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Sample records for stoddard vladimir vodeau

  1. Commentary: Responses from Colonial Williamsburg Staff to Stoddard (2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John K.; Hicks, David

    2009-01-01

    Jeremey Stoddard's article in this issue, "Toward a Virtual Field Trip Model for the Social Studies," describes his analysis of the Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trip and a conceptual model for developing meaningful and successful electronic or virtual field trips. In an effort to contextualize the Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field…

  2. Vladimir Dmitrievich Krivchenkov.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraeva, I. M.; Romanovskii, Yurii Mikhailovich; Borisov, Anatoly Viktorovich

    The book concerns the life and activity of one of the lecturers in Quantum Mechanics from the Physics Department of the Moscow State University Vladimir Dmitrievich Krivchenkov during 60-th- 70-th years of the XX-th century. A detailed biography and a list of publications has been given. A number of photographs from the personal archive and the faculty's archive is included. Some of the recollections about V.D. Krivchenkov are written by his colleagues: Kvasnikov,V.B. Braginskij, S.S . Gershtein, L.I. Ponomarev, A.E.Yunovich, A.I. Osipov, M.V. Chetkin, B.N. Zahar'ev, I.F. Ginzburg, G.L. Kotkin, D.V. Belov, V.A. Gribov, P.V. Elyutin, S.A. Kirov, D.Yu Kuznetsov.

  3. Brandy Heckman-Stoddard, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Heckman-Stoddard received a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine focusing on the intersection of Rho and IGF signaling in mammary gland development and breast cancer before joining the National Cancer Institute as a Cancer Prevention Fellow. |

  4. Congratulations to Vladimir Igorevich Arnol'd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    12 June 2007 was the seventieth birthday of a member of the editorial board of this journal, Academician Vladimir Igorevich Arnol'd. We warmly congratulate Vladimir Igorevich on his birthday and wish him good health, happiness and continuing success in his scientific activities.

  5. Life and death of Vladimir Mikhailovich Bekhterev.

    PubMed

    Maranhão Filho, Péricles; Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Engelhardt, Eliasz

    2015-11-01

    Vladimir Mikhailovich Bekhterev was a Russian innovative neuroscientist, extraordinary in the study, diagnosis, and research in the fields of neurology, psychology, morphology, physiology, and psychiatry. Considering the ample and multifaceted scientific feats, only some are touched in a very brief manner. However, it is necessary to highlight his contributions to neurology, with the description of structures, signs and syndromes, to physiology, including reflexology, which later underpinned behaviorism, to psychology, including objective psychology and suggestion. His accomplishments and legacy remained until the present days. Some comments about the scenery that involved his death are also presented. PMID:26517221

  6. Vladimir I. Keilis-Borok (1921-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielov, Andrei; Levshin, Anatoli; Newman, William I.

    2014-03-01

    Vladimir Isaakovich Keilis-Borok, emeritus Professor in Residence of Geophysics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), passed away on 19 October 2013, following a long illness. He was born on 31 July 1921 in Moscow.

  7. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB. PMID:26488585

  8. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Volchenkov, Grigory V.; Kaminski, Dorothy A.; Somova, Tatiana R.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A.; Kaunetis, Natalia V.; Cegielski, J. Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB. PMID:26488585

  9. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB.

  10. Interview with Vladimir P Torchilin: liposomal carriers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-05-01

    Vladimir P Torchilin is a University Distinguished Professor and Director at the Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine at the School of Pharmacy, Northeastern University (MA, USA). He has published over 350 original research papers and among many other awards was the recent recipient of the 2012 Bangham Award, for his contributions to the study of liposomes. Professor Torchilin spoke to Therapeutic Delivery about the progress and challenges of the field of liposomal carriers for drug delivery as well as his own career in science to date. Interview conducted by James Potticary, Assistant Commissioning Editor. PMID:23647271

  11. Rapidity: The Special Relativity Work of Dr. Vladimir Karapetoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Hamilton

    2014-03-01

    Between 1924 and 1944 Dr. Vladimir Karapetoff, a professor in the electrical engineering department of Cornell University, authored 11 papers on the topic of special relativity. While his initial papers focused on the then popular oblique angle treatment of special relativity, he soon became a vocal proponent of performing special relativistic calculations using rapidity, a technique that emphasizes the hyperbolic geometric nature of Minkowski space-time. While rapidity has fallen out of usage with the exception of a specialized dialect within particle physics, it offers interesting technical and pedagogical perspectives on the geometrical nature of space-time not evident in the present day relativistic parlance.

  12. Stoddard solvent poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling NERVOUS SYSTEM Burning sensations Convulsions Dizziness Fever Memory problems Nervousness Numbness in arms and legs Unconsciousness SKIN Burns Irritation Holes in the skin or underlying tissues

  13. On a celestial occurrence recorded in the hagiography of St. Vladimir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjević, Boris

    2002-04-01

    There were recorded a number of celestial occurrences in Serbian early history. Amongst them are a few appearances of comets. One except from Bible bearing on life of king David, relating to a phenomenon that might be interpreted as a comet, is in some way similar to the quotation from the hagiography of St. Vladimir. There is possibility that Halley's comet was observed at some time. This affects the chronology of the reign of St. Vladimir by about 11 years. This author thinks that it was in the summer 989 AD.

  14. [Vladimir Zederbaum" (1883-1942): Physician, journalist, contributor to the Russian "Jewish, Encyclopedia". A research report].

    PubMed

    Antipova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Vol. 15 o f the "Jewish Encyclopedia" (St. Petersburg 1908-1913) contains an article on Freud, signed by Vladimir Zederbaum. The data for the article were provided by Max Eitingon. This paper addresses the question of whether Zederbaum himself was Eitingon's contact. Several archives produced a lot of information about Zederbaum's medical and journalistic activities in St. Petersburg. However, to date no connection between the two men could be established. PMID:26939252

  15. [Vladimir Zederbaum" (1883-1942): Physician, journalist, contributor to the Russian "Jewish, Encyclopedia". A research report].

    PubMed

    Antipova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Vol. 15 o f the "Jewish Encyclopedia" (St. Petersburg 1908-1913) contains an article on Freud, signed by Vladimir Zederbaum. The data for the article were provided by Max Eitingon. This paper addresses the question of whether Zederbaum himself was Eitingon's contact. Several archives produced a lot of information about Zederbaum's medical and journalistic activities in St. Petersburg. However, to date no connection between the two men could be established.

  16. The Analysis of Cumulative Influence of Factors of Environment on a State of Health of the Population of Vladimir Region

    PubMed Central

    Trifonova, Tatyana Anatolyevna; Shirkin, Leonid Alekseevich

    2015-01-01

    There was investigated the contribution of factors of environment to formation of health for adult population on indicators of mid-annual rates of growth/decrease of disease of system of blood circulation and of some interfaced nosology on an example of the population of Vladimir region. The differential criterion of primary disease of system of blood circulation is considered as an indicator, integrally reflecting degree of adaptation to environment conditions on population and suitable for construction short-term prognostic estimations. It is shown that business factors or the factors of a standard of living characterized by economic indicators, are leading risk factors in disease of system of blood circulation in Vladimir region which contribution is estimated by size of 38 %. With use of regressive equations were received look-ahead estimations of annual rates of primary disease of system of blood circulation. In the regional centre Vladimir was observed more intense situation on rates of disease of system of blood circulation, than in Vladimir region. PMID:25948468

  17. Further east: eutrophication as a major threat to the flora of Vladimir Oblast, Russia.

    PubMed

    Seregin, Alexey P

    2014-11-01

    Eutrophication remains a major threat to the flora of Western Europe despite measures to reduce nitrogen emissions. Although nutrient enrichment has been recorded for both inland waters and adjacent seas, there is almost no evidence from Russia for large-scale anthropogenic eutrophication of soils and its impact on terrestrial biota. I used the distribution grid data (337 grid squares, ca. 96 km(2)) on 1,384 vascular plants of Vladimir Oblast for two periods (1869-1999 vs. 2000-2012) to estimate the shifts in mean Ellenberg's indicator values for nitrogen and soil reaction. Decadal changes in the flora of acid sandy Meshchera Lowlands were observed directly during two grid surveys of 2002 and 2012 based on a coarser grid (50 squares, ca. 24 km(2)). Despite the spatial correlation of Ellenberg's indicator values for soil reaction and nitrogen, mean grid values for nitrogen are growing in areas with both acid and neutral soils. The changes in mean grid indicator values for nitrogen are caused by either local extinctions of species from nutrient-poor habitats or spread of nitrophilous plants. I found that oligotrophic habitats are declining rapidly within the eutrophic loamy landscapes. In contrast, changes in landscapes with acid sandy soils are caused by increasing number of records of nitrophilous species, both invasive and native. These two processes have different spatial patterns caused by varying levels of geochemical buffer capacity and should be considered separately. Fragmentary historical data on Vladimir Oblast flora agrees with the overall European picture of eutrophication in the twentieth century.

  18. [To the 100th anniversary of Vladimir Pavlovich Efroimson (1908-1989)].

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    Professor Vladimir Pavlovich Efroimson is one of the most prominent Russian geneticists, a former student of N.K. Kolt'tsov, who was among the geneticists that had to struggle against the presecution of genetics in the Soviet Union. Efroimson has discovered the formula of mutation rate in human (1932). He was a laeding specialist in genetics and breeding of silkworm and defended his condidate (1941) and doctoral (1947) dissertations on the subiect. He wrote the first Russian monograph on genetics The Introduction to Medical Genetics (1964)--the book that triddered the revival of human genetics in the Soviet Union. Efroimson was a veteran of the World War II, he fought in the army in 1941 through 1945 and was awarded military decorations. He was presecuted two times in 1932 ans 1949. Efroimson spent 10 years in Gulag and for 25 years was banned from scientific work. He was the autor of three monographs and over 100 scientific papers and the editor of many books on different issues of genetics. Efroimson entered the annals of Russian science as an outstsnding researcher, but also as an inblinking fighter for the truth, an uncompromising opponent of antiscientific directions in biology, an ardent advocate of genetics and the moral standart of a true scientist.

  19. [To the 100th anniversary of Vladimir Pavlovich Efroimson (1908-1989)].

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    Professor Vladimir Pavlovich Efroimson is one of the most prominent Russian geneticists, a former student of N.K. Kolt'tsov, who was among the geneticists that had to struggle against the presecution of genetics in the Soviet Union. Efroimson has discovered the formula of mutation rate in human (1932). He was a laeding specialist in genetics and breeding of silkworm and defended his condidate (1941) and doctoral (1947) dissertations on the subiect. He wrote the first Russian monograph on genetics The Introduction to Medical Genetics (1964)--the book that triddered the revival of human genetics in the Soviet Union. Efroimson was a veteran of the World War II, he fought in the army in 1941 through 1945 and was awarded military decorations. He was presecuted two times in 1932 ans 1949. Efroimson spent 10 years in Gulag and for 25 years was banned from scientific work. He was the autor of three monographs and over 100 scientific papers and the editor of many books on different issues of genetics. Efroimson entered the annals of Russian science as an outstsnding researcher, but also as an inblinking fighter for the truth, an uncompromising opponent of antiscientific directions in biology, an ardent advocate of genetics and the moral standart of a true scientist. PMID:19062527

  20. Precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate: key processes bridging the bio- and geosciences (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    In this Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal lecture, I will focus on the biogeochemical cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) which is arguably one of the best example of a set processes that bridge the bio- and geosciences. The main reactions involved are calcification and dissolution that, respectively, manufacture and destroy calcium carbonate. Biology is intimately involved in these two processes which are key controls of the Earth's climate and leave remains that are of great use to human societies (as building materials) and geoscientists. I will illustrate the bridge between the bio- and geosciences by providing brief examples for each of the following four issues. (1) The marine cycle of CaCO3 and its relationship with climate. The release of CO2 by the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the uptake of CO2 by its dissolution are important controls of atmospheric CO2 and climate. The vertical distribution of Ψ, the ratio of CO2 released/used per CaCO3 precipitated/dissolved in the ocean will be shown to be consistent with the Högbom-Urey reactions. (2) The use of CaCO3 in paleooceanography. The remains of calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are wonderful archives of past environmental changes. Their isotopic composition and the concen-tration of trace elements are invaluable in the reconstruction of past climate. I will address the challenge of calibrating one of the proxies used to reconstruct past ocean pH. (3) The challenge of understanding calcification. Despite having been investigated for decades, many aspects of the physiological and molecular processes involved in calcification by marine organisms remain obscure. Recent breakthroughs, mostly on reef-building corals, will be briefly reviewed. (4) The response of calcification and dissolution to environmental change. The critical importance of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution as climate controls makes it vital to understand their response to global environmental changes such as ocean warming and

  1. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows: Quarterly technical progress report No. 1. [Silica gel particles suspended in mixture of 70. 3% Stoddard solvent (saturated hydrocarbon) and 29. 7% Exxon 150 (aromatic hydrocarbon)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.T.; Mannheimer, R.J.; Grimley, T.A.; Morrow, T.B.

    1987-01-26

    An experimental evaluation of the structure of non-Newtonian slurries in laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes in pipes is the primary objective of this research. Experiments will be conducted in a large scale pipe slurry flow facility with an inside pipe diameter of 50 mm (2 inches). Detailed flow measurements including turbulence quantities such as Reynolds stress will be taken with a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) in a transparent test section with a transparent model slurry. During the past quarter, a transparent model slurry was developed with non-Newtonian rheological properties. Silica gel particles with diameters less than one micron were suspended in a mixture of 70.3% Stoddard Solvent (a saturated hydrocarbon) and 29.7% Exxon 150 (an aromatic hydrocarbon) by weight. The refractive index was measured as 1.4543, and the difference in refractive indices between the solids and the liquid was estimated to be less than 0.001. In rheological measurements with a concentric cylinder viscometer, a slurry with 5.6% solids by weight exhibited both slip and power law behavior. Qualitative results also indicate that the model slurry has a yield value. An adequate signal-to-noise ratio was measured in the model slurry with a two-component LDV system during bench scale tests. Several other items of significance were also completed. A Plexiglas dye injector was fabricated for the flow visualization experiments. The device contains a circumferential injector slot for visualization of wall phenomena. Test section design has been completed and fabrication is in progress. Flow visualization experiments will be initiated during the next quarter. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Brandy Heckman-Stoddard, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Assessed occupational exposure to chlorinated, aromatic and Stoddard solvents during pregnancy and risk of fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Tania A; Lawson, Christina C; Meyer, Robert E; Stewart, Patricia A; Waters, Martha A; Correa, Adolfo; Olshan, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Previous experimental and epidemiological research suggests that maternal exposure to some organic solvents during pregnancy may increase the risk of fetal growth restriction (FGR). We evaluated the association between expert-assessed occupational solvent exposure and risk of small for gestational age (SGA) infants in a population-based sample of women in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Methods We analysed data from 2886 mothers and their infants born between 1997 and 2002. Job histories were self-reported. Probability of exposure to six chlorinated, three aromatic and one petroleum solvent was assessed by industrial hygienists. SGA was defined as birthweight<10th centile of birthweight-by-gestational age in a national reference. Logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs to assess the association between SGA and exposure to any solvent(s) or specific solvent classes, adjusting for maternal age and education. Results Approximately 8% of infants were SGA. Exposure prevalence to any solvent was 10% and 8% among mothers of SGA and non-SGA infants, respectively. Among women with ≥50% probability of exposure, we observed elevated but imprecise associations between SGA and exposure to any solvent(s) (1.71; 0.86 to 3.40), chlorinated solvents (1.70; 0.69 to 4.01) and aromatic solvents (1.87; 0.78 to 4.50). Conclusions This is the first population-based study in the USA to investigate the potential association between FGR and assessed maternal occupational exposure to distinct classes of organic solvents during pregnancy. The potential associations observed between SGA and exposure to chlorinated and aromatic solvents are based on small numbers and merit further investigation. PMID:26076683

  4. Time, Individualisation, and Ethics: Relating Vladimir Nabokov and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeverot, Herner

    2014-01-01

    This article states that the concept of time we generally hold is a spatial version of time. However, a spatial time concept creates a series of problems, with unfortunate consequences for education.The problems become particularly obvious when the spatial time concept is used as a basis for the education function that is connected to the…

  5. Citation for Vladimir Cermak: 1995 AGU Flinn Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Henry N.; Cermák, Vladìmír

    “Vladimìr Cermák, Director of the Geophysical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague, has for many years played a most remarkable role in bringing Earth scientists from the Eastern and Western Bloc countries together for scientific interactions. However anachronistic the concept of East and West political divisions may seem today, there are many who remember the nearly insuperable obstacles that prevented scientific exchange between those groups for decades prior to 1989. Vladimìr Cermák, through his organizing of small conferences and workshops in Czechoslovakia, accomplished the impossible. Through some extraordinarily deft diplomacy, Cermák obtained funding, secured visas, and mastered arcane currency regulations to enable small groups to meet in splendid castles and elegant country homes in rural Bohemia, facilities without urban distractions which had been placed under the custodianship of the Czech Academy of Science to serve as scientific retreats. Three meetings in the course of a decade stand out: at Liblice in 1982, and at Bechyne in 1987 and 1991, all dealing in general with heat flow and thermal aspects of lithospheric structure. These meetings were not just for prominent senior scientists, though of course many were in attendance. Of special significance were the opportunities for younger researchers to surmount the barriers that had been erected by forces well beyond the sphere of science. As one West German remarked as a graduate student in 1982, ‘I remember well how impressed I was…to learn the details of the daily personal and scientific life of an east German colleague of my own age.’ Cermák knew intuitively that the future belonged to the young, and he wanted to nurture their enthusiasm and stimulate their creativity.

  6. Patterns of spatial distribution of mineral components of the complex of gray forest soils Vladimir opolye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, Dina; Chizhikova, Natalya; Starokozhko, Natalya; Hadyushina, Viktorya; Korotaeva, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the work is the analysis of spatial distribution of soil fundamental characteristics - fine fractions content (less than 1, 1-5, 5-10 and more than 10 mkm) and their mineralogical composition. The experiments were carried out on the experimental field in Suzdal region in a trench (22 m length and 2 m depth) laid in upland, well-drained conditions. Soil samples from 5 different soil profiles were collected. Fractions were obtained by Gorbunov method. Mineralogical analysis were carried out by universal X-ray diffractometer (Carl Zeiss Jena, Germany). The dominant fraction is a coarse silt fraction, the sand fraction content is negligible. The soil is characterized by medium-textured loam composition from the above and a sandy loam composition in the bottom. Textural differentiation occured due to the distribution of clay fraction. The content of this fraction in plough horizons varies depending on addition of part of other horizons during plowing. The plogh-layer of the residual-carbonate agrogrey soil is characterized by higher (20-23 %) amount of fraction less than 1 mkm, in comparison with plough horizon above the second humus horizon (SHH ), where the amount of silt is 15-16 %. The main components of the fraction derived from the rock are complex mixed- lattice formations dominated by mica - smectite with a high proportion of smectite packages, mica - smectites with low content of smectite packages were in subordinate quantity. The next component is hydromica - a mixture of dioctahedral and trioctahedral varieties. Smectite phase and hydromica add up to 85-90 % of the silt component. The amount of kaolinite and chlorite usually range in 7-13 %. Kaolinite is generally imperfect, chlorite is magnesia-ferric. The presence of fine quartz and feldspars (less amount) is revealed. During the soil formation the redistribution of the above minerals whose behavior is caused by the type of soil is occurring. Agrogrey heavy-textured soils are characterized by textural differentiation of the profile. The main carrier of this differentiation is the silt fraction, mainly its component - the swelling phase. Smectite phase dominates in silt fraction and it is eluvially distributed within the soil profile. Silty fraction of loess loam contains 72 % of the smectite phase. Behavior of minerals constituting the sum of kaolinite and chlorite content indicates its relatively uniform distribution. A slight increase in their content is noted in the eluvial part of the profile, mainly due to increasing in the proportion of kaolinite. The amount of hydromica reduces down the profile from 44.2 % to 19.8% in loess loam (soil-forming rock). The ratio of dioctahedral structures of hydromica to trioctahedral changes within the soil profile: trioctahedral varieties are more abundant in the upper part of the profile.

  7. Educative Deceit: Vladimir Nabokov and the [Im]possibility of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeverot, Herner

    2010-01-01

    Herner Saeverot begins this article with an example: how Soren Kierkegaard used deceit as a means to educate. In one of his biographical texts, it turns out that Kierkegaard's objective was to deceive his readers into a totalized and universal truth. According to Saeverot, Kierkegaard's approach shows that he was a "demystifier," someone who wants…

  8. Spatial distribution of mineral components in microcombinations of agrogrey soils with the second humus horizon in the Vladimir opolie area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhikova, N. P.; Karpova, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    Mineralogical composition of silt and clay fractions (<1.1-5 and 5-10 µm) in heavy loamy agrogrey soils (Luvic Retic Phaeozems) considerably changes both in the vertical (along the soil profile) and horizontal (along soil microcatenas) directions. The eluvial-illuvial distribution pattern of the clay fraction in the podzolized agrogrey soils with the second humus horizon is replaced by the homogeneous distribution in the agrogrey soils with residual carbonates. The distribution of silt fractions in the soil profiles is relatively homogeneous. The clay (<1 µm) fraction of the parent material is represented by the poorly ordered micasmectite interstratifications minerals, the proportion between which changes in the soil profiles in dependence on the particular pedogenetic processes. Hydromicas represent the second important component of the clay fraction. They consist of di- and trioctahedral varieties, the proportion between which changes in the soil profiles. Kaolinite and iron-magnesium chlorite are present in smaller amounts. The second humus horizon is characterized by the lowest content of mica-smectite interstratifications minerals with the high content of smectitic layers and by the lowest content of the clay fraction. Silt fractions are composed of quartz, micas, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases.

  9. Hidden Forests: The role of vegetated coastal habitats in the ocean carbon budget (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    Vegetated coastal habitats, including mangrove forests, salt-marshes, seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds, provide the marine equivalent to terrestrial forests. However, in contrast to the traditional recognition of forests as significant components of the global carbon budget, the biogeochemical significance of vegetated coastal habitats has been largely ignored. However, the past decade has witness a paradigm shift, where vegetated coastal habitats have been recognized to play a globally significant role in the carbon budget of the ocean. Here I synthesize this evidence and consider how current representations of the ocean carbon budget need be reconsidered to incorporate the role of vegetated coastal habitats and globally relevant, sites of intense carbon cycling.

  10. N cycling in soils and emission of nitrogen gases: how well do we understand the processes and their controls (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Dannenmann, Michael; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Although it is well established that soils are the dominating source for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and an important source for nitric oxide (NO), we are still struggling to fully understand the complexity of the underlying microbial production and consumption processes and the links to biotic (e.g. inter- and intraspecies competition, food webs, plant-microbe interaction) and abiotic (e.g. soil climate, physics and chemistry) factors. Recent work shows that a better understanding of the composition and diversity of the microbial community across a variety of soils in different climates and under different land use, as well as plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere, may provide a key to better understand the variability of N2O fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface. Moreover, recent insights into the regulation of the reduction of N2O to dinitrogen (N2) have increased our understanding of BO and N2O exchange. This improved process understanding, building on the increased use of isotope tracing techniques and metagenomics, needs to go along with improvements in measurement techniques for N2O (and N2) emission in order to obtain robust field and laboratory datasets for different ecosystem types. Advances in both fields are currently used to improve process descriptions in biogeochemical models, which may eventually be used not only to test our current process understanding from the microsite to the field level, but also used as tools for up-scaling emissions to landscapes and regions and to explore feedbacks of soil N2O emissions to changes in environmental conditions, land management and land use.

  11. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and polishes Some ...

  12. Strongly condemning the actions of the Russian Federation, under President Vladimir Putin, which has carried out a policy of aggression against neighboring countries aimed at political and economic domination.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Kinzinger, Adam [R-IL-16

    2014-11-18

    12/04/2014 On motion to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (2/3 required): 411 - 10 (Roll no. 548). (text: CR 12/3/2014 H8345-8347)) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. The First Joint Report of the General Thomas P. Stafford Task Force and the Academician Vladimir F. Utkin Advisory Expert Council on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In October 1992, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) formally agreed to conduct a fundamentally new program of human cooperation in space. The 'Shuttle-Mir Program' encompassed combined astronaut-cosmonaut activities on the Shuttle, Soyuz Test Module(TM), and Mir station spacecraft. At that time, NASA and RSA limited the project to: the STS-60 mission carrying the first Russian cosmonaut to fly on the U.S. Space Shuttle; the launch of the first U.S. astronaut on the Soyuz vehicle for a multi-month mission as a member of a Mir crew; and the change-out of the U.S.-Russian Mir crews with a Russian crew during a Shuttle rendezvous and docking mission with the Mir Station. The objectives of the Phase 1 Program are to provide the basis for the resolution of engineering and technical problems related to the implementation of the ISS and future U.S.-Russian cooperation in space. This, combined with test data generated during the course of the Shuttle flights to the Mir station and extended joint activities between U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts aboard Mir, is expected to reduce the technical risks associated with the construction and operation of the ISS. Phase 1 will further enhance the ISS by combining space operations and joint space technology demonstrations. Phase 1 also provides early opportunities for extended U.S. scientific and research activities, prior to utilization of the ISS.

  14. Looking forward: planning America's future

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    Mr. Stoddard looks at the big picture with an eye toward solutions. He examines major challenges facing the country today - dependence on fossil fuels, urban decay, the declining industrial base, unemployment and proliferation of nuclear weapons - in a manner aimed to provide reliable road maps that might lead to a positive future. He says existing proposals for meeting crises are fragmented, unfocused, and not organized to allow practical implementation. In this book Stoddard attempts to pull together the best ideas, suggest ways to eliminate institutional barriers to those ideas, and propose long-range plans for overcoming problems.

  15. 16 CFR 1500.14 - Products requiring special labeling under section 3(b) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., stoddard solvent, and related petroleum distillates. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol) and mixtures containing 4 percent or more by weight of methyl alcohol (methanol). (5) Turpentine (including gum turpentine... section. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol). Because death and blindness can result from the ingestion...

  16. 16 CFR 1500.14 - Products requiring special labeling under section 3(b) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., stoddard solvent, and related petroleum distillates. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol) and mixtures containing 4 percent or more by weight of methyl alcohol (methanol). (5) Turpentine (including gum turpentine... section. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol). Because death and blindness can result from the ingestion...

  17. 16 CFR 1500.14 - Products requiring special labeling under section 3(b) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., stoddard solvent, and related petroleum distillates. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol) and mixtures containing 4 percent or more by weight of methyl alcohol (methanol). (5) Turpentine (including gum turpentine... section. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol). Because death and blindness can result from the ingestion...

  18. 16 CFR 1500.14 - Products requiring special labeling under section 3(b) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., stoddard solvent, and related petroleum distillates. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol) and mixtures containing 4 percent or more by weight of methyl alcohol (methanol). (5) Turpentine (including gum turpentine... section. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol). Because death and blindness can result from the ingestion...

  19. 16 CFR 1500.14 - Products requiring special labeling under section 3(b) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., stoddard solvent, and related petroleum distillates. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol) and mixtures containing 4 percent or more by weight of methyl alcohol (methanol). (5) Turpentine (including gum turpentine... section. (4) Methyl alcohol (methanol). Because death and blindness can result from the ingestion...

  20. The Apo Riboswitch as a Molecular Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Riboswitches ‘sense’ metabolites but knowledge is sparse for structures without bound ligand. Stoddard et al. (2010) determined an apo riboswitch structure ‘closed’ to metabolite binding. Further SAXS, biochemical and computational analyses support ensemble behavior with interconverting open and closed conformations. PMID:20637410

  1. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subpart V of... - Recommended Test Procedures and Test Criteria and Recommended Durability Procedures To...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fluid (Stoddard solvent or equivalent) from a 10 stroke cycle,* within ±30% of the volume from a 10 stroke cycle of an original equipment plunger or diaphragm assembly. *10 stroke cycle: 10 strokes from... intended to cover multiple vehicle or engine configurations, converter aging may be obtained per...

  2. Media and Democracy. A Response to "The Need for Media Education in Democratic Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lance E.

    2015-01-01

    This response supports Stoddard's (2014) assertion that media education should be considered a crucial factor of democratic education and offers both extensions and cautions related to that end. Extensions include practical suggestions for studying the non-neutrality of technology. The author also cautions educators that if media education and…

  3. Redkino to Rutland--a glimmer of Glasnost.

    PubMed

    Herd, M M

    1990-03-10

    Margaret Herd met Vladimir Nikitin on a BDJ study tour in the Soviet Union in March 1988. As a result of their meeting Margaret moved heaven and earth to help Vladimir come for a taste of the West. He spent a month in Britain last Christmas, encountering with awe and disbelief the many everyday things that we take for granted. Here Margaret describes Vladimir's brief visit.

  4. 78 FR 21007 - Unblocking of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons Pursuant to Executive Order 13348

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ..., Vladimir Abramovich); DOB 14 Dec 1947; alt. DOB 18 Oct 1946; nationality Ukraine; Passport 5280007248D... Ukraine; Passport AC251295 (Ukraine); alt. Passport KC024178 (Ukraine) (individual) . 8....

  5. Economic and environmental benefits of product substitution for organic solvents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, S.C.

    1991-05-01

    U.S. Army installations require solvents for effective maintenance and equipment refurbishing operations. Spent solvent generation has become a significant environmental and economic concern. Of increasing concern are toxic air emissions, threshold limit values, and increasing restriction on land disposal. Coupled with these environmental issues is the rising cost of both waste disposal and new solvent purchase. This manuscript evaluates the environmental protection and economic benefits of substituting aqueous terpene-based cleaners for petroleum-based Stoddard solvent, currently used in parts cleaning. With characteristics such as low volatility, biodegradability, and reduction of land disposal, terpene cleaners have become the favored substitution alternative. This research showed that implementing terpene cleaner substitution for Stoddard solvent requires a site-specific study of each installation which will include waste recycling, disposal of sludge and rinse water, landfills, contamination of soils and economic analysis.

  6. Geophysicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    In Memoriam: James R. Holton, Buford K. Meade, Mikhail I. Pudovkin; Honors: Michel Blanc, Alberto Borges, Paola Vannucchi, Michael A. Hapgood, Subir Banerjee, Lev Vinnik, John Wahr, Forrest Mozer, Vladimir N. Zharkov, Michael Ghil

  7. Russian Prime Minister Calls the Station Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin called the International Space Station from the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia, on Jan. 11, 2011. Putin also offered his condolences to ISS ...

  8. CCD Photometry of Asteroids at the Belgrade Astronomical Observatory: 2008 January-September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benishek, Vladimir; Protitch-Benishek, Vojislava

    2009-04-01

    Lightcurves for seven minor planets were obtained at the Belgrade Astronomical Observatory in the period 2008 January-September: 541 Deborah, 956 Elisa, 1022 Olympiada, 1071 Brita, 1724 Vladimir, 5010 Amenemhet, and (8567) 1996 HW1.

  9. Astronauts and cosmonauts sign Gagarin's diary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In keeping with Russian tradition, astronaut Norman E. Thagard (left), guest researcher, signs the diary of the late Yuriy A. Gagarin, the first Russian cosmonaut, as his Mir 18 crew mates members look on. Cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov (center), misson com

  10. Oriented strand board feasibility study for Venezuelan production. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This study, conducted by Wallace Industrial Constructors, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report shows the results of a feasibility study done as a joint venture with Delfino Group to design, build and operate and market a 300 million square foot Oriented Strand Board facility. The report covers the technical process of making the product, as well as enviromental considerations and impact. The study id divided into the following sections: Introduction and Executive Summary: (1) Schenck/Drawings; (2) Sensitivites; (3)Historical Summary A; (4) Historical Summary B; (5) Guss Report 5/94; (6) Stoddard Report; (7) WA State Study; (8) Waferboard Pricing.

  11. Oriented strand board. Feasibility study for Venezuelan production. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This study, conducted by Wallace Industrial Constructors, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report shows the results of a feasibility study done as a joint venture with Delfino Group to design, build and operate and market a 300 million square foot Oriented Strand Board facility. The report covers the technical process of making the product, as well as environmental considerations and impact. The study is divided into the following sections: Introduction and Executive Summary; (1) Schenck/Drawings; (2) Sensitivities; (3) Historical Summary A; (4) Historical Summary B; (5) Guss Report 5/94; (6) Stoddard Report; (7) WA State Study; (8) Waferboard Pricing.

  12. Cleaning up our act: Alternatives for hazardous solvents used in cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, J.D.; Meltzer, M.; Miscovich, D.; Montoya, D.; Goodrich, P.; Blycker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has studied more than 70 alternative cleaners as potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene and trichloroethane), hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene and Stoddard Solvent), and volatile organic compounds (e.g., acetone, alcohols). This report summarizes LLNL`s findings after testing more than 45 proprietary formulations on bench-scale testing equipment and in more than 60 actual shops and laboratories. Cleaning applications included electronics fabrication, machine shops, optical lenses and hardware, and general cleaning. Most of the alternative cleaners are safer than the solvents previously used and many are nonhazardous, according to regulatory criteria.

  13. Vertical axis rotations in the Mojave: Evidence from the Independence dike swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos

    1996-11-01

    The 500-km-long Late Jurassic Independence dike swarm in California extends from the central Sierra Nevada through the Mojave Desert to the Eastern Transverse Range. The dikes are mostly vertical, and their azimuth in the Sierra Nevada is ˜ 315°. However, in the Mojave region, their azimuth varies significantly: 300° 320° in the Argus Range, the Spangler Hills, and the Stoddard Well and Soda Mountain areas, and 340° 350° in the Granite Mountain, Alvord Mountain, and Eagle Mountain areas. Apparently the dikes in the Granite, Alvord, and Eagle mountains areas have rotated ˜ 50° clockwise about vertical axis relative to the Sierra Nevada and the Stoddard Well area. These rotations are remarkably consistent with known post early Miocene paleomagnetically derived rotations. The clockwise rotations are associated with the east-west trending left-lateral strike-slip faults in the northeastern Mojave and the Eastern Transverse range regions. In contrast, the data show that little or no rotation occurred in the central Mojave domain, which is characterized by northwest-trending faults.

  14. Lightning Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Kit-built airplanes are more affordable because they are assembled by the owner and do not require Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification. The Glasair III, is an advanced technology homebuilt, constructed of a fiberglass and graphite fiber composite material, and equipped with digital instruments. Both technologies make the airplane more susceptible to lightning effects. When Glasair manufacturer, Stoddard-Hamilton, decided that lightning protection would enable more extensive instrument flight and make the plane more marketable, they proposed a joint development program to NASA Langley Research Center (LAR). Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Langley contractors designed and tested a lightning protection system, and the Glasair III-LP became the first kit-built composite aircraft to be lightning tested and protection-verified under FAA guidelines for general aviation aircraft.

  15. Investigation of spray characteristics from a low-pressure common rail injector for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kihyung; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2004-03-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion provides extremely low levels of pollutant emissions, and thus is an attractive alternative for future IC engines. In order to achieve a uniform mixture distribution within the engine cylinder, the characteristics of the fuel spray play an important role in the HCCI engine concept. It is well known that high-pressure common rail injection systems, mainly used in diesel engines, achieve poor mixture formation because of the possibility of direct fuel impingement on the combustion chamber surfaces. This paper describes spray characteristics of a low-pressure common rail injector which is intended for use in an HCCI engine. Optical diagnostics including laser diffraction and phase Doppler methods, and high-speed camera photography, were applied to measure the spray drop diameter and to investigate the spray development process. The drop sizing results of the laser diffraction method were compared with those of a phase Doppler particle analyser (PDPA) to validate the accuracy of the experiments. In addition, the effect of fuel properties on the spray characteristics was investigated using n-heptane, Stoddard solvent (gasoline surrogate) and diesel fuel because HCCI combustion is sensitive to the fuel composition. The results show that the injector forms a hollow-cone sheet spray rather than a liquid jet, and the atomization efficiency is high (small droplets are produced). The droplet SMD ranged from 15 to 30 µm. The spray break-up characteristics were found to depend on the fuel properties. The break-up time for n-heptane is shorter and the drop SMD is smaller than that of Stoddard solvent and diesel fuel.

  16. A Visual/Analytical History of the Silent Cinema (1895-1930).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petric, Vladimir

    The proposed project, mentioned in Vladimir Petric's articles "From Written Film History to Visual Film History," is a book intended as a teaching vehicle for college and university film courses and involving shot-by-shot analysis and evaluation of films as primary study material. Cinematic values are emphasized both because cinematic visual…

  17. The Elephants Teach: Creative Writing since 1880

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, David Gershom

    2006-01-01

    When Vladimir Nabokov was up for a chair in literature at Harvard, the linguist Roman Jakobson protested: "What's next? Shall we appoint elephants to teach zoology?" That anecdote, with which D. G. Myers begins "The Elephants Teach", perfectly frames the issues this book tackles. Myers explores more than a century of debate over how writing should…

  18. Cultural Contact through Musical Poetry in Clara Janes's "Kampa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faszer-McMahon, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Clara Janes's "Kampa" is a love song dedicated to the renowned Czech poet Vladimir Holan. The work includes a musical and lyrical composition performed on tape, and its unconventional musical mode offers an alternative to divisions between western and non-western literary and musical forms. The poetry of "Kampa" presents musical methods of…

  19. The principle of phase stability and the accelerator program at Berkeley, 1945--1954

    SciTech Connect

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1994-07-01

    The discovery of the Principle of Phase Stability by Vladimir Veksler and Edwin McMillian and the end of the war released a surge of accelerator activity at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The University of California Radiation Laboratory). Six accelerators incorporating the Principle of Phase Stability were built in the period 1945--1954.

  20. Open Family: A Lifestyle for Kids and Other People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, Larry L.

    1977-01-01

    Presents a model for an alternative family form which extends ideological and structural features of open marriage to include children. Open families are characterized by enhanced permeability of internal/external boundaries and a single standard of behavior. A reply is given by Vladimir De Lissovoy with concluding responses by Constantine.…

  1. STS-86 Mission Specialists Chretien and Titov prepare to enter Atlantis for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien, in orange launch and entry suit at right, and Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of white room closeout crew members, including suit technician Valarie McNeal, at center.

  2. 78 FR 31386 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... AD docket. Revised Service Information Since we issued the NPRM (77 FR 68711, November 16, 2012), we... other publications listed in this AD as of March 4, 2010 (75 FR 4477, January 28, 2010). ADDRESSES: You... Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Vladimir Ulyanov, Aerospace...

  3. The Study of the Noosphere--Contemporary Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moiseev, Nikita N.

    1989-01-01

    Explains the theory of noosphere developed by Soviet academician Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky and Jesuit priest Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. States that this theory is based on a new morality concerning the unity of humanity and its responsibility for the fate of the planet. (GG)

  4. Mechano-electric heterogeneity of the myocardium as a paradigm of its function

    PubMed Central

    Solovyova, Olga; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Kohl, Peter; Panfilov, Alexander V.; Tsaturyan, Andrey K.; Tsyvian, Pavel B.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial heterogeneity is well appreciated and widely documented, from sub-cellular to organ levels. This paper reviews significant achievements of the group, led by Professor Vladimir S. Markhasin, Russia, who was one of the pioneers in studying and interpreting the relevance of cardiac functional heterogeneity. PMID:26713555

  5. Russian scientists decry savage job cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Ned

    2016-09-01

    More than 100 scientists in Russia have signed an open letter to the country's president, Vladimir Putin, protesting over a lack of funding for research and reforms that they say have left Russian science mired in a chronic state of crisis.

  6. Transformations in Exile: The Multilingual Exploits of Nabokov's Pnin and Kinbote.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Examines two works, "Pnin" (1957) and "Pale Fire" (1962), by writer Vladimir Nabokov, a polyglot with strong metalinguistic awareness. Shows how Nabokov used a polylinguistic matrix to create a subtext partially accessible to monoglots but only fully comprehensible to those who know several languages, literatures and histories. (SR)

  7. The Circulation of Sadomasochistic Desire in the "Lolita" Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Krin

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the 1955 Vladimir Nabokov novel "Lolita," and the central theme of "Lolita" being a prize in a struggle between two men. Examines some of the moments of sadomasochism in the novel and film, and the relationship between director Stanley Kubrick and the lead actor Peter Sellers. Concludes with an analysis of Kubrick's relationship with the…

  8. "Lolita": Genealogy of a Cover Girl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Shari L.

    2015-01-01

    At the publication of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel "Lolita" (1958), the author insisted that a girl never appear on the cover. This discourse analysis of 185 "Lolita" book covers, most of which feature a girl, considers the genealogy of "Lolita" in relation to representation, myth, and tacit knowledge…

  9. Astronauts and cosmonauts sign Gagarin's diary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In keeping with Russian tradition, astronaut Norman E. Thagard (seated, left), guest researcher, watches as Vladimir N. Dezhurov (seated, center), signs the diary of the late Yuriy A. Gagarin, the first Russian cosmonaut, as his Mir 18 crew mates and the

  10. Astronaut Collins and cosmonaut Titov organize TIPS paper messages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On the Space Shuttle Discovery's middeck, astronaut Eileen M. Collins and cosmonaut Vladimir G. Titov attempt to organize a lengthy mail message from flight controllers on Earth. Collins was pilot for the STS-63 eight day mission and Titov served as a mission specialist. Approximately 30 feet of messages from the Thermal Imaging Printing System (TIPS) are spread around the middeck.

  11. STS-71 preflight crew portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Crew members for the STS-71 mission and the related Mir missions assembled for a crew portrait at JSC. In front are, left to right, Vladimir N. Dezhurov, Robert L. Gibson and Anatoliy Y. Solovyev, mission commanders for Mir-18, STS-71 and Mir-19, respecti

  12. The Keys to the White House: Prediction for 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Conventional pundits, pollsters, and forecasters are focused on whether the economy will improve sufficiently in 2012 for President Barack Obama to gain reelection. The Keys to the White House, a prediction system that the author developed in collaboration with Vladimir Keilis-Borok, founder of the International Institute of Earthquake Prediction…

  13. The Keys to the White House: Prediction for 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Allan

    2008-01-01

    The winds of political change are blowing through America in 2008 and will sweep the party in power from the White House next November. That is the verdict of the Keys to the White House, a prediction system that the author developed in collaboration with Vladimir Keilis-Borok, founder of the International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory…

  14. Regional Media Education Centers (For Non-Professionals in the Media Fields) in the European Part of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitskaya, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    In the European parts of Russia (Archangelsk, Belgorod, Vladimir, Voronezh, Kazan, Krasnodar, Penza, Rostov-on-Don, St. Petersburg, Saratov, Smolensk, Taganrog, Tambov, Tver, Tolyatti and so on.) there is a lot of pedagogues, who strive to develop media competence among different age groups with different social status. More and more media…

  15. STS-86 Mission Specialist David Wolf in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of Rick Welty, in foreground at center, United Space Alliance (USA) orbiter vehicle closeout chief; and closeout team members, in background from left, Jim Davis, NASA quality assurance specialist; and George Schramm, USA mechanical technician. STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground at far left, is awaiting his turn.

  16. National Calendar-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvei, Valeria; Svet, Natalia-Maria; Puscasu, Madlena; Ciobanu, Maria; Netida, Xenia; Pohila, Vlad

    2014-02-01

    The following biographies of scientists were included in the calendar: Fermi Enrico (1901-1954), Gagarin Iury (1934-1938), Kirchhoff Gustav Robert (1824-2009), Kot Mihail V.(1914-1967), Lalescu Traian (1882-1929), Laplace Pierre Simon Marchiz de (1749-1827), Loumiere Louis, Pavlov Mihail (1884-1961), Steklov Vladimir(1864-1926), Ulugbek Mahhomed Taragai (1394-1449). A short presentation of the Harvard University, founded in 1639, has been given also.

  17. Lenin, Russia, China, world communist movement and their lieders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    2010-06-01

    The article Concerns October 1917 Revolution, its founders (Marx, Lenin and other bolshevick rullers) its impact on China as well as on other communist countries. Nobel Prize winners Steven Weinberg (as oposant of Lenin an partisan of Vladimir A. Fock) and Zhores I. Alferov as a member of Communist Party of Soviet Union and Russian Federation participated to this duiscussion. Other articles concerns Chinese ancient and Middle Age Science, Falun Dafa and Human Rights in China as well as North Korean Military program.

  18. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joel T.; Mannheimer, Richard J.; Grimley, Terrence A.; Morrow, Thomas B.

    1989-06-01

    An experimental description of the flow structure of non-Newtonian slurries in the laminar, transitional, and fully-developed turbulent pipe flow regimes was the primary objective of this research. Experiments were conducted in a large-scale pipe slurry flow facility with an inside diameter of 51 mm (2 inches). Approximately, 550 liters (145 gal) of slurry were necessary in the operation of the loop. Detailed velocity profile measurements by a two-color, two-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) were accomplished in a transparent test section with an optically transparent slurry. These velocity measurements were apparently the first ever reported for a non-Newtonian slurry with a yield value. The transparent slurry was formulated for these experiments from silica with a particle size of one to two microns, mineral oil, and Stoddard solvent. From linear regression analysis of concentric-cylinder viscometer data, the slurry exhibited yield-power-law behavior with a yield stress of 100 dynes/cm(sup 2), and an exponent of 0.630 for a solids concentration of 5.65 percent by weight. Good agreement was attained with rheological data derived from the pressure drop data in the flow loop under laminar flow conditions. The rheological properties of the transparent slurry were similar to many industrial slurries, including coal slurries, which have a yield value.

  19. An integrated surface and borehole seismic case study: Fort St. John Graben area, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds, R.C. . Dept. of Geology); Kuzmiski, R. ); Anderson, N.L. . Kansas Geological Survey); Richards, B.R. )

    1993-11-01

    The deltaic sandstones of the basal Kiskatinaw Formation (Stoddard Group, upper Mississippian) were preferentially deposited within structural lows in a regime characterized by faulting and structural lows in a regime characterized by faulting and structural subsidence. In the Fort St. John Graben area, northwest Alberta, Canada, these sandstone facies can form reservoirs where they are laterally sealed against the flanks of upthrown fault blocks. Exploration for basal Kiskatinaw reservoirs generally entails the acquisition and interpretation of surface seismic data prior to drilling. These data are used to map the grabens in which these sandstones were deposited, and the horst blocks which act as lateral seals. Subsequent to drilling, vertical seismic profile (VSP) surveys can be run. These data supplement the surface seismic and well log control in that: (1) VSP data can be directly correlated to surface seismic data. As a result, the surface seismic control can be accurately tied to the subsurface geology; (2) multiples, identified on VSP data, can be deconvolved out of the surface seismic data; and (3) the subsurface, in the vicinity of the borehole, is more clearly resolved on the VSP data than on surface seismic control. On the Fort St. John Graben data set incorporated into this paper, faults which are not well resolved on the surface seismic data, are better delineated on VSP data. The interpretative processing of these data illustrate the use of the seismic profiling technique in the search for hydrocarbons in structurally complex areas.

  20. Southern extension of the Independence dike swarm of eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Eric William

    1989-07-01

    New geochronologic data show that Jurassic dikes in the western Mojave Desert and Eastern Transverse Ranges are part of the Independence dike swarm of eastern California .These occurrences extend the length of the dike swarm to more than 500 km. U/Pb zircon concordia intercept ages for dikes near Stoddard Well in the western Mojave Desert and Big Wash in the Eagle Mountains are identical within analytical uncertainties to 148 Ma zircon ages for Independence dikes north of the Garlock fault. Recognition of this widespread magmatic and tectonic event with a restricted age has important ramifications. (1) Crosscutting relations between the dikes and pre-Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks help establish relative ages. (2) Persistence of dikes across several inferred terrane boundaries constrains terrane accretion ages. (3) The dike rocks represent magmatic processes in a wide range of wall-rock settings. (4) The dikes are structural markers that record translations and rotationsof crustal flakes. (5) Regional persistence and dilational emplacement of the Independence dike swarm suggest that it is the last extension in a series of alternating extensional and compressional events during the Jurassic. The tectonic regime responsible for the Independence dikes may be related to arc-normal extension, changes in plate motions, or oblique subduction with left-lateral shear.

  1. Synthesis of thirty years of surface water quality and aquatic biota data in Shenandoah National Park: collaboration between the US Geological Survey and the National Park Service

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.; Jastram, John D.; Wofford, John E.B.; Schaberl, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The eastern United States has been the recipient of acidic atmospheric deposition (hereinafter, “acid rain”) for many decades. Deleterious effects of acid rain on natural resources have been well documented for surface water (e.g., Likens et al. 1996; Stoddard et al. 2001), soils (Bailey et al. 2005), forest health (Long et al. 2009), and habitat suitability for stream biota (Baker et al. 1993). Shenandoah National Park (SNP) is located in northern and central Virginia and consists of a long, narrow strip of land straddling the Blue Ridge Mountains (Figure 1). The park’s elevated topography and location downwind of the Ohio River valley, where many acidic emissions to the atmosphere are generated (NSTC 2005), have made it a target for acid rain. Characterizing the link between air quality and water quality as related to acid rain, contaminants, soil conditions, and forest health is a high priority for research and monitoring in SNP. The US Geological Survey (USGS) and SNP have had a long history of collaboration on documenting acid rain effects on the park’s natural resources, starting in 1985 and continuing to the present (Lynch and Dise 1985; Rice et al. 2001, 2004, 2005, 2007; Deviney et al. 2006, 2012; Jastram et al. 2013).

  2. Retrospective cohort mortality study of workers at an aircraft maintenance facility. II. Exposures and their assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, P A; Lee, J S; Marano, D E; Spirtas, R; Forbes, C D; Blair, A

    1991-01-01

    Methods are presented that were used for assessing exposures in a cohort mortality study of 15,000 employees who held 150,000 jobs at an Air Force base from 1939 to 1982. Standardisation of the word order and spelling of the job titles identified 43,000 unique job title organisation combinations. Walkthrough surveys were conducted, long term employees were interviewed, and available industrial hygiene data were collected to evaluate historic exposures. Because of difficulties linking air monitoring data and use of specific chemicals to the departments identified in the work histories, position descriptions were used to identify the tasks in each job. From knowledge of the tasks and the chemicals used in those tasks the presence or absence of 23 chemicals or groups of chemicals were designated for each job organisation combination. Also, estimates of levels of exposure were made for trichloroethylene and for mixed solvents, a category comprising several solvents including trichloroethylene, Stoddard solvent, carbon tetrachloride, JP4 gasoline, freon, alcohols, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, acetone, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, methylene chloride, o-dichlorobenzene, perchloroethylene, chloroform, styrene, and xylene. PMID:1878309

  3. Lightning protection technology for small general aviation composite material aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumer, J. A.; Setzer, T. E.; Siddiqi, S.

    1993-01-01

    An on going NASA (Small Business Innovative Research) SBIR Phase II design and development program will produce the first lightning protected, fiberglass, General Aviation aircraft that is available as a kit. The results obtained so far in development testing of typical components of the aircraft kit, such as the wing and fuselage panels indicate that the lightning protection design methodology and materials chosen are capable of protecting such small composite airframes from lightning puncture and structural damage associated with severe threat lightning strikes. The primary objective of the program has been to develop a lightening protection design for full scale test airframe and verify its adequacy with full scale laboratory testing, thus enabling production and sale of owner-built, lightning-protected, Stoddard-Hamilton Aircraft, Inc. Glasair II airplanes. A second objective has been to provide lightning protection design guidelines for the General Aviation industry, and to enable these airplanes to meet lightening protection requirements for certification of small airplanes. This paper describes the protection design approaches and development testing results obtained thus far in the program, together with design methodology which can achieve the design goals listed above. The presentation of this paper will also include results of some of the full scale verification tests, which will have been completed by the time of this conference.

  4. Cation-ratio dating: A new rock varnish age-determination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.

    1983-07-01

    Rock varnish coats many surfaces of geomorphic and archaeologic interest in arid lands. All varnish dating techniques are limited by the time lag between the exposure of a surface to subaerial processes and the onset of varnishing. They are valid only where manganese is not remobilized after deposition, for example, in most arid environments. The premise of a new age-determination method, cation-ratio dating, is that the ratio of the more mobile cations (e.g., K and Ca) to titanium in varnish decreases with time. Although there are many inherent assumptions and potential limitations, cation-ratio dating has been verified on relative age-sequences from a Death Valley debris cone, Negev Desert talus flatirons, and prehistoric lake levels at Searles Lake in California. Varnish cation ratios have been calibrated to independently dated surfaces in the Coso volcanic field and vicinity in California. Tentative absolute dates have been assigned to geomorphic surfaces in the Coso area. Cation ratios have been used to distinguish relative ages of archaeologic artifacts in southwestern North America and to demonstrate that varnish at the South Stoddard locality, Mojave Desert, did not form in 25 yr.

  5. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-07-15

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: NPP Krsko revised decommissioning program, by Vladimir Lokner and Ivica Levanat, APO d.o.o., Croatia, and Nadja Zeleznik and Irena Mele, ARAO, Slovenia; Supporting the renaissance, by Marilyn C. Kray, Exelon Nuclear; Outage world an engineer's delight, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, NP Inc.; Optimizing refueling outages with R and D, by Ross Marcoot, GE Energy; and, A successful project, by Jim Lash, FirstEnergy.

  6. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Valeria V.; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V.

    2016-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials contains selected peer-reviewed papers from the International Baltic Conference on Magnetism: focus on biomedical aspects (IBCM-2015) held in Svetlogorsk, Kaliningrad region, Russia on the base of Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (IKBFU, Kaliningrad, Russia) during August 30-September 03, 2015. Ural Federal University named after the first President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin (UrFU, Yekaterinburg, Russia) acted as a co-organizer of the IBCM-2015. IKBFU and UrFU vice-rectors for science - Prof. Artyom V. Yurov and Prof. Vladimir V. Kruzhaev - took a special care for the IBCM-2015.

  7. Russia's energy policy: A framing comment

    SciTech Connect

    Aslund, A.

    2006-05-15

    A prominent specialist on the Russian economy provides a framing comment on two preceding papers entitled 'Russia's Energy Policy' (by Vladimir Milov, Leonard Coburn, and Igor Danchenko) and 'Russia's Energy Policy: A Divergent View' (by Matthew J. Sagers). The author argues that Russia's current energy policy should be viewed as an outcome of competition between three overlapping programs. In this context, he identifies three policy models - the old Soviet, the liberal or oligarchic, and the most recent state capitalist. The latter is currently supported by President Putin, who prioritizes diversification of the country's economy at the expense of diminished investments in the oil and gas sector.

  8. Historical aphasia cases: "Tan-tan", "Vot-vot", and "Cré nom!".

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Caramelli, Paulo

    2011-06-01

    We describe three cases of aphasia in patients who were internationally famous historical personalities, such as the case of Mr. Leborgne ("Tan") published by Paul Broca in 1861, which became a reference for the study of aphasias. The other cases described here are those of the Russian revolutionary and politician Vladimir Ilyitch Ulianov (Lenin) ("Vot-vot") and the French poet Charles Baudelaire ("Cré nom!"). Besides their historical relevance and the clinical picture of aphasia, these three cases share as a common feature the occurrence of speech automatisms or stereotypes.

  9. At the Cutting Edge of the Impossible

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2009-01-01

    Vladimir P. Demikhov (1916–1998) performed the world's first experimental intrathoracic transplantations and coronary artery bypass operation. His successes heralded the era of modern heart and lung transplantation and the surgical treatment of coronary artery disease. Even though he was one of the greatest experimental surgeons of the 20th century, his international isolation fueled speculation, suppositions, and myths. Ironically, his transplantation of a dog's head drew more publicity than did his pioneering thoracic surgical accomplishments, and he became an easy target for criticism. An account of Demikhov's life and work is presented herein. PMID:19876428

  10. Disney characters greet prime ASTP crewmen to Florida's Disney World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two Walt Disney comic cartoon characters, Donald Duck and Pluto, were on hand to greet a group of Apollo-Soyuz Test Project crewmen on their arrival at Disney World near Orlando. From left, are interpreter K. S. Samofal, interpreter Nicholas Timacheff, Cosmonaut Vladimir A. Shatalov, Astronaut Vance D. Brand, Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov (squeezing Pluto's nose) and Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford. The astronauts and cosmonauts were in Florida for a three-day inspection tour of the Kennedy Space Center where they looked over ASTP launch facilities and flight hardware.

  11. Global warming at the summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    During the recent summit meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton, the two leaders reaffirmed their concerns about global warming and the need to continue to take actions to try to reduce the threat.In a June 4 joint statement, they stressed the need to develop flexibility mechanisms, including international emissions trading, under the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They also noted that initiatives to reduce the risk of greenhouse warming, including specific mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, could potentially promote economic growth.

  12. STS-71 Mission Highlights Resources Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The flight crew of the STS-71 Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis Commander Robert L. Gibson, Pilot Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialists, Ellen S. Baker, Bonnie J. Dunbar, Gregory J. Harbaugh, and Payload Specialists, Norman E. Thagard, Vladimir Dezhurov, and Gennadiy Strekalov present an overview of their mission. It's primary objective is the first Mir docking with a space shuttle and crew transfer. Video footage includes the following: prelaunch and launch activities; the crew eating breakfast; shuttle launch; on orbit activities; rendezvous with Mir; Shuttle/Mir joint activities; undocking; and the shuttle landing.

  13. Signing of agreement on information policy for ASTP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    John P. Donnelly (seated right), NASA Assistant Administrator for Public Affairs, and Vladen S. Vereshchetin (seated left), Vice Chairman of Intercosmos, USSR Academy of Sciences, initial an agreement on information policy for the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project mission during ceremonies in Moscow in September 1974. Other members of the joint public affairs delegation looking on are, standing left to right, Vladimir A. Denissenko, Tatyana Klotchkovsaya, Igor P. Rumyantsev, John W. King, Nicholas Timacheff, and Robert Shafer. King is the Public Affairs Officer at JSC. Timacheff is the language officer with the JSC ASTP office. Shafer is NASA Deputy Assitant Administrator for Public Affairs (television).

  14. STS-63 crew portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    With the United States and Russian flags in the background, five NASA astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut named to fly aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery for the the STS-63 mission pose for the flight crew portrait at JSC. Left to right (front row) are Janice E. Voss, mission specialist, Eileen M. Collins, pilot; James D. Wetherbee, mission commander; and Vladimir Titov of the Russian Space Agency, mission specialist. In the rear are Bernard A. Harris Jr., payload commander; and C. Michael Foale, mission specialist.

  15. Memorial V.J.Glaser

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Plusieurs orateurs rendent hommage au grand physicien et scientifique Vladimir Jurko Glaser (1924 - 1984) qui travaillait au Ruder Boscovic Institut à Zagreb avant de venir au Cern en 1957 où il trouvait un poste permanent au département de physique théorique. Walter Tearing, Harry Lehmann,Henry Epstein, Jacques Bros et André Martin font des résumés biographiques de leurs collègue et ami en honorant ses grands qualités d'homme et ses remarquables conquêtes de la science et leurs accomplissement.

  16. A Practical Modeling Approach for NAPL Dissolution Kinetics, Microbially-Mediated Redox Reactions and Aquifer-Aquitard Diffusion to Assess Remedial Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J.; Kim, U.; Widdowson, M.; Chappel, F.

    2008-12-01

    Explicit modeling of contaminant dissolution from heterogeneously distributed NAPL sources, microbial growth and reaction kinetics, and diffusion into or out of low permeability layers pose significant difficulties. These include the need to estimate a large number of parameters, which may subject to great uncertainty due to inverse problem ill-posedness given limited data, and to a lesser extent, the large computational effort that may be required to solve a rigorously formulated problem. An upscaled model for NAPL dissolution kinetics is utilized in the present study based on previous work, with extentions to consider concurrent effects of residual DNAPL and pools or lenses and to consider multi-component NAPL mixtures. An approach is presented to model microbially-mediated redox reactions subject to the assumption that microbial growth and reaction rates are primarily limited by transport processes rather than by microbial kinetics at time and space scales relevant for many remediation problems. The simplified model requires only stoichiometric coefficients for electron donor and electron acceptor half-reactions and the fraction of electron donor needed for cell synthesis. Contaminant diffusion into low permeability layers and subsequent back-diffusion is approximated as a first-order mass transfer problem with an effective mass transfer coefficient computed from aquifer-aquitard properties by equating second moments of diffusion and mass transfer solutions. Accuracy of the simplified model formulation is evaluated for a hypothetical problem involving a DNAPL source consisting of a mixture of TCE and Stoddard solvent with background dissolved organic carbon, oxygen and sulfate in groundwater for 40 years followed by injection of vegetable oil as a supplemental electron donor to enhance reductive dechlorination. The simplified solution is compared to numerical results that consider multi-species Monod kinetics with explicit treatment of back-diffusion.

  17. Upgrading a 1950s tank farm to meet the environmental standards of the 1990S

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, C.F.; Peterson, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The Texaco Inc. Research and Development (Texaco) facility in Beacon, New York includes an above ground storage tank (AST) farm, known as Tank Farm No. 1, which consists of eighteen tanks with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 21,000 gallons. A second tank farm, at the Texaco, Beacon facility, designated as the Boiler House Tank Farm, includes three additional tanks with capacities from 10,000 to 44,900 gallons. The Tank Farm No. 1 AST systems are all vertical, carbon steel tanks which were initially installed in several phases in the 1950s. The Boiler House Tank Farm ASTs are also vertical, carbon steel tanks, including one riveted construction tank that was installed in 1931. Each of the Texaco ASTs are used to store a variety of petroleum products, including diesel fuel, stoddard solvent, used oil, and various grades of gasoline and gasoline components. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) has established regulations for petroleum bulk storage in 6 NYCRR Parts 612 through 614. These regulations include requirements for monitoring and inspecting AST systems, including a rigorous ``out of service`` inspection, to be completed at least once every ten years. Although several revisions had been completed at Tank Farm No. 1 in recent years, including installation of a reinforced concrete secondary containment dike system and new above ground piping, the tank shells and most appurtenances (e.g. water drawoff valves), were unmodified since they were initially installed. On this basis, Texaco decided to upgrade the AST systems in conjunction with the NYSDEC ten-year inspections, by installing reinforced fiberglass liners in the tank floors, and by removing and/or replacing tank appurtenances to meet current industry standards and fire code requirements. This paper presents a summary of the program implemented to upgrade the Texaco, Beacon tank farm AST systems.

  18. Diffusion sampler testing at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego County, California, November 1999 to January 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peters, Brian C.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compound concentrations in water from diffusion samplers were compared to concentrations in water obtained by low-flow purging at 15 observation wells at the Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California. Multiple diffusion samplers were installed in the wells. In general, comparisons using bladder pumps and diffusion samplers showed similar volatile organic carbon concentrations. In some wells, sharp concentration gradients were observed, such as an increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene concentration from 100 to 2,600 micrograms per liter over a vertical distance of only 3.4 feet. In areas where such sharp gradients were observed, concentrations in water obtained by low-flow sampling at times reflected an average concentration over the area of influence; however, concentrations obtained by using the diffusion sampler seemed to represent the immediate vicinity of the sampler. When peristaltic pumps were used to collect ground-water samples by low-flow purging, the volatile organic compound concentrations commonly were lower than concentrations obtained by using diffusion samplers. This difference may be due to loss of volatiles by degassing under negative pressures in the sampling lines induced while using the peristaltic pump, mixing in the well screen, or possible short-circuiting of water from an adjacent depth. Diffusion samplers placed in buckets of freephase jet fuel (JP-5) and Stoddard solvent from observation wells did not show evidence of structural integrity loss during the 2 months of equilibration, and volatile organic compounds detected in the free-phase fuel also were detected in the water from the diffusion samplers.

  19. [Genetic variability and differentiation of three Russian populations of yellow potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis as revealed by nuclear markers].

    PubMed

    Khrisanfova, G G; Kharchevnikov, D A; Popov, I O; Zinov'eva, S V; Semenova, S K

    2008-05-01

    Genetic variability of yellow potato cyst nematode G. rostochiensis from three Russian populations (Karelia, Vladimir oblast, and Moscow oblast) was investigated using two types of nuclear markers. Using RAPD markers identified with the help of six random primers (P-29, OPA-10, OPT-14, OPA-11, OPB-11, and OPH-20), it was possible to distinguish Karelian population from the group consisting of the populations from two adjacent regions (Moscow oblast and Vladimir oblast). Based on the combined matrix, containing 294 RAPD fragments, dendrogram of genetic differences was constructed, and the indices of genetic divergence and partition (P, H, and G(st)), as well as the gene flow indices N(m) between the nematode samples examined, were calculated. The dendrogram structure, genetic diversity indices, and variations of genetic distances between single individuals in each population from Karelia and Central Russia pointed to genetic isolation and higher genetic diversity of the nematodes from Karelia. Based on polymorphism of rDNA first intergenic spacer ITS1, attribution of all populations examined to the species G. rostochiensis was proved. Small variations of the ITS1 sequence in different geographic populations of nematodes from different regions of the species world range did not allow isolation of separate groups within the species. Possible factors (including interregional transportations of seed potato) affecting nematode population structure in Russia are discussed. PMID:18672794

  20. [FOUNDATION OF THE MUSEUM FOR THE HISTORY OF HEALTH IN 1944 AND ROLE OF ITS FIRST CURATOR STANKO SIELSKI].

    PubMed

    Fatović-Ferencić, Stella; Tahirović, Husref

    2015-01-01

    The Museum of the History of Health Care in Croatia, as the first such museum in the southeastern part of Europe, was established by the Croatian Medical Association in Zagreb in 1944. Beside Vladimir Ćepulić (1891 - 1964) the head of the Croatian Medical Association, epidemiologist Stanko Sielski (1891 - 1958), was one of the most prominent personalities to be credited for realizing this project. He was born in Gracanica into a family of Polish origin. After his graduation in Vienna in 1919, he worked as an epidemiologist in Konjic, Prozor, Glamoc and other places in the area of Bosnia, mostly involved in typhoid fever and variola eradication. At the beginning of the Second World War he was in Banja Luka where he was given the duty of director of the Department of Endemic Syphilis Eradication. During 1942 and 1943 his correspondence took place with Vladimir Ćepulić, which is today preserved in the Section of the History of Medicine of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb. On the basis of this material it was possible to trace the circumstances of the foundation of the Museum of the History of Health Care, how items were collected for its first exhibition, and the role of Stanko Sielski in preserving the medical heritage and dissemination of knowledge of the history of medicine to a broader audience. PMID:26975069

  1. [FOUNDATION OF THE MUSEUM FOR THE HISTORY OF HEALTH IN 1944 AND ROLE OF ITS FIRST CURATOR STANKO SIELSKI].

    PubMed

    Fatović-Ferencić, Stella; Tahirović, Husref

    2015-01-01

    The Museum of the History of Health Care in Croatia, as the first such museum in the southeastern part of Europe, was established by the Croatian Medical Association in Zagreb in 1944. Beside Vladimir Ćepulić (1891 - 1964) the head of the Croatian Medical Association, epidemiologist Stanko Sielski (1891 - 1958), was one of the most prominent personalities to be credited for realizing this project. He was born in Gracanica into a family of Polish origin. After his graduation in Vienna in 1919, he worked as an epidemiologist in Konjic, Prozor, Glamoc and other places in the area of Bosnia, mostly involved in typhoid fever and variola eradication. At the beginning of the Second World War he was in Banja Luka where he was given the duty of director of the Department of Endemic Syphilis Eradication. During 1942 and 1943 his correspondence took place with Vladimir Ćepulić, which is today preserved in the Section of the History of Medicine of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb. On the basis of this material it was possible to trace the circumstances of the foundation of the Museum of the History of Health Care, how items were collected for its first exhibition, and the role of Stanko Sielski in preserving the medical heritage and dissemination of knowledge of the history of medicine to a broader audience.

  2. [Tracing a journal fragment from the World War I].

    PubMed

    Fatović-Ferenčić, Stella

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a fragment of the World War I journal, discovered recently to belong to Vladimir Jelovšek (1879-1934) the physician, writer and one of the most prominent editors of Liječnički vjesnik. The journal was written during his attendance at the eastern front from June 1915 to July 1916 beginning with the fall of Lvov and partly following both Brusilov's invasions. On the territory of Croatia the war journals written by medical representatives are very rare. However, such sources could extend our knowledge on individual war reflexions, soldiers' principles or mindset, as well as to enable the comparison of their content with the body of already published autobiographical and other sources. Recently detected journal of Vladimir Jelovšek exposes the individual perception of war carried out through traumatic war experience of an individual abruptly exposed to war conditions. Furthermore, it adds to our knowledge the Jelovšek's life enlightening in those segments of his life which haven't been explored so far.

  3. Off-line life tests of Topaz-2 system reactor unit assembly units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglobin, Boris G.; Proshin, Yuriy F.; Shalaev, Anatoliy I.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental trials of the Topaz-2 nuclear power system (NPS) have been carried out according to the Integrated Experimental Trials Program (IETP). This program involved ground off-line tests of the reactor unit assembly units and their integrated tests as components of the prototype systems. Scopes of tests performed and major results of integrated and off-line tests were presented in the paper by Vladimir P. Nikitin et al. (1993). This paper considers major results of off-line life tests of the cesium unit, automatic control drive, ionization chamber suspension and dry friction pairs. These tests have been carried out in the Central Design Bureau for Machine Building (CDBMB) between 1982 and April, 1994.

  4. STS-86 Crew Photo outside hatch in LC-39A White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front, from left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, David A. Wolf and Wendy B. Lawrence. Standing, from left, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Commander James D. Wetherbee, and Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  5. STS-86 Crew Photo at Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind them, the STS-86 crew poses for a photograph at Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, David A. Wolf, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch is targeted for Sept. 25.

  6. STS-86 crew members arrive at the SLF for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 crew members pose for a photograph after arrival at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. From left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Wendy B. Lawrence, David A. Wolf and Scott Parazynski; Commander James D. Wetherbee; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; and Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf will transfer to the Mir for a long-duration stay, replacing Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth with the rest of the STS- 86 crew. The mission is targeted for a Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis.

  7. STS-86 crew arrives at the SLF before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, addresses press representatives and other onlookers after the astronauts arrival Monday at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. The other crew members, from left, are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynksi; Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; and Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir for about four months. Liftoff of STS-86 aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  8. STS-86 crew members pose in their space suits during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The seven STS-86 crew members pose for a group portrait in their space suits in front of Atlantis at Launch Complex 39A during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are, from left, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; and Scott E. Parazynski (kneeling). STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-85, in May. The STS-86 launch aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  9. Pulsars In The Headlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Puerto, C.

    1967 was the year of the so-called “war of the six days” or “third Arab Israeli war”, the year of the Che Guevara's death in Bolivia, the year of the military coup in Greece and, in medicine, the year of the first human heart transplant. Moreover, the signing of the international agreement on the use of space with peaceful means and the crash of the Russian shuttle Soyuz-1, with Cosmonaut Vladimir Kamarov on board also happened that year. Likewise, Spanish writer and professor of journalists, José Azorín, passed away. However, here we are interested in 1967 because it was the year of the detection of pulsars, which astronomers initially confused with signals from extraterrestrials or Little Green Men. Nowadays, they are still present in the headlines.

  10. STS-105 Pre-launch meal includes a cake for both crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Before suitup, the STS-105 and Expedition Three crews celebrate the pending launch with a special cake. In red shirts, seated left to right, are STS-105 Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry, Pilot Rick Sturckow and Commander Scott Horowitz. In blue shirts are the Expedition Three crew, Commander Frank Culbertson, Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin. Dezhurov and Tyurin are cosmonauts with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. On the mission, Discovery will be transporting the Expedition Three crew and several payloads and scientific experiments to the ISS, including the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank. The EAS, which will support the thermal control subsystems until a permanent system is activated, will be attached to the Station during two spacewalks. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station. Launch is scheduled for 5:38 p.m. EDT Aug. 9.

  11. The small bear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    Arguments are forwarded concerning the acomplishement of the actual president of Russia, a former member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Dmitry Anatol'evich Medvedev to the KGB informers. Namely, it is very probable, that He was an KGB informer or a member of an "Operotryad" at the Sankt-Petersburg University, which supervised the amateurs of rock -music between students of the University. His self praising with names of few popular western groups is just a reklama, in order to attract votes. It is also possible that He was an informer of the former Russian president, a former and actual Communist Party member, and a KGB officer Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin.

  12. STS-105 MS Forrester has suit fit check as part of TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-105 Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester waits to don his helmet during suit fit check as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. He and other crew members Commander Scott Horowitz, Pilot Rick Sturckow and Mission Specialist Daniel Barry are also taking part in the TCDT, which includes emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew Commander Frank Culbertson and Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin, both with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  13. STS-105 MS Forrester gets ready to drive M-113 as part of TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-105 Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester is ready to take the wheel of the M-113 armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training at the pad. Behind him on the left is George Hoggard, of the KSC/CCAS Fire Department, who supervises the driving. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Other STS-105 crew members taking part are Commander Scott Horowitz, Pilot Rick Sturckow, and Mission Specialist Daniel Barry; and the Expedition Three crew, Commander Frank Culbertson, and cosmonauts Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  14. STS-86 M.S. Titov and Chretien walk around Atlantis after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, talk about their recently completed U.S. space mission while walking under and around the orbiter Atlantis after landing on KSCs Runway 15 of the Shuttle Landing Facility. This was Chretiens third spaceflight, but first on the Space Shuttle. Titov previously flew four times in space, including once on the Space Shuttle as a mission specialist on STS-63. The nearly 11-day STS-86 mission ended with main gear touchdown at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997. STS-86 was the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir.

  15. Three Holy Men Get Haircuts: The Semiotic Analysis of a Joke.

    PubMed

    Berger, Arthur Asa

    2016-08-01

    This article deals with a typology of 45 techniques of humor that I found when doing research on the mechanisms that generate humor in texts, lists the techniques and applies them to a Jewish joke. It references the work of Vladimir Propp on folktales as analogous in that both are concerned with mechanisms in text that generate meaning. It also deals with four theories about why people find texts humorous, defines the joke as a short narrative with a punch line that is meant to generate mirthful laughter and defines Jewish humor as being about Jewish people and culture as told by Jewish people. It offers a paradigmatic analysis of the joke, and offers some insights into why Jewish people developed their distinctive kind of humor. This article is an enhanced and expanded version of an article which was published in a Chinese semiotics journal (doi:10.1515/css-2015-0022).

  16. Three Holy Men Get Haircuts: The Semiotic Analysis of a Joke

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Arthur Asa

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with a typology of 45 techniques of humor that I found when doing research on the mechanisms that generate humor in texts, lists the techniques and applies them to a Jewish joke. It references the work of Vladimir Propp on folktales as analogous in that both are concerned with mechanisms in text that generate meaning. It also deals with four theories about why people find texts humorous, defines the joke as a short narrative with a punch line that is meant to generate mirthful laughter and defines Jewish humor as being about Jewish people and culture as told by Jewish people. It offers a paradigmatic analysis of the joke, and offers some insights into why Jewish people developed their distinctive kind of humor. This article is an enhanced and expanded version of an article which was published in a Chinese semiotics journal (doi:10.1515/css-2015-0022). PMID:27547262

  17. The Expedition Three crew poses for photo at Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Expedition Three crew poses in front of Space Shuttle Discovery on Launch Pad 39A. From left are cosmonauts Mikhail Tyurin and Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov and Commander Frank Culbertson. Along with the STS-105 crew, they are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress from the pad, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  18. Expedition Three crew poses for photo on Fixed Service structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Expedition Three crew poses on the Fixed Service Structure at Launch Pad 39A. From left are cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin, commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonaut Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov. The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews are at Kennedy Space Center participating in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, a dress rehearsal for launch. The activities include emergency egress training, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The Expedition Two crew members currently on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. The mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  19. Expedition Three crew poses for photo at pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Expedition Three crew poses for a photo on Launch Pad 39A. From left are cosmonaut Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov, Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin. The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews are at Kennedy Space Center participating in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, a dress rehearsal for launch. The activities include emergency egress training, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The Expedition Two crew members currently on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. The mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001

  20. STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose for photo at Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose at Launch Pad 39A after training exercises. Pictured (left to right) are STS-105 Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry and Commander Scott Horowitz; Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Mikhail Tyurin and Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov; and STS-105 Pilot Rick Sturckow. Both crews are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The training includes emergency egress, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, which is seen in the background. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  1. The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose in front of the M-113 during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose in front of the M-113 armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training at the pad. From left to right, they are STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz, Mission Specialist Daniel Barry, Pilot Rick Sturckow, and Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester; Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Mikhail Tyurin and Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  2. Bilayer Graphene: An Electrically Tunable Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hongki; Sahu, Bhagawan; Banerjee, Sanjay; MacDonald, Allan

    2007-03-01

    Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we verify [1,2] that the energy band structure of bilayer graphene can be tuned by applying an external electric field. As the strength of the external electric field increases, the electronic spectrum of bilayer graphene changes from a that of a zero-gap semiconductor to that of a gapped semiconductor. From the ab initio calculations the external field dependence of the screened interlayer potential difference and tunneling amplitudes are extracted by fitting to a tight-binding model. We discuss the role of interlayer correlations in determining the size of the gap and the accuracy of local density approximation. [1] Edward McCann and Vladimir I. Fal'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 086805 (2006). [2] Taisuke Ohta, Aaron Bostwick,, Thomas Seyller, Karsten Horn, and Eli Rotenberg, Science 313, 951 (2006).

  3. [Decline of Activity and Shifts in the Methanotrophic Community Structure of an Ombrotrophic Peat Bog after Wildfire].

    PubMed

    Danilova, O V; Belova, S E; Kulichevskaya, I S; Dedysh, S N

    2015-01-01

    This study examined potential disturbances of methanotrophic communities playing a key role in reducing methane emissions from the peat bog Tasin Borskoye, Vladimir oblast, Russia as a result of the 2007 wildfire. The potential activity of the methane-oxidizing filter in the burned peatland site and the abundance of indigenous methanotrophic bacteria were significantly reduced in comparison to the undisturbed site. Molecular analysis of methanotrophic community structure by means of PCR amplification and cloning of the pmoAgene encoding particulate methane monooxygenase revealed the replacement of typical peat-inhabiting, acidophilic type II methanotrophic bacteria with type I methanotrophs, which are less active in acidic environments. In summary, both the structure and the activity of the methane-oxidizing filter in burned peatland sites underwent significant changes, which were clearly pronounced even after 7 years of the natural ecosystem recovery. These results point to the long-term character of the disturbances caused by wildfire in peatlands.

  4. View of signing of ASTP joint flight readiness review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An overall view of the signing of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) joint flight readiness review in ceremonies on May 22, 1975 in Moscow. Academician Vladimir A. Kotelnikov (on left) and NASA Deputy Administrator George M. Low (in center) are seen affixing their signatures to the ASTP document. Kotelnikov is the Acting President of the USSR Academy of Sciences. Seated at far left is Professor Konstantin D. Bushuyev, the Soviet Technical Director of ASTP. Dr. Glynn S. Lunney, the U.S. Technical Director of ASTP, is seated on Dr. Low's left. Arnold W. Frutkin (in light jacket), NASA Administrator for International Affairs, is standing behind Dr. Low. Academician Boris N. Petrov (in dark suit), Chairman of the USSR Council for International Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, is standing behind Kotelnikov. The signing of the agreement took place at the Presidium of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow.

  5. Special Issue on "Instanton Counting: Moduli Spaces, Representation Theory, and Integrable Systems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzo, Ugo; Sala, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Geometry and Physics collects some papers that were presented during the workshop "Instanton Counting: Moduli Spaces, Representation Theory, and Integrable Systems" that took place at the Lorentz Center in Leiden, The Netherlands, from 16 to 20 June 2014. The workshop was supported by the Lorentz Center, the "Geometry and Quantum Theory" Cluster, Centre Européen pour les Mathématiques, la Physique et leurs Interactions (Lille, France), Laboratoire Angevin de Recherche en Mathématiques (Angers, France), SISSA (Trieste, Italy), and Foundation Compositio (Amsterdam, the Netherlands). We deeply thank all these institutions for making the workshop possible. We also thank the other organizers of the workshop, Professors Dimitri Markushevich, Vladimir Rubtsov and Sergey Shadrin, for their efforts and great collaboration.

  6. STS-105 MS Barry has suit fit check as part of TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-105 Mission Specialist Daniel Barry happily sits through suit fit check as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. He and other crew members Commander Scott Horowitz, Pilot Rick Sturckow and Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester are also taking part in the TCDT, which includes emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew Commander Frank Culbertson and Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin, both with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  7. STS-105 MS Barry gets ready to drive M-113 as part of TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-105 Mission Specialist Daniel T. Barry is ready to take the wheel of the M-113 armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training at the pad. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Other STS-105 crew members taking part are Commander Scott Horowitz, Pilot Rick Sturckow, and Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester; and the Expedition Three crew, Commander Frank Culbertson, and cosmonauts Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  8. [Lieutenant-general V.O.Kappel: last campaign].

    PubMed

    Briniuk, I Iu

    2012-02-01

    The article is devoted to the last days of life and illness of one of commanders of the White movement, lieutenant-general Vladimir Oskarovich Kappel (1883-1920). Professional soldier, Nicholas Military Academy graduate, participant of the World War 1, Kappel was one of the staunch opponents of Soviet power. It is difficult to overemphasize Kappel's role in the armed struggle against Bolshevism in Volga region and Siberia in 1918-1919. He deserved reputation of the most talented and respected generals in the army of Admiral Kolchak. Kappel died January 26, 1920, his death was recorded on the death certificate, signed by temporarily seconded to the staff of East-precision front by the Russian doctor and the doctor Ryabov Romanian AK-tier Danets. The cause of the death of General called bilateral lung fever.

  9. The XXV International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali; Braun, Gunnar; Gattring, Vladimir; Göckeler, Christof; Schäfer, Meinulf; Weisz, Andreas; Wettig, Peter; Tilo

    Lattice 2007, the XXV International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory, was held from July 30 to August 4, 2007 at the University of Regensburg, Germany. The scientific program contained 24 plenary session talks and 338 parallel session contributions (talks and posters). The conference topics included: algorithms and machines; applications beyond QCD; chiral symmetry; hadron spectroscopy; hadron structure; nonzero temperature and density; standard model parameters and renormalization; theoretical developments; vacuum structure and confinement; weak decays and matrix elements. We gratefully acknowledge financial support by the following companies and institutions, which was essential for the success of the conference: Bull, Eurotech, IBM, Intel, Sun, DESY, GSI, FZ Jülich, Vielberth Foundation, Kneitinger.Editorial Board:Gunnar Bali, Vladimir Braun, Christof Gattringer (chairman), Meinulf Göckeler, Andreas Schäfer, Peter Weisz, Tilo Wettig

  10. The Double Homunculus model of self-reflective systems.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Koji; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-06-01

    Vladimir Lefebvre introduced the principles of self-reflective systems and proposed the model to describe consciousness based on these principles (Lefebvre V.A., 1992, J. Math. Psychol. 36, 100-128). The main feature of the model is an assumption of "the image of the self in the image of the self", that is, "a Double Homunculus". In this study, we further formalize the Lefebvre's formulation by using difference equations for the description of self-reflection. In addition, we also implement a dialogue model between the two homunculus agents. The dialogue models show the necessity of both exchange of information and observation of object. We conclude that the Double Homunculus model represents the most adequate description of conscious systems and has a significant potential for describing interactions of reflective agents in the social environment and their ability to perceive the outside world. PMID:27000722

  11. [Decline of Activity and Shifts in the Methanotrophic Community Structure of an Ombrotrophic Peat Bog after Wildfire].

    PubMed

    Danilova, O V; Belova, S E; Kulichevskaya, I S; Dedysh, S N

    2015-01-01

    This study examined potential disturbances of methanotrophic communities playing a key role in reducing methane emissions from the peat bog Tasin Borskoye, Vladimir oblast, Russia as a result of the 2007 wildfire. The potential activity of the methane-oxidizing filter in the burned peatland site and the abundance of indigenous methanotrophic bacteria were significantly reduced in comparison to the undisturbed site. Molecular analysis of methanotrophic community structure by means of PCR amplification and cloning of the pmoAgene encoding particulate methane monooxygenase revealed the replacement of typical peat-inhabiting, acidophilic type II methanotrophic bacteria with type I methanotrophs, which are less active in acidic environments. In summary, both the structure and the activity of the methane-oxidizing filter in burned peatland sites underwent significant changes, which were clearly pronounced even after 7 years of the natural ecosystem recovery. These results point to the long-term character of the disturbances caused by wildfire in peatlands. PMID:27169243

  12. Three Holy Men Get Haircuts: The Semiotic Analysis of a Joke.

    PubMed

    Berger, Arthur Asa

    2016-08-01

    This article deals with a typology of 45 techniques of humor that I found when doing research on the mechanisms that generate humor in texts, lists the techniques and applies them to a Jewish joke. It references the work of Vladimir Propp on folktales as analogous in that both are concerned with mechanisms in text that generate meaning. It also deals with four theories about why people find texts humorous, defines the joke as a short narrative with a punch line that is meant to generate mirthful laughter and defines Jewish humor as being about Jewish people and culture as told by Jewish people. It offers a paradigmatic analysis of the joke, and offers some insights into why Jewish people developed their distinctive kind of humor. This article is an enhanced and expanded version of an article which was published in a Chinese semiotics journal (doi:10.1515/css-2015-0022). PMID:27547262

  13. Farm 2000 and other projects

    SciTech Connect

    Edson, D.V.

    1981-07-20

    Three projects are discussed here: Farm 2000 (a tractorless, energy self-sufficient farm); an energy self-sufficient farm building; and a mobile, three-in-one still, fertilizer spreader and standby generator. The mobile still produces 20 to 25 gallons of 196-proof alcohol per hour, or roughly 50 to 65 gallons per 750 gallons of mash. The diesel powered generator provides electricity for the vacuum pump and for fermentation heat, consuming approximately 2.4 gallons of fuel each hour, and because it can be towed, the by-product can be spread as fertilizer without transferring it to other equipment. This is the invention of Dr. Vladimir Tica, the president of Solar Energy Innovations Corp., Maspeth, NY.

  14. PREFACE: International Workshop on Hysteresis & Multi-scale Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortell, Michael; O'Malley, Robert E.; Pokrovskii, Alexei; Sobolev, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    An International Workshop on Hysteresis & Multi-scale Asymptotics was held at University College Cork, Ireland on March 17-21, 2004. It brought together about 40 active scientists in the areas of dynamical systems with hysteresis and singular perturbations to analyse these phenomena which occur in many industrial, physical and economic systems. The scientific programme of the Workshop can be downloaded from the homepage http://euclid.ucc.ie/hamsa2004.htm. This collection of invited papers is based on the programme of the workshop whose main goal was to analyse and to demonstrate an interaction between theories of systems with multiple scales and systems with hysteresis (and between the 'multi-scale' and 'hysteresis' research communities) as far as possible. To fully understand the paths from singular perturbations to hysteresis and from hysteresis to singular perturbations will continue to involve much work and intense interdisciplinary interactions among experts in the two areas. We mention also two previous workshops: International Workshop on Relaxation Oscillations & Hysteresis, University College Cork, Ireland, April 1-6, 2002. The related collection, edited by us, was published as 'Singular Perturbations and Hysteresis', SIAM, Philadelphia, 2005. http://www.ucc.ie/ucc/depts/physics/ins/roh2002.htm International Workshop on Geometrical Methods of Nonlinear Analysis and Semiconductor Laser Dynamics, University College Cork, Ireland, April 5-6, 2001. A collection of invited papers has been published as a special issue of Proceedings of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences: Nonlinear dynamics of laser and reacting systems, Vol. 5, 2001, No 1 and 2 (edited by Vladimir Gol'dstein, Alexei Pokrovskii and Vladimir Sobolev), and is also available online at http://euclid.ucc.ie/appliedmath/gmna2001/ProcGMNA2001Full.pdf Finally, we wish to gratefully acknowledge the support of the School of Mathematical Sciences and the Boole Centre for Research in Informatics

  15. Influence of Terrestrial Weathering on the Magnetic Record of a LL Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Wasilewski, P.

    2001-12-01

    The origin of our solar system may have been accompanied by transient energetic events capable of magnetizing the materials from which the solid bodies in the solar system formed. The magnetic field associated with some of some of these events should have been recorded by the magnetic mineralogy contained within meteorites. To extract this information from meteorites many noise components must be carefully eliminated. The fusion crust has long been established as restricted to a thin layer on the surface of meteorite. Magnetic screening of the fusion crust that relates to Murchison meteorite indicates that during the entry and landing at least 6 mm thick layer is affected by terrestrial TRM acquisition. Many of the meteorite finds have long term residence in the terrestrial oxidized environment. This weathering is the subject of this study. The meteorite in question landed in the Libya stony desert and has obvious surface weathering that can be referred to as desert varnish. The consequent iron oxide mineralization introduced very stable origin of very stable chemical remanent magnetization. The magnetic remanence in fragments without the desert varnish is between 20 - 50 % of the oxidized ones. The orientation of this CRM appears to be random indicating that the sample may have rotated during the long period of aeolian transport and varnish formation. Magnetization of the white matrix samples (20 - 50 % of weathered ones) is thermally more stable and also randomly oriented. The range of NRM/SIRM values for both mineralogies varies between 10-2 and 10-3. Acknowledgements: This work would not be possible without help of following people: Jakub Haloda, Petr Jakes, Marcela Bukovanska, Petr Pruner, Vladimir Kohout, Libuse Kohoutova, Vladimir Kohout, Olga Kohoutova.

  16. Climatic and chemical drivers of trends in DOC in northern surface waters in Europa and North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Heleen A.; Monteith, Don T.; Stoddard, John L.

    2016-04-01

    drivers, such as temperature or precipitation, and will present multivariate models of DOC trends in relation to climate and deposition. References Monteith DT, Stoddard JL, Evans CD, de Wit HA, Forsius M, Hogasen T, Wilander A, Skjelkvale BL, Jeffries DS, Vuorenmaa J, Keller B, Kopacek J, Vesely J (2007) Dissolved organic carbon trends resulting from changes in atmospheric deposition chemistry. Nature 450(7169): 537-540

  17. Geology and stratigraphy of the Challis Volcanic Group and related rocks, Little Wood River area, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandford, Richard F.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2005-01-01

    The southwestern part of the Challis volcanic field occupies the valley of the Little Wood River and its tributaries in the Hailey and Idaho Falls 1??2? quadrangles of south-central Idaho. The Little Wood River area is a structurally controlled topographic basin that is partly filled by Eocene Challis Volcanic Group and younger rocks. Rock types in the Challis Volcanic Group of the Little Wood River area include, in order of decreasing abundance, andesite lava flows and tuff breccia, dacite lava flows and flow breccia, volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks, lithic tuff, nonvolcanic conglomerate, and rhyolite dikes. A basal nonvolcanic conglomerate, that locally rests on upper Paleozoic sedimentary rocks at a regional unconformity, was deposited prior to eruption of volcanic rocks. Andesite was the first volcanic rock erupted and is a voluminous sequence as thick as 3,000 ft (1,000 m). Locally thick volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks accumulated in topographic lows. A sharp transition marks the beginning of dacite eruption from fissures and flow-dome complexes. Dacite flows and breccias are as thick as 2,000 ft (600 m). An upper volcaniclastic unit was deposited in paleotopographic lows following emplacement of the main dacite unit. Next, a widespread, distinctive, lithic rich ash flow tuff, correlated with the tuff of Stoddard Gulch, was deposited over much of the area. Deposition of the tuff was followed by eruption of thin andesite and dacite lava flows and deposition of conglomeratic sedimentary rocks. The entire sequence was then intruded by a dacite flow-dome complex composed of at least three separate intrusions. The Challis Volcanic Group in the study area is calcalkaline. Andesitic rocks are typically high potassium basaltic andesite, high potassium andesite, shoshonite, and banakite (latite). Dacitic rocks are high potassium dacite and trachyte. Tuffs and vitrophyres range in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte. The paleotopographic basin in which the

  18. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  19. Connecting the dots: a collaborative USGS-NPS effort to expand the utility of monitoring data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, James B.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Schweiger, E. William; Mitchell, Brian R.; Miller, Kathryn; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    ; Barbour et al. 1999; Stoddard et al. 2008). Despite widespread use, many questions remain about how metrics are combined to form effective indices and about how to interpret both. Scientists and natural resource specialists within NPS and USGS have joined forces to critique the current analysis methods, with the collaboration involving the Rocky Mountain and Northeast Temperate NPS Inventory and Monitoring (I & M) networks, along with others, and USGS scientists from the National Wetlands Research Center and Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Funding that initiated the project was from a joint-partnership fund managed by the USGS Ecosystems Program for National Park Monitoring research and the work was focused at Acadia National Park and Rocky Mountain National Park. Here we present synopses of two major issues addressed by the group.

  20. Correlation of the Miocene Peach Spring Tuff with the geomagnetic polarity time scale and new constraints on tectonic rotations in the Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, John W.; Miller, David M.; Turrin, Brent D.

    2010-01-01

    We report new paleomagnetic results and 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Peach Spring Tuff (PST), a key marker bed that occurs in the desert region between Barstow, California, and Peach Springs, Arizona. The 40Ar/39Ar ages were determined using individual hand-picked sanidine crystals from ash-flow specimens used in previous paleomagnetic studies at eight sites correlated by mineralogy, stratigraphic position, and magnetic inclination. Site-mean ages, which range from 18.43 Ma to 18.78 Ma with analytical precision (1 s.d.) typically 0.04 Ma, were obtained from areas near Fort Rock, AZ; McCullough Mts, NV; Cima Dome, Parker Dam, Danby, Ludlow, Kane Wash, and Stoddard Wash, CA. The regional mean age determination is 18.71 ± 0.13 Ma, after the data were selected for sanidine crystals that yielded greater than 90% radiogenic argon (N = 40). This age determination is compatible with previous 40Ar/39Ar dating of the PST after taking various neutron-flux monitor calibrations into account. We report paleomagnetic results from eight new sites that bear on reconstructions of the Miocene basins associated with the Hector Formation, Barstow Formation, and similar fine-grained sedimentary deposits in the Barstow region. Key findings of the new paleomagnetic study pertain to age control of the Hector Formation and clockwise rotation of the Northeast Mojave Domain. Our study of a rhyolitic ash flow at Baxter Wash, northern Cady Mountains, confirms the correlation of the PST within the Hector Formation and prompts reinterpretation of the previously determined magnetostratigraphy. Our model correlates the PST to the normal-polarity zone just below the C6–C5E boundary (18.748 Ma) of the astronomically tuned Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale. After emplacement of the Peach Spring Tuff at Alvord Mountain and the Cady Mountains, the southern part of the Northeast Mojave Domain (between Cady and Coyote Lake faults) underwent clockwise rotation of 30°–55°. Clockwise rotations increase with

  1. Correlation of the Miocene Peach Spring Tuff with the geomagnetic polarity time scale and new constraints on tectonic rotations in the Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, John W.; Miller, David M.; Turrin, Brent D.; Reynolds, Robert E.; Miller, David M.

    2010-01-01

    We report new paleomagnetic results and 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Peach Spring Tuff (PST), a key marker bed that occurs in the desert region between Barstow, California, and Peach Springs, Arizona. The 40Ar/39Ar ages were determined using individual hand-picked sanidine crystals from ash-flow specimens used in previous paleomagnetic studies at eight sites correlated by mineralogy, stratigraphic position, and magnetic inclination. Site-mean ages, which range from 18.43 Ma to 18.78 Ma with analytical precision (1 s.d.) typically 0.04 Ma, were obtained from areas near Fort Rock, AZ; McCullough Mts, NV; Cima Dome, Parker Dam, Danby, Ludlow, Kane Walsh, and Stoddard Wash, CA. The regional mean age determination is 18.71 ± 0.13 Ma, after the data were selected for sanidine crystals that yielded greater than 90% radiogenic argon (N=40). This age determination is compatible with previous 40Ar/39Ar dating of the PST after taking various neutron-flux monitor calibrations into account. We report paleomagnetic results from eight new sites that bear on reconstructions of the Miocene basins associated with the Hector Formation, Barstow Formation, and similar fine-grained sedimentary deposits in the Barstow region. Key findings of the new paleomagnetic study pertain to age control of the Hector Formation and clockwise rotation of the Northeast Mojave Domain. Our study of a rhyolitic ash flow at Baxter Wash, northern Cady Mountains, confirms the correlation of the PST within the Hector Formation and prompts reinterpretation of the previously determined magnetostratigraphy. Our model correlates the PST to the normal-polarity zone just below the C6-C5E boundary (18.748 Ma) of the astronomically tuned Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale. After emplacement of the Peach Spring Tuff at Alvord Mountain and the Cady Mountains, the southern part of the Northeast Mojave Domain (between Cady and Coyote Lake faults) underwent clockwise rotation of 30°–55°. Clockwise rotations increase with

  2. Stratigraphy, age, and depositional setting of the Miocene Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, central Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leslie, Shannon R.; Miller, David M.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    New detailed geologic mapping and geochronology of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, 30 km east of Barstow, CA, help to constrain Miocene paleogeography and tectonics of the central Mojave Desert. A northern strand of the Quaternary ENE-striking, sinistral Manix fault divides the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill into two distinct lithologic assemblages. Strata north of the fault consist of: a green rhyolitic tuff, informally named the Shamrock tuff; lacustrine sandstone; partially silicified thin-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone to pebble conglomerate. Strata south of the fault consist of: lacustrine siltstone and sandstone; a rhyolitic tuff dated at 19.1 Ma (U-Pb); rock-avalanche breccia deposits; partially silicified well-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone and conglomerate. Our U-Pb zircon dating of the Shamrock tuff by SHRIMP-RG yields a peak probability age of 18.7 ± 0.1 Ma. Distinctive outcrop characteristics, mineralogy, remanent magnetization, and zircon geochemistry (Th/U) suggest that the Shamrock tuff represents a lacustrine facies of the regionally extensive Peach Spring Tuff (PST). Here we compare zircon age and geochemical analyses from the Shamrock tuff with those of the PST at Stoddard Wash and provide new insight into the age of zircon crystallization in the PST rhyolite. Results of our field studies show that Miocene strata at Harvard Hill mostly accumulated in a lacustrine environment, although depositional environments varied from a relatively deep lake to a very shallow lake or even onshore setting. Rock-avalanche breccias and alluvial deposits near the base of the exposed section indicate proximity to a steep basin margin and detrital studies suggest a southern source for coarse-grained deposits; therefore, we may infer a southern basin-margin setting at Harvard Hill during the early Miocene. Our geochronology demonstrates that deposition of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill extended from before

  3. Climatic and chemical drivers of trends in DOC in northern surface waters in Europa and North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Heleen A.; Monteith, Don T.; Stoddard, John L.

    2016-04-01

    drivers, such as temperature or precipitation, and will present multivariate models of DOC trends in relation to climate and deposition. References Monteith DT, Stoddard JL, Evans CD, de Wit HA, Forsius M, Hogasen T, Wilander A, Skjelkvale BL, Jeffries DS, Vuorenmaa J, Keller B, Kopacek J, Vesely J (2007) Dissolved organic carbon trends resulting from changes in atmospheric deposition chemistry. Nature 450(7169): 537-540

  4. PREFACE: 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    Dear Colleagues, 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures was held on March 25 - 27, 2014 at St. Petersburg Academic University - Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The School and Conference included a series of invited talks given by leading professors with the aim to introduce young scientists with actual problems and major advances in physics and technology. The keynote speakers were: Mikhail Glazov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Vladimir Dubrovskii (Saint Petersburg Academic University RAS, Russia) Alexey Kavokin (University of Southampton, United Kingdom and St. Petersburg State University, Russia) Vladimir Korenev (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Sergey Kukushkin (Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering RAS, Russia) Nikita Pikhtin (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia and "Elfolum" Ltd., Russia) Dmitry Firsov (Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Russia) During the poster session all undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference presented their works. Sufficiently large number of participants with more than 160 student attendees from all over the world allowed the Conference to provide a fertile ground for the fruitful discussions between the young scientists as well as to become a perfect platform for the valuable discussions between student authors and highly experienced scientists. The best student papers, which were selected by the Program Committee and by the invited speakers basing on the theses and their poster presentation, were awarded with diplomas of the conference - see the photos. This year's School and Conference is supported by SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics), OSA (The Optical Society), St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University and by Skolkovo Foundation. It is a continuation of the annual schools and

  5. List of Organizing Committees and Sponsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Organizers DIRECTORS Maria L CalvoPresident of International Commission for Optics, Spain Aram V PapoyanDirector of Institute for Physical Research of NAS, Armenia HEADS OF PROJECT Tigran Dadalyan YSU, Armenia Artsrun MartirosyanIPR, Armenia COORDINATOR Narine GevorgyanIPR, Armenia / ICTP, Italy MANAGERS Paytsar MantashyanIPR, Armenia Karen VardanyanIPR, Armenia INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Marcis AuzinshLatvia Roland AvagyanArmenia Tapash ChakrabortyCanada Yuri ChilingaryanArmenia Eduard KazaryanArmenia Albert KirakosyanArmenia Radik KostanyanArmenia Avinash PandeyIndia Marat SoskinUkraine INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE David Sarkisyan (Chair)Armenia Roman AlaverdyanArmenia Dan ApostolRomania Levon AslanyanArmenia Aranya BhattacherjeeIndia Gagik BuniatyanArmenia Vigen ChaltykyanArmenia Roldao Da RochaBrazil Miltcho DanailovItaly Vladimir GerdtRussia Samvel GevorgyanArmenia Gayane GrigoryanArmenia Rafik HakobyanArmenia Takayuki MiyaderaJapan Levon MouradianArmenia Atom MuradyanArmenia Simon RochesterUSA Hayk SarkisyanArmenia Aleksandr VardanyanArmenia LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Narek AghekyanArmenia Anahit GogyanArmenia Melanya GrigoryanArmenia Armen HovhannisyanArmenia Lilit HovhannisyanArmenia Tatevik KhachatryanArmenia Astghik KuzanyanArmenia Satenik KuzanyanArmenia Vladimir LazarevRussia Lilit MantashyanArmenia Hripsime MkrtchyanArmenia Pavel MuzhikyanArmenia Wahi NarsisianArmenia Sahak OrdukhanyanArmenia Anna ReymersArmenia Narine TorosyanArmenia The Symposium was organized by YSU & NAS SPIE Armenian Student Chapter Institute for Physical Research (IPR) of National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University (RAU) LT-PYRKAL cjsc Yerevan State University (YSU) Official Sponsors of the Symposium LT-PYRKAlRussian ArmenianSPIE LT-PYRKAL cjscRussian-Armenian UniversityYSU & NAS SPIE Student Chapter Further sponsors NFSATICTPSCSADevout Generation National Foundation of Science and Advanced TechnologiesThe Abdus Salam International Centre

  6. Towards an understanding of feedbacks between plant productivity, acidity and dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Ed; Tipping, Ed; Davies, Jessica; Monteith, Don; Evans, Chris

    2014-05-01

    leaching rates may thus control soil formation (Vitousek et al., 2010). Large observed DON concentrations that were observed in an experimental study are difficult to reconcile with the amount of N retention necessary to have accumulated observed organic matter stocks. We examine potential reasons for this discrepancy. - Evans CD, Jones TG, Burden A et al. (2012) Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils. Global Change Biology 18, 3317-3331. - Monteith DT, Stoddard JL, Evans CD et al. (2007) Rising freshwater dissolved organic carbon driven by changes in atmospheric deposition. Nature 450, 537-540. - Rowe EC, Tipping E, Posch M et al. (2014) Predicting nitrogen and acidity effects on long-term dynamics of dissolved organic matter. Environmental Pollution 184, 271-282. - Tipping E, Billett MF, Bryant CL et al. (2010) Sources and ages of dissolved organic matter in peatland streams: evidence from chemistry mixture modelling and radiocarbon data. Biogeochemistry 100, 121-137. - Vitousek PM, Porder S, Houlton BZ et al. (2010) Terrestrial phosphorus limitation: mechanisms, implications, and nitrogen-phosphorus interactions. Ecological Applications 20, 5-15.

  7. Rising susceptibility of freshwater DOC inputs to extreme events? The implications of underlying changes in atmospheric deposition and land-management. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C.; Monteith, D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Peacock, M.; Gauci, V.; Page, S. E.; Moore, S.

    2013-12-01

    a control on DOC leaching, focusing on the influence of peatland drainage on sites ranging from the UK to Southeast Asia. Again, we conclude that anthropogenic modification of peat hydrology has contributed both to increases in baseline rates of DOC export, and to the enhanced susceptibility of these ecosystems to extreme events. An example is presented of the impact of an uncontrolled fire on DOC export from a drained peatland in Borneo. We develop a conceptual model of the integrated effect of multiple environmental drivers on DOC export from peats and organo-mineral soils, and consider how projected changes in these drivers might be expected to alter the supply and behaviour of freshwater DOC in future. References Evans CD, Jones TG, Burden A et al. (2012) Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils. Global Change Biology 18, 3317-3331. Monteith DT, Stoddard JL, Evans CD et al. (2007). Rising freshwater dissolved organic carbon driven by changes in atmospheric deposition. Nature 450, 537-540. Moore S, Evans CD, Page SE et al. (2013). Deep instability of deforested tropical peatlands revealed by fluvial organic carbon fluxes, Nature 493, 660-664.

  8. Developing palaeolimnological records of organic content (DOC and POC) using the UK Acid Water Monitoring Network sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Fiona; Chiverrell, Richard; Boyle, John

    2016-04-01

    observed trends in DOC of surface waters. Analysis of these cores and various calibration materials (e.g. peat) suggests plant tissue undergoes pyrolysis at lower temperatures, and though humic substances can be generated in the lake this thermal phase may be a proxy record for catchment derived DOC. NIR and FTIR spectrometry data further characterise this organic phase, identify spectral structures that also correlate with monitored DOC. Together the pyrolysis, NIR, FTIR and XRF geochemistry (e.g. Fe/Mn, Si/Al ratios) data show also information on lake productivity, biogenic silica and mass accumulation rates. To explore the longer timescale equivalent proxy records have been trialled at Llyn Cwm Mynach and show possible phases of elevated DOC fluxes from catchment soils during the Holocene. References Evans C.D., Monteith D.T. and Cooper D.M. 2005. Long-term increases in surface water dissolved organic carbon: Observations, possible causes and environmental impacts. Environ. Pollut. 137: 55-71. Jonsson M., Ranaker L., Nilsson P.A. and Bronmark C. 2012. Prey-type-dependent foraging of young-of-the-year fish in turbid and humic environments. Ecol. Freshw. Fish 21: 461-468. Monteith D.T., Stoddard J.L., Evans C.D., de Wit H.A., Forsius M., Hogasen T., Wilander A., Skjelkvale B.L., Jeffries D.S., Vuorenmaa J., Keller B., Kopacek J. and Vesely J. 2007. Dissolved organic carbon trends resulting from changes in atmospheric deposition chemistry. Nature 450: 537-U539. Ranaker L., Jonsson M., Nilsson P.A. and Bronmark C. 2012. Effects of brown and turbid water on piscivore-prey fish interactions along a visibility gradient. Freshwater Biol. 57: 1761-1768. Tuvendal M. and Elmqvist T. 2011. Ecosystem Services Linking Social and Ecological Systems: River Brownification and the Response of Downstream Stakeholders. Ecol. Soc. 16

  9. Dimension of quantum phase space measured by photon correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchs, Gerd; Glauber, Roy J.; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2015-06-01

    We show that the different values 1, 2 and 3 of the normalized second-order correlation function {g}(2)(0) corresponding to a coherent state, a thermal state and a highly squeezed vacuum originate from the different dimensionality of these states in phase space. In particular, we derive an exact expression for {g}(2)(0) in terms of the ratio of the moments of the classical energy evaluated with the Wigner function of the quantum state of interest and corrections proportional to the reciprocal of powers of the average number of photons. In this way we establish a direct link between {g}(2)(0) and the shape of the state in phase space. Moreover, we illuminate this connection by demonstrating that in the semi-classical limit the familiar photon statistics of a thermal state arise from an area in phase space weighted by a two-dimensional Gaussian, whereas those of a highly squeezed state are governed by a line-integral of a one-dimensional Gaussian. We dedicate this article to Margarita and Vladimir Man’ko on the occasion of their birthdays. The topic of our contribution is deeply rooted in and motivated by their love for non-classical light, quantum mechanical phase space distribution functions and orthogonal polynomials. Indeed, through their articles, talks and most importantly by many stimulating discussions and intensive collaborations with us they have contributed much to our understanding of physics. Happy birthday to you both!

  10. The Maria Mitchell Observatory--For Astronomical Research and Public Enlightenment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffleit, Dorrit

    2001-04-01

    When the Maria Mitchell Observatory was erected in 1908 to house the 5-inch telescope that had been given Maria Mitchell in 1859, Mrs. Lydia Hinchman, niece of Maria and the principal co-founder of the Maria Mitchell Association, wanted the Observatory to specialize in research while not neglecting public relations entirely. She contacted Professor E. C. Pickering, Director of Harvard College Observatory, for advice. He recommended installing a photographic telescope and having the astronomer specialize in observations of variable asteroids, Eros in particular. Margaret Harwood, one of his assistants at Harvard, was chosen to head the Maria Mitchell Observatory, a post she held for 45 years. Besides lesser contributions, she published a catalogue of 74 asteroids known to have variable brightness. She discovered DF Cygni, an unusual type of variable star with multiple periods, and analyzed its variation on Harvard and Nantucket plates spanning over 50 years. Her final masterpiece was an analysis of 419 variable stars in the Scutum region of the Milky Way, the majority of the variables having been discovered by her High School assistant John Heath. The second Director, Dorrit Hoffleit, instituted a new project, Summer Research Participation on Variable Stars by College Undergraduates, especially women. This project was continued by her successor, Emilia Belserene. Nearly 200 college undergraduates participated in these programs. The fourth Director, Eileen Friel concentrated on both observational and theoretical researches on star clusters, her student contributing few papers on variable stars. The current Direcor, Vladimir Strelnitski, again enthusiasticlly specializes on modern problems of variable stars.

  11. PREFACE: Physics and Mathematics of Nonlinear Phenomena 2013 (PMNP2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelchenko, B. G.; Landolfi, G.; Martina, L.; Vitolo, R.

    2014-03-01

    Modern theory of nonlinear integrable equations is nowdays an important and effective tool of study for numerous nonlinear phenomena in various branches of physics from hydrodynamics and optics to quantum filed theory and gravity. It includes the study of nonlinear partial differential and discrete equations, regular and singular behaviour of their solutions, Hamitonian and bi- Hamitonian structures, their symmetries, associated deformations of algebraic and geometrical structures with applications to various models in physics and mathematics. The PMNP 2013 conference focused on recent advances and developments in Continuous and discrete, classical and quantum integrable systems Hamiltonian, critical and geometric structures of nonlinear integrable equations Integrable systems in quantum field theory and matrix models Models of nonlinear phenomena in physics Applications of nonlinear integrable systems in physics The Scientific Committee of the conference was formed by Francesco Calogero (University of Rome `La Sapienza', Italy) Boris A Dubrovin (SISSA, Italy) Yuji Kodama (Ohio State University, USA) Franco Magri (University of Milan `Bicocca', Italy) Vladimir E Zakharov (University of Arizona, USA, and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) The Organizing Committee: Boris G Konopelchenko, Giulio Landolfi, Luigi Martina, Department of Mathematics and Physics `E De Giorgi' and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, and Raffaele Vitolo, Department of Mathematics and Physics `E De Giorgi'. A list of sponsors, speakers, talks, participants and the conference photograph are given in the PDF. Conference photograph

  12. Support Vector Machine algorithm for regression and classification

    2001-08-01

    The software is an implementation of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm that was invented and developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his co-workers at AT&T Bell Laboratories. The specific implementation reported here is an Active Set method for solving a quadratic optimization problem that forms the major part of any SVM program. The implementation is tuned to specific constraints generated in the SVM learning. Thus, it is more efficient than general-purpose quadratic optimization programs. Amore » decomposition method has been implemented in the software that enables processing large data sets. The size of the learning data is virtually unlimited by the capacity of the computer physical memory. The software is flexible and extensible. Two upper bounds are implemented to regulate the SVM learning for classification, which allow users to adjust the false positive and false negative rates. The software can be used either as a standalone, general-purpose SVM regression or classification program, or be embedded into a larger software system.« less

  13. STS-86 crew members (Parazynski, Wolf, Lawrence) in slidewire basket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, David A. Wolf, and Wendy B. Lawrence, at right, participate in emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are the three U.S. astronauts who will serve as mission specialists during the planned 10-day flight to the Russian Space Station Mir. Also serving as mission specialists will be Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  14. STS-86 crew members Wolf, Chretien and Titov in M-113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. George Hoggard, in back at left, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, provides this part of the training to Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, to the right of Hoggard; Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; and Scott E. Parazynski. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Titov and Parazynski are scheduled to conduct a spacewalk primarily to retrieve four suitcase-sized environmental payloads from the exterior of the Mir docking module. Also during the mission, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A.

  15. Analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field observations at different heliocentric distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Multi-spacecraft measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) from 0.29 AU to 5 AU along the ecliptic plane have demonstrated systematic deviations of the observed IMF strength from the values predicted on the basis of the Parker-like radial extension models (Khabarova, Obridko, 2012). In particular, it was found that the radial IMF component |Br| decreases with a heliocentric distance r with a slope of -5/3 (instead of r-2 expansion law). The current investigation of multi-point observations continues the analysis of the IMF (and, especially, Br) large-scale behaviour, including its latitudinal distribution. Additionally, examples of the mismatches between the expected IMF characteristics and observations at smaller scales are discussed. It is shown that the observed effects may be explained by not complete IMF freezing-in to the solar wind plasma. This research was supported by the Russian Fund of Basic Researches' grants Nos.11-02-00259-a, and 12-02-10008-K. Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf

  16. Dynamic Clamp Analysis of Synaptic Integration in Sympathetic Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Horn, J. P.; Kullmann, P. H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in modern neuroscience require the identification of principles that connect different levels of experimental analysis, from molecular mechanisms to explanations of cellular functions, then to circuits, and, ultimately, to systems and behavior. Here, we examine how synaptic organization of the sympathetic ganglia may enable them to function as use-dependent amplifiers of preganglionic activity and how the gain of this amplification may be modulated by metabotropic signaling mechanisms. The approach combines a general computational model of ganglionic integration together with experimental tests of the model using the dynamic clamp method. In these experiments, we recorded intracellularly from dissociated bullfrog sympathetic neurons and then mimicked physiological synapses with virtual computer-generated synapses. It thus became possible to analyze the synaptic gain by recording cellular responses to complex patterns of synaptic activity that normally arise in vivo from convergent nicotinic and muscarinic synapses. The results of these studies are significant because they illustrate how gain generated through ganglionic integration may contribute to the feedback control of important autonomic behaviors, in particular to the control of the blood pressure. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Vladimir Skok, whose rich legacy in synaptic physiology helped establish the modern paradigm for connecting multiple levels of analysis in studies of the nervous system. PMID:19756262

  17. STS 63: Post flight presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-02-01

    At a post flight conference, Captain Jim Wetherbee, of STS Flight 63, introduces each of the other members of the STS 63 crew (Eileen Collins, Pilot; Dr. Bernard Harris, Payload Commander; Dr. Michael Foale, Mission Specialist from England; Dr. Janice Voss, Mission Specialist; and Colonel Vladimir Titor, Mission Specialist from Russia), gave a short autobiography of each member and a brief description of their assignment during this mission. A film was shown that included the preflight suit-up, a view of the launch site, the actual night launch, a tour of the Space Shuttle and several of the experiment areas, several views of earth and the MIR Space Station and cosmonauts, the MlR-Space Shuttle rendezvous, the deployment of the Spartan Ultraviolet Telescope, Foale and Harris's EVA and space walk, the retrieval of Spartan, and the night entry home, including the landing. Several spaceborne experiments were introduced: the radiation monitoring experiment, environment monitoring experiment, solid surface combustion experiment, and protein crystal growth and plant growth experiments. This conference ended with still, color pictures, taken by the astronauts during the entire STS 63 flight, being shown.

  18. STS 63: Post Flight Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    At a post flight conference, Captain Jim Wetherbee, of STS Flight 63, introduces each of the other members of the STS 63 crew (Eileen Collins, Pilot; Dr. Bernard Harris, Payload Commander; Dr. Michael Foale, Mission Specialist from England; Dr. Janice Voss, Misssion Specialist; and Colonel Vladimir Titor, Misssion Specialist from Russia. A short biography of each member and a brief description of their assignment during this mission is given. A film was shown that included the preflight suit-up, a view of the launch site, the actual night launch, a tour of the Space Shuttle and several of the experiment areas, several views of earth and the MIR Space Station and cosmonauts, the MIR-Space Shuttle rendezvous, the deployment of the Spartan Ultraviolet Telescope, Foale and Harris's EVA and space walk, the retrieval of Spartan, and the night entry home, including the landing. Several spaceborne experiments were introduced: the radiation monitoring experiment, environment monitoring experiment, solid surface combustion experiment, and protein crystal growth and plant growth experiments. This conference ended with still, color pictures, taken by the astronauts during the entire STS 63 flight, being shown.

  19. STS-86 crew members Lawrence, Titov and Parazynski in M-113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. George Hoggard, in back at left, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, provides this part of the training to Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, to the right of Hoggard; Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency; and Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground, of the Russian Space Agency. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A.

  20. STS-86 crew visits LC 39A on L-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left, are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (leaning into Parazynski), Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, Commander James D. Wetherbee and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Parazynski and Lawrence had trained to live and work aboard the Russian station, but were withdrawn from Mir training Parazynski because he was 'too tall' to fit safely in the Russian Soyuz vehicle, and Lawrence because she is 'too short' to fit in the Russian spacewalk suit. 'Just right' Wolf is scheduled to become a Mir 24 crew member after the docking, to replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale for an extended stay aboard the Russian orbiting outpost.

  1. STS-86 Crew walkout for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, in foreground at right, leads the way as the next Space Shuttle crew does a practice walkout from the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield is in foreground at left. Directly behind the pilot and commander, from left, are Mission Specialists Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, and Scott E. Parazynski. Bringing up the rear, from left, are Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, Wendy B. Lawrence and Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-85, in May. The STS-86 launch aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  2. STS-86 crew addresses the press during TCDT activities at LC 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, and other crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis speak to media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch From right, after Wetherbee, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence and David A. Wolf. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  3. [Method of fixing the heterotic effect--implementation on plants (on the hundredth anniversary of the birth of V.A. Strunnikov)].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Iu K

    2014-01-01

    The article is devoted to the 100th anniversary of the outstanding world-renown Russian scientist Vladimir Alexandrovich Strunnikov, Academician, Professor, Head of Group of Developmental Cytology and Sex Regulation at Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology and Head of genetic studies on silkworms in a number ofsericulture institutes in CIS. Laureate of the State Prize of the USSR (1981), Hero of Socialist Labor (1990), awarded the I.I. Mechnikov Gold Medal, Academy of Sciences of the USSR (1981), founder of the theory explaining the origin of heterosis. One of his most significant achievements is the "Methods of Fixing the Heterosis Effect," which makes it possible to abandon the production of hybrid seed and increase the yield of many crops by 20-50%. Fixing the gene complexes that determine the heterosis effect will become the "springboard" that will allow obtaining even more productive heterotic hybrids on the basis of new-generation varieties. The efficiency of this method in plant objects at the organismal and molecular levels was shown in the All-Russia Research Institute of Rice. A modification of this method reducing its laboriousness and increasing its efficiency was developed.

  4. Phylogeny and palaeoecology of Polyommatus blue butterflies show Beringia was a climate-regulated gateway to the New World

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Roger; Bell, Charles D.; Macniven, Richard; Goldman-Huertas, Benjamin; Ree, Richard H.; Marshall, Charles R.; Bálint, Zsolt; Johnson, Kurt; Benyamini, Dubi; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Transcontinental dispersals by organisms usually represent improbable events that constitute a major challenge for biogeographers. By integrating molecular phylogeny, historical biogeography and palaeoecology, we test a bold hypothesis proposed by Vladimir Nabokov regarding the origin of Neotropical Polyommatus blue butterflies, and show that Beringia has served as a biological corridor for the dispersal of these insects from Asia into the New World. We present a novel method to estimate ancestral temperature tolerances using distribution range limits of extant organisms, and find that climatic conditions in Beringia acted as a decisive filter in determining which taxa crossed into the New World during five separate invasions over the past 11 Myr. Our results reveal a marked effect of the Miocene–Pleistocene global cooling, and demonstrate that palaeoclimatic conditions left a strong signal on the ecology of present-day taxa in the New World. The phylogenetic conservatism in thermal tolerances that we have identified may permit the reconstruction of the palaeoecology of ancestral organisms, especially mobile taxa that can easily escape from hostile environments rather than adapt to them. PMID:21270033

  5. Experimental Investigation of Ech-Driven Suprathermal Populations on the Text Tokamak.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedo, Jose Armando

    1990-01-01

    We present new results of the recent X-ray spectra measurements during electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in the TEXT tokamak. A single 200 kW gyrotron was used to create TE_{11} waves at 60 GHz which are injected in TEXT in the O mode at 80 degrees to the toroidal field. Suprathermal populations were inferred from the continuum X-ray spectra during the current ramp up and during the ECH pulse. Experiments were performed with normal and inverted plasma current in order to change the injection angle and hence the driven population. Density scans and Z_{eff} scans were performed. Suprathermal temperature and density profiles were measured. These new results were compared to Fokker -Planck calculations by Vladimir Krivenski^ dagger and good agreement found (20%). Measurements of ECE on the low and high field side support our results ^ddagger. ftn^ daggerV. Krivenski, Euratom/Ciemat, Private Communication, (1989). ^ddaggerM. Austin, Auburn University, Private Communication, (1989).

  6. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  7. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group C Summary on Applications to FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2003-03-19

    This is the summary of the activities in working group C, ''Application to FELs,'' which was based in the Bithia room at the Joint ICFA Advanced Accelerator and Beam Dynamics Workshop on July 1-6, 2002 in Chia Laguna, Sardinia, Italy. Working group C was small in relation to the other working groups at that workshop. Attendees include Enrica Chiadroni, University of Rome ape with an identical pulse length. ''La Sapienza'', Luca Giannessi, ENEA, Steve Lidia, LBNL, Vladimir Litvinenko, Duke University, Patrick Muggli, UCLA, Alex Murokh, UCLA, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn, SLAC, Sven Reiche, UCLA, Jamie Rosenzweig, UCLA, Claudio Pellegrini, UCLA, Susan Smith, Daresbury Laboratory, Matthew Thompson, UCLA, Alexander Varfolomeev, Russian Research Center, plus a small number of occasional visitors. The working group addressed a total of nine topics. Each topic was introduced by a presentation, which initiated a discussion of the topic during and after the presentation. The speaker of the introductory presentation facilitated the discussion. There were six topics that were treated in stand-alone sessions of working group C. In addition, there were two joint sessions, one with working group B, which included one topic, and one with working group C, which included two topics. The presentations that were given in the joint sessions are summarized in the working group summary reports for groups B and D, respectively. This summary will only discuss the topics that were addressed in the stand-alone sessions, including Start-To-End Simulations, SASE Experiment, PERSEO, ''Optics Free'' FEL Oscillators, and VISA II.

  8. [Neurosciences and the ravings of the Soviet era. Spanish Republican physicians, a set of privileged witnesses].

    PubMed

    Marco-Igual, Miguel

    2011-08-16

    This study analyses the links between the Russian and Soviet neurosciences and their Spanish counterpart, especially with regard to the experiences of the Spanish Republican physicians exiled in the USSR. The Russian neurosciences, which date back to the second half of the 19th century, followed a path that ran parallel to the discipline throughout the rest of Europe and finally displayed signs of being influenced by the German and French schools. Important figures include Alexei Kojevnikov and Vladimir Bekhterev in neurology, Sergei Korsakov in psychiatry, Ivan Pavlov and his disciple Piotr Anojin in neurophysiology, Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria in neuropsychology, and Nikolai Burdenko in neurosurgery. When the Bolsheviks came to power, they brought with them a progressive conception of health care, which was modified during the Stalinist era to serve political interests, above all in the case of psychiatry. During the first third of the 20th century, Spanish scientists became interested in Pavlov's reflexology and the Soviets took a similar interest in Spanish histology. Among the 4500 Spanish Republicans who emigrated to the USSR because of the Spanish Civil War, there were several dozen physicians who were privileged witnesses of the madness that shook the science and the health care of that period. Relevant names worth citing here from the field of the neurosciences include Juan Planelles and Ramon Alvarez-Buylla in neurophysiology, Federico Pascual and Florencio Villa Landa in psychiatry, Angel Escobio and Maria Perez in neurology, Julian Fuster in neurosurgery and Manuel Arce in neuroimaging.

  9. Support Vector Machine algorithm for regression and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chenggang; Zavaljevski, Nela

    2001-08-01

    The software is an implementation of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm that was invented and developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his co-workers at AT&T Bell Laboratories. The specific implementation reported here is an Active Set method for solving a quadratic optimization problem that forms the major part of any SVM program. The implementation is tuned to specific constraints generated in the SVM learning. Thus, it is more efficient than general-purpose quadratic optimization programs. A decomposition method has been implemented in the software that enables processing large data sets. The size of the learning data is virtually unlimited by the capacity of the computer physical memory. The software is flexible and extensible. Two upper bounds are implemented to regulate the SVM learning for classification, which allow users to adjust the false positive and false negative rates. The software can be used either as a standalone, general-purpose SVM regression or classification program, or be embedded into a larger software system.

  10. Chemistry without bo(a)rders.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, Eva-Maria

    2014-08-01

    Note from the Editor: Science, collegiality, travel without borders. Big smiles and warmth. Eternally youthful vigor. When I think of Tetsuo Nozoe, these are the images that immediately come to mind. When I think of the Nozoe Autograph Books, I also think of time. For 40 years, Nozoe carried with him his autograph books and collected his treasures which The Chemical Record is now publishing. Vladimir Prelog signed first when he was 47 and signed last when he was almost 80. Derek Barton signed first when he was 35 and signed last when he was almost 70. Time! I was fascinated by Eva Wille's recommendation that we publish an essay by Eva-Maria Tanzer, a young organic chemist with already a lifetime's experience in exploring chemical research in laboratories around the world. Tanzer brings to us a charming, even innocent perspective that embraces so much of Tetsuo Nozoe's ideals. We are privileged to include Tanzer's vision and her experiences in the collection of essays that accompany the Nozoe Autograph Books. Our contributors range in age and experiences, from the youthful Tanzer to the more mature (including myself!) as do the signatories in the autograph books. Tetsuo Nozoe would have beamed!--Jeffrey I. Seeman Guest Editor University of Richmond Richmond, Virginia 23173, USA E-mail: jseeman@richmond.edu. PMID:25065978

  11. Origin of origami cockroach reveals long-lasting (11 Ma) phenotype instability following viviparity.

    PubMed

    Vršanský, Peter V; Šmídová, Lucia; Valaška, Daniel; Barna, Peter; Vidlička, Ľubomír; Takáč, Peter; Pavlik, Lubomir; Kúdelová, Tatiana; Karim, Talia S; Zelagin, David; Smith, Dena

    2016-10-01

    Viviparity evolved in bacteria, plants, ˃141 vertebrate lineages (ichthyosaurs, lizards, fishes, mammals, and others), and in 11 of 44 insect orders. Live-birth cockroaches preserved with brood sac (3D recovered two times optically) included Diploptera vladimir, Diploptera savba, Diploptera gemini spp.n., D. sp.1-2, and Stegoblatta irmgardgroehni from Green River, Colorado; Quilchena, Republic; McAbee, Canada; and Baltic amber, Russia (49, 54, and 45 Ma). They evolved from rare and newly evolved Blaberidae; they radiated circumtropically, later expanded into SE Asia, and have now spread to Hawaii and the SE USA. Association of autapomorphic characters that allow for passive and active protections from parasitic insects (unique wing origami pleating identical with its egg case-attacking wasp) suggest a response to high parasitic loads. Synchronized with global reorganization of the biota, morphotype destabilization in roaches lasted approximately 11-22 Ma, including both the adaptation of novel characters and the reduction of others. Thus, while viviparity can be disadvantageous, in association with new Bauplans and/or behaviors, it can contribute to the evolution of taxa with viviparous representatives that are slightly selectively preferred.

  12. STS-86 Crew Walkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists (and their nicknames for this flight) are, from left, 'too tall' Scott E. Parazynski, 'just right' David A. Wolf and 'too short' Wendy B. Lawrence. The two mission specialists representing foreign space agencies are Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, in foreground at right, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, in background at right. Commander James D. Wetherbee and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield are out of the frame. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station. Parazynski and Lawrence were withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir - Parazynski because he was too tall to fit safely in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, and Lawrence because she was too short to fit into a Russian spacewalk suit. The crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on the planned 10-day mission.

  13. Atlantis lifts off on Mission STS-86!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45- second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir.

  14. STS-86 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45- second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir.

  15. STS-86 Crew Lunch in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew members gather for a snack and a photo opportunity in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left, are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Commander James D. Wetherbee, Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, and Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency. After a weather briefing, the astronauts will don their orange launch and entry suits and depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff at about 10:34 p.m. EDT, Sept. 25. The exact launch time may vary slightly based on calculations of the Russian Space Station Mirs precise location in space at the time of liftoff. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Shuttle with the Mir. Wolf is scheduled to become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis after more than four months on the Russian orbiting outpost.

  16. STS-86 Crew Walkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 crew members smile and wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they prepare to board the astronaut van, at right, after departing from the Operations and Checkout Building. Leading the way are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, at left, and Commander James D. Wetherbee. Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, at left, and Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency are directly behind them, followed by Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence, at center. Bringing up the rear are Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. The seven-member crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a planned 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four- month stay aboard the Russian space station. He will replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew.

  17. STS-86 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on September 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six minute, 45 second launch window. The 10 day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about 3.5 tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir.

  18. Interactions of human cytomegalovirus with human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Benyesh-Melnick, M

    1966-01-01

    Vonka, Vladimir (Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.), and Matilda Benyesh-Melnick. Interactions of human cytomegalovirus with human fibroblasts. J. Bacteriol. 91:213-220. 1966.-Virus attachment of human cytomegalovirus to human embryo lung fibroblasts was found to be temperature-independent, from 4 to 37 C. Prolonged incubation at 4 C, however, resulted in inactivation of a high proportion of attached virus. Virus penetration seemed to be temperature-dependent, occurring at 37 C but not at 4 C. Detailed studies of the growth curve of the virus were made. Cell-associated virus preceded the appearance of virus in the fluid phase by 2 to 5 days. Complement-fixing antigen could be detected, but only when the cytopathic effect was advanced, and it was demonstrable only in the cell-associated fraction. Under methyl cellulose, decreasing the bicarbonate concentration in the overlay from 0.225 to 0.15% resulted in marked increase in plating efficiency with all strains tested. However, varying the concentration of bicarbonate from 0.3 to 0.15% in fluid medium did not influence the growth of virus.

  19. Correlation between infectivity and physical virus particles in human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Benyesh-Melnick, M; Probstmeyer, F; McCombs, R; Brunschwig, J P; Vonka, V

    1966-11-01

    Benyesh-Melnick, Matilda (Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.), Fern Probstmeyer, Robert McCombs, Jean P. Brunschwig, and Vladimir Vonka. Correlation between infectivity and physical virus particles in human cyto-megalovirus. J. Bacteriol. 92:1555-1561. 1966.-Infectivity titers [measured as plaque-forming units (PFU)] and particle counts by the sedimentation pseudo-replication technique were determined for crude, unpurified, intracellular preparations of two different strains of human cytomegalovirus. Unlike the high particle-infectivity ratio of 10(6) to 10(8) previously reported for these viruses, the number of total particles per PFU ranged from 160 to 490 with strain AD-169 and from 176 to 1,050 for strain C-87. Interpretation of particle-PFU ratios of intracellular cytomegalovirus in terms of particle morphology is not conclusive at this time. The number of enveloped forms found varied between 0 and 34% of the total particles counted. However, the true proportion is probably greater, because envelopes were found to be destroyed by the enzyme treatment used in preparing the specimens for examination in the electron microscope. The number of full particles found ranged between 4 and 31% of the total particles counted. The particle per PFU ratio of extracellular virus was found to be three- to fivefold lower than that of intracellular virus.

  20. Distribution and characterization of Campylobacter spp. from Russian poultry.

    PubMed

    Stern, N J; Bannov, V A; Svetoch, E A; Mitsevich, E V; Mitsevich, I P; Volozhantsev, N V; Gusev, V V; Perelygin, V V

    2004-02-01

    The distribution of Campylobacter spp. on 13 poultry farms (broiler chicken, quail, pheasant, peacock, and turkey) from eight regions (Vladimir, Vologda, Voronezh, Kaluga, Liptsk, Moscow, Orenburg, and Orel) in Russia was surveyed. Intestinal materials were plated onto Campylobacter-selective medium and plates were incubated microaerobically at 42 degrees C for 24 or 48 h. Identification was based on colonial morphology, microscopic examination, and biochemical tests; latex agglutination assays were used for confirmation. In total, 116 isolates were derived from 370 samples. Isolation rates were similar, regardless of whether the birds were from small or large broiler production farms. Susceptibility of 48 representative (from these production sources) strains of Campylobacter spp. to 38 antimicrobial compounds was determined by disk diffusion assays. All strains tested were sensitive to amikacin, gentamycin, sisomycin, chloramphenicol, imipenem, oleandomycin, erythromycin, azitromycin, and ampicillin. The strains were also sensitive to 100 microg/disk of carbenicillin, fluoroquinolones, and to nitrofurans. Fluoroquinolone sensitivity was most notable and may be related to its limited application in poultry production within Russia. Hippurate and ribosomal RNA gene primers were developed and used to distinguish Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli and to provide a measure of strain discrimination. The combination of PCR analysis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing were conducted for selected isolates. The various poultry species and the different locations yielded Campylobacter isolates with discrete randomly amplified polymorphic DNA patterns. The distribution and substantial diversity of Campylobacter spp. isolates appears similar to that previously reported in other countries.

  1. Role of cooperative H(+)/e(-) linkage (redox bohr effect) at heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B) in the proton pump of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Papa, S

    2005-02-01

    It is a pleasure to contribute to the special issue published in honor of Vladimir Skulachev, a distinguished scientist who greatly contributes to maintain a high standard of biochemical research in Russia. A more particular reason can be found in his work, where observations anticipating some ideas presented in my article were reported. Cytochrome c oxidase exhibits protonmotive, redox linked allosteric cooperativity. Experimental observations on soluble bovine cytochrome c oxidase are presented showing that oxido-reduction of heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B) is linked to deprotonation/protonation of two clusters of protolytic groups, A(1) and A(2), respectively. This cooperative linkage (redox Bohr effect) results in the translocation of 1 H(+)/oxidase molecule upon oxido-reduction of heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B), respectively. Results on liposome-reconstituted oxidase show that upon oxidation of heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B) protons from A(1) and A(2) are released in the outer aqueous phase. A(1) but not A(2) appears to take up protons from the inner aqueous space upon reduction of the respective redox center. A cooperative model is presented in which the A(1) and A(2) clusters, operating in close sequence, constitute together the gate of the proton pump in cytochrome c oxidase.

  2. Electrodynamic System of Earth in Moon and Solar Tides Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, Lubov; Isakevich, Valiriy

    Since 2000 there has been working the united system of monitoring of electrical and geomagnetic fields of ELF range of the atmosphere boundary surface layer at the spaced apart stations: Vladimir State physical experimental ground; the station of RAS Institute of Sun and Earth physics at Lake Baikal; the station in Paratunka (Kamchatka); the station in Obninsk. There has been developed a programme-analytical system (PAS) to investigate signal structures in spectral and time series, caused by geophysical and astrophysical processes based on the method of eigen vectors. There has been developed a programme and analytical system to investigate the signal structure in the spectral and time series caused by geophysical processes. There has been estimated the amplitude and investigated the properties of the Earth atmosphere boundary layer electrical field components localized spectrally at the frequencies of the moon and solar tides. There has been exposed a method of determination of relative and absolute amplitudes of the main components of the eigen series. There has been investigated coherence of the spectral components at the frequencies of solar and moon tides. The work is carried out with supporting of RFFI № 14-07-97510, State Task to Universities on 2014-2016.

  3. Book Review: Space Research at the Technical University of Moldova.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    Recently the historian of the Technical University of Moldova Aurel Marinchuk (Marinciuc) in a collaboration with the editorial team from the same University has published a Jubiliary Album "50 Years of the Technical University of Moldova". The Album is published at the Technical University in Chisinau (The Republic of Moldova). Two chapters of this album present major interest: 1) Space research at the Technical University of Moldova 2) The Foucault Pendulum manufactured at the same University under the supervision of the Rector of University, Dr. Hab. of Technical Sciences and Member of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Moldova Ion Bostan. The parameters of the Pendulums are: m=102 kg L=17,24 m T=8.35 sec. >From the first chapter We learn that 3 astronauts: Frank Lee Culbertson, Vladimir Dezhurov and Dumitru Dorin Prunariu are Doctors Honoris Causa of this University. As well we can found in the album informations about the Microsatellit "Republic of Moldova" built also by a team from the same University. It is ready to fly, but many depends on the funds for launch the Satellite. The Foucault Pendulum presents also interest in view of its possible applications to detect the influence of the relative position of the Sun and the Moon on Earthquakes. As is well known the tidal gravitational Force varies, depending on the relative position of the Sun and the Moon.

  4. TAUOLA, TAUOLA universal interface PHOTOS and MC-TESTER: Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was, Z.

    2009-04-01

    The status of Monte Carlo programs for the simulation of τ-lepton production and decay in high-energy accelerator experiments is reviewed. No basic changes in the organization of the programs were necessary since the previous τ-lepton conference in 2006. Minor in size, but practical, extensions for the use of the programs in high precision mixed languages enviromens are being introduced: (i) For the TAUOLA Monte Carlo generator of τ-lepton decays, automated and simultaneous use of many versions of form-factors for the calculation of optional weights for fits was discussed. A pilot example of its use was presented. (ii) New tests for PHOTOS Monte Carlo for QED bremsstrahlung in W decays were shown. (iii) Prototype version of the TAUOLA universal interface based on HepMC (the C++ event record) was mentioned. Its tests with the help of MC-TESTER were discussed. Presented results illustrate the status of the projects performed in collaboration with Vladimir Cherepanov, Nadia Davidson, Piotr Golonka, Gizo Nanava, Tomasz Przedziński, Elżbieta Richter-Was and others.

  5. Phylogeny and palaeoecology of Polyommatus blue butterflies show Beringia was a climate-regulated gateway to the New World.

    PubMed

    Vila, Roger; Bell, Charles D; Macniven, Richard; Goldman-Huertas, Benjamin; Ree, Richard H; Marshall, Charles R; Bálint, Zsolt; Johnson, Kurt; Benyamini, Dubi; Pierce, Naomi E

    2011-09-22

    Transcontinental dispersals by organisms usually represent improbable events that constitute a major challenge for biogeographers. By integrating molecular phylogeny, historical biogeography and palaeoecology, we test a bold hypothesis proposed by Vladimir Nabokov regarding the origin of Neotropical Polyommatus blue butterflies, and show that Beringia has served as a biological corridor for the dispersal of these insects from Asia into the New World. We present a novel method to estimate ancestral temperature tolerances using distribution range limits of extant organisms, and find that climatic conditions in Beringia acted as a decisive filter in determining which taxa crossed into the New World during five separate invasions over the past 11 Myr. Our results reveal a marked effect of the Miocene-Pleistocene global cooling, and demonstrate that palaeoclimatic conditions left a strong signal on the ecology of present-day taxa in the New World. The phylogenetic conservatism in thermal tolerances that we have identified may permit the reconstruction of the palaeoecology of ancestral organisms, especially mobile taxa that can easily escape from hostile environments rather than adapt to them.

  6. Origin of origami cockroach reveals long-lasting (11 Ma) phenotype instability following viviparity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršanský, Peter V.; Šmídová, Lucia; Valaška, Daniel; Barna, Peter; Vidlička, Ľubomír; Takáč, Peter; Pavlik, Lubomir; Kúdelová, Tatiana; Karim, Talia S.; Zelagin, David; Smith, Dena

    2016-10-01

    Viviparity evolved in bacteria, plants, ˃141 vertebrate lineages (ichthyosaurs, lizards, fishes, mammals, and others), and in 11 of 44 insect orders. Live-birth cockroaches preserved with brood sac (3D recovered two times optically) included Diploptera vladimir, Diploptera savba, Diploptera gemini spp.n., D. sp.1-2, and Stegoblatta irmgardgroehni from Green River, Colorado; Quilchena, Republic; McAbee, Canada; and Baltic amber, Russia (49, 54, and 45 Ma). They evolved from rare and newly evolved Blaberidae; they radiated circumtropically, later expanded into SE Asia, and have now spread to Hawaii and the SE USA. Association of autapomorphic characters that allow for passive and active protections from parasitic insects (unique wing origami pleating identical with its egg case-attacking wasp) suggest a response to high parasitic loads. Synchronized with global reorganization of the biota, morphotype destabilization in roaches lasted approximately 11-22 Ma, including both the adaptation of novel characters and the reduction of others. Thus, while viviparity can be disadvantageous, in association with new Bauplans and/or behaviors, it can contribute to the evolution of taxa with viviparous representatives that are slightly selectively preferred.

  7. Using pattern recognition as a method for predicting extreme events in natural and socio-economic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, M.

    2011-12-01

    Vladimir (Volodya) Keilis-Borok has pioneered the use of pattern recognition as a technique for analyzing and forecasting developments in natural as well as socio-economic systems. Keilis-Borok's work on predicting earthquakes and landslides using this technique as a leading geophysicist has been recognized around the world. Keilis-Borok has also been a world leader in the application of pattern recognition techniques to the analysis and prediction of socio-economic systems. He worked with Allan Lichtman of American University in using such techniques to predict presidential elections in the U.S. Keilis-Borok and I have worked together with others on the use of pattern recognition techniques to analyze and to predict socio-economic systems. We have used this technique to study the pattern of macroeconomic indicators that would predict the end of an economic recession in the U.S. We have also worked with officers in the Los Angeles Police Department to use this technique to predict surges of homicides in Los Angeles.

  8. World Sheet Dynamics of Effective String Theory and the Gribov Ambiguity in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Patrick

    This PhD thesis consists of a collection of results pertaining to effective string theory and quantum chromodynamics. A bijection is proven between manifestly ISO(1, p) x SO(D - p - 1) actions whose gapless degrees of freedom consist of Goldstone fields realizing the coset ISO(1, D - 1)/ISO(1, p) x SO(D - p - 1) non-linearly, and effective actions describing p + 1 dimensional surfaces embedded in a D dimensional Minkowskian target space. Continuing with effective strings, an interesting UV complete, albeit acausal theory is analyzed whose low energy effective action has a 'wrong sign' leading irrelevant operator. The constraints integrability puts on branon scattering is also catalogued in various dimensions, and in the presence of goldstini non-linearly realizing target space supersymmetry. An interesting hidden supersymmetry is discovered, for Green-Schwarz-like actions with an arbitrary coefficient preceding the Wess-Zumino term. Lastly, with regards to QCD, techniques from the program initiated by Vladimir Gribov in 1978 to investigate the effects of a non-perturbative residual gauge ambiguity are refined and applied to the Gribov-Zwanziger confinement scenario, showing an enhanced ghost propagator and divergent color coulomb potential. I then provide a careful analysis of how to correctly implement periodic boundary conditions in the finite temperature theory, which naively would be contradictory with the Maggiore-Schaden shift which is crucial to using familiar BRST cohomology techniques to define the subset of physical states of the Hilbert space.

  9. STS-105 Expedition 3 Commander Culbertson suits up for another launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Expedition Three cosmonaut Vladimir Dezhurov is ready for the second launch attempt of mission STS-105 after a 24-hour weather delay. Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:12 p.m. Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. Launch is currently scheduled for 5:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 10. Highlighting the mission will be the rotation of the International Space Station crew, the third flight of an Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and two spacewalks. Included in the payload is the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which will be attached to the Station during the spacewalks. The EAS will be installed on the P6 truss, which holds the Station'''s giant U.S. solar arrays, batteries and the cooling radiators. The EAS contains spare ammonia for the Station'''s cooling system. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station.

  10. STS-105 and Expedition 3 crews are eager for another launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews give thumbs up on another opportunity to launch after a 24-hour weather delay. In red shirts, seated left to right, are STS-105 Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry, Pilot Rick Sturckow and Commander Scott Horowitz. In blue shirts are the Expedition Three crew, Commander Frank Culbertson, Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin. Dezhurov and Tyurin are cosmonauts with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. Highlighting the mission will be the rotation of the International Space Station crew, the third flight of an Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and two spacewalks. Included in the payload is the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which will be attached to the Station during the spacewalks. The EAS will be installed on the P6 truss, which holds the Station'''s giant U.S. solar arrays, batteries and the cooling radiators. The EAS contains spare ammonia for the Station'''s cooling system. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station. Launch is scheduled for 5:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 10.

  11. STS-105 and Expedition 3 crews head for bus and another launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Waving to onlookers, the STS-105 and Expedition Three (E3) crews head to the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A for a second attempt at launch on mission STS-105. From the left are E3 cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin, Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonaut Vladimir Dezhurov; STS-105 Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry, Pilot Rick Sturckow and Commander Scott Horowitz. . Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:12 p.m. Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. Launch is currently scheduled for 5:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 10. Highlighting the mission will be the rotation of the International Space Station crew, the third flight of an Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and two spacewalks. Included in the payload is the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which will be attached to the Station during the spacewalks. The EAS will be installed on the P6 truss, which holds the Station'''s giant U.S. solar arrays, batteries and the cooling radiators. The EAS contains spare ammonia for the Station'''s cooling system. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station.

  12. Support vector machines for nuclear reactor state estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavaljevski, N.; Gross, K. C.

    2000-02-14

    Validation of nuclear power reactor signals is often performed by comparing signal prototypes with the actual reactor signals. The signal prototypes are often computed based on empirical data. The implementation of an estimation algorithm which can make predictions on limited data is an important issue. A new machine learning algorithm called support vector machines (SVMS) recently developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his coworkers enables a high level of generalization with finite high-dimensional data. The improved generalization in comparison with standard methods like neural networks is due mainly to the following characteristics of the method. The input data space is transformed into a high-dimensional feature space using a kernel function, and the learning problem is formulated as a convex quadratic programming problem with a unique solution. In this paper the authors have applied the SVM method for data-based state estimation in nuclear power reactors. In particular, they implemented and tested kernels developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET), a nonlinear, nonparametric estimation technique with a wide range of applications in nuclear reactors. The methodology has been applied to three data sets from experimental and commercial nuclear power reactor applications. The results are promising. The combination of MSET kernels with the SVM method has better noise reduction and generalization properties than the standard MSET algorithm.

  13. Impact of socio-psychological factors on treatment adherence of TB patients in Russia.

    PubMed

    Jakubowiak, W M; Bogorodskaya, E M; Borisov, S E; Danilova, I D; Lomakina, O B; Kourbatova, E V

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of social and psychological factors on treatment adherence of patients with tuberculosis (TB). To this end a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among TB patients in four Russian regions (Orel, Vladimir, Belgorod oblasts, and Republic of Mari-El) from 01/04/2004 to 31/03/2005. A total of 87 non-adherent and 1302 adherent patients were interviewed. Compared to adherents, non-adherents were significantly more likely to be male, unemployed, have a technical college education, have a history of imprisonment, have a negative emotional status, consider themselves "not sick", not know the treatment period, have negative feelings and distrust for medical staff, not believe they will fully recover, and not want to continue treatment. Patients at highest risk for non-adherence should be identified at the start of treatment, and offered the services of a psychologist. A case management and patient-centered approach should be applied.

  14. Meetings with Mark Vishik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalikinskaya, E. I.

    2014-12-01

    Mark Iosifovich Vishik was my husband Vladimir Chepyzhov's advisor during his years as a student in the Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics at Moscow State University, and afterwards they worked together for almost 30 years. This is why I knew him personally while not being a mathematician myself: we sometimes talked on the phone, and met during common trips and a few holidays. In his last years, after the death of his devoted wife who was also his best friend, my husband and I decided to visit Mark regularly in order to comfort him in his loneliness, and many other of his friends did the same. I can say without exaggeration that Mark loved to talk with me about everyday matters, to reminisce about his wife Asya Moiseevna, their friends and relatives, to tell stories of his youth and the wonderful encounters that had so enriched his life. We had the idea to write down our conversations and publish them as a book. Unfortunately, few such conversations lay ahead. The last one took place in January 2010. We did not write a book, but we did write an article [1], which was published in English in the form of an interview with Mark. The present article is based on our conversations with Mark. Here I will try to recount his memories about people who played an important role in his life.

  15. Einstein studies in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, Yuri; Vizgin, Vladimir

    This volume presents a selection of the best contributions by Russian scholars - historians and philosophers of science - to the Einstein Studies industry, broadly construed. Many of the papers were first published in Russian, in the Einshteinovskiy Sbornik series (Einstein Studies) initiated by I. Tamm in 1966. This book explores the historical and foundational issues in general relativity and relativistic cosmology, Einstein's contributions to quantum theory of radiation, and the rise of Dirac's quantum electrodynamics. It also includes a detailed description of the physics colloquium Einstein established and coordinated in 1912- 1914 in Zürich. The contributors draw extensively on documentation previously unavailable to most scholars. Materials from various Russian archives shed new light on the famous exchange (regarding the first evolutionary cosmological models) between Einstein and Alexander Friedmann in the early 1920's and on the role of Boris Podolsky and Vladimir Fock in the emergence of quantum electrodynamics. The little-known correspondence between Einstein and a famous German pilot Paul Erhardt suggests that during World War I, the former was involved with aero- and hydrodynamics research and ways of improving airplane design. Other articles introduce new approaches to important foundational questions in general relativity and cosmology. Historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science will find much new and unexpected material in this engaging volume presenting the best of recent Russian scholarship in the field. The book is also very accessible to the general reader.

  16. Physics at the Moscow State University in 70-th. Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex B.

    The Internet proceeding contains various photographs and autographs of scientists from the Moscow State University, made during 70-th and 80-th years of XX-th Century. While no the album refers to Physics in totality, the main part of the album does refer. It includes photographs and autographs of the Members of the Academy of Sciences of U.S.S.R. Il'ya M. Lifshitz, Alexander I. Ishlinskii, Leonid V. Keldysh, Nobel Prize Winners Vitaly L. Ginzburg and Andrej D. Sakharov, Professors: I.M. Ternov, M.I. Kaganov, V.I. Grigor'ev, V.R. Khalilov, V.Ch. Zhukovskij, V.G. Bagrov (Tomsk State University) and other. Another part of peoples on the photographs became later University professors and Members of Academies. A photo concerns the graduated from the Moscow University, astronomer Vladimir A. Albitzky (1892-1952) made in Odessa during the First World War, while another concerns the School "Quantum Particles in intense fields" held in Chisinau in May 1985.

  17. Fourth Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On December 6, 1994, the NASA Administrator, Mr. Daniel Goldin, requested that Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, in his role as the Chairman of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions, lead a team composed of several Task Force members and technical advisors' to Russia with the goal of reviewing preparations and readiness for the upcoming international Space Station Phase 1 missions. In his directions to Gen. Stafford, Mr. Goldin requested that the review team focus its initial efforts on safety of flight issues for the following Phase 1A missions: the Soyuz TM-21 mission which will carry U.S. astronaut Dr. Norman Thagard and cosmonauts Lt. Col. Vladimir Dezhurov and Mr. Gennady Strekalov aboard a Soyuz spacecraft to the Mir Station; the Mir 18 Main Expedition during which Thagard and his fellow cosmonauts, Dezhurov and Strokalov, will spend approximately three months aboard the Mir Station; the STS-71 Space Shuttle mission which will perform the first Shuttle-Mir docking, carry cosmonauts Col. Anatoly SoloViev and Mr. Nikolai Budarin to the Mir Station, and return Thagard, Dezhurov, and Strekalov to Earth.

  18. “Gunslinger’s gait”: a new cause of unilaterally reduced arm swing

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Rui; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To postulate a new possible cause of a unilaterally reduced arm swing in addition to the known medical conditions such as shoulder pathology, Erb’s palsy, stroke, and Parkinson’s disease. Methods Analysis of YouTube videos depicting the gait of highly ranked Russian officials. Results We found a similar walking pattern in President Vladimir Putin, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and three other highly ranked Russian officials, all presenting with a consistently reduced right arm swing in the absence of other overt neurological abnormalities. Conclusions We propose that this new gait pattern, which we term “gunslinger’s gait,” may result from a behavioural adaptation, possibly triggered by KGB or other forms of weapons training where trainees are taught to keep their right hand close to the chest while walking, allowing them to quickly draw a gun when faced with a foe. This should be included in the differential diagnosis of a unilaterally reduced arm swing. PMID:26666758

  19. Accelerating the Reduction of Excess Russian Highly Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, J; Wall, D; Parker, E; Rutkowski, E

    2004-02-18

    This paper presents the latest information on one of the Accelerated Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Disposition initiatives that resulted from the May 2002 Summit meeting between Presidents George W. Bush and Vladimir V. Putin. These initiatives are meant to strengthen nuclear nonproliferation objectives by accelerating the disposition of nuclear weapons-useable materials. The HEU Transparency Implementation Program (TIP), within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is working to implement one of the selected initiatives that would purchase excess Russian HEU (93% 235U) for use as fuel in U.S. research reactors over the next ten years. This will parallel efforts to convert the reactors' fuel core from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) material, where feasible. The paper will examine important aspects associated with the U.S. research reactor HEU purchase. In particular: (1) the establishment of specifications for the Russian HEU, and (2) transportation safeguard considerations for moving the HEU from the Mayak Production Facility in Ozersk, Russia, to the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN.

  20. “Biospherics” approach for studies of natural and artificial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechurkin, N. S.; Somova, L. A.

    The main unifying feature of natural and artificial ecosystems is their biotic turnover (cycling) of substances which is induced with energy fluxes. A new integrating scientific discipline Biospherics studies biotic cycles (both in experiments and in mathematical models) of different degree of closure and complexity. By its origin, Biospherics is to be connected with extensive studies of Biosphere by Russian academician Vladimir Vernadsky. He developed and used “empirical generalizations” based on innumerous observations, comparisons and reflections. His “bio-geo-chemical principles” of Biosphere and ecosystems development have more qualitative than quantitative nature. Quantitative criteria to evaluate the efficiency of natural and artificial ecosystems are to take into account energy fluxes and their use in ecosystems of different types. At least, three of them are of value for estimation of natural and artificial ecosystems’ functional activities. Energy principle of extensive development (EPED), energy principle of intensive development (EPID) and main universal (generalized) criterion (MUC). The last criterion (Principle) characterizes the specific cycling rate of limiting chemical elements in multi-organism systems, developing under external energy fluxes. Its value can be a quantitative measure of effectiveness for every ecosystem functioning, including our global Biosphere. Different examples of these (above-mentioned) integrated criteria actions are presented and analyzed in the paper.

  1. Meso- and submesoscale structures in marginal ice zone in Arctic ocean using Sentinel-1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Anastasiia

    2016-07-01

    A marginal sea ice zone is a region where ocean currents interact with the sea ice. Recently freezed small sea ice particles (frazil) can be used as a passive tracer for the ocean surface dynamics studies. Sentinel-1 SAR images with a high spatial resolution (40 or 25 m) permit to exploit this approach of "frazil as surface current's passive tracer". A preliminary research on meso- and submesoscale structures in marginal sea ice zone was carried out using Sentinel-1 SAR data. A new dataset of mesoscale structures was created for Eastern Greenland, Barents and Kara seas for 2014-2015. The raw data was processed with SNAP (Sentinel application Platform designed by ESA). A classical method of maximum cross-correlation was tested together with a method developed based on (Kudriavtsev et al, 2014) for eddy-like structures detection. References: Kudryavtsev, Vladimir, I. Kozlov, Bertrand Chapron, and J. A. Johannessen. "Quad-polarization SAR features of ocean currents." Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 119, no. 9 (2014): 6046-6065.

  2. [Neurosciences and the ravings of the Soviet era. Spanish Republican physicians, a set of privileged witnesses].

    PubMed

    Marco-Igual, Miguel

    2011-08-16

    This study analyses the links between the Russian and Soviet neurosciences and their Spanish counterpart, especially with regard to the experiences of the Spanish Republican physicians exiled in the USSR. The Russian neurosciences, which date back to the second half of the 19th century, followed a path that ran parallel to the discipline throughout the rest of Europe and finally displayed signs of being influenced by the German and French schools. Important figures include Alexei Kojevnikov and Vladimir Bekhterev in neurology, Sergei Korsakov in psychiatry, Ivan Pavlov and his disciple Piotr Anojin in neurophysiology, Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria in neuropsychology, and Nikolai Burdenko in neurosurgery. When the Bolsheviks came to power, they brought with them a progressive conception of health care, which was modified during the Stalinist era to serve political interests, above all in the case of psychiatry. During the first third of the 20th century, Spanish scientists became interested in Pavlov's reflexology and the Soviets took a similar interest in Spanish histology. Among the 4500 Spanish Republicans who emigrated to the USSR because of the Spanish Civil War, there were several dozen physicians who were privileged witnesses of the madness that shook the science and the health care of that period. Relevant names worth citing here from the field of the neurosciences include Juan Planelles and Ramon Alvarez-Buylla in neurophysiology, Federico Pascual and Florencio Villa Landa in psychiatry, Angel Escobio and Maria Perez in neurology, Julian Fuster in neurosurgery and Manuel Arce in neuroimaging. PMID:21780075

  3. Design of cloaking metamaterials using spectral representation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai Leung, Lai; Fung, Tai Hang; Yu, Kin Wah

    2008-03-01

    Controlling the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves, for instance in cloaking problem, has become an important topic in nanophotonics. So far, following the cloaking model proposed by Pendry et al. [1], the experimental realization was only limited to the microwave region [2]. Since practical application lies in the visible range, we have extended the investigation to that region by utilizing nanocomposites with reference to the material parameters proposed by Pendry et al. and Shalaev et al. [3]. The calculations can be made much simpler by invoking the spectral representation theory [4]. The loss and dispersion effects, as well as the propagation of EM waves are assessed for the designed cloaking models in order to investigate the cloaking performance. Further analyses show that our models can accomplish the desired cloaking effect in the visible range. Moreover, the loss and dispersion effects are found to be small and acceptable.[1] J. B. Pendry, D. Schurig, and D. R. Smith, Science 312, 1780 (2006). [2] D. Schurig, J. J. Mock, B. J. Justice, S. A. Cummer, J. B. Pendry, A. F. Starr, D. R. Smith Science 314, 5801 (2006). [3] Wenshan Cai, Uday K. Chettiar, Alexander V. Kildishev and Vladimir M. Shalaev, Nature photonics 1 (2007). [4] L. Dong, Mikko Karttunen, K. W. Yu, Phys. Rev. E 72, 016613 (2005).

  4. Magnetomineralogy as a tool for determination of the meteorite weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Kobr, M.; Pruner, P.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2002-12-01

    In early solar system history are several electromagnetic processes expected capable of magnetizing the primitive solid particles condensating from the Solar Nebula. The signature of this magnetic events can be observed in meteorites found on the Earth. It can take a long time from meteorite fall till laboratory study. Some samples are deposited in the desert or Antarctic ice for thousands of years. In this work we used the sample of the LL chondrite found in Libya desert for weathering simulations, magnetic mineralogy and magnetic properties study. The weathering in this sample is related to the desert varnish formation. From high and low temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements we can see, that most important magnetic carriers are iron, magnetite and hematite. The influence on magnetic mineralogy can be seen from weathering simulations done by leaching the samples in different solutions. This change affects the suitability of different samples for primary magnetic record study. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by Charles University Grant Agency, Czech Republic and would not be possible without the help of following people: Jakub Haloda, Petr Jakes, Marcela Bukovanska, Jaroslav Kadlec, Libuse Kohoutova, Vladimir Kohout.

  5. Particle Physics at the University of Pittsburgh Summary Report for Proposal Period FY'09-11

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, Joe; Dytman, Steven; Mueller, James; Naples, Donna; Paolone, Vittorio; Savinov, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    Presented is the final summary report for grant DOE-FG02-91ER40646. The HEP group at the University consists of three tasks: B,D and L. Task B supports Pitt's CDF group at the energy frontier which includes Joe Boudreau and Paul Shepard. Work of the group includes Hao Song's thesis on the measurement of the B_c lifetime using exclusive J/psi+pion decays, and an update of the previous B_c semi-leptonic analyses under the supervision of Paul Shepard. Task D supports Pitt's neutrino group at the intensity frontier which includes PIs Dytman, Naples and Paolone. The group also includes postdoctoral research associate Danko, and thesis students Isvan (MINOS), Eberly (Minerva ), Ren (Minerva )and Hansen (T2K). This report summarizes their progress on ongoing experiments which are designed to make significant contributions to a detailed understanding of the neutrino mixing matrix. Task L supports Pitt's ATLAS group at the energy frontier and includes investigators Vladimir Savinov, James Mueller and Joe Boudreau. This group contributed both to hardware (calorimeter electronics, Savinov) and to software (Simulation, Detector Description, and Visualization: Boudreau and Mueller; MC generators: Savinov) and a summary of their progress is presented.

  6. Implementation of magnetohydrodynamic energy bypass process for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ying Ming; Czysz, Paul A.; Bruno, Claudio

    2004-08-01

    The global political structure has changed dramatically since the breakup of the former Soviet Union, and world changes have caused the United States to reprioritize its national hypersonic needs. The US Government has looked at the needs of the future, and the hypersonic aerospace plane is one of the systems included in alternative force structures. One hypersonic aerospace plane concept would involve magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) technology (i.e., the AJAX hypersonic flight vehicle concept) originally proposed by Russian scientist Vladimir Fraishtadt. This paper reports on the current progress and findings of an air-breathing horizontal takeoff and landing design concept using an MHD energy bypass injector ramjet engine being studied at MSE Technology Applications, Inc., HyperTech Concepts, and several universities for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center under a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research project. The areas that are addressed in this paper include: (1) ionization required to achieve the required energy bypass, (2) utilization of a nonequilibrium model to calculate nonequilibrium engine ionization conditions, (3) hydrocarbon fuel reforming, and (4) vehicle performance and sizing. A quasi-onedimensional electromagnetic code combined with a new scramjet model, as well as other tools, were used to examine total system performance.

  7. STS-108 Post Flight Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The crewmembers of STS-108, Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Linda Godwin and Daniel Tani, narrate this video as footage from the mission is shown. The crew is seen flying into Kennedy Space Center, suiting up, boarding the Endeavour Orbiter, and during launch. Various mission highlights are seen, including the rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS) and docking of Endeavour, the unloading of the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), and the spacewalk to install thermal blankets over the Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGAs) at the bases of the Space Station's solar panels. A glimpse is given into the difficulties of working in a microgravity environment as the crewmembers attempt to eat food before it floats away from them and drink water from a bag. The exchange of the Expedition 4 (Yuri I. Onufrienko, Carl E. Walz, and Daniel W. Bursch) for the Expedition 3 crew (Frank L. Culbertson, Mikhail Turin, and Vladimir N. Dezhurov) is also seen. The Endeavour undocks from the ISS, which is seen over the Caribbean Sea. Endeavour passes over Cuba, and footage of the Swiss Alps is shown. The video ends with the landing of the spacecraft.

  8. Synaesthesia, the arts and creativity: a neurological connection.

    PubMed

    Mulvenna, Catherine M

    2007-01-01

    For over 100 years the link between synaesthesia and the arts has attracted controversy. This has been spurred by the production of auditory, literary and visual art by famous individuals who report experiences synonymous with the neurological condition. Impressive protagonists in this discussion include Arthur Rimbaud, Charles Baudelaire, Vasily Kandinsky, Vladimir Nabokov, Alexander Scriabin, Olivier Messiaen and David Hockney. Interdisciplinary debates have concerned whether synaesthesia can actively contribute to an artist's ability, whether it is a driving force or a mere idiosyncratic quirk and whether, fundamentally, it is a distinct idiopathic condition or an unusual metaphorical description of normal perception. Recent psychological and neuroscientific evidence offers a new level to the debate. Coherent patterns of a neural basis of synaesthesia have been confirmed with high spatial resolution brain imaging techniques and the link with the arts is transpiring to be more than superficial or coincidental. Moreover, the neural distinction of the synaesthete brain may prove to be a window into a neural basis of creative cognition, and therefore conducive to the expression of creativity in various media.

  9. Origin of origami cockroach reveals long-lasting (11 Ma) phenotype instability following viviparity.

    PubMed

    Vršanský, Peter V; Šmídová, Lucia; Valaška, Daniel; Barna, Peter; Vidlička, Ľubomír; Takáč, Peter; Pavlik, Lubomir; Kúdelová, Tatiana; Karim, Talia S; Zelagin, David; Smith, Dena

    2016-10-01

    Viviparity evolved in bacteria, plants, ˃141 vertebrate lineages (ichthyosaurs, lizards, fishes, mammals, and others), and in 11 of 44 insect orders. Live-birth cockroaches preserved with brood sac (3D recovered two times optically) included Diploptera vladimir, Diploptera savba, Diploptera gemini spp.n., D. sp.1-2, and Stegoblatta irmgardgroehni from Green River, Colorado; Quilchena, Republic; McAbee, Canada; and Baltic amber, Russia (49, 54, and 45 Ma). They evolved from rare and newly evolved Blaberidae; they radiated circumtropically, later expanded into SE Asia, and have now spread to Hawaii and the SE USA. Association of autapomorphic characters that allow for passive and active protections from parasitic insects (unique wing origami pleating identical with its egg case-attacking wasp) suggest a response to high parasitic loads. Synchronized with global reorganization of the biota, morphotype destabilization in roaches lasted approximately 11-22 Ma, including both the adaptation of novel characters and the reduction of others. Thus, while viviparity can be disadvantageous, in association with new Bauplans and/or behaviors, it can contribute to the evolution of taxa with viviparous representatives that are slightly selectively preferred. PMID:27614456

  10. Epilepsy: A Disruptive Force in History.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rohaid; Connolly, Ian D; Feroze, Abdullah H; Awad, Ahmed J; Choudhri, Omar A; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-06-01

    Since it was first described in a Mesopotamian text in 2000 bc, countless individuals have offered their perspectives on epilepsy's cause, treatment, and even deeper spiritual significance. However, despite the attention the disease has received through the millennia, it has only been within the past half-century that truly effective treatment options have been available. As a result, for the vast majority of recorded history, individuals with epilepsy have not only had to deal with the uncertainty of their next epileptic seizure but also the concomitant stigma and ostracization. Interestingly, these individuals have included several prominent historical figures, including Julius Caesar, Vladimir Lenin, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The fact that epilepsy has appeared in the lives of influential historical people means that the disease has played some role in affecting the progress of human civilization. Epilepsy has cut short the lives of key political leaders, affected the output of talented cultural icons, and, especially within the past half century, influenced the collective understanding of neuroscience and the human nervous system. In this article, the authors review how epilepsy throughout history has manifested itself in the lives of prominent figures and how the disease has helped shape the course of humanity's political, cultural, and scientific evolution. PMID:26709155

  11. [ON HUMAN BODY REACTION TO A CHANGED GEOMAGNETIC BACKGROUND].

    PubMed

    Sterlikova, I V

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to test the concept about existence of a heliobiological relation in the Earth's middle-latitude region for which to analyze, as an example, frequency of circulatory disease exacerbation, mental and behavior disorders, and respiratory diseases (bronchial asthma). The subject and object of the experimental statistic survey have been dwellers of city of Murom (Vladimir region) located in middle-latitude geomagnetic region Φ ≈ 53 degrees. The source material in the investigation was medical data of the Murom ambulance service and geophysical data of the Borok geomagnetic observatory (Yaroslavl region). The survey went on 3 years from February, 1985 till December, 1987 and coincided with the rise of the 11th solar cycle. The largest number of calls to the ambulance service due to acute circulatory condition, mental or behavior disorders, respiratory diseases (bronchial asthma particularly) and their fatal outcome fell on periods of long absence of high-frequency geomagnetic pulsation within the frequency range of human biorhythms.

  12. [ON HUMAN BODY REACTION TO A CHANGED GEOMAGNETIC BACKGROUND].

    PubMed

    Sterlikova, I V

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to test the concept about existence of a heliobiological relation in the Earth's middle-latitude region for which to analyze, as an example, frequency of circulatory disease exacerbation, mental and behavior disorders, and respiratory diseases (bronchial asthma). The subject and object of the experimental statistic survey have been dwellers of city of Murom (Vladimir region) located in middle-latitude geomagnetic region Φ ≈ 53 degrees. The source material in the investigation was medical data of the Murom ambulance service and geophysical data of the Borok geomagnetic observatory (Yaroslavl region). The survey went on 3 years from February, 1985 till December, 1987 and coincided with the rise of the 11th solar cycle. The largest number of calls to the ambulance service due to acute circulatory condition, mental or behavior disorders, respiratory diseases (bronchial asthma particularly) and their fatal outcome fell on periods of long absence of high-frequency geomagnetic pulsation within the frequency range of human biorhythms. PMID:26554135

  13. Committees and organizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    Chairman:Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Program Committee:Stephen Blundell (Oxford), J Michael D Coey (Dublin), Dominique Givord (Grenoble), Dariusz Kaczorowski (Wrocław), Roman Micnas (Poznań), Marek Przybylski (Halle), Ludiwig Schultz (Dresden), Vladimir Sechovsky (Prague), Jozef Spałek (Kraków), Henryk Szymczak (Warszawa), Manuel Vázquez (Madrid) Publication Committee:Dariusz Kaczorowski, Robert Podsiadły, Jozef Spałek, Henryk Szymczak, Andrzej Szytuła Local committee:Maria Bałanda, Anna Majcher, Robert Podsiadły, Michał Rams, Andrzej Ślebarski, Krzysztof Tomala Editors of the Proceedings:Jozef Spałek, Krzysztof Tomala, Danuta Goc-Jagło, Robert Podsiadły, Michał Rams, Anna Majcher Plenary, semi-plenary and tutorial speakers:Ernst Bauer (Wien)Stephen Blundell (Oxford)J Michael D Coey (Dublin)Russell P Cowburn (London)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern)Claudine Lacroix (Grenoble)Lluís Mañosa (Barcelona)María del Carmen Muñoz (Madrid)Bernard Raveau (Caen)Pedro Schlottmann (Tallahassee)Frank Steglich (Dresden)Oliver Waldmann (Freiburg) Invited speakers within symposia: R Ahuja (Uppsala)A Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) M Albrecht (Vienna)L Theil Kuhn (Roskilde) K Bärner (Göttingen)J Liu (Dresden) U Bovensiepen (Duisburg)G Lorusso (Modena) V Buchelnikov (Chelyabinsk)M M Maska (Katowice) B Chevalier (Bordeaux)Y Mukovskii (Moscow) O Chubykalo-Fesenko (Madrid)M Pannetier-Lecoeur (Saclay) A V Chumak (Kaiserslautern)G Papavassiliou (Athens) J M D Coey (Dublin)K R Pirota (Campinas) B Dabrowski (DeKalb)P Przyslupski (Warszawa) S Das (Aveiro)M Reiffers (Košice) A del Moral (Zaragoza)K Sandeman (London) V E Demidov (Muenster)D Sander (Halle) B Djafari-Rouhani (Lille)M Sawicki (Sendai/Warsaw) H A Dürr (Menlo Park)J Schaefer (Würzburg) J Fassbender (Dresden)H Schmidt (Wetzikon) J Fontcuberta (Barcelona)J Spałek (Kraków) V Garcia (Orsay)L Straka (Helsinki) J N Gonçalves (Aveiro)A Szewczyk (Warszawa) M E Gruner (Duisburg)Y Taguchi (Wako) G Gubbiotti (Perugia)A Thiaville

  14. Individualization of the anisotropic phenomena of the imbalanced Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, L. M.; Kontar, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    imbalanced natural phenomenon can be determined with the precision which allow the sensors and methods of interpretation. The desire to identify the separate object in the imbalanced continuous Nature is the consequence of personalized thinking of people. In Nature is not exists any separate and independent phenomenon. In Nature are exist only the more or less concentrated anisotropy, which are constantly changing in the infinite continuity. Some references: Vladimir A Kontar, Federal GEOS Funding, US: 1. What is Imbalance of Nature? 2. What is the Imbalance of Water in Nature? 3. The Imbalance of Water in Nature as System 4. Axiomatic of the Imbalance of Nature and the Imbalance of Water in Nature 5. Water Management on the Verge of the Imbalanced Revolution 6. Control the Imbalance in Nature for Humanity Survival 7. Proof of the Imbalance of Nature in the Universe 8. Imbalanced Logic as the next level development of science Vladimir A. Kontar, Lyubov M. Shlafman, Federal GEOS Funding, US: 1. The relativity theory of the imbalance of water in nature 2. Redeployment as a Parameter to Measure the Imbalance of Water in Nature 4. Imbalance's Hypothesis for the Origin and Dynamics of Water on the Terrestrial Planets 5. Imbalance of Water and Carbon as Factors of the Global Climate Changes

  15. Editorial: Focus on Dynamics and Thermalization in Isolated Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalilla, M. A.; Rigol, M.

    2010-05-01

    understand many-body quantum systems. This focus issue of New Journal Physics brings together both experimentalists and theoreticians working on these problems to provide a comprehensive picture of the state of the field. Focus on Dynamics and Thermalization in Isolated Quantum Many-Body Systems Contents Spin squeezing of high-spin, spatially extended quantum fields Jay D Sau, Sabrina R Leslie, Marvin L Cohen and Dan M Stamper-Kurn Thermodynamic entropy of a many-body energy eigenstate J M Deutsch Ground states and dynamics of population-imbalanced Fermi condensates in one dimension Masaki Tezuka and Masahito Ueda Relaxation dynamics in the gapped XXZ spin-1/2 chain Jorn Mossel and Jean-Sébastien Caux Canonical thermalization Peter Reimann Minimally entangled typical thermal state algorithms E M Stoudenmire and Steven R White Manipulation of the dynamics of many-body systems via quantum control methods Julie Dinerman and Lea F Santos Multimode analysis of non-classical correlations in double-well Bose-Einstein condensates Andrew J Ferris and Matthew J Davis Thermalization in a quasi-one-dimensional ultracold bosonic gas I E Mazets and J Schmiedmayer Two simple systems with cold atoms: quantum chaos tests and non-equilibrium dynamics Cavan Stone, Yassine Ait El Aoud, Vladimir A Yurovsky and Maxim Olshanii On the speed of fluctuations around thermodynamic equilibrium Noah Linden, Sandu Popescu, Anthony J Short and Andreas Winter A quantum central limit theorem for non-equilibrium systems: exact local relaxation of correlated states M Cramer and J Eisert Quantum quench dynamics of the sine-Gordon model in some solvable limits A Iucci and M A Cazalilla Nonequilibrium quantum dynamics of atomic dark solitons A D Martin and J Ruostekoski Quantum quenches in the anisotropic spin-1⁄2 Heisenberg chain: different approaches to many-body dynamics far from equilibrium Peter Barmettler, Matthias Punk, Vladimir Gritsev, Eugene Demler and Ehud Altman Crossover from adiabatic to sudden

  16. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS), held from 29 July-2 August 2008 at the University of Camerino. Camerino is an ancient hill-top town located in the Apennine mountains of Italy, 200 kilometres northeast of Rome, with a university dating back to 1336. The Camerino conference was the 11th in a series which started in 1977: 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (hosted by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (hosted by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, New York, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) 2005: Moscow, Russia (hosted by Vladimir E Fortov and Vladimir Vorob'ev). The name of the series was changed in 1996 from Strongly Coupled Plasmas to Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems to reflect a wider range of topics. 'Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems' encompasses diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. The purpose of the conferences is to provide a regular international forum for the presentation and discussion of research achievements and ideas relating to a variety of plasma, liquid and condensed matter systems that are dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphases that have followed new discoveries and new techniques. The field has continued to see new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions, most recently in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas

  17. V. M. BEKHTEREV IN RUSSIAN CHILD SCIENCE, 1900S–1920S: “OBJECTIVE PSYCHOLOGY”/“REFLEXOLOGY” AS A SCIENTIFIC MOVEMENT

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the early 20th century the child population became a major focus of scientific, professional and public interest. This led to the crystallization of a dynamic field of child science, encompassing developmental and educational psychology, child psychiatry and special education, school hygiene and mental testing, juvenile criminology and the anthropology of childhood. This article discusses the role played in child science by the eminent Russian neurologist and psychiatrist Vladimir Mikhailovich Bekhterev. The latter's name is associated with a distinctive program for transforming the human sciences in general and psychology in particular that he in the 1900s labelled “objective psychology” and from the 1910s renamed “reflexology.” The article examines the equivocal place that Bekhterev's “objective psychology” and “reflexology” occupied in Russian/Soviet child science in the first three decades of the 20th century. While Bekhterev's prominence in this field is beyond doubt, analysis shows that “objective psychology” and “reflexology” had much less success in mobilizing support within it than certain other movements in this arena (for example, “experimental pedagogy” in the pre‐revolutionary era); it also found it difficult to compete with the variety of rival programs that arose within Soviet “pedology” during the 1920s. However, this article also demonstrates that the study of child development played a pivotal role in Bekhterev's program for the transformation of the human sciences: it was especially important to his efforts to ground in empirical phenomena and in concrete research practices a new ontology of the psychological, which, the article argues, underpinned “objective psychology”/“reflexology” as a transformative scientific movement. PMID:26910603

  18. Rare Isotopes and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex; Engel, Jonathan; Haxton, Wick; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Romalis, Michael; Savard, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Experiments searching for new interactions in nuclear beta decay / Klaus P. Jungmann -- The beta-neutrino correlation in sodium-21 and other nuclei / P. A. Vetter ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure and fundamental symmetries/ B. Alex Brown -- Schiff moments and nuclear structure / J. Engel -- Superallowed nuclear beta decay: recent results and their impact on V[symbol] / J. C. Hardy and I. S. Towner -- New calculation of the isospin-symmetry breaking correlation to superallowed Fermi beta decay / I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy -- Precise measurement of the [symbol]H to [symbol]He mass difference / D. E. Pinegar ... [et al.] -- Limits on scalar currents from the 0+ to 0+ decay of [symbol]Ar and isospin breaking in [symbol]Cl and [symbol]Cl / A. Garcia -- Nuclear constraints on the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction / W. C. Haxton -- Atomic PNC theory: current status and future prospects / M. S. Safronova -- Parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interactions: what can we learn from nuclear anapole moments? / B. Desplanques -- Proposed experiment for the measurement of the anapole moment in francium / A. Perez Galvan ... [et al.] -- The Radon-EDM experiment / Tim Chupp for the Radon-EDM collaboration -- The lead radius Eexperiment (PREX) and parity violating measurements of neutron densities / C. J. Horowitz -- Nuclear structure aspects of Schiff moment and search for collective enhancements / Naftali Auerbach and Vladimir Zelevinsky -- The interpretation of atomic electric dipole moments: Schiff theorem and its corrections / C. -P. Liu -- T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / M. D. Swallows ... [et al.] -- The new concept for FRIB and its potential for fundamental interactions studies / Guy Savard -- Collinear laser spectroscopy and polarized exotic nuclei at NSCL / K. Minamisono -- Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants / M. Pospelov.

  19. PREFACE: International Congress on Energy Fluxes and Radiation Effects (EFRE-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The International Congress on Energy Fluxes and Radiation Effects 2014 (EFRE 2014) was held in Tomsk, Russia, on September 21-26, 2014. The organizers of the Congress were the Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS and Tomsk Polytechnic University. EFRE 2014 combines three international conferences which are regularly held in Tomsk, Russia: the 18th International Symposium on High-Current Electronics (18th SHCE), the 12th International Conference on Modification of Materials with Particle Beams and Plasma Flows (12th CMM) and the 16th International Conference on Radiation Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter (16th RPC). The International Conference on Radiation Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter is a traditional representative forum devoted to the discussion of the fundamental problems of physical and chemical non-linear processes in condensed matter (mainly inorganic dielectrics) under the action of particle and photon beams of all types including pulsed power laser radiation. The International Symposium on High-Current Electronics is held biannually in Tomsk, Russia. The program of the conferences covers a wide range of scientific and technical areas including pulsed power technology, ion and electron beams, high-power microwaves, plasma and particle beam sources, modification of materials, and pulsed power applications in chemistry, biology and medicine. The 12th International Conference on Modification of Materials with Particle Beams and Plasma Flows is devoted to the discussion of the fundamental and applied issues in the field of modification of materials properties with particle beams and plasma flows. The six-day Congress brought together more than 250 specialists and scientists from different countries and organizations and provided an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge, make oral contributions and poster presentations, and initiate discussion on the topics of interest. The proceedings were edited by Victor Lisitsyn, Vladimir

  20. High-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies foster new cutting-edge computing techniques in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mary Qu; Athey, Brian D; Arabnia, Hamid R; Sung, Andrew H; Liu, Qingzhong; Yang, Jack Y; Mao, Jinghe; Deng, Youping

    2009-07-07

    The advent of high-throughput next generation sequencing technologies have fostered enormous potential applications of supercomputing techniques in genome sequencing, epi-genetics, metagenomics, personalized medicine, discovery of non-coding RNAs and protein-binding sites. To this end, the 2008 International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Biocomp) - 2008 World Congress on Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Applied Computing (Worldcomp) was designed to promote synergistic inter/multidisciplinary research and education in response to the current research trends and advances. The conference attracted more than two thousand scientists, medical doctors, engineers, professors and students gathered at Las Vegas, Nevada, USA during July 14-17 and received great success. Supported by International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (IJCBDD), International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine (IJFIPM) and the leading research laboratories from Harvard, M.I.T., Purdue, UIUC, UCLA, Georgia Tech, UT Austin, U. of Minnesota, U. of Iowa etc, the conference received thousands of research papers. Each submitted paper was reviewed by at least three reviewers and accepted papers were required to satisfy reviewers' comments. Finally, the review board and the committee decided to select only 19 high-quality research papers for inclusion in this supplement to BMC Genomics based on the peer reviews only. The conference committee was very grateful for the Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. Brian D. Athey (University of Michigan Medical School), Dr. Vladimir N. Uversky (Indiana University School of Medicine), Dr. David A. Patterson (Member of United States National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering, University of California at Berkeley) and Anousheh Ansari (Prodea Systems, Space Ambassador). The theme of the conference to promote

  1. Academician V.F. Utkin, General Designer of Space Launch Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyukhov, S.; Novykov, O.

    2002-01-01

    Academician Vladimir Fedorovich Utkin was an outstanding scientist and designer of rocket and space machinery, Doctor of Technical Science, Professor, Twice Hero of Socialist Labor, Lenin Prize and USSR State Prize winner, bearer of six Orders of Lenin and many other government awards. For 19 years, 1971 - 1990, V. F. Utkin held a position of General Designer in Yuzhnoye SDO having inherited this post from Academician Mikhail Kuzmich Yangel - Yuhnoye's founder. From 1990 till 2000 V. F. Utkin headed Central Scientific Research Institute of Machinery of Russia (TsNIIMash) as its General Designer. Under leadership of V. F. Utkin Yuzhnoye SDO designed several generations of unique strategic missile systems that laid the foundation for Rocket Strategic Forces of the Soviet Union and Russia, subsequently, developed one of the largest high-performance liquid- propellant ICBM SS-18 (Satan), solid-propellant ICBM SS-24 designed for both silo and rail- road deployment, environment friendly Zenit launch vehicle, delivered more than three hundred military, scientific and environmental satellites with tasks. A series of complicated scientific and technical problems has been resolved, a number of unique designing and technological solutions has been implemented in course of development, e.g. separating and orbital warheads, pop-up launch of heavy missiles from a container, continuous and persistent combat duty of liquid-propellant missiles, missile tolerance to nuclear explosion damage, liberation of vessels from ice captivity in the Arctic Ocean using Cosmos-1500 satellite - ancestor of the Ocean satellite constellation designed for accomplishment of seafaring tasks. The existing Russian Program for Rocket and Space Machinery development was designed under leadership of V.F. Utkin.

  2. Microstructural musical linguistics: composers' pulses are liked most by the best musicians.

    PubMed

    Clynes, M

    1995-06-01

    Western music is a combination of notated structure plus microstructure. Composers' pulses, as precise microstructural functions, were tested with five groups of subjects of graded musical proficiency: (1) 10 famous artists including Vladimir Ashkenazy, Yehudi Menuhin, Paul Badura-Skoda and others; (2) 14 Julliard School of Music graduate students; (3) 19 Manhattan School of Music graduate students; (4) 51 Australian conservatory students; and (5) 41 non-music students (total, 135 subjects). Composers' pulses consist of combined amplitude and timing warps specific to each composer--the composer's pulse matrix. Each subject listened to and scored 40 versions of 10 short music examples (not selected by the author) of eight bars each, composed by Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn and Schubert, performed by computer, in which composers' pulses, as developed by Clynes (1983, 1985a,b, 1986, 1987), were incorporated in a two-level hierarchic pulse configuration, and interchanged. Each example was heard with the pulses of those four composers in turn, in quasi-random sequence, one performance thus incorporating the "right" pulse and three the "wrong" ones. Results show dramatically that the greater the musical proficiency, the more marked the preference for the "right" pulse (p < .0001). Non-musicians as a group showed a similar tendency of preference, but typically to a considerably less pronounced degree. Further studies suggest that longer excerpts (32 bars) and repeated hearing would help non-musicians also to better understand composers' pulses. A theory of music as a double stream is introduced. The results suggest that the composers' pulse matrices posited by Clynes as a first approximation are in fact appropriately meaningful. Brain function aspects of the meaningful discrimination of such tiny time differences are discussed. PMID:7634761

  3. Dynamically Consistent Shallow-Atmosphere Equations with a Complete Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tort, Marine; Dubos, Thomas; Bouchut, François; Zeitlin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Dynamically Consistent Shallow-Atmosphere Equations with a Complete Coriolis force Marine Tort1, Thomas Dubos1, François Bouchut2 & Vladimir Zeitlin1,3 1 Laboratoire of Dynamical Meteorology, Univ. P. and M. Curie, Ecole Normale Supérieure, and Ecole Polytechnique, FRANCE 2 Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire d'Analyse et de Mathématiques Appliquées, FRANCE 3 Institut Universitaire de France Atmospheric and oceanic motion are usually modeled within the shallow-fluid approximation, which simplifies the 3D spherical geometry. For dynamical consistency, i.e. to ensure conservation laws for potential vorticity, energy and angular momentum, the horizontal component of the Coriolis force is neglected. Here new equation sets combining consistently a simplified shallow-fluid geometry with a complete Coriolis force is presented. The derivation invokes Hamilton's principle of least action with an approximate Lagrangian capturing the small increase with height of the solid-body entrainment velocity due to planetary rotation. A three-dimensional compressible model and a one-layer shallow-water model are obtained. The latter extends previous work done on the f-plane and β-plane. Preliminary numerical results confirm the accuracy of the 3D model within the range of parameters for which the equations are relevant. These new models could be useful to incorporate a full Coriolis force into existing numerical models and to disentangle the effects of the shallow-atmosphere approximation from those of the traditional approximation. Related papers: Tort M., Dubos T., Bouchut F. and Zeitlin V. Consistent shallow-water equations on the rotating sphere with complete Coriolis force and topography. J. Fluid Mech. (under revisions) Tort M. and Dubos T. Dynamically consistent shallow-atmosphere equations with a complete Coriolis force. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. (DOI: 10.1002/qj.2274)

  4. STS-86 Atlantis Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11- day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a- half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked.

  5. STS-86 Atlantis Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS- 86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked.

  6. STS-86 Atlantis Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. The Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) can be seen in the background. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS- 86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked.

  7. STS-86 Landing (Main Gear Touchdown)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11- day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a- half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked.

  8. STS-86 Landing (Main Gear Touchdown (from back)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11- day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a- half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked.

  9. STS-86 Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on runway 15 of the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, October 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two Kennedy Space Center landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than 3.5 tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies betweent the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked.

  10. Thermoinactivation of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Benyeshmelnick, M

    1966-01-01

    Vonka, Vladimir (Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.), and Matilda Benyesh-Melnick. Thermoinactivation of human cytomegalovirus. J. Bacteriol. 91:221-226. 1966.-The inactivation at 4 and 37 C of several strains of human cytomegalovirus was studied. The preliminary findings that freshly harvested cytomegalovirus was inactivated more rapidly at 4 C than at higher temperatures was confirmed. Intracellular virus still within infected cells was found to be more stable at 4 C than virus released by sonic treatment just before incubation at 4 C. The composition of the diluent played an important role. In tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane buffer, virus was unstable at both 4 and 37 C, with the rate of inactivation faster at 4 than at 37 C. Similar results were obtained when bicarbonate-phosphate buffer or Eagle's medium when bicarbonate was used as virus diluent. Calf serum stabilized the virus at 37 C, but not at 4 C. The deletion of bicarbonate from Eagle's medium had a stabilizing effect at both temperatures. An even greater stabilizing effect at both 4 and 37 C was obtained when distilled water was used as virus diluent. Inactivation rates varied from one strain to the next at 4 C but not at 37 C. Differences were found also with virus progeny derived from a single strain, but harvested at different stages during virus multiplication. Virus harvested early was more labile at 4 than at 37 C, whereas the late virus was more labile at the higher temperature. Intracellular and extracellular virus preparations were inactivated at the same rates at either 4 or 37 C.

  11. Two-slit experiment: quantum and classical probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Inter-relation between quantum and classical probability models is one of the most fundamental problems of quantum foundations. Nowadays this problem also plays an important role in quantum technologies, in quantum cryptography and the theory of quantum random generators. In this letter, we compare the viewpoint of Richard Feynman that the behavior of quantum particles cannot be described by classical probability theory with the viewpoint that quantum-classical inter-relation is more complicated (cf, in particular, with the tomographic model of quantum mechanics developed in detail by Vladimir Man'ko). As a basic example, we consider the two-slit experiment, which played a crucial role in quantum foundational debates at the beginning of quantum mechanics (QM). In particular, its analysis led Niels Bohr to the formulation of the principle of complementarity. First, we demonstrate that in complete accordance with Feynman's viewpoint, the probabilities for the two-slit experiment have the non-Kolmogorovian structure, since they violate one of basic laws of classical probability theory, the law of total probability (the heart of the Bayesian analysis). However, then we show that these probabilities can be embedded in a natural way into the classical (Kolmogorov, 1933) probability model. To do this, one has to take into account the randomness of selection of different experimental contexts, the joint consideration of which led Feynman to a conclusion about the non-classicality of quantum probability. We compare this embedding of non-Kolmogorovian quantum probabilities into the Kolmogorov model with well-known embeddings of non-Euclidean geometries into Euclidean space (e.g., the Poincaré disk model for the Lobachvesky plane).

  12. List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J

  13. STS-105 and Expedition 3 crews head for bus and another launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-105 and Expedition Three (E3) crews grin as they exit the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to Launch Pad 39A for a second launch attempt. Leading the way are (left to right) Pilot Rick Sturckow and Commander Scott Horowitz; in the second row, Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry; in the third row, E3 cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin, Commander Frank Culbertson, and cosmonaut Vladimir Dezhurov. Forrester and Tyurin are both making their first space flights. Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:12 p.m. Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. Launch is currently scheduled for 5:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 10. Highlighting the mission will be the rotation of the International Space Station crew, the third flight of an Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and two spacewalks. Included in the payload is the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which will be attached to the Station during the spacewalks. The EAS will be installed on the P6 truss, which holds the Station'''s giant U.S. solar arrays, batteries and the cooling radiators. The EAS contains spare ammonia for the Station'''s cooling system. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station.

  14. PREFACE: 2nd International School and Conference Saint-Petersburg OPEN on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures (SPbOPEN2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    The 2nd International School and Conference ''Saint Petersburg OPEN 2015'' on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures was held on April 6 - 8, 2015 at St. Petersburg Academic University. The School and Conference included a series of invited talks given by leading professors with the aim to introduce young scientists with actual problems and major advances in physics and technology. The keynote speakers were Mikhail V. Maximov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Vladimir G. Dubrovskii (St. Petersburg Academic University and St. Petersburg State University, Russia) Anton Yu. Egorov (JSC Connector Optics, Russia) Victor V. Luchinin (St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, Russia) Vladislav E. Bugrov (St. Petersburg University of Internet Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Russia) Vitali A. Schukin (VI Systems, Germany) Yuri P. Svirko (University of Eastern Finland, Finland) During the poster session all undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference presented their works. A sufficiently large number of participants, with more than 170 student attendees from all over the world, allowed the Conference to provide a fertile ground for fruitful discussions between the young scientists as well as to become a perfect platform for valuable discussions between student authors and highly experienced scientists. The best student papers, which were selected by the Program Committee and by the invited speakers basing on the theses and their poster presentation, were awarded with diplomas of the conference - see the photos. This year ''Saint Petersburg OPEN 2015'' is organized by St. Petersburg Academic University in cooperation with Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. The School and Conference is supported by Russian Science Foundation, SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics), OSA (The Optical Society) and by Skolkovo Foundation. It is a continuation of the annual schools and seminars for

  15. Microstructural musical linguistics: composers' pulses are liked most by the best musicians.

    PubMed

    Clynes, M

    1995-06-01

    Western music is a combination of notated structure plus microstructure. Composers' pulses, as precise microstructural functions, were tested with five groups of subjects of graded musical proficiency: (1) 10 famous artists including Vladimir Ashkenazy, Yehudi Menuhin, Paul Badura-Skoda and others; (2) 14 Julliard School of Music graduate students; (3) 19 Manhattan School of Music graduate students; (4) 51 Australian conservatory students; and (5) 41 non-music students (total, 135 subjects). Composers' pulses consist of combined amplitude and timing warps specific to each composer--the composer's pulse matrix. Each subject listened to and scored 40 versions of 10 short music examples (not selected by the author) of eight bars each, composed by Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn and Schubert, performed by computer, in which composers' pulses, as developed by Clynes (1983, 1985a,b, 1986, 1987), were incorporated in a two-level hierarchic pulse configuration, and interchanged. Each example was heard with the pulses of those four composers in turn, in quasi-random sequence, one performance thus incorporating the "right" pulse and three the "wrong" ones. Results show dramatically that the greater the musical proficiency, the more marked the preference for the "right" pulse (p < .0001). Non-musicians as a group showed a similar tendency of preference, but typically to a considerably less pronounced degree. Further studies suggest that longer excerpts (32 bars) and repeated hearing would help non-musicians also to better understand composers' pulses. A theory of music as a double stream is introduced. The results suggest that the composers' pulse matrices posited by Clynes as a first approximation are in fact appropriately meaningful. Brain function aspects of the meaningful discrimination of such tiny time differences are discussed.

  16. Micro, meso, macro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljenström, Hans; Svedin, Uno

    1. System features, dynamics, and resilience - some introductory remarks / Hans Liljenström & Uno Svedin -- pt. I. The "vertical" system structure and meso-level characteristics. 2. Mesoscopic levels in science - some comments / Hermann Haken. 3. The necessity for mesoscopic organization to connect neural function to brain function / Walter J. Freeman. 4. Dynamic state transitions in the nervous system: from ion channels to neurons to networks / Peter Århem ... [et al.]. 5. A revolution in the Middle Kingdom / Robert E. Ulanowicz. 6. The meso-scale level of self-maintained reflective systems / Abir U. Igamberdiev -- pt. II. Inner and outer dynamics. 7. Time rescaling and generalized entropy in relation to the internal measurement concept / Igor Rojdestvenski & Michael G. Cottam. 8. Studying dynamic and stochastic systems using Poisson simulation / Leif Gustafsson. 9. Resource dynamics, social interactions, and the tragedy of the commons / Alia Mashanova & Richard Law. 10. Stability of social interaction / Sjur D. Flåm -- pt. III. Resilience and shocks. 11. Systems, shocks and time bombs / Nick Winder. 12. Biodiversity decreases the risk of collapse in model food webs / Charlotte Borrvall, Maria Christianou & Bo Ebenman. 13. A long-term perspective on resilience in socio-natural systems / Sander E. van der Leeuw & Christina Aschan-Leygonie. 14. Resilience in utility technologies / Roger Seaton. 15. Economic growth under shocks: path dependencies and stabilization / Yuri M. Ermoliev, Tatiana Y. Ermolieva & Vladimir I. Norkin. 16. Risk and crises management in complex systems / Koen Bertels, Jean-Marie Jacques & Magnus Boman. 17. Bridges, connections and interfaces - reflections over the meso theme / Uno Svedin & Hans Liljenström.

  17. Large-scale properties of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga; Obridko, Vladimir; Zharkova, Valentina; Veselov, Mikhail

    Since the solar wind phenomenon has been revealed and confirmed, one of the most intriguing problems was to understand processes in the solar atmosphere and their relation with the solar wind characteristics at different distances from the Sun. Analysis of multi-spacecraft measurements of plasma parameters and the interplanetary magnetic field provides us with knowledge about the heliosphere from global to small scales. Comparisons of observations with models, describing small-scale processes, usually give more positive results than in the case of models comparison with the solar wind properties at the scales larger than several proton gyroradii. For example, Parker-like models face with big problems in their attempts to predict the solar wind plasma and, especially, the behaviour of the interplanetary magnetic field. Observations show that the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field depends on heliolatitude and radially decreases with a slope of -5/3 instead of the predicted slope of -2 (Khabarova, Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). This may be determined by small-scale processes occurring in some vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet and related to the magnetic reconnection (Zharkova, Khabarova, ApJ, 2012). In this report we present results of data analysis of eight spacecraft to study variations of plasma, the electric and magnetic field with distance and heliolatitude. begin{enumerate} Zharkova V., Khabarova O., Particle Acceleration in the Reconnecting Heliospheric Current Sheet: Solar Wind Data Versus 3D PIC Simulations, Astrophysical Journal, 2012, V.752, 1, 35 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/35 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga V., The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013

  18. The Multifluid Character of the `Baranov' Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, H. J.

    2000-10-01

    Since about three decades now it is clearly recognized that the interaction of the solar system with the ambient interstellar medium flow mainly is characterized by its hydrodynamic nature invoking structures like the inner shock, the heliopause and the outer shock with plasma sheath regions in between. After the pioneering works by Eugene Parker and Vladimir Baranov the main outlines of this interaction scenario were established, while some discussion on location and geometry of these structures is still going on till now. Fundamentally new aspects of this interaction problem have meanwhile appeared calling for new and more consistent calculations. The revisions of the earlier interaction concept starts with the neutral LISM gas component passing through the solar system. At the occasion of ionizations of this component a medium-energetic plasma component in form of keV-energetic pick-up ions is created. This component changes the distant solar wind properties by mass-, momentum-, and energy-loading, by wave generation and lowering the solar wind Mach numbers. Furthermore pick-up ions serve as a seed population for a high-energetic plasma population with energies between 10 and 100 MeV/nuc called anomalous cosmic rays. This latter component by means of its pressure gradient not only modifies the solar wind flow but also modulates its termination shock. In this paper it is shown how the main features of the enlarged interaction scenario change if the above mentioned multifluid character of the scenario is taken into account. While now we present a `multicolour vision' of the interacting heliosphere, it should never be forgotten that these modern views only were possible due to the fundamental `black-and-white vision' already presented by Baranov in the seventieths.

  19. PREFACE: The International Conference on Theoretical Physics `Dubna-Nano2008'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. A.; Nesterenko, V. O.; Shukrinov, Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    The International Conference on Theoretical Physics `Dubna-Nano2008' was held on 7-11 July 2008 at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The conference provided the opportunity for the presentation and discussion of theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of the nanophysics, with the accent on its theoretical aspects. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: carbon nanosystems (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene), quantum dots, electron and spin transport, spectroscopy and dynamics of atomic clusters, Josephson junctions, bio-complexes, and applications of nanosystems. Approximately 90 scientists from 16 countries participated in the conference. The program included 48 oral talks and 40 posters. The 51 contributions are included in this proceedings. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference so successful. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee (Professors T Ando, S Datta, A V Eletskii, J Fabian, F Guinea, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, T Koyama, Yu I Latushev, N F Pedersen, P-G Reinhard, J M Rost, A Ya Vul') and the Local Organizing Committee for their fruitful work. The financial support of BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Additional information about `Dubna-Nano2008' is available at the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano08. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  20. PREFACE: International Conference on Theoretical Physics: Dubna-Nano 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury M.

    2012-11-01

    The International Conference 'Dubna-Nano2012' was held on 9-14 July 2012 at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The conference was the third one in the series started in 2008. 'Dubna-Nano2012' provided an opportunity for presentations and discussions about theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: graphene and other carbon nanostructures, topological insulators, quantum transport, quantum dots, atomic clusters, Josephson junctions and applications of nanosystems. About 100 scientists from 22 countries participated in the conference. The program included 38 oral talks and 39 posters. This volume contains 35 contributions. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee Professors K S Novoselov, T Ando, T Chakraborty, J Fabian, V M Galitski, F Guinea, M Z Hasan, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, R Kleiner, T Koyama, Yu I Latyshev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G. Reinhard, J M Rost and A Ya Vul. Financial support from BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Further information about 'Dubna-Nano2012' is available on the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano12. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  1. PREFACE International Conference on Theoretical Physics Dubna-Nano 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury

    2010-11-01

    The International Conference on Theoretical Physics 'Dubna-Nano2010' was held on 5-10 July 2010, at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The previous conference of this series was at Dubna in 2008. The conference provided the opportunity for the presentation and discussion of theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics, with the accent on its theoretical aspects. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: carbon nanosystems (graphene, nanotubes, fullerenes), quantum dots, quantum transport, spectroscopy and dynamics of atomic clusters, Josephson junctions, modelling, applications and perspectives. Approximately 120 scientists from 26 countries participated in the conference. The program included 63 oral talks and 70 posters. The 62 contributions are included in these proceedings. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference indeed successful. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee (Professors T Ando, J Fabian, F Guinea, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, T Koyama, Yu I Latushev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G Reinhard, J M Rost, A Ya Vul') and the Local Organizing Committee for their fruitful work. The financial support of BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Additional information about 'Dubna-Nano2010' is available at the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano10. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  2. International conference on "Photosynthesis research for sustainability-2013: in honor of Jalal A. Aliyev", held during June 5-9, 2013, Baku, Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Huseynova, Irada M; Govindjee

    2013-12-01

    In this brief report, we provide a pictorial essay on an international conference "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2013 in honor of Jalal A. Aliyev" that was held in Baku, Azerbaijan, during June 5-9, 2013 ( http://photosynthesis2013.cellreg.org/ ). We begin this report with a brief note on Jalal Aliyev, the honored scientist, and on John Walker (1997 Nobel laureate in Chemistry) who was a distinguished guest and lecturer at the Conference. We briefly describe the Conference, and the program. In addition to the excellent scientific program, a special feature of the Conference was the presentation of awards to nine outstanding young investigators; they are recognized in this report. We have also included several photographs to show the pleasant ambience at this conference. (See http://photosynthesis2013.cellreg.org/Photo-Gallery.php ; https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qcr124dajwffwh6/TlcHBvFu4H?m ; and https://www.copy.com/s/UDlxb9fgFXG9/Baku for more photographs taken by the authors as well as by others.) We invite the readers to the next conferences on "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2014: in honor of Vladimir A. Shuvalov" to be held during June 2-7, 2014, in Pushchino, Russia. Detailed information for this will be posted at the Website: http://photosynthesis2014.cellreg.org/ , and for the subsequent conference on "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2015" to be held in May or June 2015, in Baku, Azerbaijan, at http://photosynthesis2015.cellreg.org/ .

  3. Quantum Effects in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  4. Final Report: Radiation-magnetohydrodynamic evolution and instability of conductors driven by megagauss magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Bruno, S.; Siemon, Richard, E.

    2008-10-22

    We are pleased to report important progress in experimentally characterizing and numerically modeling the transformation into plasma of walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields. Understanding this is important to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) because an important limitation to the metal liner approach to MTF comes from the strong eddy current heating on the surface of the metal liner. This has intriguing non-linear aspects when the magnetic field is in the megagauss regime as needed for MTF, and may limit the magnetic field in an MTF implosion. Many faculty, students, and staff have contributed to this work, and, implicitly or explicitly, to this report. Contributors include, in addition to the PIs, Andrey Esaulov, Stephan Fuelling, Irvin Lindemuth, Volodymyr Makhin, Ioana Paraschiv, Milena Angelova, Tom Awe, Tasha Goodrich, Arunkumar Prasadam, Andrew Oxner, Bruno Le Galloudec, Radu Presura, and Vladimir Ivanov. Highlights of the progress made during the grant include: • 12 articles published, and 44 conference and workshop presentations made, on a broad range of issues related to this project; • An ongoing experiment that uses the 1 MA, 100-ns Zebra z-pinch at UNR to apply 2 5 megagauss to a variety of metal surfaces, examining plasma formation and evolution; • Numerical simulation studies of the 1-MA Zebra, and potential Shiva Star and Atlas experiments that include realistic equations of state and radiation effects, using a variety of tables. • Collaboration with other groups doing simulations of this experiment at LANL, VNIIEF, SNL, and NumerEx leading to a successful international workshop at UNR in the spring of 2008.

  5. V. M. BEKHTEREV IN RUSSIAN CHILD SCIENCE, 1900S-1920S: "OBJECTIVE PSYCHOLOGY"/"REFLEXOLOGY" AS A SCIENTIFIC MOVEMENT.

    PubMed

    Byford, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In the early 20(th) century the child population became a major focus of scientific, professional and public interest. This led to the crystallization of a dynamic field of child science, encompassing developmental and educational psychology, child psychiatry and special education, school hygiene and mental testing, juvenile criminology and the anthropology of childhood. This article discusses the role played in child science by the eminent Russian neurologist and psychiatrist Vladimir Mikhailovich Bekhterev. The latter's name is associated with a distinctive program for transforming the human sciences in general and psychology in particular that he in the 1900s labelled "objective psychology" and from the 1910s renamed "reflexology." The article examines the equivocal place that Bekhterev's "objective psychology" and "reflexology" occupied in Russian/Soviet child science in the first three decades of the 20(th) century. While Bekhterev's prominence in this field is beyond doubt, analysis shows that "objective psychology" and "reflexology" had much less success in mobilizing support within it than certain other movements in this arena (for example, "experimental pedagogy" in the pre-revolutionary era); it also found it difficult to compete with the variety of rival programs that arose within Soviet "pedology" during the 1920s. However, this article also demonstrates that the study of child development played a pivotal role in Bekhterev's program for the transformation of the human sciences: it was especially important to his efforts to ground in empirical phenomena and in concrete research practices a new ontology of the psychological, which, the article argues, underpinned "objective psychology"/"reflexology" as a transformative scientific movement.

  6. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  7. Phenomenon of organic carbon change in natural waters (system "catchment - Lake") of Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Tatyana, Moiseenko; Tatyana, Kremleva; Natalia, Gashkina

    2015-04-01

    this phenomenon. The water color is predominantly determined by large molecules of humus acids which molecular weight >1000 Da. Macromolecular organic substances of humus type can be dissociated in water with formation of a free proton, as well as enter into reactions of decomposition (hydrolysis) and disproportionation with formation of low-molecular weight fragments. Its fragments also are dissociated of proton (see the diagram below). Non-organic strong acids supplied from anthropogenic and natural sources may catalyze the above processes. The diagram of the organic substances destruction of humus origin is given below, where Ri means non-symmetrical fragments of a natural polymer, X_iH - functional groups of organic substances of humus origin, and n - number of protons. begin{equation*} HX_1-R_1-R_2-X_2H begin{array}{l} → R_1-X_1H + R_2-X_2H quad + quad R{^'}{_1} X1^- + R{^'}{_2} X2^- + nH+ → HX_1-R_1-R2 X_2- + - X_1R_1-R_2-X_2H + - X_1R_1-R2 X_2- + nH+ end{equation*} When strong acids get into a water environment humus acids are degraded into fractions. It could be supposed that the organic matter structure undergoes changes in natural waters, as the fraction of high-molecular weight humus acids decrease. As a consequence of interaction between humus substances and protons the humic acids precipitate to form bottom sediments, whereas fulvic acids remain in water. Fulvic acids are characterized by lower molecular weights (from 500 to 2000 Da) and exert an insignificant effect on the water color. Skelkvale, B.L., J.L. Stoddard, D.S. Jeffries, K. Torseth, T. Hogasen, J. Bowman, L. Mannio, Monteith, D.T., et al. 2005. Regional scale evidence for improvements in surface water chemistry 1990-2001. Environmental Pollution 137(1): 165-176. Moiseenko, T., L. Kudrjavzeva, I. Rodyshkin. 2001. The episodic acidification of small streams in the spring flood period of industrial polar region, Russia. Chemosphere 362: 45-50.

  8. PREFACE: Quantum Dot 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert A.

    2010-09-01

    Zrenner (Paderborn University, Germany) International Programme Committee: Alexander Eychmüller (TU Dresden, Germany) Jonathan Finley (TU Munich, Germany) Dan Gammon (NRL, Washington, USA) Alexander Govorov (Ohio University, USA) Neil Greenham (Cavendish Laboratory, UK) Vladimir Korenev (Ioffe Institute, Russia) Leo Kouwenhoven (TU Delft, Netherlands) Wolfgang Langbein (Cardiff University, UK) Xavier Marie (CNRS Toulouse, France) David Ritchie (Cambridge, UK) Andrew Sachrajda (IMS, Ottawa, Canada) Katerina Soulantica (University of Toulouse, France) Seigo Tarucha (University of Tokyo, Japan) Carlos Tejedor (UAM, Madrid, Spain) Euijoon Yoon (Seoul National University, Korea) Ulrike Woggon (Tu Berlin, Germany) Proceedings edited and compiled by Profesor Robert A Taylor, University of Oxford

  9. The magnetic flux excess effect as a consequence of non-Parker radial evolution of interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The “magnetic flux excess” effect is exceeding of magnetic flux Fs=4π|Br|r2 measured by distant spacecraft over the values obtained through measurements at the Earth’s orbit (Owens et al., JGR, 2008). Theoretically, its conservation should take place at any heliocentric distance r further than 10 solar radii, which means that the difference between the flux measured at 1 AU and Fs observed in another point in the heliosphere should be zero. However, the difference is negative closer to the Sun and increasingly positive at larger heliocentric distances. Possible explanations of this effect are continuously discussed, but the consensus is yet not reached.It is shown that a possible source of this effect is the solar wind expansion not accordingly with the Parker solution at least at low heliolatitudes. The difference between the experimentally found (r-5/3) and commonly used (r-2) radial dependence of the radial component of the IMF Br may lead to mistakes in the IMF point-to-point recalculations (Khabarova & Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). Using the observed Br (r) dependence, it is easy to find the variation of difference between the magnetic flux Fs(r) at certain heliocentric distance r and Fs_1AU at 1 AU, which can be calculated as Fs(r)-Fs_1AU =4π·(B1AU /[1AU]-5/3) (r2-5/3 -[1AU]2-5/3) (Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013).The possible influence of presence of the heliospheric current sheet near the ecliptic plane on the picture of magnetic field lines and consequent deviation from the Parker's model is discussed.- Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf- Olga V. Khabarova, The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013, Vol. 57, No. 11, pp. 844-859, http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1305/1305.1204.pdf

  10. Non-linear processes in the Earth atmosphere boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, Lubov; Valery, Isakevich; Dmitry, Rubay

    2013-04-01

    The work is connected with studying electromagnetic fields in the resonator Earth-Ionosphere. There is studied the interconnection of tide processes of geophysical and astrophysical origin with the Earth electromagnetic fields. On account of non-linear property of the resonator Earth-Ionosphere the tides (moon and astrophysical tides) in the electromagnetic Earth fields are kinds of polyharmonic nature. It is impossible to detect such non-linear processes with the help of the classical spectral analysis. Therefore to extract tide processes in the electromagnetic fields, the method of covariance matrix eigen vectors is used. Experimental investigations of electromagnetic fields in the atmosphere boundary layer are done at the distance spaced stations, situated on Vladimir State University test ground, at Main Geophysical Observatory (St. Petersburg), on Kamchatka pen., on Lake Baikal. In 2012 there was continued to operate the multichannel synchronic monitoring system of electrical and geomagnetic fields at the spaced apart stations: VSU physical experimental proving ground; the station of the Institute of Solar and Terrestrial Physics of Russian Academy of Science (RAS) at Lake Baikal; the station of the Institute of volcanology and seismology of RAS in Paratunka; the station in Obninsk on the base of the scientific and production society "Typhoon". Such investigations turned out to be possible after developing the method of scanning experimental signal of electromagnetic field into non- correlated components. There was used a method of the analysis of the eigen vectors ofthe time series covariance matrix for exposing influence of the moon tides on Ez. The method allows to distribute an experimental signal into non-correlated periodicities. The present method is effective just in the situation when energetical deposit because of possible influence of moon tides upon the electromagnetic fields is little. There have been developed and realized in program components

  11. Welcome to the 21st International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    Dear Participants and Guests On behalf of the Rector's Office, welcome to St. Petersburg University, one of the oldest, largest and most prestigious universities in Russia. The 12 Colleges Building (named after the Collegia of Peter the Great's time, Ministries in the modern sense of the word) has been home to the University since 1804. St. Petersburg State University is the successor of the first Russian University founded by Peter the Great on 24 January 1724. It's distinguished faculty members include mathematicians Chebyshev and Smirnov, physicists Lenz and Fock, chemists Mendeleev and Butlerov, embryologist Kovalevsky, and physiologist Sechenov. Several of our alumni won Nobel Prizes - Pavlov, Semenov, Kantorovich, Landau and Prokhorov. The University is the alma mater of two presidents of Russia, Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Medvedev. St. Petersburg State University today consists of 19 faculties on two campuses: in the historic downtown, on Vasilyevsky Island, and in Peterhof. The Faculty of Physics carries out research projects through the efforts of 260 employees, of which 150 hold doctoral degrees, and 50 have been awarded Grand Doctorates. The work is done in a vast variety of areas, from the physics of elementary particles to the physics of the atmosphere. Optics and spectroscopy has been a particularly significant area of research. This field of inquiry goes back to the work of Academician D S Rozhdestvensky more than 70 years ago, when he first suggested his famous hook method. After him the work was headed by S Frisch, corresponding member of the Academy of Sciences and editor-in-chief of Optics and Spectroscopy Journal. Today research projects in optics involve over 50 staff members, graduate and post-graduate students. Work involves projects on spectroscopy of cold and hot plasma, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, non-linear spectroscopy and spectroscopic analysis. Our scholars support active international ties with their colleagues worldwide. The

  12. Spatio-temporally resolved diagnostics of the barrier discharge by cross-correlation spectroscopy in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Hans-Erich

    2002-10-01

    The technique of spatially resolved cross-correlation spectroscopy (CCS) is used to carry out diagnostic measurements of the barrier discharge (BD) in air at atmospheric pressure.(Kozlov K V, Wagner H-E, Brandenburg R, Michel P 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 3164-3176.) (Kozlov K V, Dobryakov V V, Monyakin A P, Samoilovich V G, Shepeliuk O S, and Wagner H-E, Brandenburg R, Michel P 2002 in: Selected Research Papers on Spectroscopy of Nonequilibrium Plasma at Elevated Pressures, Vladimir N. Ochkin, Editor, Proceedings of SPIE vol. 4460, 165-176 Washington (USA).) Quantitative estimates for the electric field strength E(x,t) and for relative electron density n_e(x,t)/ne max are derived from the experimentally determined spatio-temporal distributions of the luminosity for the spectral bands of the 00 transitions of the second positive system of N2 (λ =337.1 nm) and the first negative system of N_2^+ (λ =391.5 nm). All the measurements and calculations have been performed for a BD with the symmetrical electrode arrangement (glass - glass), discharge gap width of 1.2 mm, in flowing synthetic air (80 % N2 + 20 % O_2) at atmospheric pressure. It is shown that the streamer starts directly from the surface of the anode and crosses the gap with an increasing velocity that reaches 10^6 m/s. The reduced electric field of the streamer grows from 120 Td at the anode to 240 Td at the cathode, respectively. The influence of the spatio-temporal structure of the discharge on the chemical kinetics of ozone synthesis is studied within the frame of the kinetic model based on the results of spatially resolved CCS measurements. It is demonstrated that the properties of the plasma in the region near the anode (where the electric field is lower but electron density is higher than near the cathode), favor dissociation of molecular oxygen by direct electron impact. In the case of the excitation of triplet nitrogen states, the contributions of both regions to this process appear to be

  13. Superregular solitonic solutions: a novel scenario for the nonlinear stage of modulation instability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelash, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    The superregular solitonic solutions, recently discovered by Vladimir E. Zakharov and Andrey A. Gelash [1], is an important scenario of modulation instability in the frame of the one-dimensional focusing Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation (NLSE). This 2N-solitonic solutions describes the evolution of a broad class of an initial plane wave (a condensate) small localized perturbations. Recently we have generalized the theory to the degenerate case [2]. Here we discuss the possibility of their experimental observation. We present the most appropriate solution parameters for hydrodynamics and optics. However, the self-consistent theory of modulation instability should describes the evolution of arbitrary initial condensate perturbations. In the second part of this work we present the next step toward the full theory. The famous Peregrine soliton [3] is an another example of the NLSE solutions which describes a very special but important nonlinear scenario of modulation instability. Nowadays multi-solitonic generalizations are known [4,5]. These rational solutions describe waves of extremely high amplitude - the so-called "freak waves". They appear from small localized perturbations, reach at least three condensate amplitude and then vanish. Physically there are always additional noise exists. Its solitonic spectrum part is described by superregular solutions. We construct N-solitonic solution on the Peregrine background by using the dressing method. It is a very useful tool allows to study nonlinear interactions of the Peregrine soliton with Kuznetsov soliton, Akhmediev breather, superregular solutions or any other N-solitonic solution without applying of the L'Hopital rule for each solution (the L'Hopital rule applies only once to construct the dressing). In conclusion we demonstrate and discuss an explicit scenario of superregular and rational solutions simultaneous development. References 1. V. E. Zakharov and A. A. Gelash. Nonlinear Stage of Modulation Instability

  14. Preservation of Near-Earth Space for Future Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John A.

    2007-05-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Introduction J. A. Simpson; Part II. Defining the Problem: 2. The Earth satellite population: official growth and constituents Nicholas L. Johnson; 3. The current and future environment: an overall assessment Donald J. Kessler; 4. The current and future space debris environment as assessed in Europe Dietrich Rex; 5. Human survivability issues in the low Earth orbit space debris environment Bernard Bloom; 6. Protecting the space environment for astronomy Joel R. Primack; 7. Effects of space debris on commercial spacecraft - the RADARSAT example H. Robert Warren and M. J. Yelle; 8. Potential effects of the space debris environment on military space systems Albert E. Reinhardt; Part III. Mitigation of and Adaptation to the Space Environment: Techniques and Practices: 9. Precluding post-launch fragmentation of delta stages Irvin J. Webster and T. Y. Kawamura; 10. US international and interagency cooperation in orbital debris Daniel V. Jacobs; 11. ESA concepts for space debris mitigation and risk reduction Heiner Klinkrad; 12. Space debris: how France handles mitigation and adaptation Jean-Louis Marcé; 13. Facing seriously the issue of protection of the outer space environment Qi Yong Liang; 14. Space debris - mitigation and adaptation U. R. Rao; 15. Near Earth space contamination and counteractions Vladimir F. Utkin and S. V. Chekalin; 16. The current and future space debris environment as assessed in Japan Susumu Toda; 17. Orbital debris minimization and mitigation techniques Joseph P. Loftus Jr, Philip D. Anz-Meador and Robert Reynolds; Part IV. Economic Issues: 18. In pursuit of a sustainable space environment: economic issues in regulating space debris Molly K. Macauley; 19. The economics of space operations: insurance aspects Christopher T. W. Kunstadter; Part V. Legal Issues: 20. Environmental treatymaking: lessons learned for controlling pollution of outer space Winfried Lang; 21. Regulation of orbital

  15. Metformin and cancer: doses, mechanisms and the dandelion and hormetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Menendez, Javier A

    2010-03-15

    In the early 1970s, Professor Vladimir Dilman originally developed the idea that antidiabetic biguanides may be promising as geroprotectors and anticancer drugs ("metabolic rehabilitation").  In the early 2000s, Anisimov´s experiments revealed that chronic treatment of female transgenic HER2-/neu mice with metformin significantly reduced the incidence and size of mammary adenocarcinomas and increased the mean latency of the tumors.  Epidemiological studies have confirmed that metformin, but not other anti-diabetic drugs, significantly reduces cancer incidence and improves cancer patients' survival in type 2 diabetics.  At present, pioneer work by Dilman & Anisimov at the Petrov Institute of Oncology (St. Petersburg, Russia) is rapidly evolving due to ever-growing preclinical studies using human tumor-derived cultured cancer cells and animal models. We herein critically review how the antidiabetic drug metformin is getting reset to metabolically fight cancer. Our current perception is that metformin may constitute a novel "hybrid anti-cancer pill" physically combining both the long-lasting effects of antibodies -by persistently lowering levels of blood insulin and glucose- and the immediate potency of a cancer cell-targeting molecular agent -by suppressing the pivotal AMPK/mTOR/S6K1 axis and several protein kinases at once, including tyrosine kinase receptors such as HER1 and HER2-.  In this scenario, we discuss the relevance of metformin doses in pre-clinical models regarding metformin's mechanisms of action in clinical settings. We examine recent landmark studies demonstrating metformin's ability to specifically target the cancer-initiating stem cells from which tumor cells develop, thereby preventing cancer relapse when used in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy (dandelion hypothesis).  We present the notion that, by acting as an efficient caloric restriction mimetic, metformin enhanced intrinsic capacity of mitotically competent cells to self

  16. The Russian Federation's Ministry of Atomic Energy: Programs and Developments

    SciTech Connect

    CM Johnson

    2000-07-24

    This paper reviews select programs driving the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation's (Minatom) efforts to raise funds, comments on their potential viability, and highlights areas likely to be of particular concern for the US over the next three to five years. The paper's findings are: (1) Despite numerous cabinet displacements throughout the Yeltsin administration, Yevgeny Adamov was reappointed Minister on four occasions. With Boris Yeltsin's January 1, 2000 resignation, Adamov's long-term position as the head of the Ministry is more tenuous, but he will likely retain his position until at least the March 2000 elections. Acting President Vladimir Putin is unlikely to reorganize his cabinet prior to that date and there are no signs that Putin is dissatisfied with Adamov's leadership of Minatom. (2) Adamov's chief priorities are downsizing Minatom's defense sector, increasing the oversight of subsidiary bodies by the central bureaucracy and consolidating commercial elements of the Ministry within an umbrella organization called Atomprom. (3) Viktor Mikhaylov, Adamov's predecessor and critic of his reform efforts, has been relieved of his duties as First Deputy Minister. While he retains his positions as Chief of the Science Councils and Chief Scientist at Arzamas-16, his influence on Minatom's direction is greatly diminished. Adamov will likely continue his efforts to further marginalize Mikhaylov in the coming year. (4) Securing extra-budgetary sources of income continues to be the major factor guiding Minatom's international business dealings. The Ministry will continue to aggressively promote the sale of nuclear technology abroad, often to countries with questionable nonproliferation commitments. (5) Given the financial difficulties in Russia and Minatom's client states, however, few nuclear development programs will come to fruition for a number of years, if ever. Nevertheless, certain peaceful nuclear cooperation agreements should be carefully

  17. In silico regulatory analysis for exploring human disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Dustin T; Kon, Mark; DeLisi, Charles

    2008-01-01

    develop classifiers for the determination of new regulatory targets. Many predicted targets are consistent with the known biology of their regulators, and new targets for the Wilms' tumor regulator, WT1, are proposed. We speculate that Wilms' tumor development is mediated by chromosomal rearrangements in the location of WT1 targets. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Trey Ideker, Vladimir A. Kuznetsov(nominated by Frank Eisenhaber), and Tzachi Pilpel. PMID:18564415

  18. Assessing different turbulence close schemes in the North Aegean: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamoutos, Ioannis; Zervakis, Vassilis; Tragou, Elina

    2015-04-01

    The North Aegean Sea potentially constitutes one of the deep-water formation sites of the Mediterranean Sea. The production of deep water however is highly controlled by the inflow of Black Sea waters forming a thin insulating surface layer over a large part of the region. For this reason, extensive replenishment of the deeper-than-400 m basins takes place infrequently, at intervals several years long. After the recorded major deep water formation events of 1987, 1992 and 1993, several smaller magnitude formation events have been observed in the 2000s. Long stagnation periods separate successive formation events, during which turbulent exchange through the interface between the deep, secluded locally-formed water mass and the overlaid, laterally flowing water masses is the major factor determining the evolution of the deep-layer properties. In this work we test different diapycnal mixing schemes via comparing the results of long-term hindcasts of the evolution of the deep-layer properties to successive observations in three deep basins of the North Aegean. The Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) was used for the hindcasts. All the available turbulence closure schemes - KPP, GLS and Mellor - Yamada 2.5 - were used for the experiments. A rectangular grid covering the Aegean sea was developed (longitudinal range: 22.50 E - 28.37 E, latitudinal range: 36.43 N - 41.12 N) with a 1/40 degree ( ~ 2.5 km ) resolution in both directions and 30 vertical sigma layers. The initial and boundary conditions used refer to the 1985 - 2013 period, and have been provided by GNOO. Atmospheric forcing fields from ERA - interim data set were used with spatial resolution 0.5 × 0.5 degrees and three-hour time step. The Black-sea water inflow is temporally variable and has been provided by Vladimir Maderich based on Black and Marmara Sea budgets and hydraulic control at Bosphorus and Dardanelles Straits. The preliminary results of the numerical experiments are hereby presented and discussed

  19. EDITORIAL: Five years of development and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-02-01

    , Andrew Harmer, Elizabeth Martin, Claire Bedrock (née Blay), Joanna Dingley and Martin Beavis from Institute of Physics Publishing in Bristol, to all Members of the Editorial Board, including the Deputy Editors Neal B Abraham and Vladimir Man’ko, and to Margarita Man’ko and Ling An Wu of the IOP Editorial Offices in Moscow and Beijing, respectively, who have channelled manuscripts to the journal from their countries. I conclude with best wishes to the new Editor-in-Chief, Wulf Lange, of Universitat Münster and to the journal as it experiences further expansion by moving to a monthly publication.

  20. The Standard Time of Nature (STON) as the base for classification of the anisotropy phenomena of the Imbalance of Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, V. A.; Shlafman, L. M.

    2013-05-01

    personified thinking of man. Parameter SELF allows to determine the size of the error in description of the phenomena of Nature for the personalization. Some references: Vladimir A Kontar, Federal GEOS Funding, US: 1.What is Imbalance of Nature? 2.The Imbalance of Water in Nature as System. 3.Imbalanced Logic as the next level development of science. 4.The relativity of the self-individualized anisotropy in the Imbalance of Nature.

  1. Extreme QCD 2012 (xQCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    university Nicholson, Amy University of Maryland Nishida, Yusuke Los Alamos National Laboratory Petreczky, Peter Brookhaven National Laboratory Sakai, Yuji RIKEN Sasaki, Takahiro Kyushu University Schmidt, Christian University of Bielefeld Scorzato, Luigi ECT* - Trento, Italy Shi, Zhifeng The College of William and Mary Shuryak, Edward Stony Brook University Skokov, Vladimir Brookhaven National Laboratory Strickland, Michael Gettysburg College Teaney, Derek Stony Brook University Wang, Qun University of Science and Technology of China Xu, Nu CCNU/LBNL Xu, Xiao-Ming Shanghai University Yamamoto, Naoki Institute for Nuclear Theory Conference photograph

  2. Genomics, molecular imaging, bioinformatics, and bio-nano-info integration are synergistic components of translational medicine and personalized healthcare research.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping

    2008-01-01

    Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, IEEE 7th Bioinformatics and Bioengineering attracted more than 600 papers and 500 researchers and medical doctors. It was the only synergistic inter/multidisciplinary IEEE conference with 24 Keynote Lectures, 7 Tutorials, 5 Cutting-Edge Research Workshops and 32 Scientific Sessions including 11 Special Research Interest Sessions that were designed dynamically at Harvard in response to the current research trends and advances. The committee was very grateful for the IEEE Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Jun Liu (Harvard), Dr. Brian Athey (Michigan), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech and President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid Arabnia (Georgia and Vice-President of ISIBM), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (Berkeley and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Andy Baxevanis (United States National Institutes of Health), Dr. Arif Ghafoor (Purdue), Dr. John Quackenbush (Harvard), Dr. Eric Jakobsson (UIUC), Dr. Vladimir Uversky (Indiana), Dr. Laura Elnitski (United States National Institutes of Health) and other world-class scientific leaders. The Harvard meeting was a large academic event 100% full-sponsored by IEEE financially and academically. After a rigorous peer-review process, the committee selected 27 high-quality research papers from 600 submissions. The committee is grateful for contributions from keynote speakers Dr. Russ Altman (IEEE BIBM conference keynote lecturer on combining simulation and machine

  3. Structure and condition of soil-vegetation cover in the Klyazma river basin applying remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Repkin, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Constant observation of vegetation and soil cover is one of the key issues of river basins ecologic monitoring. It is necessary to consider that observation objects have been continuously changing and these changes are comprehensive and depend on temporal and dimensional parameters. Remote sensing data, embracing vast areas and reflecting various interrelations, allow excluding accidental and short-term changes though concentrating on the transformation of the observed river basin ecosystem environmental condition. The research objective is to assess spatial-temporal peculiarities of soil-vegetation structure formation in the Klyazma basin as a whole and minor river basins within the area. Research objects are located in the centre of European Russia. Data used in our research include both statistic and published data, characterizing soil-vegetation cover of the area, space images Landsat. Research methods: Remote data analysis for assessing land utilization structure and soil-vegetation condition according to NDVI. Laying soil-geobotanic landscape profiles river valleys slopes. Phytomass reserve, phytoproductivity, soil fertility characteristics assessment. NDVI computation for each image pixel helped to map general condition of the Klyazma vegetation cover and to determine geographic ranges without vegetation or with depressed vegetation. For instance high vegetation index geographic range has been defined which corresponded to Vladimir Opolye characterized with the most fertile grey forest soil in the region. Comparative assessment of soil vegetation cover of minor river basins within the Klyazma basin, judging by the terrestrial data, revealed its better condition in the Koloksha basin which is also located in the area of grey forest soil. Besides here the maximum value of vegetation index for all phytocenosis was detected. In the research the most dynamically changing parts of the Klyazma basin have been determined according to NDVI dynamics analysis

  4. Health-systems efficiency in the Russian Federation: tuberculosis control.

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Katherine; Hutubessy, Raymond; Samyshkin, Yevgeniy; Korobitsyn, Alexei; Fedorin, Ivan; Volchenkov, Gregory; Kazeonny, Boris; Coker, Richard; Drobniewski, Francis; Jakubowiak, Wieslaw; Shilova, Margarita; Atun, Rifat A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a comprehensive assessment of the case-mix of patients admitted to tuberculosis hospitals and the reasons for their admission in four Russian regions: Ivanovo, Orel, Samara and Vladimir. We also sought to quantify the extent to which efficiency could be improved by reducing hospitalization rates and re-profiling hospital beds available in the tuberculosis-control system. METHODS: We used a standard questionnaire to determine how beds were being used and who was using the beds in tuberculosis facilities in four Russian regions. Data were collected to determine how 4306 tuberculosis beds were utilized as well as on the socioeconomic and demographic indicators, clinical parameters and reasons for hospitalization for 3352 patients. FINDINGS: Of the 3352 patients surveyed about 70% were male; the average age was 40; and rates of unemployment, disability and alcohol misuse were high. About one-third of beds were occupied by smear-positive or culture-positive tuberculosis patients; 20% were occupied by tuberculosis patients who were smear-negative and/or culture-negative; 20% were occupied by patients who no longer had tuberculosis; and 20% were unoccupied. If clinical and public health admission criteria were applied then < 50% of admissions would be justified and < 50% of the current number of beds would be required. Up to 85% of admissions and beds were deemed to be necessary when social problems and poor access to outpatient care were considered along with clinical and public health admission criteria. CONCLUSION: Much of the Russian Federation's large tuberculosis hospital infrastructure is unnecessary when clinical and public health criteria are used, but the large hospital infrastructure within the tuberculosis-control system has an important social support function. Improving the efficiency of the system will require the reform of health-system norms and regulations as they relate to resource allocation and clinical care and implementation of

  5. PREFACE: 2nd Russia-Japan-USA Symposium on the Fundamental and Applied Problems of Terahertz Devices and Technologies (RJUS TeraTech - 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Valeriy; Ryzhii, Viktor; Yurchenko, Stanislav

    2014-03-01

    Kirova, University Paris-Sud, France Andrei Sergeev, Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Buffalo, The State University of New Your, Buffalo, NY, USA Magnus Willander, Linkoping University (LIU), Department of Science and Technology, Linkopings, Sweden Dmitry R Khohlov, Physical Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia Vladimir L Vaks, Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

  6. PREFACE: XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics (17-21 September 2007, Caracas, Venezuela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerta, Julio

    2008-10-01

    Deutsch, Ricardo Galvao, Carlos Hidalgo, Paulo Sakanaka, Konosuke Sato, Malcom Haines and Maher Boulos. The general feeling is that these mini-courses were very successful. As an original idea of Professor Ricardo Magnus Osorio Galvão, Director of Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, we saluted the creation of The Vladimir Tsypin Award to the best Poster in the meeting. This prize was presented by Professor Galvão in memoriam of Vladimir Semenovich Tsypin. It was suggested that the granting of this award be made in every meeting from now on. We think that it is very important to emphasise the mini-courses due to the necessity of increasing in the near future a better formation for our young scientists. The contributions of all the lecturers are greatly appreciated. We had the typical fields in plasma physics as in past meetings. We also appreciated very much the lectures of Professor Malcolm Haines, Professor Sergey Popel, Professor Claude Deutsch, and Professor Antony Peratt for their very interesting talks on the Z-Pinch recorded to prehistory. Special thanks again to these lecturers since they have joined and honoured our meetings in the past as well. As in the VII LAWPP, all the sessions of the workshop were held at the Universidad Simon Bolivar campus, located in the nice green Valley of Sartenejas near Caracas. We also appreciate the stimulus and the financial support that we have always had for the preparation of these workshops from our institution by means of its authorities: Professor Benjamin Sharifker (Rector), Professor Aura Lopez (Dean of Academic Activities), (Professor Jose Luis Paz (Dean of Research and Development), Professor Pedro Berrisbeitia (Dean of Postgraduate Studies) and Professor William Colmenares (Dean of Extended Activities). We must also mention and appreciate the collaboration of architect Alejandro Chataing Roncajolo as Secretary and Coordinator of the Congress, as well as the daily important collaborations of our students Anais M

  7. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    season weather in Kazakhstan C K Wright, K M de Beurs, Z K Akhmadieva, P Y Groisman and G M Henebry Climate change in Inner Mongolia from 1955 to 2005—trends at regional, biome and local scales N Lu, B Wilske, J Ni, R John and J Chen Application of the Snowmelt Runoff model in the Kuban river basin using MODIS satellite images M V Georgievsky Record Russian river discharge in 2007 and the limits of analysis A I Shiklomanov and R B Lammers Paleoclimatic reconstructions for the south of Valdai Hills (European Russia) as paleo-analogs of possible regional vegetation changes under global warming E Novenko, A Olchev, O Desherevskaya and I Zuganova Diagnosis of the record discharge of Arctic-draining Eurasian rivers in 2007 Michael A Rawlins, Mark C Serreze, Ronny Schroeder, Xiangdong Zhang and Kyle C McDonald Studies of the cryosphere in Northern Eurasia Groundwater storage changes in arctic permafrost watersheds from GRACE and in situ measurements Reginald R Muskett and Vladimir E Romanovsky Changes in snow cover over Northern Eurasia in the last few decades O N Bulygina, V N Razuvaev and N N Korshunova Modeling sub-sea permafrost in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf: the Dmitry Laptev Strait D Nicolsky and N Shakhova Snow cover basal ice layer changes over Northern Eurasia since 1966 Olga N Bulygina, Pavel Ya Groisman, Vyacheslav N Razuvaev and Vladimir F Radionov Snow cover and permafrost evolution in Siberia as simulated by the MGO regional climate model in the 20th and 21st centuries I M Shkolnik, E D Nadyozhina, T V Pavlova, E K Molkentin and A A Semioshina Studies of the biosphere in Northern Eurasia The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites A Bartsch, H Balzter and C George Change and persistence in land surface phenologies of the Don and Dnieper river basins V Kovalskyy and G M Henebry Effects of climatic changes on carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in boreal forest ecosystems of European part of

  8. PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazaryan, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Deputy Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Alexander Aseev, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences Director, A V Rzhanov-Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Sergey Bagaev, AcademicianDirector, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexander Gintsburg, Ademician, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDirector Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Grigoryev, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesVice-president, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Michael Kovalchuk, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center, RussiaProf Valery Lunin, AcademicianDean, Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valentin Parmon, Academician, DirectorBoreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Rem Petrov, AcademicianAdvisor, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Konstantin Skryabin, AcademicianDirector, Bioinzheneriya Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vsevolod Tkachuk, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDean, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Vladimir Fortov, AcademicianDirector, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexey Khokhlov, AcademicianVice Principal, Head of Innovation, Information and International Scientific Affairs Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valery Bukhtiyarov, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Physicochemical Research Methods Dept., Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Dvurechensky, RAS Corresponding Member

  9. Sensitivity of ocean model simulation in the coastal ocean to the resolution of the meteorological forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Zatsepin , Valentina Khan, Valery Prostakishin , Tatiana Akivis , Vladimir Belokopytov , Anton Sviridov , and Vladimir Piotukh . 2011. Response of water temperature in the Black Sea to atmospheric forcing: the sensitivity study. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 13, EGU2011-933

  10. Editorial: Focus on Dynamics and Thermalization in Isolated Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalilla, M. A.; Rigol, M.

    2010-05-01

    understand many-body quantum systems. This focus issue of New Journal Physics brings together both experimentalists and theoreticians working on these problems to provide a comprehensive picture of the state of the field. Focus on Dynamics and Thermalization in Isolated Quantum Many-Body Systems Contents Spin squeezing of high-spin, spatially extended quantum fields Jay D Sau, Sabrina R Leslie, Marvin L Cohen and Dan M Stamper-Kurn Thermodynamic entropy of a many-body energy eigenstate J M Deutsch Ground states and dynamics of population-imbalanced Fermi condensates in one dimension Masaki Tezuka and Masahito Ueda Relaxation dynamics in the gapped XXZ spin-1/2 chain Jorn Mossel and Jean-Sébastien Caux Canonical thermalization Peter Reimann Minimally entangled typical thermal state algorithms E M Stoudenmire and Steven R White Manipulation of the dynamics of many-body systems via quantum control methods Julie Dinerman and Lea F Santos Multimode analysis of non-classical correlations in double-well Bose-Einstein condensates Andrew J Ferris and Matthew J Davis Thermalization in a quasi-one-dimensional ultracold bosonic gas I E Mazets and J Schmiedmayer Two simple systems with cold atoms: quantum chaos tests and non-equilibrium dynamics Cavan Stone, Yassine Ait El Aoud, Vladimir A Yurovsky and Maxim Olshanii On the speed of fluctuations around thermodynamic equilibrium Noah Linden, Sandu Popescu, Anthony J Short and Andreas Winter A quantum central limit theorem for non-equilibrium systems: exact local relaxation of correlated states M Cramer and J Eisert Quantum quench dynamics of the sine-Gordon model in some solvable limits A Iucci and M A Cazalilla Nonequilibrium quantum dynamics of atomic dark solitons A D Martin and J Ruostekoski Quantum quenches in the anisotropic spin-1⁄2 Heisenberg chain: different approaches to many-body dynamics far from equilibrium Peter Barmettler, Matthias Punk, Vladimir Gritsev, Eugene Demler and Ehud Altman Crossover from adiabatic to sudden

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  12. From Crisis to Transition: The State of Russian Science Based on Focus Groups with Nuclear Physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, T P; Ball, D Y

    2001-12-09

    The collapse of the Soviet system led to a sharp contraction of state funding for science. Formerly privileged scientists suddenly confronted miserly salaries (often paid late), plummeting social prestige, deteriorating research facilities and equipment, and few prospects for improvement. Many departed the field of science for more lucrative opportunities, both within Russia and abroad. The number of inventions, patent applications, and publications by Russian scientists declined. Reports of desperate nuclear physicists seeking work as tram operators and conducting hunger strikes dramatized the rapid collapse of one of the contemporary world's most successful scientific establishments. Even more alarming was the 1996 suicide of Vladimir Nechai, director of the second largest nuclear research center in Russia (Chelyabinsk-70, now known as Snezhinsk). Nechai, a respected theoretical physicist who spent almost 40 years working on Soviet and Russian nuclear programs, killed himself because he could no longer endure his inability to rectify a situation in which his employees had not been paid for more than 5 months and were ''close to starvation.'' The travails of Russia's scientists sparked interest in the West primarily because of the security threat posed by their situation. The seemingly relentless crisis in science raised fears that disgruntled scientists might sell their nuclear weapons expertise to countries or organizations that harbor hostile intentions toward the United States. Such concerns are particularly pressing in the wake of the September 2001 terrorist attacks in the US. At the same time, we should not overlook other critical implications that the state of Russian science has for Russia's long-term economic and political development. It is in the West's interest to see Russia develop a thriving market economy and stable democracy. A successful scientific community can help on both counts. Science and technology can attract foreign investment and fuel

  13. LPHYS'13: 22nd International Laser Physics Workshop (Prague, 15-19 July 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyev, Alexander V.

    2013-04-01

    The 22nd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'13) will be held from 15-19 July 2013 in the city of Prague, Czech Republic, at the Hotel Krystal and Czech Technical University hosted this year by the Institute of Physics ASCR and Czech Technical University in Prague. LPHYS'13 continues a series of workshops that took place in Dubna, 1992; Dubna/Volga river tour, 1993; New York, 1994; Moscow/Volga river tour (jointly with NATO SILAP Workshop), 1995; Moscow, 1996; Prague, 1997; Berlin, 1998; Budapest, 1999; Bordeaux, 2000; Moscow, 2001; Bratislava, 2002; Hamburg, 2003; Trieste, 2004; Kyoto, 2005; Lausanne, 2006; León, 2007; Trondheim, 2008; Barcelona, 2009; Foz do Iguaçu, 2010; Sarajevo, 2011; and Calgary, 2012. The total number of participants this year is expected to be about 400. In the past, annual participation was typically from over 30 countries. 2013 Chairmen: Miroslav Jelinek (Czech Republic) and Pavel P Pashinin (Russia) LPHYS'13 will offer eight scientific section seminars and one general symposium: Seminar 1 Modern Trends in Laser Physics Seminar 2 Strong Field & Attosecond Physics Seminar 3 Biophotonics Seminar 4 Physics of Lasers Seminar 5 Nonlinear Optics & Spectroscopy Seminar 6 Physics of Cold Trapped Atoms Seminar 7 Quantum Information Science Seminar 8 Fiber Optics Symposium Extreme Light Technologies, Science and Applications Abstract of your presentation A one-page abstract should contain: title; list of all co-authors (the name of the speaker underlined); affiliations; correspondence addresses including phone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail addresses; and the text of the abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the following co-chairs of the scientific seminars and the symposium: Kirill A Prokhorov (Seminar 1) E-mail: cyrpro@gpi.ru Mikhail V Fedorov (Seminar 2) E-mail: fedorov@ran.gpi.ru Sergey A Gonchukov (Seminar 3) E-mail: gonchukov@mephi.ru Ivan A Shcherbakov (Seminar 4) E-mail: gbufetova@lsk.gpi.ru Vladimir A Makarov (Seminar 5) E

  14. Soil cover patterns and SOC dynamics impacts on the soil processes, land management and ecosystem services in Central Region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Chernikov, Vladimir; Yashin, Ivan; Geraskin, Mikhail; Morev, Dmitriy

    2014-05-01

    In the Central Region of Russia (CRR) the soil cover patterns usually play the very important role in the soil forming and degradation processes (SFP & SDP) potential and current rates, soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and pools, greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and soluble SOC fluxes that we need take into attention for better assessment of the natural and especially man-changed ecosystems' services and for best land-use practices development. Central Region of Russia is the biggest one in RF according to its population and role in the economy. CRR is characterized by high spatial variability of soil cover due to as original landscape heterogeneity as complicated history of land-use practices during last 700 years. Our long-term researches include the wide zonal-provincial set of representative ecosystems and soil cover patterns with different types and history of land-use (forest, meadow-steppe and agricultural ones) from middle-taiga to steppe zones with different level of continentality. The carried out more than 30-years region- and local-scale researches of representative natural and rural landscapes in Tver', Yaroslavl', Kaluga, Moscow, Vladimir, Saransk (Mordovia), Kursk, Orel, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov oblasts give us the interregional multi-factorial matrix of elementary soil cover patterns (ESCP) with different soil forming and degradation processes rates and soil organic carbon dynamics due to regionally specific soil-geomorphologic features, environmental and dominated microclimate conditions, land-use current practices and history. The validation and ranging of the limiting factors of SFP and SDP develop¬ment, soil carbon dynamics and sequestration potential, ecosystem (agroecosystem) principal services, land functional qualities and agroecological state have been done for dominating and most dynamical components of ESCP regional-typological forms - with application of SOC structure analysis, regional and local GIS, soil spatial patterns detail

  15. Introduction and Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech; Hussin, Véronique; Piette, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    This volume contains contributions to the XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics, the GROUP 28 conference, which took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. All plenary and contributed papers have undergone an independent review; as a result of this review and the decisions of the Editorial Board most but not all of the contributions were accepted. The volume is organised as follows: it starts with notes in memory of Marcos Moshinsky, followed by contributions related to the Wigner Medal and Hermann Weyl prize. Then the invited talks at the plenary sessions and the public lecture are published followed by contributions in the parallel and poster sessions in alphabetical order. The Editors:Maia Angelova, Wojciech Zakrzewski, Véronique Hussin and Bernard Piette International Advisory Committee Michael BaakeUniversity of Bielefeld, Germany Gerald DunneUniversity of Connecticut, USA J F (Frank) GomesUNESP, Sao Paolo, Brazil Peter HanggiUniversity of Augsburg, Germany Jeffrey C LagariasUniversity of Michigan, USA Michael MackeyMcGill University, Canada Nicholas MantonCambridge University, UK Alexei MorozovITEP, Moscow, Russia Valery RubakovINR, Moscow, Russia Barry SandersUniversity of Calgary, Canada Allan SolomonOpen University, Milton Keynes, UK Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Standing Committee Twareque AliConcordia University, Canada Luis BoyaSalamanca University, Spain Enrico CeleghiniFirenze University, Italy Vladimir DobrevBulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria Heinz-Dietrich DoebnerHonorary Member, Clausthal University, Germany Jean-Pierre GazeauChairman, Paris Diderot University, France Mo-Lin GeNankai University. China Gerald GoldinRutgers University, USA Francesco IachelloYale University, USA Joris Van der JeugtGhent University, Belgium Richard KernerPierre et Marie Curie University, France Piotr KielanowskiCINVESTAV, Mexico Alan KosteleckyIndiana University, USA Mariano del Olmo

  16. Landslide Buries Valley of the Geysers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Geysers are a rare natural phenomena found only in a few places, such as New Zealand, Iceland, the United States (Yellowstone National Park), and on Russia's far eastern Kamchatka Peninsula. On June 3, 2007, one of these rare geyser fields was severely damaged when a landslide rolled through Russia's Valley of the Geysers. The landslide--a mix of mud, melting snow, trees, and boulders--tore a scar on the land and buried a number of geysers, thermal pools, and waterfalls in the valley. It also blocked the Geyser River, causing a new thermal lake to pool upstream. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this infrared-enhanced image on June 11, 2007, a week after the slide. The image shows the valley, the landslide, and the new thermal lake. Even in mid-June, just days from the start of summer, the landscape is generally covered in snow, though the geologically heated valley is relatively snow free. The tree-covered hills are red (the color of vegetation in this false-color treatment), providing a strong contrast to the aquamarine water and the gray-brown slide. According to the Russian News and Information Agency (RIA) [English language], the slide left a path roughly a kilometer and a half (one mile) long and 200 meters (600 feet) wide. Within hours of the landslide, the water in the new lake inundated a number of additional geysers. The geysers directly buried under the landslide now lie under as much as 60 meters (180 feet) of material, according to RIA reports. It is unlikely that the geysers will be able to force a new opening through this thick layer, adds RIA. Among those directly buried is Pervenets (Firstborn), the first geyser found in the valley, in 1941. Other geysers, such as the Bolshoi (Greater) and Maly (Lesser) Geysers, were silenced when buried by water building up behind the new natural dam. According to Vladimir and Andrei Leonov of the Russian Federation Institute of

  17. [Development of orthopedics and founding of the Clinic for Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology in Novi Sad].

    PubMed

    Mikić, Z

    1998-01-01

    development of orthopaedics in this area as it was the first orthopaedic hospital in the country. The first small unit for orthopaedics, as a part of the Surgical Department of the Novi Sad State Hospital, was established in 1937 and led by a surgeon, Dr. Nikola Pravdica. Development from the Second World War till the 1980. After the Second World War the Main Provincial Hospital with two surgical departments was established in Novi Sad. At the so-called Second Surgical Department led by Dr. Nestor Teodorovic a small unit for traumatology and orthopaedics was founded in 1946, which functioned as such till 1953. The first properly trained orthopaedic surgeon was Dr. Stojan Letic who passed the specialty exam in 1953 and was attached to the Second Surgical Department of the Main Provincial Hospital. The first independent Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Department, led by an experienced orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Vladimir Razenj, was established in 1956. From 1959 till 1963 the department was led by Prim. Dr. Dobrivoje Gradistanac. In 1963 this department together with the former "English Hospital" at Sremska Kamenica were incorporated into the so-called Clinic for Surgical Diseases and divided in the Orthopaedic (led by Prof. Milenko Dosen) and separated Traumatologic (led by Prim. Stojan Letić) departments which existed as such till 1975 when they were integrated again into a single unit which evolved into the Clinic for Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology in 1980.

  18. Electrochemical oxygen pumps. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J. D. Noble, J.

    2009-10-01

    Lepalovsky; and Translator Vladimir Litvinov. During this trip project participants were to discuss with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and representative of Praxair Inc. J. Chen the results of project activities (prospects of transition metal-doped material application in oxygen pumps), as well as the prospects of cooperation with Praxair at the meeting with the company management in the following fields: (1) Deposition of thin films of oxide materials of complex composition on support by magnetron and ion sputtering, research of coatings properties; (2) Development of block-type structure technology (made of porous and dense ceramics) for oxygen pump. The block-type structure is promising because when the size of electrolyte block is 2 x 2 inches and assembly height is 10 inches (5 blocks connected together) the area of active surface is ca. 290 square inches (in case of 8 slots), that roughly corresponds to one tube with diameter 1 inch and height 100 inches. So performance of the system made of such blocks may be by a factor of two or three higher than that of tube-based system. However one month before the visit, J. Chen notified us of internal changes at Praxair and the cancellation of the visit to Tonawanda, NY. During consultations with the project Technical Monitor J.D. Carter and Senior Project Manager A. Taylor a decision was made to extend the project term by 2 quarters to prepare proposals for follow-on activities during this extension (development of block-type structures made of dense and porous oxide ceramics for electrochemical oxygen pumps) using the funds that were not used for the trip to the US.

  19. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems 2014 (SCES2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    accommodation, the balance between senior and junior physicists was excellent. The weather also collaborated in a sense that the conference week was cooler than usually in July, although participants without umbrellas were often seen crossing the campus at speed! The two SCES prizes sponsored by the Philosophical Magazine to bright young physicists were respectively awarded to Max A. Metlitski (Santa Barbara) for the Mott Prize, and David Leboeuf (Grenoble) for the Coles Prize. The Coqblin Prize for developing SCES physics in emerging countries was given to Andre Strydom (Johannesburg). Of course we would like to thank all the members of the organizing committee of SCES managed by Klaus Hasselbach. During the SCES Conference two of us (JF and GL) remembered that 27 years ago, the late Jean Rossat-Mignod organized the conference ICAREA (1987) before the start of the SCES series. His enthusiasm is still with us. Topics presented at SCES2014 covered the wide area of strong correlations in Condensed Matter Physics. This proceedings volume contains papers reported at the conference, which are structured in 10 sections: S01 Heavy fermions S02 Mott insulators, correlated metals and intermetallics S03 Unconventional superconductors S04 Quantum criticality S05 Exotic ordering S06 Frustrated and quantum magnets S07 Multiferroics S08 Topological aspects S09 Low-dimensional systems and heterostructures S10 Instrumentation and methods The Proceedings of SCES2014 were edited by Mike Zhitomirsky and Pierre Dalmas de Réotier with the assistance of Dai Aoki, Kamran Behnia, Sébastien Burdin, William Knafo, Georg Knebel, Marie-Aude Méasson, Vladimir Mineev, Alexandre Pourret, Virginie Simonet, and Pierre Toulemonde. We are grateful for financial support from CEA, ESRF, ILL, Grenoble Université, and from the city council of Grenoble and the Rhône-Alpes region. Jacques Flouquet and Gerry Lander (Chairmen) Georg Knebel (General Secretary), Daniel Braithwaite (Treasurer)

  20. Soil cover patterns influence on the land environmental functions, agroecological quality, land-use and monitoring efficiency in the Central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Yashin, Ivan; Lukin, Sergey; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    current practice versions. Well-elaborated monitoring collaboration with the principal natural reserves in south-taiga and forest-steppe zones provides process-based interaction with long-term data on zonal climatic, landscape and soil features necessary to test the process, functional and evaluation models in the specific conditions of each bioclimatic zone. The dominated erosion and dehumification trends have been essentially activated for last 3-4 decades due to hu¬mus negative balance around 0.6-0.7 t ha-1year-1 and connected disaggregation with annual rate between 1 and 25 g/kg for aggregates 10-0.25 mm. "Standard" monitoring objects and regionally generalized data showed characteristic for Chernozems 2-2.5 % humus drop during this period and active processes of CO2 emission and humus eluvial-illuvial profile redistribution too. Forest-steppe Chernozems are usually characterized by higher stability than steppe ones. The ratio between erosive and biological losses in humus stock can be ten¬tatively estimated as fifty-fifty with essential variability within slope landscape. Both these processes have essential impacts on different sets of soil environmental and agroecological functions (including atmospheric air, surface and ground water quality, biodiversity and profitability) that we need to understand and predict. A drop of humus content below threshold values (for different soils between 1.5 and 6%) considerably reduces not only soil environmental regulation functions but also effectiveness of used fertilizers, crop yield quality and possibility of sustainable agricultural land-use. The carried out long-term researches of representative natural, rural and urban landscapes in Tver, Yaroslavl, Vladimir, Moscow, Kaluga, Kursk, Belgorod, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov regions give us validation and ranging of the limiting factors of the elementary soil cover patterns current features and transformation processes, environmental functions and agroecological quality

  1. LPHYS'14: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (Sofia, Bulgaria, 14-18 July 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyev, Alexander V.

    2014-04-01

    The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS14) will be held from 14 July to 18 July 2014 in the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, at the Ramada Sofia Hotel hosted this year by the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS14 continues a series of workshops that took place in Dubna,1992; Dubna/Volga river tour, 1993; New York, 1994; Moscow/Volga river tour (jointly with NATO SILAP Workshop), 1995; Moscow, 1996; Prague, 1997; Berlin, 1998; Budapest, 1999; Bordeaux, 2000; Moscow, 2001; Bratislava, 2002; Hamburg, 2003; Trieste, 2004; Kyoto, 2005; Lausanne, 2006; Len, 2007; Trondheim, 2008; Barcelona, 2009; Foz do Iguau, 2010; Sarajevo, 2011; Calgary, 2012 and Prague, 2013. The total number of participants this year is expected to be about 400. In the past, annual participation was typically from over 30 countries. 2014 Chairpersons Sanka Gateva (Bulgaria), Pavel Pashinin (Russia) LPHYS14 will offer eight scientific section seminars and one general symposium: Seminar 1 Modern Trends in Laser Physics Seminar 2 Strong Field and Attosecond Physics Seminar 3 Biophotonics Seminar 4 Physics of Lasers Seminar 5 Nonlinear Optics and Spectroscopy Seminar 6 Physics of Cold Trapped Atoms Seminar 7 Quantum Information Science Seminar 8 Fiber Optics Symposium Extreme Light Technologies, Science and Applications Abstract of your presentation A one-page abstract should contain: title; list of all co-authors (the name of the speaker underlined); affiliations; correspondence addresses including phone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail addresses; and the text of the abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the following co-chairs of the scientific seminars and the symposium: Kirill A Prokhorov (Seminar 1) E-mail: cyrpro@gpi.ru Mikhail V Fedorov (Seminar 2) E-mail: fedorov@ran.gpi.ru Sergey A Gonchukov (Seminar 3) E-mail: gonchukov@mephi.ru Ivan A Shcherbakov (Seminar 4) E-mail: gbufetova@lsk.gpi.ru Vladimir A Makarov (Seminar 5) E-mail: makarov@msu.ilc.edu.ru Vyacheslav

  2. PREFACE: International Workshop on Multi-Rate processes and Hysterisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortell, Michael P.; O'Malley, Robert E.; Pokrovskii, Alexei V.; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2006-12-01

    with an emphasis on hysteresis and singular perturbations; to learn and to share modern techniques in areas of common interest. The `International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis' (University College Cork, Ireland, April 3-8, 2006) brought together more than 50 scientists, actively researching in the areas of dynamical systems with hysteresis and singular perturbations, to analyze these phenomena that occur in many industrial, physical and economic systems. The Workshop has been sponsored by the University College Cork (UCC), the Boole Centre for Research in Informatics, UCC, Cork, the School of Mathematical Sciences UCC, Cork, Science Foundation Ireland and the Irish Mathematical Society. The supportive affiliation of the UK and Republic of Ireland SIAM Section is gratefully acknowledged. The Editors and the Organizers of the Workshop wish to place on record their sincere gratitude to Mr Andrew Zhezherun of University College Cork for both the assistance which he provided to all the presenters at the Workshop, and for the careful formatting of all the manuscripts prior to their being forwarded to the Publisher. More information about the Workshop can be found at http://euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2006.htm Michael P Mortell, Robert E O'Malley, Alexei Pokrovskii and Vladimir Sobolev Editors From left to right: M P Mortell, V Sobolev, R E O'Malley and A Pokrovskii.

  3. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Sans Second Postulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzius, R.

    In 1950, Albert Einstein intimated to Robert Shankland that in the years prior to 1905 he had considered using an emission theory [similar to that which Swiss Physicist Walter Ritz propounded in 1908.] In Ritz's theory the velocity of light with respect to an observer is c + v, where c is the velocity of light with respect to its source, and v is the relative velocity between the source and the observer. Einstein abandoned the c+v approach because he could think of no form of differential equation that could have solutions representing waves whose velocity depended [in part] on the motion of the source. For binary stars the c + v approach would predict "observed" phase relations for light arriving from different parts of a given component's orbit, such that the observed light would be, according to Einstein, all badly "mixed up" and might even "back up on itself." In 1913, the Dutch astronomer, Willem de Sitter, urged abandonment of Ritz's c + v relativity by showing that binary stars failed to provide evidence of the "mixed up" light phasing. (Apparent departures from Keplerian motion, including seeing the same star on opposite sides of its orbit at the same time [at the appropriate observer distance] were predicted by Ritz's c +v relativity.) In 1987, Vladimir Sekerin, at Tomsk University, announced that de Sitter failed to address the fact that for the observer-distances required to produce the star-in-two-places-at-once phenomenon, the angular diameter of the binary component's orbit (from the observer's viewpoint) would be too small for our atmospherically limited earth-borne "seeing" to resolve the images. In essence, de Sitter did not "de throne" Ritz. Sekerin then showed how de Sitter's binary star scenario could be interpreted as evidence "for" the Ritzian theory. (Two images briefly on top of one another will be briefly twice as bright as a single image.) He used de Sitter's equations to analog compute light curves of a number of different kinds variable

  4. Observations of elevated Atlantic water heat fluxes at the boundary of the Arctic Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, Benjamin; Rippeth, Tom; Lenn, Yueng; Bacon, Sheldon

    2014-05-01

    diffusive fluxes. Dissipation rates were enhanced by up to 3 orders of magnitude at the boundaries of the Arctic basin with the highest rates North of Svalbard and decreasing ɛ anticlockwise around the basin with low ɛ in the Canada basin. Enhanced heat fluxes at the boundaries ranged from 10-100 Wm-2 north of Svalbard decreasing to 2-5 Wm-2 along the Laptev shelf slope and less than 0.5 Wm-2 along the East Siberian slope and Lomonosov ridge. In the Canada basin heat fluxes at the boundary were less than 0.2 Wm-2. --- Arctic Ocean Warming Contributes to Reduced Polar Ice Cap Igor V. Polyakov, Leonid A. Timokhov, Vladimir A. Alexeev, Sheldon Bacon, Igor A. Dmitrenko, Louis Fortier, et al. in Journal of Physical Oceanography (2010)

  5. Vladimirivanovite, Na6Ca2[Al6Si6O24](SO4,S3,S2,Cl)2 · H2O, a new mineral of sodalite group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, A. N.; Kaneva, E. V.; Cherepanov, D. I.; Suvorova, L. F.; Levitsky, V. I.; Ivanova, L. A.; Reznitsky, L. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The results of an examination of vladimirivanovite, a new mineral of the sodalite group, found at the Tultui deposit in the Baikal region are discussed. The mineral occurs in the form of outer rims (0.01-3 mm thick) of lazurite, elongated segregations without faced crystals (0.2 to 3-4 mm in size; less frequently, 4 × 12-15 × 20 mm), and rare veinlets (up to 5 mm) hosted in calciphyre and marble. Vladimirivanovite is irregular and patchy dark blue. The mineral is brittle; on average, the microhardness VHN is 522-604, 575 kg/mm2; and the Mohs hardness is 5.0-5.5. The measured and calculated densities are 2.48(3) and 2.436 g/cm3, respectively. Vladimirivanovite is optically biaxial; 2 V meas = 63(±1)°, 2 V calc = 66.2°; the refractive indices are α = 1.502-1.507 (±0.002), N m = 1.509-1.514 (±0.002), and N g = 1.512-1.517 (±0.002). The chemical composition is as follows, wt %: 32.59 SiO2, 27.39 Al2O3, 7.66 CaO, 17.74 Na2O, 11.37 SO3, 1.94 S, 0.12 Cl, and 1.0 H2O; total is 99.62. The empirical formula calculated based on (Si + Al) = 12 with sulfide sulfur determined from the charge balance is Na6.36Ca1.52(Si6.03Al5.97)Σ12O23.99(SO4)1.58(S3)0.17(S2)0.08 · Cl0.04 · 0.62H2O; the idealized formula is Na6Ca2[Al6Si6O24](SO4,S3,S2,Cl)2 · H2O. The new mineral is orthorhombic, space group Pnaa; the unit-cell dimensions are a = 9.066, b = 12.851, c = 38.558 Å, V = 4492 Å3, and Z = 6. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern ( dÅ— I[ hkl]) are: 6.61-5[015], 6.43-11[020, 006], 3.71-100[119, 133], 2.623-30[20.12, 240], 2.273-6[04.12], 2.141-14[159, 13.15], 1.783-9[06.12, 04.18], and 1.606-6[080, 00.24]. The crystal structure has been solved with a single crystal. The mineral was named in memoriam of Vladimir Georgievich Ivanov (1947-2002), Russian mineralogist and geochemist. The type material of the mineral is deposited at the Mineralogical Museum of St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.

  6. PREFACE: The Universe under the Microscope: Astrophysics at High Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Köln, Köln, Germany Eduardo Ros Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Bonn, Germany Scientific organizing committee Dennis Downes Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique, France Wolfgang Duschl University of Kiel, Germany Andrea Ghez University of California, Los Angeles, USA Vladimir Karas Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic Andreas Eckart University of Cologne, Germany Sera Marko University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands Susanne Pfalzner University of Cologne, Germany Sebastian Rabien Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany Daniel Rouan Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France Eduardo Ros Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Germany Rainer Schödel Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía -CSIC, Spain Zhiqiang Shen Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China Anton Zensus Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Germany Local organizing committee Sebastian Fischer University of Cologne, Germany Devaky Kunneriath University of Cologne, Germany Leo Meyer University of Cologne, Germany Koraljka Muzic University of Cologne, Germany Rainer Schödel University of Cologne, Germany/IAA -CSIC, Spain Christian Straubmeier University of Cologne, Germany Mohammad Zamaninasab University of Cologne, Germany

  7. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    Spacewalkers enjoy a view of Earth once reserved for Apollo, Zeus, and other denizens of Mt. Olympus. During humanity's first extravehicular activity (EVA), Alexei Leonov floated above Gibraltar, the rock ancient seafarers saw as the gateway to the great unknown Atlantic. The symbolism was clear, Leonov stepped past a new Gibraltar when he stepped into space. More than 32 years and 154 EVAs later, Jerry Linenger conducted an EVA with Vladimir Tsibliyev as part of International Space Station Phase 1. They floated together above Gibraltar. Today the symbolism has new meaning: humanity is starting to think of stepping out of Earth orbit, space travel's new Gibraltar, and perhaps obtaining a new olympian view, a close-up look at Olympus Mons on Mars. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology chronicles the 154 EVAs conducted from March 1965 to April 1997. It is intended to make clear the crucial role played by EVA in the history of spaceflight, as well as to chronicle the large body of EVA "lessons learned." Russia and the U.S. define EVA differently. Russian cosmonauts are said to perform EVA any time they are in vacuum in a space suit. A U.S. astronaut must have at least his head outside his spacecraft before he is said to perform an EVA. The difference is based in differing spacecraft design philoso- phies. Russian and Soviet spacecraft have always had a specialized airlock through which the EVA cosmonaut egressed, leaving the main habitable volume of the spacecraft pressurized. The U.S. Gemini and Apollo vehicles, on the other hand, depressurized their entire habitable volume for egress. In this document, we apply the Russian definition to Russian EVAS, and the U.S. definition to U.S. EVAS. Thus, for example, Gemini 4 Command Pilot James McDivitt does not share the honor of being first American spacewalker with Ed White, even though he was suited and in vacuum when White stepped out into space. Non-EVA spaceflights are listed in the chronology to provide context and to

  8. PREFACE: Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserlohe, Christof; Karas, Vladimir; Krips, Melanie; Eckart, Andreas; Britzen, Silke; Fischer, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    University of Thessaloniki in Greece for giving the dinner talk on the most astounding ancient Antikythera mechanism. We would also like to thank Victor Gomer and the staff of the Physikzentrum of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft in Bad Honnef where the conference took place. Last but not least we would like to thank all unnamed helpers, without whom the organisation of this conference would not have been possible. Financial support for this conference was granted by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) Sonderforschungsbereich project number SFB 956. We also acknowledge support from the European Community Framework Programme 7, Advanced Radio Astronomy in Europe, grant agreement no. 227290. Christof Iserlohe, Vladimir Karas, Melanie Krips, Andreas Eckart, Silke Britzen and Sebastian Fischer The Editors Conference photograph Conference Group Photo, 1 September 2011 The PDF also contains additional photographs from the conference and the Contents of the Proceedings.

  9. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    season weather in Kazakhstan C K Wright, K M de Beurs, Z K Akhmadieva, P Y Groisman and G M Henebry Climate change in Inner Mongolia from 1955 to 2005—trends at regional, biome and local scales N Lu, B Wilske, J Ni, R John and J Chen Application of the Snowmelt Runoff model in the Kuban river basin using MODIS satellite images M V Georgievsky Record Russian river discharge in 2007 and the limits of analysis A I Shiklomanov and R B Lammers Paleoclimatic reconstructions for the south of Valdai Hills (European Russia) as paleo-analogs of possible regional vegetation changes under global warming E Novenko, A Olchev, O Desherevskaya and I Zuganova Diagnosis of the record discharge of Arctic-draining Eurasian rivers in 2007 Michael A Rawlins, Mark C Serreze, Ronny Schroeder, Xiangdong Zhang and Kyle C McDonald Studies of the cryosphere in Northern Eurasia Groundwater storage changes in arctic permafrost watersheds from GRACE and in situ measurements Reginald R Muskett and Vladimir E Romanovsky Changes in snow cover over Northern Eurasia in the last few decades O N Bulygina, V N Razuvaev and N N Korshunova Modeling sub-sea permafrost in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf: the Dmitry Laptev Strait D Nicolsky and N Shakhova Snow cover basal ice layer changes over Northern Eurasia since 1966 Olga N Bulygina, Pavel Ya Groisman, Vyacheslav N Razuvaev and Vladimir F Radionov Snow cover and permafrost evolution in Siberia as simulated by the MGO regional climate model in the 20th and 21st centuries I M Shkolnik, E D Nadyozhina, T V Pavlova, E K Molkentin and A A Semioshina Studies of the biosphere in Northern Eurasia The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites A Bartsch, H Balzter and C George Change and persistence in land surface phenologies of the Don and Dnieper river basins V Kovalskyy and G M Henebry Effects of climatic changes on carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in boreal forest ecosystems of European part of

  10. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010) Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaerts, Dominiek; Vullers, Ruud

    2011-10-01

    journal bearing with a flexible, damped support operating at 7.2 million DNTobias Waumans, Jan Peirs, Farid Al-Bender and Dominiek Reynaerts Thermoelectric energy harvester on the heated human machineVladimir Leonov

  11. The World - Socio-economically and politically: What you need to know.

    PubMed

    Ausman, James I

    2013-01-01

    without the responsibility to work or pay for these entitlements, has touched many countries and people with a few exceptions. This problem is the result of a worldwide breakdown of ethics and morality in society and a desire of the few for centralized control and power over the people. No country has instituted a solution to these problems that results in reducing expenditures or the growing debts. As many have stated in this paper, this policy cannot be sustained. The result of this scenario will be a worldwide economic crisis. Fundamental to this impending economic crisis is the failure of centrally controlled economies and socialistic programs. Those selected groups, who benefit from having control, are the politicians, bankers, some selected industry leaders, and socialist planners, who will stop at nothing to maintain power and control over the people. Liberty of the people is in jeopardy worldwide. Read the evidence presented and decide if this summary is correct. The troubling question is, "What will happen if the world economy collapses?" Will this crisis be a time for the few to take more control of the people through fear, crisis decisions, misinformation, prevention of the public from protecting themselves with guns, and pervasive spying technology on each citizen or will more democratic governments arise from the failure of centralized control, the welfare state, and the loss of liberty? Such crises have been repeated throughout 4000 years of recorded history. What happened in those past times? Read the quotations of Vladimir Lenin, developer of Marxism-Leninism, the foundation of Communism and judge what you have read from his statements. An alternative to this dismal scenario is little discussed also in the Press. Why not? In the past 150 years, the alternative has happened with a rapid growth in democracy, communications technology, and life expectancy from advances in science and medicine. To unleash this huge human potential, at this time, will require

  12. EDITORIAL: Extreme Ultraviolet Light Sources for Semiconductor Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, David

    2004-12-01

    filaments, for both Xe and Sn. The embodiment of electrical discharge plasmas and laser-produced plasmas into commercially available EUV sources, with EUV powers that project to suitable levels, is presented in the fifth paper by Uwe Stamm of XTREME Technologies in Göttingen. For discharge produced plasmas, thermal loading and electrode erosion are significant issues. Vladimir Borisov and his colleagues, at the Troitsk Institute outside Moscow, address these issues and provide novel ideas for the multiplexing of several discharge plasmas feeding a single optical system. Igor Fomenkov and his colleagues at Cymer in San Diego describe issues associated with a dense plasma focus pinch, including a comparison of operations with both positive and negative polarity. In the eighth paper, Malcolm McGeoch of Plex in Massachusetts provides a theoretical description of the vaporization and ionization of spherical tin droplets in discharge plasma. Together this cluster of papers provides a broad review of the current status of high power EUV plasma sources for semiconductor manufacturing. This very current topic, of intense interest worldwide, is considered further in a book [4] of collected papers to become available in mid-2005. Additionally, a special journal issue emphasizing coherent EUV sources, albeit at lower average powers, is soon to appear [5]. References [1] http://public.itrsr.net [2] Attwood D 2000 Soft X-Rays and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation: Principles and Applications (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) www.coe.Berkeley.edu/AST/sxreuv [3] Moore G E 1965 Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits Electronics Magazine 114 Moore G E 1995 Lithography and the Future of Moore's Law SPIE 243 2 [4] Bakshi V ed 2005 EUV Sources for Lithography (Bellingham WA:SPIE) at press [5] IEEE J. Special Topics in Quantum Electronics, Short Wavelength and EUV Lasers 10 Dec 2004 at press

  13. The Peak of Rocket Production: The Designer of Ballistic Missiles V.F. Utkin (1923-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, V.; Sitnikova, N.

    2002-01-01

    The main landmarks of the biography of the general designer of the most power missiles Vladimira Fe- dorovicha Utkina are stated. Formation of character of outstanding scientist of 20 century as the son of the Soviet epoch is shown. He belongs to that generation which had many difficulties and afflictions - hungry time, the heavy years of the second world war, post-war disruption, but also many happy days - the Victory above fascism, restoration of the country, pride of successes in conquest of Space. In June, 1941 Vladimir has finished school with honours certificate and since October, 1941 up to the end of the second world war was on various fronts. After the ending of Leningrad military-mechanical insti- tute the young engineer came in Southern engineering works in Dnipropetrovsk (Yugmach). Here for 40 years there was a dizzy ascent of the beginner-designer over a ladder of space-rocket's Olympus up to the chief designer and the general director of the biggest in the world of rocket concern (9000 high quality engineers of Design office Yugnoe (DOYu) and 60 thousand workers Yugmach). After death in 1971 to year of main designer M. Jangele V. F. Utkin has headed Design office Yugnoe. Under ma- nual of V. Utkin four strategic rocket complexes of new generation SS-17, SS-18 (three updatings with divided head parts with weight of 8 tons), SS-24 (railway and shaft basing) were developed and han- ded over on arms. Among development of academician V. Utkin there is a rocket-carrier "Zenit" which delivers to an orbit over 12 tons of a payload. This rocket is also a basis of the first stage of reusable transport space system "Energia-Buran". Under manual of V. Utkin were developed and used the con- version carrier-rockets "Ziclon" and "Kosmos", as well the effective satellites of a defensive, scientific and economic direction, among which family of satellites "Kosmos", the satellite "Ocean", equipped by a locator of the side observation too. Largest scientific

  14. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-08-01

    GonzalezBUAP, FCFM Lorenzo Díaz CruzBUAP Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas Luis Rey Díaz BarrónDivisión de Ciencias e Ingenierías Luis UrenaUniversidad de Guanajuato Magda LolaDept. of Physics, University of Patras, Greece Mahmoud WahbaEgyptian Center for Theoretical Physics, MTI Marcus S CohenNew Mexico State University Mario A Acero OrtegaICN - UNAM Mario E GomezUniversidad de Huelva Mark PipeUniversity of Sheffield Mauro NapsucialeDCI-UG Mirco CannoniUniversidad de Huelva Mónica Felipa Ramírez PalaciosUniversidad de Guadalajara Murli Manohar VermaLucknow university, India Nassim BozorgniaUCLA Octavio Obregón Octavio ValenzuelaIA-UNAM Oleg KamaevUniversity of Minnesota Osamu SetoHokkai-Gakuen University Pedro F González DíazIFF, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid, Spain Qaisar ShafiBartol Research Inst. and Delaware U. Raul Hennings-YeomansLos Alamos National Laboratory René Ángeles MartínezDepartamento de Fisica, del DCI de la Universidad de Guanajuato Reyna XoxocotziBUAP, FCFM Rishi Kumar TiwariGovt. Model Science College, Rewa (MP) INDIA Roberto A SussmanICN-UNAM Selim Gómez ÁvilaDCI-UG Sugai KenichiSaitama University Susana Valdez AlvaradoDCI-UG TVladimir - 2K CollaborationColorado State University Tonatiuh MatosCINVESTAV Valeriy DvoeglazovUniversidad de Zacatecas Vannia Gonzalez MaciasDCI-UG Vladimir Avila-ReeseInstituto de Astronomia, UNAM Wolfgang BietenholzINC, UNAM (Mexico) Yamanaka MasatoKyoto Sangyo University Yann MambriniLPT Orsay Yu-Feng ZhouInstitute of Theotretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PR China Aaron HigueraDCI-UG Azarael Yebra PérezDCI-UG César Hernández AguayoDCI-UG Jaime Chagoya AlvarezDCI-UG Jonathan Rashid Rosique CampuzanoDCI-UG José Alfredo Soto ÁlvarezDCI-UG Juan Carlos De Haro SantosDCI-UG Luis Eduardo Medina MedranoDCI-UG Maria Fatima Rubio EspinozaDCI-UG Paulo Alberto Rodriguez HerreraDCI-UG Roberto Oziel Gutierrez CotaDCI-UG Rocha Moran Maria PaulinaDCI-UG Xareni Sanchez MonroyDCI-UG

  15. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  16. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  17. EDITORIAL: The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Soto, Luis L.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2012-02-01

    decided that Physica Scripta could offer a poster prize (200 euros + certificate) for young scientists (less than 30 years old) at the annual CEWQO conference. A panel of experts was formed to judge the posters which included Apostol Vourdas, University of Bradford, UK (Chairman), Alberto Ibort, University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain, Andrei Klimov, University of Guadalajara, Mexico, Margarita A Man'ko, P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia and Antonino Messina, University of Palermo, Italy. The poster ''How can we check the uncertainty relation?'' by Vladimir Chernega, PhD student of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, won the prize. The 19th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics will be held in Sinaia, Romania on 2-6 July 2012. It will be chaired by Professor Aurelian Isar from the Horia Hulubei National Institute for Research and Development in Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest.

  18. The World – Socio-economically and politically: What you need to know

    PubMed Central

    Ausman, James I.

    2013-01-01

    everything without the responsibility to work or pay for these entitlements, has touched many countries and people with a few exceptions. This problem is the result of a worldwide breakdown of ethics and morality in society and a desire of the few for centralized control and power over the people. No country has instituted a solution to these problems that results in reducing expenditures or the growing debts. As many have stated in this paper, this policy cannot be sustained. The result of this scenario will be a worldwide economic crisis. Fundamental to this impending economic crisis is the failure of centrally controlled economies and socialistic programs. Those selected groups, who benefit from having control, are the politicians, bankers, some selected industry leaders, and socialist planners, who will stop at nothing to maintain power and control over the people. Liberty of the people is in jeopardy worldwide. Read the evidence presented and decide if this summary is correct. The troubling question is, “What will happen if the world economy collapses?” Will this crisis be a time for the few to take more control of the people through fear, crisis decisions, misinformation, prevention of the public from protecting themselves with guns, and pervasive spying technology on each citizen or will more democratic governments arise from the failure of centralized control, the welfare state, and the loss of liberty? Such crises have been repeated throughout 4000 years of recorded history. What happened in those past times? Read the quotations of Vladimir Lenin, developer of Marxism–Leninism, the foundation of Communism and judge what you have read from his statements. An alternative to this dismal scenario is little discussed also in the Press. Why not? In the past 150 years, the alternative has happened with a rapid growth in democracy, communications technology, and life expectancy from advances in science and medicine. To unleash this huge human potential, at this time

  19. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Index. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2010 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2011. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, two of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2009 to November 2010 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their special issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Osamu Naito, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Japan Masahiro Kobayashi, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan Duccio Testa, Lausanne Federal Polytechnic University, Switzerland Vladimir Pustovitov, Russian Research Centre, Kurchatov Insitute, Russia Christopher Holland, University of California at San Diego, USA Yuri Gribov, ITER International Organisation, Cadarache, France Eriko Jotaki, Kyushu University, Japan Sven Wiesen, Jülich Research Centre, Germany Viktor S. Marchenko, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine Richard Stephens, General Atomics, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2010. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award was J.E. Rice et al for the paper entitled 'Inter-machine comparison of

  20. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  1. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  2. PREFACE: International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Carugno, Giovanni; Dodonov, Victor; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-07-01

    Organizers Gabriel Barton and Victor Dodonov International Advisory Committee of the Workshop Michael Bordag (Leipzig, Germany) Giovanni Carugno (Padova, Italy) Emilio Elizalde (Barcelona, Spain) Francisco Mazzitelli (Buenos Aires, Argentina) Kimball Milton (Norman, USA) Vladimir Mostepanenko (St Petersburg, Russia) Serge Reynaud (Paris, France) Conference photograph

  3. Soil cover patterns influence on the land environmental functions, agroecological quality, land-use and monitoring efficiency in the Central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Yashin, Ivan; Lukin, Sergey; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    current practice versions. Well-elaborated monitoring collaboration with the principal natural reserves in south-taiga and forest-steppe zones provides process-based interaction with long-term data on zonal climatic, landscape and soil features necessary to test the process, functional and evaluation models in the specific conditions of each bioclimatic zone. The dominated erosion and dehumification trends have been essentially activated for last 3-4 decades due to hu¬mus negative balance around 0.6-0.7 t ha-1year-1 and connected disaggregation with annual rate between 1 and 25 g/kg for aggregates 10-0.25 mm. "Standard" monitoring objects and regionally generalized data showed characteristic for Chernozems 2-2.5 % humus drop during this period and active processes of CO2 emission and humus eluvial-illuvial profile redistribution too. Forest-steppe Chernozems are usually characterized by higher stability than steppe ones. The ratio between erosive and biological losses in humus stock can be ten¬tatively estimated as fifty-fifty with essential variability within slope landscape. Both these processes have essential impacts on different sets of soil environmental and agroecological functions (including atmospheric air, surface and ground water quality, biodiversity and profitability) that we need to understand and predict. A drop of humus content below threshold values (for different soils between 1.5 and 6%) considerably reduces not only soil environmental regulation functions but also effectiveness of used fertilizers, crop yield quality and possibility of sustainable agricultural land-use. The carried out long-term researches of representative natural, rural and urban landscapes in Tver, Yaroslavl, Vladimir, Moscow, Kaluga, Kursk, Belgorod, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov regions give us validation and ranging of the limiting factors of the elementary soil cover patterns current features and transformation processes, environmental functions and agroecological quality

  4. FOREWORD: The 70th birthday of Professor Stig Stenholm The 70th birthday of Professor Stig Stenholm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2010-09-01

    Western and Soviet laser cooling communities. In neutral Finland, accessible to both parties, he organized informal workshops that crucially sped the development of laser cooling. The importance of these meetings is highlighted in Bill Phillips' Nobel lecture in 1997 [6]. However, as the emphasis in laser cooling moved from a semiclassical description to quantum theory, Stig started to look for new avenues of research. My contact with Stig came when I went to see him for an MSc thesis topic. This involved polarization spectroscopy and modelling of an experiment performed by the laser spectroscopy group (Birger Ståhlberg) at the University of Helsinki. Without knowing anything about quantum optics I then found myself immediately in one of the Finnish-Soviet workshops on quantum electronics in the small town of Porvoo slightly east of Helsinki. There I met people like Juha Javanainen, Peter Knight, Axel Schenzle and Vladimir Chebotayev, and my own career in quantum optics began, working on the mathematics of the Landau-Zener model and how to apply it and other such models in molecular excitation by femtosecond pulses for my PhD thesis. This work was done together with Barry Garraway, who was a postdoc in Helsinki in the early 1990s. The Finnish-Soviet meetings continued for a while, and in 1990 we even got to travel to Novosibirsk (and back, too). During its existence (1964-1996), the Research Institute of Theoretical Physics (TFT) had a tremendous impact on physics in Finland. Short and long stays by visitors provided a unique and high-level environment for local researchers, the research fields covered a wide range of physics, and for many Finns returning from abroad it provided a place to stay until something more permanent turned up. Thus many researchers who later became professors had, at some point in their career, a connection with TFT. As a director Stig was very broad-minded and without this the happy atmosphere of TFT could not have existed. In the 1980s young

  5. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    , University College London, UK Vladimir Lyashuk, ITEP, Russia Radovan Milincic, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA Rolf Nahnhauer, DESY, Zeuthen, Germany Christopher Naumann, University of Erlangen, Germany Valentin Niess, CPPM Jonathan Perkin, University of Sheffield, UK Steve Ralph, University of Sheffield, UK Christopher Rhodes, Imperial College London, UK Carsten Richardt, University of Erlangen, Germany Karsten Salomon, University of Erlangen, Germany Olaf Scholten, KVI/University of Groningen, Netherlands Terry Sloan, University of Lancaster, UK Pierre Sokolsky, University of Utah, USA Lee Thompson, University of Sheffield, UK Omar Veledar, Northumbria University, UK David Waters, UCL, USA Dawn Williams, Pennsylvania State University, USA Igor Zheleznykh, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Conference photograph

  6. EDITORIAL: CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2010-09-01

    QED. Another rapidly growing research field (although its origin can be traced to the beginning of the 1980s) is the quantum control of evolution at the microscopic level. These examples show that quantum non-stationary systems continue to be a living and very interesting part of quantum physics, uniting researchers from many different areas. Thus it is no mere chance that several special scientific meetings devoted to these topics have been organized recently. One was the international seminar 'Time-Dependent Phenomena in Quantum Mechanics' organized by Manfred Kleber and Tobias Kramer in 2007 at Blaubeuren, Germany. The proceedings of that event were published in 2008 as volume 99 of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Another recent meeting was the International Workshop on Quantum Non-Stationary Systems, held on 19-23 October 2009 at the International Center for Condensed Matter Physics (ICCMP) in Brasilia, Brazil. It was organized and directed by Victor Dodonov (Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, Brazil), Vladimir Man'ko (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia) and Salomon Mizrahi (Physics Department, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil). This event was accompanied by a satellite workshop 'Quantum Dynamics in Optics and Matter', organized by Salomon Mizrahi and Victor Dodonov on 25-26 October 2009 at the Physics Department of the Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil. These two workshops, supported by the Brazilian federal agencies CAPES and CNPq and the local agencies FAP-DF and FAPESP, were attended by more than 120 participants from 16 countries. Almost 50 invited talks and 20 poster presentations covered a wide area of research in quantum mechanics, quantum optics and quantum information. This special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta contains contributions presented by some invited speakers and participants of the workshop in Brasilia. Although they do not cover all of the wide spectrum of problems related to quantum non

  7. Controllable Quantum States Mesoscopic Superconductivity and Spintronics (MS+S2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Nakano, Hayato

    2008-10-01

    Josephson effect in diffusive d-wave junctions / T. Yokoyama. Quantum dissipation due to the zero energy bound states in high-T[symbol] superconductor junctions / Shiro Kawabata. Spin-polarized heat transport in ferromagnet/unconventional superconductor junctions / T. Yokoyama. Little-Parks oscillations in chiral p-wave superconducting rings / Mitsuaki Takigawa. Theoretical study of synergy effect between proximity effect and Andreev interface resonant states in triplet p-wave superconductors / Yasunari Tanuma. Theory of proximity effect in unconventional superconductor junctions / Y. Tanaka -- Quantum information. Analyzing the effectiveness of the quantum repeater / Kenichiro Furuta. Architecture-dependent execution time of Shor's algorithm / Rodney Van Meter -- Quantum dots and Kondo effects. Coulomb blockade properties of 4-gated quantum dot / Shinichi Amaha. Order-N electronic structure calculation of n-type GaAs quantum dots / Shintaro Nomura. Transport through double-dots coupled to normal and superconducting leads / Yoichi Tanaka. A study of the quantum dot in application to terahertz single photon counting / Vladimir Antonov. Electron transport through laterally coupled double quantum dots / T. Kubo. Dephasing in Kondo systems: comparison between theory and experiment / F. Mallet. Kondo effect in quantum dots coupled with noncollinear ferromagnetic leads / Daisuke Matsubayashi. Non-crossing approximation study of multi-orbital Kondo effect in quantum dot systems / Tomoko Kita. Theoretical study of electronic states and spin operation in coupled quantum dots / Mikio Eto. Spin correlation in a double quantum dot-quantum wire coupled system / S. Sasaki. Kondo-assisted transport through a multiorbital quantum dot / Rui Sakano. Spin decay in a quantum dot coupled to a quantum point contact / Massoud Borhani -- Quantum wires, low-dimensional electrons. Control of the electron density and electric field with front and back gates / Masumi Yamaguchi. Effect of the array

  8. PREFACE: International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortell, Michael P.; O'Malley, Robert E.; Pokrovskii, Alexei; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2008-07-01

    , International Association of Hydrological Sciences, and Laboratoire Poncelet is gratefully acknowledged. The Editors and the Organizers of the Workshop wish to place on record their sincere gratitude to Mr Andrew Zhezherun and Mr Alexander Pimenov of University College Cork for both the assistance which he provided to all the presenters at the Workshop, and for the careful formatting of all the manuscripts prior to their being forwarded to the Publisher. More information about the Workshop can be found at http://euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2006.htm Michael P Mortell, Robert E O'Malley Jr, Alexei Pokrovskii, Dmitrii Rachinskii and Vladimir Sobolev Editors

  9. The World – Socio-economically and politically: What you need to know

    PubMed Central

    Ausman, James I.

    2013-01-01

    everything without the responsibility to work or pay for these entitlements, has touched many countries and people with a few exceptions. This problem is the result of a worldwide breakdown of ethics and morality in society and a desire of the few for centralized control and power over the people. No country has instituted a solution to these problems that results in reducing expenditures or the growing debts. As many have stated in this paper, this policy cannot be sustained. The result of this scenario will be a worldwide economic crisis. Fundamental to this impending economic crisis is the failure of centrally controlled economies and socialistic programs. Those selected groups, who benefit from having control, are the politicians, bankers, some selected industry leaders, and socialist planners, who will stop at nothing to maintain power and control over the people. Liberty of the people is in jeopardy worldwide. Read the evidence presented and decide if this summary is correct. The troubling question is, “What will happen if the world economy collapses?” Will this crisis be a time for the few to take more control of the people through fear, crisis decisions, misinformation, prevention of the public from protecting themselves with guns, and pervasive spying technology on each citizen or will more democratic governments arise from the failure of centralized control, the welfare state, and the loss of liberty? Such crises have been repeated throughout 4000 years of recorded history. What happened in those past times? Read the quotations of Vladimir Lenin, developer of Marxism–Leninism, the foundation of Communism and judge what you have read from his statements. An alternative to this dismal scenario is little discussed also in the Press. Why not? In the past 150 years, the alternative has happened with a rapid growth in democracy, communications technology, and life expectancy from advances in science and medicine. To unleash this huge human potential, at this time

  10. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkov, Benjamin M.; Balatsky, Galya I.

    2012-07-26

    In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of

  11. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Efroimsky, Michael; Kaplan, George

    2011-09-01

    , Russia); the late Yuri P. Ilyasov from Astro Space Center of Russian Academy of Science; Michael V. Sazhin, Vladimir A. Zharov, and Igor Yu. Vlasov of the Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow, Russia); and Vladimir B. Braginsky of Moscow State University (Russia) for their remarks and comments, all of which helped us to properly formulate the theoretical concepts and other material presented in this book. The discussions among themembers of the IAU Worki! ng Group on Relativity in Celestial Mechanics and Astrometry as well as those within the Working Group on Nomenclature for Fundamental Astronomy have also been quite valuable and have contributed to what is presented here. The numerous scientific papers written by Nicole Capitaine of the Paris Observatory and her collaborators have been essential references. Victor Slabinski and Dennis D. McCarthy of the US Naval Observatory, P. Kenneth Seidelmann of the University of Virginia, Catherine Y. Hohenkerk of Her Majesty's Nautical Almanac Office, and E. Myles Standish, retired from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, reviewed early drafts of the material that became Chapter 9 and made many substantial suggestions for improvement. We were, of course, influenced by many other textbooks available in this field. We would like to pay particular tribute to: C.W. Misner, K. S. Thorne and J. A. Wheeler "Gravitation" V.A. Brumberg "Essential Relativistic Celestial Mechanics" B.F. Schutz "Geometrical Methods of Mathematical Physics" M.H. Soffel "Relativity in Celestial Mechanics, Astrometry and Geodesy" C.M. Will "Theory and Experiment in Gravitational Physics". There are many other books and influential papers that are important as well which are referenced in the relevant parts of the present book. Not one of our aforementioned colleagues is responsible for any remaining errors or omissions in this book, for which, of course, the authors bear full responsibility. Last, but by nomeans least,Michael Efroimsky and George Kaplan wish to

  12. PREFACE Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, Amalia; Iványi, Péter; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2011-02-01

    Engineering, University of Pécs (Hungary), University College Cork (Ireland), University of Pécs (Hungary), The University of Texas at Dallas (USA), and the Cultural Capital of Europe 2010, Pécs (Hungary), is gratefully acknowledged. The Editors and Organizers of the Workshop are sincerely grateful to Dr Géza Várady, Ms Andrea Zseni and Mr Ádám Schiffer of the Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs, and Dr Alexander Pimenov of University College Cork for managing the organization of the conference and for the assistance in formatting of all the manuscripts. More information about the workshop can be found at http://murphys5.pmmk.pte.hu/ Amalia Ivanyi, Péter Iványi, Dmitrii Rachinskii and Vladimir A SobolevEditors MURPHYS 2010, PMMK PTE, 31 May - 3 June 2010 Sponsored by Pollack Mihály logo POLLACK MIHÁLY FACULTY OF ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF PÉCS UCC logo PÉCSI TUDOMÁNYEGYETEM logo PÉCSI TUDOMÁNYEGYETEM UNIVERSITY OF PÉCS UTD logo Cultural capital logo Cultural Capital of Europe 2010, Pécs, Hungary International Steering Committee Z I BalanovIsrael M BrokateGermany R CrossUK K DahmenUSA M DimianRomania G FriedmanUSA A Ivanyi (Co-Chairman)Hungary P Iványi (Co-Chairman)Hungary L KalachevUSA P KrejčíCzech Republic R O'Malley (Co-Chairman)USA A Pokrovskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland N PopovicUK D Rachinskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland S S SazhinUK V Sobolev (Co-Chairman)Russia S SzabóHungary C VisoneItaly International Program Committee G AlmásiHungary Z BalanovIsrael M BrokateGermany R CrossUK K DahmenUSA M DimianRomania G FriedmanUSA A Ivanyi (Co-Chairman)Hungary P Iványi (Co-Chairman)Hungary S JeneiHungary G KádárHungary L KalachevUSA R KersnerHungary G KovácsHungary P KrejčíCzech Republic P M KuczmannHungary P P O'KaneIreland R O'Malley (Co-Chairman)USA A Pokrovskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland N PopovicUK D Rachinskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland B V H ToppingUK V C VisoneItaly

  13. Report from the organizers Report from the organizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter

    2009-04-01

    conferences time is reserved for prize ceremonies. The recipients of the most important prize in low temperature physics, the Fritz London Memorial Prize 2008, were Yuriy M Bunkov (Institute Néel, Grenoble), Vladimir V Dmitriev, and Igor A Fomin (both Kapitza Institute, Moscow). They got the prize for their discovery and understanding of the 'phase coherent spin precession and spin superfluidity of 3He-B'. The Simon Prize 2008 of The Physical Society went to Yasunobu Nakamura and Jaw-Shen Tsai (NEC Laboratories, Tsukuba) for their 'pioneering demonstration of quantum coherent behaviour in a macroscopic object and for their subsequent explorations of quantum coherent physics in a series of novel superconducting devices'. The Nicholas Kurti European Science Prize (sponsored by Oxford Instruments) was awarded to Lieven Vandersypen (Delft University of Technology) for his 'ground-breaking work on the coherent control of nuclear and electron spins, with possible application to quantum information processing'. Finally, the first IUPAP Young Scientist Prizes in Low Temperature Physics went to Kostya Novoselov (University of Manchester) for his 'contribution in the discovery of graphene and for pioneering studies of its extraordinary properties', to Dai Aoki (Tohuko University, Sendai) for his 'discovery of novel heavy fermion superconductivity in actinide compounds', and to Viktor Tsepelin (Lancaster University) for 'the development of new experimental techniques and key discoveries in the fields of 3He crystals and quantum turbulence'. All prize recipients got the opportunity to present their work in an invited oral contribution. As is common practice nowadays all announcements, registrations, paper submissions and communications regarding program and practical matters were done electronically, either by email or via the internet. Nevertheless, the program book was still printed and handed out to all participants at registration and they received an electronic version on a USB

  14. REPORT FROM THE ORGANIZERS: The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter

    2009-03-01

    recipients of the most important prize in low temperature physics, the Fritz London Memorial Prize 2008, were Yuriy M Bunkov (Institute Neël, Grenoble), Vladimir V Dmitriev, and Igor A Fomin (both Kapitza Institute, Moscow). They got the prize for their discovery and understanding of the 'Phase Coherent Spin Precession and Spin Superfluidity of 3He-B'. The Simon Prize 2008 of The Physical Society went to Yasunobu Nakamura and Jaw-Shen Tsai (NEC Laboratories, Tsukuba) for their 'Pioneering demonstration of quantum coherent behaviour in a macroscopic object and for their subsequent explorations of quantum coherent physics in a series of novel superconducting devices'. The Nicholas Kurti European Science Prize (sponsored by Oxford Instruments) was awarded to Lieven Vandersypen (Delft University of Technology) for his 'Ground-breaking work on the coherent control of nuclear and electron spins, with possible application to quantum information processing'. Finally, the first IUPAP Young Scientist Prizes in Low Temperature Physics went to Kostya Novoselov (University of Manchester) for his 'Contribution in the discovery of graphene and for pioneering studies of its extraordinary properties', to Dai Aoki (Tohuko University, Sendai) for his 'Discovery of novel heavy fermion superconductivity in actinide compounds', and to Viktor Tsepelin (Lancaster University) for 'The development of new experimental techniques and key discoveries in the fields of 3He crystals and quantum turbulence'. All prize recipients got the opportunity to present their work in an invited oral contribution. As is common practice nowadays all announcements, registrations, paper submissions and communications regarding program and practical matters were done electronically, either by email or via internet. Nevertheless, the program book was still printed and handed out to all participants at registration and they received an electronic version on a USB stick as well. The stick also contained all the submitted

  15. List of Posters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    , Calibration, and Jets/Missing Transverse Energy Measurements By Sergey Petrushanko. The CMS Silicon Tracker By Oliver Pooth. Drift Chamber for CMD-3 detector By Alexandr Popov, et al.. Vacuum Phototriods for the CMS ECAL Endcap crystal calorimeter By Vladimir Postoev. CMS Silicon Tracker: Track Reconstruction and Alignment By Frank-Peter Schilling. eRHIC - A precision electron-proton/ion collider facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory By Bernd Surrow. Development of tracking detectors with industrially produced GEM foils By Bernd Surrow, et al.. A Linear Collider Facility with High Intensity e+e- beams (A high intensity e+e- Linear Collider Facility at low energy) By Andre Schoening. Construction of the BESIII detector for tau-charm physics By Yifang Wang. The HERMES Recoil Detector By Sergey Yashchenko. Simulation of MICE in G4 MICE MICE Experiment: The new DO Layer O silicon detector The DO trigger upgrade for RUNIIb The Do Collaboration. Operational experiences with the silicon detector at CDF By Jeannine Wagner. Mathematical aspects of QFT & string theory: Electron in superstrong Coulomb field By D. Gitman. Stability of a non-commutative Jackiw-Teitelboim gravity By Fresneda Rodrigo, et al.. 4d gravity localized on thick branes: the complete mass spectrum By Alfredo Herrera-Aguilar. On Emergence of Quantum Mechanics By L. V. Prokhorov.

  16. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  17. PREFACE: Festschrift to mark the sixtieth birthday of Professor Jens Lothe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jøssang, Torstein; Barnett, David M.

    1992-01-01

    with their work. No doubt his warm personality, natural curiosity and willingness to promote and seize opportunities for collaboration across national boundaries is what has allowed great intellect stationed in a somewhat remote part of the scientific community to engender such a large international following, when other gifted men might have chosen to work in isolation under similar circumstances. Vladimir Alshits may have said it best during his visit to Oslo last April, namely, "There are three Norwegian names known to every Russian—Henrik Ibsen, Fridtjof Nansen and Jens Lothe". None of this is meant to imply that Jens has neglected or ignored his colleagues in Norway. Indeed, quite the contrary is true, but we believe the exposition on the development within the Solid State Group and the Cooperative Phenomena Program at the University of Oslo and at NTH in Trondheim in this symposium and its proceedings, presented by the local staff and present close associates addresses Jens Lothe's contribution on the home front far better than this preface would allow. We believe we speak for all the symposium attendees by extending to Jens the happiest greetings and our best wishes for continued health and happiness.

  18. Preface: Proceedings of the 13th Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals (LAM13) (Ekaterinburg, Russia, 8 14 July 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy

    2008-03-01

    Pedagogical University who did their best to help us with all our problems, especially to Boris Igoshev and Nikolay Vatolin; all the sponsors who supported the conference: the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Ural Mining and Metallurgical Company headed by Andrey Kozicyn, the Open Joint Stock Company 'Uralsvjazinform' (Alexey Ufimkin), the A A Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, RAS (July Kovneristii), the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Alexandre Ephanov), the Nuclear Power Plant 'Beloyarskaya' (Nikolay Oshkanov), the South Ural State University (German Vjatkin), Ural Technical Institute of Communications and Informatics (Evgeny Subbotin), Physical-Technical Institute UB RAS (Vladimir Lad'yanov), Metallurgical Department of the Ural State Technical University (Victor Shimov), Academy of Sciences of Chechen Republic (Raikom Dadashev) and NETZSCH-Gerätebau GmbH; the invited lecturers who immediately answered positively to the invitation and contributed to the high level of success of LAM13; the colleagues who acted as chairmen in the various sessions; Graham Douglas and Richard Palmer who kindly answered our queries and tried to satisfy our requirements; the seniors of the LAM series who could not participate at the 13th conference but helped us to manage it in the best way, namely J Dupuy, M Silbert, F Sommer, W C Pilgrim, W Freyland, K Lu, J Brmejo and F Hensel. We dedicate the LAM13 conference to the 80 year jubilee of Professor Nikolay Vatolin who is one of the leaders of Russian investigation in the field of liquid and amorphous metals, and who managed 12 similar conferences in our country. One of us (PP) commemorates his father, Professor Stanislav Popel, who was a known specialist in high temperature capillarity and sadly left us six months before the event.

  19. PREFACE: Nonlinearity and Geometry: connections with integrability Nonlinearity and Geometry: connections with integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslinski, Jan L.; Ferapontov, Eugene V.; Kitaev, Alexander V.; Nimmo, Jonathan J. C.

    2009-10-01

    accessible to younger researchers. It is not out of place to recall that earlier the Institute of Theoretical of Physics of Warsaw University organized two, now legendary, Jadwisin Soliton Workshops (1977 and 1979); see the short note in Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena (1980 vol. 1, issue 1, pp 159-163) written by Antoni Sym who was deeply engaged in the organization of these conferences. In scale and scope both Jadwisin workshops preceded a series of very successful NEEDS conferences. Among the celebrated participants of the Jadwisin meeetings one can find names of great importance for the history of soliton theory: Martin Kruskal, Norman Zabuski, Mark Ablowitz, David Kaup, Allan Newell, Vladimir Zakharov, Sergei Manakov, Francesco Calogero, Antonio Degasperis and Ryogo Hirota. This special issue begins with an introductory historical article in which Antoni Sym presents the most important ideas in the scientific biography of Gaston Darboux. We encourage the readers discover the greatest (scientific!) love of Darboux. This is followed by five review papers. M Błaszak and B M Szablikowski discuss the general R-matrix formalism for the construction of integrable systems with infinitely many degrees of freedom. The general theory is applied to several infinite-dimensional Lie algebras leading to new examples of dispersionless and dispersive (soliton) integrable field systems in 1+1 and 2+1 dimensions. J L Cieśliński presents the Darboux-Bäcklund transformation for 1+1-dimensional integrable systems of PDEs. He compares existing approaches to the construction of multisoliton Darboux matrices, discusses the nonisospectral case and presents some new results on the linear and bilinear invariants of the Darboux-Bäcklund transformation. M Dunajski presents twistor theory as a geometric tool for solving nonlinear differential equations. Many soliton equations admit twistor interpretation in terms of holomophic vector bundles. A different approach is provided for dispersionless

  20. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy; Son, Leonid; Sabirzjanov, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    Conference had opened a door between the world scientific community and Russian scientists who have high expertise in the field but could not actively participate in the conferences of the LAM series before because of the situation in Russian economics. We are thankful to the Advisory and Program Committees of previous LAM12 conference in Metz and especially to Dr Monique Calvo-Dahlborg for their trust and the opportunity to manage such an outstanding event in Russia. In addition we would like to give all our sincere thanks to:

  21. the authorities of the Russian Academy of Sciences, its Ural Branch and Ural State Pedagogical University who have done their best and who helped us with all problems, especially to Boris Igoshev and Nikolay Vatolin;
  22. all sponsors who supported the conference: Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Ural Mining and Metallurgical Company headed by Andrey Kozicyn, Open Joint Stock Company `Uralsvjazinform' (Alexey Ufimkin), A A Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science RAS (July Kovneristii), Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Alexandre Ephanov), Nuclear Power Plant `Beloyarskaya' (Nikolay Oshkanov), South Ural State University (German Vjatkin), Ural Technical Institute of Communications and Informatics (Evgeny Subbotin), Physical - Technical Institute UB RAS (Vladimir Lad'yanov), Metallurgical Department of the Ural State Technical University (Victor Shimov), Academy of Sciences of Chechen Republic (Raikom Dadashev) and NETZSCH-Gerätebau GmbH;
  23. the invited lecturers who have immediately answered positively to the invitation and contributed to the high level of LAM13;
  24. all the colleagues who have not hesitated to act as chairmen in the various sessions;
  25. Graham Douglas and Richard Palmer from IOP Publishing, who have kindly answered all our emails and found solutions to all our questions and demands;
  26. wise seniors of the LAM series who could not participate at the 13th conference but

  1. FOREWORD: The 70th birthday of Professor Stig Stenholm The 70th birthday of Professor Stig Stenholm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2010-09-01

    Western and Soviet laser cooling communities. In neutral Finland, accessible to both parties, he organized informal workshops that crucially sped the development of laser cooling. The importance of these meetings is highlighted in Bill Phillips' Nobel lecture in 1997 [6]. However, as the emphasis in laser cooling moved from a semiclassical description to quantum theory, Stig started to look for new avenues of research. My contact with Stig came when I went to see him for an MSc thesis topic. This involved polarization spectroscopy and modelling of an experiment performed by the laser spectroscopy group (Birger Ståhlberg) at the University of Helsinki. Without knowing anything about quantum optics I then found myself immediately in one of the Finnish-Soviet workshops on quantum electronics in the small town of Porvoo slightly east of Helsinki. There I met people like Juha Javanainen, Peter Knight, Axel Schenzle and Vladimir Chebotayev, and my own career in quantum optics began, working on the mathematics of the Landau-Zener model and how to apply it and other such models in molecular excitation by femtosecond pulses for my PhD thesis. This work was done together with Barry Garraway, who was a postdoc in Helsinki in the early 1990s. The Finnish-Soviet meetings continued for a while, and in 1990 we even got to travel to Novosibirsk (and back, too). During its existence (1964-1996), the Research Institute of Theoretical Physics (TFT) had a tremendous impact on physics in Finland. Short and long stays by visitors provided a unique and high-level environment for local researchers, the research fields covered a wide range of physics, and for many Finns returning from abroad it provided a place to stay until something more permanent turned up. Thus many researchers who later became professors had, at some point in their career, a connection with TFT. As a director Stig was very broad-minded and without this the happy atmosphere of TFT could not have existed. In the 1980s young

  2. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    . Improved beam quality of a high power Yb: YAG laser (oral paper) / Dennis G. Harris ... [et al.]. Intracavity adaptive optics optimization of an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (oral paper) / Petra Welp, Ulrich Wittrock. New results in high power lasers beam correction (oral paper) / Alexis Kudryashov ... [et al.]. Adaptive optical systems for the Shenguang-III prototype facility (oral paper) / Zeping Yang ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics control of solid-state lasers (poster paper) / Walter Lubeigt ... [et al.]. Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for multimode beam reshaping (poster paper) / Inna V. Ilyina, Tatyana Yu. Cherezova. New algorithm of combining for spatial coherent beams (poster paper) / Ruofu Yang ... [et al.]. Intracavity mode control of a solid-state laser using a 19-element deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ping Yang ... [et al.] -- pt. 6. Adaptive optics in communication and atmospheric compensation. Fourier image sharpness sensor for laser communications (oral paper) / Kristin N. Walker and Robert K. Tyson. Fast closed-loop adaptive optics system for imaging through strong turbulence layers (oral paper) / Ivo Buske and Wolfgang Riede. Correction of wavefront aberrations and optical communication using aperture synthesis (oral paper) / R. J. Eastwood ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics system for a small telescope (oral paper) / G. Vdovin, M. Loktev and O. Soloviev. Fast correction of atmospheric turbulence using a membrane deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ivan Capraro, Stefano Bonora, Paolo Villoresi. Atmospheric turbulence measurements over a 3km horizontal path with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Ruth Mackey, K. Murphy and Chris Dainty. Field-oriented wavefront sensor for laser guide stars (poster paper) / Lidija Bolbasova, Alexander Goncharov and Vladimir Lukin.

  3. 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2013-07-01

    the accepted contributions have been reviewed by the international team of 27 members of the Scientific Committee, with every contribution considered by four to eleven experts. In the majority of cases, the opinions of referees with diverse backgrounds and expertise converged. In 2011, the award 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond for Youth' was issued to Gregory P Bewley (Max Plank Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Germany) and Robert Zimmermann (Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, France) in recognition of their contributions to TMB-related scientific problems. The Best Poster Award was issued by Physica Scripta to Michael Winkler (University of Potsdam, Germany) in recognition of their poster presentation at TMB-2011. 5. Organization and acknowledgments The Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond was organized by the following members of the Organizing Committee: • Snezhana I Abarzhi (Chairperson, University of Chicago, USA) • Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) • Hiroshi Azechi (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Vladimir E Fortov (Institute for High Energy Density, Russia) • Boris Galperin (Organizer of the Special Course, University of South Florida, USA) • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Christopher J Keane (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) • Joseph J Niemela (Local Organizer, International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) • Katepalli R Sreenivasan (New York University, USA) The conference and course were sponsored by several agencies and institutions in the USA, Europe, Russia and Japan. The Organizing Committee of the TMB-2011 gratefully acknowledges support of the: • National Science Foundation (NSF), USA. Programmes: Plasma Physics; Physics Education and Interdisciplinary Research; Astronomy and Astrophysics; Applied Mathematics; Particulate and Multiphase Processes; Combustion, Fire and Plasma Systems • European Office of

  4. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  5. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del