansion coefficient.

  18. Evidence against a charge density wave on Bi(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Wells, J.; Kirkegaard, C.; Li, Z.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Gayone, J. E.; Fernandez-Torrente, I.; Häberle, P.; Pascual, J. I.; Moore, K. T.; Schwartz, A. J.; He, H.; Spence, J. C. H.; Downing, K. H.; Lazar, S.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Borisenko, S. V.; Knupfer, M.; Hofmann, Ph.

    2005-08-18

    The Bi(111) surface was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) in order to verify the existence of a recently proposed surface charge density wave (CDW). The STM and TEM results to not support a CDW scenario at low temperatures. Thus the quasiparticle interference pattern observed in STM confirms the spin-orbit split character of the surface states which prevents the formation of a CDW, even in the case of good nesting. The dispersion of the electronic states observed with ARPES agrees well with earlier findings. In particular, the Fermi contour of the electron pocket at the centre of the surface Brillouin zone is found to have a hexagonal shape. However, no gap opening or other signatures of a CDW phase transition can be found in the temperature-dependent data.

  19. Evidence against a charge density wave on Bi(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.K.; Wells, J.; Kirkegaard, C.; Li, Z.; Hoffmann, S.V.; Gayone, J.E.; Fernancez-Torrente, I.; Haberle, P.; Pascual, J.I.; Moore,K.T.; Schwartz, A.J.; He, H.; Spence, J.C.H.; Downing, K.H.; Lazar, S.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Borisenko, S.V.; Knupfer, M.; Hofmann, Ph.

    2005-05-01

    The Bi(111) surface was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) in order to verify the existence of a recently proposed surface charge density wave (CDW) [Ch. R. Ast and H. Hoechst Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 016403 (2003)]. The STM and TEM results to not support a CDW scenario at low temperatures. Furthermore, the quasiparticle interference pattern observed in STM confirms the spin-orbit split character of the surface states which prevents the formation of a CDW, even in the case of good nesting. The dispersion of the electronic states observed with ARPES agrees well with earlier findings. In particular, the Fermi contour of the electron pocket at the centre of the surface Brillouin zone is found to have a hexagonal shape. However, no gap opening or other signatures of a CDW phase transition can be found in the temperature-dependent data.

  20. Deciphering the atomic structure of a complex Sr/Ge (100) phase via scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanov, Boris; Garrity, Kevin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Altman, Eric I.

    2012-05-01

    The details of a Sr-induced (3×4) reconstruction on Ge(100) were examined using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory. At 1/6 ML of Sr, this reconstruction is similar to the 1/6 ML (3×2) Sr phase previously observed on Si. In contrast to Si, however, atomic-resolution images of the Sr-Ge phase exhibit more dramatic and unusual bias dependence in STM that could be explained with the help of first-principles calculations of minimum energy structures. Simulated STM images are in excellent agreement with the experimental data and allow the (3×2) Sr-Si double dimer vacancy alloy model to be extended to the Ge surface through a more complex (3×4) arrangement of its building blocks. The difference between Si and Ge is interpreted in terms of the lower Ge-Ge binding energy and differences in the interatomic bond lengths.