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Sample records for stool antigen test

  1. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... TOPIC Peptic Ulcers Stool Tests Stool Test: Bacteria Culture Stool Test: Giardia Antigen Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Helicobacter pylori X-Ray Exam: Upper Gastrointestinal Tract (Upper GI) Ugh! Ulcers Ulcers Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines ...

  2. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  3. Stool Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC E. Coli Giardiasis Yersiniosis Stool Test: Bacteria Culture Stool Test: ... Stool Test: Ova and Parasites (O&P) Diarrhea E. Coli Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  4. [A new method for detection and erradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigens test].

    PubMed

    Amèndola, R; Doweck, J; Katz, J; Racca, J; Menendez, G; Schenone, L; Farìas, R; Barrantes, C; Quintanta, C; Zerbo, O; Kogan, Z; Valero, J; Bartellini, M A; Questa, U; Luna, P; Corti, R E

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays technics for Helicobacter pylori detection in stools like culture, and PCR, are expensive and difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate ELISA test efficacy for detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools comparing this results with standarized technics like histology (Giemsa), ureasa test and UBT C 14. 26 patients were evaluated in this study, ages between 15-75 with upper gastrointestinal symptoms; all of them required gastroduodenal endoscopy, status H. Pylori was determined with methods upon mentioned. 24 hours after endoscopy H. Pylori antigens in stools with the technique Premier Platinum Htsa, Elisa were determined. The detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools accurately identified active H. Pylori infection. The performance characteristics of this non-invasive method was similar in sensibility and specificity to conventional tests.

  5. Influence of proton pump inhibitor treatment on Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Okuda, Masumi; Kato, Chieko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Fujioka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment on stool antigen test using the TestMate pylori enzyme immunoassay. METHODS: This study assessed 28 patients [16 men and 12 women; mean age (63.1 ± 5.9) years; range, 25-84 years] who underwent stool antigen test and urea breath test (UBT) before and after PPI administration. RESULTS: Using the UBT as the standard, the sensitivity, specificity and agreement of the stool antigen test in all 28 patients were 95.2%, 71.4%, and 89.3%, respectively, before PPI administration, and 88.9%, 90.9%, and 89.3%, respectively, after PPI treatment. Mean UBT values were 23.98% ± 5.33% before and 16.19% ± 4.75% after PPI treatment and, in 15 patients treated for ≥ 4 wk, were significantly lower after than before 4 wk of PPI treatment (12.58% ± 4.49% vs 24.53% ± 8.53%, P = 0.048). The mean optical density (A450/630) ratios on the stool antigen test were 1.16 ± 0.20 before and 1.17 ± 0.24 after PPI treatment (P = 0.989), and were 1.02 ± 0.26 and 0.69 ± 0.28, respectively, in the group treated for > 4 wk (P = 0.099). CONCLUSION: The stool antigen test was equally sensitive to the UBT, making it a useful and reliable diagnostic method, even during PPI administration. PMID:22228969

  6. Stool Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the stomach, intestines, or another part of the gastrointestinal system . A doctor may order a stool collection to ... of bacteria , viruses, or parasites that invade the gastrointestinal system digestive problems, such as the malabsorption of certain ...

  7. Validation of a monoclonal stool antigen test for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in young children.

    PubMed

    Raguza, Daniele; Machado, Rodrigo Strehl; Ogata, Silvio Kazuo; Granato, Celso Francisco H; Patrício, Francy Reis S; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2010-04-01

    The monoclonal stool antigen test for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in children has been tested in developed countries, showing sensitivity and specificity higher than 90%. However, its accuracy in young children from developing countries is not well established. The aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of the monoclonal stool antigen test for diagnosing H pylori infection in children up to 7 years old. Two hundred seventy-six patients (53.6% female; ages 0.35-6.99 years) were evaluated. Gold standard positive culture or positive histology and rapid urease tests were performed. The test (Amplified IDEIATM Hp StAR) was done according to the manufacturer's instructions. Results were expressed as optical density (OD) and an OD more than or equal to 0.190 was considered positive. Additionally, a receiver operating characteristic curve was used to find the best cutoff. The monoclonal stool antigen test for diagnosing H pylori infection showed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] 92.7%-100%) and 76.2% specificity (95% CI 70.1%-81.4%), considering the manufacturer's cutoff. After setting a new cutoff with the receiver operating characteristic curve (OD = 0.400), sensitivity remained 100% (95% CI 92.7%-100%), but the specificity improved to 97.7% (95% CI 94.7%-99%). At ages up to 2 years, sensitivity was 100% (95% CI 43.8%-100%) and specificity was 100% (95% CI 92.4%-100%); at ages 2 to 4 years, 100% (95% CI 80.6%-100%) and 97.6% (95% CI 96%-99.2%); at ages older than 4 years, 100% (95% CI 88.6%-100%) and 96.6% (95% CI 94.7%-98%), respectively. The monoclonal stool antigen test is accurate for diagnosing H pylori in children younger than 7 years old, but it must be locally validated in order to find the best cutoff for each population.

  8. A one-step immune-chromatographic Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test for children was quick, consistent, reliable and specific.

    PubMed

    Kalach, Nicolas; Gosset, Pierre; Dehecq, Eric; Decoster, Anne; Georgel, Anne-France; Spyckerelle, Claire; Papadopoulos, Stephanos; Dupont, Christophe; Raymond, Josette

    2017-07-01

    This French study assessed a quick, noninvasive, immuno-chromatographic, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) stool antigen test for detecting infections in children. We enrolled 158 children, with a median age of 8.5 years (range eight months to 17 years), with digestive symptoms suggesting upper gastrointestinal tract disease. Upper digestive endoscopy was performed with gastric biopsy specimens for histology, a rapid urease test, culture test and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The H. pylori stool antigen test was performed twice for each child and the results were compared to the reference method. The reference methods showed that 23 (14.6%) of the 158 children tested were H. pylori positive. The H. pylori stool antigen test showed 91.3% sensitivity, with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 86.9-95.6 and 97% specificity (95% CI 94.3-99.6), 30.84 positive likelihood ratio and 0.09 negative likelihood ratio. The test accuracy was 96.2% (95% CI 93.2-99.1). The two blinded independent observers produced identical H. pylori stool antigen test results and the Kappa coefficient for the H. pylori stool antigen test was one. The H. pylori stool antigen test was found to be a consistent, reliable, quick and specific test for detecting the H. pylori infection in children. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comparison of a stool antigen test and serology for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in mass survey.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Tadashi; Oyama, Takao; Matsuzaka, Masashi; Danjo, Kazuma; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2009-04-01

    Serum antibody to Helicobacter pylori is tested in mass screening for gastric cancer along with the level of serum pepsinogens (PG) I and II. Recently, stool antigen tests have been developed as a new non-invasive test. We examined H. pylori infection by both serology and stool antigen test in a mass survey and compared the results to estimate applicability of stool antigen test for mass survey. A total of 994 healthy adults who received mass survey in April 2005 were tested. There were 379 men and 615 women, and the mean age was 57.7 years old. Stool samples were used to measure a H. pylori-specific antigen by enzyme immunoassay. Serum samples were tested for the prevalence of IgG antibody to H. pylori, and the level of PGs I and II was also measured to determine the presence of atrophic gastritis. Infection of H. pylori was defined as positive 61.4% and 56.4% by serology and stool antigen test, respectively. The concordance of both tests was not affected by gender and age of the subjects but difference was seen in subjects with atrophic gastritis. In particular, positivity of stool antigen test (81.8%) was significantly lower than that of serology (88.7%, p < .05) in 303 subjects with severe atrophic gastritis. Stool antigen test, which detects present but not previous infection of H. pylori, would be applicable to diagnose H. pylori infection in mass survey. Usefulness of stool antigen tests for the screening of gastric cancer should be examined.

  10. Characterization and usefulness of stool antigen tests using a monoclonal antibody to Helicobacter pylori catalase.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masami; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Takahashi, Ryoki; Kajiyama, Hirofumi; Sano, Yukari; Sakaedani, Naomi; Kato, Azusa; Hirata, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Yoshihiro

    2012-04-01

    Two types of stool antigen tests have been used in the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. Testmate Pylori Antigen enzyme immunoassay (TPAg EIA) is a direct sandwich enzyme immunoassay (EIA) while Testmate Rapid Pylori Antigen (Rapid TPAg) is performed using immunochromatography. The aim of this study was to study the characterization and usefulness of these tests. Accuracy of both tests was studied using 111 fecal samples obtained from H. pylori-positive or -negative patients. Cross-reactivity was examined with four other Helicobacter spp. and five fecal bacteria in humans. To estimate the sensitivity of both kits, we tested H. pylori clinical strains. We also examined the diagnostic performances of both tests after the storage for 12 months. The accuracy of both Testmate kits was 100% in fecal samples from 111 patients. No cross-reactivity was observed in both Testmate kits in five fecal bacteria and four other Helicobacter spp. TPAg EIA and Rapid TPAg showed positive results in 1342 of 1344, and 483 of 485 clinical strains, respectively. Diagnostic performances was maintained for 12 months when TPAg EIA was stored at 4°C and Rapid TPAg at 30°C. We examined the details of high accuracy of TPAg EIA and Rapid TPAg. The diagnostic performance of both kits was maintained after storage for up to 1 year. The two types of tests would be useful in the management of H. pylori infection. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of stool antigen test for Helicobacter pylori infection in asymptomatic children from a developing country using 13C-urea breath test as a standard.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saijuddin; Khaled, M A; Islam, Aminul; Kurpad, A V; Mahalanabis, Dilip

    2005-05-01

    Prevalence of asymptomatic Helicobacter pylori infection is very high in infants and children in developing countries. C urea breath test (UBT) is a reliable non-invasive diagnostic test for H. pylori infection in children that avoids invasive endoscopy. We compared a newly introduced H. pylori stool antigen test (with a high sensitivity and specificity in symptomatic children) with UBT in asymptomatic children mostly 1-5 years old, from a population with a high prevalence of infection. Eighty six asymptomatic children (42 boys and 44 girls) were tested for H. pylori infection using the UBT and a stool antigen test (HpSA) based on a sandwich enzyme immunoassay for antigen detection. Forty five of the eighty-six (52.3%) children tested positive for H. pylori using the breath test. In 34 of these forty-five children, H. pylori antigen was detected in stool (sensitivity = 75.6%, 95% CI = 63 to 88%). Of the 50 of 86 (58%) children positive by HpSA test, 34 were positive for breath test. Of the 41 children with negative UBT test 25 were negative for stool antigen test (specificity = 61%, 95% CI = 46 to 76%). The sensitivity and specificity of the new stool antigen test are lower in asymptomatic children with high H. pylori prevalence rate compared to those reported for children with gastrointestinal symptoms. Its usefulness is limited for diagnosis in an asymptomatic child with H. pylori infection.

  12. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of five different stool antigen tests for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Huseyin; Kesli, Recep; Karabagli, Pinar; Terzi, Yuksel

    2013-10-01

    Several noninvasive diagnostic tests based on the detection of Helicobacter pylori stool antigen (HpSA) have been developed. The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of 5 HpSA tests-2 monoclonal enzyme immunoassay tests (EIAs: the Premier Platinum HpSA Plus test and Helicobacter pylori Antigen (Hp Ag) test) and 3 rapid immunochromatographic assay (ICA) tests (the ImmunoCard STAT! HpSA test, one step HpSA test, and H. pylori fecal antigen test)--for diagnosing H. pylori infection in adult patients with dyspeptic symptoms before eradication therapy. A total of 198 patients with dyspeptic symptoms were included in the study. A gastric biopsy was collected for histopathology and rapid urease testing. Stool specimens for HpSA testing were also collected. Patients were considered H. pylori positive if two invasive tests (histological and rapid urease tests) were positive. The sensitivity and specificity were 92.2% and 94.4%, respectively, for the Premier Platinum HpSA Plus test; 48.9% and 88.9%, respectively, for the HP Ag test; 86.7% and 88.9, respectively, for the One Step HpSA test; 68.9% and 92.6%, respectively, for the ImmunoCard STAT! HpSA test; and 78.9% and 87%, respectively, for the H. Pylori fecal antigen test. The Premier Platinum HpSA Plus EIA test was determined to be the most accurate stool test for diagnosing H. pylori infections in adult dyspeptic patients. The currently available ICA-based tests are fast and easy to use but provide less reliable results. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Development and initial evaluation of a lateral flow dipstick test for antigen detection of Entamoeba histolytica in stool sample.

    PubMed

    Saidin, Syazwan; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Othman, Nurulhasanah; Lim, Yvonne Ai-Lian; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Zakaria, Nik Zairi; Noordin, Rahmah

    2017-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica infection remains a public health concern in developing countries. Early diagnosis of amoebiasis can avoid disease complications, thus this study was aimed at developing a test that can rapidly detect the parasite antigens in stool samples. Rabbits were individually immunized with recombinant pyruvate phosphate dikinase (rPPDK) and E. histolytica excretory-secretory antigens to produce polyclonal antibodies. A rapid dipstick test was produced using anti-rPPDK PAb lined on the dipstick as capture reagent and anti-EhESA PAb conjugated to colloidal gold as the detector reagent. Using E. histolytica-spiked in stool sample of a healthy individual, the detection limit of the dipstick test was found to be 1000 cells ml(-1). Meanwhile when rPPDK was spiked in the stool sample, the minimum concentration detected by the dipstick test was 0.1 μg ml(-1). The performances of the dipstick, commercial Techlab E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and real-time PCR were compared using 70 stool samples from patients infected with Entamoeba species (n = 45) and other intestinal pathogens (n = 25). When compared to real-time PCR, the diagnostic sensitivity of the dipstick for detection of E. histolytica was 65.4% (n = 17/26); while the diagnostic specificity when tested with stool samples containing other intestinal pathogens was 92% (23/25). In contrast, Techlab E. histolytica II ELISA detected 19.2% (5/26) of the E. histolytica-positive samples as compared to real-time PCR. The lateral flow dipstick test produced in this study enabled rapid detection of E. histolytica, thus it showed good potential to be further developed into a diagnostic tool for intestinal amoebiasis.

  14. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of two rapid stool antigen tests using an immunochromatographic assay to detect Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Etto, Joyce Matie Kinoshita; Mattar, Rejane; Villares-Lopes, Cibele Aparecida; Marques, Sergio Barbosa; Carrilho, Flair José

    2017-05-05

    The stool antigen assay for H. pylori infection diagnosis with monoclonal antibodies is a simple and recommended technique by the Maastricht V/Florence consensus report. Recently, Pylori K-Set K-1219 (Coris Bioconcept Sprl, Belgium) and HP-F23 (Symbiosys, Brazil) have been made commercially available in Brazil. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracies of these two rapid stool antigen tests by immunochromatographic assays (index tests) for the clinical practice. A total of 98 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and (13)C-urea breath test entered the study. H. pylori infection status was defined by the combination of the rapid urease test and the (13)C-urea breath test (reference standard). Two observers who were aware of H. pylori status performed the reading of index tests. Diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value with 95% confidence intervals, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio and kappa index measure of agreement) were determined. The index tests where in perfect agreement with the H. pylori status with kappa values of 0.87 for Pylori K-Set K-1219 and 0.92 for HP-F23. The sensitivity of HP-F23 was 97.9% (IC95%: 87.5-100) and specificity was 93.8% (IC95%; 84-97.2).The positive likelihood ratio was 15.8, and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.02. The Pylori K-Set K-1219 had a sensitivity of 87.7% (IC95%: 74.5-94.9) and a specificity of 100% (IC95%: 91.6-100); the positive likelihood ratio was ∞, and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.1. The test line on the cassette device of HP-F23 was stronger than of the Pylori K-Set K-1219. The HP-F23 test performed better in clinical practice. Nonetheless, the (13)C-urea breath test is more reliable technique. Moreover, caution must be paid to the trace or clear pale test line readings that were observed in false positive and false negative results, leading to incorrect management of the patient

  15. Efficiency of Direct Microscopy of Stool Samples Using an Antigen-Specific Adhesin Test for Entamoeba Histolytica

    PubMed Central

    İrvem, Arzu; Özdil, Kamil; Çalışkan, Zuhal; Yücel, Muhterem

    2016-01-01

    Background: E. histolytica is among the common causes of acute gastroenteritis. The pathogenic species E. histolytica and the nonpathogenic species E. dispar cannot be morphologically differentiated, although correct identification of these protozoans is important for treatment and public health. In many laboratories, the screening of leukocytes, erythrocytes, amoebic cysts, trophozoites and parasite eggs is performed using Native-Lugol’s iodine for pre-diagnosis. Aims: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of E. histolytica in stool samples collected from 788 patients residing in the Anatolian region of İstanbul who presented with gastrointestinal complaints. We used the information obtained to evaluate the effectiveness of microscopic examinations when used in combination with the E. histolytica adhesin antigen test. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study Methods: Preparations of stool samples stained with Native-Lugol’s iodine were evaluated using the E. histolytica adhesin test and examined using standard light microscopy at ×40 magnification. Pearson’s Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis. Results: Of 788 samples, 38 (4.8%) were positive for E. histolytica adhesin antigens. When evaluated together with the presences of erythrocytes, leukocytes, cysts, and trophozoites, respectively, using logistic regression analysis, leukocyte positivity was significantly higher. The odds ratio of leukocyte positivity increased adhesin test-positivity by 2,530-fold (95% CI=1.01–6.330). Adhesin test-positivity was significant (p=0.047). Conclusion: In line with these findings, the consistency between the presence of cysts and erythrocytes and adhesin test-positivity was found to be highly significant, but that of higher levels of leukocytes was found to be discordant. It was concluded that leukocytes and trophozoites were easily misjudged

  16. Performances of Four Helicobacter pylori Serological Detection Kits Using Stool Antigen Test as Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine the performances of four Helicobacter pylori serological detection kits in different target groups, using Amplified IDEIA™ Hp StAR™ as gold standard. Kits studied were Rapid Immunochromatoghraphic Hexagon, Helicoblot 2.1, an EIA IgG kit and EIA IgA kit. Methods: Stool and blood samples were collected from 162 apparently healthy participants (control) and 60 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Results: The performances of the four serological detection kits were found to be affected by gender, age, health status and ethnicity of the participants. In the control group, the Helicoblot 2.1 kit had the best performance (AUC = 0.85; p<0.05, accuracy = 86.4%), followed by EIA IgG (AUC = 0.75; p<0.05, accuracy = 75.2%). The Rapid Hexagon and EIA IgA kits had relatively poor performances. In the T2DM subgroup, the kits H2.1 and EIA IgG had best performances, with accuracies of 96.5% and 93.1% respectively. The performance of EIA IgG improved with adjustment of its cut-off value. Conclusion: The performances of the detection kits were affected by various factors which should be taken into consideration. PMID:27736910

  17. Flushable reagent stool blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Stool occult blood test - flushable home test; Fecal occult blood test - flushable home test ... This test is performed at home with disposable pads. You can buy the pads at the drug store without ...

  18. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Infants and Toddlers in South America: Concordance between [13C]Urea Breath Test and Monoclonal H. pylori Stool Antigen Test

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mayuko; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; Melo, Fabrício Freire; Checkley, William; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa C.; Silva, Igor Simões; Gilman, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive tests for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in very young children are strongly required. We investigated the agreement between the [13C]urea breath test ([13C]UBT) and a monoclonal ELISA (HpSA) for detection of H. pylori antigen in stool. From October 2007 to July 2011, we enrolled 414 infants (123 from Brazil and 291 from Peru) of ages 6 to 30 months. Breath and stool samples were obtained at intervals of at least 3 months from Brazilian (n = 415) and Peruvian (n = 908) infants. [13C]UBT and stool test results concurred with each other in 1,255 (94.86%) cases (kappa coefficient = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87 to 0.92). In the H. pylori-positive group, delta-over-baseline (DOB) and optical density (OD) values were positively correlated (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). The positivity of the tests was higher (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.01; 95% CI = 4.50 to 8.04) in Peru (546/878; 62.2%) than in Brazil (81/377; 21.5%) and increased with increasing age in Brazil (P = 0.02), whereas in Peru it decreased with increasing age (P < 0.001). The disagreement between the test results was associated with birth in Brazil and female gender but not with age and diarrhea. Our results suggest that both [13C]UBT and the stool monoclonal test are reliable for diagnosing H. pylori infection in very young children, which will facilitate robust epidemiological studies in infants and toddlers. PMID:24006009

  19. Prospective evaluation of a new stool antigen test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori, in comparison with histology, rapid urease test, (13)C-urea breath test, and serology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongmin; Kim, Chung Hyeon; Kim, Donghee; Chung, Su Jin; Song, Ji Hyun; Kang, Jung Mook; Yang, Jong In; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young Sun; Yim, Jeong Yoon; Lim, Seon Hee; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a new polyclonal enzyme immunoassay for the detection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antigen in stool by determination of the optimal cut-off value in the screening population. A consecutive 515 patients undergoing a routine health check-up were prospectively enrolled. H. pylori infection was defined if at least two of four tests (histology, rapid urease test, (13)C-urea breath test, and serology) were positive. A stool antigen test (EZ-STEP H. pylori) was performed for the detection of H. pylori. The optimal cut-off value was determined by the receiver-operator characteristic curve. The diagnostic performance of each test was evaluated with regard to the histological diagnosis of atrophic gastritis (AG)/intestinal metaplasia (IM), degree of AG/IM, and old age. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of the stool antigen test were 93.1%, 94.6%, 95.1%, 92.3%, and 93.8%, respectively. The sensitivity of histology, rapid urease test, and the (13)C-urea breath test ranged from 89.1% to 97.6%, and their specificity was > 98%, while serology had high sensitivity, but low specificity. The accuracy of the stool antigen test was comparable to that of other methods (93.6-95.9%), whereas it was higher than that of serology. The stool antigen test still showed good diagnostic performance in the setting of progression of AG/IM and in patients over 40 years. The performance of a new stool antigen test was comparable to that of other methods in the diagnosis of H. pylori infection for the screening population, even with the presence of AG/IM. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Detection of Helicobacter pylori by Real-Time PCR for 16s rRNA in Stools of NonInfected Healthy Children, Using ELISA Antigen Stool Test as the Gold Standard.

    PubMed

    George, Sergio; Mamani, Nora; Lucero, Yalda; Torres, Juan Pablo; Farfán, Mauricio; Lagomarcino, Anne J; Orellana, Andrea; O'Ryan, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    We previously detected Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigen ELISA assay in 33-41% of asymptomatic Chilean children between 2-3 years of age, of which 11-20% had a transient infection and 21-22% a persistent infection. A total of 88% of ELISA-positive samples were also rtPCR positive, while 37/133 (33%) of ELISA-negative stool samples were rtPCR positive. The significance of a ELISA-negative/rtPCR-positive sample requires clarification. We aimed to determine whether rtPCR is able to detect persistent infections not detected by ELISA. We selected 36 children with an ELISA-negative/rtPCR-positive stool sample, of which 25 were never H. pylori infected according to ELISA, and 11 had a transient infection with an ELISA-positive sample before or after the discordant sample. At least two additional consecutive ELISA-negative samples per child were tested in duplicate by rtPCR for the 16s rRNA gene. A total of 14 of 78 (17.9%) rtPCR reactions were positive, but only 4/78 (5.1%) were positive in both duplicates, representing a total of 3/36 (8.3%) children with an additional rtPCR-positive sample, only one of whom was persistently negative by ELISA. One child with a transient infection had two positive rtPCR reactions despite negative ELISA samples. In H. pylori noninfected or transiently infected children, as determined by stool ELISA, additional ELISA-negative/rtPCR-positive stool samples were found in 8.3% of children, but a possible persistent infection was only identified in 2.7% of children. Thus, the characterization of infection dynamics in children is not being misrepresented by application of stool ELISA. Furthermore, rtPCR does not significantly improve dynamic characterization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Stool DNA Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... result. A test is considered negative if DNA markers common to colon cancer or precancerous polyps and signs of blood are ... result. A test is considered positive if DNA markers common to colon cancer or precancerous polyps or signs of blood are ...

  2. Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin A A A What's in this ... Questions en español Muestra de materia fecal: toxina C. difficile What It Is A stool (feces) sample ...

  3. Stool Testing for Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Douglas J; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to reduce CRC incidence and mortality and is widely recommended. However, despite the demonstrated benefits of screening and ongoing efforts to improve screening rates, a large percentage of the population remains unscreened. Noninvasive stool based tests offer great opportunity to enhance screening uptake. The evidence supporting the use of both fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and stool DNA (sDNA) has been growing rapidly and both tests are now commercially available for use. Other stool biomarkers (eg, RNA and protein based) are also actively under study both for use independently and as adjuncts to the currently available tests. This mini review provides current, state of the art knowledge about noninvasive stool based screening. It includes a more detailed examination of those tests currently in use (ie, FIT and sDNA) but also provides an overview of stool testing options under development (ie, protein and RNA).

  4. Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is normally harmless, but certain varieties may produce toxins (harmful substances) if the bacterial balance in the colon is disrupted. This might happen as a result of antibiotic treatment, chemotherapy, or intestinal ... request a C. difficile toxin stool test if your child has taken antibiotics ...

  5. Investigation of Helicobacter pylori antigen in stool samples of patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Zeki; Karamese, Murat; Acar, Osman; Aksak Karamese, Selina; Dicle, Yalcin; Albayrak, Fatih; Can, Serpil; Guvendi, Bulent; Turgut, Alpgiray; Cicek, Mustafa; Yazgi, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is usually acquired in early childhood and it can persist throughout life without antibiotic treatment. This study aimed to compare the accuracy of the noninvasive H. pylori Stool Antigen Test-applied on the stool samples with the invasive gold standart Rapid Urease Test-applied on the gastric biopy samples of patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. After endoscopy, biopsy and stool specimens were taken in 122 patients. The infection was detected with rapid urease test which is accepted as gold standart test. Rapid, one-step H. pylori card test was applied to all patients stool specimens. In this study 106 of the 122 patients (86.8%) were positive for H. pylori infection, while 16 of the 122 patients (13.2%) were negative. H. pylori card test was negative in 13 of the 16 patients and was positive in 98 of the 106. The sensitivity, specifity, positive and negative predictive values were 92.45%, 81.25%, 97.02%, and 61.90%, respectively. H. pylori card test is rapid, easy, noninvasive and inexpensive methods for detection H. pylori infection. This test showed high sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, it may be a good alternative to invasive tests for the detection of H. pylori infections especially in children. PMID:26887240

  6. Detection of non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter Species from Stool Specimens with an Immunochromatographic Antigen Detection Assay

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Brianne A.; Couturier, Marc Roger; Kalp, Kim J.

    2013-01-01

    The STAT! Campy immunochromatographic assay for Campylobacter antigen was compared to culture for 500 clinical stool specimens. Antigen was detected in six culture-negative, PCR-positive specimens. C. upsaliensis, a pathogenic species that is traditionally difficult to recover in routine stool cultures, was detected in two of these culture-negative specimens. This study provides evidence that antigen testing may cross-react with at least one additional non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter species that may be missed by routine culture for campylobacteriosis. PMID:23554192

  7. Evaluation of a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Giardia lamblia antigen in stool.

    PubMed Central

    Addiss, D G; Mathews, H M; Stewart, J M; Wahlquist, S P; Williams, R M; Finton, R J; Spencer, H C; Juranek, D D

    1991-01-01

    The lack of a quick, simple, and inexpensive diagnostic test has limited the ability of public health officials to rapidly assess and control outbreaks of Giardia lamblia in child day-care centers. We evaluated the performance of a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of a G. lamblia-associated antigen in stool. Stool specimens were collected from the diapers of 426 children attending 20 day-care centers, fixed in 10% Formalin and polyvinyl alcohol, and examined by microscopy by Formalin concentration and trichrome staining techniques. Specimens were also tested visually and spectrophotometrically by ELISA. Of 99 tests positive by microscopy, 93 were visually positive by ELISA (sensitivity, 93.9%). Of 534 tests negative for G. lamblia by microscopy, 32 (6.0%) were ELISA positive. However, on the basis of examination of multiple specimens from the same child, none of these could be considered false-positive ELISAs; the specificity of the ELISA was therefore 100%. The sensitivity of both microscopy and ELISA improved as the number of specimens per child increased. An optical density value of greater than 0.040 was 98.0% sensitive and 100% specific for G. lamblia. This ELISA, which appeared to be more sensitive for G. lamblia than did microscopic examination of stool, should be useful as an epidemiologic tool, particularly in day-care settings, and may also have a role in confirming clinical diagnoses of giardiasis. PMID:1864930

  8. Prevalence of amoebiasis in a model research community and its confirmation using stool antigen elisa for Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Tasleem; Khan, Aamir Ghafoor; Ahmed, Israr; Nazli, Rubina; Haider, Jamila

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) produces an invasive disease called amoebiasis, which commonly produces diarrhea with or without blood in both children and adults, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Entamoeba dispar (E. Dispar) is a non invasive, non pathogenic organism. Both Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba Dispar look alike on microscopy and therefore cannot be differentiated unless checked on ELISA, PCR or other specific method. To calculate the actual prevalence of pathogenic amoebiasis in children by comparing the stool microscopy with ELISA stool antigen i.e. gold standard. Across sectional, comparative study. Children under five years in a community village Budhni, District Peshawar. A sample of 288 children aged <5 years were randomly selected. Information's were collected on the age and gender of the children. Fresh stool specimens were examined microscopically and with stool antigen kit of ELISA for detection of Entamoeba histolytica. The specificity and sensitivity of microscopic method was calculated against ELISA. Data was analyzed using statistical computer software package SPSS version 10.0. A total of 288 stool specimens were collected and examined for Entamoeba histolytica. Out of these 36(12.5%) stools were positive for E. histolyticaon microscopy while 14(4.9%) were positive on ELISA. Out of 14 ELISA positive samples, 10 samples were also positive on microscopy while 4 were ELISA positive but microscopy negative. About 22 samples, which were positive on microscopy were negative on ELISA indicating that these samples might have been of E. Dispar which is non pathogenic protozoa. The sensitivity and specificity of microscopic method was 71.4% and 90.5% respectively, as against stool antigen test. Actual prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica is low in the area. Stool ELISA was able to differentiate between pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and the non-pathogenic Entamoeba dispar and thus can minimize unnecessary antiamoebic treatment in

  9. Detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I in stool specimens by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Clegg, S

    1980-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect and quantitate the fimbrial colonization factor antigen (CFA/I) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in stool specimens obtained from adult cases of diarrhea in which CFA/I-positive E. coli was the known causative agent. The inhibition method, or blocking technique, was used. In this method, a standardized dilution of human anti-CFA/I serum was preincubated with dilutions of stool extract before transfer to CFA/I-coated microtiter plate wells, and then ELISA was performed with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin. CFA/I purified from E. coli strain H-10407 (O78:H11) was used. Acute-phase diarrheal stool specimens were found to contain approximately 3.0 mg of antigen (mean value) per g stool, whereas control (CFA/I-negative) specimens contained insignificant amounts (less than 0.03 mg/g) of antigen. Also, CFA/I was detected in culture fluids of CFA/I positive enterotoxigenic E. coli belonging to a variety of serotypes and was undetectable in similar preparations from P-strains (spontaneous CFA/I-negative derivatives) of the same test cultures. Equivalent results were obtained in ELISA tests by using bacterial cells taken from isolated colonies grown on CFA agar. These results indicate that the ELISA technique will be useful for the diagnosis of diarrhea caused by CFA/I-positive enterotoxigenic E. coli. PMID:7031075

  10. Evaluation of a new antigen for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in stool of adult and children.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Maleknejad, Parviz; Mamishi, Setareh; Azhdarkosh, Hossein; Daryani, Naser Ebrahimi; Najafi, Mehri; Kazemi, Bahram; Paknejad, Malieh; Mahmoudi, Shima; Bandehpour, Mozhgan; Ghazi, Mona; Salavati, Ali

    2011-02-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing interest in noninvasive methods to diagnose Helicobacter pylori infection. Indeed, they can profitably replace endoscopy in predicting the diagnosis. The stool antigen test for H. pylori is a noninvasive immunoassay to diagnose active infection with this bacterium in human fecal samples. The aim of this study was detection of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase protein (AhpC) antigen by immunoblotting in stool samples for diagnosis of H. pylori. Chromosomal DNA from H. pylori was isolated. AhpC gene was amplified by PCR, These amplicons were cloned into pTZ57R/T cloning vector then subcloned into pQE30 expression vector and overexpressed using isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside in E. coli M15. AhpC protein was purified by affinity chromatography. Rabbits were immunized with the purified AhpC protein for the production of antibodies. To determine the accuracy of the test for diagnosing H. pylori infection from stool, we evaluated 84 patients (6-81 years old) using Western blot analysis by rabbit anti-AhpC antibody. Positive rapid urease test on biopsy samples was considered as the gold standard. AhpC gene was overexpressed, and AhpC protein was purified. Rabbit anti-AhpC antibody produced after immunization with the purified AhpC protein. By immunoblotting, we detected AhpC protein in the positive stool samples. The test showed a 83.3% sensitivity (95% CI: 69.8-92.5%) and a 91.7% specificity (95% CI: 77.5-98.2). Among the children, the sensitivity was 88.2% (95% CI: 63.6-98.5) and the specificity was 100% (95% CI: 69.2-100); in adults, the sensitivity and specificity were 80.6% (95% CI: 62.5-92.5) and 88.5% (95% CI: 69.8-97.6), respectively. Using of AhpC antigen for diagnosis of H. pylori infection is a useful noninvasive method, accurate in adolescents and children, and can be used for the development of a stool antigen detection kit for H. pylori. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER ANTIGEN IN STOOL SAMPLES AND ITS RELATION TO H. PYLORI POSITIVE CHOLECYSTITIS IN EGYPTIAN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC CALCULAR CHOLECYSTITIS.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ehsan H; Gerges, Shawkat S; Ahmed, Rehab; Mostafa, Zeinab M; Al-Hamid, Hager Abd; Abd El-Galil, Heba; Thabet, Suzan

    2015-12-01

    Evidences supporting the association between H. pylori infection and chronic cholecystitis could be found by using direct culture or staining of H. pylori in gallbladder tissues as well as indirect techniques. Stool antigen test has been widely used due to its noninvasive nature. Various stool antigen tests were developed to detect H. pylori using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) based on monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies This study evaluated the frequency of H. pylori antigen in stool samples of patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis as regard gall bladder histopathological changes. Fifty patients were included presented with symptomatic qholecystolithiasis recruited from the outpatient clinic of National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institute during 2014-2015. Full history and clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography were performed. Stool samples were collected, prepared and examined for detection of H. pylori antigen. Cholecystectomy was done for all patients; 45 patients (90%) by laparoscopic Cholecystectomy and 5 patients (10%) by open surgery and removed gallbladders were submitted to pathology department for detection of H. pylori in tissue under microscope using Giemsa stain. The results showed that (82%) were females with mean age (42.6 +/- 1 years). The mean BMI was (29 + 7.2) H. pylori-specific antigen in stool samples was detected in 40% of patients and 38% were detected in patients; tissue, with significant correlation between H. pylori-specific antigen in stool and in tissue. Histopathological pictures infection in tissue were 68.4% mucosal erosions, 63.2% mucosal atrophy, 57.9% mucosal hyperplasia, 26.3% metaplasia, 42.1% musculosa hypertrophy, 26.3% fibrosis, but lymphoid aggregates were in 42.1% of cases.

  12. A novel multitarget stool DNA test for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Malik, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Imperiale TF, Ransohoff DF, Itzkowitz SH, Levin TR, Lavin P, Lidgard GP, Ahlquist DA, Berger BM. Multitarget stool DNA testing for colorectal-cancer screening. N Engl J Med 2014;370(14):1287-97. This Practice Pearl reviews the results of a prospective, multicenter, cross-sectional clinical study that evaluated the performance of a new multitarget stool DNA (or mt-sDNA) screening test for colorectal cancer (CRC) and compared it with a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in individuals at average risk for CRC. The potential impact of this test on the future of CRC screening is also discussed in a brief commentary. mt-sDNA testing is a noninvasive screening test designed to detect DNA biomarkers associated with colorectal neoplasia and occult hemoglobin in the stool. The sensitivity of mt-sDNA testing for detection of CRC was 92.3%, compared with 73.8% for FIT (p = 0.002). Sensitivity for detecting advanced precancerous lesions was 42.4% for mt-sDNA testing and 23.8% for FIT (p < 0.001). The specificities of mt-sDNA testing and FIT were 86.6% and 94.9%, respectively (p < 0.001). mt-sDNA testing thus may be a first-line screening option for asymptomatic individuals at average risk for CRC who do not want to have a colonoscopy.

  13. The Diagnostic Performance of Stool DNA Testing for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Rong-Lin; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Wan-Li; Wang, Hui; Wang, Ji-Liang; Cai, Kai-Lin; Long, Yue-Ping; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Tao, Kai-Xiong; Wang, Guo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of stool DNA testing for colorectal cancer (CRC) and compare the performance between single-gene and multiple-gene tests. MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE databases were searched using keywords colorectal cancers, stool/fecal, sensitivity, specificity, DNA, and screening. Sensitivity analysis, quality assessments, and performance bias were performed for the included studies. Fifty-three studies were included in the analysis with a total sample size of 7524 patients. The studies were heterogeneous with regard to the genes being analyzed for fecal genetic biomarkers of CRC, as well as the laboratory methods being used for each assay. The sensitivity of the different assays ranged from 2% to 100% and the specificity ranged from 81% to 100%. The meta-analysis found that the pooled sensitivities for single- and multigene assays were 48.0% and 77.8%, respectively, while the pooled specificities were 97.0% and 92.7%. Receiver operator curves and diagnostic odds ratios showed no significant difference between both tests with regard to sensitivity or specificity. This meta-analysis revealed that using assays that evaluated multiple genes compared with single-gene assays did not increase the sensitivity or specificity of stool DNA testing in detecting CRC. PMID:26844449

  14. Posttreatment Follow-Up of Helicobacter pylori Infection Using a Stool Antigen Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Daniel E.; Taylor, David N.; Gilman, Robert H.; Meza, Rina; Katz, Uriel; Bautista, Christian; Cabrera, Lilia; Velapatiño, Billie; Lebron, Carlos; Razúri, Manuel; Watanabe, J.; Monath, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori stool antigen enzyme immunoassay (HpSA) was evaluated during posttreatment follow-up of patients in a country with a very high prevalence of H. pylori infection. From among 273 dyspeptic individuals (18 to 55 years) initially recruited from a shantytown in Lima, Peru, 238 participants who met the inclusion criteria and were suspected to be H. pylori positive based on 14C urea breath test (UBT) results underwent endoscopy. Participants with endoscopy-proven infections received standard eradication therapy and were monitored by UBT and HpSA at 1 month following treatment and at 3-month intervals for 9 months posttreatment. A second endoscopy was performed if UBT results showed evidence of treatment failure or H. pylori recurrence. Biopsy results were considered the “gold standard” in all analyses. Among patients who underwent endoscopy, HpSA had a pretreatment sensitivity of 93%. Two-hundred thirty patients completed the treatment regimen, of whom 201 (93%) were considered to have had successful treatment outcomes based on a negative follow-up UBT. Thirty-two patients with UBT-defined treatment failures or H. pylori recurrences at any point during the 9-month follow-up underwent a second endoscopy. In the posttreatment setting, HpSA had an overall sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 67%. Agreement between UBT and HpSA diminished throughout the follow-up. Among 14 participants in whom HpSA remained positive at 1 month following treatment despite UBT evidence of treatment success, 12 (86%) became HpSA negative within 3 months posttreatment. Although this study confirmed the validity of the HpSA in the initial assessment of dyspeptic patients, the test demonstrated a reduced overall accuracy in the detection of treatment failures and H. pylori recurrences during 9 months of posttreatment follow-up. Furthermore, in some patients it may take up to 3 months after successful eradication for antigen shedding to diminish to levels within the

  15. Nonutility of routine testing of stool for ova and parasites in a tertiary care Canadian centre.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mahmoud; Gregor, Jamie; Chande, Nilesh; Lannigan, Robert

    2012-05-01

    In many clinical situations, stool examinations for ova and parasites (O&P) are routine in the work-up of patients with acute or chronic diarrhea. Frequently, these tests are found to be negative for pathogens. The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic yield of routine stool testing for O&P in a Canadian tertiary care centre and to estimate the potential clinical benefit of a positive result. All stool samples sent to the central microbiology laboratory at London Health Sciences Centre were reviewed over a 5-year period ending January 2010. Initial screening was done by direct antigen testing using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique followed by direct microscopy for negative results where there was a high index of suspicion and for positive results to rule out any concurrent parasites not included in the EIA kit. Pathogens identified were categorized and their potential susceptibility to metronidazole was estimated. No clinical data were available, as this was purely a utilization study. A total of 5812 stool tests were ordered. Of these, 5681 (97.7%) were completed. The most common reasons for an incomplete test were sample leakage (n = 38) and use of the incorrect collection kit (n = 32). Direct microscopy identified white blood cells in 17% of patients with positive testing. The most common pathogen was Giardia lamblia , which was detected in 45/83 (54%) of positive specimens. Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar was identified in 16/83 (19%) and Cryptosporidium spp. in 10/83 (12%) of positive specimens. Microorganisms not thought to be pathogenic were identified in 7/83 (8%). Direct laboratory costs independent of labor were estimated at $1836 per clinically significant organism identified. Of the 77 specimens positive for pathogenic organisms, 62 (81%) were likely to be sensitive to treatment with metronidazole. In a tertiary care centre, the diagnostic yield of routine testing of stool for O&P during the evaluation of patients with acute or

  16. Multisite clinical evaluation of a rapid test for Entamoeba histolytica in stool.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, Hans P; Hanbury, Blake; Siddique, Abdullah; Samie, Amidou; Haque, Rashidul; Herbein, Joel; Petri, William A

    2015-02-01

    Rapid point-of-care detection of enteric protozoa in diarrheal stool is desirable in clinical and research settings to efficiently determine the etiology of diarrhea. We analyzed the ability of the third-generation E. histolytica Quik Chek assay developed by Techlab to detect amebic antigens in fecal samples collected from independent study populations in South Africa and Bangladesh. We compared the performance of this recently released rapid test to that of the commercially available ProSpecT Entamoeba histolytica microplate assay from Remel and the E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from Techlab, using real-time and nested-PCR for Entamoeba species to resolve any discrepant results. After discrepant resolution, The E. histolytica Quik Chek assay exhibited sensitivity and specificity compared to the E. histolytica II ELISA of 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.9% to 99.8%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%), respectively. Compared to the ProSpecT microplate assay, the E. histolytica Quik Chek (Quik Chek) assay exhibited 97.0% sensitivity (95% CI, 91.5% to 99.4%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%). Our results indicate that the Quik Chek is a robust assay for the specific detection of E. histolytica trophozoites in unfixed frozen clinical stool samples. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Multisite Clinical Evaluation of a Rapid Test for Entamoeba histolytica in Stool

    PubMed Central

    Verkerke, Hans P.; Hanbury, Blake; Siddique, Abdullah; Samie, Amidou; Haque, Rashidul; Herbein, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Rapid point-of-care detection of enteric protozoa in diarrheal stool is desirable in clinical and research settings to efficiently determine the etiology of diarrhea. We analyzed the ability of the third-generation E. histolytica Quik Chek assay developed by Techlab to detect amebic antigens in fecal samples collected from independent study populations in South Africa and Bangladesh. We compared the performance of this recently released rapid test to that of the commercially available ProSpecT Entamoeba histolytica microplate assay from Remel and the E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from Techlab, using real-time and nested-PCR for Entamoeba species to resolve any discrepant results. After discrepant resolution, The E. histolytica Quik Chek assay exhibited sensitivity and specificity compared to the E. histolytica II ELISA of 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.9% to 99.8%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%), respectively. Compared to the ProSpecT microplate assay, the E. histolytica Quik Chek (Quik Chek) assay exhibited 97.0% sensitivity (95% CI, 91.5% to 99.4%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%). Our results indicate that the Quik Chek is a robust assay for the specific detection of E. histolytica trophozoites in unfixed frozen clinical stool samples. PMID:25428152

  18. The development of an artificial stool usable for the surveillance of faecal haemoglobin testing.

    PubMed

    Miike, Akira; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sakurabayashi, Ikunosuke

    2017-01-01

    Background Faecal occult blood testing is an important diagnostic tool for the detection of colorectal cancer. However, it has not been standardized due to the absence of suitable specimens for surveillance. Methods We developed a ready-to-use artificial stool made from rice flour. This new artificial stool homogeneously contains not only human haemoglobin A0 (HbA0) but also glycerol as an internal standard material. After the collection of the artificial stool into a buffer, the haemoglobin concentration in dispersed solution was measured using a method based on the peroxidase like activity of haemoglobin. The glycerol concentration was measured using a commercially available triglyceride measurement kit. Results With regard to the haemoglobin stability, the decrease in the level of human haemoglobin in the artificial stool was <2% when it was stored at -80℃ for four months, -20℃ for two weeks, and 5℃ for two days. The artificial stool was easily collected with the collecting tubes of a commercially available faecal haemoglobin test kit. The weight of the collected artificial stool could be calculated by measuring the concentration of glycerol in the extracting solution of the collected stool sample. The haemoglobin concentrations could be adjusted based on their collection weights. Conclusions The artificial stool has a paste-like consistency and contains both haemoglobin and glycerol homogeneously. Furthermore, the measured haemoglobin concentration could be determined based on the collected stool weight, which was directly related to the glycerol concentration. These features make it a useful material for the surveillance of faecal occult blood testing.

  19. Stool DNA Testing to Screen for Colorectal Cancer in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Kuntz, Karen M.; Knudsen, Amy B.; Wilschut, Janneke A.; Zauber, Ann G.; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2013-01-01

    Background Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) considered whether to reimburse stool DNA testing for colorectal cancer screening among Medicare enrollees. Objective To evaluate the conditions under which stool DNA testing could be cost-effective compared with the colorectal cancer screening tests currently reimbursed by CMS. Design Comparative microsimulation modeling study using two independently-developed models. Data Sources Derived from literature. Target Population 65-year-old (Medicare eligible) individuals; 50-year old individuals as sensitivity analysis. Time Horizon Lifetime. Perspective Third-party payer. Interventions Stool DNA test every 3 or 5 years in comparison to currently-recommended colorectal cancer screening strategies. Outcome Measures Life expectancy, lifetime costs, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, threshold costs. Results of Base-Case Analysis Assuming a cost of $350 per test, strategies of stool DNA testing every 3 or 5 years yielded fewer life-years and higher costs than the currently recommended colorectal cancer screening strategies. Results of Threshold Analysis Screening with the stool DNA test would be cost-effective at per-test cost of $40 to $60 for 3-yearly stool DNA testing, depending on the simulation model used. There were no levels of sensitivity and specificity for which stool DNA testing would be cost-effective at its current cost of $350 per test. Stool DNA testing at 3-yearly intervals would be cost-effective at a cost of $350 per test if the relative adherence with stool DNA testing were at least 50% better than with other screening tests. Results of Sensitivity Analysis None of the above mentioned results changed significantly when considering a 50-year old cohort. Limitations We did not model other pathways than the traditional adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Conclusions Only if a significant reduction can be made to the test cost or if its availability would entice a large fraction of otherwise unscreened

  20. Stool DNA Testing for the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer: Assessment of Methylation Marker Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, John B.; Yab, Tracy C.; Taylor, William R.; Chari, Suresh T.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Ahlquist, David A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic cancer (PanC) presents at late stage with high mortality. Effective early detection methods are needed. Aberrantly methylated genes are unexplored as markers for noninvasive detection by stool testing. We aimed to select discriminant methylated genes and to assess accuracy of these and mutant KRAS in stool to detect PanC. METHODS Nine target genes were assayed by real-time methylation-specific PCR (MSP) in bisulfite-treated DNA from microdissected frozen specimens of 24 PanC cases and 30 normal colon controls. Archived stools from 58 PanC cases and 65 controls matched on sex, age, and smoking were analyzed. Target genes from fecal supernatants were enriched by hybrid capture, bisulfite-treated, and assayed by MSP. KRAS mutations were assayed using the QuARTS technique. RESULTS Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUCs) for tissue BMP3, NDRG4, EYA4, UCHL1, MDFI, Vimentin, CNTNAP2, SFRP2 and TFPI2 were 0.90, 0.79, 0.78, 0.78, 0.77, 0.77, 0.69, 0.67, and 0.66, respectively. The top 4 markers and mutant KRAS were evaluated in stool. BMP3 was the most discriminant methylation marker in stool. At 90% specificity: methylated BMP3 alone detected 51% of PanCs, mutant KRAS detected 50%, and combination detected 67%. AUCs for methylated BMP3, mutant KRAS, and combination in stool were 0.73, 0.75, and 0.85, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that stool assay of a methylated gene marker can detect PanC. Among candidate methylated markers discriminant in tissue, BMP3 alone performed well in stool. Combining methylated BMP3 and mutant KRAS increased stool detection over either marker alone. PMID:22083596

  1. Comparison of a Stool Antigen Detection Kit and PCR for Diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar Infections in Asymptomatic Cyst Passers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Rezaian, Mostafa; Babaei, Zahra; Rajabpour, Azam; Meamar, Ahmad R.; Pourbabai, Ahmad A.; Petri, William A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare stool antigen detection with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba sp. infection in asymptomatic cyst passers from Iran. Entamoeba dispar and, in one case, E. moshkovskii were the Entamoeba spp. found in the amebic cyst passers. There was a 100% correlation between the results from the TechLab E. histolytica II stool antigen kit and those from nested PCR. We concluded that E. dispar is much more common in asymptomatic cyst passers in Iran and that antigen detection and PCR are comparable diagnostic modalities. PMID:16757634

  2. Diagnostic Yield of Routine Enteropathogenic Stool Tests in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ihekweazu, Faith D.; Ajjarapu, Avanthi; Kellermayer, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Goals It can be important to exclude infectious etiologies prior to adjusting immunosuppressive therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) exacerbation. We sought to determine the diagnostic yield of routine infectious stool studies in pediatric UC patients. Procedures We conducted a retrospective review of 152 pediatric UC patients at Texas Children’s Hospital between January 2003 and December 2009. The patient records were followed through July 2014. The number and type of infectious stool studies performed and the results of those were collected. Results Three hundred fifty-four diagnostic stool tests were conducted for Clostridium difficile; 13.6% were positive. Two hundred twenty stool bacterial cultures were performed, and 1.8% were positive, all growing non-typhoid Salmonella. One of 13 (7.7%) Adenovirus PCR tests was positive. Two of 152 examinations (1.3%) for Ova and Parasites were positive. No stool tests for viral culture, viral particles, Yersinia or Rotavirus were positive. Conclusions Clostridium difficile infection is common in pediatric UC, and routine screening during flares is strongly recommended. Other bacterial and parasitic infections routinely tested for are uncommon, but Salmonella may be a potentially important attribute to disease exacerbations in select patients. In patients without co-morbid conditions, the utility of performing non-specific fecal viral tests is questionable. PMID:26663793

  3. Culturing Stool Specimens for Campylobacter spp., Pennsylvania, USA

    PubMed Central

    M’ikanatha, Nkuchia M.; Dettinger, Lisa A.; Perry, Amanda; Rogers, Paul; Reynolds, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, we surveyed 176 clinical laboratories in Pennsylvania regarding stool specimen testing practices for enteropathogens, including Campylobacter spp. Most (96.3%) routinely test for Campylobacter spp. In 17 (15.7%), a stool antigen test is the sole method for diagnosis. We recommend that laboratory practice guidelines for Campylobacter spp. testing be developed. PMID:22377086

  4. Stool DNA Test of Methylated Syndecan-2 for the Early Detection of Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Niu, Feng; Wen, Jialing; Fu, Xinhui; Li, Chujun; Zhao, Rongsong; Wu, Shan; Yu, Hao; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Side; Wang, Xinying; Wang, Jianping; Zou, Hongzhi

    2017-09-01

    Background: Although the incidence of colorectal cancer is steadily increasing, screening for colorectal cancer with conventional approaches is not routinely performed in China. Noninvasive screening methods are attractive options to resolve this issue. Syndecan-2 (SDC2) is frequently methylated in colorectal cancer. However, the value of a stool test of methylated SDC2 for the detection of colorectal cancer is unknown.Methods: Methylation status of SDC2 was tested in cell lines and 398 colorectal tissue samples and further evaluated with 497 stool samples, including 196 from colorectal cancer patients, 122 from adenoma patients, and 179 from normal individuals, using real-time methylation-specific PCR. The impacts of one quantitative partial stool sampling device and 17 potentially interfering substances on the performance of fecal methylated SDC2 were also analyzed. SDC2 expression was also measured.Results:SDC2 methylation level was higher in 96.8% (120/124) of colorectal cancer tissues compared with paired adjacent normal epithelia. Stool test of methylated SDC2 detected 81.1% (159/196) of colorectal cancer and 58.2% (71/122) of adenomas at a specificity of 93.3% (167/179). No significant difference was found between partial and whole stool collection on colorectal cancer detection (P > 0.05, R(2) = 0.80). Among 17 interfering substances, only berberine at high concentrations inhibited fecal detection of methylated SDC2SDC2 was overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared with normal epithelia.Conclusions: Fecal methylated SDC2 is a valuable biomarker for the noninvasive detection of colorectal neoplasms.Impact: Stool DNA test of methylated SDC2 would serve as an alternative method for screening colorectal neoplasms. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1411-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Active surveillance for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae using stool specimens submitted for testing for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Francois, Jeannette; Blash, Stephanie; Patel, Gopi; Jenkins, Stephen G; LaBombardi, Vincent; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Srinivasan, Arjun; Calfee, David P

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance to identify asymptomatic carriers of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is a recommended strategy for CRE control in healthcare facilities. Active surveillance using stool specimens tested for Clostridium difficile is a relatively low-cost strategy to detect CRE carriers. Further evaluation of this and other risk factor-based active surveillance strategies is warranted.

  6. Prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica -like cysts compared to E. histolytica antigens detected by ELISA in the stools of 600 patients from three socioeconomic communities in the Metropolitan City of Lahore, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muhammad Azhar; Maqbool, Azhar; Nazir, Muhammad Mudasser; Lateef, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Sarwar; Ahmed, Atif Nisar; Ziaullah, M; Lindsay, David S

    2015-04-01

    Amoebiasis, caused by Entamoeba histolytica , has a worldwide distribution and is of public health significance in many developing countries. It has a fecal-oral transmission cycle and is most prevalent in developing countries in regions where substandard sanitary conditions exist due to poverty. Little is known about the epidemiology of E. histolytica infection and its presence in different socioeconomic communities in developing countries. We undertook the present study in the city of Lahore, Pakistan, and our prediction was that the prevalence of E. histolytica -like cysts and E. histolytica stool antigen would be lower in patients from upper socioeconomic levels than in individuals from middle or lower socioeconomic levels. We investigated the prevalence of E. histolytica in humans from 3 socioeconomic communities in territories of Lahore, Pakistan. Six hundred fecal samples were collected and examined using both microscopy (triple fecal test) to detect cysts of E. histolytica -like amoeba and ELISA (stool antigen ELISA) to demonstrate diagnostic stool antigens of E. histolytica . Samples were from individuals living under conditions deemed to be upper socioeconomic class (n = 287), middle socioeconomic class (n = 172), and lower socioeconomic class (n = 141). The total prevalence of positive samples was 22.5% (135/600) by triple test and 16.8% (101/600) by stool antigen ELISA in the 600 fecal samples. Statistically, significant (P < 0.05) differences in prevalence were seen between the 3 socioeconomic class groups. Forty-four (15.3%) and 32 (11.1%) of 287 in the fecal samples from the upper socioeconomic class were positive by triple test and by antigen ELISA, respectively. Thirty-nine (22.6%) and 29 (16.8%) of 172 in the fecal samples from the middle socioeconomic class were positive by the triple test and by antigen ELISA, respectively. Fifty-two (36.8%) and 40 (28.3%) of 141 in the fecal samples from the lower socioeconomic class were positive by the triple

  7. Stool diagnosis of giardiasis using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay to detect Giardia-specific antigen 65 (GSA 65).

    PubMed

    Rosoff, J D; Sanders, C A; Sonnad, S S; De Lay, P R; Hadley, W K; Vincenzi, F F; Yajko, D M; O'Hanley, P D

    1989-09-01

    A commercially available enzyme immunoassay for the diagnosis of giardiasis was evaluated in a clinical trial. The ProSpecT/Giardia diagnostic test (Alexon, Inc., Mountain View, Calif.) was compared with the standard ova and parasite (O&P) microscopic examination. Additionally, several widely used stool fixatives and a commonly used transport medium were assessed for compatibility with the immunoassay. A total of 325 stool specimens were collected and used to evaluate assay performance. Of those, 93 specimens were collected from symptomatic Giardia O&P-positive patients and 232 specimens were randomly collected from patients as part of a routine health screening procedure. All 93 Giardia O&P-positive stool specimens were strongly positive by visual and spectrophotometric examination using the immunoassay. Of the 232 randomly collected specimens, 16 were positive by O&P examination and immunoassay, 6 were negative by O&P examination but positive by immunoassay, and 1 was positive by O&P examination and negative by immunoassay. There was substantial supportive evidence that indicated that the six immunoassay-positive, O&P-negative specimens were true-positives. When these six specimens were accepted as true-positives, the immunoassay detected almost 30% more cases of Giardia infection than did O&P examination. Its sensitivity and specificity were 96 and 100%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of O&P examination were 74 and 100%, respectively. The immunoassay also performed well on specimens treated with 10% neutral Formalin, sodium acetate-Formalin fixative, and Cary-Blair transport medium. However, the test was not compatible with polyvinyl alcohol-treated specimens. Overall, the ProSpecT/Giardia test was a sensitive, specific immunoassay which was easy to run and interpret. It offers a simple solution to traditional difficulties encountered in diagnosing Giardia infection.

  8. Multicenter Evaluation of Clinical Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Isolation of Campylobacter spp. from Stool

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Mary; Gonzalez, Anthony; Akin, Joshua; Polage, Christopher R.; Wymore, Kate; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Xavier, Karen; Sadlowski, Jennifer; Monahan, Jan; Hurd, Sharon; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Jerris, Robert; Watson, Renee; Santovenia, Monica; Mitchell, David; Harrison, Cassandra; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; DeMartino, Mary; Pentella, Michael; Razeq, Jafar; Leonard, Celere; Jung, Carrianne; Achong-Bowe, Ria; Evans, Yaaqobah; Jain, Damini; Juni, Billie; Leano, Fe; Robinson, Trisha; Smith, Kirk; Gittelman, Rachel M.; Garrigan, Charles; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-01-01

    The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), such as stool antigen tests, as standalone tests for the detection of Campylobacter in stool is increasing. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate the performance of stool antigen CIDTs compared to culture and PCR for Campylobacter detection. Between July and October 2010, we tested 2,767 stool specimens from patients with gastrointestinal illness with the following methods: four types of Campylobacter selective media, four commercial stool antigen assays, and a commercial PCR assay. Illnesses from which specimens were positive by one or more culture media or at least one CIDT and PCR were designated “cases.” A total of 95 specimens (3.4%) met the case definition. The stool antigen CIDTs ranged from 79.6% to 87.6% in sensitivity, 95.9 to 99.5% in specificity, and 41.3 to 84.3% in positive predictive value. Culture alone detected 80/89 (89.9% sensitivity) Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli-positive cases. Of the 209 noncases that were positive by at least one CIDT, only one (0.48%) was positive by all four stool antigen tests, and 73% were positive by just one stool antigen test. The questionable relevance of unconfirmed positive stool antigen CIDT results was supported by the finding that noncases were less likely than cases to have gastrointestinal symptoms. Thus, while the tests were convenient to use, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Campylobacter stool antigen tests were highly variable. Given the relatively low incidence of Campylobacter disease and the generally poor diagnostic test characteristics, this study calls into question the use of commercially available stool antigen CIDTs as standalone tests for direct detection of Campylobacter in stool. PMID:26962088

  9. Multicenter Evaluation of Clinical Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Isolation of Campylobacter spp. from Stool.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Collette; Patrick, Mary; Gonzalez, Anthony; Akin, Joshua; Polage, Christopher R; Wymore, Kate; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Xavier, Karen; Sadlowski, Jennifer; Monahan, Jan; Hurd, Sharon; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Jerris, Robert; Watson, Renee; Santovenia, Monica; Mitchell, David; Harrison, Cassandra; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; DeMartino, Mary; Pentella, Michael; Razeq, Jafar; Leonard, Celere; Jung, Carrianne; Achong-Bowe, Ria; Evans, Yaaqobah; Jain, Damini; Juni, Billie; Leano, Fe; Robinson, Trisha; Smith, Kirk; Gittelman, Rachel M; Garrigan, Charles; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-05-01

    The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), such as stool antigen tests, as standalone tests for the detection of Campylobacter in stool is increasing. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate the performance of stool antigen CIDTs compared to culture and PCR for Campylobacter detection. Between July and October 2010, we tested 2,767 stool specimens from patients with gastrointestinal illness with the following methods: four types of Campylobacter selective media, four commercial stool antigen assays, and a commercial PCR assay. Illnesses from which specimens were positive by one or more culture media or at least one CIDT and PCR were designated "cases." A total of 95 specimens (3.4%) met the case definition. The stool antigen CIDTs ranged from 79.6% to 87.6% in sensitivity, 95.9 to 99.5% in specificity, and 41.3 to 84.3% in positive predictive value. Culture alone detected 80/89 (89.9% sensitivity) Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli-positive cases. Of the 209 noncases that were positive by at least one CIDT, only one (0.48%) was positive by all four stool antigen tests, and 73% were positive by just one stool antigen test. The questionable relevance of unconfirmed positive stool antigen CIDT results was supported by the finding that noncases were less likely than cases to have gastrointestinal symptoms. Thus, while the tests were convenient to use, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Campylobacter stool antigen tests were highly variable. Given the relatively low incidence of Campylobacter disease and the generally poor diagnostic test characteristics, this study calls into question the use of commercially available stool antigen CIDTs as standalone tests for direct detection of Campylobacter in stool. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin testing.

    PubMed

    Özsoy, Sevim; İlki, Arzu

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and efficacy of screening stools submitted for C. difficile toxin assay for prevalence of VRE. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 158 stool samples submitted for C. difficile toxin to the Marmara University Microbiology Laboratory, were included in the study. Stool samples were analyzed by enzyme immuno assay test; VIDAS (bioMerieux, France) for Toxin A&B. Samples were inoculated on chromID VRE (bioMerieux, France) and incubated 24h at 37°C. Manuel tests and API20 STREP (bioMerieux, France) test were used to identify the Enterococci species. After the species identification, vancomycin and teicoplanin MIC's were performed by E test and molecular resistance genes for vanA vs vanB were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 158 stool samples, 88 were toxin positive. The prevalence of VRE was 17%(n:19) in toxin positives however, 11.4% in toxin negatives(n:70). All VRE isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium. These results were evaluated according to Fischer's exact chi-square test and p value between VRE colonization and C. difficile toxin positivity was detected 0.047 (p<0.05). PPV and NPV were 79% and 47% respectively. In our study, the presence of VRE in C. difficile toxin positives is statistically significant compared with toxin negatives (p<0.05). Screening for VRE is both additional cost and work load for the laboratories. Therefore VRE screening among C. difficile toxin positive samples, will be cost effective for determination of high risk patients in the hospitals especially for developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA from fecal immunochemical test can replace stool for detection of colonic lesions using a microbiota-based model.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Nielson T; Koumpouras, Charles C; Rogers, Mary A M; Ruffin, Mack T; Schloss, Patrick D

    2016-11-14

    There is a significant demand for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening methods that are noninvasive, inexpensive, and capable of accurately detecting early stage tumors. It has been shown that models based on the gut microbiota can complement the fecal occult blood test and fecal immunochemical test (FIT). However, a barrier to microbiota-based screening is the need to collect and store a patient's stool sample. Using stool samples collected from 404 patients, we tested whether the residual buffer containing resuspended feces in FIT cartridges could be used in place of intact stool samples. We found that the bacterial DNA isolated from FIT cartridges largely recapitulated the community structure and membership of patients' stool microbiota and that the abundance of bacteria associated with CRC were conserved. We also found that models for detecting CRC that were generated using bacterial abundances from FIT cartridges were equally predictive as models generated using bacterial abundances from stool. These findings demonstrate the potential for using residual buffer from FIT cartridges in place of stool for microbiota-based screening for CRC. This may reduce the need to collect and process separate stool samples and may facilitate combining FIT and microbiota-based biomarkers into a single test. Additionally, FIT cartridges could constitute a novel data source for studying the role of the microbiome in cancer and other diseases.

  12. Stool Xpert® MTB/RIF test for the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis at primary clinics in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mateveke, K.; Makamure, B.; Ferrand, R. A.; Gomo, E.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of Xpert® MTB/RIF on stool samples from children with clinical suspicion of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) at primary care clinics. DESIGN: A cross-sectional diagnostic evaluation enrolling 5–16 year olds from whom one induced sputum (IS) sample was tested for microbiological TB confirmation. Results of a single stool sample tested using Xpert were compared against microbiologically confirmed TB, defined as a positive result on sputum microscopy and/or culture and/or IS Xpert. RESULTS: Of 222 children enrolled, 218 had complete microbiological results. The median age was 10.6 years (interquartile range 8–13). TB was microbiologically confirmed in 19/218 (8.7%) children. Of these, respectively 5 (26%), 9 (47%) and 15 (79%) were smear-, culture- and IS Xpert-positive. Stool Xpert was positive in 13/19 (68%) microbiologically confirmed cases and 4/199 (2%) microbiologically negative cases. Stool Xpert detected 76.9% (10/13) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and 50% (3/6) of non-HIV-infected children with microbiologically confirmed TB (P = 0.241). CONCLUSION: Stool Xpert is a potential alternative screening test for children with suspected TB if sputum is unavailable. Strategies to optimise the diagnostic yield of stool Xpert assay need further study. PMID:28234079

  13. Discrepancies between Antigen and Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests for the Detection of Rotavirus and Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2016-05-01

    We compared the results of an antigen test (ELISA) with those of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of rotavirus and norovirus in stool specimens. Rotavirus and norovirus antigen-positive stool specimens were collected, and rotavirus and norovirus PCRs were performed on these specimens. Of the 325 rotavirus antigen-positive specimens, 200 were positive for both assays and 125 were PCR negative. Of 286 norovirus antigen-positive specimens, 51 were PCR negative. Comparison of the lower limit of detection showed that rotavirus PCR was 16 times more sensitive and norovirus PCR was over 4,000 times more sensitive than the ELISA. Discrepant results between ELISA and PCR were common, and the possibility of false-positive and false-negative results should be considered with rotavirus and norovirus assays.

  14. Intradermal antigen tests in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    McFadden, J P; Powles, A V; Baker, B S; Valdimarsson, H; Fry, L

    1990-01-01

    To assess whether elicitation of delayed hypersensitivity may be superior to trauma in inducing the Koebner reaction in psoriasis, 12 affected patients and 9 control subjects were tested with 0.1 ml intradermal injections of streptokinase/streptodornase (20 mu/5 mu per 0.1 ml), PPD (1 in 1000) and saline control solutions in a double-blind study; Koebner status was also established in the psoriatic patients. Injected sites were examined at 48 h and 7, 14, 21 and 28 days for local development of psoriasis, erythema and induration (diameter). One patient was Koebner-positive and developed psoriasis at all three injection sites. The other, Koebner-negative psoriatic subjects did not develop psoriasis locally. However, compared with non-psoriatic controls they showed a marked delay in resolution of the delayed hypersensitivity reaction to the PPD antigen and a similar but less marked phenomenon was observed for streptokinase/streptodornase. These findings indicate that intradermal antigen, of the nature and amount used in this study, is no more effective in inducing the Koebner phenomenon than injury alone. However, the ability of psoriasis patients to switch off cell-mediated immune reaction appears to be impaired.

  15. A qualitative study to identify reasons for Clostridium difficile testing in pediatric inpatients receiving laxatives or stool softeners.

    PubMed

    Kinlay, Joanne; Sandora, Thomas J

    2017-05-01

    To understand why clinicians send Clostridium difficile tests from hospitalized children receiving laxatives or stool softeners, we performed a mixed-methods study. We prospectively identified tested patients and surveyed their clinicians by e-mail. Reasons for testing included changes in stooling pattern on baseline bowel regimen, other changes in clinical status, and risk factors for C difficile infection. Education targeting discontinuing bowel medications before C difficile testing could improve the specificity of pediatric C difficile infection diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of Colorectal Serrated Polyps by Stool DNA Testing: Comparison with Fecal Immunochemical Testing for Occult Blood (FIT)

    PubMed Central

    Heigh, Russell I.; Yab, Tracy C.; Taylor, William R.; Hussain, Fareeda T. N.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Domanico, Michael J.; Berger, Barry M.; Lidgard, Graham P.; Ahlquist, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Precursors to 1/3 of colorectal cancer (CRC), serrated polyps have been under-detected by screening due to their inconspicuous, non-hemorrhagic, and proximal nature. A new multi-target stool DNA test (multi-target sDNA) shows high sensitivity for both CRC and advanced adenomas. Screen detection of serrated polyps by this approach requires further validation. We sought to assess and compare noninvasive detection of sessile serrated polyps (SSP) ≥1 cm by sDNA and an occult blood fecal immunochemical test (FIT). Methods In a blinded prospective study, a single stool sample used for both tests was collected from 456 asymptomatic adults prior to screening or surveillance colonoscopy (criterion standard). All 29 patients with SSP≥1 cm were included as cases and all 232 with no neoplastic findings as controls. Buffered stool samples were processed and frozen on receipt; Exact Sciences performed sDNA in batches using optimized analytical methods. The sDNA multi-marker panel targets methylated BMP3 (mBMP3) and NDRG4, mutant KRAS, β-actin, and hemoglobin. FIT (Polymedco OC-FIT Check) was performed in separate lab ≤2 days post defecation and evaluated at cutoffs of 50 (FIT-50) and 100 ng/ml (FIT-100). Results Median ages: cases 61 (range 57–77), controls 62 (52–70), p = NS. Women comprised 59% and 51%, p = NS, respectively. SSP median size was 1.2 cm (1–3 cm), 93% were proximal, and 64% had synchronous diminutive polyps. Among multi-target sDNA markers, mBMP3 proved highly discriminant for detection of SSP≥1 cm (AUC = 0.87, p<0.00001); other DNA markers provided no incremental sensitivity. Hemoglobin alone showed no discrimination (AUC = 0.50, p = NS). At matched specificities, detection of SSP≥1 cm by stool mBMP3 was significantly greater than by FIT-50 (66% vs 10%, p = 0.0003) or FIT-100 (63% vs 0%, p<0.0001). Conclusions In a screening and surveillance setting, SSP≥1 cm can be detected noninvasively by stool assay of

  17. Evaluation of molecular tools for detection and drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in stool specimens from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Julianna; Shiloh, Ron; Gilman, Robert H; Sheen, Patricia; Martin, Laura; Arenas, Fanny; Caviedes, Luz; Kawai, Vivian; Soto, Giselle; Williams, Diana L; Zimic, Mirko; Escombe, A Roderick; Evans, Carlton A

    2010-05-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis is difficult when patients cannot produce sputum. Most sputum is swallowed, and tuberculosis DNA can survive intestinal transit. We therefore evaluated molecular testing of stool specimens for detecting tuberculosis originating from the lungs. Paired stool and sputum samples (n=159) were collected from 89 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Control stool samples (n=47) were collected from patients without tuberculosis symptoms. Two techniques for DNA extraction from stool samples were compared, and the diagnostic accuracy of the PCR in stool was compared with the accuracy of sputum testing by PCR, microscopy, and culture. A heminested IS6110-PCR was used for tuberculosis detection, and IS6110-PCR-positive stool samples then underwent rifampin sensitivity testing by universal heteroduplex generator PCR (heteroduplex-PCR) assay. For newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, stool IS6110-PCR had 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity compared with results obtained by sputum culture, and stool PCR had similar sensitivities for HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients (P=0.3). DNA extraction with commercially available spin columns yielded greater stool PCR sensitivity than DNA extraction with the in-house Chelex technique (P=0.007). Stool heteroduplex-PCR had 98% agreement with the sputum culture determinations of rifampin resistance and multidrug resistance. Tuberculosis detection and drug susceptibility testing by stool PCR took 1 to 2 days compared with an average of 9 weeks to obain those results by traditional culture-based testing. Stool PCR was more sensitive than sputum microscopy and remained positive for most patients for more than 1 week of treatment. In conclusion, stool PCR is a sensitive, specific, and rapid technique for the diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing of pulmonary tuberculosis and should be considered when sputum samples are unavailable.

  18. Evaluation of Molecular Tools for Detection and Drug Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Stool Specimens from Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Julianna; Shiloh, Ron; Gilman, Robert H.; Sheen, Patricia; Martin, Laura; Arenas, Fanny; Caviedes, Luz; Kawai, Vivian; Soto, Giselle; Williams, Diana L.; Zimic, Mirko; Escombe, A. Roderick; Evans, Carlton A.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis is difficult when patients cannot produce sputum. Most sputum is swallowed, and tuberculosis DNA can survive intestinal transit. We therefore evaluated molecular testing of stool specimens for detecting tuberculosis originating from the lungs. Paired stool and sputum samples (n = 159) were collected from 89 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Control stool samples (n = 47) were collected from patients without tuberculosis symptoms. Two techniques for DNA extraction from stool samples were compared, and the diagnostic accuracy of the PCR in stool was compared with the accuracy of sputum testing by PCR, microscopy, and culture. A heminested IS6110-PCR was used for tuberculosis detection, and IS6110-PCR-positive stool samples then underwent rifampin sensitivity testing by universal heteroduplex generator PCR (heteroduplex-PCR) assay. For newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, stool IS6110-PCR had 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity compared with results obtained by sputum culture, and stool PCR had similar sensitivities for HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients (P = 0.3). DNA extraction with commercially available spin columns yielded greater stool PCR sensitivity than DNA extraction with the in-house Chelex technique (P = 0.007). Stool heteroduplex-PCR had 98% agreement with the sputum culture determinations of rifampin resistance and multidrug resistance. Tuberculosis detection and drug susceptibility testing by stool PCR took 1 to 2 days compared with an average of 9 weeks to obain those results by traditional culture-based testing. Stool PCR was more sensitive than sputum microscopy and remained positive for most patients for more than 1 week of treatment. In conclusion, stool PCR is a sensitive, specific, and rapid technique for the diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing of pulmonary tuberculosis and should be considered when sputum samples are unavailable. PMID:20200293

  19. Stool-based DNA testing, a new noninvasive method for colorectal cancer screening, the first report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Tavasoli, Alireza; Velayati, Arash; Sima, Hamid Reza; Vosooghinia, Hassan; Farzadnia, Mehdi; Asadzedeh, Hamid; Gholamin, Mehran; Dadkhah, Ezzat; Aarabi, Azadeh

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To detect tumor-associated DNA changes in stool samples among Iranian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to healthy individuals using BAT-26, p16 hypermethylation and long DNA markers. METHODS: Stool DNA was isolated from 45 subjects including 25 CRC patients and 20 healthy individuals using a new, fast and easy extraction method. Long DNA associated with tumor was detected using polymerase chain reaction method. Microsatellite studies were performed utilizing denaturating polyacrylamide gel to determine the instability of BAT-26. Methylation status of p16 promoter was analyzed using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). RESULTS: The results showed a significant difference in existence of long DNA (16 in patients vs 1 in controls, P < 0.001) and p16 (5 in patients vs none in controls, P = 0.043) in the stool samples of two groups. Long DNA was detected in 64% of CRC patients; whereas just one of the healthy individuals was positive for Long DNA. p16 methylation was found in 20% of patients and in none of healthy individuals. Instability of BAT-26 was not detected in any of stool samples. CONCLUSION: We could detect colorectal cancer related genetic alterations by analyzing stool DNA with a sensitivity of 64% and 20% and a specificity of 95% and 100% for Long DNA and p16 respectively. A non-invasive molecular stool-based DNA testing can provide a screening strategy in high-risk individuals. However, additional testing on more samples is necessary from Iranian subjects to determine the exact specificity and sensitivity of these markers. PMID:17461444

  20. Early Adoption of a Multitarget Stool DNA Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Finney Rutten, Lila J; Jacobson, Robert M; Wilson, Patrick M; Jacobson, Debra J; Fan, Chun; Kisiel, John B; Sweetser, Seth; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; St Sauver, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    To characterize early adoption of a novel multitarget stool DNA (MT-sDNA) screening test for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to test the hypothesis that adoption differs by demographic characteristics and prior CRC screening behavior and proceeds predictably over time. We used the Rochester Epidemiology Project research infrastructure to assess the use of the MT-sDNA screening test in adults aged 50 to 75 years living in Olmsted County, Minnesota, in 2014 and identified 27,147 individuals eligible or due for screening colonoscopy from November 1, 2014, through November 30, 2015. We used electronic Current Procedure Terminology and Health Care Common Procedure codes to evaluate early adoption of the MT-sDNA screening test in this population and to test whether early adoption varies by age, sex, race, and prior CRC screening behavior. Overall, 2193 (8.1%) and 974 (3.6%) individuals were screened by colonoscopy and MT-sDNA, respectively. Age, sex, race, and prior CRC screening behavior were significantly and independently associated with MT-sDNA screening use compared with colonoscopy use after adjustment for all other variables (P<.05 for all). The rates of adoption of MT-sDNA screening increased over time and were highest in those aged 50 to 54 years, women, whites, and those who had a history of screening. The use of the MT-sDNA screening test varied predictably by insurance coverage. The rates of colonoscopy decreased over time, whereas overall CRC screening rates remained steady. The results of the present study are generally consistent with predictions derived from prior research and the diffusion of innovation framework, pointing to increasing use of the new screening test over time and early adoption by younger patients, women, whites, and those with prior CRC screening. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stools - floating

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorption of nutrients ( malabsorption ) or too much gas (flatulence). Considerations Most causes of floating stools are harmless. ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 140. Read More Gas - flatulence Malabsorption Review Date 5/11/2016 Updated by: ...

  2. Stool Investigations for Colorectal Cancer Screening: From Occult Blood Test to DNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Andrea; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Pricci, Maria; Girardi, Bruna; Massaro, Antonio; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Barone, Michele; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo

    2016-06-01

    We report an update of current methods for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening based on fecal sample analysis. A systematic review of the literature was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Direct electronic databases. Blood in the stools is the first and most used strategy. Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and fecal immunochemical test (FIT) are the main methods. Both are economic, easy to perform with high specificity, and low sensitivity. Based on CRC multi-step process with genetic and epigenetic alterations in large bowel cell DNA, single mutations or panels of alterations have been detected. These tests have the advantage of a marked improvement of the sensitivity when compared to fecal blood. However, high costs, poor availability, and correct choice of marker panel represent the major limits. A specific sDNA panel including aberrantly methylated BMP3 and NDRG4 promoter regions, mutant k-ras and β-actin (a reference gene for human DNA quantity), and an immunochemical assay for human hemoglobin has been recently approved by Food and Drug Administration. Novel promising biomarkers for CRC screening are represented by microRNAs (miRNAs), a group of 18-25 nucleotide non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. Reports on these fecal biomarkers are case-control studies, and each of them evaluates single miRNAs or multi-target panels. On the other hand, some fecal proteins have been studied as possible CRC screening markers, even though they demonstrated poor results. Finally, alterations of estrogen receptor-beta (i.e., dramatic reduction in the early stage of CRC) have been demonstrated in tissue samples. Specific investigations are warranted in order to add further noninvasive markers to the panel of CRC screening tools.

  3. Dipstick Test for Rapid Diagnosis of Shigella dysenteriae 1 in Bacterial Cultures and Its Potential Use on Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Neelam; Nato, Faridabano; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Sire, Jean Marie; Garin, Benoit; Thi Phuong, Lan Nguyen; Diep, Tai The; Shako, Jean Christophe; Bimet, François; Filliol, Ingrid; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Ungeheuer, Marie Noëlle; Ottone, Catherine; Sansonetti, Philippe; Germani, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Background We describe a test for rapid detection of S. dysenteriae 1 in bacterial cultures and in stools, at the bedside of patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The test is based on the detection of S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using serotype 1-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to gold particles and displayed on a one-step immunochromatographic dipstick. A concentration as low as 15 ng/ml of LPS was detected in distilled water and in reconstituted stools in 10 minutes. In distilled water and in reconstituted stools, an unequivocal positive reaction was obtained with 1.6×106 CFU/ml and 4.9×106 CFU/ml of S. dysenteriae 1, respectively. Optimal conditions to read the test have been determined to limit the risk of ambiguous results due to appearance of a faint yellow test band in some negative samples. The specificity was 100% when tested with a battery of Shigella and unrelated strains in culture. When tested on 328 clinical samples in India, Vietnam, Senegal and France by laboratory technicians and in Democratic Republic of Congo by a field technician, the specificity (312/316) was 98.7% (95% CI:96.6–99.6%) and the sensitivity (11/12) was 91.7% (95% CI:59.8–99.6%). Stool cultures and the immunochromatographic test showed concordant results in 98.4 % of cases (323/328) in comparative studies. Positive and negative predictive values were 73.3% (95% CI:44.8–91.1%) and 99.7% (95% CI:98–100%). Conclusion The initial findings presented here for a simple dipstick-based test to diagnose S. dysenteriae 1 demonstrates its promising potential to become a powerful tool for case management and epidemiological surveys. PMID:21984895

  4. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  5. [Positive urine pneumococcal antigen test and vaccination].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Botrán, Alejandro; Martín-Rico, Patricia; Valdivia, Antonio; Pellicer, Ángel; Esparcia, Óscar

    2016-04-15

    Although urine pneumococcal antigen is an useful test, it has false positives such as pneumococcal vaccination. Positive urine pneumococcal antigen in Hospital de Denia (January-February/2015). We studied epidemiological, radiological and microbiological variables as well as previous pneumococcal vaccination (neumo-23 and/or neumo-13). Urine pneumococcal antigen test was positive in 12.4% of 385 cases. Only 33.3% of positive cases had pneumonia in chest X-ray, and 35.4% of patients had previous pneumococcal vaccination. In most cases (87.5%), an antibiotic was prescribed. Pneumococcal vaccination can produce a false positive result in the urine pneumococcal antigen test in clinical practice, leading to an unnecessary prescription of antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Stool Diary

    MedlinePlus

    ... descriptors for describing stool consistency: Type 1: Separate hard lumps, like nuts. Type 2: Sausage-shaped but lumpy. Type 3: Like a sausage or snake but with cracks on its surface. Type 4: Like a sausage or snake, smooth and soft. ...

  7. Multitarget stool DNA tests increases colorectal cancer screening among previously noncompliant Medicare patients

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Mark; Lester, Lynn; Chiniwala, Rupal; Berger, Barry

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the uptake of noninvasive multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) in a cohort of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening non-compliant average-risk Medicare patients. METHODS This cross sectional primary care office-based study examined mt-sDNA uptake in routine clinical practice among 393 colorectal cancer screening non-compliant Medicare patients ages 50-85 ordered by 77 physicians in a multispecialty group practice (USMD Physician Services, Dallas, TX) from October, 2014-September, 2015. Investigators performed a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective review of electronic health records to identify mt-sDNA use in patients who were either > 10 years since last colonoscopy and/or > 1 year since last fecal occult blood test. Test positive patients were advised to get diagnostic colonoscopy and thereafter patients were characterized by the most clinically significant lesion documented on histopathology of biopsies or excisional tissue. Descriptive statistics were employed. Key outcome measures included mt-sDNA compliance and diagnostic colonoscopy compliance on positive cases. RESULTS Over 12 mo, 77 providers ordered 393 mt-sDNA studies with 347 completed (88.3% compliance). Patient mean age was 69.8 (50-85) and patients were 64% female. Mt-sDNA was negative in 85.3% (296/347) and positive in 14.7% (51/347). Follow-up colonoscopy was performed in 49 positive patients (96.1% colonoscopy compliance) with two patients lost to follow up. Index findings included: colon cancer (4/49, 8.2%), advanced adenomas (21/49, 42.9%), non-advanced adenomas (15/49, 30.6%), and negative results (9/49, 18.4%). The positive predictive value for advanced colorectal lesions was 51.0% and for any colorectal neoplasia was 81.6%. The mean age of patients with colorectal cancer was 70.3 and all CRC's were localized Stage I (2) and Stage II (2), three were located in the proximal colon and one was located in the distal colon. CONCLUSION Mt-sDNA provided

  8. Multitarget stool DNA tests increases colorectal cancer screening among previously noncompliant Medicare patients.

    PubMed

    Prince, Mark; Lester, Lynn; Chiniwala, Rupal; Berger, Barry

    2017-01-21

    To determine the uptake of noninvasive multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) in a cohort of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening non-compliant average-risk Medicare patients. This cross sectional primary care office-based study examined mt-sDNA uptake in routine clinical practice among 393 colorectal cancer screening non-compliant Medicare patients ages 50-85 ordered by 77 physicians in a multispecialty group practice (USMD Physician Services, Dallas, TX) from October, 2014-September, 2015. Investigators performed a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective review of electronic health records to identify mt-sDNA use in patients who were either > 10 years since last colonoscopy and/or > 1 year since last fecal occult blood test. Test positive patients were advised to get diagnostic colonoscopy and thereafter patients were characterized by the most clinically significant lesion documented on histopathology of biopsies or excisional tissue. Descriptive statistics were employed. Key outcome measures included mt-sDNA compliance and diagnostic colonoscopy compliance on positive cases. Over 12 mo, 77 providers ordered 393 mt-sDNA studies with 347 completed (88.3% compliance). Patient mean age was 69.8 (50-85) and patients were 64% female. Mt-sDNA was negative in 85.3% (296/347) and positive in 14.7% (51/347). Follow-up colonoscopy was performed in 49 positive patients (96.1% colonoscopy compliance) with two patients lost to follow up. Index findings included: colon cancer (4/49, 8.2%), advanced adenomas (21/49, 42.9%), non-advanced adenomas (15/49, 30.6%), and negative results (9/49, 18.4%). The positive predictive value for advanced colorectal lesions was 51.0% and for any colorectal neoplasia was 81.6%. The mean age of patients with colorectal cancer was 70.3 and all CRC's were localized Stage I (2) and Stage II (2), three were located in the proximal colon and one was located in the distal colon. Mt-sDNA provided medical benefit to screening

  9. Aspergillus antigen skin test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... After 48 to 72 hours the site of injection is evaluated by a physician. If a positive reaction occurs (the test site is inflamed), the person has been exposed to the aspergillus mold and is at risk for developing aspergillosis.

  10. Evaluation of a New Device for Simplifying and Standardizing Stool Sample Preparation for Viral Molecular Testing with Limited Hands-On Time

    PubMed Central

    Feghoul, Linda; Salmona, Maud; Cherot, Janine; Fahd, Mony; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Vachon, Carole; Perrod, Aurélie; Bourgeois, Philippe; Scieux, Catherine; Baruchel, André; Simon, François

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive molecular assays have greatly improved the diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis. However, the proper preparation of stool samples for clinical testing remains an issue. bioMérieux has developed a stool preprocessing device (SPD) that includes a spoon for calibrated sampling and a vial containing buffer, glass beads, and two filters. The resulting stool filtrate is used for nucleic acid extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SPD for the quantification of human adenovirus (HAdV) DNA in stool samples collected from hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. HAdV DNA was quantified with the Adenovirus R-gene kit. The suitability of the device to reproducibly quantify HAdV DNA in stools using different extraction platforms (easyMAG and QIAsymphony) was determined using archived HAdV-positive stool samples. Coefficients of variation of HAdV DNA quantifications ranged from 1.79% to 1.83%, and no difference in quantification was observed between the two extraction systems. The HAdV DNA limit of quantification using the SPD was 3.75 log10 copies/g of stool. HAdV DNA quantification using the SPD was then compared to that of the routine preprocessing technique on 75 fresh stool samples collected prospectively from pediatric HSCT recipients at risk for HAdV infections. Thirty-eight samples were HAdV DNA positive with both the SPD and routine preprocessing methods. HAdV DNA loads were on average 1.14-log10 copies/g of stool higher with the SPD (P < 0.0001) than with routine methods. This new device enabled a standardized preparation of stool samples in <5 min and a reproducible and sensitive quantification of HAdV DNA. The use of the SPD for the detection of other gastrointestinal infections warrants further evaluation. PMID:26763967

  11. Evaluation of a New Device for Simplifying and Standardizing Stool Sample Preparation for Viral Molecular Testing with Limited Hands-On Time.

    PubMed

    Feghoul, Linda; Salmona, Maud; Cherot, Janine; Fahd, Mony; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Vachon, Carole; Perrod, Aurélie; Bourgeois, Philippe; Scieux, Catherine; Baruchel, André; Simon, François; LeGoff, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Sensitive molecular assays have greatly improved the diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis. However, the proper preparation of stool samples for clinical testing remains an issue. bioMérieux has developed a stool preprocessing device (SPD) that includes a spoon for calibrated sampling and a vial containing buffer, glass beads, and two filters. The resulting stool filtrate is used for nucleic acid extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SPD for the quantification of human adenovirus (HAdV) DNA in stool samples collected from hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. HAdV DNA was quantified with the Adenovirus R-gene kit. The suitability of the device to reproducibly quantify HAdV DNA in stools using different extraction platforms (easyMAG and QIAsymphony) was determined using archived HAdV-positive stool samples. Coefficients of variation of HAdV DNA quantifications ranged from 1.79% to 1.83%, and no difference in quantification was observed between the two extraction systems. The HAdV DNA limit of quantification using the SPD was 3.75 log10copies/g of stool. HAdV DNA quantification using the SPD was then compared to that of the routine preprocessing technique on 75 fresh stool samples collected prospectively from pediatric HSCT recipients at risk for HAdV infections. Thirty-eight samples were HAdV DNA positive with both the SPD and routine preprocessing methods. HAdV DNA loads were on average 1.14-log10copies/g of stool higher with the SPD (P< 0.0001) than with routine methods. This new device enabled a standardized preparation of stool samples in <5 min and a reproducible and sensitive quantification of HAdV DNA. The use of the SPD for the detection of other gastrointestinal infections warrants further evaluation.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of a rapid fecal test to confirm H pylori eradication after therapy: Prospective comparison with a laboratory stool test

    PubMed Central

    Trevisani, Lucio; Cifalà, Viviana; Fusetti, Nadia; Gilli, Giuseppe; Tombesi, Paola; Torchiaro, Marco; Boccia, Sergio; Abbasciano, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical performances of rapid stool test (ImmunoCard STAT HpSA, Meridian Diagnostic Inc.) in the evaluation of eradication therapy of H pylori and to compare it with a well-known and validated laboratory stool test (Amplified IDEA Hp StAR, Dako). METHODS: Stool samples of 122 patients were evaluated after eradication therapy of H pylori. H pylori status was assessed by 13C-urea breath test (UBT). Stool specimens were tested using either the rapid immunoassay kit or the laboratory immunoassay kit. RESULTS: Forty-three patients were infected and 79 non-infected. Sensitivity and specificity of ImmunoCard STAT and Hp StAR were 58.14% and 76.4%, and 97.47% and 98.73%, respectively (P > 0.05). Overall agreement between the two tests was 92.6% (113 of 122 cases). CONCLUSION: ImmunoCard STAT seems to have rather low performances, and it cannot be regarded as a reliable tool in the post-treatment setting. Also Hp StAR cannot be recommended to confirm H pylori eradication after treatment. PMID:17724805

  13. Comparison of a new multiplex real-time PCR with the Kato Katz thick smear and copro-antigen ELISA for the detection and differentiation of Taenia spp. in human stools.

    PubMed

    Ng-Nguyen, Dinh; Stevenson, Mark A; Dorny, Pierre; Gabriël, Sarah; Vo, Tinh Van; Nguyen, Van-Anh Thi; Phan, Trong Van; Hii, Sze Fui; Traub, Rebecca J

    2017-07-01

    Taenia solium, the cause of neurocysticercosis (NCC), has significant socioeconomic impacts on communities in developing countries. This disease, along with taeniasis is estimated to infect 2.5 to 5 million people globally. Control of T. solium NCC necessitates accurate diagnosis and treatment of T. solium taeniasis carriers. In areas where all three species of Taenia tapeworms (T. solium, Taenia saginata and Taenia asiatica) occur sympatrically, conventional microscope- and copro-antigen based diagnostic methods are unable to distinguish between these three Taenia species. Molecular diagnostic tools have been developed to overcome this limitation; however, conventional PCR-based techniques remain unsuitable for large-scale deployment in community-based surveys. Moreover, a real-time PCR (qPCR) for the discrimination of all three species of Taenia in human stool does not exist. This study describes the development and validation of a new triplex Taq-Man probe-based qPCR for the detection and discrimination of all three Taenia human tapeworms in human stools collected from communities in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. The diagnostic characteristics of the test are compared with conventional Kato Katz (KK) thick smear and copro-antigen ELISA (cAgELISA) method utilizing fecal samples from a community based cross-sectional study. Using this new multiplex real-time PCR we provide an estimate of the true prevalence of taeniasis in the source population for the community based cross-sectional study. Primers and TaqMan probes for the specific amplification of T. solium, T. saginata and T. asiatica were designed and successfully optimized to target the internal transcribed spacer I (ITS-1) gene of T. solium and the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COX-1) gene of T. saginata and T. asiatica. The newly designed triplex qPCR (T3qPCR) was compared to KK and cAgELISA for the detection of Taenia eggs in stool samples collected from 342 individuals in Dak Lak province, Central

  14. Evaluation of the cobas® Cdiff test for the Detection of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile in Stool Samples.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lance R; Young, Stephen A; Davis, Thomas E; Wang, Zi-Xuam; Duncan, John; Noutsios, Christopher; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Osiecki, John C; Lewinski, Michael A

    2017-09-27

    Nucleic acid amplification tests are reliable tools for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile from unformed (liquid or soft) stool samples. The objective of this study was to evaluate performance of the cobas® Cdiff Test on the cobas® 4800 System using prospectively collected stool specimens from patients suspected of C. difficile infection (CDI). Performance of the cobas® Cdiff Test was compared to the combined results of direct and broth enriched toxigenic culture in a large, multicenter clinical trial. Additional discrepant analysis was performed using the Xpert® C. difficile Epi Test. Sample storage was evaluated on contrived and fresh samples before and after storage at -20°C. Testing was from 683 subjects (306 males and 377 females); 113 (16.5%) of 683 were positive for toxigenic C. difficile by direct toxigenic culture and 141 of 682 were positive using the combined direct and enriched toxigenic culture (reference method), for a prevalence rate of 20.7%. The sensitivity and specificity of the cobas® Cdiff Test compared to combined direct and enriched culture was 92.9% (131/141; 95% CI: 87.4% to 96.1%) and 98.7% (534/541; 95% CI: 97.4% to 99.4%), respectively. Discrepancy analysis using a retested sample results from a second NAAT (Xpert® C. difficile/Epi test (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) found no false negative and 4 false positive cobas® Cdiff Test results. There was no difference in positive and negative results when comparing fresh and stored samples. These results support the use of the cobas® Cdiff Test as a robust aid in the diagnosis of CDI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Folic acid absorption determined by a single stool sample test--a double-isotope technique. The folic acid absorption capacity in children

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The fractional folic acid absorption (FAFol) was determined in 66 patients with various gastrointestinal diseases by a double-isotope technique, employing a single stool sample test (SSST) as well as a complete stool collection. The age of the patients ranged from 2.5 months to 16.8 years (mean 6.3 years). The test dose was administered orally and consisted of 50 micrograms of (3H)folic acid (monoglutamate) (approximately 20 muCi), carmine powder, and 2 mg 51CrCl3 (approximately 1.25 muCi) as the unabsorbable tracer. The whole-body radiation given to a 1-year-old child averaged 4.8 mrad only. The stool and napkin contents were collected and homogenized by the addition of 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid. A 300-ml sample of the homogenized stool and napkin contents, as well as 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid (75% vol/vol) containing the standards, were counted for the content of 51Cr in a broad-based well counter. The quantity of (3H)folic acid was determined by liquid scintillation, after duplicate distillation. Estimated by SSST, the FAFol, which employs the stool with the highest content of 51Cr corresponding to the most carmine-colored stool, correlated closely with the FAFol based on complete stool collection (r = 0.96, n = 39, p less than 0.0001). The reproducibility of FAFol determined by SSST was assessed from repeated tests in 18 patients. For a mean of 81%, the SD was 4.6%, which corresponded to a coefficient of variation of 5.7%.

  16. Folic acid absorption determined by a single stool sample test--a double-isotope technique. The folic acid absorption capacity in children.

    PubMed

    Hjelt, K

    1989-10-01

    The fractional folic acid absorption (FAFol) was determined in 66 patients with various gastrointestinal diseases by a double-isotope technique, employing a single stool sample test (SSST) as well as a complete stool collection. The age of the patients ranged from 2.5 months to 16.8 years (mean 6.3 years). The test dose was administered orally and consisted of 50 micrograms of [3H]folic acid (monoglutamate) (approximately 20 muCi), carmine powder, and 2 mg 51CrCl3 (approximately 1.25 muCi) as the unabsorbable tracer. The whole-body radiation given to a 1-year-old child averaged 4.8 mrad only. The stool and napkin contents were collected and homogenized by the addition of 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid. A 300-ml sample of the homogenized stool and napkin contents, as well as 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid (75% vol/vol) containing the standards, were counted for the content of 51Cr in a broad-based well counter. The quantity of [3H]folic acid was determined by liquid scintillation, after duplicate distillation. Estimated by SSST, the FAFol, which employs the stool with the highest content of 51Cr corresponding to the most carmine-colored stool, correlated closely with the FAFol based on complete stool collection (r = 0.96, n = 39, p less than 0.0001). The reproducibility of FAFol determined by SSST was assessed from repeated tests in 18 patients. For a mean of 81%, the SD was 4.6%, which corresponded to a coefficient of variation of 5.7%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Detection by an immunofluorescence test of Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores in routinely formalin-fixed stool samples stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moura, H; Sodre, F C; Bornay-Llinares, F J; Leitch, G J; Navin, T; Wahlquist, S; Bryan, R; Meseguer, I; Visvesvara, G S

    1999-07-01

    Of the several microsporidia that infect humans, Enterocytozoon bieneusi is known to cause a gastrointestinal disease whereas Encephalitozoon intestinalis causes both a disseminated and an intestinal disease. Although several different staining techniques, including the chromotrope technique and its modifications, Uvitex 2B, and the quick-hot Gram-chromotrope procedure, detect microsporidian spores in fecal smears and other clinical samples, they do not identify the species of microsporidia. A need for an easily performed test therefore exists. We reevaluated 120 stool samples that had been found positive for microsporidia previously, using the quick-hot Gram-chromotrope technique, and segregated them into two groups on the basis of spore size. We also screened the smears by immunofluorescence microscopy, using a polyclonal rabbit anti-E. intestinalis serum at a dilution of 1:400. Spores in 29 (24.1%) of the 120 samples fluoresced brightly, indicating that they were E. intestinalis spores. No intense background or cross-reactivity with bacteria, yeasts, or other structures in the stool samples was seen. Additionally, the numbers of spores that fluoresced in seven of these samples were substantially smaller than the numbers of spores that were present in the stained smears, indicating that these samples were probably derived from patients with mixed infections of Enterocytozoon bieneusi and E. intestinalis. Because a 1:400 dilution of this serum does not react with culture-grown Encephalitozoon hellem, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, or Vittaforma corneae or with Enterocytozoon bieneusi spores in feces, we concluded that an immunofluorescence test using this serum is a good alternative for the specific identification of E. intestinalis infections.

  18. Detection by an Immunofluorescence Test of Encephalitozoon intestinalis Spores in Routinely Formalin-Fixed Stool Samples Stored at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Moura, H.; Sodre, F. C.; Bornay-Llinares, F. J.; Leitch, G. J.; Navin, T.; Wahlquist, S.; Bryan, R.; Meseguer, I.; Visvesvara, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    Of the several microsporidia that infect humans, Enterocytozoon bieneusi is known to cause a gastrointestinal disease whereas Encephalitozoon intestinalis causes both a disseminated and an intestinal disease. Although several different staining techniques, including the chromotrope technique and its modifications, Uvitex 2B, and the quick-hot Gram-chromotrope procedure, detect microsporidian spores in fecal smears and other clinical samples, they do not identify the species of microsporidia. A need for an easily performed test therefore exists. We reevaluated 120 stool samples that had been found positive for microsporidia previously, using the quick-hot Gram-chromotrope technique, and segregated them into two groups on the basis of spore size. We also screened the smears by immunofluorescence microscopy, using a polyclonal rabbit anti-E. intestinalis serum at a dilution of 1:400. Spores in 29 (24.1%) of the 120 samples fluoresced brightly, indicating that they were E. intestinalis spores. No intense background or cross-reactivity with bacteria, yeasts, or other structures in the stool samples was seen. Additionally, the numbers of spores that fluoresced in seven of these samples were substantially smaller than the numbers of spores that were present in the stained smears, indicating that these samples were probably derived from patients with mixed infections of Enterocytozoon bieneusi and E. intestinalis. Because a 1:400 dilution of this serum does not react with culture-grown Encephalitozoon hellem, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, or Vittaforma corneae or with Enterocytozoon bieneusi spores in feces, we concluded that an immunofluorescence test using this serum is a good alternative for the specific identification of E. intestinalis infections. PMID:10364604

  19. Reliability of a new technique for the determination of vitamin B12 absorption in children: single stool sample test--a double isotope technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K.

    1986-03-01

    The fractional vitamin B12 absorption (FAB12) was determined in 39 patients with various gastrointestinal diseases by a double-isotope technique, employing a single stool sample test (SSST), as well as a complete stool collection. The age of the patients ranged from 2.5 months to 16.2 years (mean 5.0 years). The test dose was administered orally and consisted of 0.5-4.5 micrograms of /sup 57/CoB12 (approximately 0.05 microCi), carmine powder, and 2 mg /sup 51/CrCl/sub 3/ (approximately 1.25 microCi) as the inabsorbable tracer. The wholebody radiation to a 1-year-old child averaged only 20 mrad. The stool and napkin was collected and homogenized by addition of 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid. A 300-ml sample of the homogenized stool and napkin, as well as 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid (75% v/v) containing the standards, were counted in a broad-based well counter. The FAB12 determined by SSST employing the stool with the highest content of /sup 51/Cr (which corresponded to the most carmine-colored stool) correlated closely to the FAB12 based on complete stool collection (r = 0.98, n = 39, p less than 0.001). The reproducibility of FAB12 determined by SSST was assessed from double assays in 19 patients. For a mean value of 12%, the SD was 3%, which corresponded to a coefficient of variation (CV) of 25%. The excretion of /sup 57/Co and /sup 51/Cr in the urine was examined in six patients with moderate to severe mucosal damage and was found to be low.

  20. Screening for Colorectal Cancer Using a Multitarget Stool DNA Test: Modeling the Effect of the Intertest Interval on Clinical Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Berger, Barry M; Schroy, Paul C; Dinh, Tuan A

    2016-09-01

    A multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) test was recently approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening for men and women, aged ≥ 50 years, at average risk of CRC. The guidelines currently recommend a 3-year interval for mt-sDNA testing in the absence of empirical data. We used clinical effectiveness modeling to project decreases in CRC incidence and related mortality associated with mt-sDNA screening to help inform interval setting. The Archimedes model (Archimedes Inc., San Francisco, CA) was used to conduct a 5-arm, virtual, clinical screening study of a population of 200,000 virtual individuals to compare the clinical effectiveness of mt-sDNA screening at 1-, 3-, and 5-year intervals compared with colonoscopy at 10-year intervals and no screening for a 30-year period. The study endpoints were the decrease in CRC incidence and related mortality of each strategy versus no screening. Cost-effectiveness ratios (US dollars per quality-adjusted life year [QALY]) of mt-sDNA intervals were calculated versus no screening. Compared with 10-year colonoscopy, annual mt-sDNA testing produced similar reductions in CRC incidence (65% vs. 63%) and related mortality (73% vs. 72%). mt-sDNA testing at 3-year intervals reduced the CRC incidence by 57% and CRC mortality by 67%, and mt-sDNA testing at 5-year intervals reduced the CRC incidence by 52% and CRC mortality by 62%. At an average price of $600 per test, the annual, 3-year, and 5-year mt-sDNA screening costs would be $20,178, $11,313, and $7388 per QALY, respectively, compared with no screening. These data suggest that screening every 3 years using a multitarget mt-sDNA test provides reasonable performance at acceptable cost. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of serological tests for antibody to hepatitis A antigen, using coded specimens from individuals infected with the MS-1 strain of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dienstag, J L; Krugman, S; Wong, D C; Purcell, R H

    1976-01-01

    To compare serological tests for antibody to hepatitis A antigen (anti-HA), we tested 15 paired serum specimens, submitted under code, from individuals infected with the MS-1 strain of hepatitis A virus. Immune electron microscopy (IEM), immune adherence hemagglutination (IAHA), and solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) tests for anti-HA were performed with hepatitis A antigen (HA Ag) derived from human stool; results were also compared with previously reported titers determined by IAHA with HA Ag derived from marmoset liver. Antibody titers (IAHA and RIA) and ratings (IEM) determined with stool-derived HA Ag compared favorably, and a seroresponse to HA Ag was detected by all three methods for every serum pair tested. Differences in titers were noted between IAHA tests with liver-derived and with stool-derived HA Ag, but the discrepancies could be accounted for by differences in test technique. The agreement found in this study among the three techniques was quite good and confirms the specificity and sensitivity of tests for anti-HA that are done with stool-derived HA-Ag. PMID:186409

  2. Quantitative detection and genotyping of Helicobacter pylori from stool using droplet digital PCR reveals variation in bacterial loads that correlates with cagA virulence gene carriage

    PubMed Central

    Talarico, Sarah; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Gonzalez, Paula; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Cortes, Bernal; Larson, Ann; Fang, Ferric C.; Salama, Nina R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies of the carcinogenic stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori have been limited by the lack of non-invasive detection and genotyping methods. We developed a new stool-based method for detection, quantification, and partial genotyping of H. pylori using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), which allows for increased sensitivity and absolute quantification by PCR partitioning. Materials and Methods Stool-based ddPCR assays for H. pylori 16S gene detection and cagA virulence gene typing were tested using a collection of 50 matched stool and serum samples from Costa Rican volunteers and 29 H. pylori stool antigen-tested stool samples collected at a U.S. hospital. Results The stool-based H. pylori 16S ddPCR assay had a sensitivity of 84% and 100% and a specificity of 100% and 71% compared to serology and stool antigen tests, respectively. The stool-based cagA genotyping assay detected cagA in 22 (88%) of 25 stools from CagA antibody-positive individuals and 4 (16%) of 25 stools from CagA antibody-negative individuals from Costa Rica. All 26 of these samples had a Western-type cagA allele. Presence of serum CagA antibodies was correlated with a significantly higher load of H. pylori in the stool. Conclusions The stool-based ddPCR assays are a sensitive, non-invasive method for detection, quantification, and partial genotyping of H. pylori. The quantitative nature of ddPCR-based H. pylori detection revealed significant variation in bacterial load among individuals that correlates with presence of the cagA virulence gene. These stool-based ddPCR assays will facilitate future population-based epidemiologic studies of this important human pathogen. PMID:26667241

  3. Quantitative Detection and Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori from Stool using Droplet Digital PCR Reveals Variation in Bacterial Loads that Correlates with cagA Virulence Gene Carriage.

    PubMed

    Talarico, Sarah; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Gonzalez, Paula; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Cortes, Bernal; Larson, Ann; Fang, Ferric C; Salama, Nina R

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies of the carcinogenic stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori have been limited by the lack of noninvasive detection and genotyping methods. We developed a new stool-based method for detection, quantification, and partial genotyping of H. pylori using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), which allows for increased sensitivity and absolute quantification by PCR partitioning. Stool-based ddPCR assays for H. pylori 16S gene detection and cagA virulence gene typing were tested using a collection of 50 matched stool and serum samples from Costa Rican volunteers and 29 H. pylori stool antigen-tested stool samples collected at a US hospital. The stool-based H. pylori 16S ddPCR assay had a sensitivity of 84% and 100% and a specificity of 100% and 71% compared to serology and stool antigen tests, respectively. The stool-based cagA genotyping assay detected cagA in 22 (88%) of 25 stools from CagA antibody-positive individuals and four (16%) of 25 stools from CagA antibody-negative individuals from Costa Rica. All 26 of these samples had a Western-type cagA allele. Presence of serum CagA antibodies was correlated with a significantly higher load of H. pylori in the stool. The stool-based ddPCR assays are a sensitive, noninvasive method for detection, quantification, and partial genotyping of H. pylori. The quantitative nature of ddPCR-based H. pylori detection revealed significant variation in bacterial load among individuals that correlates with presence of the cagA virulence gene. These stool-based ddPCR assays will facilitate future population-based epidemiologic studies of this important human pathogen. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Stool guaiac test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the esophagus ( esophagitis ) Inflammation of the stomach ( gastritis ) from GI infections Hemorrhoids Crohn disease or ulcerative ... varices Colon cancer Colorectal polyps Crohn disease Esophagitis Gastritis Hemorrhoids Peptic ulcer Tumor Review Date 1/28/ ...

  5. Validation of a Point-of-Care Circulating Cathodic Antigen Urine Cassette Test for Schistosoma mansoni Diagnosis in the Sahel, and Potential Cross-Reaction in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Greter, Helena; Krauth, Stefanie J.; Ngandolo, Bongo N. R.; Alfaroukh, Idriss O.; Zinsstag, Jakob; Utzinger, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    On the shores of Lake Chad, schistosomiasis among mobile pastoralists was investigated in a field laboratory. Point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) cassette test, reagent strip, and filtration were conducted on urine samples. Fresh stool samples were subjected to the Kato-Katz technique, and fixed samples were examined with an ether-concentration method at a reference laboratory. POC-CCA urine cassette tests revealed a Schistosoma mansoni prevalence of 6.9%, compared with only 0.5% by stool microscopy. Three pregnant women with otherwise negative urine and stool testing had positive POC-CCA. This observation raises concern of cross-reactivity in pregnancy. Hence, two pregnant women in Switzerland with no history of schistosomiasis were subjected to POC-CCA and one tested positive. Our data suggest that POC-CCA can be performed under extreme Sahelian conditions (e.g., temperatures > 40°C), and it is more sensitive than stool microscopy for S. mansoni diagnosis. However, potential cross-reactivity in pregnancy needs further investigation. PMID:26556831

  6. Validation of a Point-of-Care Circulating Cathodic Antigen Urine Cassette Test for Schistosoma mansoni Diagnosis in the Sahel, and Potential Cross-Reaction in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Greter, Helena; Krauth, Stefanie J; Ngandolo, Bongo N R; Alfaroukh, Idriss O; Zinsstag, Jakob; Utzinger, Jürg

    2016-02-01

    On the shores of Lake Chad, schistosomiasis among mobile pastoralists was investigated in a field laboratory. Point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) cassette test, reagent strip, and filtration were conducted on urine samples. Fresh stool samples were subjected to the Kato-Katz technique, and fixed samples were examined with an ether-concentration method at a reference laboratory. POC-CCA urine cassette tests revealed a Schistosoma mansoni prevalence of 6.9%, compared with only 0.5% by stool microscopy. Three pregnant women with otherwise negative urine and stool testing had positive POC-CCA. This observation raises concern of cross-reactivity in pregnancy. Hence, two pregnant women in Switzerland with no history of schistosomiasis were subjected to POC-CCA and one tested positive. Our data suggest that POC-CCA can be performed under extreme Sahelian conditions (e.g., temperatures > 40°C), and it is more sensitive than stool microscopy for S. mansoni diagnosis. However, potential cross-reactivity in pregnancy needs further investigation.

  7. Stool Color: When to Worry

    MedlinePlus

    Stool color: When to worry Yesterday, my stool color was bright green. Should I be concerned? Answers from Michael ... M.D. Stool comes in a range of colors. All shades of brown and even green are ...

  8. Serodiagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infections in an endemic area of Burkina Faso: performance of several immunological tests with different parasite antigens.

    PubMed

    Sorgho, Hermann; Bahgat, Mahmoud; Poda, Jean-Noel; Song, Wenjian; Kirsten, Christa; Doenhoff, Michael J; Zongo, Issaka; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Ruppel, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    The performance of indirect haemagglutination assays (IHA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT) were compared with 450 sera from a Schistosoma mansoni-endemic area in Burkina Faso. All participants in this survey provided at least one sample each of stool, urine and serum. From those with an egg-negative Kato-Katz thick smear, a second stool sample was examined. IHA was based on either extracts of adult S. mansoni worms (SmIHA) or S. japonicum egg antigen (SjIHA). For ELISA, three antigen preparations were used, namely: (i) soluble S. mansoni adult worm antigens (SWAP); (ii) soluble S. mansoni egg antigens (SEA); and (iii) a cationic exchange fraction of S. mansoni eggs (CEF6). IFAT was performed with S. mansoni male worm sections. Among the egg-excretors, the sensitivity of ELISA was high and egg antigens performed slightly better (SEA, 96%; CEF6, 97%) than worm antigen (94%). Sensitivity of IHA was satisfactory with homologous (Sm, >85%), but not heterologous (Sj, 56%) parasite antigen. In IFAT, the parenchyma-associated fluorescence showed high sensitivity (95%), but gut-associated fluorescence, which is known to be a sensitive diagnostic marker for schistosome-infected European travelers, was observed only in 76% of a sub-sample of 100 of the endemic sera. Among sera from egg-negative individuals, many gave positive reactions in several or all of the tests employed. These reactions (formally "false positive") are considered to represent true infections, since chemotherapy had not yet been delivered to this population. For the purpose of further surveys in Burkina Faso or other resource-poor settings, we suggest IHA as an accurate diagnostic test and propose to further improve its performance by including egg rather than worm antigens.

  9. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Compared to Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Test for the Detection of Fasciola hepatica in Human Stool.

    PubMed

    Cabada, Miguel M; Malaga, Jose L; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Bagwell, Kelli A; Naeger, Patrick A; Rogers, Hayley K; Maharsi, Safa; Mbaka, Maryann; White, A Clinton

    2017-02-08

    Fasciola hepatica is the most widely distributed trematode infection in the world. Control efforts may be hindered by the lack of diagnostic capacity especially in remote endemic areas. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods offer high sensitivity and specificity but require expensive technology. However, the recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an efficient isothermal method that eliminates the need for a thermal cycler and has a high deployment potential to resource-limited settings. We report on the characterization of RPA and PCR tests to detect Fasciola infection in clinical stool samples with low egg burdens. The sensitivity of the RPA and PCR were 87% and 66%, respectively. Both tests were 100% specific showing no cross-reactivity with trematode, cestode, or nematode parasites. In addition, RPA and PCR were able to detect 47% and 26% of infections not detected by microscopy, respectively. The RPA adapted to a lateral flow platform was more sensitive than gel-based detection of the reaction products. In conclusion, the Fasciola RPA is a highly sensitive and specific test to diagnose chronic infection using stool samples. The Fasciola RPA lateral flow has the potential for deployment to endemic areas after further characterization. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Bloody or tarry stools

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron pills, bismuth medicines like Pepto-Bismol, or blueberries can also cause black stools. Beets and tomatoes ... you eaten black licorice, lead, Pepto-Bismol, or blueberries? Have you had more than one episode of ...

  11. Stools - foul smelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... smelling stools also have normal causes, such as diet changes. Causes Causes may include: Celiac disease - sprue Crohn ... of diet have you eaten recently? Does a change in your diet make the smell worse or better? What other ...

  12. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate cancer recurrence. However, a single elevated PSA measurement in a patient who has a history of ... than with BPH . One recently approved test combines measurement of a form of pro-PSA called [-2] ...

  13. A screening trial of Helicobacter pylori-specific antigen tests in saliva to identify an oral infection.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kuo Ching; Wei, M H; Yee, Hsian Ching; Everett, Karin D E; Yee, Hsian Pei; Hazeki-Talor, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection places a heavy burden on medical and economic resources. Standard diagnosis requires the presence of established H. pylori gastric disease. A multicenter screening trial assessing 2 immunochromatographic H. pylori antigen oral tests was carried out with 201 participants. The analysis also included a urea breath test (UBT), a Campylobacter-like organism test, silver stain, culture, serology, and stool tests. The participants were grouped into UBT positive (UBT+) and UBT negative (UBT-) people, using conventional methods with congruent clusters based on p values from McNemar's paired χ2 analysis and 95% CI estimates. Both oral tests were also positive in 82% of the seropositive UBT- people. However, oral antigen and seroprevalence divided UBT- people into 2 statistically separate CI subgroups: the UBT- symptomatic (highly positive) group and the UBT- asymptomatic (mostly negative) group. 90.5% of all people whose oral tests were both negative were also UBT-. Saliva H. pylori antigen is an important indicator in UBT- asymptomatic patients. Currently, its clinical significance remains uncertain, but saliva may be a reservoir from where H. pylori is transmitted to the stomach. In symptomatic patients, it is strongly associated with stomach infection. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Evaluation of proper height for squatting stool.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hwa S; Jung, Hyung-Shik

    2008-05-01

    Many jobs and activities in people's daily lives have them in squatting postures. Jobs such as housekeeping, farming and welding require various squatting activities. It is speculated that prolonged squatting without any type of supporting stool would gradually and eventually impose musculoskeletal injuries on workers. This study aims to examine the proper height of the stool according to the position of working materials for the squatting worker. A total of 40 male and female college students and 10 female farmers participated in the experiment to find the proper stool height. Student participants were asked to sit and work in three different positions: floor level of 50 mm; ankle level of 200 mm; and knee level of 400 mm. They were then provided with stools of various heights and asked to maintain a squatting work posture. For each working position, they were asked to write down their thoughts on a preferred stool height. A Likert summated rating method as well as pairwise ranking test was applied to evaluate user preference for provided stools under conditions of different working positions. Under a similar experimental procedure, female farmers were asked to indicate their body part discomfort (BPD) on a body chart before and after performing the work. Statistical analysis showed that comparable results were found from both evaluation measures. When working position is below 50 mm, the proper stool height is 100 or should not be higher than 150 mm. When working position is 200 mm, the proper stool height is 150 mm. When working position is 400 mm, the proper stool height is 200 mm. Thus, it is strongly recommended to use proper height of stools with corresponding working position. Moreover, a wearable chair prototype was designed so that workers in a squatting posture do not have to carry and move the stool from one place to another. This stool should ultimately help to relieve physical stress and hence promote the health of squatting workers. This study sought

  15. Performance of the Fecal Immunochemical Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening Using Different Stool-Collection Devices: Preliminary Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye Young; Suh, Mina; Baik, Hyung Won; Choi, Kui Son; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Lee, Chan Wha; Oh, Jae Hwan; Lee, You Kyoung; Han, Dong Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2016-11-15

    We are in the process of conducting a randomized trial to determine whether compliance with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for colorectal cancer screening differs according to the stool-collection method. This study was an interim analysis of the performance of two stool-collection devices (sampling bottle vs conventional container). In total, 1,701 individuals (age range, 50 to 74 years) were randomized into the sampling bottle group (intervention arm) or the conventional container group (control arm). In both groups, we evaluated the FIT positivity rate, the positive predictive value for advanced neoplasia, and the detection rate for advanced neoplasia. The FIT positivity rates were 4.1% for the sampling bottles and 2.0% for the conventional containers; these values were significantly different. The positive predictive values for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 11.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -3.4 to 25.6) and 12.0% (95% CI, -0.7 to 24.7), respectively. The detection rates for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 4.5 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 2.0 to 11.0) and 2.4 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 0.0 to 5.0), respectively. The impact of these findings on FIT screening performance was unclear in this interim analysis. This impact should therefore be evaluated in the final analysis following the final enrollment period.

  16. Use of immunoblotting in testing Madurella mycetomatis specific antigen

    PubMed Central

    ELbadawi, Hana S.; Mahgoub, Elsheikh; Mahmoud, Najwa; Fahal, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Though serodiagnosis of actinomycetoma is established, that of eumycetoma due to Madurella mycetomatis is limited because of lack of pure antigen. Reliable rapid tests are needed to make an accurate timely diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to detect antigen parts of M. mycetomatis, which act specifically with M. mycetomatis antibodies. Methods Cytoplasmic antigen was prepared from molecularly identified cultures of M. mycetomatis by sonication, ultracentrifugation, dried, weighed and appropriately reconstituted. M. mycetomatis cytoplasmic antigen were separated using 12% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, and immunoblotting to detect the reactive ones. Immunoblotting was carried out in nitrocellulose strips containing different molecular size. Sera from patients and co-patients as control were used. Results When stained with Coomassie brilliant blue R 250 seven molecular weights appeared but only three, 45, 60, 95 kDa reacted with M. mycetomatis patients few from control group, one from a malaria patient. No reactive band was observed with sera from actinomycetoma, Aspergillus flavus-associated aspergillosis, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, fungal sinusitis nor healthy controls. Conclusions Specific fractions of M. mycetomatis antigen which were demonstrated by immunoblotting showed 75% sensitivity and 95% specificity. The true negative tests were 14 patients (32.5%). This also means that immunoblotting is reasonably reliable in diagnosis and follow-up of eumycetoma patients. PMID:27198216

  17. The relationship between stool hardness and stool composition in breast- and formula-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, P T; Lockton, S; Irwin, J; Lucas, A L

    1995-01-01

    "Constipation" and "hard stools" are associated with formula feeding of both term and preterm infants and, in the latter, can lead to life-threatening complications. This study tested the hypothesis that stool hardness is related to excretion of fatty acid (FA) soaps in term infants, and in the extreme to milk bolus obstruction in premature infants. Stools (n = 44) were collected from 20 formula-fed and 10 breast-fed infants aged 6 weeks and were classified using visual charts for stool hardness on a 5-point scale (1, watery; 5, hard). Stools were analysed for nitrogen, minerals, and lipid, the latter divided between the soap and nonsoap fractions. We explored the relationship between stool hardness or solids content and stool constituents, relative to both wet and dry weight. Calcium and FA soaps were the dominant factors significantly related to stool solids and hardness score across the breast- and formula-fed groups. An 8% increase in stool dry weight FA soap content corresponded to a 1-point change in stool hardness score. Stools from formula-fed infants had a higher solids content and were classified as significantly harder than those from breast-fed infants (hardness scores, 4.0 +/- 0.5 versus 2.6 +/- 0.7, mean +/- SD) and on both a wet- and dry-weight basis contained severalfold higher levels of minerals and lipid and considerably less carbohydrate. Differences in lipids between formula- and breast-fed infants' stools were due almost entirely to FAs (mainly C16:0 and C18:0) excreted as soaps (27.7 +/- 7.5% compared to 3.1 +/- 4.1% of dry weight), suggesting the groups differed markedly in their handling of saturated FAs. An inspissated stool sample from a premature infant requiring surgical disempaction of an obstructed small intestine was found to be enriched in FA and calcium relative to the preterm formula. FA soaps, predominantly saturated, accounted for one third of the stool dry weight. These data support the hypothesis that calcium FA soaps are

  18. IS THE IMMUNOCROMATOGRAPHIC FECAL ANTIGEN TEST EFFECTIVE FOR PRIMARY DIAGNOSIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN DYSPEPTIC PATIENTS?

    PubMed

    Dalla Nora, Magali; Hörner, Rosmari; De Carli, Diego Michelon; Rocha, Marta Pires da; Araujo, Amanda Faria de; Fagundes, Renato Borges

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of H. pylori infection can be performed by non-invasive and invasive methods.The identification through a fecal antigen test is a non-invasive, simple, and relatively inexpensive test. To determine the diagnostic performance of fecal antigen test in the identification of H. pylori infection. H. pylori antigens were identified in the stools of dyspeptic patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. For the identification of H. pylori antigen, we use ImmunoCard STAT! HpSA with immunochromatography technique. Histopathology plus urease test were the gold standard. We studied 163 patients, 51% male, mean age of 56.7± 8.5years. H. pylori infection was present in 49%. Fecal test presented: sensitivity 67.5% (CI95% 60.6-72.9); specificity 85.5% (CI95% 78.9-90.7); positive predictive value 81.8% (CI95% 73.4-88.4) and negative predictive value 73,2% (CI95% 67.5-77.6); Positive likelihood ratio was 4.7 (CI95% 2.9-7.9) and Negative Likelihood Ratio 0.4 (CI95% 0.3-0.5). The prevalence odds ratio for a positive test was 12.3 (CI95% 5.7-26.3).The index kappa between FAT and histology/urease test was 0.53 (CI95% 0.39-0.64). Immunochromatographic FAT is less expensive than the other methods and readily accepted by the patients but its diagnostic performance does not recommend its use in the primary diagnosis, when the patient may have an active infection.

  19. Circulating antigen tests and urine reagent strips for diagnosis of active schistosomiasis in endemic areas.

    PubMed

    Ochodo, Eleanor A; Gopalakrishna, Gowri; Spek, Bea; Reitsma, Johannes B; van Lieshout, Lisette; Polman, Katja; Lamberton, Poppy; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Leeflang, Mariska M G

    2015-03-11

    Point-of-care (POC) tests for diagnosing schistosomiasis include tests based on circulating antigen detection and urine reagent strip tests. If they had sufficient diagnostic accuracy they could replace conventional microscopy as they provide a quicker answer and are easier to use. To summarise the diagnostic accuracy of: a) urine reagent strip tests in detecting active Schistosoma haematobium infection, with microscopy as the reference standard; and b) circulating antigen tests for detecting active Schistosoma infection in geographical regions endemic for Schistosoma mansoni or S. haematobium or both, with microscopy as the reference standard. We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, MEDION, and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) without language restriction up to 30 June 2014. We included studies that used microscopy as the reference standard: for S. haematobium, microscopy of urine prepared by filtration, centrifugation, or sedimentation methods; and for S. mansoni, microscopy of stool by Kato-Katz thick smear. We included studies on participants residing in endemic areas only. Two review authors independently extracted data, assessed quality of the data using QUADAS-2, and performed meta-analysis where appropriate. Using the variability of test thresholds, we used the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model for all eligible tests (except the circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) POC for S. mansoni, where the bivariate random-effects model was more appropriate). We investigated heterogeneity, and carried out indirect comparisons where data were sufficient. Results for sensitivity and specificity are presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 90 studies; 88 from field settings in Africa. The median S. haematobium infection prevalence was 41% (range 1% to 89%) and 36% for S. mansoni (range 8% to 95%). Study design and conduct were poorly reported against current standards. Tests for S

  20. Bristol Stool Form Scale

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stool Form Scale Type Description Type 1 Separate hard lumps, like nuts Image Type 2 Sausage-shaped but lumpy Type 3 Like a sausage or snake but with cracks on its surface Type 4 Like a sausage or snake, smooth and soft ...

  1. Comparison of Various Methods in the Diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica in Stool and Serum Specimens.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Hakan; Aktas, Osman; Uyanik, Muhammet Hamidullah

    2016-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is indistinguishable from Entamoeba dispar in direct microscopic examination. A definitive diagnosis of E. histolytica is important in terms of the treatment of the patient and to avoid unnecessary costs. This study's aim is to determine the prevalence of E. histolytica and to make a comparison of the different diagnostic tests in the patients specimens defined as E. histolytica/E. dispar infection. Faecal and serum specimens of 90 patients defined as E. histolytica/E. dispar with microscopy (wet mount examination with 0.85% saline and Lugol's iodine) were examined. Stool samples were examined by trichrome staining for trophozoites and cysts and by immunoassay methods for specific adhesin antigens (Wampole (®) E. histolytica II antigen testing) and for specific serine-rich 30 kD membrane protein (Serazym(®) E. histolytica antigen testing). Anti-E. histolytica antibodies were investigated using a latex slide test and indirect hemagglutination methods in serum specimens. Presence of E. histolytica was not confirmed in 31.1% cases with trichrome staining, 62.2% of the Wampole antigen test, 64.4%, of the Serazym antigen test, 73.3% of the indirect hemagglutination test and 75.6%. of the latex agglutination. Considering the common results from Wampole and Serazym antigen testing as a reference standard, the specificity/sensitivity is 100/53.85% for trichrome staining, 75.00/98.11% for the latex agglutination test and 78.57/96.77% for the indirect hemagglutination test. It has been shown that investigation of E. histolytica in stools by direct wet-smear microscopy alone can cause significant false positive results. To obtain a reliable diagnosis for E. histolytica and to avoid unnecessary treatment for this parasite, at least one more specific assay, particularly an antigen testing and microscopy, is required.

  2. Evolution of Cryptococcal Antigen Testing: What is new?

    PubMed

    Nalintya, Elizabeth; Kiggundu, Reuben; Meya, David

    Over the last decade, an upsurge in both the frequency and severity of fungal infections due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the use of immunosuppressive therapy has occurred. Even diagnostic methods like culture and microscopy, which have low sensitivity and longer turn-around-times are not widely available, leading to delays in timely antifungal therapy and detrimental patient outcomes. The evolution of cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) testing to develop inexpensive and more sensitive methods to detect cryptococcal antigen is significant. These newer tests employ immunoassays as part of point-of-care platforms, which do not require complex laboratory infrastructure and they have the potential to detect early disease and reduce time to diagnosis of cryptococcal infection. Advocacy for widely available and efficacious life-saving antifungal treatment should be the only remaining challenge.

  3. Evaluation of Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA) Urine-Tests for Diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Kueté Fouodo, Césaire Joris; Kamwa Ngassam, Romuald Isaka; Sumo, Laurentine; Dongmo Noumedem, Calvine; Kenfack, Christian Mérimé; Gipwe, Nestor Feussom; Nana, Esther Dankoni; Stothard, J. Russell; Rollinson, David

    2012-01-01

    Background The Kato-Katz is the most common diagnostic method for Schistosoma mansoni infection. However, the day-to-day variability in host egg-excretion and its low detection sensitivity are major limits for its use in low transmission zones and after widespread chemotherapy. We evaluated the accuracy of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) urine-assay as a diagnostic tool of S. mansoni. In comparison, a low sensitive CCA test (CCA-L) was assessed. Methodology The study was conducted in three settings: two foci with single S. mansoni infections (settings A and B), and one mixed S. mansoni – S. haematobium focus (setting C). Stool and urine samples were collected from school-children on three consecutive days. Triplicate Kato-Katz readings were performed per stool sample. Each urine sample was tested with one CCA and only the first urine sample was subjected to CCA-L. Urine samples were also examined for S. haematobium eggs using the filtration method and for microhaematuria using urine reagent strips. Overall, 625 children provided three stool and three urine samples. Principal Findings Considering nine Kato-Katz thick smears as ‘reference’ diagnostic test, the prevalence of S. mansoni was 36.2%, 71.8% and 64.0% in settings A, B and C, respectively. The prevalence of S. haematobium in setting C was 12.0%. The sensitivities of single Kato-Katz, CCA and CCA-L from the first stool or urine samples were 58%, 82% and 46% in setting A, 56.8%, 82.4% and 68.8% in setting B, and 49.0%, 87.7% and 55.5% in setting C. The respective specificities were 100%, 64.7% and 100%; 100%, 62.3% and 91.3%; and 100%, 42.5% and 92.0%. Mixed infection with S. haematobium did not influence the CCA test results for S. mansoni diagnosis. Conclusions/Significance Urine CCA revealed higher sensitivity than CCA-L and triplicate Kato-Katz, and produced similar prevalence as nine Kato-Katz. It seems an attractive method for S. mansoni diagnosis. PMID:22860148

  4. Counter-immunoelectro-osmophoresis for the detection of infantile gastroenteritis virus (orbi-group) antigen and antibody.

    PubMed

    Middleton, P J; Petric, M; Hewitt, C M; Szymanski, M T; Tam, J S

    1976-03-01

    A moderatley sensitive, rapid, and economical test scheme for the detection of infantile gastroenteritis virus (IGV) in stool or antibody in serum has been developed and evaluated. The test scheme with minor modifications was an adaptation of a counter-immunoelectro-osmophoresis system we once used for the detection of hepatitis B antigen. Large numbers of stool samples may be screened during half a working day for the presence of IGV using reference antiserum to IGV prepared in guinea-pigs. Serological studies of a diagnostic but not epidemiological nature may also be performed with equal facility by this same test scheme using highly purified IGV antigen derived from stool.

  5. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Tumor Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  6. Aspergillus antigen testing in bone marrow transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, E; Oliver, D; Johnson, E; Foot, A; Marks, D; Warnock, D

    2000-01-01

    Aims—To assess the clinical usefulness of a commercial aspergillus antigen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in bone marrow transplant recipients, and to compare it with a commercial latex agglutination (LA) test. Methods—In total, 2026 serum samples from 104 bone marrow transplant recipients were tested. These comprised 67 sera from seven patients who had died with confirmed IA, 268 sera from nine patients who had died with suspected IA, and 1691 sera from 88 patients with no clinical, radiological, or microbiological signs of IA. Results—The ELISA was more sensitive than the LA test. All patients who were ELISA positive were also LA positive, and a positive LA result never preceded a positive ELISA. Twelve of 16 patients with confirmed or suspected IA were ELISA positive on two or more occasions, compared with 10 of 15 who were LA positive. ELISA was positive before LA in five patients (range, 2–14 days), and became positive on the same day in the remainder. Aspergillus antigen was detected by ELISA a median of 15 days before death (range, 4–233). Clinical and/or radiological evidence of IA was noted in all patients, and a positive ELISA was never the sole criterion for introduction of antifungal treatment. Two samples (one from each of two patients without IA) gave false positive results. Conclusions—The aspergillus ELISA is a specific indicator of invasive aspergillosis if the criterion of two positive samples is required to confirm the diagnosis. However, the test is insufficiently sensitive to diagnose aspergillosis before other symptoms or signs are apparent, and hence is unlikely to lead to earlier initiation of antifungal treatment. It is therefore unsuitable for screening of asymptomatic patients at risk of invasive aspergillosis, but does have a useful role in confirming the diagnosis in symptomatic patients. Key Words: invasive aspergillosis • aspergillus antigen • Platelia enzyme

  7. Circulating antigen tests and urine reagent strips for diagnosis of active schistosomiasis in endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Ochodo, Eleanor A; Gopalakrishna, Gowri; Spek, Bea; Reitsma, Johannes B; van Lieshout, Lisette; Polman, Katja; Lamberton, Poppy; Bossuyt, Patrick Mm; Leeflang, Mariska Mg

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care (POC) tests for diagnosing schistosomiasis include tests based on circulating antigen detection and urine reagent strip tests. If they had sufficient diagnostic accuracy they could replace conventional microscopy as they provide a quicker answer and are easier to use. Objectives To summarise the diagnostic accuracy of: a) urine reagent strip tests in detecting active Schistosoma haematobium infection, with microscopy as the reference standard; and b) circulating antigen tests for detecting active Schistosoma infection in geographical regions endemic for Schistosoma mansoni or S. haematobium or both, with microscopy as the reference standard. Search methods We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, MEDION, and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) without language restriction up to 30 June 2014. Selection criteria We included studies that used microscopy as the reference standard: for S. haematobium, microscopy of urine prepared by filtration, centrifugation, or sedimentation methods; and for S. mansoni, microscopy of stool by Kato-Katz thick smear. We included studies on participants residing in endemic areas only. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data, assessed quality of the data using QUADAS-2, and performed meta-analysis where appropriate. Using the variability of test thresholds, we used the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model for all eligible tests (except the circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) POC for S. mansoni, where the bivariate random-effects model was more appropriate). We investigated heterogeneity, and carried out indirect comparisons where data were sufficient. Results for sensitivity and specificity are presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Main results We included 90 studies; 88 from field settings in Africa. The median S. haematobium infection prevalence was 41% (range 1% to 89%) and 36% for S. mansoni (range 8

  8. Providing Quantitative Information and a Nudge to Undergo Stool Testing in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Decision Aid: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Peter H; Perkins, Susan M; Schmidt, Karen K; Muriello, Paul F; Althouse, Sandra; Rawl, Susan M

    2017-08-01

    Guidelines recommend that patient decision aids should provide quantitative information about probabilities of potential outcomes, but the impact of this information is unknown. Behavioral economics suggests that patients confused by quantitative information could benefit from a "nudge" towards one option. We conducted a pilot randomized trial to estimate the effect sizes of presenting quantitative information and a nudge. Primary care patients (n = 213) eligible for colorectal cancer screening viewed basic screening information and were randomized to view (a) quantitative information (quantitative module), (b) a nudge towards stool testing with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) (nudge module), (c) neither a nor b, or (d) both a and b. Outcome measures were perceived colorectal cancer risk, screening intent, preferred test, and decision conflict, measured before and after viewing the decision aid, and screening behavior at 6 months. Patients viewing the quantitative module were more likely to be screened than those who did not ( P = 0.012). Patients viewing the nudge module had a greater increase in perceived colorectal cancer risk than those who did not ( P = 0.041). Those viewing the quantitative module had a smaller increase in perceived risk than those who did not ( P = 0.046), and the effect was moderated by numeracy. Among patients with high numeracy who did not view the nudge module, those who viewed the quantitative module had a greater increase in intent to undergo FIT ( P = 0.028) than did those who did not. The limitations of this study were the limited sample size and single healthcare system. Adding quantitative information to a decision aid increased uptake of colorectal cancer screening, while adding a nudge to undergo FIT did not increase uptake. Further research on quantitative information in decision aids is warranted.

  9. Rapid diagnosis of cryptococcosis using an antigen detection immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Rivet-Dañon, Diane; Guitard, Juliette; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Gay, Frédérick; Ait-Ammar, Nawel; Angoulvant, Adela; Marinach, Carine; Hennequin, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    Current methods for cryptococcal antigen detection have some limitations. This study aimed at evaluating a lateral flow assay (LFA) for the diagnosis of cryptococcosis in a French University medical center. A retrospective study was performed on samples collected from patients with a definitive diagnosis of cryptococcosis (group I 66 samples; 28 patients) or with non-Cryptococcus invasive fungal infection (group II 18 samples; 17 patients). In addition, 274 samples from 205 consecutive patients, either suspected of cryptococcal infection or routinely screened during their follow-up, were prospectively tested (group III). Cryptococcal antigen was assayed using LFA and an EIA. A latex-based test was used for confirmation. Sensitivity calculated on group I and specificity on group II, were respectively at 100% and 90.0%. Two false positives were related to Trichosporon fungemia. Per-sample analysis on group III revealed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values all at 100% for CSF, and at 100%, 98.9%, 75% and 100%, respectively for serum samples. LFA enabled the diagnosis of two cases of asymptomatic cryptococcosis. The excellent diagnostic value and practicality (visual reading results in 15 min) of LFA make it fully appropriate for the diagnosis of cryptococcosis in this particular setting. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaplasma platys Immunoblot Test Using Major Surface Antigens.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tzung-Huei; Parraga, Maria E; Alvarez, Elizabeth; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-09-01

    Anaplasma platys is an uncultivable tick-borne obligatory intracellular bacterium, which is known to infect platelets of dogs. A. platys causes infectious canine cyclic thrombocytopenia in subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world. Several cases of human infection with A. platys infection have also been reported. However, seroprevalence of A. platys exposure and infection has not been determined in most of the regions, in part, due to lack of a simple and reliable assay method. Furthermore, A. platys antigens recognized by dogs are unknown. We previously sequenced gene encoding A. platys major outer membrane proteins P44 and Omp-1X. In the present study, we obtained purified recombinant A. platys P44 and Omp-1X proteins, and using them as antigens in immunoblotting examined seroreactivity in dogs. Of 34 specimens from Venezuela where A. platys infection was previously reported, 25 specimens (73.5%) reacted to rAplP44 and/or rAplOMP-1X. Neither Anaplasma phagocytophilum-seropositive (N = 10) nor A. phagocytophilum-seronegative canine specimens (N = 10) from the geographic regions where A. platys infection has never been reported, reacted rAplP44 or rAplOMP-1X. The result indicates a high A. platys seroprevalence rate in tested dogs from Venezuela and suggests that the immunoblot analysis based on recombinant A. platys major outer membrane proteins can provide a simple and defined tool to enlighten the prevalence of A. platys infection.

  11. The potential role of HCV core antigen testing in diagnosing HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Dawson, George J

    2012-01-01

    The potential uses of serological tests that detect HCV core antigens in biological fluids are highlighted. The most common serological tests utilized to detect exposure to HCV rely on the detection of antibodies to HCV. However, these tests cannot distinguish between individuals who have resolved their infection and those who remain actively infected with HCV. By contrast, the HCV core antigen test detects circulating HCV core antigen and identifies individuals who are actively infected with HCV. There is increasing interest in using the HCV core antigen test as a reflex test for seropositive individuals to identify individuals who are actively infected with HCV. In addition, the HCV core antigen test can be utilized to detect the early phase of HCV infection prior to the development of antibodies, both in the blood bank setting and in the diagnostic laboratory. Lastly, quantitative versions of the HCV core antigen test can be used to monitor the effectiveness of antiviral therapy.

  12. Parasitological diagnosis combining an internally controlled real-time PCR assay for the detection of four protozoa in stool samples with a testing algorithm for microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Wallinga, J A; Ruijs, G J H M; Bruins, M J; Verweij, J J

    2009-09-01

    Molecular detection of gastrointestinal protozoa is more sensitive and more specific than microscopy but, to date, has not routinely replaced time-consuming microscopic analysis. Two internally controlled real-time PCR assays for the combined detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis in single faecal samples were compared with Triple Faeces Test (TFT) microscopy results from 397 patient samples. Additionally, an algorithm for complete parasitological diagnosis was created. Real-time PCR revealed 152 (38.3%) positive cases, 18 of which were double infections: one (0.3%) sample was positive for E. histolytica, 44 (11.1%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 122 (30.7%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and three (0.8%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. TFT microscopy yielded 96 (24.2%) positive cases, including five double infections: one sample was positive for E. histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, 29 (7.3%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 69 (17.4%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and two (0.5%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium hominis/Cryptosporidium parvum. Retrospective analysis of the clinical patient information of 2887 TFT sets showed that eosinophilia, elevated IgE levels, adoption and travelling to (sub)tropical areas are predisposing factors for infection with non-protozoal gastrointestinal parasites. The proposed diagnostic algorithm includes application of real-time PCR to all samples, with the addition of microscopy on an unpreserved faecal sample in cases of a predisposing factor, or a repeat request for parasitological examination. Application of real-time PCR improved the diagnostic yield by 18%. A single stool sample is sufficient for complete parasitological diagnosis when an algorithm based on clinical information is applied.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid Coccidioides antigen testing in the diagnosis and management of central nervous system coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, David M; Pepito, Brian S; Proia, Laurie A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Ashraf, Madiha; Marty, Francisco; Scully, Eileen; Wheat, L Joseph

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to report on the potential utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Coccidioides antigen testing in the diagnosis and management of Coccidioides meningitis. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of seven patients with Coccidioides meningitis who had Coccidioides antigen tests performed on CSF. In two severely immunocompromised patients, CSF Coccidioides antigen testing was helpful in the diagnosis when other testing modalities were negative. Coccidioides antigen testing was also useful in the management of patients who had progression of disease due to non-adherence, development of resistance, failure of therapy and the presence of vasculitis. Changing antigen levels helped identify disease complications in three patients that led to alterations in therapy or management. On the basis of our review of these seven patients with Coccidioides meningitis, we concluded that the Coccidioides antigen test contributed to the diagnosis and management of patients with Coccidioides meningitis. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Development of a novel antigen detection test for histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, B L; Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Ortiz, B L; Robledo, M A; Restrepo, A; Hay, R J

    1997-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is an important systemic fungal infection, particularly among immunocompromised individuals living or travelling in areas of endemicity, who, without antifungal therapy, may develop a progressive disseminated fatal infection. For such patients, the detection of antibody responses by immunodiffusion or complement fixation test is of limited use. In contrast, the detection of Histoplasma capsulatum circulating antigens may provide a more practical approach to the rapid diagnosis of the disease. Accordingly, an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of a 69- to 70-kDa H. capsulatum-specific determinant and incorporating a species-specific murine monoclonal antibody was developed. With sera from patients with different forms of the disease (n = 35), the overall sensitivity of the test was found to be 71.4%, while the specificity was found to be 98% with normal human sera from areas of endemicity (n = 44) and 85.4% with sera from patients with other chronic fungal or bacterial infections (n = 48). This novel, highly specific ELISA provides a significant addition to the existing diagnostic tests for the detection of histoplasmosis. PMID:9316918

  15. The rapid detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia species in clinical stools using the Quik Chek immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Claire L; Niebel, Marc; Jones, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Diagnostic testing in the United Kingdom for Cryptosporidium and Giardia species is routinely performed by microscopy. In this study, two hundred stool samples from human clinical cases were examined for the presence of these two parasites comparing microscopy with an antigen immunoassay, Quik Chek (Techlab, Inc.). The Quik Chek assay was shown to have a sensitivity and specificity for Cryptosporidium detection of 87.6% and 98.9% respectively and for Giardia detection, 93.3% and 99.4% respectively. The high correlation with microscopy data provides evidence to support implementation of this rapid test within diagnostic microbiology laboratories.

  16. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  17. Repeat Prostate-Specific Antigen Tests Before Prostate Biopsy Decisions.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tobias; Adolfsson, Jan; Grönberg, Henrik; Eklund, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Despite limited scientific support, a repeat prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test before prostate biopsy decisions is common. We analyzed biopsy outcomes in 1686 men from the STHLM3 study with PSA 3-10 ng/mL and two PSA tests taken within eight weeks and before prostate biopsy using percentages and multinomial logistic regression. We found that omitting prostate biopsy for men with PSA values decreasing to PSAs of 3 ng/mL or less would save 16.8% of biopsy procedures, while missing 5.4% of the cancers with Gleason scores (GSs) of 7 or higher. The proportion of cancers with GSs of 6 or lower was independent of the first PSA value, as well as of PSA change. Also, the risk of tumors with GSs of 7 or higher decreased with both decreasing and increasing PSA levels: It was 18.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 16.3% to 20.9%) for men with PSA changes of less than 20%, 12.1% (95% CI = 8.0% to 16.2%) for men with PSA levels increasing at least 20%, and 6.6% (95% CI = 3.8% to 9.3%) for men with PSA levels decreasing at least 20%. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The procedure...

  19. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The procedure...

  20. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The procedure...

  1. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The procedure...

  2. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The procedure...

  3. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  5. Comprehensive assessment for serum treatment for single antigen test for detection of HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohai; Reinsmoen, Nancy L

    2017-09-09

    The single antigen test is widely used in the field of transplantation to determine the specificity of HLA antibodies. It will be beneficial to standardize the procedure of the single antigen test among HLA laboratories. It is not uncommon that single antigen testing on native sera fails to detect antibodies with very high concentrations. It has been shown that cleavage products of activated complement components may mask strongly binding antibodies in single antigen testing. To overcome inhibition by the activated complement products, sera are pretreated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), dithiothreitol (DTT), or heat inactivation before single antigen testing. However, no studies have been published to systemically compare the impact of these treatments on single antigen testing. The aim of this study is to understand the different effects these treatments may have on single antigen test results. We found that mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) obtained from sera treated with EDTA and heat inactivation were nearly identical, while DTT treatment was less potent to remove the inhibition. In addition, sera dilution did not further increase MFI of antibodies after EDTA treatment. Our results provide guidance to choose a pretreatment reagent for single antigen testing, and to compare studies obtained from laboratories using different treatments. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Two-step stool aerobic training for smokers.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Manuel; Saavedra, Pedro; Martin, Nieves; Lantarón, Ev M; Polu, Elisabeth; Bach, John Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze subjective, physical, and physiologic responses to a standardized incremental 30-min two-step stool test to create an individualized 45-min maximally intensive two-step stool endurance exercise regimen for home training. This is a longitudinal study on 26 consecutively referred male smokers aged 39-66 yrs. Each performed the two-step stool test on two 15-cm steps at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 climbs per minute. Exertional dyspnea, oxygen consumption per unit time, ventilation, respiratory rate, tidal volume, heart rate, capillary oxyhemoglobin saturation, physiologic cost index, and oxygen pulse were recorded and compared with those observed during incremental cycle exercise (30 W per 3 mins). Multivariate analysis for each parameter was undertaken as a mixed model. All subjects attained 60 climbs per minute on the two-step stool test and performed 38-42 mins of two-step stool endurance. All parameters reached 80%-96% of cycle maximum oxygen consumption. The subjects found the two-step stool endurance simple and practical to perform at home. There were no complications. The incremental two-step stool test is a simple, cost-effective way to establish a 45-min maximally intensive endurance exercise training program practical for use in the home.

  7. Sensitivity and Specificity of Multiple Kato-Katz Thick Smears and a Circulating Cathodic Antigen Test for Schistosoma mansoni Diagnosis Pre- and Post-repeated-Praziquantel Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lamberton, Poppy H. L.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Oguttu, David W.; Fenwick, Alan; Webster, Joanne P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Two Kato-Katz thick smears (Kato-Katzs) from a single stool are currently recommended for diagnosing Schistosoma mansoni infections to map areas for intervention. This ‘gold standard’ has low sensitivity at low infection intensities. The urine point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen test (POC-CCA) is potentially more sensitive but how accurately they detect S. mansoni after repeated praziquantel treatments, their suitability for measuring drug efficacy and their correlation with egg counts remain to be fully understood. We compared the accuracies of one to six Kato-Katzs and one POC-CCA for the diagnosis of S. mansoni in primary-school children who have received zero to ten praziquantel treatments. We determined the impact each diagnostic approach may have on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and drug-efficacy findings. Method/Principle Findings In a high S. mansoni endemic area of Uganda, three days of consecutive stool samples were collected from primary school-aged children (six - 12 years) at five time-points in year one: baseline, one-week-post-, four-weeks-post-, six-months-post-, and six-months-one-week-post-praziquantel and three time-points in years two and three: pre-, one-week-post- and four-weeks-post-praziquantel-treatment/retreatment (n = 1065). Two Kato-Katzs were performed on each stool. In parallel, one urine sample was collected and a single POC-CCA evaluated per child at each time-point in year one (n = 367). At baseline, diagnosis by two Kato-Katzs (sensitivity = 98.6%) or one POC-CCA (sensitivity = 91.7%, specificity = 75.0%) accurately predicted S. mansoni infections. However, one year later, a minimum of three Kato-Katzs, and two years later, five Kato-Katzs were required for accurate diagnosis (sensitivity >90%) and drug-efficacy evaluation. The POC-CCA was as sensitive as six Kato-Katzs four-weeks-post and six-months-post-treatment, if trace readings were classified as positive. Conclusions

  8. Use of recombinant purified protein derivative (PPD) antigens as specific skin test for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Stavri, Henriette; Bucurenci, Nadia; Ulea, Irina; Costache, Adriana; Popa, Loredana; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2012-11-01

    Purified protein derivative (PPD) is currently the only available skin test reagent used worldwide for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to develop a Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific skin test reagent, without false positive results due to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination using recombinant antigens. Proteins in PPD IC-65 were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and compared to proteins in M. tuberculosis culture filtrate; 54 proteins were found in common. Top candidates MPT64, ESAT 6, and CFP 10 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli expression strains and purified as recombinant proteins. To formulate optimal immunodiagnostic PPD cocktails, the antigens were evaluated by skin testing guinea pigs sensitized with M. tuberculosis H37Rv and BCG. For single antigens and a cocktail mixture of these antigens, best results were obtained using 3 μg/0.1 ml, equivalent to 105 TU (tuberculin units). Each animal was simultaneously tested with PPD IC-65, 2 TU/0.1 ml, as reference. Reactivity of the multi-antigen cocktail was greater than that of any single antigen. The skin test results were between 34.3 and 76.6 per cent the level of reactivity compared to that of the reference when single antigens were tested and 124 per cent the level of reactivity compared to the reference for the multi-antigen cocktail. Our results showed that this specific cocktail could represent a potential candidate for a new skin diagnostic test for TB.

  9. Differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar by the polymerase chain reaction in stool samples of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in the Sanliurfa Province.

    PubMed

    Zeyrek, Fadile Yıldız; Turgay, Nevin; Unver, Aysegül; Ustün, Sebnem; Akarca, Ulus; Töz, Seray

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to diagnose amebiasis and also identify Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) and Entamoeba dispar (E. dispar) in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in an endemic region in Turkey. Stool samples obtained from 181 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms from the Harran University Hospital of Sanliurfa were examined for the diagnosis of amebiasis by the three methods which are as follows:- In house polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 135 base pair region located on the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene to differentiate E. histolytica from E. dispar; and the commercial kit, RIDASCREEN® stool ELISA, that identifies Entamoeba sensu lato antigen and microscopical examination of Trichrome stained smears of stool samples. Positivity for E. histolytica/E. dispar complex was found to be 79 (43.6%) by microscopy versus 83 (45.9%) by PCR out of 181 stool samples. A total of 45 patients were found to be positive by the antigen detection method. PCR and microscopy were both positive in 59 samples. The number of patients infected with E. dispar (39.8%) was found to be higher than E. histolytica (3.3%) while 5 patients (2.8%) had mixed E. histolytica+E. dispar infections according to PCR results. Routine diagnosis of amebiasis by a combination of microscopy and antigen detection technique should be complemented with a PCR assay as a reference test for sensitive differentiation of both species.

  10. The Relationship between the Methylated Septin-9 DNA Blood Test and Stool Occult Blood Test for Diagnosing Colorectal Cancer in Taiwanese People.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Hung; Yan, Sheng-Lei; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Shih-Feng; Yeh, Yung-Hsiang; Ou, Jing-Jim; Lin, Chien-Hua; Lee, Yueh-Tsung; Chen, Chien-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common and lethal disease in the world. There is an increasing number of cases in Taiwan and a higher rate at advanced stages. The immune fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) has been used as a screening method in Taiwan for years. A new novel diagnostic tool, the Methylated Septin-9 (MS-9) DNA blood test, had been reported to have high sensitivity and specificity for CRC detection. There are no available data in Taiwan, so we conducted this prospective randomized trial to investigate the relationship among the MS-9 DNA blood test, iFOBT, and a combination of the two tests for diagnosing CRC in Taiwanese people. From July 1, 2012 to December 31, 2013, we prospectively selected 60 plasma samples from patients who were diagnosed with CRC and otherwise, the healthy group by colonoscopy in our hospital. Patients were divided into the CRC group and healthy group. CRC stages 0, I, II and stages III and IV were separately analyzed. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of each group to determine the relationship among the MS-9 DNA blood test, iFOBT, and a combination of the two tests for diagnosing CRC in Taiwanese people. The results of the MS-9 DNA blood test for the 60 samples were divided into three groups, and the sensitivity as well as the specificity of the MS-9 DNA blood test to detect CRC were 47% and 89%, respectively. The results of iFOBT were also divided into three groups, and had higher sensitivity (84%) but lower specificity (55%) using iFOBT to detect CRC. Higher rates could be predicted to detect CRC if both the tests were positive. A combined MS-9 DNA blood test and iFOBT may help in a higher detection rate of CRC. It could be offered to individuals who are unwilling or unable to undergo colonoscopy. Further large prospective, randomized studies are needed in the future. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Accuracy of Urine Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA) Test for Schistosoma mansoni Diagnosis in Different Settings of Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Coulibaly, Jean T.; Knopp, Stefanie; N'Guessan, Nicaise A.; Silué, Kigbafori D.; Fürst, Thomas; Lohourignon, Laurent K.; Brou, Jean K.; N'Gbesso, Yve K.; Vounatsou, Penelope; N'Goran, Eliézer K.; Utzinger, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    Background Promising results have been reported for a urine circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) test for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni. We assessed the accuracy of a commercially available CCA cassette test (designated CCA-A) and an experimental formulation (CCA-B) for S. mansoni diagnosis. Methodology We conducted a cross-sectional survey in three settings of Côte d'Ivoire: settings A and B are endemic for S. mansoni, whereas S. haematobium co-exists in setting C. Overall, 446 children, aged 8–12 years, submitted multiple stool and urine samples. For S. mansoni diagnosis, stool samples were examined with triplicate Kato-Katz, whereas urine samples were tested with CCA-A. The first stool and urine samples were additionally subjected to an ether-concentration technique and CCA-B, respectively. Urine samples were examined for S. haematobium using a filtration method, and for microhematuria using Hemastix dipsticks. Principal Findings Considering nine Kato-Katz as diagnostic ‘gold’ standard, the prevalence of S. mansoni in setting A, B and C was 32.9%, 53.1% and 91.8%, respectively. The sensitivity of triplicate Kato-Katz from the first stool and a single CCA-A test was 47.9% and 56.3% (setting A), 73.9% and 69.6% (setting B), and 94.2% and 89.6% (setting C). The respective sensitivity of a single CCA-B was 10.4%, 29.9% and 75.0%. The ether-concentration technique showed a low sensitivity for S. mansoni diagnosis (8.3–41.0%). The specificity of CCA-A was moderate (76.9–84.2%); CCA-B was high (96.7–100%). The likelihood of a CCA-A color reaction increased with higher S. mansoni fecal egg counts (odds ratio: 1.07, p<0.001). A concurrent S. haematobium infection or the presence of microhematuria did not influence the CCA-A test results for S. mansoni diagnosis. Conclusion/Significance CCA-A showed similar sensitivity than triplicate Kato-Katz for S. mansoni diagnosis with no cross-reactivity to S. haematobium and microhematuria. The low sensitivity of

  12. Community Laboratory Testing for Cryptosporidium: Multicenter Study Retesting Public Health Surveillance Stool Samples Positive for Cryptosporidium by Rapid Cartridge Assay with Direct Fluorescent Antibody Testing

    PubMed Central

    Roellig, Dawn M.; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Madison-Antenucci, Susan; Robinson, Trisha J.; Van, Tam T.; Collier, Sarah A.; Boxrud, Dave; Monson, Timothy; Bates, Leigh Ann; Blackstock, Anna J.; Shea, Shari; Larson, Kirsten; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a common cause of sporadic diarrheal disease and outbreaks in the United States. Increasingly, immunochromatography-based rapid cartridge assays (RCAs) are providing community laboratories with a quick cryptosporidiosis diagnostic method. In the current study, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), and four state health departments evaluated RCA-positive samples obtained during routine Cryptosporidium testing. All samples underwent “head to head” re-testing using both RCA and direct fluorescence assay (DFA). Community level results from three sites indicated that 54.4% (166/305) of Meridian ImmunoCard STAT! positives and 87.0% (67/77) of Remel Xpect positives were confirmed by DFA. When samples were retested by RCA at state laboratories and compared with DFA, 83.3% (155/186) of Meridian ImmunoCard STAT! positives and 95.2% (60/63) of Remel Xpect positives were confirmed. The percentage of confirmed community results varied by site: Minnesota, 39.0%; New York, 63.9%; and Wisconsin, 72.1%. The percentage of confirmed community results decreased with patient age; 12.5% of community positive tests could be confirmed by DFA for patients 60 years of age or older. The percentage of confirmed results did not differ significantly by sex, storage temperature, time between sample collection and testing, or season. Findings from this study demonstrate a lower confirmation rate of community RCA positives when compared to RCA positives identified at state laboratories. Elucidating the causes of decreased test performance in order to improve overall community laboratory performance of these tests is critical for understanding the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in the United States (US). PMID:28085927

  13. Community Laboratory Testing for Cryptosporidium: Multicenter Study Retesting Public Health Surveillance Stool Samples Positive for Cryptosporidium by Rapid Cartridge Assay with Direct Fluorescent Antibody Testing.

    PubMed

    Roellig, Dawn M; Yoder, Jonathan S; Madison-Antenucci, Susan; Robinson, Trisha J; Van, Tam T; Collier, Sarah A; Boxrud, Dave; Monson, Timothy; Bates, Leigh Ann; Blackstock, Anna J; Shea, Shari; Larson, Kirsten; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a common cause of sporadic diarrheal disease and outbreaks in the United States. Increasingly, immunochromatography-based rapid cartridge assays (RCAs) are providing community laboratories with a quick cryptosporidiosis diagnostic method. In the current study, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), and four state health departments evaluated RCA-positive samples obtained during routine Cryptosporidium testing. All samples underwent "head to head" re-testing using both RCA and direct fluorescence assay (DFA). Community level results from three sites indicated that 54.4% (166/305) of Meridian ImmunoCard STAT! positives and 87.0% (67/77) of Remel Xpect positives were confirmed by DFA. When samples were retested by RCA at state laboratories and compared with DFA, 83.3% (155/186) of Meridian ImmunoCard STAT! positives and 95.2% (60/63) of Remel Xpect positives were confirmed. The percentage of confirmed community results varied by site: Minnesota, 39.0%; New York, 63.9%; and Wisconsin, 72.1%. The percentage of confirmed community results decreased with patient age; 12.5% of community positive tests could be confirmed by DFA for patients 60 years of age or older. The percentage of confirmed results did not differ significantly by sex, storage temperature, time between sample collection and testing, or season. Findings from this study demonstrate a lower confirmation rate of community RCA positives when compared to RCA positives identified at state laboratories. Elucidating the causes of decreased test performance in order to improve overall community laboratory performance of these tests is critical for understanding the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in the United States (US).

  14. A test of antigenicity for the selection of strains for inclusion in cholera vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Richard A.; Pongpairojana, Smarn

    1968-01-01

    The antigenicity of a large number of cholera vibrio strains was compared, in groups of rabbits, by evaluating the serological responses to single limited doses of vaccines prepared from the strains. On the basis of these tests, it was possible to construct 2 quadrivalent (El Tor and classical, Inaba and Ogawa) vaccines which differed significantly in antigenicity for rabbits but which were indistinguishable in the “standard” mouse-protection test. The advisability of using a test of antigenicity for selection of strains and laboratory evaluation of vaccines is considered. Application of the proposed antigenicity test would depend on further comparisons of human response to vaccines which differ in antigenicity for the rabbit. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:5303406

  15. Development of an immunochromatography strip test based on truncated nucleocapsid antigens of three representative hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Amada, Takako; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Koma, Takaaki; Shimizu, Kenta; Gamage, Chandika D; Shiokawa, Kanae; Nishio, Sanae; Ahlm, Clas; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-05-14

    Hantaviruses are causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and nephropathia epidemica (NE) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the New World. There is a need for time-saving diagnostic methods. In the present study, recombinant N antigens were used as antigens in an immunochromatography strip (ICG) test to detect specific IgG antibodies. The N-terminal 103 amino acids (aa) of Hantaan virus (HTNV), Puumala virus (PUUV) and Andes virus (ANDV) nucleocapsid (N) protein were expressed in E. coli as representative antigens of three groups (HFRS, NE and HPS-causing viruses) of hantavirus. Five different types of ICG test strips, one antigen line on one strip for each of the three selected hantaviruses (HTNV, PUUV and ANDV), three antigen lines on one strip and a mixed antigen line on one strip, were developed and sensitivities were compared. A total of 87 convalescent-phase patient sera, including sera from 35 HFRS patients, 36 NE patients and 16 HPS patients, and 25 sera from healthy seronegative people as negative controls were used to evaluate the ICG test. Sensitivities of the three-line strip and mixed-line strip were similar to those of the single antigen strip (97.2 to 100%). On the other hand, all of the ICG test strips showed high specificities to healthy donors. These results indicated that the ICG test with the three representative antigens is an effective serodiagnostic tool for screening and typing of hantavirus infection in humans.

  16. Optimal screening and donor management in a public stool bank.

    PubMed

    Kazerouni, Abbas; Burgess, James; Burns, Laura J; Wein, Lawrence M

    2015-12-17

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is an effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and is being investigated as a treatment for other microbiota-associated diseases. To facilitate these activities, an international public stool bank has been created, which screens donors and processes stools in a standardized manner. The goal of this research is to use mathematical modeling and analysis to optimize screening and donor management at the stool bank. Compared to the current policy of screening active donors every 60 days before releasing their quarantined stools for sale, costs can be reduced by 10.3 % by increasing the screening frequency to every 36 days. In addition, the stool production rate varies widely across donors, and using donor-specific screening, where higher producers are screened more frequently, also reduces costs, as does introducing an interim (i.e., between consecutive regular tests) stool test for just rotavirus and C. difficile. We also derive a donor release (i.e., into the system) policy that allows the supply to approximately match an exponentially increasing deterministic demand. More frequent screening, interim screening for rotavirus and C. difficile, and donor-specific screening, where higher stool producers are screened more frequently, are all cost-reducing measures. If screening costs decrease in the future (e.g., as a result of bringing screening in house), a bottleneck for implementing some of these recommendations may be the reluctance of donors to undergo serum screening more frequently than monthly.

  17. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  18. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  19. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  20. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  1. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  2. Antigen and antibody testing for the diagnosis of blastomycosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Spector, D; Legendre, A M; Wheat, J; Bemis, D; Rohrbach, B; Taboada, J; Durkin, M

    2008-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with an improved prognosis in blastomycosis. The diagnosis of blastomycosis may be missed by cytology, histopathology, culture, or serology. An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for detection of Blastomyces dermatitidis galactomannan antigen in body fluids has been used for rapid diagnosis of blastomycosis in humans. Measurement of Blastomyces antigen in urine or serum by the MVista Blastomyces antigen EIA is more sensitive than measurement of anti-Blastomyces antibodies for diagnosis of blastomycosis in dogs. Serum and urine samples from 46 dogs with confirmed blastomycosis were tested for Blastomyces antigen and serum was tested for anti-Blastomyces antibodies. The sensitivity for the detection of antigen in urine was 93.5% and it was 87.0% in serum. The sensitivity of antibody detection by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) was 17.4% and it was 76.1% by EIA. Antigen and antibody decreased during itraconazole treatment. Antigen detection is a more sensitive test for diagnosis of blastomycosis than antibody testing by AGID, the only commercially available method. Antigen concentrations decreased with treatment.

  3. Circulating cathodic antigen cassette test versus haematuria strip test in diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    El-Ghareeb, Azza S; Abd El Motaleb, Ghada S; Waked, Nevien Maher; Osman Hany Kamel, Nancy; Aly, Nagwa Shaban

    2016-12-01

    Urinary schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium constitutes a major public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. This study was conducted to evaluate circulating cathodic antigen cassette test and haematuria strip test for detection of S. haematobium in urine samples and to evaluate their screening performance among the study population. Microscopy was used as a gold standard. A total of 600 urine samples were examined by microscopy for detection of S. haematobium eggs, screened for microhaematuria using Self-Stik reagent strips and screened for circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) using the urine-CCA cassette test. The specificity of CCA, microhaematuria and macrohaematuria was 96.4, 40.6 and 31.2 % respectively while the sensitivity was 88.2, 99.3 and 100 % respectively which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that using of urine-CCA cassette test in diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis is highly specific (96.4 %) compared with the highly sensitive haematuria strip test (100 %). The degree of agreement between microscopic examination and CCA detection was 99.3 % with highly statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). The combination of two techniques could potentially use for screening and mapping of S. haematobium infection.

  4. Rapid Diagnosis of Diarrhea Caused by Shigella sonnei Using Dipsticks; Comparison of Rectal Swabs, Direct Stool and Stool Culture

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Claudia; Nato, Faridabano; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Thi Phuong, Lan Nguyen; Taneja, Neelam; Ungeheuer, Marie Noëlle; Soza, Guillermo; Anderson, Leslie; Benadof, Dona; Zamorano, Agustín; Diep, Tai The; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Nguyen, Vu Hoang; Ottone, Catherine; Bégaud, Evelyne; Pahil, Sapna; Prado, Valeria; Sansonetti, Philippe; Germani, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated a dipstick test for rapid detection of Shigella sonnei on bacterial colonies, directly on stools and from rectal swabs because in actual field situations, most pathologic specimens for diagnosis correspond to stool samples or rectal swabs. Methodology/Principal Findings The test is based on the detection of S. sonnei lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-side chains using phase I-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to gold particles, and displayed on a one-step immunochromatographic dipstick. A concentration as low as 5 ng/ml of LPS was detected in distilled water and in reconstituted stools in 6 minutes. This is the optimal time for lecture to avoid errors of interpretation. In distilled water and in reconstituted stools, an unequivocal positive reaction was obtained with 4 x 106 CFU/ml of S. sonnei. The specificity was 100% when tested with a battery of Shigella and different unrelated strains. When tested on 342 rectal swabs in Chile, specificity (281/295) was 95.3% (95% CI: 92.9% - 97.7%) and sensitivity (47/47) was 100%. Stool cultures and the immunochromatographic test showed concordant results in 95.5 % of cases (328/342) in comparative studies. Positive and negative predictive values were 77% (95% CI: 65% - 86.5%) and 100% respectively. When tested on 219 stools in Chile, Vietnam, India and France, specificity (190/198) was 96% (95% CI 92%–98%) and sensitivity (21/21) was 100%. Stool cultures and the immunochromatographic test showed concordant results in 96.3 % of cases (211/219) in comparative studies. Positive and negative predictive values were 72.4% (95% CI 56.1%–88.6%) and 100 %, respectively. Conclusion This one-step dipstick test performed well for diagnosis of S. sonnei both on stools and on rectal swabs. These data confirm a preliminary study done in Chile. PMID:24278267

  5. Delayed diagnosis of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis due to negative cryptococcal antigen test.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Bernhard; Bally, Frank; Hewer, Ekkehard; Sendi, Parham

    2013-01-29

    Cryptococcus spp. commonly causes infection in immunocompromised hosts. Clinical presentation of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is variable, but headache, fever and a high intracranial pressure should suggest the diagnosis. The cryptococcal antigen test is a specific and sensitive rapid test that can be performed on blood or cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of CM in a patient with previously undetected lymphocytopenia. Because cryptococcal antigen test results were negative, diagnosis and treatment were delayed.

  6. Are floating stools associated with specific functional bowel disorders?

    PubMed

    Bouchoucha, Michel; Devroede, Ghislain; Benamouzig, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Functional bowel disorders are recognized as being common, but remain very difficult to diagnose accurately and to differentiate from one another, despite their significant impact on the quality of life of patients.The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the clinical sign of 'floating stools' is associated with psychological disorders, colonic transit time, or other specific bowel disorders as defined by the Rome III diagnostic criteria. A total of 1252 consecutive patients, referred for and found to have functional gastrointestinal disorders, filled in a standard clinical questionnaire on the basis of the Rome III diagnostic criteria and were asked to provide information on the presence of floating stools. Overall, 344 of these scored positive for functional bowel disorders and underwent psychometric testing and colonic transit time studies. Floating stools were reported by 26% of functional bowel disorder patients and 3% of the other functional gastrointestinal disorder patients (P<0.001). The basic demographic characteristics, psychometric evaluation scores, Bristol stool form scales, and total and segmental colonic transit times were not statistically different according to the presence or not of floating stools in these patients. Logistic regression showed that mixed irritable bowel syndrome was the only functional gastrointestinal disorder associated independently with floating stools (P=0.003). Floating stools are a characteristic of patients with mixed irritable bowel syndrome.

  7. Predictive value of stool examination in acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D; Cohen, P T; Neighbor, M; Larkin, H; Newman, M; Yajko, D; Hadley, K

    1987-08-01

    We prospectively evaluate the value of fecal blood and fecal leukocytes in predicting whether acute diarrhea in adults is associated with a stool culture positive for a bacterial pathogen. One hundred thirteen patients, aged 19 to 50 years, seen in a two-year period in an urban adult outpatient setting underwent stool culture for the presenting symptom of diarrhea. Heterosexual men represented 48% of the cohort, women represented 17%, and homosexual men represented 35%. Overall, 53 (47%) of the patients had positive stool cultures for enteric pathogens. Campylobacter jejuni was the most common organism in the entire cohort, but Shigella species were most common in homosexual men. The best predictive variables for a stool culture positive for a bacterial pathogen were the presence of both fecal leukocytes and fecal blood in the stool, compared with only one or neither. When both were present, the sensitivity was 81%, the specificity 74%, and the predictive values of a positive and negative test were 81% and 83%, respectively; the likelihood ratio was 4.87. When homosexual men and the rest of the cohort were analyzed separately, the combination of fecal leukocytes and fecal blood remained the best method of predicting a positive stool culture in both. Examination of stool for fecal leukocytes and fecal blood is a rapid, reliable, and inexpensive way to differentiate between bacterial and other causes of acute diarrhea in the adult acute care setting.

  8. Stool C. difficile toxin

    MedlinePlus

    ... test detects harmful substances produced by the bacterium Clostridium difficile ( C difficile) . This infection is a common ... toxin; Necrotizing colitis - toxin; C difficile - toxin Images Clostridium difficile organism References Beavis KG, Charnot-Katsikas A. ...

  9. Buffered Plate Antigen Test as a Screening Test for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Nidia E.; Bolpe, Jorge E.

    1998-01-01

    Brucellosis in Argentina is currently investigated in bank donor blood by the standard plate agglutination test (PAT). This study evaluated the buffered plate antigen test (BPA), now used to screen for bovine brucellosis, as a screen for human disease. Of 57 sera from patients with culture-confirmed brucellosis, 100% were detected with the BPA. Of 142 sera positive by rose bengal (RB) and complement fixation (CF), from patients with clinical evidence of brucellosis, the BPA detected 100%. Of 307 sera from a nonsymptomatic population that were RB and CF negative, the BPA detected 99.67% of the negative sera. The data indicate that the BPA is satisfactory compared to the other agglutination tests employed. It is an inexpensive and practical screening test and reduces the nonspecific reactions detected by the PAT. PMID:9574720

  10. [Procedure and indications of stool examination in parasitology].

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Sonia; Aouinet, Amira; Khaled, Samira

    2012-06-01

    Intestinal parasites are a public health problem in the world especially in tropical and subtropical countries. Despite the improvement in living standards and healthy conditions, these parasitoses remain relatively frequent in Tunisia. Stool specimen examination keeps the fundamental test for screening and diagnosis. It is to directly search the parasite. Respect for the right procedure of collection of stool is an essential step for the reliability and proper interpretation of results of this examination.

  11. [Evaluation of Two Methods (Nativ-Lugol Preparation and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) for Detection of Entamoeba histolytica in Stool Samples].

    PubMed

    Alver, Oktay; Topaç, Tuncay; Töre, Okan

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to compare the performance of Native-Lugol examination and EIA Antigen Detection Test using stool samples obtained from patients diagnosed as clinical gastroenteritis and submitted to the Parasitology Laboratory in Uludağ University between January 2010 and February 2011. The stool samples taken from 116 patients and sent to the laboratory of parasitology from various clinics including outpatient services have been investigated using Native-Lugol examination and EIA Antigen Detection Kit (Wampole® E. histolytica II Techlab®, Inc., Blacksburg, Virginia) methods on all the samples. In one of 116 stool samples (%0,86), E. histolytica/E. dispar cysts and/or trophozoites were detected by using direct microscobic (nativ-lugol) method. E. histolytica specific antigen was detected in 34 (29.3%) out of the sample set, and the patients were given adequate treatment. The highest rate of E. histolytica specific antigen positivity were observed in 11-19 age group. On account of the fact that the sensitivity of direct microscopy is quite low, it is concluded that, from the viewpoint of preventing the amebiasis suspected patients from false diagnosis and hence from receiving inadequate treatment, the use of the ELISA method is more appropriate and advantageous, as it is cost effective and does not require highly qualified staff.

  12. Heat treatment prior to testing allows detection of antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in feline serum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis infection in cats is complicated by the difficulty associated with reliable detection of antigen in feline blood and serum samples. Methods To determine if antigen-antibody complex formation may interfere with detection of antigen in feline samples, we evaluated the performance of four different commercially available heartworm tests using serum samples from six cats experimentally infected with D. immitis and confirmed to harbor a low number of adult worms (mean = 2.0). Sera collected 168 (n = 6), 196 (n = 6), and 224 (n = 6) days post infection were tested both directly and following heat treatment. Results Antigen was detected in serum samples from 0 or 1 of 6 infected cats using the assays according to manufacturer’s directions, but after heat treatment of serum samples, as many as 5 of 6 cats had detectable antigen 6–8 months post infection. Antibodies to D. immitis were detected in all six infected cats by commercial in-clinic assay and at a reference laboratory. Conclusions These results indicate that heat treatment of samples prior to testing can improve the sensitivity of antigen assays in feline patients, supporting more accurate diagnosis of this infection in cats. Surveys conducted by antigen testing without prior heat treatment of samples likely underestimate the true prevalence of infection in cats. PMID:24411014

  13. The surface antigens of orthopoxviruses detected by cross-neutralization tests on cross-absorbed antisera.

    PubMed

    Baxby, D

    1982-02-01

    Cross-neutralization tests were done on accepted species and recently isolated members of the genus Orthopoxvirus using antisera which had been separately absorbed with the various viruses. The results provided evidence for the involvement of four neutralizing antigens, and their distribution among 13 virus strains was determined. Monkeypox (Congo-8-Lombe), camelpox (Gorgan), ectromelia (Mill Hill), 'Lenny' and elephant poxviruses had distinctive antigenic formulae. Lister and Wyeth vaccines were indistinguishable but different from Copenhagen and EM63 vaccines which were themselves distinct. Cowpox (Brighton), buffalopox (BP4), MK 10, and Moscow poxviruses were indistinguishable. Examples were found where viruses shared surface antigens but were not all neutralized by antibody to them. this reduced the practical value of the technique for virus identification. Evidence was also obtained for the existence in some viruses of a fifth antigen, antibody to which could block neutralization by antibody to one particular antigen.

  14. Use of recombinant purified protein derivative (PPD) antigens as specific skin test for tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Stavri, Henriette; Bucurenci, Nadia; Ulea, Irina; Costache, Adriana; Popa, Loredana; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Purified protein derivative (PPD) is currently the only available skin test reagent used worldwide for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to develop a Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific skin test reagent, without false positive results due to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination using recombinant antigens. Methods: Proteins in PPD IC-65 were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and compared to proteins in M. tuberculosis culture filtrate; 54 proteins were found in common. Top candidates MPT64, ESAT 6, and CFP 10 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli expression strains and purified as recombinant proteins. To formulate optimal immunodiagnostic PPD cocktails, the antigens were evaluated by skin testing guinea pigs sensitized with M. tuberculosis H37Rv and BCG. Results: For single antigens and a cocktail mixture of these antigens, best results were obtained using 3 μg/0.1 ml, equivalent to 105 TU (tuberculin units). Each animal was simultaneously tested with PPD IC-65, 2 TU/0.1 ml, as reference. Reactivity of the multi-antigen cocktail was greater than that of any single antigen. The skin test results were between 34.3 and 76.6 per cent the level of reactivity compared to that of the reference when single antigens were tested and 124 per cent the level of reactivity compared to the reference for the multi-antigen cocktail. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that this specific cocktail could represent a potential candidate for a new skin diagnostic test for TB. PMID:23287127

  15. Display of Antigens on Polyester Inclusions Lowers the Antigen Concentration Required for a Bovine Tuberculosis Skin Test.

    PubMed

    Parlane, Natalie A; Chen, Shuxiong; Jones, Gareth J; Vordermeier, H Martin; Wedlock, D Neil; Rehm, Bernd H A; Buddle, Bryce M

    2015-10-28

    The tuberculin skin test is the primary screening test for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (TB), and use of this test has been very valuable in the control of this disease in many countries. However, the test lacks specificity when cattle have been exposed to environmental mycobacteria or vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Recent studies showed that the use of three or four recombinant mycobacterial proteins, including 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT6), 10-kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP10), Rv3615c, and Rv3020c, or a peptide cocktail derived from those proteins, in the skin test greatly enhanced test specificity, with minimal loss of test sensitivity. The proteins are present in members of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but are absent in or not expressed by the majority of environmental mycobacteria and the BCG vaccine strain. To produce a low-cost skin test reagent, the proteins were displayed at high density on polyester beads through translational fusion to a polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase that mediates the formation of antigen-displaying inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. Display of the proteins on the polyester beads greatly increased their immunogenicity, allowing for the use of very low concentrations of proteins (0.1 to 3 μg of mycobacterial protein/inoculum) in the skin test. Polyester beads simultaneously displaying all four proteins were produced in a single fermentation process. The polyester beads displaying three or four mycobacterial proteins were shown to have high sensitivity for detection of M. bovis-infected cattle and induced minimal responses in animals exposed to environmental mycobacteria or vaccinated with BCG.

  16. Day-to-day fluctuation of point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen test scores and faecal egg counts in children infected with Schistosoma mansoni in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Determining the variation of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) in urine and egg counts variation in stool between days in Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) infected individuals is vital to decide whether or not to rely on a single-sample test for diagnosis of Schistosomiasis. In this study, the magnitude of day-to-day variation in urine-CCA test scores and in faecal egg counts was evaluated in school children in Ethiopia. Methods A total of 620 school children (age 8 to 12 years) were examined for S. mansoni infection using double Kato-Katz and single urine-CCA cassette methods (batch 32727) on three consecutive days. Results The prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 81.1% based on triple urine-CCA-cassette test and 53.1% based on six Kato-Katz thick smears. Among the study participants, 26.3% showed fluctuation in urine CCA and 32.4% showed fluctuation in egg output. Mean egg count as well as number of cases in each class of intensity and intensity of cassette band color varied over the three days of examination. Over 85% of the children that showed day-to-day variations in status of S. mansoni infection from negative to positive or vice versa by the Kato-Katz and the CCA methods had light intensity of infection. The fluctuation in both the CCA test scores and faecal egg count was not associated with age and sex. Conclusions The current study showed day-to-day variation in CCA and Kato-Katz test results of children infected with S. mansoni. This indicates the necessity of more than one urine or stool samples to be collected on different days for more reliable diagnosis of S. mansoni infection in low endemic areas. PMID:24742192

  17. Development of an immunochromatography strip test based on truncated nucleocapsid antigens of three representative hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses are causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and nephropathia epidemica (NE) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the New World. There is a need for time-saving diagnostic methods. In the present study, recombinant N antigens were used as antigens in an immunochromatography strip (ICG) test to detect specific IgG antibodies. Methods The N-terminal 103 amino acids (aa) of Hantaan virus (HTNV), Puumala virus (PUUV) and Andes virus (ANDV) nucleocapsid (N) protein were expressed in E. coli as representative antigens of three groups (HFRS, NE and HPS-causing viruses) of hantavirus. Five different types of ICG test strips, one antigen line on one strip for each of the three selected hantaviruses (HTNV, PUUV and ANDV), three antigen lines on one strip and a mixed antigen line on one strip, were developed and sensitivities were compared. Results A total of 87 convalescent-phase patient sera, including sera from 35 HFRS patients, 36 NE patients and 16 HPS patients, and 25 sera from healthy seronegative people as negative controls were used to evaluate the ICG test. Sensitivities of the three-line strip and mixed-line strip were similar to those of the single antigen strip (97.2 to 100%). On the other hand, all of the ICG test strips showed high specificities to healthy donors. Conclusion These results indicated that the ICG test with the three representative antigens is an effective serodiagnostic tool for screening and typing of hantavirus infection in humans. PMID:24885901

  18. Detection of hypermethylated spastic paraplegia-20 in stool samples of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Song, Yong-Chun; Dang, Cheng-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of aberrant hypermethylation in stool DNA might provide a novel strategy for noninvasive detection of colorectal cancer. To explore the feasibility of detecting hypermethylation in Spastic paraplegia-20 promoter as a stool-based DNA marker for detection of colorectal cancer. We collected 96 tissue and stool samples from patients with colorectal cancer and 30 stool samples healthy individuals. Hypermethylated Spastic paraplegia-20 occurs in 85.4% (82/96) of patients with colorectal cancer in the tissue samples. In the stool samples, the results indicate 80.2% (77/96) sensitivity and 100% (30/30) specificity of the test for detecting colorectal cancer by using the stool samples as a noninvasive method. The study reveals that hypermethylation in Spastic paraplegia-20 promoter is a highly specific and sensitive biomarker for screening colorectal cancer in stool samples as a noninvasive method.

  19. Rabies Group-Specific Ribonucleoprotein Antigen and a Test System for Grouping and Typing of Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, L. G.; Dietzschold, B.; Dierks, R. E.; Matthaeus, W.; Enzmann, P.-J.; Strohmaier, K.

    1973-01-01

    Cell-associated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was isolated from BHK-21 cells infected with several strains of rabies and rabies-related viruses. The RNP-antigen from rabies and related viruses induced the formation of complement-fixing, precipitating, and immunofluorescent antibodies, and proved to be the group-specific antigen common to all rabies viruses. Antigens of the envelope which induce virus-neutralizing antibodies are apparently determinative for the serotype of a virus as evidenced by two-way neutralization tests. A combination of these methods seems to be a useful approach to the serological grouping and typing of rhabdoviruses. Images PMID:4196634

  20. Stools - pale or clay-colored

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003129.htm Stools - pale or clay-colored To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stools that are pale, clay, or putty-colored may be due to problems ...

  1. Skin tests with soluble tumor membrane antigens in patients with transitional cell cancers.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, A C

    1978-12-01

    Patients with transitional cell cancers and control patients with other forms of cancer were tested with cell membranes and soluble membrane antigens with the use of delayed hypersensitivity skin tests. These ongoing and parallel studies in which LMI tests are used have not been completed.

  2. Screening for enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Aitchison, Alan; Purcell, Rachel V; Greenlees, Rosie; Pearson, John F; Frizelle, Frank A

    2016-08-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most humans, however enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains (ETBF) have been associated with diarrhoea and colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to establish a method of screening for the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft) gene in stool samples, as a means of determining if carriage of ETBF is detected more often in CRC patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Stool samples from 71 patients recently diagnosed with CRC, and 71 age-matched controls, were screened by standard and quantitative PCR using primers specific for the detection of the bft gene. Bacterial template DNA from stool samples was prepared by two methods: a sweep, where all colonies growing on Bacteroides Bile Esculin agar following stool culture for 48 h at 37 °C in an anaerobic environment were swept into sterile water and heat treated; and a direct DNA extraction from each stool sample. The bft gene was detected more frequently from DNA isolated from bacterial sweeps than from matched direct DNA extractions. qPCR was found to be more sensitive than standard PCR in detecting bft. The cumulative total of positive qPCR assays from both sample types revealed that 19 of the CRC patients had evidence of the toxin gene in their stool sample (27%), compared to seven of the age-matched controls (10%). This difference was significant (P = 0.016). Overall, ETBF carriage was detected more often in CRC patient stool samples compared to controls, but disparate findings from the different DNA preparations and testing methods suggests that poor sensitivity may limit molecular detection of ETBF in stool samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of rabies virus antigen in dog saliva using a latex agglutination test.

    PubMed

    Kasempimolporn, S; Saengseesom, W; Lumlertdacha, B; Sitprija, V

    2000-08-01

    Dog bites are responsible for more than 90% of human rabies deaths in Asia. We developed a simple and inexpensive test based on latex agglutination (LA) for rabies virus antigen detection in dog saliva. Rabies virus antigen could be detected by agglutination on a glass slide using latex particles coated with gamma globulin. By evaluation of paired saliva-brain specimens from 238 dogs, the LA test using saliva was 99% specific and 95% sensitive compared to the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) on brain smears. The advantages of the LA test over the standard FAT are that it is comparatively simple and there is no need to kill the animal before examination.

  4. [Evaluation of Mascia Brunelli rapid antigen test in the diagnosis of group A streptococcal pharyngitis].

    PubMed

    Barış, Ayşe; Anlıaçık, Nur; Bulut, Mehmet Emin; Deniz, Rıdvan; Yücel, Elif; Aktaş, Elif

    2017-01-01

    Pharyngitis in most cases is due to viral microorganisms however drug therapy without the detection of etiological agent leads to unnecessary use of antibiotics. On the other hand, when the etiologic agent is group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) it is important to identify the etiologic agent rapidly which will guide the treatment with appropriate antibiotics. The use of highly sensitive rapid tests will contribute significantly to early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Mascia Brunelli rapid antigen test for the detection of GAS in throat swab samples. A total of 833 throat swab samples submitted to our laboratory with pre-diagnosis of pharyngitis were assessed between June 2016 and August 2016. The samples were simultaneously cultured and tested by rapid Mascia Brunelli Strep-A Card (Mascia Brunelli S.p.a, Italy). For identification, bacitracin sensitivity, PYR test and latex agglutination test in addition to Bruker MALDI-TOF MS (Daltonics, Germany) system were used. The density of GAS growth in the culture was noted. The samples that were false negative with Mascia Brunelli test were re-tested with QuickVue + Strep A Test (Quidel Corporation, San Diego, USA) rapid antigen test. A total of 833 patients, 376 (45.2%) female and 457 (54.8%) male were included in the study. The age range was between 0-94 years with a mean value of 7.86 ± 6.72. 125 (15%) and 94 (11.28%) of the samples were positive with culture and rapid antigen test, respectively. Mascia Brunelli antigen test gave negative results for 31 culture positive samples. Of these 31 samples, 28 were found positive by QuickVue + Strep A antigen test. As a result, the sensitivity of the test was found to be independent of the inoculum effect. The culture positivity rate in patients between 5-15 years was 18.4%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and the accuracy of Mascia Brunelli antigen test, with

  5. Evaluation of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R D; Jaeger, K L; Wuhib, T; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of the small (4- to 6-microns) Cryptosporidium oocysts is labor intensive and relies on stool concentration, with subsequent staining and microscopy. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (LMD Laboratories, Carlsbad, Calif.) in detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in human stools. A total of 591 specimens (76 diarrheal, 515 control) obtained from 213 inhabitants of an urban slum in northeastern Brazil were examined by both ELISA and conventional microscopic examination (CME) of formalin-ethyl acetate-concentrated stool samples stained with modified acid-fast and auramine stains. Forty-eight diarrheal stools (63.2%) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts by CME, with 40 of these positive by ELISA. Thirty-five control stools (6.8%) had Cryptosporidium oocysts detected by CME, with 15 of these also positive by ELISA. All of the 480 nondiarrheal stools and all but one of the diarrheal stools negative by CME were negative by ELISA. The test had an overall sensitivity of 66.3% and a specificity of 99.8% (positive predictive value, 98.2%; negative predictive value, 94.8%). In the evaluation of human diarrheal stool samples, the test sensitivity increased to 83.3%, with a specificity of 96.4%, and, in analysis of samples from individual patients with diarrhea, the sensitivity was 87.9%, with a specificity of 100%. These results indicate that this stool ELISA is sensitive and specific for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in human diarrheal stool specimens but has limited use in epidemiologic studies for the diagnosis of asymptomatic Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:8370732

  6. Performance of ARCHITECT HCV core antigen test with specimens from US plasma donors and injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Dawson, George J; Teshale, Eyasu; Le, Thao; Cheng, Kevin; Drobeniuc, Jan; Ward, John; Kamili, Saleem

    2015-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen is a serological marker of current HCV infection. The aim of this study was mainly to evaluate the performance characteristics of the ARCHITECT HCV core antigen assay with specimens from US plasma donors and injecting drug users. A total of 551 serum and plasma samples with known anti-HCV and HCV RNA status were tested for HCV core antigen using the Abbott ARCHITECT HCV core antigen test. HCV core antigen was detectable in 100% of US plasma donor samples collected during the pre-seroconversion phase of infection (anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive). Overall sensitivity of the HCV core antigen assay was 88.9-94.3% in samples collected after seroconversion. The correlation between HCV core antigen and HCV RNA titers was 0.959. HCV core antigen testing may be reliably used to identify current HCV infection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Hepatitis C virus core antigen test in monitoring of dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Li Cavoli, Gioacchino; Zagarrigo, Carmela; Schillaci, Onofrio; Servillo, Francesca; Tralongo, Angelo; Coglitore, Mario; Spadaro, Filippo; Scimeca, Concetta; Li Destri, Natalia; Rotolo, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection is a persistent worldwide public health concern. The prevalence of HCV infection is much higher in patients on chronic haemodialysis (HD) than in the general population. HCV infection can detrimentally affect patients throughout the spectrum of chronic kidney disease. Despite the control of blood products, hepatitis C virus transmission is still being observed among patients undergoing dialysis. Detection systems for serum HCV antibodies are insensitive in the acute phase because of the long serological window. Direct detection of HCV depends on PCR test but this test is not suitable for routine screening. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of HCV core antigen detection as an alternative to PCR. Few studies exist about the efficacy of HCV core antigen test in dialysis population. We studied the utility of HCV core antigen test in routine monitoring of virological status of dialysis patients. We screened 92 patients on long-term dialysis both by PCR HCV-RNA and HCV core antigen test. The sensitivity of HCVcAg test was 90%, the specificity 100%, the positive predictive power 100%, the negative predictive power 97%, and the accuracy 97%. We think serological detection of HCV core antigen may be an alternative to NAT techniques for routine monitoring of patients on chronic dialysis.

  8. Preparation of urine samples for use in commercial latex agglutination tests for bacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, G A; Storch, G A

    1985-01-01

    The use of latex agglutination (LA) tests for bacterial antigen detection in urine specimens is hindered by troublesome reactions such as nonspecific agglutination. Therefore, procedures such as boiling or membrane filtration of urine specimens are often used before LA testing. We discovered that the composition of the membrane filter used in filtration has a marked effect on the performance of an LA test used for detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen. False-positive LA reactivity was common in urine specimens from pediatric patients that were processed by membrane filtration through certain filters; furthermore, such reactivity also occurred in LA tests for antigens other than those of H. influenzae. A protein present in urine at low concentrations appeared to be responsible for these phenomena. PMID:3874212

  9. Evaluation of a Rapid Lateral Flow Point-of-Care Test for Detection of Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Fleece, Molly E.; Heptinstall, Jack; Khan, Shaila S.; Kabir, Mamum; Herbein, Joel; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A new rapid lateral flow fecal antigen detection test for Cryptosporidium was evaluated using diarrheal stool samples from a cohort of children in Bangladesh. The test had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 94% when compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen detection. PMID:27573629

  10. [The lysate and recombinant antigens in ELISA-test-systems for diagnostic of herpes simplex].

    PubMed

    Ganova, L A; Kovtoniuk, G V; Korshun, L N; Kiseleva, E K; Tereshchenko, M I; Vudmaska, M I; Moĭsa, L N; Shevchuk, V A; Spivak, N Ia

    2014-08-01

    The lysate and recombinant antigens of various production included informula of ELISA-test-systems were analyzed. The ELISA-test-systems are used for detection of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I and II. For testing the panel of serums PTH 201 (BBI Inc.) were used. The samples of this panel contain antibodies to Herpes simplex virus type I and II in mixed titers. The 69 serums of donors were used too (17 samples had IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I, 23 samples to Herpes simplex virus type II and 29 samples had no antibodies to Herpes simplex virus). The diagnostic capacity of mixture of recombinant antigens gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I and gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II (The research-and-production complex "DiaprofMed") was comparable with mixture of lysate antigen Herpes simplex virus type I and II (Membrane) EIE Antigen ("Virion Ltd."). In the test-systems for differentiation of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I the recombinant antigen gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I proved to be comparable with commercial analogue Herpes simplex virus-1 gG1M ("Viral Therapeutics Inc."'). At the same time, capacity to detect IgG to Herpes simplex virus type II in recombinant protein gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II is significantly higher than in its analogue Herpes simplex virus-2 gG2c ("Viral Therapeutics Inc.").

  11. Advanced Development of Leishmania Topical Skin Test Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-28

    Qualification of Cell Substrates and Other Biological Materials Used in the Production of Viral Vaccines for Infectious Disease Indications"(2010). The tests...product formulation was a phosphate buffer system as formulated below: 12.5mM Na2HPO4 12.5mM NaH2PO4 8.5% NaCl 0.4% Phenol 1.0% Glycerol 0.01...prior infection with the parasite. The test is commonly used to screen candidates in Leishmania vaccine trials. The skin test also has been used as a

  12. Validity of rapid antigen detection testing in group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Küçük, Oznur; Biçer, Suat; Giray, Tuba; Cöl, Defne; Erdağ, Gülay Ciler; Gürol, Yeşim; Kaspar, Ciğdem E; Vitrinel, Ayça

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the utility of rapid antigen detection testing (RADT) for the diagnosis of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis in children, and to detect the sensitivity and specificity of rapid antigen detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci from throat specimen compared with throat culture. Rapid antigen detection and throat culture results for group A beta-hemolytic streptococci from outpatients attending university hospital between 1st January 2011 and 31st of December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. The antigen test negative-throat culture positive patients were investigated for streptococcal carriage. For this purpose, the throat culture results taken from these patients were reviewed after treatment. Eight hundred and ninetytwo children were included in the studywith a mean age of 5.34 y. There were 639 and 253 children in two groups with age of 0-6 and 7-17 y, RADT sensitivity and specificity were found to be 59.5 % and 97.2 %, respectively. The positive predictive value was 87.1 %, whereas negative predictive value was 88.4 %. After treatment of 74 patients with throat culture positive and antigen test negative. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci were isolated in 12 of them (16.2 %) and accepted as a carrier. The low sensitivity of the RADT may be related to streptococcal carriage in some patients. The throat culture should be repeated after treatment to detect streptococcal carriage.

  13. Equine infectious anemia: preparation of a liquid antigen extract for the agar-gel immunodiffusion and complement-fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, P; Bannister, G L; Carrier, S P

    1972-04-01

    An agar-gel immunodiffusion test recommended for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia was evaluated. Our preliminary observations confirmed those of Coggins concerning the mechanism of the test and the results obtained. Furthermore, emphasis was put on the difficulties encountered in the production of spleen antigens with an optimum amount of reactivity. Acetone-ether extraction procedures for the preparation of a liquid antigen extract are described. This type of antigen was reactive in the complement-fixation test in 1:8 or greater dilution and it is proposed to use the complement-fixation test in assessing and standardizing the liquid antigen extract activity to be used in the immunodiffusion test. This antigen can also be concentrated or diluted, if required, to meet the reactivity of a standard antigen used in the test.

  14. Equine Infectious Anemia: Preparation of a Liquid Antigen Extract for the Agar-gel Immunodiffusion and Complement-fixation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P.; Bannister, G. L.; Carrier, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    An agar-gel immunodiffusion test recommended for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia was evaluated. Our preliminary observations confirmed those of Coggins concerning the mechanism of the test and the results obtained. Furthermore, emphasis was put on the difficulties encountered in the production of spleen antigens with an optimum amount of reactivity. Acetone-ether extraction procedures for the preparation of a liquid antigen extract are described. This type of antigen was reactive in the complement-fixation test in 1:8 or greater dilution and it is proposed to use the complement-fixation test in assessing and standardizing the liquid antigen extract activity to be used in the immunodiffusion test. This antigen can also be concentrated or diluted, if required, to meet the reactivity of a standard antigen used in the test. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4259924

  15. Pneumococcal urinary antigen test use in diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia in seven Utah hospitals.

    PubMed

    West, Devin M; McCauley, Lindsay M; Sorensen, Jeffrey S; Jephson, Al R; Dean, Nathan C

    2016-10-01

    The pneumocococcal urine antigen test increases specific microbiological diagnosis over conventional culture methods in pneumonia patients. Data are limited regarding its yield and effect on antibiotic prescribing among patients with community-onset pneumonia in clinical practice. We performed a secondary analysis of 2837 emergency department patients admitted to seven Utah hospitals over 2 years with international diagnostic codes version 9 codes and radiographic evidence of pneumonia. Mean age was 64.2 years, 47.2% were male and all-cause 30-day mortality was 9.6%. Urinary antigen testing was performed in 1110 (39%) patients yielding 134 (12%) positives. Intensive care unit patients were more likely to undergo testing, and have a positive result (15% versus 8.8% for ward patients; p<0.01). Patients with risk factors for healthcare-associated pneumonia had fewer urinary antigen tests performed, but 8.4% were positive. Physicians changed to targeted antibiotic therapy in 20 (15%) patients, de-escalated antibiotic therapy in 76 patients (57%). In 38 (28%) patients, antibiotics were not changed. Only one patient changed to targeted therapy suffered clinical relapse. Length of stay and mortality were lower in patients receiving targeted therapy. Pneumococcal urinary antigen testing is an inexpensive, noninvasive test that favourably influenced antibiotic prescribing in a "real world", multi-hospital observational study.

  16. Pneumococcal urinary antigen test use in diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia in seven Utah hospitals

    PubMed Central

    West, Devin M.; McCauley, Lindsay M.; Sorensen, Jeffrey S.; Jephson, Al R.

    2016-01-01

    The pneumocococcal urine antigen test increases specific microbiological diagnosis over conventional culture methods in pneumonia patients. Data are limited regarding its yield and effect on antibiotic prescribing among patients with community-onset pneumonia in clinical practice. We performed a secondary analysis of 2837 emergency department patients admitted to seven Utah hospitals over 2 years with international diagnostic codes version 9 codes and radiographic evidence of pneumonia. Mean age was 64.2 years, 47.2% were male and all-cause 30-day mortality was 9.6%. Urinary antigen testing was performed in 1110 (39%) patients yielding 134 (12%) positives. Intensive care unit patients were more likely to undergo testing, and have a positive result (15% versus 8.8% for ward patients; p<0.01). Patients with risk factors for healthcare-associated pneumonia had fewer urinary antigen tests performed, but 8.4% were positive. Physicians changed to targeted antibiotic therapy in 20 (15%) patients, de-escalated antibiotic therapy in 76 patients (57%). In 38 (28%) patients, antibiotics were not changed. Only one patient changed to targeted therapy suffered clinical relapse. Length of stay and mortality were lower in patients receiving targeted therapy. Pneumococcal urinary antigen testing is an inexpensive, noninvasive test that favourably influenced antibiotic prescribing in a “real world”, multi-hospital observational study. PMID:28053969

  17. [Clinical value of a rapid respiratory syncytial virus antigen detection in point-of-care testing].

    PubMed

    Ding, Y X; Tian, R; Qian, Y; Sun, Y; Deng, J; Wang, F; Zhu, R N; Zhao, L Q

    2017-02-02

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of a rapid respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen detection in point-of-care testing (POCT). Method: A total of 209 specimens, including 78 throat swabs (TS) and 131 nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs), were collected from inpatients who visited the Children's Hospital Affiliated to the Capital Institute of Pediatrics and were diagnosed as acute respiratory infection from 5 January to 7 February, 2015. These specimens were tested for RSV by a rapid antigen detection kit which was compared with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA) for RSV detection. Result: Compared with DFA for NPAs, the sensitivity and specificity of rapid antigen detection were 83.9% and 97.3%, respectively, with Kappa value of 0.86; Compared with RT-PCR, the sensitivity (NPAs, 74.2%; TS, 77.8%) and specificity (NPAs, 100.0%; TS, 92.0%) of rapid antigen detection were high, too, with Kappa value of 0.74 in NPAs and 0.62 in TS. However, the RSV positive rate of rapid antigen detection in TS (21.7%) from pediatric patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection was lower than that in NPAs (78.3%), as well as that of RT-PCR (7.3% in TS verse 78% in NPAs). The RSV rapid antigen detection kit can be finished in about 10 minutes. Conclusion: With characteristics of high specificity, high sensitivity, being rapid, efficient and easy to operate in comparison with DFA and RT-PCR, RSV rapid antigen detection in this study is suitable for POCT. For pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infection, NPA was better than TS for RSV detection.

  18. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P.; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A.; Michels, Paul A.; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R.; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung’u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Background Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. Methodology/Principal Findings The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. Conclusions This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease. PMID:27936225

  19. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A; Michels, Paul A; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung'u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease.

  20. Viral hepatitis and tests for the Australia (hepatitis-associated) antigen and antibody*

    PubMed Central

    1970-01-01

    ”Australia” antigen has been shown to be closely associated with serum hepatitis. The presence of the antigen and its corresponding antiserum can be detected in human beings (and in certain primates) by a number of laboratory tests. This is of great potential importance to blood transfusion and similar services because detection and exclusion of blood donors carrying the antigen might significantly reduce the risk of hepatitis from transfusions and other procedures. In this paper the present state of knowledge of ”Australia” or ”hepatitis-associated” antigen is reviewed. The currently employed tests are described in detail and their use, interpretation and limitations are discussed. Though it appears from early studies that the application of routine screening tests to blood donors would only reduce the risk to recipients by less than 25%, the more sensitive tests becoming available may increase this percentage and it is recommended that where competent laboratory services are available steps should be taken to set up a scheme for testing donors—provided that the current limitations of such a scheme are clearly recognized. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 1FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4991606

  1. Cross-reactivity in Cryptococcus antigen latex agglutination test in two commercial kits.

    PubMed

    Tone, Kazuya; Umeda, Yoshiko; Makimura, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    This article presents an examination of the cross-reactivity of pathogenic fungi with Cryptococcus neoformans in two commercial Cryptococcus antigen latex agglutination tests performed across 39 fungal strains. Some fungi were newly indicated as Cryptococcus cross-reactive, and the two kits showed differences in cross-reactive fungi.

  2. Latex agglutination: diagnose the early cryptococcus neoformans test of capsular polysaccharide antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanrong; Yuan, Xueqian; Zhang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the early diagnosis value of latex agglutination test in Cryptococcal meningitis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 112 patients with definite Cryptococcal meningitis and 26 patients with tubercular meningitis and virus meningitis were collected, latex agglutination test is adopted to detect Cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen. Then it was compared with fungal culture and direct microscopy method for evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis. The sensitivity of three methods including latex agglutination test, fungal culture and direct microscopy was 91.1%,69.6% and 73.2% respectively. The specificity of latex agglutination test was 96.0%, 100% and 100% respectively. That latex agglutination test to detect Cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen could be taken as the early diagnostic method of Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis.

  3. Adjustable Cardboard Dental Chair and Stool,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    tape and a water resistant sealant spray around the exposed edges, especially on the lower portions of the chair "* and stool. Assembly Because of design...securing the chair in the reclining position. The stool used for sit-down dentistry , when the patient is in the reclining position, is fabricated from...accommodate an adult patient, is sturdy, and includes a reclining and an upright position. A stool has been added to the design for sit-down dentistry , and

  4. Cryptococcal antigen test revisited: significance for cryptococcal meningitis therapy monitoring in a tertiary chinese hospital.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongzhou; Zhou, Yingjie; Yin, Youkuan; Pan, Xiaozhang; Weng, Xinhua

    2005-06-01

    For a total of 29 non-human immunodeficiency virus 1 cryptococcal meningitis cases, titer changes in the latex agglutination test before and after therapy were reviewed along with clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and therapy regimens. The cryptococcal antigen titer decreased for every case after therapy and was correlated to fungal clearance as defined by fungus smear and/or culture. However, cryptococcal antigen can remain at low titers for long periods of time after therapy, even when fungus smears and/or cultures become negative.

  5. Procedures for Sxs antigen detection by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests. A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Jiménez, R; Burgos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R

    1994-11-01

    Biological reagents used in the serological detection of Sxs antigen by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests were compared in order to optimize the method. Our analyses showed that: (a) red cell-free spleen cells are the best target cells, (b) rabbit serum used as the complement source should be obtained from females, and absorbed with female spleen cells before use, (c) antiserum obtained by immunizing females with repeated injections of syngenic male spleen cells provides the highest anti-Sxs antibody titer, and (d) of the different biological fluids investigated, testis supernatant has highest concentration of Sxs antigen.

  6. Rapid antigen detection test for respiratory syncytial virus diagnosis as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Flávio da Silva; Oliveira, Danielle Bruna Leal de; Crema, Daniela; Pinez, Célia Miranda Nunes; Colmanetti, Thaís Cristina; Thomazelli, Luciano Matsumia; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Vieira, Sandra Elisabeth; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; Botosso, Viviane Fongaro; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the QuickVue(®) RSV Test Kit (QUIDEL Corp, CA, USA) as a screening tool for respiratory syncytial virus in children with acute respiratory disease in comparison with the indirect immunofluorescence assay as gold standard. In Brazil, rapid antigen detection tests for respiratory syncytial virus are not routinely utilized as a diagnostic tool, except for the diagnosis of dengue and influenza. The authors retrospectively analyzed 486 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from children under age 5 with acute respiratory infection, between December 2013 and August 2014, the samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay and QuickVue(®) RSV Test kit. Samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR and nucleotide sequencing. From 313 positive samples by immunofluorescence assays, 282 (90%) were also positive by the rapid antigen detection test, two were positive only by rapid antigen detection test, 33 were positive only by immunofluorescence assays, and 171 were positive by both methods. The 35 samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR; the two samples positive only by rapid antigen detection test and the five positive only by immunofluorescence assays were also positive by real time PCR. There was no relation between the negativity by QuickVue(®) RSV Test and viral load or specific strain. The QuickVue(®) RSV Test showed sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 98.8%, predictive positive value of 99.3%, and negative predictive value of 94.6%, with accuracy of 93.2% and agreement κ index of 0.85 in comparison to immunofluorescence assay. This study demonstrated that the QuickVue(®) RSV Test Kit can be effective in early detection of Respiratory syncytial virus in nasopharyngeal aspirate and is reliable for use as a diagnostic tool in pediatrics. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Selection of Antigens and Development of Prototype Tests for Point-of-Care Leprosy Diagnosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Duthie, Malcolm S.; Ireton, Greg C.; Kanaujia, Ganga V.; Goto, Wakako; Liang, Hong; Bhatia, Ajay; Busceti, Jean Marie; Macdonald, Murdo; Neupane, Kapil Dev; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Balagon, Marivic; Esfandiari, Javan; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G.

    2008-01-01

    Leprosy can be a devastating chronic infection that causes nerve function impairment and associated disfigurement. Despite the recent reduction in the number of registered worldwide leprosy cases as a result of the widespread use of multidrug therapy, the number of new cases detected each year remains relatively stable. The diagnosis of leprosy is currently based on the appearance of clinical signs and requires expert clinical, as well as labor-intensive and time-consuming laboratory or histological, evaluation. For the purpose of developing an effective, simple, rapid, and low-cost diagnostic alternative, we have analyzed the serologic antibody response to identify Mycobacterium leprae proteins that are recognized by leprosy patients. More than 100 recombinant antigens were analyzed in a protein array format to select those with discriminatory properties for leprosy diagnosis. As expected, multibacillary leprosy patients recognized more antigens with stronger antibody responses than paucibacillary leprosy patients. Our data indicate, however, that multibacillary patients can be distinguished from paucibacillary patients, and both of these groups can be segregated from endemic control groups. We went on to confirm the diagnostic properties of antigens ML0405 and ML2331 and the LID-1 fusion construct of these two proteins by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We then demonstrated the performance of these antigens in rapid test formats with a goal of developing a point-of-care diagnostic test. A serological diagnostic test capable of identifying and allowing treatment of leprosy could reduce transmission, prevent functional disabilities and stigmatizing deformities, and facilitate leprosy eradication. PMID:18716007

  8. Detection of Rabies Virus Antigen in Dog Saliva Using a Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    Kasempimolporn, S.; Saengseesom, W.; Lumlertdacha, B.; Sitprija, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dog bites are responsible for more than 90% of human rabies deaths in Asia. We developed a simple and inexpensive test based on latex agglutination (LA) for rabies virus antigen detection in dog saliva. Rabies virus antigen could be detected by agglutination on a glass slide using latex particles coated with gamma globulin. By evaluation of paired saliva-brain specimens from 238 dogs, the LA test using saliva was 99% specific and 95% sensitive compared to the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) on brain smears. The advantages of the LA test over the standard FAT are that it is comparatively simple and there is no need to kill the animal before examination. PMID:10921987

  9. Safety and Efficacy Assessment of Two New Leprosy Skin Test Antigens: Randomized Double Blind Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivoire, Becky L.; Groathouse, Nathan A.; TerLouw, Stephen; Neupane, Kapil Dev; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Khadge, Saraswoti; Kunwar, Chatra B.; Macdonald, Murdo; Hawksworth, Rachel; Thapa, Min B.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Tibbals, Melinda; Smith, Carol; Dube, Tina; She, Dewei; Wolff, Mark; Zhou, Eric; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Mason, Robin; Sizemore, Christine; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Background New tools are required for the diagnosis of pre-symptomatic leprosy towards further reduction of disease burden and its associated reactions. To address this need, two new skin test antigens were developed to assess safety and efficacy in human trials. Methods A Phase I safety trial was first conducted in a non-endemic region for leprosy (U.S.A.). Healthy non-exposed subjects (n = 10) received three titrated doses (2.5 µg, 1.0 µg and 0.1 µg) of MLSA-LAM (n = 5) or MLCwA (n = 5) and control antigens [Rees MLSA (1.0 µg) and saline]. A randomized double blind Phase II safety and efficacy trial followed in an endemic region for leprosy (Nepal), but involved only the 1.0 µg (high dose) and 0.1 µg (low dose) of each antigen; Tuberculin PPD served as a control antigen. This Phase II safety and efficacy trial consisted of three Stages: Stage A and B studies were an expansion of Phase I involving 10 and 90 subjects respectively, and Stage C was then conducted in two parts (high dose and low dose), each enrolling 80 participants: 20 borderline lepromatous/lepromatous (BL/LL) leprosy patients, 20 borderline tuberculoid/tuberculoid (BT/TT) leprosy patients, 20 household contacts of leprosy patients (HC), and 20 tuberculosis (TB) patients. The primary outcome measure for the skin test was delayed type hypersensitivity induration. Findings In the small Phase I safety trial, reactions were primarily against the 2.5 µg dose of both antigens and Rees control antigen, which were then excluded from subsequent studies. In the Phase II, Stage A/B ramped-up safety study, 26% of subjects (13 of 50) showed induration against the high dose of each antigen, and 4% (2 of 50) reacted to the low dose of MLSA-LAM. Phase II, Stage C safety and initial efficacy trial showed that both antigens at the low dose exhibited low sensitivity at 20% and 25% in BT/TT leprosy patients, but high specificity at 100% and 95% compared to TB patients. The high dose of both antigens

  10. How do we use molecular red blood cell antigen typing to supplement pretransfusion testing?

    PubMed

    Sapatnekar, Suneeti; Figueroa, Priscilla I

    2014-06-01

    The molecular basis of many blood group antigens is known, and it provides a means for predicting the red blood cell phenotype. Molecular typing methods are useful when serologic typing cannot be performed, due to sample or reagent limitations. We discuss the implementation of a commercial molecular typing assay at our Transfusion Service, the indications for testing, and the advantages and drawbacks of the assay. We also present our algorithm for selecting candidates for testing.

  11. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection by invasive and noninvasive tests.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Ghazi, Mona; Mahmoudi, Shima; Mamishi, Setareh; Azhdarkosh, Hossein; Najafi, Mehri; Kazemi, Bahram; Salavati, Ali; Mirsalehian, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Although several invasive and noninvasive tests have been developed for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection, all of the tests have their limitations. We conducted a study to investigate and compare the suitability of rapid urease test (RUT), serology, histopathology and stool antigen tests with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of H. pylori, and correlate the diagnostic methods with PCR. Eighty nine patients (61 adults, 28 children) referred to the Firoozgar Hospital and Children Medical Center Hospital for diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy entered to the study and noninvasive tests such as immunoassay for serological antibodies against H. pylori and detection of its antigen in feces were measured. The biopsies were utilized for histological examination, RUT and PCR. The H. pylori statuses were evaluated by the positivity of ureC PCR in biopsy specimens and 53 subjects had H. pylori positive result. Histopathology showed high overall performance in adults and children with sensitivity and specificity 100% and 90%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for stool antigen test were 87.8%, 75% and 82%, respectively. Correlation of RUT, serology (IgG), histopathology and stool antigen tests with PCR were 0.82, 0.32, 0.91 and 0.63, respectively. In conclusion, the RUT and histopathology are as accurate as the PCR of biopsy and stool antigen test can consider as appropriate noninvasive test for detection of H. pylori infection.

  12. Bristol Stool Form Scale reliability and agreement decreases when determining Rome III stool form designations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rater reproducibility of the Bristol Stool Form Scale (BSFS), which categorizes stools into one of seven types, is unknown. We sought to determine reliability and agreement by individual stool type and when responses are categorized by Rome III clinical designation as normal or abnormal (constipatio...

  13. Lack of reactivity of paracoccidioidomycosis sera in the double immunodiffusion test with the gp43 antigen: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    del Negro, G M; Benard, G; de Assis, C M; Vidal, M S; Garcia, N M; Otani, C; Shikanai-Yasuda, M A; da S Lacaz, C

    1995-01-01

    Sera from two patients with chronic active paracoccidioidomycosis yielded negative double immunodiffusion results with a culture filtrate antigen from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis routinely used in our laboratory. Complement fixation tests were positive for both sera using a polysaccharide-rich antigen. This study reports the results of a more extensive serological investigation of these two sera. Both a somatic antigen and a saline extract from the fungus yielded positive results in the double immunodiffusion. However, the immunodominant 43 kDa glycoprotein antigen showed negative results, although it was recognized by both sera in the Western blot assay. The value of the double immunodiffusion as a single serological test in paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis is discussed.

  14. The efficacy of high-dose penicillin for community-acquired pneumonia diagnosed by pneumococcal urine antigen test.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hideaki; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Watanuki, Yuji; Tsukiji, Jun; Kuroda, Hideyo; Akashi, Syunsuke; Hirai, Yoshihiro; Fuyuki, Toshiharu; Kaneko, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2009-04-01

    We analyzed the efficacy of both the Streptococcus pneumoniae urine antigen test as a quick diagnostic tool and the administration of high-dose penicillin in response to a positive S. pneumoniae urine antigen test. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 48 cases of pneumococcal pneumonia, in which the patients were treated with high-dose penicillin. All the cases were diagnosed by a positive urine antigen test. Treatment with high-dose penicillin was effective in 43 of the 48 patients. This treatment was also effective in 12 of 16 culture-confirmed cases with low susceptibility to penicillin. Eleven patients who were positive for the S. pneumoniae urine antigen test but culture-negative showed clinical improvement with high-dose penicillin. Pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae appeared to be treated safely and effectively with high-dose penicillin based on positive results of the urine antigen test, as penicillin resistance was unlikely to be a problem.

  15. Stool microbiota and vaccine responses of infants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: Vaccination decreases morbidity and mortality. Vaccine efficacy may be lower in less-developed countries due to environmental enteropathy. This study determined if relative abundance of stool bacteria predicted infant vaccine responses. Methods: The stool microbiome of 48 breastfed Ba...

  16. Detection of Escherichia coli enterotoxins in stools.

    PubMed Central

    Merson, M H; Yolken, R H; Sack, R B; Froehlich, J L; Greenberg, H B; Huq, I; Black, R W

    1980-01-01

    We determined whether enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea could be diagnosed by direct examination of stools for heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. The Y-1 adrenal cell and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detected LT in 85 and 93%, respectively, of stool specimens obtained from adults with acute diarrhea from whom an LT- and ST-producing organism had been isolated. Furthermore, the ELISA assay detected LT in 8 of 35 stool specimens from which no LT-producing E. coli had been isolated. The infant mouse assay was utilized to detect ST in these stool specimens and was found to be an insensitive method, showing positive results in only 36% of the specimens from which an ST-producing organism was isolated. Further studies are warranted to determine the diagnostic value of direct detection of LT in stools, especially by the ELISA method. PMID:6995331

  17. Accuracy of Urine Circulating Cathodic Antigen Test for the Diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni in Preschool-Aged Children before and after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Coulibaly, Jean T.; N'Gbesso, Yves K.; Knopp, Stefanie; N'Guessan, Nicaise A.; Silué, Kigbafori D.; van Dam, Govert J.; N'Goran, Eliézer K.; Utzinger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Background The Kato-Katz technique is widely used for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni, but shows low sensitivity in light-intensity infections. We assessed the accuracy of a commercially available point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) cassette test for the diagnosis of S. mansoni in preschool-aged children before and after praziquantel administration. Methodology A 3-week longitudinal survey with a treatment intervention was conducted in Azaguié, south Côte d'Ivoire. Overall, 242 preschoolers (age range: 2 months to 5.5 years) submitted two stool and two urine samples before praziquantel administration, and 86 individuals were followed-up posttreatment. Stool samples were examined with duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears for S. mansoni. Urine samples were subjected to POC-CCA cassette test for S. mansoni, and a filtration method for S. haematobium diagnosis. Principal Findings Before treatment, the prevalence of S. mansoni, as determined by quadruplicate Kato-Katz, single CCA considering ‘trace’ as negative (t−), and single CCA with ‘trace’ as positive (t+), was 23.1%, 34.3% and 64.5%, respectively. Using the combined results (i.e., four Kato-Katz and duplicate CCA(t−)) as diagnostic ‘gold’ standard, the sensitivity of a single Kato-Katz, a single CCA(t−) or CCA(t+) was 28.3%, 69.7% and 89.1%, respectively. Three weeks posttreatment, the sensitivity of a single Kato-Katz, single CCA(t−) and CCA(t+) was 4.0%, 80.0% and 84.0%, respectively. The intensity of the POC-CCA test band reaction was correlated with S. mansoni egg burden (odds ratio = 1.2, p = 0.04). Conclusions/Significance A single POC-CCA cassette test appears to be more sensitive than multiple Kato-Katz thick smears for the diagnosis of S. mansoni in preschool-aged children before and after praziquantel administration. The POC-CCA cassette test can be recommended for the rapid identification of S. mansoni infections before treatment. Additional studies are

  18. Routine use of counter-immunoelectrophoresis test for detecting antibody to hepatitis B virus core antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R; Hambling, M H

    1978-01-01

    Tests by counter-immunoelectrophoresis for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) were introduced into a routine testing programme for evidence of hepatitis B virus infection. Samples tested for anti-HBc were selected on the basis of the results of tests for HBsAg and clinical details. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were assessed and correlations made with the presence of HBsAg. The presence of anti-HBc was very useful in the interpretation of a doubtful positive result for HBsAg in the haemagglutination test. With very few exceptions the serum samples positive for HBsAg by routine tests also contained anti-HBc. It is concluded that the test is valuable and merits introduction into routine testing programmes. PMID:711911

  19. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  20. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  1. The sensitivity and the specifity of rapid antigen test in streptococcal upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gurol, Yesim; Akan, Hulya; Izbirak, Guldal; Tekkanat, Zuhal Tazegun; Gunduz, Tehlile Silem; Hayran, Osman; Yilmaz, Gulden

    2010-06-01

    It is aimed to detect the sensitivity and specificity of rapid antigen detection of group A beta hemolytic streptococci from throat specimen compared with throat culture. The other goal of the study is to help in giving clinical decisions in upper respiratory tract infections according to the age group, by detection of sensitivity and positive predictive values of the rapid tests and throat cultures. Rapid antigen detection and throat culture results for group A beta hemolytic streptococci from outpatients attending to our university hospital between the first of November 2005 and 31st of December 2008 were evaluated retrospectively. Throat samples were obtained by swabs from the throat and transported in the Stuart medium and Quickvue Strep A [Quidel, San Diego, USA] cassette test was applied and for culture, specimen was inoculated on 5% blood sheep agar and identified according to bacitracin and trimethoprim-sulphametaxazole susceptibility from beta hemolytic colonies. During the dates between the first of November 2005 and 31st of December 2008, from 453 patients both rapid antigen detection and throat culture were evaluated. Rapid antigen detection sensitivity and specificity were found to be 64.6% and 96.79%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 80.95% whereas negative predictive value was 92.82%. Kappa index was 0.91. When the results were evaluated according to the age groups, the sensitivity and the positive predictive value of rapid antigen detection in children were 70%, 90.3% and in adults 59.4%, 70.4%. When bacterial infection is concerned to prevent unnecessary antibiotic use, rapid streptococcal antigen test (RSAT) is a reliable method to begin immediate treatment. To get the maximum sensitivity of RSAT, the specimen collection technique used and education of the health care workers is important. While giving clinical decision, it must be taken into consideration that the sensitivity and the positive predictive value of the RSAT is quite

  2. False-positive cryptococcal antigen test associated with use of BBL Port-a-Cul transport vials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah A; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S; Procop, Gary W

    2011-02-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed.

  3. False-Positive Cryptococcal Antigen Test Associated with Use of BBL Port-A-Cul Transport Vials▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Deborah A.; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S.; Procop, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed. PMID:21159939

  4. Cost-Effective and Rapid Presumptive Identification of Gram-Negative Bacilli in Routine Urine, Pus, and Stool Cultures: Evaluation of the Use of CHROMagar Orientation Medium in Conjunction with Simple Biochemical Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2000-01-01

    The algorithm for a new identification system was designed on the basis of colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests such as indole (IND), lysine decarboxylase (LDC), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) utilization tests with gram-negative bacilli isolated from urine samples as well as pus, stool, and other clinical specimens by the following colony characteristics, biochemical reactions, and serological results: pinkish to red, IND positive (IND+), Escherichia coli; metallic blue, IND+, LDC+, and ODC negative (ODC−), Klebsiella oxytoca; IND+, LDC−, and ODC+, Citrobacter diversus; IND+ or IND−, LDC−, and ODC−, Citrobacter freundii; IND−, LDC+, and ODC+, Enterobacter aerogenes; IND−, LDC−, and ODC+, Enterobacter cloacae; IND−, LDC+, and ODC−, Klebsiella pneumoniae; diffuse brown and IND+, Morganella morganii; IND−, Proteus mirabilis; aqua blue, Serratia marcescens; bluish green and IND+, Proteus vulgaris; transparent yellow-green, serology positive, Pseudomonas aeruginosa; clear and serology positive, Salmonella sp.; other colors and reactions, the organism was identified by the full identification methods. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of this new system were prospectively evaluated. During an 8-month period, a total of 345 specimens yielded one or more gram-negative bacilli. A total of 472 gram-negative bacillus isolates were detected on CHROMagar Orientation medium. For 466 of the isolates (98.7%), no discrepancies in the results were obtained on the basis of the identification algorithm. The cost of identification of gram-negative bacilli during this period was reduced by about 70%. The results of this trial for the differentiation of the most commonly encountered gram-negative pathogens in clinical specimens with the new algorithm were favourable in that it permitted reliable detection and presumptive identification. In addition, this rapid identification system not only

  5. Cost-effective and rapid presumptive identification of gram-negative bacilli in routine urine, pus, and stool cultures: evaluation of the use of CHROMagar orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests.

    PubMed

    Ohkusu, K

    2000-12-01

    The algorithm for a new identification system was designed on the basis of colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests such as indole (IND), lysine decarboxylase (LDC), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) utilization tests with gram-negative bacilli isolated from urine samples as well as pus, stool, and other clinical specimens by the following colony characteristics, biochemical reactions, and serological results: pinkish to red, IND positive (IND(+)), Escherichia coli; metallic blue, IND(+), LDC(+), and ODC negative (ODC(-)), Klebsiella oxytoca; IND(+), LDC(-), and ODC(+), Citrobacter diversus; IND(+) or IND(-), LDC(-), and ODC(-), Citrobacter freundii; IND(-), LDC(+), and ODC(+), Enterobacter aerogenes; IND(-), LDC(-), and ODC(+), Enterobacter cloacae; IND(-), LDC(+), and ODC(-), Klebsiella pneumoniae; diffuse brown and IND(+), Morganella morganii; IND(-), Proteus mirabilis; aqua blue, Serratia marcescens; bluish green and IND(+), Proteus vulgaris; transparent yellow-green, serology positive, Pseudomonas aeruginosa; clear and serology positive, Salmonella sp.; other colors and reactions, the organism was identified by the full identification methods. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of this new system were prospectively evaluated. During an 8-month period, a total of 345 specimens yielded one or more gram-negative bacilli. A total of 472 gram-negative bacillus isolates were detected on CHROMagar Orientation medium. For 466 of the isolates (98.7%), no discrepancies in the results were obtained on the basis of the identification algorithm. The cost of identification of gram-negative bacilli during this period was reduced by about 70%. The results of this trial for the differentiation of the most commonly encountered gram-negative pathogens in clinical specimens with the new algorithm were favourable in that it permitted reliable detection and presumptive identification. In addition, this rapid

  6. Rapid antigen tests for dengue virus serotypes and Zika virus in patient serum.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Irene; de Puig, Helena; Hiley, Megan; Carré-Camps, Marc; Perdomo-Celis, Federico; Narváez, Carlos F; Salgado, Doris M; Senthoor, Dewahar; O'Grady, Madeline; Phillips, Elizabeth; Durbin, Ann; Fandos, Diana; Miyazaki, Hikaru; Yen, Chun-Wan; Gélvez-Ramírez, Margarita; Warke, Rajas V; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Teixeira, Mauro M; Almeida, Roque P; Muñóz-Medina, José E; Ludert, Juan E; Nogueira, Mauricio L; Colombo, Tatiana E; Terzian, Ana C B; Bozza, Patricia T; Calheiros, Andrea S; Vieira, Yasmine R; Barbosa-Lima, Giselle; Vizzoni, Alexandre; Cerbino-Neto, José; Bozza, Fernando A; Souza, Thiago M L; Trugilho, Monique R O; de Filippis, Ana M B; de Sequeira, Patricia C; Marques, Ernesto T A; Magalhaes, Tereza; Díaz, Francisco J; Restrepo, Berta N; Marín, Katerine; Mattar, Salim; Olson, Daniel; Asturias, Edwin J; Lucera, Mark; Singla, Mohit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; de Bosch, Norma; Tam, Justina; Gómez-Márquez, Jose; Clavet, Charles; Villar, Luis; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Gehrke, Lee

    2017-09-27

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak demonstrates that cost-effective clinical diagnostics are urgently needed to detect and distinguish viral infections to improve patient care. Unlike dengue virus (DENV), ZIKV infections during pregnancy correlate with severe birth defects, including microcephaly and neurological disorders. Because ZIKV and DENV are related flaviviruses, their homologous proteins and nucleic acids can cause cross-reactions and false-positive results in molecular, antigenic, and serologic diagnostics. We report the characterization of monoclonal antibody pairs that have been translated into rapid immunochromatography tests to specifically detect the viral nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein antigen and distinguish the four DENV serotypes (DENV1-4) and ZIKV without cross-reaction. To complement visual test analysis and remove user subjectivity in reading test results, we used image processing and data analysis for data capture and test result quantification. Using a 30-μl serum sample, the sensitivity and specificity values of the DENV1-4 tests and the pan-DENV test, which detects all four dengue serotypes, ranged from 0.76 to 1.00. Sensitivity/specificity for the ZIKV rapid test was 0.81/0.86, respectively, using a 150-μl serum input. Serum ZIKV NS1 protein concentrations were about 10-fold lower than corresponding DENV NS1 concentrations in infected patients; moreover, ZIKV NS1 protein was not detected in polymerase chain reaction-positive patient urine samples. Our rapid immunochromatography approach and reagents have immediate application in differential clinical diagnosis of acute ZIKV and DENV cases, and the platform can be applied toward developing rapid antigen diagnostics for emerging viruses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Comparative testing for weak expression of D antigen: manual tube testing vs. a semiautomated IgG gel system.

    PubMed

    Martinez, B; Crews, E; Dowd, A; M McMahan, M

    2003-01-01

    Donor RBCs nonreactive in initial tests for D must be tested further for evidence of weak expression of D antigen. Performing this test in test tubes is labor intensive and prone to inconsistencies in readings (relative strength of agglutination) and interpretation (positive versus negative). These inconsistencies can lead to repeat testing, additional documentation, and delay in releasing units. We evaluated use of the Tecan MEGAFlex-ID pipettor to perform this test in anti-IgG gel cards. Results with this semi-automated gel test were compared with results obtained with 37 D- and 99 weak D samples, as determined by previous testing with a manual IAT tube test. Hands-on time was determined for both methods and both methods were evaluated for inconsistency, or nonagreement, between the interpretation of the current weak D test and the results on record for any prior donations. There were no discordant results obtained, with the majority of weak D samples giving stronger reactions with the gel test. The semiautomated gel test required less hands-on time, with an average savings of more than 70 seconds per test. There were no inconsistencies with the gel method, whereas manual tube testing was found to have an inconsistency rate of 0.035 percent of total samples tested. Semiautomated IgG gel is now used for all weak D testing, with a labor savings of more than 10 hours per week. Thus far, more than 70,000 donors have been tested, with no inconsistencies reported.

  8. Comparative tests for detection of plague antigen and antibody in experimentally infected wild rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, A J; Hummitzsch, D E; Leman, P A; Swanepoel, R; Searle, L A

    1986-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was compared with other standard tests for detection of plague (Yersinia pestis) antibody and antigen in multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha and M. natalensis) which were experimentally infected and then killed at daily intervals postinoculation. For detection of antibody in sera from M. natalensis, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISA was equivalent in sensitivity to passive hemagglutination and more sensitive than the IgM ELISA and complement fixation. Antibody was first detected on postinfection day 6 by all four tests, but IgM ELISA titers had declined to undetectable levels after 8 weeks. For detection of fraction 1 Y. pestis antigen in rodent organs, the ELISA was less sensitive than fluorescent antibody but more sensitive than complement fixation or immunodiffusion. Plague fraction 1 antigen was detected in 16 of 34 bacteremic sera from M. coucha and M. natalensis. The threshold sensitivity of the ELISA was approximately 10(5) Y. pestis per ml. PMID:3097065

  9. Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis by Reagent Strip Test for Detection of Circulating Cathodic Antigen

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, G. J.; Wichers, J. H.; Ferreira, T. M. Falcao; Ghati, D.; van Amerongen, A.; Deelder, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed reagent strip assay for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis based on parasite antigen detection in urine of infected individuals was evaluated. The test uses the principle of lateral flow through a nitrocellulose strip of the sample mixed with a colloidal carbon conjugate of a monoclonal antibody specific for Schistosoma circulating cathodic antigen (CCA). The strip assay to diagnose a group of highly infected schoolchildren in Mwanza, Tanzania, demonstrated a high sensitivity and association with the intensity of infection as measured both by egg counts, and by circulating anodic antigen and CCA levels determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A specificity of ca. 90% was shown in a group of schistosome-negative schoolchildren from Tarime, Tanzania, an area where schistosomiasis is not endemic. The test is easy to perform and requires no technical equipment or special training. The stability of the strips and the conjugate in the dry format lasts for at least 3 months at ambient temperature in sealed packages, making it suitable for transport and use in areas where schistosomiasis is endemic. This assay can easily be developed to an end-user format. PMID:15583265

  10. Detection of urinary Vi antigen as a diagnostic test for typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D N; Harris, J R; Barrett, T J; Hargrett, N T; Prentzel, I; Valdivieso, C; Palomino, C; Levine, M M; Blake, P A

    1983-01-01

    Since Vi antigen is limited primarily to Salmonella typhi, it has been thought that detection of the antigen may be a useful method for diagnosing acute typhoid fever. The slide coagglutination method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have recently been suggested as ways to detect small quantities of Vi antigen in urine. In Santiago, Chile, we compared the results of these two methods in patients with acute typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and other febrile illnesses and in afebrile control subjects. Using a cut-off value that maximally separated typhoid patients from controls, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive in 62.4% of 141 patients with culture-proven typhoid infections and in 13.2% of 159 afebrile control subjects. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was false positive in 64.7% of 34 culture-proven paratyphoid A or B patients and 47.1% of 21 patients with other nontyphoidal febrile illnesses. The coagglutination test was positive in 34% of typhoid patients, 14% of afebrile control subjects, and 46% of febrile control subjects. We conclude that these tests when performed with the Vi antibodies employed in this study are of little value for the diagnosis of typhoid fever in this setting. PMID:6630465

  11. Utility of antigen testing for the diagnosis of ocular histoplasmosis in four cats: a case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathryn M; Strom, Ann R; Gilmour, Margi A; LaDouceur, Elise; Reilly, Christopher M; Byrne, Barbara A; Affolter, Verena K; Sykes, Jane E; Maggs, David J

    2017-10-01

    Case series summary This case series describes the clinical utility of antigen testing for the diagnosis of feline ocular histoplasmosis. Four cats with suspected (n = 2) or confirmed (n = 2) ocular histoplasmosis are described: three from Oklahoma and one from California. In one case, serial urine antigen tests, as well as a serum antigen test for Histoplasma capsulatum, were negative; however, light microscopy identified microorganisms consistent with H capsulatum in ocular tissues at necropsy. In a further two cats with recurrent ocular histoplasmosis following long-term systemic antifungal therapy, Histoplasma species urine antigen concentrations were negative, but both cats improved clinically following systemic antifungal therapy and remained in apparent clinical remission after treatment cessation (9-16 months). The final cat displayed profound bilateral endophthalmitis; however, Histoplasma species antigen testing of vitreous humor and subretinal fluid from the left eye was negative. Intralesional organisms were detected on histopathology of both eyes, and H capsulatum was subsequently isolated and sequenced from tissue of one eye. Relevance and novel information These cases highlight the potential difficulty in definitively diagnosing ocular histoplasmosis in cats when conducting antigen testing of serum, urine and even ocular fluids. Although antigen testing has previously proven useful in the diagnosis of disseminated feline histoplasmosis, it may not be adequate in cats with only ocular signs.

  12. Performance of Three Enzyme Immunoassays and Two Direct Fluorescence Assays for Detection of Giardia lamblia in Stool Specimens Preserved in ECOFIX

    PubMed Central

    Fedorko, Daniel P.; Williams, Esther C.; Nelson, Nancy A.; Calhoun, Leslie B.; Yan, Sizhuang S.

    2000-01-01

    ECOFIX is a single-vial stool preservative that is both formalin- and mercury-free. We evaluated the abilities of three commercial Giardia lamblia-specific enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) (ProSpecT Giardia Microplate Assay [Alexon-Trend Inc.], Giardia Test [Techlab], and Premier Giardia lamblia [Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.]) and two commercial direct fluorescent-antibody (FA) assays for G. lamblia (Crypto/Giardia IF Test [Techlab] and Merifluor Cryptosporidium/Giardia [Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.]) to detect G. lamblia in 34 G. lamblia-positive and 44 G. lamblia-negative stool specimens (determined by traditional examination for ova and parasites) preserved in ECOFIX compared to their abilities to detect G. lamblia in the same specimens preserved in formalin as the “gold standard” for each assay. Of the 34 formalin-fixed positive specimens, the number detected by each assay was as follows:, Alexon EIA, 34; Meridian EIA, 27; Techlab EIA, 29; Meridian FA assay, 31; and Techlab FA assay, 28. Both FA tests and the Alexon EIA performed well with ECOFIX, but the other two EIAs detected fewer positive specimens (the difference was statistically significant with the Techlab EIA) when ECOFIX was the preservative. Use of G. lamblia cyst antigen from cultured organisms preserved in formalin and ECOFIX demonstrated that the Alexon EIA could detect smaller amounts of antigen in ECOFIX than the other two EIAs could and suggested that cyst antigen is more stable in formalin. We recommend that laboratories use an FA assay or the Alexon EIA if they plan to use ECOFIX as their stool preservative. PMID:10878088

  13. Performance of three enzyme immunoassays and two direct fluorescence assays for detection of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens preserved in ECOFIX.

    PubMed

    Fedorko, D P; Williams, E C; Nelson, N A; Calhoun, L B; Yan, S S

    2000-07-01

    ECOFIX is a single-vial stool preservative that is both formalin- and mercury-free. We evaluated the abilities of three commercial Giardia lamblia-specific enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) (ProSpecT Giardia Microplate Assay [Alexon-Trend Inc.], Giardia Test [Techlab], and Premier Giardia lamblia [Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.]) and two commercial direct fluorescent-antibody (FA) assays for G. lamblia (Crypto/Giardia IF Test [Techlab] and Merifluor Cryptosporidium/Giardia [Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.]) to detect G. lamblia in 34 G. lamblia-positive and 44 G. lamblia-negative stool specimens (determined by traditional examination for ova and parasites) preserved in ECOFIX compared to their abilities to detect G. lamblia in the same specimens preserved in formalin as the "gold standard" for each assay. Of the 34 formalin-fixed positive specimens, the number detected by each assay was as follows:, Alexon EIA, 34; Meridian EIA, 27; Techlab EIA, 29; Meridian FA assay, 31; and Techlab FA assay, 28. Both FA tests and the Alexon EIA performed well with ECOFIX, but the other two EIAs detected fewer positive specimens (the difference was statistically significant with the Techlab EIA) when ECOFIX was the preservative. Use of G. lamblia cyst antigen from cultured organisms preserved in formalin and ECOFIX demonstrated that the Alexon EIA could detect smaller amounts of antigen in ECOFIX than the other two EIAs could and suggested that cyst antigen is more stable in formalin. We recommend that laboratories use an FA assay or the Alexon EIA if they plan to use ECOFIX as their stool preservative.

  14. An iPhone application using a novel stool color detection algorithm for biliary atresia screening.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Eri; Hayashi, Kuniyoshi; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Obatake, Masayuki; Urayama, Kevin Y; Nakano, Satoshi; Taura, Yasuyuki; Nio, Masaki; Takahashi, Osamu

    2017-08-17

    The stool color card has been the primary tool for identifying acholic stools in infants with biliary atresia (BA), in several countries. However, BA stools are not always acholic, as obliteration of the bile duct occurs gradually. This study aims to introduce Baby Poop (Baby unchi in Japanese), a free iPhone application, employing a detection algorithm to capture subtle differences in colors, even with non-acholic BA stools. The application is designed for use by caregivers of infants aged approximately 2 weeks-1 month. Baseline analysis to determine optimal color parameters predicting BA stools was performed using logistic regression (n = 50). Pattern recognition and machine learning processes were performed using 30 BA and 34 non-BA images. Additional 5 BA and 35 non-BA pictures were used to test accuracy. Hue, saturation, and value (HSV) were the preferred parameter for BA stool identification. A sensitivity and specificity were 100% (95% confidence interval 0.48-1.00 and 0.90-1.00, respectively) even among a collection of visually non-acholic, i.e., pigmented BA stools and relatively pale-colored non-BA stools. Results suggest that an iPhone mobile application integrated with a detection algorithm is an effective and convenient modality for early detection of BA, and potentially for other related diseases.

  15. Pregnancy Constipation: Are Stool Softeners Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat pregnancy constipation? Answers from Roger W. Harms, M.D. Stool softeners are generally considered safe ... easier to pass. These products are unlikely to harm a developing baby because their active ingredient is ...

  16. I. POLIOMYELITIC VIRUS IN HUMAN STOOLS.

    PubMed

    Trask, J D; Paul, J R; Vignec, A J

    1940-05-31

    1. The detection of the virus of poliomyelitis in 10 stools from 8 individuals is reported. All were in relation to epidemic poliomyelitis and 7 of them represented well recognized forms of the disease. The positive stools were distributed among 56 specimens collected from 53 persons in the first 4 weeks of illness. 2. The ease of detection of virus was directly related to the non-paralytic type of disease and inversely related to the age of the patients. 3. The negative results with stools employed for controls gives point to the use of the fecal examinations as an epidemiological tool. 4. The stability of the virus in feces has been demonstrated by successful mailing of samples over long distances and during the heat of summer. 5. At least one infective dose per gram of fecal material was extracted from one stool.

  17. Countrywide Reassessment of Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Burundi Using a Urine-Circulating Cathodic Antigen Rapid Test: Informing the National Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Ortu, Giuseppina; Ndayishimiye, Onésime; Clements, Michelle; Kayugi, Donatien; Campbell, Carl H.; Lamine, Mariama Sani; Zivieri, Antonio; Magalhaes, Ricardo Soares; Binder, Sue; King, Charles H.; Fenwick, Alan; Colley, Daniel G.; Jourdan, Peter Mark

    2017-01-01

    Following implementation of the national control program, a reassessment of Schistosoma mansoni prevalence was conducted in Burundi to determine the feasibility of moving toward elimination. A countrywide cluster-randomized cross-sectional study was performed in May 2014. At least 25 schools were sampled from each of five eco-epidemiological risk zones for schistosomiasis. Fifty randomly selected children 13–14 years of age per school were included for a single urine-circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) rapid test and, in a subset of schools, for duplicate Kato-Katz slide preparation from a single stool sample. A total of 17,331 children from 347 schools were tested using CCA. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection, when CCA trace results were considered negative, was 13.5% (zone range [zr] = 4.6–17.8%), and when CCA trace results were considered positive, it was 42.8% (zr = 34.3–49.9%). In 170 schools, prevalence of this infection determined using Kato-Katz method was 1.5% (zr ==0–2.7%). The overall mean intensity of S. mansoni infection determined using Kato-Katz was 0.85 eggs per gram (standard deviation = 10.86). A majority of schools (84%) were classified as non-endemic (prevalence = 0) using Kato-Katz; however, a similar proportion of schools were classified as endemic when CCA trace results were considered negative (85%) and nearly all (98%) were endemic when CCA trace results were considered positive. The findings of this nationwide reassessment using a CCA rapid test indicate that Schistosoma infection is still widespread in Burundi, although its average intensity is probably low. Further evidence is now needed to determine the association between CCA rapid test positivity and low-intensity disease transmission. PMID:28115675

  18. Countrywide Reassessment of Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Burundi Using a Urine-Circulating Cathodic Antigen Rapid Test: Informing the National Control Program.

    PubMed

    Ortu, Giuseppina; Ndayishimiye, Onésime; Clements, Michelle; Kayugi, Donatien; Campbell, Carl H; Lamine, Mariama Sani; Zivieri, Antonio; Magalhaes, Ricardo Soares; Binder, Sue; King, Charles H; Fenwick, Alan; Colley, Daniel G; Jourdan, Peter Mark

    2017-01-23

    Following implementation of the national control program, a reassessment of Schistosoma mansoni prevalence was conducted in Burundi to determine the feasibility of moving toward elimination. A countrywide cluster-randomized cross-sectional study was performed in May 2014. At least 25 schools were sampled from each of five eco-epidemiological risk zones for schistosomiasis. Fifty randomly selected children 13-14 years of age per school were included for a single urine-circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) rapid test and, in a subset of schools, for duplicate Kato-Katz slides preparation from a single stool sample. A total of 17,331 children from 347 schools were tested using CCA. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection, when CCA trace results were considered negative, was 13.5% (zone range [zr] = 4.6-17.8%), and when CCA trace results were considered positive, it was 42.8% (zr = 34.3-49.9%). In 170 schools, prevalence of this infection determined using Kato-Katz method was 1.5% (zr ==0-2.7%). The overall mean intensity of S. mansoni infection determined using Kato-Katz was 0.85 eggs per gram (standard deviation = 10.86). A majority of schools (84%) were classified as non-endemic (prevalence = 0) using Kato-Katz; however, a similar proportion of schools were classified as endemic when CCA trace results were considered negative (85%) and nearly all (98%) were endemic when CCA trace results were considered positive. The findings of this nationwide reassessment using CCA rapid test indicate that Schistosoma infection is still widespread in Burundi, although its average intensity is probably low. Further evidence is now needed to determine the association between CCA rapid test positivity and low-intensity disease transmission.

  19. Accuracy of a new rapid antigen detection test for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Aliannejad, Rasoul; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Seifi, Mahnaz; Safavi, Enayat; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Shahriaran, Shahriyar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major problem in the world. Treatment and control of TB needs detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) in the proper samples. While smear doesn’t have enough sensitivity, culture and PCR are expensive, time consuming and unavailable in many centers. Recent development of a rapid TB antigen detection test (PrTBK) at Pasteur Institute of Iran could give a simple way for diagnosis of TB in about two hours. In this test the antigen-antibody complex will change color when gold conjugated mouse anti-rabbit antibody detects specific MT cell wall antigen in suspected samples. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PrTBK for diagnosis of pulmonary TB in comparison with smear, culture and PCR techniques in 56 consecutive samples (47 BAL and 13 sputum samples) obtained from patients with clinical suspicion of active TB. Results: Twentynine patients (52%) were female and seven patients were HIV positive. PrTBK was positive in 17 culture positive and 4 culture negative samples (100% sensitivity, 89% specificity and 92% accuracy in comparison with culture method). In two out of four patients with negative culture who were positive for PrTBK, PCR and anti-tuberculosis drugs trial therapy responses were in favor of tuberculosis. If we take this finding into account, the accuracy of PrTBK will rise. Conclusion: High sensitivity and accuracy of PrTBK test enable us to initiate treatment on the basis of this convenient and rapid test. PMID:28210462

  20. Rapid antigen tests for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis are not accurate for screening women with disturbed vaginal lactobacillary flora.

    PubMed

    Donders, G G; van Gerven, V; de Wet, H G; van Straten, A M; de Boer, F

    1996-01-01

    We studied the accuracy of the rapid antigen detection tests Gonozyme and Chlamydiazyme in high-risk women in an outpatient prenatal clinic, Kalafong University Hospital, Pretoria, South Africa. Women (n = 433) presenting with uneventful pregnancy (n = 324), unavoidable miscarriage (n = 41) or infertility of 1 year's duration (n = 68) had a Pap smear for lactobacillary grading and detection of pathogens like Candida albicans or Trichomonas vaginalis, a swab for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and a swab for Gonozyme, Chlamydiazyme and Chlamydia immunofluorescence collected from the endocervix. Specificities of both antigen tests were high, but sensitivities and positive predictive values were disappointingly low. Chlamydial antigen was recovered in only 37% of samples with positive immunofluorescence, gonococcal antigen was detected in only 50% of samples with positive culture for N. gonorrhoeae. Although prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis was higher in women with disturbed lactobacillary grades on the Pap smears, sensitivities of the antigen tests were lower in this group. We conclude that detection of endocervical antigens of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae lacked sensitivity in pregnant and infertile women living in an area with high prevalence of chlamydial cervicitis, gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginitis. Furthermore, the rapid antigen tests lack accuracy when the lactobacillary flora is disturbed and are, therefore, not suitable for detection of C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae in pre-screened patients.

  1. Ruling out False-Positive Urinary Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae Antigen Test Results by Heating Urine

    PubMed Central

    Pontoizeau, C.; Dangers, L.; Jarlier, V.; Luyt, C. E.; Guiller, E.; Fievet, M. H.; Lecsö-Bornet, M.; Aubry, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report here false-positive urinary Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen test results due to rabbit antilymphocyte serum treatment and provide a simple and fast solution to rule them out by heating urine. PMID:25253788

  2. Evaluation of a radial immunodiffusion test with polysaccharide B antigen for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L M; Berman, D T; Moreno, E; Deyoe, B L; Gilsdorf, M J; Huber, J D; Nicoletti, P

    1980-01-01

    A radial immunodiffusion (RID) test employing a polysaccharide antigen (poly B) was compared with tests currently used in the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Over 1,000 sera from vaccinated and infected cattle, all of which had been examined bacteriologically, were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the RID, card, Rivanol, and complement fixation tests. The RID test identified 90% of the cattle that were shedding Brucella in their milk. Although the complement fixation test was more sensitive, it was less specific than the RID test in cattle vaccinated as adults with Brucella abortus strain 19. A sensitive screening test, such as the card test, in combination with the RID test could be used in diagnostic laboratories, or even in the field, with little additional expense or technical expertise. An additional advantage is that the RID could be applied to sera from adult cattle as early as 2 months after vaccination, when postvaccinal agglutinins and complement-fixing antibodies may still be present. The indirect hemolytic test was used with some of the sera and was found to be a very sensitive test which could be useful in areas of low incidence but would not be practical for large-scale testing in adult-vaccinated herds. PMID:6796600

  3. Novel antigen identification method for discovery of protective malaria antigens by rapid testing of DNA vaccines encoding exons from the parasite genome.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Diana; Bilcikova, Erika; Witney, Adam A; Carlton, Jane M; White, Charles E; Blair, Peter L; Chattopadhyay, Rana; Russell, Joshua; Abot, Esteban; Charoenvit, Yupin; Aguiar, Joao C; Carucci, Daniel J; Weiss, Walter R

    2004-03-01

    We describe a novel approach for identifying target antigens for preerythrocytic malaria vaccines. Our strategy is to rapidly test hundreds of DNA vaccines encoding exons from the Plasmodium yoelii yoelii genomic sequence. In this antigen identification method, we measure reduction in parasite burden in the liver after sporozoite challenge in mice. Orthologs of protective P. y. yoelii genes can then be identified in the genomic databases of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax and investigated as candidate antigens for a human vaccine. A pilot study to develop the antigen identification method approach used 192 P. y. yoelii exons from genes expressed during the sporozoite stage of the life cycle. A total of 182 (94%) exons were successfully cloned into a DNA immunization vector with the Gateway cloning technology. To assess immunization strategies, mice were vaccinated with 19 of the new DNA plasmids in addition to the well-characterized protective plasmid encoding P. y. yoelii circumsporozoite protein. Single plasmid immunization by gene gun identified a novel vaccine target antigen which decreased liver parasite burden by 95% and which has orthologs in P. vivax and P. knowlesi but not P. falciparum. Intramuscular injection of DNA plasmids produced a different pattern of protective responses from those seen with gene gun immunization. Intramuscular immunization with plasmid pools could reduce liver parasite burden in mice despite the fact that none of the plasmids was protective when given individually. We conclude that high-throughput cloning of exons into DNA vaccines and their screening is feasible and can rapidly identify new malaria vaccine candidate antigens.

  4. Antibody Responses to Recombinant Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: Complementary Test of ZEBRA Protein and Early Antigens p54 and p138

    PubMed Central

    Dardari, R.; Hinderer, W.; Lang, D.; Benider, A.; El Gueddari, B.; Joab, I.; Benslimane, A.; Khyatti, M.

    2001-01-01

    Serological tests based on the antibodies directed against the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EA) and viral capsid antigen (VCA), which have been recognized as tumor markers for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), are routinely used to help in the diagnosis of this malignancy. The detection of these antibodies reveals very low titers, found only in a small proportion of young compared with older NPC patients. This is a problem for the diagnosis of NPC, especially among Maghrebians, among whom young people are also affected, and emphasizes the necessity to search for more reliable markers. The present study reports results of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA responses of NPC patients to recombinant EA antigens p54 (BMRF1) and p138 (BALF2), VCA complex antigens p18 (BFRF3) and p23 (BLRF2), and EBNA antigen p72 (BKRF1). Our results show that IgA-EA-p54 and -p138 (IgA-EA-p54+138) antibodies have a diagnostic value for detection of NPC (70%), compared with IgA-VCA-p18+23 and IgA-EBNA-p72, which have limited diagnostic value, especially in young patients. It is also noteworthy that IgA-EA-p54+138 can detect a high percentage (64%) of NPC cases negative by immunofluorescence. These results, however, clearly show that a single test cannot achieve the objective of detecting all NPC patients, and it seems advisable to combine different tests for the diagnosis of NPC. The combination of IgG-ZEBRA with IgA-EA-p54+138 improved the sensitivity of detection of NPC to 95% in the overall NPC population. The use of IgA-EA-p54+138 in combination with IgG-ZEBRA will facilitate detailed studies on the pattern of antibody response, which may result in the development of useful serological markers to guide the treatment of NPC. PMID:11526145

  5. Intralesional injection of mumps or Candida skin test antigens: a novel immunotherapy for warts.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S M; Roberson, P K; Horn, T D

    2001-04-01

    Warts are common and induce physical and emotional discomfort. Numerous therapies exist, yet none is optimal. Despite theoretical advantages, immunotherapeutic modalities are often neglected as first-line wart therapies. To compare treatment with intralesional skin test antigen injection of 1 wart vs cryotherapy of all warts. Pilot study. University dermatology outpatient clinic. A total of 115 consecutive patients with at least 1 nongenital wart. Patients with warts were tested for immunity to mumps and Candida using commercial antigens. Nonresponders received cryotherapy and immune individuals received cryotherapy or intralesional injection of 1 antiserum. Thirty-four (30%) of the 115 patients did not respond to the test injections and 81 (70%) had detectable immunity. Of the immune group, 26 (32%) received cryotherapy, 45 (56%) received intralesional mumps antiserum, and 10 (12%) received intralesional Candida antiserum. Of the anergic patients, 28 (82%) were treated with cryotherapy; 6 (18%) refused cryotherapy. Of the 39 patients who were treated with immunotherapy and completed the protocol, 29 (74%) had complete clearing of the treated wart. Fourteen (78%) of 18 patients with complete resolution of their immunotherapy-treated wart also had resolution of untreated, distant warts. Intralesional injection of mumps or Candida antigens into warts of immune individuals represents effective treatment. Observation of clearing of anatomically distinct and distant warts suggests acquisition of human papillomavirus-directed immunity in some patients. We conclude that this novel approach to immunotherapy may serve as first-line treatment in immune individuals with multiple or large warts and as second-line treatment in immune patients for whom cryotherapy fails.

  6. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against human Rh antigens in tests with the red cells of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Ruffie, J

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against Rh related antigens on human red cells often crossreact with the red cells of the highest subhuman primate species. Depending on specificity of antibody, the species tested, and technique used, these reactions can be either species-specific or type specific. In tests with chimpanzee red cells, some of the latter type reactions have specificities related to the R antigen of the R-C-E-F blood group system of chimpanzee; specificities of some others seem to be unrelated to any known chimpanzee blood groups. Monoclonal anti-D reagents that give uniformly positive reactions with human D-positive (common and rare types) red cells, display wide individual differences in tests with chimpanzee blood. This indicates that there are minute structural variations of antibody molecules from one monoclonal anti-D antibodies apparently have no bearing on recognition of the D combining site on the human red cells, but come into play when in contact with chimpanzee rbcs. Some of the monoclonal antibodies directed against Rh and LW molecules are distinguished by unusually strong reactions with the red cells of the Old World monkeys (macaques and baboons), which is in contrast with negative or weak reactions of the same antibodies with the red cells of anthropoid apes and human bloods. One may recall, that polyclonal anti-Rh sera do not react with the blood of rhesus monkeys, the phenomenon that was the source of controversy surrounding the discovery of the rhesus factor of the human blood.

  8. Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) papillomaviruses: vaccine antigen candidates and screening test development.

    PubMed

    Rehtanz, Manuela; Bossart, Gregory D; Doescher, Bethany; Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc; Fair, Patricia A; Jenson, Alfred B; Ghim, Shin-Je

    2009-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) have been shown as being the etiologic agents of various benign and malignant tumours in many vertebrate species. In dolphins and porpoises, a high prevalence of orogenital tumours has recently been documented with at least four distinct novel species-specific PV types detected in such lesions. Therefore, we generated the immunological reagents to establish a serological screening test to determine the prevalence of PV infection in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins [(Tursiops truncatus (Tt)]. Using the baculovirus expression system, virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from the L1 proteins of two TtPV types, TtPV1 and TtPV2, were generated. Polyclonal antibodies against TtPV VLPs were produced in rabbits and their specificity for the VLPs was confirmed. Electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) studies revealed that the generated VLPs self-assembled into particles presenting conformational immunodominant epitopes. As such, these particles are potential antigen candidates for a TtPV vaccine. Subsequently, the VLPs served as antigens in initial ELISA tests using sera from six bottlenose dolphins to investigate PV antibody presence. Three of these sera were derived from dolphins with genital tumour history and showed positive PV ELISA reactivity, while the remaining sera from lesion-free dolphins were PV antibody-negative. The results suggest that the developed screening test may serve as a potential tool for determining PV prevalence and thus for observing transmission rates in dolphin populations as the significance of PV infection in cetaceans starts to unfold.

  9. Evaluation of a new lateral flow test for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigen.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Uldum, Søren A; Sørensen, Jesper F; Skovsted, Ian C; Otte, Sanne; Elverdal, Pernille L

    2015-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of the etiologic agent is important in order to choose the correct antibiotic treatment. In this study we evaluated the first commercial combined test for the agents of pneumococcal pneumonia and Legionnaires' disease based on urinary antigen detection, the ImmuView® Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test. In this evaluation, the new test had a significantly higher sensitivity than the BinaxNOW® lateral flow tests and the Binax® EIA test. This identifies the ImmuView® S. pneumoniae and L. pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test as a fast and sensitive point of care test for identification of the infectious agent in a major group of patients with pneumonia.

  10. Manufacturer's recall of rapid assay kits based on false positive Cryptosporidium antigen tests--Wisconsin, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    2002-03-08

    The Wisconsin Division of Public Health and the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene (WSLH) reported that a recent cluster of cryptosporidiosis cases in a three-county area in southeastern Wisconsin was the result of false-positive tests. During December 1, 2001-February 1, 2002, approximately 30 cases of cryptosporidiosis were diagnosed at a laboratory in southeastern Wisconsin using the Becton, Dickinson, and Company (Franklin Lakes, New Jersey) ColorPAC Cryptosporidium/Giardia rapid assay (lot number 219370, expiration date 2002-06-05). Seventeen stool specimens, which were collected from 11 patients and tested positive by the rapid assay, were re-evaluated at WSLH. Six of these stool specimens were in EcoFix (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), eight were in Cary-Blair transport media, and three were formalin fixed. All 17 specimens tested negative for Cryptosporidium at WSLH using the hot safranin stain and MeriFluor (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio) Cryptosporidium/Giardia direct fluorescent antibody kit with concentrated specimens.

  11. Immunoagglutination test to diagnose Chagas disease: comparison of different latex-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Valeria S; Gonzalez, Verónica D G; Marcipar, Ivan S; Gugliotta, Luis M

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of novel latex-protein complexes obtained from different antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi through immunoagglutination test using a panel of T. cruzi-positive sera, leishmaniasis-positive sera and negative sera for both parasites. Complexes' behaviour using total parasite homogenate (TPH), two simple recombinant proteins (RP1 and RP5) and two chimeric recombinant proteins (CP1 and CP2) was comparatively evaluated. The area under ROC curves was used as an index of accuracy. Sensitivity, specificity and discrimination efficiency were assessed. All recombinant antigens showed higher specificity than TPH. The lower specificity of TPH was mainly due to cross-reacting peptides between T. cruzi and Leishmania spp. In turn, all performance indicators were higher for CP1 and CP2 than for RP1 and RP5. The carboxylated latex-CP2 (C2-CP2) complex was able to detect antibodies against T. cruzi. The values of area under ROC curve (0.96), sensitivity (92.3%, 95% CI: 79.4-100.0%) and specificity (84.0%, 95% CI: 67.6-100.0%) indicate that the assay could be used as a screening test. The C2-CP2 complex could be an important tool to carry out sero-epidemiological studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of the circulating cathodic antigen rapid urine test in the diagnosis of Schistosomiasis mansoni infection and evaluation of morbidity in a low- endemic area in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fernanda Teixeira; Fidelis, Thiago André; Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Otoni, Alba; Queiroz, Leonardo Campos; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Antunes, Carlos Maurício; Lambertucci, José Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The Kato-Katz technique is the standard diagnostic test for Schistosoma mansoni infection in rural areas. However, the utility of this method is severely limited by the day-to-day variability in host egg excretion in the stool. In high-transmission areas, the point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) urine assay has proven to be a reliable test. However, investigations of the reliability of the POC-CCA assay in low-transmission regions are under way. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the POC-CCA assay and the morbidity of schistosomiasis in a low-endemic area in Brazil. Pains City is a low-transmission zone for schistosomiasis. A total of 300 subjects aged 7-76 years were randomly selected for the POC-CCA cassette test. For S. mansoni diagnosis, three stool samples on six slides were compared with one urine sample for each subject. The sensitivity and specificity in the absence of a gold standard were calculated using latent class analysis. Clinical examinations and abdominal ultrasounds were performed in 181 volunteers to evaluate morbidity associated with schistosomiasis. The sensitivity and specificity of the Kato-Katz technique were 25.6% and 94.6%, respectively. By contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of the POC-CCA assay were 68.1% and 72.8%, respectively. Hepatosplenic schistosomiasis was diagnosed in two patients (1.1%). Overall, the POC-CCA urine assay proved to be a useful test for diagnosing S. mansoni in a low-endemic area in Brazil. Severe clinical forms of schistosomiasis can be present even in such low-endemic areas.

  13. The use of hydrogel microparticles to sequester and concentrate bacterial antigens in a urine test for Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Temple A; Tamburro, Davide; Fredolini, Claudia; Espina, Benjamin H; Lepene, Benjamin S; Ilag, Leopold; Espina, Virginia; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra

    2011-02-01

    Hydrogel biomarker capturing microparticles were evaluated as a biomaterial to amplify the sensitivity of urine testing for infectious disease proteins. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection transmitted by ticks. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of Lyme disease reduces complications including arthritis and cardiac involvement. While a urine test is highly desirable for Lyme disease screening, this has been difficult to accomplish because the antigen is present at extremely low concentrations, below the detection limit of clinical immunoassays. N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm)-acrylic acid (AAc) microparticles were covalently functionalized with amine containing dyes via amidation of carboxylic groups present in the microparticles. The dyes act as affinity baits towards protein analytes in solution. NIPAm/AAc microparticles functionalized with acid black 48 (AB48) mixed with human urine, achieved close to one hundred percent capture and 100 percent extraction yield of the target antigen. In urine, microparticles sequestered and concentrated Lyme disease antigens 100 fold, compared to the absence of microparticles, achieving an immunoassay detection sensitivity of 700 pg/mL in 10 mL urine. Antigen present in a single infected tick could be readily detected following microparticle sequestration. Hydrogel microparticles functionalized with high affinity baits can dramatically increase the sensitivity of urinary antigen tests for infectious diseases such as Lyme disease. These findings justify controlled clinical studies evaluating the sensitivity and precision of Lyme antigen testing in urine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative evaluation of two commercial multiplex panels for detection of gastrointestinal pathogens by use of clinical stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Khare, Reeti; Espy, Mark J; Cebelinski, Elizabeth; Boxrud, David; Sloan, Lynne M; Cunningham, Scott A; Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Binnicker, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    The detection of pathogens associated with gastrointestinal disease may be important in certain patient populations, such as immunocompromised hosts, the critically ill, or individuals with prolonged disease that is refractory to treatment. In this study, we evaluated two commercially available multiplex panels (the FilmArray gastrointestinal [GI] panel [BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT] and the Luminex xTag gastrointestinal pathogen panel [GPP] [Luminex Corporation, Toronto, Canada]) using Cary-Blair stool samples (n = 500) submitted to our laboratory for routine GI testing (e.g., culture, antigen testing, microscopy, and individual real-time PCR). At the time of this study, the prototype (non-FDA-cleared) FilmArray GI panel targeted 23 pathogens (14 bacterial, 5 viral, and 4 parasitic), and testing of 200 μl of Cary-Blair stool was recommended. In contrast, the Luminex GPP assay was FDA cleared for the detection of 11 pathogens (7 bacterial, 2 viral, and 2 parasitic), but had the capacity to identify 4 additional pathogens using a research-use-only protocol. Importantly, the Luminex assay was FDA cleared for 100 μl raw stool; however, 100 μl Cary-Blair stool was tested by the Luminex assay in this study. Among 230 prospectively collected samples, routine testing was positive for one or more GI pathogens in 19 (8.3%) samples, compared to 76 (33.0%) by the FilmArray and 69 (30.3%) by the Luminex assay. Clostridium difficile (12.6 to 13.9% prevalence) and norovirus genogroup I (GI)/GII (5.7 to 13.9% prevalence) were two of the pathogens most commonly detected by both assays among prospective samples. Sapovirus was also commonly detected (5.7% positive rate) by the FilmArray assay. Among 270 additional previously characterized samples, both multiplex panels demonstrated high sensitivity (>90%) for the majority of targets, with the exception of several pathogens, notably Aeromonas sp. (23.8%) by FilmArray and Yersinia enterocolitica (48.1%) by the Luminex

  15. Evaluation of ergonomic dental stools through clinical simulation.

    PubMed

    Parsell, D E; Weber, M D; Anderson, B C; Cobb, G W

    2000-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal pain occurs commonly within the dental community. Three stool designs were utilized in this study: a standard dental stool, a stool with dual arm supports, and a stool with dual arm supports and chest support. Electromyographic data from four muscle groups were collected on 13 clinicians during a simulated crown preparation procedure. Clinical simulation suggests that a potential musculoskeletal benefit to the clinician exists through utilization of dental stool designs which incorporate static arm supports.

  16. Pre-screening Discussions and Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing for Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Guixiang; Hall, Ingrid J

    2015-08-01

    For many men, the net benefit of prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests may be small. Many major medical organizations have issued recommendations for prostate cancer screening, stressing the need for shared decision making before ordering a test. The purpose of this study is to better understand associations between discussions about benefits and harms of PSA testing and uptake of the test among men aged ≥40 years. Associations between pre-screening discussions and PSA testing were examined using self-reported data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unadjusted prevalence of PSA testing was estimated and AORs were calculated using logistic regression in 2014. The multivariate analysis showed that men who had ever discussed advantages of PSA testing only or discussed both advantages and disadvantages were more likely, respectively, to report having had a test within the past year than men who had no discussions (p<0.001). In addition, men who had only discussed the disadvantages of PSA testing with their healthcare providers were more likely (AOR=2.75, 95% CI=2.00, 3.79) to report getting tested than men who had no discussions. Discussions of the benefits or harms of PSA testing are positively associated with increased uptake of the test. Given the conflicting recommendations for prostate cancer screening and increasing importance of shared decision making, this study points to the need for understanding how pre-screening discussions are being conducted in clinical practice and the role played by patients' values and preferences in decisions about PSA testing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Prostate-specific antigen testing in inner London general practices: are those at higher risk most likely to get tested?

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Ashworth, Mark; Mathur, Rohini; Hull, Sally; Dudek, Alexandra; Chowdhury, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between factors influencing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing prevalence including prostate cancer risk factors (age, ethnicity, obesity) and non-risk factors (social deprivation and comorbidity). Setting A cross-sectional database of 136 inner London general practices from 1 August 2009 to 31 July 2014. Participants Men aged ≥40 years without prostate cancer were included (n=150 481). Primary outcome Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association between PSA testing and age, ethnicity, social deprivation, body mass index (BMI) and comorbidity while adjusting for age, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostatitis and tamsulosin or finasteride use. Results PSA testing prevalence was 8.2% (2013–2014), and the mean age was 54 years (SD 11). PSA testing was positively associated with age (OR 70–74 years compared to 40–44 years: 7.34 (95% CI 6.82 to 7.90)), ethnicity (black) (OR compared to white: 1.78 (95% CI 1.71 to 1.85)), increasing BMI and cardiovascular comorbidity. Testing was negatively associated with Chinese ethnicity and with increasing social deprivation. Conclusions PSA testing among black patients was higher compared to that among white patients, which differs from lower testing rates seen in previous studies. PSA testing was positively associated with prostate cancer risk factors and non-risk factors. Association with non-risk factors may increase the risk of unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:27406644

  18. Detection of Chikungunya Virus Antigen by a Novel Rapid Immunochromatographic Test

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tadahiro; Masrinoul, Promsin; Chantawat, Nantarat; Yoksan, Sutee; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chusri, Sarunyou; Morales Vargas, Ronald E.; Grandadam, Marc; Brey, Paul T.; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Mulyantno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Sow, Abdourahmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Puiprom, Orapim; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Kurosu, Takeshi; Kato, Seiji; Kosaka, Mieko; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a mosquito-borne disease of key public health importance in tropical and subtropical countries. Although severe joint pain is the most distinguishing feature of chikungunya fever, diagnosis remains difficult because the symptoms of chikungunya fever are shared by many pathogens, including dengue fever. The present study aimed to develop a new immunochromatographic diagnosis test for the detection of chikungunya virus antigen in serum. Mice were immunized with isolates from patients with Thai chikungunya fever, East/Central/South African genotype, to produce mouse monoclonal antibodies against chikungunya virus. Using these monoclonal antibodies, a new diagnostic test was developed and evaluated for the detection of chikungunya virus. The newly developed diagnostic test reacted with not only the East/Central/South African genotype but also with the Asian and West African genotypes of chikungunya virus. Testing of sera from patients suspected to have chikungunya fever in Thailand (n = 50), Laos (n = 54), Indonesia (n = 2), and Senegal (n = 6) revealed sensitivity, specificity, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) agreement values of 89.4%, 94.4%, and 91.1%, respectively. In our study using serial samples, a new diagnostic test showed high agreement with the RT-PCR within the first 5 days after onset. A rapid diagnostic test was developed using mouse monoclonal antibodies that react with chikungunya virus envelope proteins. The diagnostic accuracy of our test is clinically acceptable for chikungunya fever in the acute phase. PMID:25411170

  19. Detection of chikungunya virus antigen by a novel rapid immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Tamaki; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Masrinoul, Promsin; Chantawat, Nantarat; Yoksan, Sutee; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chusri, Sarunyou; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Grandadam, Marc; Brey, Paul T; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Mulyantno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Sow, Abdourahmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Puiprom, Orapim; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Kurosu, Takeshi; Kato, Seiji; Kosaka, Mieko; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Chikungunya fever is a mosquito-borne disease of key public health importance in tropical and subtropical countries. Although severe joint pain is the most distinguishing feature of chikungunya fever, diagnosis remains difficult because the symptoms of chikungunya fever are shared by many pathogens, including dengue fever. The present study aimed to develop a new immunochromatographic diagnosis test for the detection of chikungunya virus antigen in serum. Mice were immunized with isolates from patients with Thai chikungunya fever, East/Central/South African genotype, to produce mouse monoclonal antibodies against chikungunya virus. Using these monoclonal antibodies, a new diagnostic test was developed and evaluated for the detection of chikungunya virus. The newly developed diagnostic test reacted with not only the East/Central/South African genotype but also with the Asian and West African genotypes of chikungunya virus. Testing of sera from patients suspected to have chikungunya fever in Thailand (n = 50), Laos (n = 54), Indonesia (n = 2), and Senegal (n = 6) revealed sensitivity, specificity, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) agreement values of 89.4%, 94.4%, and 91.1%, respectively. In our study using serial samples, a new diagnostic test showed high agreement with the RT-PCR within the first 5 days after onset. A rapid diagnostic test was developed using mouse monoclonal antibodies that react with chikungunya virus envelope proteins. The diagnostic accuracy of our test is clinically acceptable for chikungunya fever in the acute phase.

  20. Physician practices in requesting stool samples for patients with acute gastroenteritis, France, August 2013-July 2014.

    PubMed

    Van Cauteren, D; Turbelin, C; Fonteneau, L; Hanslik, T; De Valk, H; Blanchon, T

    2015-09-01

    A better understanding of physician practices in requesting stool samples for patients with acute gastroenteritis (AG) is needed to more accurately interpret laboratory-based surveillance data. A survey was conducted in General Practitioners (GPs) between August 2013 and July 2014 to estimate the proportion of stool samples requested for patients with AG and to identify factors associated with GP requests for a stool sample. National health insurance (NHI) data together with surveillance data from a French Sentinel GP network were also used to estimate the proportion of stool samples requested. This proportion was estimated at 4·3% in the GP survey and 9·1% (95% confidence interval 8·7-9·6) using NHI data. Multivariate analysis indicated that the ratio of stool samples requested was almost five times higher in patients with bloody diarrhoea and 10-20 times higher in patients with a long duration of illness before consultation. Laboratory-based surveillance data underestimates the actual burden of disease as fewer than one in 10 AG cases consulting their GP will be requested to submit a stool sample for laboratory testing. This underestimation varies by pathogen as stool samples are more frequently requested for severe illness.

  1. Detection of SNCA and FBN1 Methylation in the Stool as a Biomarker for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-han; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Qi; Wu, Xuan-di; Xu, Zi-sen; Dang, Cheng-xue; Xia, Peng; Song, Yong-chun

    2015-01-01

    Aim. We examined the methylation status of SNCA and FBN1 genes in patients' paired tissue and stool samples for detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and Methods. 89 DNA tissue samples (normal/cancer) and corresponding stool samples were analyzed in our study. In addition, 30 stool samples were collected as healthy controls. Results. The methylation level of those samples was measured by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The result shows that compared with the paired controls, both SNCA and FBN1 were significantly hypermethylated in CRC patients in tissue samples (P < 0.001). In the stool samples, hypermethylated SNCA and FBN1 were detected to be significantly higher than that in normal stool samples (P < 0.001). The combined sensitivity of at least one positive among the two markers in stool samples was 84.3%, with a specificity of 93.3%. In addition, our experiment suggested that the positive rates of SNCA and FBN1 in Dukes A stage were significantly higher than that of FOBT (P = 0.039; P = 0.006, resp.). Conclusion. We concluded that methylation testing of SNCA and FBN1 genes in stool sample may offer a good alternative in a simple, promising, and noninvasive detection of colorectal cancer. PMID:25802477

  2. Collaborative study on antigens for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    Mott, K. E.; Dixon, H.

    1982-01-01

    Eight research laboratories in Europe and the United States of America were selected on the basis of having published data on Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum antigens to participate in a study of various antigen/test combinations for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. The serum bank consisted of 395 well documented sera from four endemic areas in Brazil (2 areas), Kenya, and the Philippines. Altogether, 21 S. mansoni and four S. japonicum antigen and immunoassay combinations were evaluated. S. mansoni egg antigens yielded a higher combined sensitivity than adult worm antigens, irrespective of their purity, in active S. mansoni infections before and after specific treatment. Quantitative seroreactivity of characterized S. mansoni egg antigens showed good correlation with faecal egg counts in the 5-14 year age group. No correlation between morbidity related to S. mansoni and seroreactivity was observed in any test system. Three S. japonicum egg antigens showed high sensitivity and specificity in relation to the presence or absence of eggs in the stool. The quantitative seroreactivity of the characterized S. japonicum egg antigens correlated directly with the intensity of S. japonicum infection in all age groups. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using several different procedures, performed well with the antigens used in the study. The indium slide immunoassay (ISI), a simple qualitative visual test system using an S. mansoni egg antigen, demonstrated a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. The results did not indicate the superiority of any particular immunodiagnostic method for detecting antischistosome antibodies. This collaborative study is considered a first step towards developing and standardizing antigens for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. PMID:6983926

  3. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

  4. Performance comparison of new generation HCV core antigen test versus HCV RNA test in management of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Çetiner, Salih; Çetin Duran, Alev; Kibar, Filiz; Yaman, Akgün

    2017-06-01

    The study has evaluated the performance of HCV core antigen (Cag) test by comparing HCV RNA PCR assay which is considered the gold standard for management of HCV infection. Totally, 132 samples sent for HCV RNA (real-time PCR) test were included in the study. Anti-HCV antibody test and HCV Cag test were performed by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CMEI). Anti-HCV test was positive in all samples. HCV RNA was detected in 112/132 (84.8%) samples, and HCV Cag in 105/132 (79.5%). The most common HCV genotype was genotype 1 (86%). Considering the HCV RNA test as gold standard; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of Cag test were found to be 93.75%, 100%, 100%, 74.07% and 94.69%, respectively, and paired test results were detected as highly concordant. A high level of correlation was seen between HCV RNA and Cag tests, however, the concordance between the two tests appeared to be disrupted at viral loads lower than 10(3)IU/mL. On the contrary, the correlation reached significance for the values higher than 10(3)IU/mL. Viral loads were in the 17-2500IU/mL range for the negative results for Cag test. Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed a considerably high correlation. The concordance between HCV RNA and Cag tests was disrupted under a viral load lower than 10(3)IU/mL. Therefore, it would be appropriate to consider cost effectiveness, advantages and limitations of the HCV RNA and Cag tests during the decision on which method to use for patient management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ELISA testing for common food antigens in four dry dog foods used in dietary elimination trials.

    PubMed

    Raditic, D M; Remillard, R L; Tater, K C

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluated four over the counter venison dry dog foods available from one on-line retail vendor for potential contamination with common known food allergens: soy, poultry or beef. An amplified, double sandwich type enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test of soy, poultry and beef proteins were performed by an independent accredited food laboratory. The ELISA test for poultry protein was found to be unreliable when testing in dry dog foods because false negatives occurred. ELISA testing of control diets for both soy and beef proteins performed as expected and could be useful in antigen testing in dry dog foods. Three of the four over the counter (OTC) venison canine dry foods with no soy products named in the ingredient list were ELISA positive for soy; additionally one OTC diet tested positive for beef protein with no beef products listed as an ingredient list. One OTC venison diet was not found to be positive for soy, poultry or beef proteins. However, none of the four OTC venison diets could be considered suitable for a diagnostic elimination trial as they all contained common pet food proteins, some of which were readily identifiable on the label and some that were only detected by ELISA. Therefore, if the four OTC venison products selected in this study are representative of OTC products in general, then the use of OTC venison dry dog foods should not be used during elimination trials in suspected food allergy patients. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. ‘It's a maybe test’: men's experiences of prostate specific antigen testing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhodri; Edwards, Adrian GK; Elwyn, Glyn; Watson, Eila; Grol, Richard; Brett, Jo; Austoker, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing in primary care is an important and contentious issue. Due to concerns about the test and the value of early detection, countries such as the UK advocate ‘informed choice’ instead of population screening. It is not known whether this policy is actually adhered to in primary care. Furthermore, little is known of the experiences of men who face this decision. Aim To explore the experiences, understanding, and views of men who considered or undertook PSA testing in UK primary care. Design of study Qualitative interview-based study. Setting Primary care, Wales, UK. Method Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were conducted with 28 men, representing a range of clinical outcomes. Transcripts were coded and subjected to thematic analysis. Results Three themes were identified: the decision-making context, the locus of decision making, and uncertainty related to the PSA test. Conclusion The decision to undertake PSA testing was affected by both social and media factors and it did not appear to be a patient-led decision. The decision created considerable uncertainty for men and this uncertainty persisted after the test, even if the result was normal. Raised PSA led to further investigations and this exacerbated the uncertainty. Anxiety and regret were consequences of this uncertainty. PMID:17394734

  7. p24 antigen rapid test for diagnosis of acute pediatric HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Parpia, Zaheer A; Elghanian, Robert; Nabatiyan, Arman; Hardie, Diana R; Kelso, David M

    2010-12-01

    Currently, the majority of HIV-infected infants are found within limited-resource settings, where inadequate screening for HIV due to the lack of access to simple and affordable point-of-care tests impedes implementation of antiretroviral therapy. Here we report development of a low-cost dipstick p24 antigen assay using a visual readout format that can facilitate the diagnosis of HIV for infants in resource-poor conditions. A heat shock methodology was developed to optimize disruption of immune complexes present in the plasma of infected infants. The analytical sensitivity of the assay using recombinant p24 antigen is 50 pg/mL (2 pM) with whole virus detection as low as 42.5k RNA copies per milliliter plasma. In a blinded study comprising 51 archived infant samples from the Women and Infants Transmission Study, our assay demonstrated an overall sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 100%, respectively. In field evaluations of 389 fresh samples from South African infants, a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 99% was achieved. The assay is simple to perform, requires minimal plasma volume (25 μL), and yields a result in less than 40 minutes making it ideal for implementation in resource-limited settings.

  8. Clinical usefulness of pneumococcal urinary antigen test, stratified by disease severity and serotypes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Joo; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Jeon, Ji Ho; Kang, Seong Hui; Jung, Eun Ju; Noh, Ji Yun; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-09-01

    Early diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia facilitates appropriate antibiotic therapy. The urinary antigen test (UAT) is known to be useful for the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of UAT in the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV13) era. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) cases aged ≥19 years were reviewed retrospectively. This study evaluated the utility of Streptococcus pneumoniae UAT (BinaxNOW(®) assay) for diagnosis of pneumococcal CAP, and the relation of the UAT positive rate to age, comorbidities, pneumonia severity, and pneumococcal serotypes. Among 752 microbiologically identified CAP cases, S. pneumoniae (36.7%) was the most common isolate, and of those cases, 56.4% were positive for UAT. UAT positivity varied by pneumococcal serotype (serotype 3, 50%; 9V/9A, 85%; 11A/11E, 54%; 14, 36.4%; 19A, 50%; and 23F, 37.5%), and was significantly increased since 2012, two years after introduction of PCV13. The positive rate of UAT was significantly related to CRP level (P = 0.007) and lobar pneumonia (P = 0.006), but not to age, co-morbidities or prior antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, urinary antigen detection varied depending on the S. pneumoniae serotype. In the PCV13 era, the serotype distribution of pneumococcal pneumonia may be changing, and the clinical usefulness of UAT needs to be monitored. The positive rate of UAT may be influenced by a localized bacterial burden and host reactions.

  9. Cost-effective antigen testing for delimitation, monitoring and evaluation in bancroftian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Das, L K; Pani, S P; Vanamail, P; Vijayalakshmi, G; Debritto, L J

    2012-01-31

    This study was focussed on identifying a cost-effective method for delimitation, monitoring and evaluation in bancroftian filariasis. Finger prick blood samples were collected between 20.00 and 23.00 hours for the detection of microfilariae (mf) from the available population in a village which was endemic for lymphatic filariasis. Simultaneously, from each individual, four spots of 25-μl blood samples were collected on Whatman number 3 filter paper and air dried. Dried filter paper spots were pooled in quantities of 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 on unknown and simulated mf and antigen prevalence. Pooled samples were assayed for circulating filarial antigen (CFA) using TropBIO Og4C3 ELISA kits. The community mf and CFA rates were 3.4% and 25.9%, respectively. The pool sizes of 20 and 25 showed CFA positivity in all the above categories tested. The results of the pooled blood spot samples suggest that, in areas with mf and CFA prevalence rates between 1 and 10%, pools of 20 or 25 could be considered as the ideal pool size for the detection of filarial infection in the community. CFA prevalence at the level of 5-6% following desirable rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) indicates that the community mf prevalence is likely to be at the 1% level.

  10. ELISA testing for soy antigens in dry dog foods used in dietary elimination trials.

    PubMed

    Willis-Mahn, Christine; Remillard, Rebecca; Tater, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The use of elimination diet trials is necessary in the diagnosis of food allergies and intolerances. The objective of this study was to determine in vitro if four over-the-counter (OTC) dry dog foods carrying a "no soy" claim and seven veterinary therapeutic dry dog foods designed for food elimination trials were suitable for a soybean elimination trial. A 100 g sample of each diet plus one soy positive and one soy negative control diet were submitted for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing to an independent food laboratory. The positive control diet contained >25 ppm soy protein antigens and the negative control contained <2.5 ppm. Three of the four OTC "no soy" claiming diets were positive for soy antigen. Two of the three soy-containing diets had >25 ppm. Three veterinary therapeutic diets had less than the lowest detectable limit of soy protein and four were positive (>2.5 ppm). OTC dog food diets that claim to contain "no soy" may contain high concentrations of soy protein and, therefore, should not be used in soy elimination trials in suspect food allergic dogs. The veterinary therapeutic diet selected for a soy elimination trial needs to be carefully chosen based on diet history.

  11. Metabolomic study of a diagnostic model for the metabolites of stool fat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong Hwan; Kim, Jiyoung; Ahn, Su Young; Lee, Sun Young

    2013-01-25

    Metabolomics is a powerful tool for measuring low-molecular-weight metabolites in an organism at a specified time under specific environmental conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of metabolomics in identifying the metabolites in stool-fat-positive specimens, and to establish whether the results could be used to predict the long-term prognosis. Fecal specimens were collected from 52 subjects with bowel habit change. The subjects were accessed using Rome III questionnaires and Bristol stool scale form, and followed after three years. The feces samples were centrifuged and the resulting extracts reconstituted for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The datasets were autoscaled, log-transformed, and mean-centered in a column-wise fashion prior to principal-components analysis and partial least-squares-discrimination analysis modeling. Fecal samples from 10 of the 52 patients gave a positive stool-fat result of 30-100 mm; those of the remaining 42 contained neither fatty acids nor neutral fats. The peak intensities of lithocholic acid (p=0.001), lysophosphatidyl ethanolamine (lysoPE) 16:0 (p=0.015), and lysoPE 18:1/0:0 (p=0.014) were correlated with the size of the fatty acid. Subjects with positive stool-fat result showed higher score in Bristol stool scale form than those with negative stool-fat result at initial (p=0.040) and after three years (p=0.012). The metabolomic assay of stool fatty acid revealed mainly lysoPEs and lithocholic acid. The size of the fatty acid was correlated with higher concentrations of lysoPEs and lithocholic acid in stool-fat-test-positive specimens and related to loose stool even after three years of follow-up period.

  12. Impact of the rapid antigen detection test in diagnosis and treatment of acute pharyngotonsillitis in a pediatric emergency room.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Débora Morais; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Hsin, Shieh Huei; Machado, Beatriz Marcondes; de Paulis, Milena; Lotufo, João Paulo B; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; Grisi, Sandra Josefina E

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the routine use of rapid antigen detection test in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pharyngotonsillitis in children. This is a prospective and observational study, with a protocol compliance design established at the Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of Universidade de São Paulo for the care of children and adolescents diagnosed with acute pharyngitis. 650 children and adolescents were enrolled. Based on clinical findings, antibiotics would be prescribed for 389 patients (59.8%); using the rapid antigen detection test, they were prescribed for 286 patients (44.0%). Among the 261 children who would not have received antibiotics based on the clinical evaluation, 111 (42.5%) had positive rapid antigen detection test. The diagnosis based only on clinical evaluation showed 61.1% sensitivity, 47.7% specificity, 44.9% positive predictive value, and 57.5% negative predictive value. The clinical diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis had low sensitivity and specificity. The routine use of rapid antigen detection test led to the reduction of antibiotic use and the identification of a risk group for complications of streptococcal infection, since 42.5% positive rapid antigen detection test patients would not have received antibiotics based only on clinical diagnosis.

  13. Peritonsillar abscess and cellulitis and their relation to a positive antigen detection test for streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Risberg, Stefan; Engfeldt, Peter; Hugosson, Svante

    2010-10-01

    The microbiological cause of peritonsillar abscess and the role of group A β-haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) are unclear. We performed a retrospective study at the ear, nose and throat clinic (ENT) of Orebro University Hospital, Sweden, and included 376 events of peritonsillitis between 2002 and 2004. We determined if the patients had visited a primary healthcare centre (PHCC) within 30 days prior to inclusion. The results of the rapid antigen detection test for GAS (Strep A) taken at the PHCC were compared with the occurrence of peritonsillar abscess (PTA) and peritonsillar cellulitis (PTC). A Strep A test was performed in 61% (229/376) of the events studied. Strep A was positive in 22% of PTA events and in 35% of PTC events (p = 0.036). Of 48,000 Strep A tests taken in primary healthcare, mainly for sore throat, 22% were positive. We examined the relationship between age, the incidence of PTA, and positive Strep A tests. We also determined if there was a monthly correlation between number of positive Strep A tests and number of PTA events. We found no significant correlations. In conclusion, our findings indicate that GAS does not play a major role in the development of PTA/PTC.

  14. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in Australian men: the influence of family history.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Michelle E; Occhipinti, Stefano; Gardiner, Robert A; Chambers, Suzanne K

    2012-04-01

    To describe how a family history of prostate cancer influences men's prostate cancer testing behaviours, information support preferences, and motives for testing. Men with a first-degree family history (239 men) and a comparison sample from the general population of Queensland, Australia (289) aged 40-65 years, and no prior history of cancer. Cross-sectional, retrospective survey assessing: prevalence of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examination (DRE); discussion of prostate cancer risks and benefits with a physician; prostate cancer information needs and preferences; motivations for testing. Men with a family history were more likely to report: having ever had a PSA test (odds ratio [OR] 4.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.16-7.85), more PSA tests in their lifetimes (b 1.04; se 0.40; 95% CI 0.26-1.82); to have had a DRE (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.54-3.23); to have spoken to a doctor about prostate cancer (OR 3.72; 95% CI 2.30-6.02); and to have instigated these discussions (OR 1.74; 95%CI 1.13-2.70). Most men from both groups did not recall any discussion of the 'cons' of prostate cancer testing with a doctor. Men with a family history reported a greater desire for information about prostate cancer prevention than did men without a family history. Men with a family history are more concerned about getting prostate cancer and are tested more often; however, information needs, discussions about prostate cancer, and motivations for testing are similar to those of all men. There appears to be a disparity between public health approaches that promote informed decision-making and what is happening in practice. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  15. PRISM hepatitis B surface antigen detection of hepatits B virus minipool nucleic acid testing yield samples.

    PubMed

    Linauts, Sandy; Saldanha, John; Strong, D Michael

    2008-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) residual risk has been estimated at 1:63,000-1:205,000 and introduction of more sensitive serological tests and nucleic acid testing (NAT) would reduce that risk. Sensitivity of the recently licensed Abbott PRISM hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) CLIA and minipool (MP) HBV NAT has been described as comparable and thus the need for HBV NAT has not been compelling. In this study, eight samples identified as yield samples with MP HBV NAT were tested using the PRISM test. Seven samples were identified using the Roche COBAS AmpliScreen HBV test and one additional sample was obtained from the clinical trial for the Roche cobas TaqScreen MPX test. Each of these samples was reactive by MP HBV NAT and nonreactive for HBsAg using one of three licensed enzyme immunoassay (EIA) tests. After licensure of the PRISM HBsAg, aliquots were tested with this assay, and DNA quantitation and genotyping were repeated where sample volume permitted. Three samples (2000, 2300, and 61,000 copies/mL) produced reactive results with PRISM. Four samples with viral loads less than 300 copies per mL produced nonreactive results. One sample, originally quantitated at 37,000 copies per mL (but 3850 copies/mL in repeat testing) was also nonreactive by PRISM. Genotyping of this sample indicated a type C genotype with no mutations. Adding serological sensitivity of PRISM CLIA reduced the NAT yield from the original 1: 385,555 to 1:610,488. However, MP HBV NAT still provides additional sensitivity over CLIA, even for a donation with a viral load of almost 4000 copies per mL.

  16. STools: IDL Tools for Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    STools contains a variety of simple tools for spectroscopy, such as reading an IRAF-formatted (multispec) echelle spectrum in FITS, measuring the wavelength of the center of a line, Gaussian convolution, deriving synthetic photometry from an input spectrum, and extracting and interpolating a MARCS model atmosphere (standard composition).

  17. Parasitology: diagnostic yield of stool examination.

    PubMed Central

    Senay, H; MacPherson, D

    1989-01-01

    To assess the need for routinely submitting three stool samples per patient for recovery of enteric parasites, we reviewed the records of our parasitology laboratory for 1985-87 to determine the number of parasites that would not have been detected if only one or two samples had been submitted. A total of 16% of all stool samples were positive. For each sample that was positive for a parasite (index sample) a search was done for other stool samples, positive or negative, received from the same patient within 6 days of reception of the index sample. We identified 676 sets of two (276) or three (400) samples of which at least 1 was positive. A total of 93% of the enteric parasites were detected in the first sample in the two-sample sets. Among the three-sample sets 90% of the parasites were detected in the first sample, 8% in the second and 2% in the third. We recommend waiting for the result from the first stool sample rather than routinely submitting three samples for recovery of enteric parasites. PMID:2720516

  18. Stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Gewolb, I.; Schwalbe, R.; Taciak, V.; Harrison, T.; Panigrahi, P.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To serially characterise aerobic and anaerobic stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants and to correlate colonisation patterns with clinical risk factors.
METHODS—Stool specimens from 29 infants of birthweight <1000 g were collected on days 10, 20, and 30 after birth. Quantitative aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed.
RESULTS—By day 30, predominant species were Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterbacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria spp were identified in only one infant. In breast milk fed (but not in formula fed) infants, the total number of bacterial species/stool specimen increased significantly with time (2.50 (SE 0.34) on day 10; 3.13 (0.38) on day 20; 4.27 (0.45) on day 30) as did quantitative bacterial counts; Gram negative species accounted for most of the increase. On day 30, significant inverse correlations were found between days of previous antibiotic treatment and number of bacterial species (r=0.491) and total organisms/g of stool (r=0.482). Gestational age, birthweight, maternal antibiotic or steroid treatment, prolonged rupture of the membranes, and mode of delivery did not seem to affect colonisation patterns.
CONCLUSIONS—The gut of extremely low birthweight infants is colonised by a paucity of bacterial species. Breast milking and reduction of antibiotic exposure are critical to increasing fecal microbial diversity.

 PMID:10212075

  19. Proficiency testing for the radioimmunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen. A one-year report.

    PubMed

    Reynoso, G; Keane, M; Konopka, S

    1977-07-01

    Forty-three laboratories participated in an interlaboratory testing program offered by the College of American Pathologists for the radioimmunoassay (RIA) of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Thirty correctly reported a sample with 1.9 ng of endogenous CEA per ml as less than 2.5 ng. For samples with added exogenous CEA at the 5.4 ng/ml level, 24 laboratories reported too low and six too high (more than 2 SD beyond the targe value). At the 8.9 ng/ml concentration, three laboratories underestimated the CEA, while 18 overestimated the sample's concentration. A similar proportion of the laboratories performed in the same manner when estimating CEA at a target concentration of 15.9 ng/ml (five underestimating and 27 overestimating the concentration). Although individual variations were large, the majority of participating laboratories can reliably distinguish normal concentrations of CEA from moderate, intermediate and large elevations.

  20. Skin Testing of Guinea Pigs and Footpad Testing of Mice With a New Antigen for Detecting Delayed Hypersensitivity to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Juneann W.; Gregory, Jay A.; Larsh, Howard W.

    1974-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of a cryptococcal culture filtrate antigen, cryptococcin C184, for detecting delayed hypersensitivity in Cryptococcus neoformans-injected animals. The antigen was tested on guinea pigs which had received saline or C. neoformans and on animals sensitized to Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida albicans, or Sporothrix schenckii. A delayed-type hypersensitivity response was elicited by cryptococcin C184 in C. neoformans-injected guinea pigs, whereas no indurations or erythemas were seen at 48 h after skin testing of saline controls or heterologously sensitized guinea pigs. Besides being specific for Cryptococcus, the antigen showed a high degree of sensitivity and was reproducible. Footpad tests were conducted with the antigen on mice which had previously received either 105 viable C. neoformans cells or saline. Delayed hypersensitivity was indicated in the C. neoformans-injected mice by the increase in thickness of antigen-injected footpads when compared with the saline-injected footpads. In control mice, antigen- and saline-injected footpads were comparable in thickness 24 h after injection. Mice sensitized to B. dermatitidis were footpad tested with C184, and no cross-reactivity was demonstrated. Images PMID:4593343

  1. Comparison of Xpert Flu rapid nucleic acid testing with rapid antigen testing for the diagnosis of influenza A and B.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, Michael A; Sahoo, Malaya K; Waggoner, Jesse; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2012-12-01

    Influenza infections are associated with thousands of hospital admissions and deaths each year. Rapid detection of influenza is important for prompt initiation of antiviral therapy and appropriate patient triage. In this study the Cepheid Xpert Flu assay was compared with two rapid antigen tests, BinaxNOW Influenza A & B and BD Directigen EZ Flu A+B, as well as direct fluorescent antibody testing for the rapid detection of influenza A and B. Using real-time, hydrolysis probe-based, reverse transcriptase PCR as the reference method, influenza A sensitivity was 97.3% for Xpert Flu, 95.9% for direct fluorescent antibody testing, 62.2% for BinaxNOW, and 71.6% for BD Directigen. Influenza B sensitivity was 100% for Xpert Flu and direct fluorescent antibody testing, 54.5% for BinaxNOW, and 48.5% for BD Directigen. Specificity for influenza A was 100% for Xpert Flu, BinaxNOW, and BD Directigen, and 99.2% for direct fluorescent antibody testing. All methods demonstrated 100% specificity for influenza B. These findings support the use of the Xpert Flu assay in settings requiring urgent diagnosis of influenza A and B.

  2. Use of a Perianal Swab Compared With a Stool Sample to Detect Symptomatic Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Montecalvo, Marisa A; Sisay, Emnet; McKenna, Donna; Wang, Guiqing; Visintainer, Paul; Wormser, Gary P

    2017-04-05

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a perianal swab to detect CDI. METHODS A perianal swab was collected from each inpatient with a positive stool sample for C. difficile (by polymerase chain reaction [PCR] test) and was tested for C. difficile by PCR and by culture. The variables evaluated included demographics, CDI severity, bathing before perianal swab collection, hours between stool sample and perianal swab, cycle threshold (Ct) to PCR positivity, and doses of CDI treatment before stool sample and before perianal swab. RESULTS Of 83 perianal swabs, 59 (71.1%) tested positive for C. difficile by PCR when perianal swabs were collected an average of 21 hours after the stool sample. Compared with the respective stool sample, the perianal sample was less likely to grow C. difficile (P=.005) and had a higher PCR Ct (P<.001). A direct, significant but weak correlation was detected between the Ct for a positive perianal sample and the respective stool sample (r=0.36; P=.006). An inverse dose relationship was detected between PCR positivity and CDI treatment doses before perianal swab collection (P=.27). CONCLUSION Perianal swabs are a simple method to detect C. difficile tcdB gene by PCR, with a sensitivity of 71%. These data were limited because stool samples and perianal swabs were not collected simultaneously. Compared with stool samples, the perianal Ct values and culture results were consistent with a lower bacterial load on the perianal sample due to the receipt of more CDI treatment before collection or unknown factors affecting perianal skin colonization. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;1-5.

  3. [Rapid antigen detection tests for group A streptococcus in children with pharyngitis].

    PubMed

    Cohen, J; Levy, C; Chalumeau, M; Bidet, Ph; Cohen, R

    2014-11-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most frequently identified bacterium in children with acute pharyngitis. Clinical signs and symptoms cannot distinguish accurately between viral and GAS pharyngitis. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) can identify GAS by an immunologic reaction within a few minutes. Compared to throat culture, most RADTs have a high specificity (around 95 %), allowing antibiotic prescribing on the basis of a positive RADT result. Similarly, the negative predictive value of RADTs seems sufficiently high (around 95 %) to ensure against the presence of GAS in case of a negative RADT result. Among several factors affecting RADT sensitivity, the training and expertise of the person performing the test and the quality of the throat swab specimen seem to be key determinants. Available evidence suggests that clinical prediction rules for the triage of children who should undergo GAS testing are not sufficiently accurate. Implementing RADTs into clinical practice has an important impact on antibiotic prescription rates, for a reduction of about 30 %. French guidelines that recommend using RADTs in all children above 3 years of age presenting with pharyngitis without backup culture of negative tests seem relevant in this context.

  4. Recombinase polymerase amplification-based assay to diagnose Giardia in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Cabada, Miguel Mauricio; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Irani, Ayesha; White, Arthur Clinton; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most commonly identified parasites in stool samples. Although relatively easy to treat, giardiasis can be difficult to detect as it presents similar to other diarrheal diseases. Here, we present a recombinase polymerase amplification-based Giardia (RPAG) assay to detect the presence of Giardia in stool samples. The RPAG assay was characterized on the bench top using stool samples spiked with Giardia cysts where it showed a limit-of-detection nearly as low as the gold standard polymerase chain reaction assay. The RPAG assay was then tested in the highlands of Peru on 104 stool samples collected from the surrounding communities where it showed 73% sensitivity and 95% specificity against a polymerase chain reaction and microscopy composite gold standard. Further improvements in clinical sensitivity will be needed for the RPAG assay to have clinical relevance.

  5. Helicobacter pylori in cathartic stools of subjects with and without cimetidine-induced hypochlorhydria.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Thomas; Shmuely, Haim; Parsonnet, Julie

    2003-02-01

    We previously identified viable Helicobacter pylori in stools from asymptomatic hosts. We now report whether a decrease in gastric acidity enhances faecal shedding. Sixteen asymptomatic H. pylori-positive patients underwent two separate days of phosphosoda-induced diarrhoea, both with normal gastric acidity and under hypochlorhydric conditions induced with the H2-blocker cimetidine. Stool samples were collected for culture to determine the presence of viable H. pylori. Five of the 16 patients gave positive cultures with at least one stool from both normal pH and cimetidine-induced hypochlorhydria. Four were negative for all samples with both. Six gave positive stools only after cimetidine treatments, while one gave positive samples with normal pH but not with cimetidine (two-tailed P value, 0.13; McNemar test). These numbers show a trend suggesting that cimetidine-induced hypochlorhydria increases shedding of viable H. pylori.

  6. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification-Based Assay to Diagnose Giardia in Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Cabada, Miguel Mauricio; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Irani, Ayesha; White, Arthur Clinton; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most commonly identified parasites in stool samples. Although relatively easy to treat, giardiasis can be difficult to detect as it presents similar to other diarrheal diseases. Here, we present a recombinase polymerase amplification-based Giardia (RPAG) assay to detect the presence of Giardia in stool samples. The RPAG assay was characterized on the bench top using stool samples spiked with Giardia cysts where it showed a limit-of-detection nearly as low as the gold standard polymerase chain reaction assay. The RPAG assay was then tested in the highlands of Peru on 104 stool samples collected from the surrounding communities where it showed 73% sensitivity and 95% specificity against a polymerase chain reaction and microscopy composite gold standard. Further improvements in clinical sensitivity will be needed for the RPAG assay to have clinical relevance. PMID:25510713

  7. Evaluation and optimization of the Circulating Cathodic Antigen (POC-CCA) cassette test for detecting Schistosoma mansoni infection by using image analysis in school children in Mwanza Region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Casacuberta, Miriam; Kinunghi, Safari; Vennervald, Birgitte J; Olsen, Annette

    2016-06-01

    There is a need for diagnostic techniques which are sensitive, specific, rapid and easy to perform at the point-of-care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the Circulating Cathodic Antigen (POC-CCA) assay for Schistosoma mansoni in four schools along the coast of Lake Victoria in Mwanza Region, Tanzania, and to optimize the reading of the POC-CCA test lines by using a computer software image analysis. Initially, a pilot study in 106 school children indicated that time of urine collection did not have an impact on CCA results as 84.9% (90) had identical scores from a urine collected in the morning and a urine taken at midday after drinking 0.5 L of water. The main study was conducted among 404 school children (aged 9-12 years) where stool and urine samples were collected for three consecutive days. For S. mansoni diagnosis, stool samples were examined for eggs with duplicate Kato-Katz smears, whereas urine samples were tested for presence of antigen by POC-CCA. The proportion of positive individuals for S. mansoni by one POC-CCA was higher compared to two Kato-Katz smears (66.1% vs. 28.7%; p < 0.0001). Both proportions increased expectedly when three POC-CCAs were compared to six Kato-Katz smears (75.0% vs. 42.6%; p < 0.0001). Three POC-CCAs were more sensitive (94.7%) than six Kato-Katz smears (53.8%) using the combined results of three POC-CCAs and six Kato-Katz smears as the 'gold standard'. To optimize the reading of the POC-CCA, a Software tool (Image Studio Lite®) was used to read and quantify the colour (expressed as pixels) of the test line on all positive tests, showing a positive correlation between number of pixels and the visually scored intensities and between number of pixels and egg counts. In conclusion, the POC-CCA assay seems to be a more appropriate tool for S. mansoni diagnosis compared to the Kato-Katz method in endemic communities such as Mwanza Region. Optimization of the tool in terms of cassette

  8. Evaluation of Dengue NS1 Antigen Rapid Tests and ELISA Kits Using Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Subhamoy; Dauner, Allison L.; Mitra, Indrani; Forshey, Brett M.; Garcia, Paquita; Morrison, Amy C.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) infection can improve clinical outcomes by ensuring close follow-up, initiating appropriate supportive therapies and raising awareness to the potential of hemorrhage or shock. Non-structural glycoprotein-1 (NS1) has proven to be a useful biomarker for early diagnosis of dengue. A number of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) targeting NS1 antigen (Ag) are now commercially available. Here we evaluated these tests using a well-characterized panel of clinical samples to determine their effectiveness for early diagnosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Retrospective samples from South America were used to evaluate the following tests: (i) “Dengue NS1 Ag STRIP” and (ii) “Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag ELISA” (Bio-Rad, France), (iii) “Dengue NS1 Detect Rapid Test (1st Generation)” and (iv) “DENV Detect NS1 ELISA” (InBios International, United States), (v) “Panbio Dengue Early Rapid (1st generation)” (vi) “Panbio Dengue Early ELISA (2nd generation)” and (vii) “SD Bioline Dengue NS1 Ag Rapid Test” (Alere, United States). Overall, the sensitivity of the RDTs ranged from 71.9%–79.1% while the sensitivity of the ELISAs varied between 85.6–95.9%, using virus isolation as the reference method. Most tests had lower sensitivity for DENV-4 relative to the other three serotypes, were less sensitive in detecting secondary infections, and appeared to be most sensitive on Day 3–4 post symptom onset. The specificity of all evaluated tests ranged from 95%–100%. Conclusions ELISAs had greater overall sensitivity than RDTs. In conjunction with other parameters, the performance data can help determine which dengue diagnostics should be used during the first few days of illness, when the patients are most likely to present to a clinic seeking care. PMID:25412170

  9. The detection of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) virus antigen by agar gel precipitation test and counter-immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Obi, T. U.; Patrick, D.

    1984-01-01

    The detectability of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) viral antigen in both ante-mortem secretions and necropsy samples from experimentally infected goats was investigated by both the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) and counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIE). Viral antigen was detected from 42.6% of the samples tested by the AGPT and 80.3% by CIE. The detection of viral antigen in a high proportion of the ocular and nasal secretions as well as the faeces and buccal scrapings, particularly from those collected within seven days of the onset of fever, by both techniques, would seem to obviate the need for lymph node biopsies or post-mortem samples in order to make a diagnosis of PPRV infection. PMID:6512258

  10. A comparative study of antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from patients and soil of ornamental plants in the immunodiffusion test.

    PubMed

    Staib, F; Folkens, U; Tompak, B; Abel, T; Thiel, D

    1978-11-01

    The strikingly frequent and constant presence of Aspergillus fimigatus in the soil of potted ornamental plants kept in private houses and hospitals has been the reason for studying the antigens of the strains found from the diagnostic and epidemiological angles. Culture-filtrate antigens of A. fumigatus strains isolated from the soil of 4 different ornamental plants, epiphyllum (Epiphyllum truncatum), orange tree (Citrus sinensis), Alpine rose (Azalea indica) and Christmas flower (Euphorbia pulcherrima), were compared, in the immunodiffusion test, with antigens of A. fumigatus strains from aspergillosis patients prepared in an identical way. When tested against 8 different sera from different aspergillosis patients there was a good coincidence of results. Control sera from patients suffering from diseases other than aspergillosis, no false-positive reactions could be observed. The findings are discussed in respect of diagnosis and epidemiology.

  11. The Challenge of Producing Skin Test Antigens with Minimal Resources Suitable for Human Application against a Neglected Tropical Disease; Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rivoire, Becky L.; TerLouw, Stephen; Groathouse, Nathan A.; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3–10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan) and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens). In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial. PMID:24874086

  12. An ELISA test for the binding of von Willebrand antigen to collagen.

    PubMed

    Brown, J E; Bosak, J O

    1986-08-01

    Collagen (soluble bovine tendon type I) coated onto microtiter plates binds von Willebrand antigen (vW:Ag) in a dose-dependent manner. An ELISA test was set up with both antibody and collagen coated microtiter plates. Test specimens assayed were: 1) normal plasmas, 2) type I vW plasmas, 3) type IIa vW plasmas, and 4) factor VIII concentrates (KoateR, Cutter; Conco-VIII, Green Cross). Normal and type I vW plasmas exhibited comparable values for vW:Ag in binding studies to both collagen and antibody-coated plates. Type IIa vW plasmas demonstrated decreased (less than 1/2) collagen to antibody-binding ratios. Ristocetin cofactor (VIII:RCO) levels in type IIa vW plasmas correlated with quantified collagen-binding levels. Factor VIII concentrates show variable results when comparing collagen and antibody-binding levels. A comparison of vW:Ag ELISA (antibody) with VIII:RCO shows ratios of 2:1 (KoatR) or 20:1 (Conco-VIII). Collagen-binding ELISA levels in concentrates show parallel decreases, reflecting presumed binding to collagen of only the high M.W. multimers. The vW:Ag collagen binding ELISA represents a possible replacement assay for the laborious and imprecise VIII:RCO method of measurement of in vitro vWf functional activity.

  13. Stool consistency is strongly associated with gut microbiota richness and composition, enterotypes and bacterial growth rates.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Doris; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Tito, Raul Y; Joossens, Marie; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of potentially confounding factors affecting colon microbiota composition is essential to the identification of robust microbiome based disease markers. Here, we investigate the link between gut microbiota variation and stool consistency using Bristol Stool Scale classification, which reflects faecal water content and activity, and is considered a proxy for intestinal colon transit time. Through 16S rDNA Illumina profiling of faecal samples of 53 healthy women, we evaluated associations between microbiome richness, Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, enterotypes, and genus abundance with self-reported, Bristol Stool Scale-based stool consistency. Each sample's microbiota growth potential was calculated to test whether transit time acts as a selective force on gut bacterial growth rates. Stool consistency strongly correlates with all known major microbiome markers. It is negatively correlated with species richness, positively associated to the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, and linked to Akkermansia and Methanobrevibacter abundance. Enterotypes are distinctly distributed over the BSS-scores. Based on the correlations between microbiota growth potential and stool consistency scores within both enterotypes, we hypothesise that accelerated transit contributes to colon ecosystem differentiation. While shorter transit times can be linked to increased abundance of fast growing species in Ruminococcaceae-Bacteroides samples, hinting to a washout avoidance strategy of faster replication, this trend is absent in Prevotella-enterotyped individuals. Within this enterotype adherence to host tissue therefore appears to be a more likely bacterial strategy to cope with washout. The strength of the associations between stool consistency and species richness, enterotypes and community composition emphasises the crucial importance of stool consistency assessment in gut metagenome-wide association studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  14. Stool consistency is strongly associated with gut microbiota richness and composition, enterotypes and bacterial growth rates

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Doris; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Tito, Raul Y; Joossens, Marie; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The assessment of potentially confounding factors affecting colon microbiota composition is essential to the identification of robust microbiome based disease markers. Here, we investigate the link between gut microbiota variation and stool consistency using Bristol Stool Scale classification, which reflects faecal water content and activity, and is considered a proxy for intestinal colon transit time. Design Through 16S rDNA Illumina profiling of faecal samples of 53 healthy women, we evaluated associations between microbiome richness, Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, enterotypes, and genus abundance with self-reported, Bristol Stool Scale-based stool consistency. Each sample’s microbiota growth potential was calculated to test whether transit time acts as a selective force on gut bacterial growth rates. Results Stool consistency strongly correlates with all known major microbiome markers. It is negatively correlated with species richness, positively associated to the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, and linked to Akkermansia and Methanobrevibacter abundance. Enterotypes are distinctly distributed over the BSS-scores. Based on the correlations between microbiota growth potential and stool consistency scores within both enterotypes, we hypothesise that accelerated transit contributes to colon ecosystem differentiation. While shorter transit times can be linked to increased abundance of fast growing species in Ruminococcaceae-Bacteroides samples, hinting to a washout avoidance strategy of faster replication, this trend is absent in Prevotella-enterotyped individuals. Within this enterotype adherence to host tissue therefore appears to be a more likely bacterial strategy to cope with washout. Conclusions The strength of the associations between stool consistency and species richness, enterotypes and community composition emphasises the crucial importance of stool consistency assessment in gut metagenome-wide association studies. PMID:26069274

  15. Impact of Adenoviral Stool Load on Adenoviremia in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Klepper, Corie; Sunkara, Anusha; Kang, Guolian; Carr, Jeanne; Gu, Zhengming; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenoviremia adversely affects prognosis in the post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting. Methods We sought to determine retrospectively the cutoff load of adenovirus in the stool as a predictor of adenoviremia, in children who underwent an allogeneic HSCT. The prevalence of sapovirus, norovirus and astrovirus in the stool was also studied. Results The study cohort consisted of 117 patients, of which 71 (60%) had diarrhea. Adenovirus was detected in the stool in 39 out of 71 (55%) patients. Age ≤ 10 years (P = 0.05; odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval: 0.98–6.75), and male sex (P = 0.04; odds ratio 2.67; 95% confidence interval: 1.02–6.99) increased risk for detection of adenovirus in stool on univariate analysis. Co-infections with enteric pathogens were infrequent. Viral load > 106 copies / gram stool predicted adenoviremia with a sensitivity and specificity of 82%. Sapovirus, norovirus, and astrovirus were detected in 3, 4 and one patient, respectively. Conclusions Quantitative detection of adenovirus in stool may have implications for pre-emptive therapy. Testing for other enteric viruses may have implications for infection control. PMID:25742243

  16. The concentration of calprotectin in the stools of children with diagnosed cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Woś, Halina; Kordys-Darmolińska, Bożena; Sankiewicz-Szkółka, Magda; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calprotectin is a protein that plays a regulatory role in inflammatory reactions as an antibacterial and antiproliferative factor. Aim To assess the concentration of calprotectin in the stools of patients with diagnosed cystic fibrosis. Material and methods Forty-one patients were included in the study, 24 boys and 17 girls, aged from 7 weeks to 18 years. The concentration of calprotectin in stools was assessed with the ELISA method. The analysis included clinical symptoms and the results of laboratory tests and the type of mutation. Results An elevated level of calprotectin in the stool was observed in 4/41 (9.7%) patients, mainly in older children, and mainly delta F508/deltaF508 mutation. The correlation between the concentration of calprotectin and clinical symptoms, age, increased indicators of an inflammatory process, levels of protein and aminotransferases in blood serum and the values of acid steatocrit of the stool was not proven. Conclusions High concentrations of calprotectin in the stools of children with diagnosed cystic fibrosis do not correlate with the level of advancement of lesions within the gastrointestinal tract. Elevated concentrations of calprotectin in the stools of patients with cystic fibrosis may indicate inflammation of intestine and should be further scrutinised.

  17. Clinical value of stool culture in paediatric oncology patients: hospital evaluation and UK survey of practice.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, O; Cooke, R P D; Cunliffe, N A; Pizer, B

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a frequently occurring symptom in paediatric oncology patients. The role of routine testing for enteric bacteria in hospitalized patients with diarrhoea is considered limited, but the diagnostic value of testing in children with oncological conditions has not been reported. Therefore, we conducted a five-year retrospective service evaluation in our tertiary paediatric oncology unit together with a national survey of 21 centres to estimate the utility of stool cultures in oncology patients with diarrhoea and the national approach to testing. Our local survey demonstrated very low diagnostic yield using routine enteric stool cultures with only one sample out of 842 (0.1%) testing positive. The national survey demonstrated considerable variation in practice. There is little evidence to support the use of conventional stool culture for enteric bacteria in children with cancer in our centre. These findings should inform national testing policies.

  18. Factors influencing use of the prostate-specific antigen screening test in primary care.

    PubMed

    Moran, W P; Cohen, S J; Preisser, J S; Wofford, J L; Shelton, B J; McClatchey, M W

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the use of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal examination (DRE) in prostate cancer screening by primary care physicians. Physician survey and retrospective medical record review. We randomly selected and reviewed the medical records of 3 cross-sectional samples of male patients and surveyed their primary care physicians at 1-year intervals. All the physicians practiced in Colorado. The study spanned 3 years, including late 1992, when the American Cancer Society recommended the use of PSA in a prostate cancer screening guideline. We reviewed the medical records of 4772 male patients and surveyed 109 primary care physicians. We found that PSA testing for men aged 50 or older increased significantly from 1992 to 1994, from 24% in 1992 to 35% in 1993 and 40% in 1994 (overall odds ratio, 2.94; P < .05). Over the same time period, the DRE rate remained relatively unchanged (39% in 1992, 41% in 1993, and 36% in 1994). Overall PSA use was positively associated with patient age greater than 59 years, patient non-smoking status, physician "readiness to change cancer screening behavior," private insurance status, and nonsolo practice. Before the release of a prostate cancer screening guideline, participating physicians cited the American Cancer Society as the organization that most influenced their practice with respect to cancer screening. The magnitude of the reported influence of the American Cancer Society was correlated with the subsequent use of PSA in 1994 by primary care physicians after adjustment for change in DRE and baseline PSA rates, although the association did not reach statistical significance in multivariable regression models. Primary care physicians in Colorado significantly increased their use of the PSA test from 1992 to 1994, during which time the American Cancer Society issued a guideline recommending the use of PSA for prostate cancer screening. The reported influence of the American Cancer Society on cancer

  19. Cryptococcosis in HIV-infected hospitalized patients in Germany: Evidence for routine antigen testing.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Jefferys, Laura; Tominski, Daniela; Wöstmann, Kai; Slevogt, Hortense; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of routine cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) testing in HIV-infected patients in a low prevalence setting. Retrospective single centre cohort study of a 10-year period (2005-2014). 5461 patients tested for CRAG were included. Cryptococcal antigenaemia was found in 1.6% and 1.1% of patients with CD4 counts of ≤100/μl and 101-200/μl, respectively. The positive predictive values for identifying clinically relevant cryptococcal disease was 96% and 100%, respectively. Half of the patients had a non-specific presentation and median time-to-diagnosis was high (5 days, range 1-44 days). The median time-to-diagnosis in direct admissions to our centre with routine CRAG testing was significantly shorter: 1 day (range: 1-17) vs. 7 days (range: 2-44), p = 0.003. Prevalence of cryptococcal antigenaemia was 2.8% in patients with pneumocystis pneumonia and median time-to-diagnosis of cryptococcosis was significantly longer in this subgroup (15 days; range: 1-44 vs. 3 days; range: 1-17; p = 0.008). CRAG titres ≥1:512 were associated with disseminated disease (OR 21.3, p = 0.0008, 95% CI 1.64-277), however, 10% of patients with disseminated cryptococcosis had CRAG titres <1:16. Our data support routine CRAG testing in hospitalized HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts ≤200/μl, and/or pneumocystis pneumonia. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Concordance analysis of paired cancer antigen (CA) 15-3 and 27.29 testing.

    PubMed

    Lin, David C; Genzen, Jonathan R

    2017-09-19

    Cancer antigens (CA) 15-3 and 27.29 are used in the clinical management of many breast cancer patients. Given that immunoassays for CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 target epitopes on the same glycoprotein-Mucin 1 (MUC1)-the present analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential concordance of tumor marker results when both tests were ordered by providers on the same specimens. A retrospective limited dataset of paired CA 15-3 (Roche Diagnostics) and CA 27.29 (Siemens Diagnostics) test results was obtained from a national clinical reference laboratory. Concordance according to reference interval (RI) status and percent (%) change between consecutive test results was analyzed. 37,652 paired results from 12,470 distinct patients were obtained. The correlation between CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 results was high (correlation coefficient: Pearson, 0.967), although across the dataset a significant difference between CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 results was observed (P < 0.05). RI concordance between CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 results was observed in 93.7% of pairs (35,280 of 37,652). Correlation was also observed in the % change of CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 results between consecutive specimens for individual patients. Using doubling or halving thresholds (i.e., 100% increase or 50% decrease), concordance in % change was observed between CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 in approximately 90% of cases. Individual patient results trended similarly across both markers over time. While generally concordant, CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 results should not be used interchangeably. The present report provides no evidence for added value in performing both tests routinely for individual patients.

  1. Indirect fluorescent antibody test and surface antigen ELISAs for antemortem diagnosis of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L; Morrow, J K; Sweeney, R W

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that serum : CSF titer ratios could provide the most accurate antemortem diagnosis of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) caused by Sarcocystis neurona. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of two commercially available tests, the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and the surface antigen 2, 4/3 ELISA (SAG2, 4/3 ELISA), using archived paired serum and CSF samples. Samples were obtained from 4 types of clinical patients. Confirmed positive cases (n = 9 horses; 11 sample sets) had neurologic deficits and postmortem lesions consistent with EPM. Confirmed negative cases (n = 28) had variable clinical signs and postmortem lesions consistent with another disease. Suspected positive cases (n = 6) had neurologic deficits consistent with EPM, marked improvement after treatment, and exclusion of other diseases. Suspected negative cases (n = 14) had variable signs with a strong presumptive diagnosis of another disease. For each test, descriptive statistics were calculated using serum results alone, CSF results alone, and a serum : CSF titer ratio. Overall accuracy was highest for SAG2, 4/3 ELISA titer ratio at 0.97 (95% CI 0.88-0.99) with sensitivity = 0.88 (95% CI 0.66-0.97) and specificity = 1 (95% CI 0.92-1). IFAT CSF and titer ratio results also showed high accuracy at 0.88 (95% CI 0.77-0.94), but lower sensitivity = 0.65 (95% CI 0.41-0.83). Using serum results alone was least accurate for both test types. The more accurate methods, such as the SAG2, 4/3 ELISA serum : CSF titer ratio, should be utilized. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Undigested Pills in Stool Mimicking Parasitic Infection.

    PubMed

    Mir, Fazia; Achakzai, Ilyas; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    Background. Orally ingested medications now come in both immediate release and controlled release preparations. Controlled release preparations were developed by pharmaceutical companies to improve compliance and decrease frequency of pill ingestion. Case Report. A 67-year-old obese male patient presented to our clinic with focal abdominal pain that had been present 3 inches below umbilicus for the last three years. This pain was not associated with any trauma or recent heavy lifting. Upon presentation, the patient reported that for the last two months he started to notice pearly oval structures in his stool accompanying his chronic abdominal pain. This had coincided with initiation of his nifedipine pills for his hypertension. He reported seeing these undigested pills daily in his stool. Conclusion. The undigested pills may pose a cause of concern for both patients and physicians alike, as demonstrated in this case report, because they can mimic a parasitic infection. This can result in unnecessary extensive work-up. It is important to review the medication list for extended release formulations and note that the outer shell can be excreted whole in the stool.

  3. Undigested Pills in Stool Mimicking Parasitic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Fazia; Achakzai, Ilyas; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Orally ingested medications now come in both immediate release and controlled release preparations. Controlled release preparations were developed by pharmaceutical companies to improve compliance and decrease frequency of pill ingestion. Case Report. A 67-year-old obese male patient presented to our clinic with focal abdominal pain that had been present 3 inches below umbilicus for the last three years. This pain was not associated with any trauma or recent heavy lifting. Upon presentation, the patient reported that for the last two months he started to notice pearly oval structures in his stool accompanying his chronic abdominal pain. This had coincided with initiation of his nifedipine pills for his hypertension. He reported seeing these undigested pills daily in his stool. Conclusion. The undigested pills may pose a cause of concern for both patients and physicians alike, as demonstrated in this case report, because they can mimic a parasitic infection. This can result in unnecessary extensive work-up. It is important to review the medication list for extended release formulations and note that the outer shell can be excreted whole in the stool. PMID:28255472

  4. Specific antigen serologic tests in leprosy: implications for epidemiological surveillance of leprosy cases and household contacts

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Coelho, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is a lack of straightforward tests for field application and known biomarkers for predicting leprosy progression in infected individuals. OBJECTIVE The aim was to analyse the response to infection by Mycobacterium leprae based on the reactivity of specific antigens: natural disaccharide linked to human serum albumin via an octyl (NDOHSA), a semisynthetic phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I); Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (LID-1) and natural disaccharide octyl - Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (NDOLID). METHODS The study population consisted of 130 leprosy cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 and 277 household contacts. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyse the reactivity of antibodies against NDOHSA, LID-1 and NDOLID. The samples and controls were tested in duplicate, and the antibody titer was expressed as an ELISA index. Data collection was made by home visits with application of questionnaire and dermatological evaluation of all household contacts to identify signs and symptoms of leprosy. FINDINGS Significant differences in the median ELISA results were observed among leprosy cases in treatment, leprosy cases that had completed treatment and household contacts. Higher proportions of seropositivity were observed in leprosy cases in treatment. Seropositivity was also higher in multibacillary in relation to paucibacillary, with the difference reaching statistical significance. Lower titers were observed among cases with a longer treatment time or discharge. For household contacts, the differences according to the clinical characteristics of the leprosy index case were less pronounced than expected. Other factors, such as the endemicity of leprosy, exposure outside the residence and genetic characteristics, appeared to have a greater influence on the seropositivity. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Serologic tests could be used as auxiliary tools for determining the operational

  5. Prospective evaluation of rapid antigen tests for diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Aslanzadeh, Jaber; Zheng, Xiaotian; Li, Haijing; Tetreault, Janice; Ratkiewicz, Irene; Meng, Shufang; Hamilton, Pamela; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2008-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are two important viral pathogens that cause respiratory tract infections in the pediatric population. The rapid detection of these agents allows the prompt isolation and treatment of infected patients. In the present prospective study, we evaluated the performances of four rapid antigen detection assays, including a rapid chromatographic immunoassay (CIA) for RSV (Directigen EZ RSV; Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD), a direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) for RSV (Bartels; Trinity Biotech, Carlsbad, CA), and two DFAs for hMPV manufactured by Diagnostic Hybrids Inc. (DHI; Athens, OH) and Imagen (Oxoid Ltd., Basingstoke, Hampshire, United Kingdom). The clinical specimens tested comprised 515 nasopharyngeal aspirates submitted to the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Hartford Hospital from 1 November 2006 to 21 April 2007. Compared to the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), the CIA had a sensitivity of 79.8% and a specificity of 89.5%. The RSV DFA with Bartels reagents showed a sensitivity of 94.1% and a specificity of 96.8%. For hMPV, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.5% and 99.8%, respectively, for the DHI DFA and 63.2% and 100%, respectively, for the Imagen DFA. The hands-on and test turnaround times for CIA were 10 and 30 to 60 min, respectively, and the hands-on and test turnaround times for the RSV and hMPV DFAs were 30 and 105 min, respectively. We conclude that while the RSV CIA is user-friendly, it lacks sensitivity and specificity, especially during off-peak months. In contrast, the RSV DFA is more sensitive and specific, but interpretation of its results is subjective and it demands technical time and expertise. Similarly, both hMPV DFAs are highly specific in comparison to the results of RT-PCR, but their sensitivities await further improvements.

  6. Prospective Evaluation of Rapid Antigen Tests for Diagnosis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Aslanzadeh, Jaber; Zheng, Xiaotian; Li, Haijing; Tetreault, Janice; Ratkiewicz, Irene; Meng, Shufang; Hamilton, Pamela; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are two important viral pathogens that cause respiratory tract infections in the pediatric population. The rapid detection of these agents allows the prompt isolation and treatment of infected patients. In the present prospective study, we evaluated the performances of four rapid antigen detection assays, including a rapid chromatographic immunoassay (CIA) for RSV (Directigen EZ RSV; Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD), a direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) for RSV (Bartels; Trinity Biotech, Carlsbad, CA), and two DFAs for hMPV manufactured by Diagnostic Hybrids Inc. (DHI; Athens, OH) and Imagen (Oxoid Ltd., Basingstoke, Hampshire, United Kingdom). The clinical specimens tested comprised 515 nasopharyngeal aspirates submitted to the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Hartford Hospital from 1 November 2006 to 21 April 2007. Compared to the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), the CIA had a sensitivity of 79.8% and a specificity of 89.5%. The RSV DFA with Bartels reagents showed a sensitivity of 94.1% and a specificity of 96.8%. For hMPV, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.5% and 99.8%, respectively, for the DHI DFA and 63.2% and 100%, respectively, for the Imagen DFA. The hands-on and test turnaround times for CIA were 10 and 30 to 60 min, respectively, and the hands-on and test turnaround times for the RSV and hMPV DFAs were 30 and 105 min, respectively. We conclude that while the RSV CIA is user-friendly, it lacks sensitivity and specificity, especially during off-peak months. In contrast, the RSV DFA is more sensitive and specific, but interpretation of its results is subjective and it demands technical time and expertise. Similarly, both hMPV DFAs are highly specific in comparison to the results of RT-PCR, but their sensitivities await further improvements. PMID:18337386

  7. Microtiter solid-phase radioimmunoassay for detection of human calicivirus in stools.

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, S; Chiba, S; Terashima, H; Sakuma, Y; Kogasaka, R; Nakao, T

    1983-01-01

    A microtiter solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for detection of human calicivirus in stool specimens. Seventy-eight stool specimens were tested by RIA. All 17 specimens positive for human calicivirus by electron microscopy (EM) were also positive by RIA. In addition, of 21 specimens obtained from an outbreak of caliciviral gastroenteritis, 11 were positive by RIA but negative by EM. Of 20 specimens positive for rotavirus by EM and 20 nondiarrheic specimens with no virus, 2 and 1, respectively, were positive by RIA but were subsequently shown to be falsely positive by a blocking test. There was no cross-reaction between human and feline caliciviruses. Thus, the test was more sensitive than EM and, with an appropriate blocking test, was specific for human calicivirus. It might be especially useful for screening large numbers of stool specimens. PMID:6833476

  8. Impact of nucleic acid testing relative to antigen/antibody combination immunoassay on the detection of acute HIV infection.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Mark S; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Pattanachaiwit, Supanit; Chomchey, Nitiya; Fletcher, James L; Kroon, Eugene D; Michael, Nelson L; Phanuphak, Praphan; Kim, Jerome H; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-04-24

    To assess the addition of HIV nucleic acid testing (NAT) to fourth-generation (4thG) HIV antigen/antibody combination immunoassay in improving detection of acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants attending a major voluntary counseling and testing site in Thailand were screened for AHI using 4thG HIV antigen/antibody immunoassay and sequential less sensitive HIV antibody immunoassay. Samples nonreactive by 4thG antigen/antibody immunoassay were further screened using pooled NAT to identify additional AHI. HIV infection status was verified following enrollment into an AHI study with follow-up visits and additional diagnostic tests. Among 74 334 clients screened for HIV infection, HIV prevalence was 10.9% and the overall incidence of AHI (N = 112) was 2.2 per 100 person-years. The inclusion of pooled NAT in the testing algorithm increased the number of acutely infected patients detected, from 81 to 112 (38%), relative to 4thG HIV antigen/antibody immunoassay. Follow-up testing within 5 days of screening marginally improved the 4thG immunoassay detection rate (26%). The median CD4 T-cell count at the enrollment visit was 353 cells/μl and HIV plasma viral load was 598 289 copies/ml. The incorporation of pooled NAT into the HIV testing algorithm in high-risk populations may be beneficial in the long term. The addition of pooled NAT testing resulted in an increase in screening costs of 22% to identify AHI: from $8.33 per screened patient to $10.16. Risk factors of the testing population should be considered prior to NAT implementation given the additional testing complexity and costs.

  9. Blackcurrant seed press residue increases tocopherol concentrations in serum and stool whilst biomarkers in stool and urine indicate increased oxidative stress in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Helbig, Dorit; Wagner, Andreas; Glei, Michael; Basu, Samar; Schubert, Rainer; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2009-08-01

    Berry seeds are a tocopherol-rich by-product of fruit processing without specific commercial value. In a human intervention study, the physiological impact of blackcurrant seed press residue (PR) was tested. Thirty-six women (aged 24 +/- 3 years; twenty non-smokers, sixteen smokers) consumed 250 g bread/d containing 8% PR for a period of 4 weeks (period 3). Comparatively, a control bread without PR (250 g/d) was tested (period 2) and baseline data were obtained (period 1). Blood, stool and 24 h urine were collected during a 5 d standardised diet within each period. Tocopherol and Fe intakes were calculated from food intake. In serum, tocopherol concentration and Fe parameters were determined. In urine, oxidative stress markers 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-iso-PGF2alpha and inflammatory response marker 15-keto-dihydro-PGF2alpha were analysed. Stool tocopherol concentration, genotoxicity of faecal water (comet assay) and antioxidant capacity of stool (aromatic hydroxylation of salicylic acid) were determined. Fe and total tocopherol intake, total tocopherol concentrations in serum and stool, and genotoxicity of faecal water increased with PR bread consumption (P < 0.05). The antioxidant capacity of stool decreased between baseline and intervention, expressed by increased formation of 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid in vitro (P < 0.05). In smokers, 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine increased with PR consumption (P < 0.05). Prostane concentrations were unaffected by PR bread consumption. In summary, the intake of bread containing blackcurrant PR for 4 weeks increased serum and stool total tocopherol concentrations. However, various biomarkers indicated increased oxidative stress, suggesting that consumption of ground berry seed may not be of advantage.

  10. Analysis of speckled fluorescent antinuclear antibody test antisera using electrofocused nuclear antigens.

    PubMed

    Okarma, T B; Krueger, J A; Holman, H R

    1982-08-01

    Antibodies to different components of the extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) have been thought to be serological markers for clinical subsets of rheumatic diseases. However, incomplete characterization and standardization of antigenic components such as ribonucleoprotein (RNP), Sm, and SS-B (Ha), and the multiplicity of autoantibodies produced by different patients have confounded correlations between autoantibody specificity and disease subsets. This study describes the preparative separation of the antigens Sm, RNP, and Ss-B (Ha) by electrofocusing and their use in a rocket electrophoretic assay that in one step identifies and quantifies the multiple reactivities of patient sera exhibiting the speckled FANA pattern. Preparative electrofocusing generates milligram quantities of these antigens with retention of their immunologic and biochemical characteristics, facilitating further study of their biological properties and relationships to disease subsets.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori - Specific Antigen Tests in Saliva to Identify an Oral Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yajie; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shumin; Yee, John Kc

    2017-05-01

    Over the past twenty years, the existence of oral Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been controversial and is still disputed. It proposes that living H. pylori do not exist in the oral cavity. However, the progressive loss of efficacy of standard eradication therapies has made the treatment of H. pylori more challenging than ever due to oral H. pylori infection. We conducted a study to explore the existence of oral H. pylori infection among 4321 adults. A total 4321 adults (age range, 20-89 years old) comprising 2849 men and 1472 women were recruited by annual physical exam and evaluated using the saliva H. pylori antigen test (HPS) to diagnose oral H. pylori infection and the urea breath test (UBT) to diagnose stomach H. pylori infection. According to the classification on age grouping of World Health Organization, patients were divided into three age groups: A group, the young age subgroup (<45 years); B group, the middle age subgroup (45 to 59 years); C group, the old age subgroup (60-74 years) and D group, the elder subgroup (75-89 years). We found the positive rate of oral H. pylori was 59.59% in the 95% confidence interval (CI) ranges on A group. The lowest positive rate of H. pylori in D group was 25.48% in the 95% confidence interval CI ranges. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001) between A, B, C, and D groups but no significant difference between men and women. HPS could identify oral H. pylori infection of individuals who have no risk for H. pylori gastric infection. The positive rate of oral H. pylori was 59.59% and this varies across different age groups. This information was not provided by UBT methods. It further identified that the prevalence of oral H. pylori infection is lower in the elder group that may be associated with fewer number of teeth. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  12. Comparative evaluation of recombinant LigB protein and heat-killed antigen-based latex agglutination test with microscopic agglutination test for diagnosis of bovine leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Nagalingam, Mohandoss; Thirumalesh, Sushma Rahim Assadi; Kalleshamurthy, Triveni; Niharika, Nakkala; Balamurugan, Vinayagamurthy; Shome, Rajeswari; Sengupta, Pinaki Prasad; Shome, Bibek Ranjan; Prabhudas, Krishnamsetty; Rahman, Habibur

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to develop latex agglutination test (LAT) using recombinant leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein (LigB) (rLigB) antigen and compare its diagnostic efficacy with LAT using conventional heat-killed leptospiral antigen and microscopic agglutination test (MAT) in diagnosing bovine leptospirosis. The PCR-amplified 1053-bp ligB gene sequences from Leptospira borgpetersenii Hardjo serovar were cloned in pET 32 (a) vector at EcoRI and NotI sites and expressed in BL21 E. coli cells as fusion protein with thioredoxin (-57 kDa) and characterized by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot. Out of 390 serum samples [cattle (n = 214), buffaloes (n = 176)] subjected to MAT, 115 samples showed reciprocal titre≥100 up to 1600 against one or more serovars. For recombinant LigB protein/antigen-based LAT, agglutination was observed in the positive sample, while no agglutination was observed in the negative sample. Similarly, heat-killed leptospiral antigen was prepared from and used in LAT for comparison with MAT. A two-sided contingency table was used for analysis of LAT using both the antigens separately against MAT for 390 serum samples. The sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of recombinant LigB LAT were found to be 75.65, 91.27, 78.38 and 89.96 %, respectively, and that of heat-killed antigen-based LAT were 72.17, 89.82, 74.77 and 88.53 %, respectively, in comparison with MAT. This developed test will be an alternative/complementary to the existing battery of diagnostic assays/tests for specific detection of pathogenic Leptospira infection in bovine population.

  13. Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens from Stool Samples on Hemoccult Cards by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, Nicklas; Bauer, Malkin; Helfrich, Kerstin; Mengele, Carolin; Löscher, Thomas; Nothdurft, Hans Dieter; Bretzel, Gisela; Beissner, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Up to 30% of international travelers are affected by travelers' diarrhea (TD). Reliable data on the etiology of TD is lacking. Sufficient laboratory capacity at travel destinations is often unavailable and transporting conventional stool samples to the home country is inconvenient. We evaluated the use of Hemoccult cards for stool sampling combined with a multiplex PCR for the detection of model viral, bacterial, and protozoal TD pathogens. Methods. Following the creation of serial dilutions for each model pathogen, last positive dilution steps (LPDs) and thereof calculated last positive sample concentrations (LPCs) were compared between conventional stool samples and card samples. Furthermore, card samples were tested after a prolonged time interval simulating storage during a travel duration of up to 6 weeks. Results. The LPDs/LPCs were comparable to testing of conventional stool samples. After storage on Hemoccult cards, the recovery rate was 97.6% for C. jejuni, 100% for E. histolytica, 97.6% for norovirus GI, and 100% for GII. Detection of expected pathogens was possible at weekly intervals up to 42 days. Conclusion. Stool samples on Hemoccult cards stored at room temperature can be used in combination with a multiplex PCR as a reliable tool for testing of TD pathogens. PMID:28408937

  14. Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens from Stool Samples on Hemoccult Cards by Multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Alberer, Martin; Schlenker, Nicklas; Bauer, Malkin; Helfrich, Kerstin; Mengele, Carolin; Löscher, Thomas; Nothdurft, Hans Dieter; Bretzel, Gisela; Beissner, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Up to 30% of international travelers are affected by travelers' diarrhea (TD). Reliable data on the etiology of TD is lacking. Sufficient laboratory capacity at travel destinations is often unavailable and transporting conventional stool samples to the home country is inconvenient. We evaluated the use of Hemoccult cards for stool sampling combined with a multiplex PCR for the detection of model viral, bacterial, and protozoal TD pathogens. Methods. Following the creation of serial dilutions for each model pathogen, last positive dilution steps (LPDs) and thereof calculated last positive sample concentrations (LPCs) were compared between conventional stool samples and card samples. Furthermore, card samples were tested after a prolonged time interval simulating storage during a travel duration of up to 6 weeks. Results. The LPDs/LPCs were comparable to testing of conventional stool samples. After storage on Hemoccult cards, the recovery rate was 97.6% for C. jejuni, 100% for E. histolytica, 97.6% for norovirus GI, and 100% for GII. Detection of expected pathogens was possible at weekly intervals up to 42 days. Conclusion. Stool samples on Hemoccult cards stored at room temperature can be used in combination with a multiplex PCR as a reliable tool for testing of TD pathogens.

  15. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Stool DNA and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James R; Aggarwal, Ashish; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer screening dates to the discovery of precancerous adenomatous tissue. Screening modalities and guidelines directed at prevention and early detection have evolved and resulted in a significant decrease in the prevalence and mortality of colorectal cancer via direct visualization or using specific markers. Despite continued efforts and an overall reduction in deaths attributed to colorectal cancer over the last 25 years, colorectal cancer remains one of the most common causes of malignancy-associated deaths. In attempt to further reduce the prevalence of colorectal cancer and associated deaths, continued improvement in screening quality and adherence remains key. Noninvasive screening modalities are actively being explored. Identification of specific genetic alterations in the adenoma-cancer sequence allow for the study and development of noninvasive screening modalities beyond guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing which target specific alterations or a panel of alterations. The stool DNA test is the first noninvasive screening tool that targets both human hemoglobin and specific genetic alterations. In this review we discuss stool DNA and other commercially available noninvasive colorectal cancer screening modalities in addition to other targets which previously have been or are currently under study.

  16. Multiple-antigen slide test for detection of immunoglobulin M antibodies in newborn and infant sera by immunofluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, D; Riggs, J L; Schachter, J; Emmons, R W

    1981-01-01

    A microimmunofluorescence test was evaluated for use in measuring immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in infant sera to five of the agents implicated in congenital and neonatal disease. Pen point dots of Toxoplasma gondii, cytomegalovirus, rubella virus, herpes simplex virus, and chlamydial cell culture antigens were applied to each circle of eight-circle printed slides. These multiple-antigen slides greatly facilitated the screening of 607 sera from infants and 117 sera from mothers for the presence of IgM antibody to these agents. Forty sera could be examined microscopically in approximately 30 min. All sera reacting with one or more antigens were tested for rheumatoid factor by the latex method, absorbed with glutaraldehyde-cross-linked human IgG, and retested for the presence of IgM antibody. IgM antibody to cytomegalovirus was demonstrated in sera from four newborns, but IgM antibody to rubella virus could not be detected until 21 days after birth, although rubella virus was isolated from sera from five younger infants. This may indicate that rubella IgM levels in many congenitally infected newborns are too low to be measured by the immunofluorescence method. Five percent of the sera from infants in this study possessed demonstrable IgM antibody to one of the antigens. PMID:6262369

  17. Immunoaffinity isolation and partial characterization of the Coccidioides immitis antigen detected by the tube precipitin and immunodiffusion-tube precipitin tests.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, B L; Pappagianis, D

    1989-01-01

    The antigen participating in the tube precipitin (TP) serologic test for coccidioidomycosis was isolated from mycelial-phase antigen (coccidioidin) by immunoaffinity and characterized by various analytical procedures. This was accomplished by first preparing the antigen-antibody precipitate by using antigen and human serum positive for TP (immunoglobulin M) antibody and then liberating the antigen by digestion with pronase. This protease destroyed the antibody and left the antigen intact as indicated by immunodiffusion-TP. The coccidioidal antigen was isolated from the proteolytic digest by using size exclusion chromatography. DEAE chromatography of this antigen yielded two fractions with immunodiffusion-TP reactivity which had average molecular sizes of 225 and 140 kilodaltons, respectively. The presence of carbohydrate and amino acids indicated that the antigen(s) is a glycopeptide. Compositional analysis showed that one fraction contained 3-O-methylmannose, mannose, and glucose in a ratio of 8:1.2:1, whereas the second fraction contained 3-O-methylmannose, mannose, glucose, and galactose in a ratio of 1:1:1:1. The amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid plus asparagine, and glutamic acid plus glutamine constituted 60 to 70% of the amino acids in both glycopeptides. Neither antigen could be detected entering the gel in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Lectin affinity provided evidence of a high-mannose asparagine-linked glycopeptide in the first peak and an asparagine-linked glycopeptide with a biantennary complex-type structure in the second peak. Images PMID:2504775

  18. Variation in the limit-of-detection of the ProSpecT Campylobacter microplate enzyme immunoassay in stools spiked with emerging Campylobacter species.

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Krunoslav; Midwinter, Anne Camilla; Marshall, Jonathan Craig; Rogers, Lynn Elizabeth; Biggs, Patrick Jon; Acke, Els

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans is primarily associated with C. jejuni/coli infection. The impact of other Campylobacter spp. is likely to be underestimated due to the bias of culture methods towards Campylobacter jejuni/coli diagnosis. Stool antigen tests are becoming increasingly popular and appear generally less species-specific. A review of independent studies of the ProSpecT® Campylobacter Microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) developed for C. jejuni/coli showed comparable diagnostic results to culture methods but the examination of non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter spp. was limited and the limit-of-detection (LOD), where reported, varied between studies. This study investigated LOD of EIA for Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter helveticus spiked in human stools. Multiple stools and Campylobacter isolates were used in three different concentrations (10(4)-10(9)CFU/ml) to reflect sample heterogeneity. All Campylobacter species evaluated were detectable by EIA. Multivariate analysis showed LOD varied between Campylobacter spp. and faecal consistency as fixed effects and individual faecal samples as random effects. EIA showed excellent performance in replicate testing for both within and between batches of reagents, in agreement between visual and spectrophotometric reading of results, and returned no discordance between the bacterial concentrations within independent dilution test runs (positive results with lower but not higher concentrations). This study shows how limitations in experimental procedures lead to an overestimation of consistency and uniformity of LOD for EIA that may not hold under routine use in diagnostic laboratories. Benefits and limitations for clinical practice and the influence on estimates of performance characteristics from detection of multiple Campylobacter spp. by EIA are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. New skin test for detection of bovine tuberculosis on the basis of antigen-displaying polyester inclusions produced by recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuxiong; Parlane, Natalie A; Lee, Jason; Wedlock, D Neil; Buddle, Bryce M; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-04-01

    The tuberculin skin test for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in cattle lacks specificity if animals are sensitized to environmental mycobacteria, as some antigens in purified protein derivative (PPD) prepared from Mycobacterium bovis are present in nonpathogenic mycobacteria. Three immunodominant TB antigens, ESAT6, CFP10, and Rv3615c, are present in members of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but absent from the majority of environmental mycobacteria. These TB antigens have the potential to enhance skin test specificity. To increase their immunogenicity, these antigens were displayed on polyester beads by translationally fusing them to a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase which mediated formation of antigen-displaying inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. The most common form of these inclusions is poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB). The respective fusion proteins displayed on these PHB inclusions (beads) were identified using tryptic peptide fingerprinting analysis in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The surface exposure and accessibility of antigens were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Polyester beads displaying all three TB antigens showed greater reactivity with TB antigen-specific antibody than did beads displaying only one TB antigen. This was neither due to cross-reactivity of antibodies with the other two antigens nor due to differences in protein expression levels between beads displaying single or three TB antigens. The triple-antigen-displaying polyester beads were used for skin testing of cattle and detected all cattle experimentally infected with M. bovis with no false-positive reactions observed in those sensitized to environmental mycobacteria. The results suggested applicability of TB antigen-displaying polyester inclusions as diagnostic reagents for distinguishing TB-infected from noninfected animals.

  20. Novel Aspects of the Z and R3 Antigens of Streptococcus agalactiae Revealed by Immunological Testing

    PubMed Central

    Maeland, Johan A.; Lyng, Randi V.; Mavenyengwa, Rooyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) are important human and bovine pathogens which can be classified by a variety of phenotype- and gene-based techniques. The capsular polysaccharide and strain-variable, surface-anchored proteins are particularly important phenotypic markers. In an earlier study, a previously unrecognized protein antigen called Z was described. It was expressed by 27.2% of GBS strains from Zimbabwe, usually in combination with R3 protein expression. In this study, a putative Z-specific antiserum actually contained antibodies against two different antigens named Z1 and Z2; Z1 was >250 kDa in molecular mass. Z1, Z2, and R3 generated multiple stained bands on Western blots and showed similar chromatographic characteristics with respect to molecular mass, aggregate formation, and charge. Of 28 reference and prototype GBS strains examined, 8/28 (28.5%) isolates expressed one, two, or all three of the Z1, Z2, and R3 antigens; 4/28 expressed all three antigens; 2/28 expressed Z2 and R3; 1/28 expressed Z1 only; and 1/28 expressed R3 only. Twenty (71.5%) of the 28 isolates expressed none of the three antigens. Expression of one or more of these antigens was shown by isolates of the capsular polysaccharide types Ia, Ib, V, and IX and NT strains and occurred in combination with expression of various other strain-variable and surface-localized protein antigens. When used as serosubtype markers, Z1, Z2, and R3 affected existing GBS serotype designations for some of the isolates. For instance, the R3 reference strain Prague 10/84 (ATCC 49447) changed serotype markers from V/R3 to V/R3, Z1, and Z2. Other isolates may change correspondingly, implying consequences for GBS serotyping and research. PMID:23408530

  1. Novel aspects of the Z and R3 antigens of Streptococcus agalactiae revealed by immunological testing.

    PubMed

    Maeland, Johan A; Radtke, Andreas; Lyng, Randi V; Mavenyengwa, Rooyen T

    2013-04-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) are important human and bovine pathogens which can be classified by a variety of phenotype- and gene-based techniques. The capsular polysaccharide and strain-variable, surface-anchored proteins are particularly important phenotypic markers. In an earlier study, a previously unrecognized protein antigen called Z was described. It was expressed by 27.2% of GBS strains from Zimbabwe, usually in combination with R3 protein expression. In this study, a putative Z-specific antiserum actually contained antibodies against two different antigens named Z1 and Z2; Z1 was >250 kDa in molecular mass. Z1, Z2, and R3 generated multiple stained bands on Western blots and showed similar chromatographic characteristics with respect to molecular mass, aggregate formation, and charge. Of 28 reference and prototype GBS strains examined, 8/28 (28.5%) isolates expressed one, two, or all three of the Z1, Z2, and R3 antigens; 4/28 expressed all three antigens; 2/28 expressed Z2 and R3; 1/28 expressed Z1 only; and 1/28 expressed R3 only. Twenty (71.5%) of the 28 isolates expressed none of the three antigens. Expression of one or more of these antigens was shown by isolates of the capsular polysaccharide types Ia, Ib, V, and IX and NT strains and occurred in combination with expression of various other strain-variable and surface-localized protein antigens. When used as serosubtype markers, Z1, Z2, and R3 affected existing GBS serotype designations for some of the isolates. For instance, the R3 reference strain Prague 10/84 (ATCC 49447) changed serotype markers from V/R3 to V/R3, Z1, and Z2. Other isolates may change correspondingly, implying consequences for GBS serotyping and research.

  2. Analytical Validation of the ReEBOV Antigen Rapid Test for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Cross, Robert W; Boisen, Matthew L; Millett, Molly M; Nelson, Diana S; Oottamasathien, Darin; Hartnett, Jessica N; Jones, Abigal B; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Fusco, Marnie L; Abelson, Dafna M; Oda, Shunichiro; Brown, Bethany L; Pham, Ha; Rowland, Megan M; Agans, Krystle N; Geisbert, Joan B; Heinrich, Megan L; Kulakosky, Peter C; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Schieffelin, John S; Kargbo, Brima; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Gevao, Sahr M; Wilson, Russell B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Pitts, Kelly R; Khan, Sheik Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Geisbert, Thomas W; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F

    2016-10-15

     Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a severe viral illness caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). The 2013-2016 EVD outbreak in West Africa is the largest recorded, with >11 000 deaths. Development of the ReEBOV Antigen Rapid Test (ReEBOV RDT) was expedited to provide a point-of-care test for suspected EVD cases.  Recombinant EBOV viral protein 40 antigen was used to derive polyclonal antibodies for RDT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay development. ReEBOV RDT limits of detection (LOD), specificity, and interference were analytically validated on the basis of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance.  The ReEBOV RDT specificity estimate was 95% for donor serum panels and 97% for donor whole-blood specimens. The RDT demonstrated sensitivity to 3 species of Ebolavirus (Zaire ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, and Bundibugyo ebolavirus) associated with human disease, with no cross-reactivity by pathogens associated with non-EBOV febrile illness, including malaria parasites. Interference testing exhibited no reactivity by medications in common use. The LOD for antigen was 4.7 ng/test in serum and 9.4 ng/test in whole blood. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction testing of nonhuman primate samples determined the range to be equivalent to 3.0 × 10(5)-9.0 × 10(8) genomes/mL.  The analytical validation presented here contributed to the ReEBOV RDT being the first antigen-based assay to receive FDA and World Health Organization emergency use authorization for this EVD outbreak, in February 2015. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Association of black race with follow-up of an abnormal prostate-specific antigen test.

    PubMed

    Turner, Barbara J; Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Weiner, Mark G

    2011-02-01

    Delayed evaluation after a clearly abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) result may contribute to more advanced prostate cancer at diagnosis in black men. In 46 primary care practices over a period of 4.5 years, we studied men aged more than 50 years without known prostate cancer who had a PSA of at least 10.0 ng/mL for the first time. PSA follow-up included: a urology appointment, a new prostate diagnosis, or repeat PSA test. Cox proportional hazards models assessed time to follow-up, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and health care factors with censoring at a time that represents excessive delay (200 days). Among all 724 study men (27% black), delay until PSA follow-up averaged 115.2 days (+/- 79.7 d) and the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for follow-up was shorter for black men than nonblack men (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00-1.51). However, black men were more likely to have had prior urology care and had higher index PSA levels than other men; both factors were associated with shorter follow-up. After adjustment, delay did not differ for black vs nonblack race (HR, 1.05; 95% Cl, 0.78-1.43) but men aged at least 75 years had a longer delay than men aged 74 years or less (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.89). Despite black men having greater risk of advanced prostate disease at diagnosis and better linkage to urologic care, follow-up was delayed, on average, by more than 3 months and did not differ by race. These results reveal a potentially important, remediable factor to improve prostate cancer prevention and care for black men.

  4. Molecular detection of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance in stool vs biopsy samples

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Denise E; Omorogbe, Joseph; Hussey, Mary; Tighe, Donal; Holleran, Grainne; O’Morain, Colm; Smith, Sinéad M; McNamara, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare (1) demographics in urea breath test (UBT) vs endoscopy patients; and (2) the molecular detection of antibiotic resistance in stool vs biopsy samples. METHODS Six hundred and sixteen adult patients undergoing endoscopy or a UBT were prospectively recruited to the study. The GenoType HelicoDR assay was used to detect Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and antibiotic resistance using biopsy and/or stool samples from CLO-positive endoscopy patients and stool samples from UBT-positive patients. RESULTS Infection rates were significantly higher in patients referred for a UBT than endoscopy (overall rates: 33% vs 19%; treatment-naïve patients: 33% vs 14.7%, respectively). H. pylori-infected UBT patients were younger than H. pylori-infected endoscopy patients (41.4 vs 48.4 years, respectively, P < 0.005), with a higher percentage of H. pylori-infected males in the endoscopy-compared to the UBT-cohort (52.6% vs 33.3%, P = 0.03). The GenoType HelicoDR assay was more accurate at detecting H. pylori infection using biopsy samples than stool samples [98.2% (n = 54/55) vs 80.3% (n =53/66), P < 0.005]. Subset analysis using stool and biopsy samples from CLO-positive endoscopy patients revealed a higher detection rate of resistance-associated mutations using stool samples compared to biopsies. The concordance rates between stool and biopsy samples for the detection of H. pylori DNA, clarithromycin and fluoroquinolone resistance were just 85%, 53% and 35%, respectively. CONCLUSION Differences between endoscopy and UBT patients provide a rationale for non-invasive detection of H. pylori antibiotic resistance. However, the GenoType HelicoDR assay is an unsuitable approach. PMID:27895408

  5. Novel methylation panel for the early detection of colorectal tumors in stool DNA.

    PubMed

    Azuara, Daniel; Rodriguez-Moranta, Francisco; de Oca, Javier; Soriano-Izquierdo, Antonio; Mora, Josefina; Guardiola, Jordi; Biondo, Sebastiano; Blanco, Ignacio; Peinado, Miguel Angel; Moreno, Victor; Esteller, Manel; Capellá, Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies showed that the assessment of promoter hypermethylation of a limited number of genes in tumor biopsies may identify the majority of colorectal tumors. This study aimed to assess the clinical usefulness of a panel of methylation biomarkers in stool DNA in the identification of colorectal tumors, using methylation-specific melting curve analysis (MS-MCA), a technique that simultaneously analyzes all cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) residues within a promoter. The promoter methylation status of 4 tumor-related genes (RARB2, p16INK4a, MGMT, and APC) was analyzed in DNA stool samples and corresponding tissues in an initial set of 12 patients with newly diagnosed primary colorectal carcinomas and 20 patients with newly diagnosed colorectal adenomas, using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Results were replicated in a set of 82 patients (20 healthy subjects, 16 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 20 patients with adenomas, and 26 patients with carcinomas), using MS-MCA analyses. In the initial set, >or= 1 positive methylation marker was detected in the stools of 9 of 12 patients (75%) with carcinomas and 12 of 20 patients (60%) with adenomas, with no false-positive results. Stool analyses missed 7 methylated lesions (25%). In the replication set, stool DNA testing detected 16 of 26 carcinomas (62%) and 8 of 20 adenomas (40%). The MS-MCAs missed 14 methylated tumors (37%). No aberrant methylation was evident in healthy subjects, but the RARB2 marker was positive in 2 of 15 stool samples (13%) of patients with IBD. Analysis via MS-MCA of a panel of methylation markers in stool DNA may offer a good alternative in the early, noninvasive detection of colorectal tumors.

  6. Complementary serum test of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 and early antigen: a possible alternative for primary screening of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai-Ping; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chang, Yu-Liang; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chen, Chin-Kuo; Lee, Ta-Jen; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song; Hao, Sheng-Po

    2008-08-01

    This hospital-based cohort study evaluated the efficacy of three Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - associated assays for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) primary screening and monitoring treatment outcome. Five hundred and seventeen consecutive subjects, including 156 NPC patients, 264 healthy volunteers and 97 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were enrolled. The sensitivity and specificity of EBV IgAs to viral capsid antigen (VCA), complementary EBV IgAs to early antigen and nuclear antigen-1 (EA+EBNA-1), and EBV DNA load were examined by immunofluorescent assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. After constructing the receiver operating characteristics to demonstrate screening efficacy, EBV EA+EBNA-1 IgA (AUC: 0.952; 95% CI, 0.930-0.974) was proved superior to EBV VCA IgA (AUC: 0.888; 95% CI, 0.854-0.922) or EBV DNA load (AUC: 0.893; 95% CI, 0.854-0.932) in differentiating NPC patients from controls. Comparison of screening efficacy between NPC patients and HNSCC patients revealed EBV EA+EBNA-1 IgA (AUC: 0.964; 95% CI, 0.943-0.985) still outperformed EBV VCA IgA (AUC: 0.884; 95% CI, 0.845-0.923). In subjects with higher serum titer or level equal to or above 1:80 and 6 EU/ml for EBV VCA IgA and EA+EBNA-1 IgA, the specificity reached as high as 99.2% and 95.1%, respectively, in the control groups. However, correlation of these three assays with clinicopathological manifestations of NPC, revealed only EBV DNA load significantly associated with N stage and overall stage in NPC patients. Additionally, EBV DNA load could be used to further raise the specificity of EBV EA+EBNA-1 IgA assays and was also the only assay to be consistently predictive of tumor relapse in post-treatment patients according to serial test results by time frame. Consequently, an EBV EA+EBNA-1 IgA-based protocol is recommended for mass screening, but EBV DNA load should be used solely for post-treatment monitoring for NPC in

  7. Serological, intradermal and live flea challenge tests in the assessment of hypersensitivity to flea antigens in cats (Felis domesticus).

    PubMed

    Bond, Ross; Hutchinson, Melanie J; Loeffler, Anette

    2006-09-01

    The results of intradermal testing with three commercial flea antigens and a serological test for IgE antibodies to flea antigens were compared with live flea challenge in cats. Eight control cats with no prior flea exposure had negative serological test and flea challenge results. By contrast, 17 out of 27 cats with previous flea exposure showed immediate reactivity to flea challenge; reactivity at 6, 24 and 48 h after flea exposure was noted in 12, 16 and 21 cats, respectively. Seventeen of these cats had positive serological test results. Seven cats showed immediate intradermal test reactions to the ARTU allergen, six reacted to the Biophady allergen, and six reacted to the Greer allergen. Intradermal test reactivity was less frequent at the other time points. Using the results of the flea challenge as the 'gold standard' for the presence or absence of sensitisation to fleas, the sensitivity and specificity of the serological test was 0.88 and 0.77, respectively. Sensitivities of the intradermal tests at the four time points ranged from 0 to 0.33, whereas the specificities ranged from 0.78 to 1.0. Live flea challenge is better able to detect cats with hypersensitivity to fleas than either intradermal or serological testing.

  8. [Development and testing of an enzyme immunoassay-based monoclonal test system for the detection of the Yersinia pestis V antigen].

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, T A; Belova, E V; Dentovskaia, S V; Bel'kova, S A; Balakhonov, S V; Ignatov, S G; Shemiakin, I G

    2014-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay-based test system for Y. pestis V antigen detection was developed. The specificity and sensitivity of this system met the requirements for medical immunobiological preparations for the identification of causative agents of highly fatal diseases. The sensitivity of the test system was assessed, and its high specificity was also demonstrated: the test system did not detect bacterial cells of closely related (four Y. pseudotuberculosis strains) and heterologous microorganism strains. The test system developed was able to detect the V antigen at concentrations as low as 2.0 ng/mL in cells of nine experimental Y. pestis cultures. The obtained preparation can be recommended for use in laboratory diagnostics of plaque.

  9. Investigation of spore surface antigens in the genus Bacillus by the use of polyclonal antibodies in immunofluorescence tests.

    PubMed

    Phillips, A P; Martin, K L

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescein-conjugated rabbit antibodies to formalized spores of Bacillus anthracis were tested against strains of B. anthracis and other Bacillus species in a subjective immunofluorescence test. The lack of reaction of B. anthracis Vollum spores with conjugated antibody raised against B. anthracis Sterne spores indicated that spores of the Vollum strain lacked a major surface antigen present in most of the other anthrax strains tested, including the non-encapsulated strains Sterne and the Soviet ST1, variants cured of the pX01 plasmid that codes for the toxin, and several virulent strains. Four other antibody preparations, raised against B. anthracis Vollum, New Hampshire, Ames and Strain 15, reacted to an approximately similar degree with spores of all four strains and of Sterne, indicating that Vollum has at least one spore antigen in common with these other strains. The anti-Sterne and anti-Vollum conjugates both displayed cross-reactions with spores of strains of B. cereus, B. coagulans, B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. polymyxa, B. pumilus and B. thuringiensis. Absorption of the anti-anthrax conjugates with B. cereus NCTC 8035 and NCTC 10320 removed all these cross-reactions, demonstrating the existence of spore antigens specific for anthrax.

  10. Comparison of three feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) point-of-care antigen test kits using blood and saliva.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2017-02-01

    Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) can be a challenging infection to diagnose due to a complex feline host-pathogen relationship and occasionally unreliable test results. This study compared the accuracy of three point-of-care (PoC) FeLV p27 antigen test kits commonly used in Australia and available commercially worldwide (SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo, Witness FeLV/FIV and Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV), using detection of FeLV provirus by an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay as the diagnostic gold standard. Blood (n=563) and saliva (n=419) specimens were collected from a population of cats determined to include 491 FeLV-uninfected and 72 FeLV-infected individuals (45 progressive infections [p27 and qPCR positive], 27 regressive infections [p27 negative, qPCR positive]). Sensitivity and specificity using whole blood was 63% and 94% for SNAP Combo, 57% and 98% for Witness, and 57% and 98% for Anigen Rapid, respectively. SNAP Combo had a significantly lower specificity using blood compared to the other two kits (P=0.004 compared to Witness, P=0.007 compared to Anigen Rapid). False-positive test results occurred with all three kits using blood, and although using any two kits in parallel increased specificity, no combination of kits completely eliminated the occurrence of false-positive results. We therefore recommend FeLV proviral PCR testing for any cat that tests positive with a PoC FeLV antigen kit, as well as for any cat that has been potentially exposed to FeLV but tests negative with a FeLV antigen kit, before final assignment of FeLV status can be made with confidence. For saliva testing, sensitivity and specificity was 54% and 100%, respectively, for all three test kits. The reduced sensitivity of saliva testing compared to blood testing, although not statistically significant, suggests saliva testing with the current generation of PoC FeLV antigen kits is unsuitable for screening large populations of cats, such as in shelters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  11. Transcriptomic molecular markers for screening human colon cancer in stool and tissue.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E; Vos, Paul; iJames, Stephanie; Lysle, Donald T; Allison, Ron R; Flake, Gordon; Sinar, Dennis R; Naziri, Wade; Marcuard, Stefan P; Pennington, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for sensitive and specific diagnostic molecular markers that can be used to monitor early patterns of gene expression in non-invasive exfoliated colonocytes shed in the stool, and in situ in adenoma-carcinoma epithelium of the colon. RNA-based detection methods are more comprehensive than either DNA-, protein- or methylation-based screening methods. By routinely and systematically being able to perform quantitative gene expression studies on these samples using less than ten colon cancer genes selected by the enormous resources of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genome Anatomy Project, we were able to monitor changes at various stages in the neoplastic process, allowing for reliable diagnostic screening of colon cancer particularly at the early, pre-malignant stages. Although the expression of some of the genes tested in tissue showed less variability in normal or cancerous patients than in stool, the stool by itself is suitable for screening. Thus, a transcriptomic approach using stool or tissue samples promises to offer more sensitivity and specificity than currently used molecular screening methods for colon cancer. A larger prospective clinical study utilizing stool and tissue samples derived from many control and colon cancer patients, to allow for a statistically valid analysis, is now urgently required to determine the true sensitivity and specificity of the transcriptomic screening approach for this preventable cancer.

  12. Prevalence of Entamoeba spp. in Stool Samples of Patients with Amebiasis Suspect by Native-Lugol and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Beyhan, Yunus Emre; Yılmaz, Hasan; Taş Cengiz, Zeynep

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Entamoeba spp. in suspected stool samples submitted to our laboratory. In this retrospective study, stool samples of 998 patients with suspected amebiasis were sent from various clinics and services to our laboratory and were investigated by native-Lugol and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) [for Entamoeba spp. antigen (Ridascreen® Entamoeba)] between January 2010 and December 2014. By the end of the study, it was shown that 8.5% (85) of 997 patients, 7.45% (39) of males and 9.8% (46) of females whom amoeba antigen inspected in their stool samples, were positive. No parasite was identified by the saline-Lugol method. The highest antigen positivity was detected in the 25-44-year-old group with 11% positivity, and a high positivity of 23.2% was seen in March. These results demonstrate that amebiasis is still a major health concern for our region. Although no parasite was detected during microscopic examinations, the detection of antigen positivity by ELISA reveals that microscopic examinations require experience and utilizing only microscopic examinations may lead to overlooks. To obtain more reliable results in diagnosis, ELISA analyses that use E. histolytica-specific monoclonal antibodies should be applied in addition to microscopic methods.

  13. Expression of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Antigens in Leishmania tarentolae. Potential for Use in Rapid Serodiagnostic Tests (RDTs)

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Barrie; Piening, Turid; Büscher, Philippe; Rogé, Stijn; Smales, C. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The development of rapid serodiagnostic tests for sleeping sickness and other diseases caused by kinetoplastids relies on the affordable production of parasite-specific recombinant antigens. Here, we describe the production of recombinant antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T.b. gambiense) in the related species Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae), and compare their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to native antigens currently used in diagnostic kits against a panel of human sera. A number of T.b. gambiense protein antigen candidates were chosen for recombinant expression in L. tarentolae based on current diagnostics in field use and recent findings on immunodiagnostic antigens found by proteomic profiling. In particular, the extracellular domains of invariant surface glycoprotein 65 (ISG65), variant surface glycoproteins VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 were fused with C-terminal histidine tags and expressed as soluble proteins in the medium of cultured, recombinant L. tarentolae. Using affinity chromatography, on average 10 mg/L of recombinant protein was purified from cultures and subsequently tested against a panel of sera from sleeping sickness patients from controls, i.e. persons without sleeping sickness living in HAT endemic countries. The evaluation on sera from 172 T.b. gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients and from 119 controls showed very high diagnostic potential of the two recombinant VSG and the rISG65 fragments with areas under the curve between 0.97 and 0.98 compared to 0.98 and 0.99 with native VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 (statistically not different). Evaluation on sera from 78 T.b. rhodesiense HAT patients and from 100 controls showed an acceptable diagnostic potential of rISG65 with an area under the curve of 0.83. These results indicate that a combination of these recombinant antigens has the potential to be used in next generation rapid serodiagnostic tests. In addition, the L. tarentolae expression system

  14. Can newly developed, rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection tests be reliably used for the laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infections?

    PubMed

    Dunn, James J; Ginocchio, Christine C

    2015-06-01

    Five years ago, the Point-Counterpoint series was launched. The initial article asked about the role of rapid immunochromatographic antigen testing in the diagnosis of influenza A virus 2009 H1N1 infection (D. F. Welch and C. C. Ginocchio, J Clin Microbiol 48:22-25, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02268-09). Since that article, not only have major changes been made in immunochromatographic antigen detection (IAD) testing for the influenza viruses, but there has also been rapid development of commercially available nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for influenza virus detection. Further, a novel variant of influenza A, H7N9, has emerged in Asia, and H5N1 is also reemergent. In that initial article, the editor of this series, Peter Gilligan, identified two issues that required further consideration. One was how well IAD tests worked in clinical settings, especially in times of antigen drift and shift. The other was the role of future iterations of influenza NAATs and whether this testing would be available in a community hospital setting. James Dunn, who is Director of Medical Microbiology and Virology at Texas Children's Hospital, has extensive experience using IAD tests for diagnosing influenza. He will discuss the application and value of these tests in influenza diagnosis. Christine Ginocchio, who recently retired as the Senior Medical Director, Division of Infectious Disease Diagnostics, North Shore-LIJ Health System, and now is Vice President for Global Microbiology Affairs at bioMérieux, Durham, NC, wrote the initial counterpoint in this series, where she advocated the use of NAATs for influenza diagnosis. She will update us on the commercially available NAAT systems and explain what their role should be in the diagnosis of influenza infection.

  15. [Bristol Stool Chart: Prospective and monocentric study of "stools introspection" in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Amarenco, G

    2014-09-01

    The Bristol Stool Chart (BSC) allows patients to identify their stool form using seven different images with accompanying written descriptors. Stool form was found to correlate better than stool frequency with whole-gut transit as measured by a radio-opaque marker study. This score is widely used in order to verify the presence of a constipation and to evaluate the therapeutic impact of various treatments. In our clinical practice, we was strongly surprised by the facility and the great precision of the patients to report their stool form, meaning that they usually and daily verify these stools. We wanted to precise the goals of a such attitude. Two questionnaires were proposed to healthy and voluntary subjects. Q1 was supposedly presented in order to verify the sensibility of a French version of BSC in a healthy population. Thus, Q1 precised the difficulties or not to understand pictures and written descriptors, asked about exhaustive analysis by means of BSC of stool form and bowel condition. All subjects with history of ano-rectal disorders or specific treatment for bowel dysfunction were excluded. After Q1 fulfilled, Q2 was proposed to the subjects. Q2 was designed to precise the goals of the patient when he look at his stool and the frequency of such an investigation. Finally a specific question concerning the subject opinion about this behavior in terms of bothersome, shame, or metaphysic interrogation. Eighty-five healthy subjects were recruited (42 female and 43 male). Mean age was 37.2 (sd = 15.7). Mean score of BCS was 2.07 (sd =1.05) (2.07 for female and 1.81 for male, P = 0.22). Number of categories of stool form was only 1 in 40%, 2 categories in 31%, 3 in 19%, 4 in 10%. Presence of a constipation defined by category 1 or 2 was found in 17% (23% in F, 12% in M, P = 0.075). Precision of BSC was noted as excellent in 68%, moderated in 18% and poor in 14%. BSC was considered as easy to use in 75%. Frequency of inspection of feces was systematic for 37%, 1

  16. A New Lab Developed Real Time PCR Assay for Direct Detection of C. Difficle from Stool Sample without DNA Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Detection of C. difficile by anaerobic bacterial culture and/or cytotoxicity assays has been largely replaced by rapid enzyme immunoassays (EIA). However, due to the lack of sensitivity of stool EIA, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay targeting the C. difficile toxin genes tcdB. stool samples from hospitalized pediatric patients suspected of having C. difficile-associated disease were prospectively collected. Three testing modalities were evaluated, including enriched culture, cepheid Xpert and real-time Pcr (tcdB) on stool samples performed with tcdB gene-specific primers and hydrolysis probes. A total of 150 de-identified clinical specimen were analyzed. The sensitivities of stool real-time Pcr were 95% against cepheid Xpert C. difficile and 93% against enriched culture respectively, with a specificity of 97% and 94%. The lower limit of detection of the stool real-time PCR was 0.5 cFU/ml of per reaction for tcdB. Direct detection of C. difficile toxin genes in stool samples by real-time Pcr showed performance comparable to enriched culture. Real-time PCR of DNA from stool samples is a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic modality for patients that should facilitate appropriate patient management. PMID:27829823

  17. A New Lab Developed Real Time PCR Assay for Direct Detection of C. Difficle from Stool Sample without DNA Extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Brandon

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Detection of C. difficile by anaerobic bacterial culture and/or cytotoxicity assays has been largely replaced by rapid enzyme immunoassays (EIA). However, due to the lack of sensitivity of stool EIA, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay targeting the C. difficile toxin genes tcdB. stool samples from hospitalized pediatric patients suspected of having C. difficile-associated disease were prospectively collected. Three testing modalities were evaluated, including enriched culture, cepheid Xpert and real-time Pcr (tcdB) on stool samples performed with tcdB gene-specific primers and hydrolysis probes. A total of 150 de-identified clinical specimen were analyzed. The sensitivities of stool real-time Pcr were 95% against cepheid Xpert C. difficile and 93% against enriched culture respectively, with a specificity of 97% and 94%. The lower limit of detection of the stool real-time PCR was 0.5 cFU/ml of per reaction for tcdB. Direct detection of C. difficile toxin genes in stool samples by real-time Pcr showed performance comparable to enriched culture. Real-time PCR of DNA from stool samples is a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic modality for patients that should facilitate appropriate patient management.

  18. Decline in Prostate Cancer Screening by Primary Care Physicians: An Analysis of Trends in the Use of Digital Rectal Examination and Prostate Specific Antigen Testing.

    PubMed

    Shoag, Jonathan; Halpern, Joshua A; Lee, Daniel J; Mittal, Sameer; Ballman, Karla V; Barbieri, Christopher E; Hu, Jim C

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer screening by digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen testing has been routine clinical practice in the United States for the last 25 years. Recent studies have shown a national decline in prostate specific antigen testing following the USPSTF (United States Preventive Services Task Force) recommendation against routine prostate specific antigen screening. However, to our knowledge the effect of this recommendation on digital rectal examination utilization remains unknown. We used NAMCS (National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey) to characterize trends in the rate of digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen testing by primary care physicians in men older than 40 years presenting for preventive care. From 2005 to 2012 NAMCS contained 3,368 such visits (unweighted) for the study of digital rectal examination trends and 4,035 unweighted visits from 2002 to 2012 for the study of prostate specific antigen trends. Following the USPSTF recommendation the proportion of visits where digital rectal examination was performed decreased from 16.0% (95% CI 13.1-19.5) to 5.8% (95% CI 4.0-8.3, p <0.001). Similarly, the proportion of visits where prostate specific antigen testing was performed decreased from 27.3% (95% CI 24.5-30.3) to 16.7% (95% CI 12.9-21.2, p <0.001). This represents a relative 64% decrease in digital rectal examination and a 39% decrease in prostate specific antigen testing. Among men 55 to 69 years old the number of visits where digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen testing were performed decreased 65% and 39%, respectively (p <0.001). Utilization of digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen has declined significantly following the release of the USPSTF recommendation against prostate specific antigen screening. This suggests that prostate cancer screening is rapidly disappearing from primary care practice. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research

  19. Evaluation of a new immunochromatography test for rapid and simultaneous detection of Clostridium difficile antigen and toxins.

    PubMed

    Samra, Zmira; Madar-Shapiro, Liora; Aziz, Mahanez; Bishara, Jihad

    2013-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is considered the most common cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea among adults in the developed world. It is responsible for virtually all cases of pseudomembranous colitis. The Tox A/B enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is the most widely used test for the detection of C. difficile toxins A and B. However, it is associated with poor sensitivity and an unacceptable high rate of false-negative results. To evaluate the performance of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE assay, designed to simultaneously detect C. difficile-produced glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxins A and B. Using the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE assay, the Tox A/B EIA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we tested 223 stool specimens from hospitalized patients with antibiotics-associated diarrhea. Sensitivity and specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test and the Tox A/B EIA against PCR RESULTS: The C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test had a sensitivity of 83.5% and specificity of 94.3% compared to PCR for Tox A/B, with 93.7% correlation (PPV 98.5%, NPV 91.7%). The Tox A/B EIA yielded corresponding values of 72.1% and 93.1%, with 85.6% correlation (PPV 85.1%, NPV 85.8%). Given the importance of an early and appropriate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated infection, the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test may be of huge benefit to practitioners.

  20. Enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative E. coli in stools of children with acute gastroenteritis in Davidson County, Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Monique A.; Iqbal, Junaid; Zhang, Chengxian; McHenry, Rendie; Cleveland, Brent E.; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia; Fonnesbeck, Chris; Payne, Daniel C.; Chappell, James D.; Halasa, Natasha; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.

    2015-01-01

    This prospective acute gastroenteritis (AGE) surveillance was conducted in the inpatient and emergency room settings at a referral pediatric hospital to determine the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in children<12 years of age with AGE in Davidson County, Tennessee. Subjects 15 days to 11 years of age, who presented with diarrhea and/or vomiting, were enrolled. Stool specimens were processed for detection of DEC using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. From December 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, a total of 79 (38%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE tested positive for E. coli. A total of 12 (5.8%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE were positive for a DEC. Eight (67%) out of these 12 were positive for enteropathogenic E. coli, and the remaining 4 were positive for enteroaggregative E. coli. DEC clinical isolates clustered with known E. coli enteropathogens according to multilocus sequencing typing. PMID:26298817

  1. Accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the detection of schistosome infection: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Minton, Jonathan; Boamah, Daniel; Otchere, Joseph; Asmah, Richard H; Rodgers, Mark; Bosompem, Kwabena M; Eusebi, Paolo; De Vlas, Sake J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the diagnosis of schistosome infection. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and other bibliographic databases for studies published until 30 September 2015 that described circulatory cathodic antigen testing compared against one to three Kato–Katz tests per subject – for Schistosoma mansoni – or the filtration of one 10-ml urine sample per subject – for S. haematobium. We extracted the numbers of true positives, false positives, true negatives and false negatives for the antigen testing and performed meta-analyses using a bivariate hierarchical regression model. Findings Twenty-six studies published between 1994 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. In the detection of S. mansoni, a single antigen test gave a pooled sensitivity of 0.90 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.84–0.94) and a pooled specificity of 0.56 (95% CI: 0.39–0.71; n = 7) when compared against a single Kato–Katz test. The corresponding values from comparisons with two to three Kato–Katz tests per subject were 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80–0.88) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.53–0.76; n = 14), respectively. There appeared to be no advantage in using three antigen tests per subject instead of one. When compared against the results of urine filtration, antigen testing for S. haematobium showed poor sensitivity and poor specificity. The performance of antigen testing was better in areas of high endemicity than in settings with low endemicity. Conclusion Antigen testing may represent an effective tool for monitoring programmes for the control of S. mansoni. PMID:27429491

  2. Sensitivity and specificity of rapid diagnostic tests for detection of group B streptococcal antigen in bacteremic neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, D N; Ascher, D P; Yoder, B A; Hensley, D M; Heiman, H S; Keith, J F

    1995-01-01

    Latex particle agglutination (LPA) testing for antigen to group B streptococcus (GBS) has been useful in the diagnosis of GBS sepsis in newborns. However, recent reports have demonstrated that the sensitivity of LPA assays may be as low as 27 to 54%. The purposes of the present study were to directly compare the abilities of four urine antigen assays to detect GBS antigen with clinical urine samples from neonates with GBS bacteremia and to evaluate the effect of the urine concentration on the sensitivities and specificities of these assays. Urine samples were collected serially from neonates with blood cultures positive for GBS or on admission from healthy full-term infants. One milliliter of urine was removed, and the remainder was concentrated to a volume of 1 ml. Unconcentrated samples were serially diluted with normal saline and were assayed to determine the highest dilution which would produce a positive test result. The Wellcogen, Bactigen, and Directigen LPA tests and ICON immunoassay were directly compared by using concentrated and unconcentrated urine specimens and urine specimens with known titers. A total of 94 urine specimens, including 61 concentrated and 75 unconcentrated specimens, from bacteremic infants were available for sensitivity testing, and 220 urine specimens from uninfected infants were available for specificity testing. There were significant differences in sensitivity among the four assays when they were performed on concentrated urine specimens, as follows: Directigen, 98%; Bactigen, 92%; ICON, 89%; Wellcogen, 68%. When the assays were performed on unconcentrated urine specimens, the Directigen (84%) and Bactigen (76%) assays were each significantly more sensitive than the ICON (59%) or Wellcogen (43%) assay.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7699040

  3. Evaluation of the KEMRI Hep-cell II test kit for detection of hepatitis B surface antigens in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kilale, Andrew M; Range, Nyagosya S; Ngowi, Prosper H; Kahwa, Amos M; Mfinanga, Sayoki G

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is one of the most important serological markers used to diagnose acute and chronic hepatitis B infection. The objective of the current evaluation was to assess the operational characteristics of the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) Hep-cell II against an ELISA Exsym HBsAg in the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens. To evaluate the Hep-cell II test, blood samples were collected from blood donors and processed for detection of HBsAg using Hep-cell II based on the test principle and procedure outlined by the manufacturer. ELISA Axsym HBsAg test was used as golden standard. Of the 400 samples tested, 287 (71.8%) were positive by Hep-cell test and 295 (73.8%) were positive by the ELISAAxsym. Hep-cell test had a sensitivity of 98.6% and specificity of 95.96%. Similar values of sensitivity and specificity of the Hep-cell test were obtained even when Bayesian Analysis Model was applied. The positive and negative predictive values of Hep-cell test were 98.61% and 95.96%, respectively. The positive and negative diagnostic likelihood ratios of Hep-cell test were 24.4% and 0.0145, respectively. In conclusion, the Hep-cell test is useful for detecting hepatitis B virus and the high likelihood ratio observed suggests that it may be useful in blood screening. However, it may be necessary to evaluate for cost-effectiveness and robustness in field conditions before the test is recommended for use.

  4. [Investigation of Brucella canis seropositivity by in-house slide agglutination test antigen in healthy blood donors].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Erdenliğ, Sevil; Etiler, Nilay

    2011-10-01

    Canine brucellosis which is due to Brucella canis, is transmitted to man by infected dogs or their secretions. The symptoms of canine brucellosis are similar to the symptoms of brucellosis caused by other Brucella species and endocarditis or meningitis may develop in untreated cases. There is limited data regarding B.canis infections in man and the current status of the disease is insufficiently evaluated in our country. Serological diagnosis of brucellosis is classically based on standard slide and tube agglutination tests. However, the antigens used in these tests detect antibodies that develop against species (B.melitensis, B.abortus, B.suis) with "smooth" lipopolysaccharides in their cell wall. B.canis has "rough" lipopolysaccharide in its cell wall and thus these classical tests can not detect antibodies against B.canis. Besides there is no commercial slide agglutination test which uses B.canis antigens. The aim of this study was to investigate the B.canis seropositivity by slide agglutination test (SAT), using homemade B.canis antigen, in healthy subjects and to determine the prevalence of B.canis infection in our population. A total of 1930 blood donors (age range: 18-55 years) who were admitted to the blood donation centers of different hospitals in Kocaeli province (located at Northwestern part of Turkey) between January-December 2010, have been included in the study. All of the subjects were negative in terms of Rose-Bengal plate test (B.abortus antigen test). Undiluted serum samples were initially screened by SAT, and those which were found positive were retested by SAT in the dilutions of 1/25 - 1/200. Confirmation of the positive results was performed by using 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) SAT. The test antigen (Alton antigen) was prepared from the less mucoid M(-) variant of B.canis, and 1/1048 titered dog antiserum was used as positive control. Of the 1930 blood donors sera, 40 (2.1%) were found positive with SAT, whereas 16 of them yielded equivocal

  5. Detection of IgG Anti-Leishmania Antigen by Flow Cytometry as a Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Schriefer, Albert; Magalhães, Andréa; Meyer, Roberto; Glesby, Marshall J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Carvalho, Lucas P.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) relies on clinical presentation, parasite isolation, histopathologic evaluation and positive Montenegro skin test. However, the low amounts of parasites in the lesion of these individuals make parasite isolation and histopatologic diagnosis unreliable, often leading to false-negative results. Also, 15% of people living in endemic areas have sub-clinical infection characterized by positive Montenegro skin test, which may contribute to misdiagnosis. Although the main Leishmania killing mechanism is through cell-mediated immune response, antibodies against Leishmania antigens are found in infected individuals. Here our goal was to develop a new serological technique using polystyrene microspheres sensitized with soluble Leishmania antigens as a tool for the detection of IgG in serum from CL patients by flow cytometry. To validate the assay we carried out a comparative test (ELISA) commonly used as a diagnostic test for parasitic diseases. To determine cross-reactivity we used serum from patients with Chagas disease, caused by a trypanosome that has several proteins with high homology to those of the Leishmania genus. We observed that the flow cytometry technique was more sensitive than the ELISA, but, less specific. Our results show that the flow cytometry serologic test can be used to confirm CL cases in L. braziliensis transmission areas, however, presence of Chagas disease has to be ruled out in these individuals. PMID:27622535

  6. Sensitivity of the VecTest antigen assay for eastern equine encephalitis and western equine encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Nasci, Roger S; Gottfried, Kristy L; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Ryan, Jeffrey R; Emmerich, Eva; Davé, Kirti

    2003-12-01

    VecTest assays for detecting eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEE) and western equine encephalitis virus (WEE) antigen in mosquito pools were evaluated to determine their sensitivity and specificity by using a range of EEE, WEE, St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLE), and West Nile virus (WN) dilutions as well as individual and pooled mosquitoes containing EEE or WEE. The EEE test produced reliable positive results with samples containing > or = 5.3 log10 plaque-forming units (PFU) of EEE/ml, and the WEE test produced reliable positive results with samples containing > or = 4.7 log10 PFU WEE/ml. Both assays detected the respective viral antigens in single virus-positive mosquitoes and in pools containing a single positive mosquito and 49 negative specimens. The SLE and WN assays also contained on the dipsticks accurately detected their respective viruses. No evidence was found of cross reaction or false positives in any of the tests. The VecTest assays were less sensitive than the EEE- and WEE-specific TaqMan reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Vero cell plaque assay, but appear to be useful for detecting arboviruses in mosquito-based arbovirus surveillance programs.

  7. Rapid urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults with community-acquired pneumonia: clinical use and barriers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Aaron M; Beekmann, Susan E; Polgreen, Philip M; Moore, Matthew R

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the most common bacterial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, a leading cause of death. The majority of pneumococcal CAP is diagnosed by blood culture, which likely underestimates the burden of disease. The 2007 CAP guidelines recommend routine use of the rapid pneumococcal urinary antigen (UAg) test. To assess the how pneumococcal UAg testing is being used among hospitalized adult CAP patients and what barriers restrict its use, a Web-based survey was distributed in 2013 to 1287 infectious disease physician members of the Emerging Infectious disease Network of the Infectious Disease Society of America. Of 493 eligible responses, 65% use the pneumococcal UAg test. The primary barrier to UAg use was availability (46%). UAg users reported ordering fewer other diagnostic tests and tailoring antibiotic therapy. Increased access to UAg tests could improve pneumonia management and pneumococcal CAP surveillance.

  8. Prostate-specific antigen test use and digital rectal examinations among African-American men, 2002-2006.

    PubMed

    Ross, Louie E; Meade, Shelly-Ann; Powe, Barbara D; Howard, Daniel L

    2009-07-01

    African-American men experience greater incidence and mortality from prostate cancer compared to White men as well as men from other groups. Few studies have examined prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal examination (DRE) use in African-American men. This study examined use of the PSA test and DRE among African-American men over time and identified correlates associated with the use of these procedures. Overall trends for years 2002-2006 showed a significant decrease in recent PSA test use and DRE among African-American men in 2004 and 2006 compared to year 2002. Recent PSA test use and DRE were associated with several factors including older ages, being married, higher levels of education and income, and overweight and obese body mass index (BMI). PSA test use and DRE among African-American men should be monitored over time to find out if this pattern continues.

  9. Molecular Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis Infection by PCR Detection of Specific DNA in Human Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddassani, H; Mirhendi, H; Hosseini, M; Rokni, MB; Mowlavi, Gh; Kia, Eb

    2011-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis is mostly an asymptomatic infection and diagnosis of latent infections is difficult due to limitations of current parasitological and serological methods. This study was conducted to set up a PCR-based method for molecular diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection by detection of copro-DNA in stool samples. Methods A total of 782 fresh stool samples were collected and examined by agar plate culture. Among those sixteen stool samples, which confirmed to be infected with S. stercoralis were examined as positive control to set up each single and nested PCR, using two primer sets designing to amplify partial ribosomal DNA of S. stercoralis genome. Since, single PCR method yielded higher efficacy in detecting positive samples, in the second step, 30 stool samples, which found negative for S. stercoralis by agar plate culture of single stool sample, were examined by single PCR. Data analysis was performed using McNemar's χ2 test, with consideration of a P-value of <0.05 as indication of significant difference. Results In amplification of DNA extracted from stool samples, single PCR detected S. stercoralis DNA target in all 16 positive samples, while nested PCR amplified DNA in only 75% of samples. In the second step, single PCR amplified S. stercoralis extracted DNA in 5 out of 30 samples which were negative by coproculture. Conclusion Single PCR method amplifying a short (100bp) target represented more efficacies for detection of S. stercoralis in faecal examination compared to agar plate culture and nested PCR, which amplified longer target. PMID:22347284

  10. Background levels of carbon-13 reduced in breath and stool by new infant formula.

    PubMed

    Boutton, T W; Hopkinson, J M; Benton, D A; Klein, P D

    1988-01-01

    Studies of the absorption and bioavailability of nutrients naturally enriched with 13C require accurate measurements of small increases of 13C in respiratory CO2 and stool carbon. The sensitivity of these measurements would be increased if the natural background of 13C in these excreta were reduced. We have developed a 13C-depleted infant formula based on lactose, whey, and casein from New Zealand cows that consume only C3 vegetation naturally low in 13C. This formula, designated CNRC3, was produced by a commercial infant formula manufacturer and was comparable with a 60:40 whey/casein product. To test the ability of the formula to reduce baseline levels of 13C in infant excreta, 10 formula-fed infants 28-60 days old and free of metabolic disorders were enrolled in the 9-day study. Two stool samples were collected daily. Infants received their usual formula on days 1 and 2 and were switched to CNRC3 formula for days 3-9. On days 2 and 9, seven breath samples were collected at 30-min intervals with a face mask. Breath and stool samples were analyzed for 13C content by gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Infants consuming their commercial formula had breath delta 13C values of -21.1 +/- 0.6% over the 3-h collection period; stool values were -22.9 +/- 0.4%. After 7 days on the CNRC3 formula, delta 13C values of breath declined by 5.6% to -26.7 +/- 0.7%; stool values declined by 3.0% to -25.6 +/- 0.5%. The reduced background of 13C achieved by the CNRC3 formula can improve resolution of excess 13C from naturally enriched substrates in infant breath by approximately 50% and in stool by approximately 30%.

  11. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  12. A TeGM6-4r antigen-based immunochromatographic test (ICT) for animal trypanosomosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu-Thuy; Ruttayaporn, Ngasaman; Goto, Yasuyuki; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru

    2015-11-01

    Animal trypanosomosis is a disease that is distributed worldwide which results in huge economic losses due to reduced animal productivity. Endemic regions are often located in the countryside where laboratory diagnosis is costly or inaccessible. The establishment of simple, effective, and accurate field tests is therefore of great interest to the farming and veterinary sectors. Our study aimed to develop a simple, rapid, and sensitive immunochromatographic test (ICT) for animal trypanosomosis utilizing the recombinant tandem repeat antigen TeGM6-4r, which is conserved amongst salivarian trypanosome species. In the specificity analysis, TeGM6-4r/ICT detected all of Trypanosoma evansi-positive controls from experimentally infected water buffaloes. As expected, uninfected controls tested negative. All sera samples collected from Tanzanian and Ugandan cattle that were Trypanosoma congolense- and/or Trypanosoma vivax-positive by microscopic examination of the buffy coat were found to be positive by the newly developed TeGM6-4r/ICT, which was comparable to results from TeGM6-4r/ELISA (kappa coefficient [κ] = 0.78). TeGM6/ICT also showed substantial agreement with ELISA using Trypanosoma brucei brucei (κ = 0.64) and T. congolense (κ = 0.72) crude antigen, suggesting the high potential of TeGM6-4r/ICT as a field diagnostic test, both for research purposes and on-site diagnosis of animal trypanosomosis.

  13. Dot-ELISA Rapid Test Using Recombinant 56-kDa Protein Antigens for Serodiagnosis of Scrub Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Rodkvamtook, Wuttikon; Zhang, Zhiwen; Chao, Chien-Chung; Huber, Erin; Bodhidatta, Dharadhida; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Grieco, John; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Kityapan, Manerat; Lewis, Michael; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2015-01-01

    We developed a rapid dot–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) using the combination of recombinant 56-kDa protein antigens that exhibited broad reactivity with serum antibodies against the four most prevalent strains (Karp, Kato, Gilliam, and TA763) of Orientia tsutsugamushi. The assay is rapid (30 minutes), and can be done at room temperature, and results can be read by the naked eye. Only a simple shaker is required to wash the membrane. Sera from 338 patients suspected of being ill with scrub typhus from rural hospitals around Thailand were tested using this dot-ELISA. Seventy-five (22.2%) patients were found to be positive. The sensitivity and specificity of dot-ELISA were determined using the indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) test as the gold standard, with the cutoff titer of immunoglobulin peroxidase conjugate M (IgM)/G (IgG) greater than 1:400/1:400. The dot-ELISA had a sensitivity of 98.5%, a specificity of 96.3%, a positive predictive value of 86.7%, and a negative predictive value of 99.6% for the acute-phase specimens. The results indicate that dot-ELISA rapid test using recombinant 56-kDa protein antigen was comparable with the IFA test and may be very useful for the diagnosis of scrub typhus in rural hospitals, where IFA is not available. PMID:25802430

  14. Assessment of skin test with varicella-zoster virus antigen for predicting the risk of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Y; Takao, Y; Miyazaki, Y; Ohnishi, F; Okeda, M; Yano, S; Kumihashi, H; Gomi, Y; Maeda, K; Ishikawa, T; Mori, Y; Asada, H; Iso, H; Yamanishi, K

    2013-04-01

    The Shozu Herpes Zoster (SHEZ) Study was designed to clarify the incidence of and predictive and immunological factors for herpes zoster in a defined community-based Japanese population. As part of this series, a total of 5683 residents aged ≥50 years received a varicella-zoster virus (VZV) skin test with VZV antigen, and 48 h later, the erythema and oedema were assessed by measuring the longest diameter. The diameters of both the erythema and oedema decreased with the increasing age of the subject. Sixty-three subjects contracted herpes zoster within a year after receiving the VZV skin test. Analysis of the herpes zoster incidence rate vs. the skin test reaction revealed that the shorter the diameter of erythema or oedema, the greater the likelihood of herpes zoster. These results demonstrated that the VZV skin test is an excellent surrogate marker for predicting the risk of herpes zoster.

  15. Complexity of the Rh antigen demonstrated by comparative tests using antisera of human and primate origins.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Rouger, P; Ruffié, J; Moor-Jankowski, J

    1987-01-01

    Comparative analysis of two antisera, one produced in chimpanzee and another of human origin, demonstrates the existence of a spectrum of antibodies directed against at least four antigenic determinants connected with Rh reactivity. Some of the determinants are shared by chimpanzee and human red cells, while others are restricted to one species only. Based on this study, it is suggested that both the human Rh(D)-positive type and its chimpanzee counterpart, the Rc-positive type, could be of common origin, while the negative types are the results of later, parallel events during evolution.

  16. Complexity of the Rh antigen demonstrated by comparative tests using antisera of human and primate origins.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Rouger, P; Ruffié, J; Moor-Jankowski, J

    1989-01-01

    Comparative analysis of two antisera, one produced in chimpanzee and another of human origin, demonstrates the existence of the whole spectrum of antibodies directed against at least four, and possibly five, antigenic determinants connected with the Rh reactivity. Some of the determinants are shared by chimpanzee and human red cells, while others are restricted to one species only. Based on this study, it is suggested that both the human Rh(D)-positive type and its chimpanzee counterpart, the Rc-positive type, could be of common origin, while the negative types are the results of later, parallel events during the evolution.

  17. Possible alternative to European Pharmacopoeia's method of analysis Test for Fc Function of Immunoglobulin (2.7.9) by using tetanus toxoid as antigen.

    PubMed

    Perez-del-Pulgar, S; Lopez, M; Gensana, M; Jorquera, J I

    2006-08-01

    Preparations of intravenous immunoglobulins must keep functional integrity throughout the purification process. In order to assess Fc fragment functionality, the European Pharmacopoeia proposes the Test for Fc function of immunoglobulin (2.7.9), which is based on a rubella antigen of high titre. Sometimes, such antigen is difficult to obtain. In the present study, we develop the same assay using tetanus toxoid instead of rubella antigen, adapting the procedure for the use of tetanus toxoid. The comparison between rubella-based and tetanus-based assays showed that the slopes of the haemolysis curves were higher if red blood cells had been sensitised with the rubella antigen than with tetanus toxoid. Nonetheless, the tetanus-based assay gave satisfactory results and it could be a good alternative antigen target.

  18. DIFFERENTIATION OF GROUP A STREPTOCOCCI WITH A COMMON R ANTIGEN INTO THREE SEROLOGICAL TYPES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE BACTERICIDAL TEST

    PubMed Central

    Lancefield, Rebecca C.

    1957-01-01

    In further study of streptococci having the R antigen, the bactericidal test has been used instead of the mouse protection test in investigating the type-specific M antigens of these organisms. The results have been confirmed by M anti-M precipitin tests, and a correlation between the M and T antigens of the strains has been shown. On the basis of a specific M antigen, type 28 has been shown to comprise Griffith's strain Small and four other R-containing strains. A number of other strains previously thought to belong to type 28 on the basis of R antigen reactions have now been identified as belonging either to type 2 or to a new type, designated 48, which shows a one-way cross-relationship to type 13. The bactericidal test is suggested as a useful method for assessing M antigen in group A streptococci and for establishing type-specificity by means of a biological test which is more widely applicable than the standard mouse protection test. PMID:13475611

  19. Should antibody to hepatitis B core antigen be tested in routine screening of donor corneas for transplant?

    PubMed

    Mattern, R M; Cavanagh, H D

    1997-03-01

    A review of the literature on transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases shows that antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) is not presently viewed as helpful for hepatitis C or hepatitis non-ABC screening of blood donors. Its utility as a screen for hepatitis B or human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is controversial among experts. We compare relevant aspects of the screening of blood donations and the screening of cornea transplant donors to assess implications for the screening of donor corneas. We conclude that there is not sufficient evidence to warrant introducing anti-HBc as a routine screening test for cornea donors.

  20. Validation of a modified Bristol stool scale - inter-rater reliability amongst pediatric gastroenterologists

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stool form and changes in stool form are important criteria in both clinical practice and clinical research. However, descriptions of stool form from both patients and physicians alike may be subjective and objective measurements of stool form are not well developed. Although the Bristol stool scale...

  1. Evaluation of different turkey rhinotracheitis viruses used as antigens for serological testing following live vaccination and challenge.

    PubMed

    Eterradossi, N; Toquin, D; Guittet, M; Bennejean, G

    1995-05-01

    Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) developed in the authors' laboratory for turkey rhinotracheitis serological testing, a commercial ELISA kit, and two virus-neutralization (VN) assays were compared with respect to the efficiency of these assays for serological monitoring in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) turkeys inoculated with four pathogenic isolates of turkey rhinotracheitis virus, with or without previous live vaccination. Both the live vaccine and the different isolates of virus were shown to induce antibody rises, the detectability of which varied depending on the ELISA or VN assay used for serological testing. The results show that 3 weeks after vaccination with an attenuated strain, the choice of an inadequate antigen for serological testing may be the cause of an apparent lack of immunogenicity of the vaccine, and that 2 weeks after challenge, such a choice in ELISA can also hinder the early diagnosis of a TRT virus infection in both vaccinated and unvaccinated turkeys.

  2. There is need for antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests to identify common acute tropical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Henry; Suankratay, Chusana

    2007-01-01

    Enteric fever, typhus, leptospirosis, dengue, melioidosis, and tuberculous meningitis present urgent diagnostic problems that require experience and clinical judgment to make early evidence-based management decisions. Basic and applied research dealing with reliable antigen-based diagnostics has been published and confirmed for several of these infections. This should have initiated commercial production but has not. Established international firms see little profit in such diagnostic kits since they would be used in poor countries with little prospects for return of investment capital. We attempt to illustrate this issue, using common causes of acute febrile illnesses in the Southeast Asian region. We believe that rapid diagnostic technology could prevent significant delay in starting appropriate therapy, reduce hospital expenses, and even save lives.

  3. Accurate detection of Campylobacter spp. antigens by immunochromatography and enzyme immunoassay in routine microbiological laboratory.

    PubMed

    Regnath, Thomas; Ignatius, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter spp. are fastidious microorganisms, and their detection by culture depends on the freshness of the stool sample and the skills of the laboratory staff. To improve laboratory diagnosis, assays for the detection of specific antigens have been developed. Here, we evaluated two assays for the detection of Campylobacter spp.-specific antigens, i.e., one immunochromatographic test and one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), in 38 frozen Campylobacter spp.-positive specimens and prospectively in 533 fresh stool samples with a conventional enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and culture. Both assays were positive for 36 samples with Campylobacter jejuni and one with Campylobacter coli among 38 Campylobacter spp.-positive frozen samples. One Campylobacter lari-positive sample was identified by the immunochromatographic assay (ICA) only. In a prospective study performed within the course of routine microbiology, both assays were positive for 24/25 C. jejuni culture-positive samples (positive percent agreement, 96.0% [95% CI: 78.9-100%]). ICA and EIA also were positive for 14 and 10 culture-negative samples, respectively (negative percent agreement: ICA, 97.2% [95% CI: 95.4-98.4%]; EIA, 98.0% [95% CI: 96.4-99.0%]). In conclusion, the high agreement between both antigen-detection assays and culture indicates that both assays may be initially performed followed by culture only upon a positive test result.

  4. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine.

  5. ANTIGENIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Old, Lloyd J.; Stockert, Elisabeth; Boyse, Edward A.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1968-01-01

    Antigenic modulation (the loss of TL antigens from TL+ cells exposed to TL antibody in the absence of lytic complement) has been demonstrated in vitro. An ascites leukemia, phenotype TL.1,2,3, which modulates rapidly and completely when incubated with TL antiserum in vitro, was selected for further study of the phenomenon. Over a wide range of TL antibody concentrations modulation at 37°C was detectable within 10 min and was complete within approximately 1 hr. The cells were initially sensitized to C' by their contact with antibody, thereafter losing this sensitivity to C' lysis together with their sensitivity to TL antibody and C' in the cytotoxic test. The capacity of the cells to undergo modulation was abolished by actinomycin D and by iodoacetamide, and by reducing the temperature of incubation to 0°C. Thus modulation apparently is an active cellular process. Antigens TL. 1,2, and 3 are all modulated by anti-TL.1,3 serum and by anti-TL.3 serum. This modulation affects all three TL components together, even when antibody to one or two of them is lacking. aAnti-TL.2 serum does not induce modulation and in fact impairs modulation by the other TL antibodies. The influence of the TL phenotype of cells upon the demonstrable content of H-2 (D region) isoantigen, first shown in cells modulated in vivo, has been observed with cells modulated in vitro. Cells undergoing modulation show a progressive increase in H-2 (D region) antigen over a period of 4 hr, with no change in H-2 antigens of the K region. Restoration of the TL+ phenotype of modulated cells after removal of antibody is less rapid than TL+ → TL- modulation and may require several cell divisions. PMID:5636556

  6. Isolation of a Trypanosoma cruzi antigen by affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody. Preliminary evaluation of its possible applications in serological tests.

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetto, C H; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M; Durante de Isola, E; Fossati, C A; Margni, R A

    1990-01-01

    By affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody (163B6), obtained in our laboratory, we have isolated a T. cruzi antigen which could be useful for differential diagnosis of Chagas' disease from leishmaniasis. This antigen, a 52-kD protein, reacted with all sera from Chagas' disease patients tested but not with sera from patients with leishmania, in ELISA. The 52-kD antigen is widely distributed in the Trypanosoma genus since the 163B6 monoclonal antibody reacts with T. rangeli and 8 strains and a clone of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2119921

  7. Prevalence of Salmonella Excretion in Stool: A Community Survey in 2 Sites, Guinea-Bissau and Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Im, Justin; Nichols, Chelsea; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Sow, Amy Gassama; Løfberg, Sandra; Tall, Adama; Pak, Gi Deok; Aaby, Peter; Baker, Stephen; Clemens, John D.; Espinoza, Ligia Maria Cruz; Konings, Frank; May, Jürgen; Monteiro, Mario; Niang, Aissatou; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Marks, Florian; von Kalckreuth, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic and convalescent carriers play an important role in the transmission and endemicity of many communicable diseases. A high incidence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection has been reported in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, yet the prevalence of Salmonella excretion in the general population is unknown. Methods. Stool specimens were collected from a random sample of households in 2 populations in West Africa: Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, and Dakar, Senegal. Stool was cultured to detect presence of Salmonella, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on the isolated organisms. Results. Stool was cultured from 1077 and 1359 individuals from Guinea-Bissau and Senegal, respectively. Salmonella Typhi was not isolated from stool samples at either site. Prevalence of NTS in stool samples was 24.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.5–35.1; n = 26/1077) per 1000 population in Guinea-Bissau and 10.3 (95% CI, 6.1–17.2; n = 14/1359) per 1000 population in Senegal. Conclusions. Evidence of NTS excretion in stool in both study populations indicates a possible NTS transmission route in these settings. PMID:26933022

  8. Prevalence of Salmonella Excretion in Stool: A Community Survey in 2 Sites, Guinea-Bissau and Senegal.

    PubMed

    Im, Justin; Nichols, Chelsea; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Sow, Amy Gassama; Løfberg, Sandra; Tall, Adama; Pak, Gi Deok; Aaby, Peter; Baker, Stephen; Clemens, John D; Espinoza, Ligia Maria Cruz; Konings, Frank; May, Jürgen; Monteiro, Mario; Niang, Aissatou; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Wierzba, Thomas F; Marks, Florian; von Kalckreuth, Vera

    2016-03-15

    Chronic and convalescent carriers play an important role in the transmission and endemicity of many communicable diseases. A high incidence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection has been reported in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, yet the prevalence of Salmonella excretion in the general population is unknown. Stool specimens were collected from a random sample of households in 2 populations in West Africa: Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, and Dakar, Senegal. Stool was cultured to detect presence of Salmonella, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on the isolated organisms. Stool was cultured from 1077 and 1359 individuals from Guinea-Bissau and Senegal, respectively. Salmonella Typhi was not isolated from stool samples at either site. Prevalence of NTS in stool samples was 24.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.5-35.1; n = 26/1077) per 1000 population in Guinea-Bissau and 10.3 (95% CI, 6.1-17.2; n = 14/1359) per 1000 population in Senegal. Evidence of NTS excretion in stool in both study populations indicates a possible NTS transmission route in these settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Validation of a Simple Stool Diary Used by Caregivers to Document Diarrhea Among Young Children in a Low-Income Country.

    PubMed

    Grenov, Benedikte; Namusoke, Hanifa; Nabukeera-Barungi, Nicolette; Lanyero, Betty; Ritz, Christian; Carlsson, Amalie; Vinther, Cecilie K; Michaelsen, Kim F; Holm-Larsen, Tove

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was the development and validation of a simple stool diary for caretakers collecting data on stool frequency and consistency among young children in a low-income country. Focus group studies evaluated how diarrhea was understood by caregivers (content validity). The sensitivity, reliability, and correlations between dehydration and diary scores (construct validity) were tested in a clinical trial. Caregivers recognized and understood the concept and severity of diarrhea. Stool frequency and liquid consistency decreased in children admitted with diarrhea (P < 0.0001 for both), confirming good sensitivity of the diary. High reliability was obtained after a few days of training. The caregiver intracorrelation coefficients were 0.66 (0.55-0.77) and 0.75 (0.66-0.84) after 2 and 7 days of training, respectively, and subjective staff evaluation of caregiver scores showed that ≤6% of caregivers had low scoring abilities after 3 days. The degree of dehydration (4-point score) was correlated with both increasing stool frequency and liquid stool consistency (+0.2 points [0.07-0.3], P = 0.0018 for 6 or more diarrheal stools, compared to 3 or more diarrheal stools per day, and +0.5 points (0.3-0.6), P < 0.0001 for diarrheal episodes with 3 or more watery stools/day compared with episodes with 3 or more "watery + abnormally loose + loose" stools per day). The diary showed high validity, good reliability, and high sensitivity. After 3 days of training, caregivers with mainly no or limited education could report stool consistency with good reliability. Stool consistency, which correlated strongly with dehydration, may be considered an important marker of diarrhea severity in future research.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of testing hepatitis B-positive pregnant women for hepatitis B e antigen or viral load.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F; Murphy, Trudy V

    2014-05-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of testing pregnant women with hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive) for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and administering maternal antiviral prophylaxis if indicated, to decrease breakthrough perinatal HBV transmission from the U.S. health care perspective. A Markov decision model was constructed for a 2010 birth cohort of 4 million neonates to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two strategies: testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for 1) HBeAg or 2) HBV load. Maternal antiviral prophylaxis is given from 28 weeks of gestation through 4 weeks postpartum when HBeAg is positive or HBV load is high (10 copies/mL or greater). These strategies were compared with the current recommendation. All neonates born to HBsAg-positive women received recommended active-passive immunoprophylaxis. Effects were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and all costs were in 2010 U.S. dollars. The HBeAg testing strategy saved $3.3 million and 3,080 QALYs and prevented 486 chronic HBV infections compared with the current recommendation. The HBV load testing strategy cost $3 million more than current recommendation, saved 2,080 QALYs, and prevented 324 chronic infections with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,583 per QALY saved compared with the current recommendations. The results remained robust over a wide range of assumptions. Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBeAg or HBV load followed by maternal antiviral prophylaxis if HBeAg-positive or high viral load to reduce perinatal hepatitis B transmission in the United States is cost-effective.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Testing Hepatitis B–Positive Pregnant Women for Hepatitis B e Antigen or Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the cost-effectiveness of testing pregnant women with hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive) for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and administering maternal antiviral prophylaxis if indicated, to decrease breakthrough perinatal HBV transmission from the U.S. health care perspective. METHODS A Markov decision model was constructed for a 2010 birth cohort of 4 million neonates to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two strategies: testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for 1) HBeAg or 2) HBV load. Maternal antiviral prophylaxis is given from 28 weeks of gestation through 4 weeks postpartum when HBeAg is positive or HBV load is high (108 copies/mL or greater). These strategies were compared with the current recommendation. All neonates born to HBsAg-positive women received recommended active-passive immunoprophylaxis. Effects were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and all costs were in 2010 U.S. dollars. RESULTS The HBeAg testing strategy saved $3.3 million and 3,080 QALYs and prevented 486 chronic HBV infections compared with the current recommendation. The HBV load testing strategy cost $3 million more than current recommendation, saved 2,080 QALYs, and prevented 324 chronic infections with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,583 per QALY saved compared with the current recommendations. The results remained robust over a wide range of assumptions. CONCLUSION Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBeAg or HBV load followed by maternal antiviral prophylaxis if HBeAg-positive or high viral load to reduce perinatal hepatitis B transmission in the United States is cost-effective. PMID:24785842

  12. Direct detection of Vibrio cholerae in stool samples.

    PubMed Central

    Varela, P; Pollevick, G D; Rivas, M; Chinen, I; Binsztein, N; Frasch, A C; Ugalde, R A

    1994-01-01

    A direct method to detect Vibrio cholerae in stool samples was developed by using a PCR procedure that did not require a DNA purification step. Dilution (1/100) of stool samples prevented inhibition of the reaction by contaminants, and two consecutive PCRs, the second one with a nested primer, achieved the desired sensitivity. Comparison of the results obtained from stool swab samples processed by the two-step PCR and by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using GM1 as the capture molecule showed that the former is more sensitive and gave positive results even when V. cholerae was not culturable or dead. Images PMID:8051251

  13. The effects of serial skin testing with purified protein derivative on the level and quality of antibodies to complex and defined antigens in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several serologic tests designed to detect antibodies to immunodominant Mycobacterium bovis antigens have recently emerged as ancillary tests for the detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle, particularly when applied after injection of purified protein derivative (PPD) for skin test that signific...

  14. Relationship between Antibody Susceptibility and Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Characteristics of Invasive and Gastrointestinal Nontyphoidal Salmonellae Isolates from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Onsare, Robert S.; Micoli, Francesca; Lanzilao, Luisa; Alfini, Renzo; Okoro, Chinyere K.; Muigai, Anne W.; Revathi, Gunturu; Saul, Allan; Kariuki, Samuel; MacLennan, Calman A.; Rondini, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) cause a large burden of invasive and gastrointestinal disease among young children in sub-Saharan Africa. No vaccine is currently available. Previous reports indicate the importance of the O-antigen of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide for virulence and resistance to antibody-mediated killing. We hypothesised that isolates with more O-antigen have increased resistance to antibody-mediated killing and are more likely to be invasive than gastrointestinal. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 192 NTS isolates (114 Typhimurium, 78 Enteritidis) from blood and stools, mostly from paediatric admissions in Kenya 2000–2011. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to antibody-mediated killing, using whole adult serum. O-antigen structural characteristics, including O-acetylation and glucosylation, were investigated. Overall, isolates were susceptible to antibody-mediated killing, but S. Enteritidis were less susceptible and expressed more O-antigen than Typhimurium (p<0.0001 for both comparisons). For S. Typhimurium, but not Enteritidis, O-antigen expression correlated with reduced sensitivity to killing (r = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.10-0.45, p = 0.002). Both serovars expressed O-antigen populations ranging 21–33 kDa average molecular weight. O-antigen from most Typhimurium were O-acetylated on rhamnose and abequose residues, while Enteritidis O-antigen had low or no O-acetylation. Both Typhimurium and Enteritidis O-antigen were approximately 20%–50% glucosylated. Amount of S. Typhimurium O-antigen and O-antigen glucosylation level were inversely related. There was no clear association between clinical presentation and antibody susceptibility, O-antigen level or other O-antigen features. Conclusion/Significance Kenyan S. Typhimurium and Enteritidis clinical isolates are susceptible to antibody-mediated killing, with degree of susceptibility varying with level of O-antigen for S. Typhimurium. This supports the development of an

  15. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  16. Good Performance of Rapid Prostate-Specific Antigen Test for Detection of Semen Exposure in Women: Implications for Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Marcia M.; Steiner, Markus J.; Rich, Kimberly D.; Gallo, Maria F.; Alam, Anadil; Rahman, Motiur; Menezes, Prema; Chipato, Tsungai; Warner, Lee; Macaluso, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a valid biomarker of semen exposure in women and has been used to assess reliability of self-reported sexual behavior as well as serve as a proxy measure for condom efficacy. Quantitative PSA tests are expensive and require specialized equipment. A simple, rapid, and inexpensive test for PSA would facilitate semen biomarker evaluation in a variety of research settings. This study evaluated the performance of a rapid PSA test compared with a quantitative assay to identify semen in vaginal swab specimens. Methods We tested 581 vaginal swabs collected from 492 women participating in 2 separate research studies in Bangladesh and Zimbabwe. PSA in vaginal secretions was detected using the quantitative IMx (Abbott Laboratories) assay and the ABAcard p30 (Abacus Diagnostics) rapid immunochromatographic strip test. Results The ABAcard test was 100% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI], 98%–100%) and 96% specific (95% CI, 93%–97%) compared with the quantitative test in detecting >1.0 ng PSA/mL vaginal swab eluate. Rapid PSA results were semiquantitative and correlated well with PSA concentrations (κ = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85–0.90). Conclusion Rapid PSA detection requires no instrumentation and can be performed easily and economically. Having rapid PSA results available immediately following interview provides opportunities to explore discrepancies between the objective marker of recent semen exposure and self-reported behaviors. PMID:19455082

  17. Good performance of rapid prostate-specific antigen test for detection of semen exposure in women: implications for qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Marcia M; Steiner, Markus J; Rich, Kimberly D; Gallo, Maria F; Alam, Anadil; Rahman, Motiur; Menezes, Prema; Chipato, Tsungai; Warner, Lee; Macaluso, Maurizio

    2009-08-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a valid biomarker of semen exposure in women and has been used to assess reliability of self-reported sexual behavior as well as serve as a proxy measure for condom efficacy. Quantitative PSA tests are expensive and require specialized equipment. A simple, rapid, and inexpensive test for PSA would facilitate semen biomarker evaluation in a variety of research settings. This study evaluated the performance of a rapid PSA test compared with a quantitative assay to identify semen in vaginal swab specimens. We tested 581 vaginal swabs collected from 492 women participating in 2 separate research studies in Bangladesh and Zimbabwe. PSA in vaginal secretions was detected using the quantitative IMx (Abbott Laboratories) assay and the ABAcard p30 (Abacus Diagnostics) rapid immunochromatographic strip test. The ABAcard test was 100% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI], 98%-100%) and 96% specific (95% CI, 93%-97%) compared with the quantitative test in detecting >1.0 ng PSA/mL vaginal swab eluate. Rapid PSA results were semiquantitative and correlated well with PSA concentrations (kappa = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85-0.90). Rapid PSA detection requires no instrumentation and can be performed easily and economically. Having rapid PSA results available immediately following interview provides opportunities to explore discrepancies between the objective marker of recent semen exposure and self-reported behaviors.

  18. Impact of the availability of an influenza virus rapid antigen test on diagnostic decision making in a pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Hojat, Katayun; Duppenthaler, Andrea; Aebi, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Fever is one of the most commonly seen symptoms in the pediatric emergency department. The objective of this study was to observe how the rapid testing for influenza virus impacts on the management of children with fever. We performed a review of our pediatric emergency department records during the 2008/2009 annual influenza season. The BinaxNow Influenza A+B test was performed on patients with the following criteria: age 1.0 to 16.0 years, fever greater than 38.5 °C, fever of less than 96 hours' duration after the onset of clinical illness, clinical signs compatible with acute influenza, and nontoxic appearance. Additional laboratory tests were performed at the treating physician's discretion. The influenza rapid antigen test was performed in 192 children. One hundred nine (57%) were influenza positive, with the largest fraction (101 patients) positive for influenza A. The age distribution did not differ between children with negative and positive test results (mean, 5.3 vs. 5.1 years, not statistically significant). A larger number of diagnostic tests were performed in the group of influenza-negative patients. Twice as many complete blood counts, C-reactive protein determinations, lumbar punctures, and urinalyses were ordered in the latter group. Rapid diagnosis of influenza in the pediatric emergency department affects the management of febrile children as the confirmation of influenza virus infection decreases additional diagnostic tests ordered.

  19. Rapid-Antigen Test Negative Malaria in a Traveler Returning From Thailand, Molecularly Diagnosed as Plasmodium knowlesi.

    PubMed

    Mackroth, Maria S; Tappe, Dennis; Tannich, Egbert; Addo, Marylyn; Rothe, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi has been identified in the last decade as a fifth species causing malaria in areas of South East Asia. Due to its short erythrocytic cycle, rapid development of high parasitemia and severe manifestations are frequently observed. Therefore, prompt diagnosis of infection is essential to prevent complications, but the low sensitivity of rapid diagnostic tests for P knowlesi pose a diagnostic challenge in acute settings. In this study, we report the case of a German traveler to Thailand, who was treated for P knowlesi malaria after returning to Germany. Rapid antigen test for malaria was negative on presentation. Diagnosis of a nonfalciparum malaria was made based on microscopy, and species definition was determined using polymerase chain reaction technique.

  20. Rapid-Antigen Test Negative Malaria in a Traveler Returning From Thailand, Molecularly Diagnosed as Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    Mackroth, Maria S.; Tappe, Dennis; Tannich, Egbert; Addo, Marylyn; Rothe, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi has been identified in the last decade as a fifth species causing malaria in areas of South East Asia. Due to its short erythrocytic cycle, rapid development of high parasitemia and severe manifestations are frequently observed. Therefore, prompt diagnosis of infection is essential to prevent complications, but the low sensitivity of rapid diagnostic tests for P knowlesi pose a diagnostic challenge in acute settings. In this study, we report the case of a German traveler to Thailand, who was treated for P knowlesi malaria after returning to Germany. Rapid antigen test for malaria was negative on presentation. Diagnosis of a nonfalciparum malaria was made based on microscopy, and species definition was determined using polymerase chain reaction technique. PMID:27006963

  1. The Relationship Between Education and Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing Among Urban African American Medicare Beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Hararah, Mohammad Khalid; Pollack, Craig Evan; Garza, Mary A; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Markakis, Diane; Phelan-Emrick, Darcy F; Wenzel, Jennifer; Shapiro, Gary R; Bone, Lee; Johnson, Lawrence; Ford, Jean G

    2015-06-01

    We examined the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) cancer screening among older African American men. We analyzed baseline data from a sample of 485 community-dwelling African American men who participated in the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Demonstration Trial. The outcome was receipt of PSA screening within the past year. SES was measured using income and educational attainment. Sequential multivariate logistic regression models were performed to study whether health care access, patient-provider relationship, and cancer fatalism mediated the relationship between SES and PSA screening. Higher educational attainment was significantly associated with higher odds of PSA screening in the past year (odds ratio (OR) 2.08 for college graduate compared to less than high school graduate, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.03-4.24); income was not. Health care access and patient-provider communication did not alter the relationship between education and screening; however, beliefs regarding cancer fatalism partially mediated the observed relationship. Rates of prostate cancer screening among African American men vary by level of educational attainment; beliefs concerning cancer fatalism help explain this gradient. Understanding the determinants of cancer fatalism is a critical next step in building interventions that seek to ensure equitable access to prostate cancer screening.

  2. The Relationship Between Education and Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing Among Urban African American Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Garza, Mary A.; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Markakis, Diane; Phelan-Emrick, Darcy F.; Wenzel, Jennifer; Shapiro, Gary R.; Bone, Lee; Johnson, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We examined the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) cancer screening among older African American men. Methods We analyzed baseline data from a sample of 485 community-dwelling African American men who participated in the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Demonstration Trial. The outcome was receipt of PSA screening within the past year. SES was measured using income and educational attainment. Sequential multivariate logistic regression models were performed to study whether health care access, patient–provider relationship, and cancer fatalism mediated the relationship between SES and PSA screening. Results Higher educational attainment was significantly associated with higher odds of PSA screening in the past year (odds ratio (OR) 2.08 for college graduate compared to less than high school graduate, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.03–4.24); income was not. Health care access and patient–provider communication did not alter the relationship between education and screening; however, beliefs regarding cancer fatalism partially mediated the observed relationship. Conclusion Rates of prostate cancer screening among African American men vary by level of educational attainment; beliefs concerning cancer fatalism help explain this gradient. Understanding the determinants of cancer fatalism is a critical next step in building interventions that seek to ensure equitable access to prostate cancer screening. PMID:26863336

  3. Correlation between the response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens and the tuberculin skin test in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Colombia.

    PubMed

    López, Yurika; Vargas, Francisco; Velásquez, Mónica; Ortiz, Carolina; Rodríguez, Libia M; París, Sara; García, Luis F; Baena, Andrés; Vásquez, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients under treatment with anti-TNF-α are at a high risk of developing active tuberculosis, and therefore, screening for latent tuberculosis infection is recommended before anti-TNF-α therapy. To compare the tuberculin test and IFNγ production induced by culture filtrate proteins(CFPs) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CFP-10 antigens in rheumatoid arthritis patients. An analytic transversal study was conducted in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated at Hospital Universitario San Vicente Fundación between January and December 2007. IFNγ production in response to CFPs and CFP-10 was measured in the supernatants of whole blood cultures and evaluated for correlations with tuberculin reactivity. The degree of concordance between both tests was also established. Forty-five patients were included, of which 14 (31.1%) had a tuberculin reaction of ≥10 mm of induration, 9 (20%) produced IFNγ in response to CFP-10, and 7 were positive for both tests. The correlation between tests was r=0.53 (IC 95%:0.28-0.72), and the global concordance between tests was80%, with a Kappa coefficient of 0.48 (IC95%:0.20-0.76). Only two tuberculin (-)/CFP-10+ "anergic" patients were observed. By contrast, six tuberculin +/CFP-10(-) "tuberculin false-positive" patients were observed. These data suggest that the tuberculin test is not an appropriate tool for determining the need for tuberculosis prophylaxis.

  4. Prostate-specific antigen testing in men aged 40-64 years: impact of publication of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, James S; Tan, Alai; Jaramillo, Elizabeth; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2013-05-15

    We assessed the impact of the publication of trials and changes in recommendations on the rates of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in men aged 40 to 64 years by analyzing monthly medical claims for PSA testing in a commercial insurance database from 2001 to 2011, covering more than 1.5 million men in each year. The testing rates for men aged 40 to 49 years, 50 to 59 years, and 60 to 64 years were 12.1%, 32.7%, and 42.7%, respectively, in 2001 vs 15.7%, 34.2%, and 42.0%, respectively, in 2011. Men aged 40 to 49 years experienced a gradual increase in testing rate from 2001 through 2008 (annual change in PSA testing per 10,000 men [AC] = 4.37; P < .001), which became flat from mid-2009 through 2011(AC = -0.06; P =.98). The slope of PSA testing rates did not change in men aged 50 to 59 years or 60 to 64 years with the publication of the results of the large trials in 2009 or with the subsequent changes in recommendations on PSA testing.

  5. Evaluation of antigen detection and antibody detection tests for Trypanosoma evansi infections of buffaloes in Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, H. C.; Thrusfield, M. V.; Muharsini, S.; Husein, A.; Partoutomo, S.; Rae, P. F.; Masake, R.; Luckins, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    Two Ag-ELISAs, an IgG-specific antibody detection ELISA (IgG ELISA) and a card agglutination test (CATT) for the detection of Trypanasoma evansi infections in buffaloes in Indonesia, were compared. Diagnostic sensitivity estimates were obtained by testing sera from 139 Indonesian buffaloes which had been found to be infected by parasitological tests. Diagnostic specificity was estimated by testing sera from 263 buffaloes living in Australia. Response-operating characteristic curves were constructed, and optimal ELISA cut-off values, which minimized the number of false-negative and false-positive results, were chosen. The IgG ELISA had the highest sensitivity (89%) and the CATT had the highest specificity (100%). There was a significant difference between the sensitivities (71 and 81%), but not between the specificities (75 and 78%), of the two Ag-ELISAs. The four tests were further compared by calculation of post-test probabilities of infection for positive and negative test results using a range of prevalence values, and likelihood ratios. The results suggested that the CATT was the best test to 'rule-in' infection (i.e. the highest probability of infection in test-positive animals) and the IgG ELISA was the best test to 'rule-out' infection (i.e. the lowest probability of infection in test-negative animals). PMID:10487651

  6. Evaluation of antigen detection and antibody detection tests for Trypanosoma evansi infections of buffaloes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Davison, H C; Thrusfield, M V; Muharsini, S; Husein, A; Partoutomo, S; Rae, P F; Masake, R; Luckins, A G

    1999-08-01

    Two Ag-ELISAs, an IgG-specific antibody detection ELISA (IgG ELISA) and a card agglutination test (CATT) for the detection of Trypanasoma evansi infections in buffaloes in Indonesia, were compared. Diagnostic sensitivity estimates were obtained by testing sera from 139 Indonesian buffaloes which had been found to be infected by parasitological tests. Diagnostic specificity was estimated by testing sera from 263 buffaloes living in Australia. Response-operating characteristic curves were constructed, and optimal ELISA cut-off values, which minimized the number of false-negative and false-positive results, were chosen. The IgG ELISA had the highest sensitivity (89%) and the CATT had the highest specificity (100%). There was a significant difference between the sensitivities (71 and 81%), but not between the specificities (75 and 78%), of the two Ag-ELISAs. The four tests were further compared by calculation of post-test probabilities of infection for positive and negative test results using a range of prevalence values, and likelihood ratios. The results suggested that the CATT was the best test to 'rule-in' infection (i.e. the highest probability of infection in test-positive animals) and the IgG ELISA was the best test to 'rule-out' infection (i.e. the lowest probability of infection in test-negative animals).

  7. Evaluation of a New Immunochromatographic Test Using Recombinant Antigen B8/1 for Diagnosis of Cystic Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Mary L.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Sako, Yashuito; Nkouawa, Agathe; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Sotomayor, Alfredo L.; Peralta, Julio E.; Valcarcel, Maria; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, Hector H.; Ito, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis (CE) is based on the identification of the cyst(s) by imaging, using immunodiagnostic tests mainly as complementary tools in clinical settings. Among the antigens used for immunodiagnosis, previous studies described a good performance of the recombinant antigen B8/1 (rAgB) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format; however, in remote parts of areas where the disease is endemic, the implementation of an ELISA is difficult, so a more simple, rapid, and reliable method such as the immunochromatographic test (ICT) is required. In this study, using a set of 50 serum samples from patients with surgically confirmed CE, we compared the performance of an ICT and that of an ELISA using the rAgB. The overall sensitivities of ICT and ELISA were not statistically different (78% versus 72%; P = 0.36). The overall agreement between both tests was moderate (κ = 0.41; P < 0.01). Concordance between ICT and ELISA was substantial or almost perfect for patients with liver involvement (κ = 0.65; P < 0.001) and patients with more than one hydatid cyst (κ = 0.82; P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, specificity analysis using a total of 88 serum samples from healthy individuals (n = 20) and patients (n = 68) with other parasitic infections revealed that ICT had a specificity of 89.8%. ICT and ELISA had similar performance for the detection of specific antibodies to E. granulosus, and ICT had a high specificity, opening the possibility of using ICT as a screening tool in rural settings. PMID:26447116

  8. Evaluation of a New Immunochromatographic Test Using Recombinant Antigen B8/1 for Diagnosis of Cystic Echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Santivañez, Saul J; Rodriguez, Mary L; Rodriguez, Silvia; Sako, Yashuito; Nkouawa, Agathe; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Sotomayor, Alfredo L; Peralta, Julio E; Valcarcel, Maria; Gonzalez, Armando E; Garcia, Hector H; Ito, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis (CE) is based on the identification of the cyst(s) by imaging, using immunodiagnostic tests mainly as complementary tools in clinical settings. Among the antigens used for immunodiagnosis, previous studies described a good performance of the recombinant antigen B8/1 (rAgB) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format; however, in remote parts of areas where the disease is endemic, the implementation of an ELISA is difficult, so a more simple, rapid, and reliable method such as the immunochromatographic test (ICT) is required. In this study, using a set of 50 serum samples from patients with surgically confirmed CE, we compared the performance of an ICT and that of an ELISA using the rAgB. The overall sensitivities of ICT and ELISA were not statistically different (78% versus 72%; P = 0.36). The overall agreement between both tests was moderate (κ = 0.41; P < 0.01). Concordance between ICT and ELISA was substantial or almost perfect for patients with liver involvement (κ = 0.65; P < 0.001) and patients with more than one hydatid cyst (κ = 0.82; P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, specificity analysis using a total of 88 serum samples from healthy individuals (n = 20) and patients (n = 68) with other parasitic infections revealed that ICT had a specificity of 89.8%. ICT and ELISA had similar performance for the detection of specific antibodies to E. granulosus, and ICT had a high specificity, opening the possibility of using ICT as a screening tool in rural settings.

  9. Extent and effects of recurrent shortages of purified-protein derivative tuberculin skin test antigen solutions - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-12-13

    Two purified-protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin skin test (TST) antigen solutions are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): Tubersol (Sanofi Pasteur Limited) and Aplisol (JHP Pharmaceuticals, LLC). Tubersol was out of production in late 2012 through April 2013. Shortages of Aplisol have resulted from increased demand as practitioners have sought a substitute for Tubersol. Tubersol production resumed in May 2013, and supplies had been nearly restored by early June. However, in mid-July, state tuberculosis (TB) control officials notified CDC of difficulty obtaining Tubersol and Aplisol. Sanofi Pasteur notified FDA of a temporary delay in the availability of tuberculin in the 10-dose and 50-dose presentations. In mid-October, the 10-dose presentation was being returned to market, on allocation, which means that historical purchasing practices determine the amount that customers are allotted. In late October, the 50-dose presentation was being returned to market, also on allocation, one vial per historical customer per month. Supplies are forecast to approach normal during January 2014, after distributors have restored their supply chains. A compensatory surge in testing after deferment of testing during the periods of shortage might cause further temporary instability of supplies. In mid-August 2013, officials in 29 of 52 U.S. jurisdictions noted a shortage of at least one PPD TST antigen solution in health departments to the extent that it interrupted activities. This report includes a summary of the extent and effects of the shortages and a reiteration of advice on how to adapt to them.

  10. Clinical evaluation of the QuickVet/RapidVet canine dog erythrocyte antigen 1.1 blood-typing test.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Barbara; Classe, Gabriele; Weingart, Christiane

    2012-05-01

    In transfusion medicine, blood typing is an integral part of pretransfusion testing. The objective of the current study was the clinical evaluation of an automated canine cartridge dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 1.1 blood-typing method (QuickVet/RapidVet) and comparison of the results with a gel column-based method (ID-Gel Test Canine DEA 1.1). Ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid-anticoagulated blood samples from 11 healthy and 85 sick dogs were available for typing. Before blood typing, all samples were tested for agglutination and hemolysis. All samples were tested once or multiple times with both methods according to the manufacturer's guidelines. With the gel method, 53 dogs tested DEA 1.1 positive and 42 dogs DEA 1.1 negative; blood typing was not possible due to erythrocyte autoagglutination in 1 dog. With the cartridge test, 53 samples tested DEA 1.1 positive, 34 samples tested DEA 1.1 negative, and 6 results were inconclusive (3 samples were not included due to autoagglutination or severe hemolysis). Without taking the inconclusive samples into account, the agreement between both methods was 96.5%. The sensitivity and specificity for samples that were definitively typed by both methods were 100% and 91.9%, respectively. The cartridge test was suitable for in-clinic canine DEA 1.1 blood typing, although some discrepancies compared to the gel method existed. The cartridge test is software-directed, is easy to use, and does not require user interpretation, but preanalytical guidelines (sample evaluation for agglutination and hemolysis) have to be followed. For inconclusive results, an alternate blood-typing method should be performed.

  11. Isolation and characterization of Yersinia-specific bacteriophages from pig stools in Finland.

    PubMed

    Salem, M; Virtanen, S; Korkeala, H; Skurnik, M

    2015-03-01

    Bacteriophages infect bacteria, and they are present everywhere in the world including the intestinal tracts of animals. Yersiniosis is a common foodborne infection caused by Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. As these bacteria are frequently isolated from pigs, we wanted to know whether Yersinia-specific bacteriophages are also present in the pig stools and, if so, whether there is a positive or negative association between the prevalence of the Yersinia phages and the pathogenic Yersinia in the stool samples. Altogether 793 pig stool samples collected between November 2010 and March 2012 from 14 Finnish pig farms were screened for the presence of bacteriophages able to infect Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3, O:5,27 or O:9 strains, or Y. pseudotuberculosis serotype O:1a, O:1b or O:3 strains. Yersinia phages were isolated from 90 samples from eight farms. Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 was infected by 59 phages, 28 phages infected serotypes O:3 and O:5,27, and eight phages infected serotypes O:3, O:5,27 and O:9, and Y. pseudotuberculosis O:1a by eight phages. Many phages originating from pigs in the same farm were identical based on their restriction enzyme digestion patterns; 20 clearly different phages were selected for further characterization. Host ranges of these phages were tested with 94 Yersinia strains. Six of the phages infected eight strains, 13 phages infected three strains, and one phage infected only one strain, indicating that the phages had a relatively narrow host range. There was a clear association between the presence of the host bacteria and specific phages in the stools. The isolated bacteriophages may have potential as biocontrol agents for yersiniosis in both humans and pigs in future, and as alternatives or in addition to antibiotics. To our knowledge, this is the first reported isolation of Yersinia-specific phages from pig stool samples. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Clinical illnesses associated with isolation of dysgonic fermenter 3 from stool samples.

    PubMed Central

    Blum, R N; Berry, C D; Phillips, M G; Hamilos, D L; Koneman, E W

    1992-01-01

    The clinical significance of the fastidious organism DF-3 isolated from stool cultures is unclear. We sought to improve our understanding of this organism and to further define its association with human disease. Stool cultures for DF-3 were obtained from three sources: an ongoing study of enteric pathogens in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, a screening procedure in which all stool samples submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin assay were cultured for DF-3, and stool samples submitted specifically for DF-3 culture. Retrospective clinical data were obtained from chart reviews of patients with positive cultures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and cell wall fatty acid analysis were performed for each DF-3 isolated. Eight isolates of DF-3 were obtained over a period of 8 months. All patients either had severe underlying disease or were immunocompromised, including three patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and two patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of clinical disease ranged from chronic diarrhea with a well-defined response to therapy for DF-3 to an asymptomatic carrier state. Cell wall fatty acid analysis of these isolates demonstrated a consistent pattern with a large peak of 12-methyltetradecanoate. DF-3, a fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus, can be recovered from stool cultures of immunocompromised patients by using selective media. The presence of 12-methyltetradecanoate in cell wall fatty acid analysis assists in identification. The increased use of a selective medium-(cefoperazone-vancomycin-amphotericin B) in the evaluation of diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts, including persons with inflammatory bowel disease, may better define the association of DF-3 with human gastrointestinal disease. PMID:1537908

  13. Clinical illnesses associated with isolation of dysgonic fermenter 3 from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Blum, R N; Berry, C D; Phillips, M G; Hamilos, D L; Koneman, E W

    1992-02-01

    The clinical significance of the fastidious organism DF-3 isolated from stool cultures is unclear. We sought to improve our understanding of this organism and to further define its association with human disease. Stool cultures for DF-3 were obtained from three sources: an ongoing study of enteric pathogens in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, a screening procedure in which all stool samples submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin assay were cultured for DF-3, and stool samples submitted specifically for DF-3 culture. Retrospective clinical data were obtained from chart reviews of patients with positive cultures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and cell wall fatty acid analysis were performed for each DF-3 isolated. Eight isolates of DF-3 were obtained over a period of 8 months. All patients either had severe underlying disease or were immunocompromised, including three patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and two patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of clinical disease ranged from chronic diarrhea with a well-defined response to therapy for DF-3 to an asymptomatic carrier state. Cell wall fatty acid analysis of these isolates demonstrated a consistent pattern with a large peak of 12-methyltetradecanoate. DF-3, a fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus, can be recovered from stool cultures of immunocompromised patients by using selective media. The presence of 12-methyltetradecanoate in cell wall fatty acid analysis assists in identification. The increased use of a selective medium-(cefoperazone-vancomycin-amphotericin B) in the evaluation of diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts, including persons with inflammatory bowel disease, may better define the association of DF-3 with human gastrointestinal disease.

  14. Specific testing for "isolated" anti-52 kDa SSA/Ro antibodies during standard anti-extractable nuclear antigen testing is of limited clinical value.

    PubMed

    Langguth, Daman M; Morris, Samantha; Clifford, Lynette; Wilson, Robert J; Neil, John; Hogan, Patrick G; Wong, Richard C W

    2007-06-01

    To ascertain whether specific testing for "isolated" anti-52 kDa SSA/Ro antibodies (a-SSA/Ro52) during standard anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) testing is clinically useful. 1438 consecutive sera submitted for anti-ENA testing over 1 year were evaluated for a-SSA/Ro52 using various assays. 7 of 1438 (0.48%) patients were found to have a-SSA/Ro52 without SSA/Ro60 antibodies. Subsequent testing detected a further five patients. Clinical follow-up was possible in 10/12 patients. 2 of these 10 patients had evidence of primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and one had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with sicca symptoms and abnormal Schirmer's tests. Five other patients had sicca symptoms, of which four had abnormal Schirmer's tests. "Isolated" anti-52 kDa SSA/Ro antibodies were detected in approximately 0.5% of standard anti-ENA requests, in which their presence was generally not associated with underlying SS or SLE. In view of the increased testing complexity and costs in detecting and confirming these antibodies, specific testing for isolated a-SSA Ro52 antibodies during standard anti-ENA testing seems to be of limited clinical value in a non-obstetric population.

  15. Dual Immunomagnetic Nanobeads-Based Lateral Flow Test Strip for Simultaneous Quantitative Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Neuron Specific Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenting; Wang, Kan; Xiao, Kun; Qin, Weijian; Hou, Yafei; Xu, Hao; Yan, Xinyu; Chen, Yanrong; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2017-01-01

    A novel immunomagnetic nanobeads -based lateral flow test strip was developed for the simultaneous quantitative detection of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which are sensitive and specific in the clinical diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Using this nanoscale method, high saturation magnetization, carboxyl-modified magnetic nanobeads were successfully synthesized. To obtain the immunomagnetic probes, a covalent bioconjugation of the magnetic nanobeads with the antibody of NSE and CEA was carried out. The detection area contained test line 1 and test line 2 which captured the immune complexes sensitively and formed sandwich complexes. In this assay, cross-reactivity results were negative and both NSE and CEA were detected simultaneously with no obvious influence on each other. The magnetic signal intensity of the nitrocellulose membrane was measured by a magnetic assay reader. For quantitative analysis, the calculated limit of detection was 0.094 ng/mL for NSE and 0.045 ng/mL for CEA. One hundred thirty clinical samples were used to validate the test strip which exhibited high sensitivity and specificity. This dual lateral flow test strip not only provided an easy, rapid, simultaneous quantitative detection strategy for NSE and CEA, but may also be valuable in automated and portable diagnostic applications. PMID:28186176

  16. Randomised controlled trial on whether advance knowledge of prostate‐specific antigen testing improves participant reporting of unprotected sex

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Sarah C; Gallo, Maria F; Ombidi, Wilkister; Omungo, Zablon; Janowitz, Barbara; Hawken, Mark; Tucker, Heidi; Wong, Emelita L; Hobbs, Marcia M

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the process of informing research participants that they would be tested for the presence of a biological marker of semen exposure would reduce bias in their reports of unprotected sex. Methods A randomised trial of 210 female sex workers from Mombasa, Kenya, was conducted, where half the group had advance knowledge (via the request for informed consent) that they would be tested for prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) in their vaginal fluid before they reported on sex and condom use for the past 48 h. The other half were invited to participate (via additional informed consent) in the test for PSA after they had already consented to be questioned and reported on these sexual behaviours. A trained nurse instructed participants to self‐swab to collect vaginal fluid specimens, which were tested for PSA using ELISA. Results Reporting of unprotected sex did not differ between those with advance knowledge of the test for PSA and those without this knowledge (14.3% v 11.4%, respectively; p = 0.27). Surprisingly, more women with advance knowledge (15.8%) had discrepant self reports and PSA results than women without advance knowledge (9.1%); however, the difference was not statistically significant (OR 1.9; 95% CI 0.8 to 4.5). Conclusions Knowing that one's answers to a questionnaire could be verified with a biological marker of semen exposure did not make respondents more likely to report unprotected sex. PMID:17135328

  17. In vitro evaluation of five rapid antigen detection tests for group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal sore throat infections.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, Gemma M; McNulty, Cliodna A M; Richard Hobbs, F D; Mant, David; Little, Paul

    2009-12-01

    Using accurate and easy to use rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) to identify group A beta-haemolytic Streptococci (GABHS) sore throat infections could reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing and antimicrobial resistance. Although there is no international consensus on the use of RADTs, these kits have been widely adopted in Finland, France and the USA. Yet in the UK, the Clinical Knowledge Summaries, that provide the main online guidance for GPs, discourage RADTs use, citing their poor sensitivity and inability to impact on prescribing decisions in acute sore throat infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ease of use and in vitro accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of the five most commonly used RADTs in Europe (OSOM Ultra, Quickvue Dipstick, Streptatest, Clearview Exact Strep A and IMI Test Pack). To ensure the RADTs were evaluated objectively, a standardized in vitro method using known concentrations of GABHS was used to remove the inherent biases associated with clinical studies. The IMI Test Pack was the easiest RADT to use overall. The ability to detect all positive GABHS (sensitivity) varied considerably between kits from 95% [95% confidence interval (CI): 88-98%], for the IMI Test Pack and OSOM, to 62% (95% CI: 51-72%) for Clearview, at the highest GABHS concentration. None of the RADTs gave any false-positive results with commensal flora-they were 100% specific. The IMI Test Pack is most suitable for use in primary care, as it had high sensitivity, high specificity and was easy to use.

  18. Value of rapid antigen test for pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Duman, Murat; Gençpinar, Pinar; Ozbek, Ozgen Alpay; Ozdemir, Durgül; Sayiner, A Arzu

    2013-05-01

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza is the predominant influenza virus circulating in Turkey in 2009. Because of the clinical manifestations of influenza overlap with those attributable to other common respiratory illnesses of childhood, establishing a diagnosis of influenza requires confirmatory testing. The aim of our study was to define the predictive value of rapid influenza antigen detection test in children presenting to a pediatric emergency care department with influenza-like illness and to compare with clinical signs and symptoms. From October to November 2009, 3646 patients presented with influenza-like illness to the pediatric emergency department. Influenza-like illness is defined as fever with cough or sore throat in the absence of a known cause other than influenza. Enrollment criteria included fever and at least one of the following symptoms: coryza, cough, headache, sore throat, or myalgia. All 322 enrolled patients received a nasal wash for rapid influenza diagnostic tests, and the results were compared with clinical signs. Rapid influenza detection test result was found positive in 167 (51.9%) of 322 patients. Clinical findings included fever as the presenting complaint (100%), fever (≥38 °C) (93.4%), cough (91.3%), rhinorrhea (66.1%), sore throat (35.1%), vomiting-diarrhea (22.4%), myalgia (20.2%), headache (18%) and shortness of breath (12.1%). There were 211 patients (65.5%) at high risk for the development of complications of pandemic H1N1 influenza A such as chronic lung disease (asthma) (n = 103, 48.8%), age younger than 2 years (n = 78, 37%), and neurologic disease (n = 10, 4.7%). The positivity rate and sensitivity of the test increase up to 70% in patients, who had the high body temperature (≥39 °C). The rapid test achieved the highest sensitivity in patients, who have high fever (≥39 °C), myalgia, vomiting, and diarrhea. We found that if the patients have high fever (≥39 °C), myalgia, and vomiting-diarrhea together, the likelihood of

  19. [Detection of Neisseria meningitidis group B antigens by MB-Dot-Elisa test in patients with meningitis].

    PubMed

    Alkmin, M G; Landgraf, I M; Shimizu, S H

    1997-03-01

    Infection with Neisseria meningitidis group B has been difficult to detect, partly because this bacterial group's polysaccharide is a weak immunogen. This article describes work carried out to test a new procedure (MB-Dot-ELISA) employing a high-titered horse antiserum for detection of N. meningitidis group B antigens. The study assayed cerebrospinal fluid samples from 585 subjects, 574 with suspected meningitis cases and 11 with neurologic disorders. The results of the assay indicated a sensitivity of 0.991 and a specificity of 0.826. These results were superior to those obtained with latex agglutination and in substantial agreement with the results of counterimmunoelectrophoresis and bacteriologic methods. Overall, the MB-Dot-ELISA was found to be sensitive, inexpensive, and suitable for public health laboratory investigations.

  20. False-negative cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen test due to small-colony variants of Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis in a patient with cystopleural shunt.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Tang, Bone S F; Fan, Yiu-Wah; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2006-01-01

    This is the first report of a small-colony variant Cryptococcus neoformans isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with cystopleural shunt associated chronic meningitis. Cryptococcal antigen testing of the cerebrospinal fluid and the serum were both negative. The atypical morphology and the false-negative test may lead to delay of diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Shortening of the diagnostic window with a new combined HIV p24 antigen and anti-HIV-1/2/O screening test.

    PubMed

    Brust, S; Duttmann, H; Feldner, J; Gürtler, L; Thorstensson, R; Simon, F

    2000-11-01

    Because antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are absent in the very early phase of HIV infection, there remains a slight residual risk for HIV transmission by blood donations by viremic but antibody negative donations. To shorten the diagnostic window between infection and the detection of antibodies, Enzygnost HIV Integral (Dade Behring, Germany) was developed. With this new test, HIV p24 antigen and HIV antibodies can be detected simultaneously in a single test. In a multicenter study the new screening assay has been compared with various tests that detect only HIV antibodies or HIV p24 antigen and with assays which permit a simultaneous detection of HIV antigen and HIV antibodies. The new assay showed 100% sensitivity for the detection of antibodies to HIV-1, groups M (n=1102) and O (n=55), and HIV-2 (n=289). In 23 out of 52 seroconversion panels, seroconversion was detected 2-18 days earlier with the new combined antigen/antibody test compared to single antibody tests. All samples from a viral load panel (n=451), all samples containing p24 antigen (n=302), and all but one of the cell culture supernatants (n=38) infected with various HIV-1 subtypes or HIV-2 were identified reliably by the new test. The specificity of the assay for 4002 unselected blood donors was 99.78% initially and 99.80% after retesting. Potentially interfering factors had no systematic influence on specificity. By testing for p24 antigen, which is present prior to the onset of antibody production in some cases of recent HIV infection, the new assay reduces the diagnostic window as compared to third generation screening assays, thus permitting an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection.

  2. Rapid and quantitative detection of prostate specific antigen with a quantum dot nanobeads-based immunochromatography test strip.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Li, Wenbin; Yang, Qiuhua; Gong, Xiaoqun; Guo, Weisheng; Dong, Chunhong; Liu, Junqing; Xuan, Lixue; Chang, Jin

    2014-05-14

    Convenient and fast testing using an immunochromatography test strip (ICTS) enables rapid yes/no decisions regarding a disease to be made. However, the fundamental limitations of an ICTS, such as a lack of quantitative and sensitive analysis, severely hampers its application in reliable medical testing for the early detection of cancer. Herein, we overcame these limitations by integrating an ICTS with quantum dot nanobeads (QD nanobeads), which were fabricated by encapsulating QDs within modified poly(tert-butyl acrylate-co-ethyl acrylate-co-methacrylic acid) and served as a robust signal-generating reagent for the ICTS. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was used as a model analyte to demonstrate the performance of the QD nanobeads-based ICTS platform. Under optimized conditions, the concentration of PSA could be determined within 15 min with high sensitivity and specificity using only 40 μL of sample. The detection limit was enhanced by ∼12-fold compared with that of an ICTS that used QDs encapsulated by commercial 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (QDs@MUA) as the signal-generating reagent. At the same time, the possible clinical utility of this approach was demonstrated by measurements recorded from PSA-positive patient specimens. Our data suggest that the QD nanobeads-based ICTS platform is not only rapid and low-cost but also highly sensitive and specific for use in quantitative point-of-care diagnostics; thus, it holds promise for becoming a part of routine medical testing for the early cancer of detection.

  3. False positive dengue NS1 antigen test in a traveller with an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gyurech, Danielle; Schilling, Julian; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Cassinotti, Pascal; Kaeppeli, Franz; Dobec, Marinko

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland by a traveller returning from Canoa Quebrada, Ceará state, in the north-eastern part of Brazil. Due to a false positive dengue virus NS1 antigen test, IgG antibody seroconversion and a suggestive clinical picture,an acute dengue fever was initially considered. However, because of lack of specific IgM-antibodies, stationary IgG antibody titre and a negative dengue virus PCR test result, a dengue virus infection was excluded and a cross-reaction with other, causative flaviviruses was postulated. Based on recent reports of Zika fever cases in the north-eastern parts of Brazil, an acute Zika virus infection was suspected. Because of a lack of commercially available Zika virus diagnostic tests, the case was confirmed in the WHO reference laboratory. As the clinical presentation of Zika virus infection can be confused with dengue fever and chikungunya fever, and because of possible public health implications, all patients returning from affected areas should be additionally tested for Zika virus. This case illustrates the urgent medical need for a broadly available assay capable of differentiating Zika from Dengue infections.

  4. Gelatin particle indirect agglutination and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis using Strongyloides venezuelensis antigen.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Sato, Yoshiya; Aguilar, Jose Luis; Terashima, Angelica; Guerra, Humberto; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2003-01-01

    Routine microscopical examination of stool specimens for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis is insensitive and serological methods using Strongyloides stercoralis antigen are at present not available for field studies. We evaluated 2 techniques, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gelatin particle indirect agglutination (GPIA), using an antigen obtained from the rodent parasite, S. venezuelensis. Fifty-four Peruvian patients with different clinical forms of strongyloidiasis were studied: 12 asymptomatic, 31 symptomatic, and 11 hyperinfection cases. Our results demonstrate that both ELISA and GPIA using S. venezuelensis antigen are useful for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis, with sensitivities of 74.1% and 98.2%, respectively and a specificity of 100% for both techniques. We found that GPIA is a highly sensitive test for patients with suspected chronic infection and/or hyperinfection. In the hyperinfection cases, significantly lower concentrations of specific immunoglobulin antibodies and eosinophils (P < 0.001) were found compared with the asymptomatic and symptomatic cases.

  5. Screening for prostate cancer with prostate-specific antigen testing: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion.

    PubMed

    Basch, Ethan; Oliver, Thomas K; Vickers, Andrew; Thompson, Ian; Kantoff, Philip; Parnes, Howard; Loblaw, D Andrew; Roth, Bruce; Williams, James; Nam, Robert K

    2012-08-20

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction to the ASCO membership after publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO addresses the role of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in the screening of men for prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. The rationale for screening men for prostate cancer is the potential to reduce the risk of death through early detection. Evidence from a 2011 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality systematic review primarily informs this PCO on the benefits and harms of PSA-based screening. An update search was conducted to March 16, 2012, for additional evidence related to the topic. In one randomized trial, PSA testing in men who would not otherwise have been screened resulted in reduced death rates from prostate cancer, but it is uncertain whether the size of the effect was worth the harms associated with screening and subsequent unnecessary treatment. Although there are limitations to the existing data, there is evidence to suggest that men with longer life expectancy may benefit from PSA testing. Adverse events associated with prostate biopsy are low for the majority of men; however, several population-based studies have shown increasing rates of infectious complications after prostate biopsy, which is a concern.

  6. Combined stool-based multiplex PCR and microscopy for enhanced pathogen detection in patients with persistent diarrhoea and asymptomatic controls from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Becker, S L; Chatigre, J K; Gohou, J-P; Coulibaly, J T; Leuppi, R; Polman, K; Chappuis, F; Mertens, P; Herrmann, M; N'Goran, E K; Utzinger, J; von Müller, L

    2015-06-01

    Infectious diarrhoea ranks among the leading causes of morbidity worldwide. Although most acute diarrhoeal episodes are self-limiting, the diagnosis and treatment of persistent diarrhoea (≥2 weeks) are cumbersome and require laboratory identification of the causative pathogen. Stool-based PCR assays have greatly improved the previously disappointing pathogen detection rates in high-income countries, but there is a paucity of quality data from tropical settings. We performed a case-control study to elucidate the spectrum of intestinal pathogens in patients with persistent diarrhoea and asymptomatic controls in southern Côte d'Ivoire. Stool samples from 68 patients and 68 controls were obtained and subjected to molecular multiplex testing with the Luminex(®) Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP), microscopy and rapid antigen detection tests for the diagnosis of diarrhoeagenic pathogens. Overall, 20 different bacteria, parasites and viruses were detected by the suite of diagnostic methods employed. At least one pathogen was observed in 84% of the participants, and co-infections were observed in >50% of the participants. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (32%), Giardia intestinalis (29%) and Shigella species (20%) were the predominant pathogens, and Strongyloides stercoralis (10%) was the most prevalent helminth. Pathogen frequencies and numbers of co-infections were similar in patients and controls. Although the Luminex(®) GPP detects a broad range of pathogens, microscopy for helminths and intestinal protozoa remains necessary to cover the full aetiological spectrum in tropical settings. We conclude that highly sensitive multiplex PCR assays constitute a useful screening tool, but that positive results might need to be confirmed by independent methods to discriminate active infection from asymptomatic faecal shedding of nucleic acids. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. Population-based prostate-specific antigen testing in the UK leads to a stage migration of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison L; Dimitropoulou, Polyxeni; Lane, Athene; Powell, Philip H; Greenberg, David C; Brown, Clement H; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Martin, Richard M; Neal, David E

    2009-12-01

    To determine, within the UK, the stage and grade of prostate cancers that would be found through population-based prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing and biopsy. In the 'Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment' trial (ProtecT), men aged 50-69 years were recruited from nine cities in the UK and from randomly selected practices of general practitioners. Those with a PSA level of >3 ng/mL were offered a prostate biopsy. Age, PSA, stage and grade at diagnosis of ProtecT participants with cancer were compared with contemporaneous incident cases aged 50-69 years (age-restricted Cancer Registry cases) registered with the Eastern Cancer Registration and Information Centre (ECRIC). Within ProtecT, 94,427 men agreed to be tested (50% of men contacted), 8807 ( approximately 9%) had a raised PSA level and 2022 (23%) had prostate cancer; 229 ( approximately 12%) had locally advanced (T3 or T4) or metastatic cancers, the rest having clinically localized (T1c or T2) disease. Within ECRIC, 12,661 cancers were recorded over the same period; 3714 were men aged 50-69 years at diagnosis. Men in ProtecT had a lower age distribution and PSA level, and the cancers were of lower stage and grade (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). If population-based PSA testing were introduced in the UK, approximately 2660 men per 100,000 aged 50-69 years would be found to have prostate cancer, compared to current rates of approximately 130 per 100,000. If half of men accepted PSA testing, approximately 160,000 cancers would be found, compared to 30,000 diagnosed each year at present. Population-based PSA testing resulted in a significant downward stage and grade migration, and most such cancers were of low stage and grade, which could lead to risks of over-treatment for some men.

  8. Design and testing for a nontagged F1-V fusion protein as vaccine antigen against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Powell, Bradford S; Andrews, Gerard P; Enama, Jeffrey T; Jendrek, Scott; Bolt, Chris; Worsham, Patricia; Pullen, Jeffrey K; Ribot, Wilson; Hines, Harry; Smith, Leonard; Heath, David G; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J

    2005-01-01

    A two-component recombinant fusion protein antigen was re-engineered and tested as a medical counter measure against the possible biological threat of aerosolized Yersinia pestis. The active component of the proposed subunit vaccine combines the F1 capsular protein and V virulence antigen of Y. pestis and improves upon the design of an earlier histidine-tagged fusion protein. In the current study, different production strains were screened for suitable expression and a purification process was optimized to isolate an F1-V fusion protein absent extraneous coding sequences. Soluble F1-V protein was isolated to 99% purity by sequential liquid chromatography including capture and refolding of urea-denatured protein via anion exchange, followed by hydrophobic interaction, concentration, and then transfer into buffered saline for direct use after frozen storage. Protein identity and primary structure were verified by mass spectrometry and Edman sequencing, confirming a purified product of 477 amino acids and removal of the N-terminal methionine. Purity, quality, and higher-order structure were compared between lots using RP-HPLC, intrinsic fluorescence, CD spectroscopy, and multi-angle light scattering spectroscopy, all of which indicated a consistent and properly folded product. As formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant and administered in a single subcutaneous dose, this new F1-V protein also protected mice from wild-type and non-encapsulated Y. pestis challenge strains, modeling prophylaxis against pneumonic and bubonic plague. These findings confirm that the fusion protein architecture provides superior protection over the former licensed product, establish a foundation from which to create a robust production process, and set forth assays for the development of F1-V as the active pharmaceutical ingredient of the next plague vaccine.

  9. [Serologic diagnosis of avian salmonelloses: adjustment of an ELISA test using antigens adsorbed with the aid of anti-colibacillary sera].

    PubMed

    Kles, V; Morin, M; Humbert, F; Lalande, F; Guittet, M; Bennejean, G

    1993-07-01

    A serological ELISA test for diagnosis of avian salmonellosis infections with Salmonella typhimurium or enteritidis has been established. Plates were coated half with a negative antigen and half with a positive antigen. Both negative and positive antigens were adsorbed with a monovalent agglutinant anti Escherichia coli serum prior to being distributed into wells of the plates. Sera from SPF birds and from SPF birds vaccinated and/or inoculated with numerous viruses or bacteria, or sera from conventional birds bacteriologically free of any salmonellosis were tested and the percentage of false positive reactions was inferior than 1%. In groups of birds naturally infected or experimentally inoculated with Salmonella enteritidis or typhimurium the percentages of positive individuals were ranged from 15 to more than 90% according to the doses and routes of inoculation and the delay between contamination and sampling.

  10. Comparison of the ImmuView and the BinaxNOW antigen tests in detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila in urine.

    PubMed

    Athlin, S; Iversen, A; Özenci, V

    2017-06-06

    The use of urinary antigen tests (UATs) may provide early etiology in pneumonia, and facilitates rapid and directed antibiotic treatment. In this study, we evaluated the novel lateral flow ImmuView Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila UAT, which detects pneumococcal and L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigens in a combined test. We compared the ImmuView UAT with the BinaxNOW S. pneumoniae UAT and the BinaxNOW L. pneumophila UAT in 147 patients with pneumococcal bacteremia (n = 48), non-pneumococcal non-Legionella bacteremia (n = 93) and Legionella infections in the lower airways (L. pneumophila, n = 5; L. bozemanii, n = 1). In three cases, the ImmuView test was invalid before and after boiling while the BinaxNOW tests were valid in all cases. In 144 cases, the three UATs demonstrated a very good inter-assay agreement for detection of pneumococcal antigen (κ = 0.86) and L. pneumophila antigen (κ = 1.00). The ImmuView and BinaxNOW S. pneumoniae tests had similar sensitivities (62% vs 60%; p = ns) in 48 cases with pneumococcal bacteremia and both tests had specificities of 97% in 96 cases with non-pneumococcal infections. Furthermore, the ImmuView and BinaxNOW L. pneumophila tests were positive for Legionella antigen in five patients with confirmed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 infections, and negative in all non-L. pneumophila cases. The ImmuView and BinaxNOW tests performed similarly when evaluated on urine samples from bacteremic and non-bacteremic patients with identified etiology.

  11. A simple and inexpensive point-of-care test for hepatitis B surface antigen detection: serological and molecular evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gish, R G; Gutierrez, J A; Navarro-Cazarez, N; Giang, K; Adler, D; Tran, B; Locarnini, S; Hammond, R; Bowden, S

    2014-12-01

    Early identification of chronic hepatitis B is important for optimal disease management and prevention of transmission. Cost and lack of access to commercial hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) immunoassays can compromise the effectiveness of HBV screening in resource-limited settings and among marginalized populations. High-quality point-of-care (POC) testing may improve HBV diagnosis in these situations. Currently available POC HBsAg assays are often limited in sensitivity. We evaluated the NanoSign(®) HBs POC chromatographic immunoassay for its ability to detect HBsAg of different genotypes and with substitutions in the 'a' determinant. Thirty-seven serum samples from patients with HBV infection, covering HBV genotypes A-G, were assessed for HBsAg titre with the Roche Elecsys HBsAg II quantification assay and with the POC assay. The POC assay reliably detected HBsAg at a concentration of at least 50 IU/mL for all genotypes, and at lower concentrations for some genotypes. Eight samples with substitutions in the HBV 'a' determinant were reliably detected after a 1/100 dilution. The POC strips were used to screen serum samples from 297 individuals at risk for HBV in local clinical settings (health fairs and outreach events) in parallel with commercial laboratory HBsAg testing (Quest Diagnostics EIA). POC testing was 73.7% sensitive and 97.8% specific for detection of HBsAg. Although the POC test demonstrated high sensitivity over a range of genotypes, false negatives were frequent in a clinical setting. Nevertheless, the POC assay offers advantages for testing in both developed and resource-limited countries due to its low cost (0.50$) and immediately available results. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction method to detect Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Mami; Verweij, Jaco J; Sethabutr, Orntipa; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Garcia, Lynne; Maro, Athanasia; Kumburu, Happiness; Gratz, Jean; Kibiki, Gibson; Houpt, Eric R

    2011-12-01

    Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia are eukaryotic enteropathogens that are difficult to detect in stool samples because they require special stains and microscopy. We developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reaction with 4 primer sets to amplify Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cystoisospora belli, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, and Encephalitozoon intestinalis. Detection of the amplicon is through specific probes coupled to Luminex beads. Sensitivity of the assay was evaluated using Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores and revealed detection of 10(1) spores spiked into stool. No cross-reactivity was observed. We evaluated the assay on diarrheal specimens from Thailand, Tanzania, Indonesia, and the Netherlands that had been previously tested by microscopy, and the assay yielded 87-100% sensitivity and 88-100% specificity. Microscopy-negative/PCR-positive samples had lower Luminex values, suggesting they were true but with lower burden infections. In summary, this is a convenient single PCR reaction that can detect Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia without the need for cumbersome microscopic analysis.

  13. Multiplex PCR method to detect Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, Mami; Verweij, Jaco J.; Sethabutr, Orntipa; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Garcia, Lynne; Maro, Athanasia; Kumburu, Happiness; Gratz, Jean; Kibiki, Gibson; Houpt, Eric R.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia are eukaryotic enteropathogens that are difficult to detect in stool samples because they require special stains and microscopy. We developed a multiplex PCR reaction with 4 primer sets to amplify Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cystoisospora belli, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, and Encephalitozoon intestinalis. Detection of the amplicon is through specific probes coupled to Luminex beads. Sensitivity of the assay was evaluated using Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores and revealed detection of 101 spores spiked into stool. No cross reactivity was observed. We evaluated the assay on diarrheal specimens from Thailand, Tanzania, Indonesia, and the Netherlands that had been previously tested by microscopy and the assay yielded 87–100% sensitivity and 88–100% specificity. Microscopy negative/PCR positive samples had lower Luminex values suggesting they were true but lower burden infections. In summary this is a convenient single PCR reaction that can detect Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia without the need for cumbersome microscopic analysis. PMID:21982218

  14. Diagnosis of human fascioliasis by stool and blood techniques: update for the present global scenario.

    PubMed

    Mas-Coma, S; Bargues, M D; Valero, M A

    2014-12-01

    Before the 1990s, human fascioliasis diagnosis focused on individual patients in hospitals or health centres. Case reports were mainly from developed countries and usually concerned isolated human infection in animal endemic areas. From the mid-1990s onwards, due to the progressive description of human endemic areas and human infection reports in developing countries, but also new knowledge on clinical manifestations and pathology, new situations, hitherto neglected, entered in the global scenario. Human fascioliasis has proved to be pronouncedly more heterogeneous than previously thought, including different transmission patterns and epidemiological situations. Stool and blood techniques, the main tools for diagnosis in humans, have been improved for both patient and survey diagnosis. Present availabilities for human diagnosis are reviewed focusing on advantages and weaknesses, sample management, egg differentiation, qualitative and quantitative diagnosis, antibody and antigen detection, post-treatment monitoring and post-control surveillance. Main conclusions refer to the pronounced difficulties of diagnosing fascioliasis in humans given the different infection phases and parasite migration capacities, clinical heterogeneity, immunological complexity, different epidemiological situations and transmission patterns, the lack of a diagnostic technique covering all needs and situations, and the advisability for a combined use of different techniques, at least including a stool technique and a blood technique.

  15. Relationship of phospholipid chemistry to serological reactivity in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory slide test antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, M W; McGrew, B E; McLaurin, B; Pine, L

    1981-01-01

    A total of 13 egg lecithins, 12 beef heart lecithins, and 15 beef heart cardiolipins were assayed for the ability to function in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory microflocculation test, as well as for purity, fatty acid composition, free amines, metals, and products of oxidation. We found that the presence of peroxides and oxidation-related ultraviolet-absorbing chromophores showed a close inverse relationship to acceptable serological activity. The degree of purity of the lipids had only a slight influence on serological activity, whereas fatty acid composition, saturation, and configuration had none at all. We did not detect contaminating iron, copper, cobalt, nickel, or free amines in these lipids. We discuss the implications of our findings for improving the chemical standards for these lipids. Images PMID:7263853

  16. Evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii soluble, whole and excretory/secretary antigens for diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by ELISA test.

    PubMed

    Pishkari, S; Shojaee, S; Keshavarz, H; Salimi, M; Mohebali, M

    2017-03-01

    The present study was performed to compare the soluble, whole and excretory/secretary antigens of Toxoplasma gondii (RH strain) in diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by ELISA method. Tachyzoites of T. gondii, RH strain were injected in intra-peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice, after 4 days tachyzoites were harvested by peritoneal washing of the mice. For soluble antigen, exudates were centrifuged and sediment sonicated and then centrifuged at 4 °C, 1 h, supernatant collected and density of protein determined by Bradford method. For whole antigen after collecting, washing and centrifuging of peritoneal fluid the tachyzoites sediment was counted. In excretory/secretary antigen 1.5 × 10(8) tachyzoites were transferred in 1 ml tube of saline and incubated under mild agitation and after centrifuging, supernatant was collected and protein density determined by Bradford method. 176 human serum samples were evaluated for T. gondii IgG antibody with prepared antigens, and finally serum samples were evaluated by commercial ELISA kit (Trinity, USA) which was considered as gold standard method. In this study sensitivity and specificity of prepared antigens compared with commercial kit in ELISA method. Sensitivity and specificity of soluble antigen was 91.4 and 74.5 %, in whole antigen these parameters were 77.1 and 77.3 % and in excretory/secretary antigen were 28.5 and 74.5 % respectively. Soluble antigen had high levels of sensitivity and specificity in ELISA method and the results were rather resemble to commercial kit (Trinity, USA).

  17. The Evaluation of Two Methods to Facilitate Shared Decision Making for Men Considering the Prostate-Specific Antigen Test

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, Dominick L; Kaplan, Robert M; Felitti, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE California law (Grant H. Kenyon Prostate Cancer Detection Act) requires physicians to inform all patients older than aged 50 years who receive a prostate examination about the availability of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Physicians are not given guidance on how this information should be presented. We sought to evaluate the effects upon PSA screening rates of informing patients about PSA testing by 2 different techniques. DESIGN Factorial comparison of discussion versus video formats for presenting information about the PSA test. SETTING Patients were recruited through the Health Appraisal screening program in the Department for Preventive Medicine, Kaiser Permanente, San Diego, Calif. PARTICIPANTS Male patients undergoing health appraisal screening participated in 1 of 4 groups providing information about PSA screening: usual care ( n =43), discussion about risks and benefits of PSA ( n =45), shared decision-making video ( n =46), or video plus discussion ( n =42). Participants were sequentially assigned to 1 of the 4 groups. RESULTS No significant differences in demographics or family history was demonstrated between the groups at the time of group assignment. Participants in the intervention groups rated the information as clear, balanced, and fair. There were significant differences in the number of men requesting a PSA test, with the highest rate in the usual care group (97.7%), followed by discussion (82.2%), video (60.0%), and video plus discussion (50.0%). CONCLUSION Providing information about PSA screening in the form of video or discussion is feasible and significantly alters PSA screening rates. PMID:11422636

  18. Evaluation of the BinaxNOW® Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen test on fresh, frozen and concentrated urine samples in elderly patients with and without community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saukkoriipi, Annika; Pascal, Thierry; Palmu, Arto A

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated the BinaxNOW® urine antigen test in elderly. For fresh un-concentrated urine samples, the sensitivity for pneumococcal pneumonia was 63% and specificity 97%. After freezing and concentration, the results comparable to positive control line in intensity at 60 min gave high sensitivity (81%) with no loss in specificity (96%).

  19. Use of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) dipsticks for detection of intestinal and urinary schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Stothard, J Russell; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Tukahebwa, Edridah M; Kazibwe, Francis; Rollinson, David; Mathieson, William; Webster, Joanne P; Fenwick, Alan

    2006-02-01

    An evaluation of a commercially available antigen capture dipstick that detects schistosome circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) in urine was conducted in representative endemic areas for intestinal and urinary schistosomiasis in Uganda and Zanzibar, respectively. Under field-based conditions, the sensitivity (SS) and specificity (SP) of the dipstick was 83 and 81% for detection of Schistosoma mansoni infections while positive predictive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 84%. Light egg-positive infections were sometimes CCA-negative while CCA-positives included egg-negative children. A positive association between faecal egg output and intensity of CCA test band was observed. Estimating prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis by school with dipsticks was highly correlated (r=0.95) with Kato-Katz stool examinations, typically within +/-8.5%. In Zanzibar, however, dipsticks totally failed to detect S. haematobium despite examining children with egg-patent schistosomiasis. This was also later corroborated by further surveys in Niger and Burkina Faso. Laboratory testing of dipsticks with aqueous adult worm lysates from several reference species showed correct functioning, however, dipsticks failed to detect CCA in urine from S. haematobium-infected hamsters. While CCA dipsticks are a good alternative, or complement, to stool microscopy for field diagnosis of intestinal schistosomiasis, they have no proven value for field diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis. At approximately 2.6 US dollars per dipstick, they are presently too expensive to be cost-effective for wide scale use in disease mapping surveys unless Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) strategies are developed.

  20. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing ; MRSA ; Fungal Tests ; Sputum Culture ; Stool Culture ; Gram Stain ; Body Fluid Analysis ; Pleural Fluid Analysis ; Pericardial ... to Get Tested? As follow up to a positive bacterial or fungal culture ; when you have an ...

  1. Clinical score and rapid antigen detection test to guide antibiotic use for sore throats: randomised controlled trial of PRISM (primary care streptococcal management).

    PubMed

    Little, Paul; Hobbs, F D Richard; Moore, Michael; Mant, David; Williamson, Ian; McNulty, Cliodna; Cheng, Ying Edith; Leydon, Geraldine; McManus, Richard; Kelly, Joanne; Barnett, Jane; Glasziou, Paul; Mullee, Mark

    2013-10-10

    To determine the effect of clinical scores that predict streptococcal infection or rapid streptococcal antigen detection tests compared with delayed antibiotic prescribing. Open adaptive pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Primary care in United Kingdom. Patients aged ≥ 3 with acute sore throat. An internet programme randomised patients to targeted antibiotic use according to: delayed antibiotics (the comparator group for analyses), clinical score, or antigen test used according to clinical score. During the trial a preliminary streptococcal score (score 1, n=1129) was replaced by a more consistent score (score 2, n=631; features: fever during previous 24 hours; purulence; attends rapidly (within three days after onset of symptoms); inflamed tonsils; no cough/coryza (acronym FeverPAIN). Symptom severity reported by patients on a 7 point Likert scale (mean severity of sore throat/difficulty swallowing for days two to four after the consultation (primary outcome)), duration of symptoms, use of antibiotics. For score 1 there were no significant differences between groups. For score 2, symptom severity was documented in 80% (168/207 (81%) in delayed antibiotics group; 168/211 (80%) in clinical score group; 166/213 (78%) in antigen test group). Reported severity of symptoms was lower in the clinical score group (-0.33, 95% confidence interval -0.64 to -0.02; P=0.04), equivalent to one in three rating sore throat a slight versus moderate problem, with a similar reduction for the antigen test group (-0.30, -0.61 to -0.00; P=0.05). Symptoms rated moderately bad or worse resolved significantly faster in the clinical score group (hazard ratio 1.30, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.63) but not the antigen test group (1.11, 0.88 to 1.40). In the delayed antibiotics group, 75/164 (46%) used antibiotics. Use of antibiotics in the clinical score group (60/161) was 29% lower (adjusted risk ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.95; P=0.02) and in the

  2. Streptococcal Pharyngitis: Impact of a High-Sensitivity Antigen Test on Physician Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Cynthia A.; McPherson, Kenneth A.; Webb, Kenneth H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the availability of results from a high-sensitivity, rapid test for group A streptococci (Strep A OIA; BioStar, Inc., Boulder, Colo.) improves physician outcome. The study population included 465 consecutive patients with symptoms of acute pharyngitis seen in two outpatient clinics in a large suburban medical center; one clinic, a walk-in clinic (WIC), primarily saw adult patients, and one clinic, a pediatric and adolescent medicine clinic (PED), primarily saw pediatric patients. We measured improvement in physician outcome by comparing physician intent for prescribing an antibiotic based on clinical impression with physician practice once the results of the Strep A OIA were known. Based upon intent, the physicians seeing WIC patients (WIC physicians) would have prescribed an appropriate antibiotic course for 42% of patients with cultures positive for group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) and 61% of patients with cultures negative for GABHS. After receiving the results of the Strep A OIA, WIC physicians prescribed an appropriate antibiotic course for 81% of patients with positive cultures and 72% of patients with negative cultures. Based upon intent, the physicians seeing PED patients (PED physicians) would have prescribed an appropriate antibiotic course for 35% of patients with positive cultures and 77% of patients with negative cultures. After receiving the results of the Strep A OIA, PED physicians prescribed an appropriate antibiotic course for 90% of patients with positive cultures and 81% of patients with negative cultures. Based on a 14.5% prevalence of GABHS among WIC patients, Strep A OIA improved the overall WIC physician outcome from 58 to 74%. Based on a 31.5% prevalence of GABHS among PED patients, Strep A OIA improved the PED physician outcome from 64 to 84%. Had Strep A OIA alone guided therapeutic choice, physicians would have prescribed an appropriate antibiotic course for 95% of the

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Alone and Compared to Urinary Antigen Testing for Detection of Legionella spp.: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Green, Hefziba; Steinmetz, Tali; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease (LD) is based on the isolation of Legionella spp., a 4-fold rise in antibodies, a positive urinary antigen (UA), or direct immunofluorescence tests. PCR is not accepted as a diagnostic tool for LD. This systematic review assesses the diagnostic accuracy of PCR in various clinical samples with a direct comparison versus UA. We included prospective or retrospective cohort and case-control studies. Studies were included if they used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention consensus definition criteria of LD or a similar one, assessed only patients with clinical pneumonia, and reported data for all true-positive, false-positive, true-negative, and false-negative results. Two reviewers abstracted data independently. Risk of bias was assessed using Quadas-2. Summary sensitivity and specificity values were estimated using a bivariate model and reported with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Thirty-eight studies were included. A total of 653 patients had confirmed LD, and 3,593 patients had pneumonia due to other pathogens. The methodological quality of the studies as assessed by the Quadas-2 tool was poor to fair. The summary sensitivity and specificity values for diagnosis of LD in respiratory samples were 97.4% (95% CI, 91.1% to 99.2%) and 98.6% (95% CI, 97.4% to 99.3%), respectively. These results were mainly unchanged by any covariates tested and subgroup analysis. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was much better than that of UA. Compared to UA, PCR in respiratory samples (especially in sputum samples or swabs) revealed a significant advantage in sensitivity and an additional diagnosis of 18% to 30% of LD cases. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was excellent and preferable to that of the UA. Results were independent on the covariate tested. PCR in respiratory samples should be regarded as a valid tool for the diagnosis of LD. PMID:26659202

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Alone and Compared to Urinary Antigen Testing for Detection of Legionella spp.: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Avni, Tomer; Bieber, Amir; Green, Hefziba; Steinmetz, Tali; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2016-02-01

    The diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease (LD) is based on the isolation of Legionella spp., a 4-fold rise in antibodies, a positive urinary antigen (UA), or direct immunofluorescence tests. PCR is not accepted as a diagnostic tool for LD. This systematic review assesses the diagnostic accuracy of PCR in various clinical samples with a direct comparison versus UA. We included prospective or retrospective cohort and case-control studies. Studies were included if they used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention consensus definition criteria of LD or a similar one, assessed only patients with clinical pneumonia, and reported data for all true-positive, false-positive, true-negative, and false-negative results. Two reviewers abstracted data independently. Risk of bias was assessed using Quadas-2. Summary sensitivity and specificity values were estimated using a bivariate model and reported with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Thirty-eight studies were included. A total of 653 patients had confirmed LD, and 3,593 patients had pneumonia due to other pathogens. The methodological quality of the studies as assessed by the Quadas-2 tool was poor to fair. The summary sensitivity and specificity values for diagnosis of LD in respiratory samples were 97.4% (95% CI, 91.1% to 99.2%) and 98.6% (95% CI, 97.4% to 99.3%), respectively. These results were mainly unchanged by any covariates tested and subgroup analysis. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was much better than that of UA. Compared to UA, PCR in respiratory samples (especially in sputum samples or swabs) revealed a significant advantage in sensitivity and an additional diagnosis of 18% to 30% of LD cases. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was excellent and preferable to that of the UA. Results were independent on the covariate tested. PCR in respiratory samples should be regarded as a valid tool for the diagnosis of LD.

  5. Reassessment of the Role of Rapid Antigen Detection Tests in Diagnosis of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gazzano, Vincent; Berger, Anne; Benito, Yvonne; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Tristan, Anne; Boisset, Sandrine; Carricajo, Anne; Poyart, Claire; Vandenesch, François

    2016-01-01

    Rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for group A streptococci (GAS) are widely used for diagnosing acute pharyngitis, which has led to a considerable reduction in antibiotic prescriptions over the past decade. Beyond this intended use, their reassessment on invasive samples may be relevant in the management of life-threatening GAS infections. To this end, we evaluated the performances of three RADTs, culture, GAS PCR, and 16S rRNA gene PCR assays, and compared them with a composite gold standard (GAS-PCR assay and/or culture) for the diagnosis of severe GAS infection. A total of 192 specimens from deep-tissue (mostly normally sterile) sites enriched for 75 GAS-positive samples were enrolled in the study. The three evaluated RADTs showed sensitivities ranging from 88.0% to 94.7% versus 98.7% for GAS PCR, 84% for 16S rRNA gene PCR, and 77.3% for culture. The sensitivities of the ImmunoCard STAT! Strep A test (Meridian Bioscience) and the NADAL Strep A strip (Nal Von Minden) were similar to that of GAS PCR (P = 0.25 and 0.03, respectively) and higher than that of culture (P = 0.001 and 0.006, respectively), whereas the SD Bioline Strep A test strip (Standard Diagnostics) showed a performance similar to that of culture (P = 0.02). The three RADTs detected 10 distinct emm types, including a predominance of emm 1 (33.3%), emm 89 (10.6%), and emm 12 (7.6%). No false-positive results were observed, leading to a specificity of 100% for all the evaluated RADTs. The GAS RADTs turned out to be sensitive, specific, and easy-to-use tools that may aid in the management of invasive GAS infections in 24/7 point-of-care laboratories by enabling early diagnosis and focused therapy. PMID:26818671

  6. Enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative E. coli in stools of children with acute gastroenteritis in Davidson County, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Foster, Monique A; Iqbal, Junaid; Zhang, Chengxian; McHenry, Rendie; Cleveland, Brent E; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia; Fonnesbeck, Chris; Payne, Daniel C; Chappell, James D; Halasa, Natasha; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-11-01

    This prospective acute gastroenteritis (AGE) surveillance was conducted in the inpatient and emergency room settings at a referral pediatric hospital to determine the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in children <12years of age with AGE in Davidson County, Tennessee. Subjects 15 days to 11 years of age, who presented with diarrhea and/or vomiting, were enrolled. Stool specimens were processed for detection of DEC using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. From December 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, a total of 79 (38%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE tested positive for E. coli. A total of 12 (5.8%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE were positive for a DEC. Eight (67%) out of these 12 were positive for enteropathogenic E. coli, and the remaining 4 were positive for enteroaggregative E. coli. DEC clinical isolates clustered with known E. coli enteropathogens according to multilocus sequencing typing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Real time PCR to detect the environmental faecal contamination by Echinococcus multilocularis from red fox stools.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Jenny; Millon, Laurence; Mouzon, Lorane; Umhang, Gérald; Raoul, Francis; Ali, Zeinaba Said; Combes, Benoît; Comte, Sébastien; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Giraudoux, Patrick

    2014-03-17

    The oncosphere stage of Echinococcus multilocularis in red fox stools can lead, after ingestion, to the development of alveolar echinococcosis in the intermediate hosts, commonly small mammals and occasionally humans. Monitoring animal infection and environmental contamination is a key issue in public health surveillance. We developed a quantitative real-time PCR technique (qPCR) to detect and quantify E. multilocularis DNA released in fox faeces. A qPCR technique using a hydrolysis probe targeting part of the mitochondrial gene rrnL was assessed on (i) a reference collection of stools from 57 necropsied foxes simultaneously investigated using the segmental sedimentation and counting technique (SSCT) (29 positive for E. multilocularis worms and 28 negative animals for the parasite); (ii) a collection of 114 fox stools sampled in the field: two sets of 50 samples from contrasted endemic regions in France and 14 from an E. multilocularis-free area (Greenland). Of the negative SSCT controls, 26/28 were qPCR-negative and two were weakly positive. Of the positive SSCT foxes, 25/29 samples were found to be positive by qPCR. Of the field samples, qPCR was positive in 21/50 (42%) and 5/48 (10.4%) stools (2 samples inhibited), originating respectively from high and low endemic areas. In faeces, averages of 0.1 pg/μl of DNA in the Jura area and 0.7 pg/μl in the Saône-et-Loire area were detected. All qPCR-positive samples were confirmed by sequencing. The qPCR technique developed here allowed us to quantify environmental E. multilocularis contamination by fox faeces by studying the infectious agent directly. No previous study had performed this test in a one-step reaction.

  8. Comparison of a recombinant-antigen enzyme immunoassay with Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test for serological confirmation of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Islay; Alvarez, Elvio L; Fernández, Carmen; Miranda, Alina

    2002-04-01

    A recombinant-antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA), BioSCREEN anti-Treponema pallidum, was compared favorably with the T. pallidum hemagglutination test, in the detection of specific antibodies in different groups of sera from patients with primary (n = 38), secondary (n = 10), early latent (n = 28) and congenital syphilis (n = 2), patients with leptospirosis ( n= 8), infectious mononucleosis (n = 7), hepatitis (n = 9), diabetes mellitus (n = 11), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 13), leprosy (n = 11), tuberculosis (n = 9), HIV/Aids ( n= 12), systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 4), rheumatic fever (n = 3), old-persons (n = 9), pregnant women (n = 29) and blood donors (n = 164). The coincidence between them was 95.1%. The sensitivity and specificity of the EIA were 93.3% and 95.5%, respectively. Fifteen serum specimens belonging to old-persons, pregnant women, blood donors, and patients with human leptospirosis, hepatitis, diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis and rheumatic fever gave false-positive results by Venereal Disease Research Laboratory and/or Rapid Plasma Reagin. The EIA can be used as alternative method for the serological confirmation of syphilis.

  9. Antibiotic use in children is not influenced by the result of rapid antigen detection test for the respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Thibeault, Roseline; Gilca, Rodica; Côté, Stéphanie; De Serres, Gaston; Boivin, Guy; Déry, Pierre

    2007-07-01

    Rapid antigen detection test (RADT) for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is widely used in children hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI), but its influence on antibiotic (AB) use is uncertain. To evaluate if confirmation of RSV infection by RADT modified AB use and elucidate others factors associated with the continuation of antibiotics. Charts of children hospitalized with viral ARTI aged 0-35 months were reviewed. Modification of antibiotics according to RSV RADT results was compared using Kaplan-Meier estimates and multivariate Cox regression. Of children receiving antibiotics when the RSV RADT result was available, RSV RADT was positive in 144 and negative in 54. Positive RSV RADT results did not lead to modification of antibiotic use. Factors independently associated with cessation of intravenous antibiotics were age > or = 3 months (HR 2.44 [1.41-4.21]) and absence of pneumonia (HR 1.50 [1.03-2.19]). Absence of otitis was associated with cessation of oral antibiotics (HR 9.16 [95% CI, 2.35-35.76]). Confirmed presence of RSV by RADT did not influence antibiotic use in young children with ARTI. Except with pneumonia, the risk of bacterial superinfection of RSV infected children is minimal and confirmation of RSV infection should prompt treating physicians to interrupt antibiotics.

  10. A protein-conjugate approach to develop a monoclonal antibody-based antigen detection test for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kailash P; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L; Rolán, Hortensia G; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H; Tsolis, Renee M; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize a monoclonal antibody-based assay to detect Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide in blood by conjugating B. melitensis LPS to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an immunogenic protein carrier to maximize IgG affinity of monoclonal antibodies. A panel of specific of monoclonal antibodies was obtained that recognized both B. melitensis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes. An antigen capture assay was developed that detected B. melitensis in the blood of experimentally infected mice and, in a pilot study, in naturally infected Peruvian subjects. As a proof of principle, a majority (7/10) of the patients with positive blood cultures had B. melitensis lipopolysaccharide detected in the initial blood specimen obtained. One of 10 patients with relapsed brucellosis and negative blood culture had a positive serum antigen test. No seronegative/blood culture negative patients had a positive serum antigen test. Analysis of the pair of monoclonal antibodies (2D1, 2E8) used in the capture ELISA for potential cross-reactivity in the detection of lipopolysaccharides of E. coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica O9 showed specificity for Brucella lipopolysaccharide. This new approach to develop antigen-detection monoclonal antibodies against a T cell-independent polysaccharide antigen based on immunogenic protein conjugation may lead to the production of improved rapid point-of-care-deployable assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis and other infectious diseases.

  11. Evaluation of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards as sampling devices for detection of rotavirus in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Tam, Ka Ian; Esona, Mathew D; Williams, Alice; Ndze, Valantine N; Boula, Angeline; Bowen, Michael D

    2015-09-15

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are available and rotavirus surveillance is carried out to assess vaccination impact. In surveillance studies, stool samples are stored typically at 4°C or frozen to maintain sample quality. Uninterrupted cold storage is a problem in developing countries because of power interruptions. Cold-chain transportation of samples from collection sites to testing laboratories is costly. In this study, we evaluated the use of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards for storage and transportation of samples for virus isolation, EIA, and RT-PCR testing. Infectious rotavirus was recovered after 30 days of storage on Sensi-Discs™ at room temperature. We were able to genotype 98-99% of samples stored on Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards at temperatures ranging from -80°C to 37°C up to 180 days. A field sampling test using samples prepared and shipped from Cameroon, showed that both matrices yielded 100% genotyping success compared with whole stool and Sensi-Discs™ demonstrated 95% concordance with whole stool in EIA testing. The utilization of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards for stool sample storage and shipment has the potential to have great impact on global public health by facilitating surveillance and epidemiological investigations of rotavirus strains worldwide at a reduced cost.

  12. Evaluation of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards as sampling devices for detection of rotavirus in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Ka Ian; Esona, Mathew D.; Williams, Alice; Ndze, Valentine N.; Boula, Angeline; Bowen, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are available and rotavirus surveillance is carried out to assess vaccination impact. In surveillance studies, stool samples are stored typically at 4°C or frozen to maintain sample quality. Uninterrupted cold storage is a problem in developing countries because of power interruptions. Cold-chain transportation of samples from collection sites to testing laboratories is costly. In this study, we evaluated the use of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards for storage and transportation of samples for virus isolation, EIA, and RT-PCR testing. Infectious rotavirus was recovered after 30 days of storage on Sensi-Discs™ at room temperature. We were able to genotype 98–99% of samples stored on Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards at temperatures ranging from −80°C to 37°C up to 180 days. A field sampling test using samples prepared and shipped from Cameroon, showed that both matrices yielded 100% genotyping success compared with whole stool and Sensi-Discs™ demonstrated 95% concordance with whole stool in EIA testing. The utilization of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards for stool sample storage and shipment has the potential to have great impact on global public health by facilitating surveillance and epidemiological investigations of rotavirus strains worldwide at a reduced cost. PMID:26022083

  13. Early Detection of Neonatal Cholestasis: Inadequate Assessment of Stool Color by Parents and Primary Healthcare Doctors.

    PubMed

    Witt, Mauri; Lindeboom, Jeanet; Wijnja, Corry; Kesler, Anneke; Keyzer-Dekker, Claudia M G; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hulscher, Jan B F

    2016-02-01

    Early diagnosis and surgery (< 60 days of age) improve outcomes in children with biliary atresia. Only 56% of patients undergo timely surgery in the Netherlands. Lack of acquaintance with symptoms such as discolored stools might underlie this delay. We analyzed whether Dutch parents, youth healthcare doctors, or general practitioners recognized discolored stools and evaluated the effect of the Infant Stool Color Card (ISCC) on recognizing discolored stools. We asked 100 parents, 33 youth healthcare doctors, and 50 general practitioners to classify photographs of stools as "normal" or "abnormal." Subsequently, we asked whether parents would seek medical help and doctors would refer the patient for medical investigation. Finally, parents scored stools using the ISCC. Two-third of both parents and youth healthcare doctors recognized all discolored stools. Only half of them would seek medical help for all discolored stools resp. refer patient for medical investigation. Only one-third of the general practitioners recognized all discolored stools and would refer for medical investigation for all discolored stools. Using the ISCC, the percentage of parents recognizing all discolored stool increased from 66 to 87% (p < 0.01). Neither parents nor youth healthcare doctors nor general practitioners reliably recognize discolored stool. The ISCC is an effective screening method for discolored stool. Our data indicate that the ISCC should be accompanied by unequivocal advices regarding referral for medical investigation upon detection of discolored stools. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. 6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. PROTRUSION ON UPPER RIGHT HAND SIDE OF LUT IS SWING ARM NINE WHICH PROVIDED ACCESS TO CAPSULE OF LAUNCH VEHICLE WHILE ON LAUNCHER. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  15. A Five-Country Evaluation of a Point-of-Care Circulating Cathodic Antigen Urine Assay for the Prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G.; Binder, Sue; Campbell, Carl; King, Charles H.; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; N'Goran, Eliézer K.; Erko, Berhanu; Karanja, Diana M. S.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; van Lieshout, Lisette; Rathbun, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated a commercial point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) test for assessing Schistosoma mansoni infection prevalence in areas at risk. Overall, 4,405 school-age children in Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda provided urine for POC-CCA testing and stool for Kato-Katz assays. By latent class analysis, one POC-CCA test was more sensitive (86% versus 62%) but less specific (72% versus ∼100%) than multiple Kato-Katz smears from one stool. However, only 1% of POC-CCA tests in a non-endemic area were false positives, suggesting the latent class analysis underestimated the POC-CCA specificity. Multivariable modeling estimated POC-CCA as significantly more sensitive than Kato-Katz at low infection intensities (< 100 eggs/gram stool). By linear regression, 72% prevalence among 9–12 year olds by POC-CCA corresponded to 50% prevalence by Kato-Katz, whereas 46% POC-CCA prevalence corresponded to 10% Kato-Katz prevalence. We conclude that one urine POC-CCA test can replace Kato-Katz testing for community-level S. mansoni prevalence mapping. PMID:23339198

  16. TERT Promoter Hypermethylation in Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Potential Stool Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Liu, Cheng; Fotouhi, Omid; Fan, Yidong; Wang, Kun; Xia, Chuanyou; Shi, Benkang; Zhang, Guangyong; Wang, Kexin; Kong, Feng; Larsson, Catharina; Hu, Sanyuan; Xu, Dawei

    2017-07-28

    There is a high demand for noninvasive screening tools for gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) detection, and GIC-specific markers are required for such purposes. It is established that induction of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT) coupled with telomerase activation is essential for cancer development/progression and aberrant TERT promoter methylation of specific 5'-C-phosphate-G-3' (CpGs) has been linked to TERT induction in oncogenesis. Here we analyzed TERT promoter methylation in fecal samples from GIC patients and healthy adults and determined its value as a stool biomarker for GIC detection. Sixty-nine GIC patients (34 colorectal carcinoma and 35 gastric cancer) and 62 healthy adults were recruited and fecal samples were collected. Paired tumors and adjacent non-cancerous tissues from 34 patients and normal mucosa tissues from 12 healthy individuals were collected. TERT promoter methylation density was determined using pyrosequencing. We identified two GIC-specific methylation sites at -218 (CpG site 1) and -210 (CpG site 2) in the TERT promoter in tumor tissues. Methylated TERT promoter CpG sites 1 and 2 were also detectable in patient stool, while only background levels were observed in healthy individuals. The overall sensitivity reached 52.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 48.3-56.0) for fecal methylated TERT promoter assays at 90% specificity, which was comparable to other known stool methylation markers for GIC detection. The combined assays of fecal TERT promoter methylation and occult blood (OB) significantly improved sensitivity and specificity in colorectal cancer (area under curves for methylation alone: 0.798, 95% CI: 0.707-0.889 vs. methylation + OB: 0.920, 95% CI: 0.859-0.981; p = .028), but not in gastric cancer. This proof-of-concept study suggests the feasibility of stool TERT promoter methylation analyses as an additional tool in noninvasive GIC screening. The Oncologist IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Induction of telomerase

  17. Risk of underdiagnosing amebic dysentery due to false-negative Entamoeba histolytica antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Escamilla, Pilar; Solé, Roser; Llovet, Teresa; Soriano, Germán; Muñoz, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica antigen assays on stool are widely used to diagnose amebiasis. We report a case of confirmed amebic colitis with a false-negative antigen detection that became positive after treatment. Our results indicate that these assays may underdiagnose acute amebic infection when used alone and should be used cautiously.

  18. Impact on antibiotic prescription of rapid antigen detection testing in acute pharyngitis in adults: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Llor, Carl; Madurell, Jordi; Balagué-Corbella, Montse; Gómez, Mónica; Cots, Josep Maria

    2011-05-01

    Acute pharyngitis is one of the most frequent reasons for a GP consultation, and in most cases an antibiotic is prescribed. To determine the impact of rapid antigen detection testing (RADT) to identify group A beta haemolytic streptococcus in acute pharyngitis on the utilisation of antibiotics and appropriateness of their use. Cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care centres in Catalonia, Spain. Patients with acute pharyngitis aged 14 years or older with at least one Centor criterion (fever, tonsillar exudate, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, or absence of cough) were recruited. Participant physicians were randomly assigned to one of two study arms: an intervention group (assigned to RADT) and a control group (following usual care, without RADT). Of the 557 adults enrolled, 543 could be evaluated for analysis (281 [51.7%] in the intervention group and 262 [48.3%] in the control group). GPs without access to RADT were more likely to prescribe antibiotics compared with those who performed rapid tests (64.1% versus 43.8%, P<0.001). The more Centor criteria the patients presented, the greater the number of antibiotics prescribed, regardless of whether RADT was available (P<0.001). Antibiotics were prescribed in 30.7% of the cases with negative RADT results. Inappropriate antibiotic prescription was observed in 226 cases (43%), and was significantly greater in the control than in the intervention group (60% versus 26.9%; P<0.001). Even though more than 30% of negative RADT results resulted in antibiotic prescribing, the study findings support the use of RADT in the consultation. This strategy has an important impact on reducing antibiotic prescription among adults with acute pharyngitis.

  19. Rotavirus antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 265. ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 340. ...

  20. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tend to have higher CEA levels than non-smokers. Increased CEA levels can indicate some non-cancer-related conditions, such as inflammation , cirrhosis , peptic ulcer , ulcerative colitis , rectal polyps , emphysema , and benign breast disease. ^ Back to top Proudly ...

  1. Histocompatibility antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the surface of almost all cells in the human body. HLAs are found in large amounts on the surface of white blood cells. They help the immune system tell the difference between body tissue and substances ...

  2. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  3. Effects of Serial Skin Testing with Purified Protein Derivative on the Level and Quality of Antibodies to Complex and Defined Antigens in Mycobacterium bovis-Infected Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Mitchell V.; Stafne, Molly R.; Bass, Kristin E.; Maggioli, Mayara F.; Thacker, Tyler C.; Linscott, Rick; Lawrence, John C.; Nelson, Jeffrey T.; Esfandiari, Javan; Greenwald, Rena; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.

    2015-01-01

    Several serological tests designed to detect antibodies to immunodominant Mycobacterium bovis antigens have recently emerged as ancillary tests for the detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle, particularly when used after the injection of purified protein derivative (PPD) for skin testing, which significantly boosts M. bovis-specific antibody responses. The present findings demonstrate the onset and duration of boosted antibody responses after the injection of M. bovis PPD for the caudal fold test (CFT) and Mycobacterium avium and M. bovis PPDs for the comparative cervical test (CCT), administered in series in cattle experimentally infected with M. bovis. While skin tests boosted the responses to certain antigens (i.e., MPB83 and MPB70), they did not affect the responses to other antigens (e.g., ESAT-6, CFP10, MPB59, and MPB64). Administration of the CCT 105 days after the CFT resulted in an even greater secondary boost in antibody responses to MPB83 and MPB70 and to a proteinase K-digested whole-cell sonicate (WCS-PK) of M. bovis. Both IgM and IgG contributed to the initial boost in the MPB83/MPB70-specific antibody response after the CFT. The secondary boost after the CCT was primarily due to increased IgG levels. Also, the avidity of antibodies to MPB83 and MPB70 increased after the CCT in M. bovis-infected cattle. The avidity of antibodies to the WCS-PK antigens increased in the interval between the CFT and the CCT but did not increase further after the CCT. Together, these findings demonstrate that the administration of PPDs for skin tests results in additive enhancement (i.e., when the CFT and CCT are performed in series), both qualitative and quantitative, of MPB83/MPB70-specific antibody responses. PMID:25855555

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Rapid Diagnostic Test Kit Using the Polysaccharide as a Genus-Specific Diagnostic Antigen for Leptospirosis in Korea, Bulgaria, and Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Woo; Park, Sungman; Kim, Seung Han; Christova, Iva; Jacob, Paulina; Vanasco, Norma B; Kang, Yeon-Mi; Woo, Ye-Ju; Kim, Min Soo; Kim, Young-Jin; Cho, Min-Kee; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that is caused by many serovars which are more than 200 in the world, is an emerging worldwide disease. Accurate and rapid diagnostic tests for leptospirosis are a critical step to diagnose the disease. There are some commercial kits available for diagnosis of leptospirosis, but the obscurity of a species- or genus-specific antigen of pathogenic Leptospira interrogans causes the reduced sensitivity and specificity. In this study, the polysaccharide derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of nonpathogenic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc was prepared, and the antigenicity was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit using the polysaccharide as a diagnostic antigen was evaluated in Korea, Bulgaria and Argentina. The sensitivity was 93.9%, 100%, and 81.0% and the specificity was 97.9%, 100%, and 95.4% in Korea (which is a rare region occurring with 2 serovars mostly), Bulgaria (epidemic region with 3 serovars chiefly) and Argentina (endemic region with 19 serovars mainly) respectively. These results indicate that this RDT is applicable for global diagnosis of leptospirosis. This rapid and effective diagnosis will be helpful for diagnosis and manage of leptospirosis to use and the polysaccharide of Leptospira may be called as genus specific antigen for diagnosis.

  5. Challenge with Bovine viral diarrhea virus by exposure to persistently infected calves: protection by vaccination and negative results of antigen testing in nonvaccinated acutely infected calves

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bill J.; Briggs, Robert E.; Ridpath, Julia F.; Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Confer, Anthony W.; Burge, Lurinda J.; Step, Douglas L.; Walker, Derek A.; Payton, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Calves persistently infected (PI) with Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) represent an important source of infection for susceptible cattle. We evaluated vaccine efficacy using calves PI with noncytopathic BVDV2a for the challenge and compared tests to detect BVDV in acutely or transiently infected calves versus PI calves. Vaccination with 2 doses of modified live virus vaccine containing BVDV1a and BVDV2a protected the calves exposed to the PI calves: neither viremia nor nasal shedding occurred. An immunohistochemistry test on formalin-fixed ear notches and an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on fresh notches in phosphate-buffered saline did not detect BVDV antigen in any of the acutely or transiently infected calves, whereas both tests had positive results in all the PI calves. PMID:16639944

  6. Diagnostic microRNA markers to screen for sporadic human colon cancer in stool: I. Proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E; Ahmed, Nancy C; Vos, Paul W; Bonnerup, Chris; Atkins, James N; Casey, Michelle; Nuovo, Gerard J; Naziri, Wade; Wiley, John E; Mota, Helvecio; Allison, Ron R

    2013-01-01

    R-222 and miR-938) had decreased expression in the stool of patients with colon cancer, which was also more pronounced from early to later TNM stages. Results from colon mucosal tissues were similar to those from stool samples, although with more apparent changes in expression. Cytological studies on purified stool colonocytes that employed Giemsa staining showed 80% sensitivity for detecting tumor cells in stool smears. The performance characteristics of the test confirmed that stool is a medium well-suited for colon cancer screening, and that the quantitative changes in the expression of few mature miRNA molecules in stool associated with colon cancer progression provided for more sensitive and specific non-invasive diagnostic markers than tests currently available on the market. Thus, a larger prospective and properly randomized validation study of control individuals and patients exhibiting various stages of colon cancer progression (TNM stages 0-IV) is now needed in order to standardize test conditions, and provide a means for determining the true sensitivity and specificity of a miRNA screening approach in stool for the non-invasive detection of colon cancer, particularly at an early stage (0-I). Eventually, we will develop a chip to enhance molecular screening for colon cancer, as has been accomplished for the detection of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) in foods.

  7. Assessing stool quantities generated by three specific Kato-Katz thick smear templates employed in different settings.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Andrea; Nassoro, Tatu; Said, Khadija; Fenner, Lukas; Sikalengo, George; Letang, Emilio; Montresor, Antonio; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Steinmann, Peter; Marti, Hanspeter; Utzinger, Jürg; Knopp, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    The Kato-Katz technique is recommended for the diagnosis of helminth infections in epidemiological surveys, drug efficacy studies and monitoring of control interventions. We assessed the comparability of the average amount of faeces generated by three Kato-Katz templates included in test kits from two different providers. Nine hundred Kato-Katz thick smear preparations were done; 300 per kit. Empty slides, slides plus Kato-Katz template filled with stool and slides plus stool after careful removal of the template were weighed to the nearest 0.1 mg. The average amount of stool that was generated on the slide was calculated for each template, stratified by standard categories of stool consistency (i.e. mushy, soft, sausage-shaped, hard and clumpy). The average amount of stool generated on slides was 40.7 mg (95 % confidence interval (CI): 40.0-41.4 mg), 40.3 mg (95 % CI: 39.7-40.9 mg) and 42.8 mg (95 % CI: 42.2-43.3 mg) for the standard Vestergaard Frandsen template, and two different templates from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), respectively. Mushy stool resulted in considerably lower average weights when the Vestergaard Frandsen (37.0 mg; 95 % CI: 34.9-39.0 mg) or new China CDC templates (37.4 mg; 95 % CI: 35.9-38.9 mg) were used, compared to the old China CDC template (42.2 mg; 95 % CI: 40.7-43.7 mg) and compared to other stool consistency categories. The average amount of stool generated by three specific Kato-Katz templates was similar (40.3-42.8 mg). Since the multiplication factor is somewhat arbitrary and small changes only have little effect on infection intensity categories, it is suggested that the standard multiplication factor of 24 should be kept for the calculation of eggs per gram of faeces for all investigated templates.

  8. Strong-LAMP: A LAMP Assay for Strongyloides spp. Detection in Stool and Urine Samples. Towards the Diagnosis of Human Strongyloidiasis Starting from a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gandasegui, Javier; Bajo Santos, Cristina; López-Abán, Julio; Saugar, José María; Rodríguez, Esperanza; Vicente, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis, the chief causative agent of human strongyloidiasis, is a nematode globally distributed but mainly endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. Chronic infection is often clinically asymptomatic but it can result in severe hyperinfection syndrome or disseminated strongyloidiasis in immunocompromised patients. There is a great diversity of techniques used in diagnosing the disease, but definitive diagnosis is accomplished by parasitological examination of stool samples for morphological identification of parasite. Until now, no molecular method has been tested in urine samples as an alternative to stool samples for diagnosing strongyloidiasis. This study aimed to evaluate the use of a new molecular LAMP assay in a well-established Wistar rat experimental infection model using both stool and, for the first time, urine samples. The LAMP assay was also clinically evaluated in patients´ stool samples. Methodology/Principal Findings Stool and urine samples were obtained daily during a 28-day period from rats infected subcutaneously with different infective third-stage larvae doses of S. venezuelensis. The dynamics of parasite infection was determined by daily counting the number of eggs per gram of feces from day 1 to 28 post-infection. A set of primers for LAMP assay based on a DNA partial sequence in the 18S rRNA gene from S. venezuelensis was designed. The set up LAMP assay (namely, Strong-LAMP) allowed the sensitive detection of S. venezuelensis DNA in both stool and urine samples obtained from each infection group of rats and was also effective in S. stercoralis DNA amplification in patients´ stool samples with previously confirmed strongyloidiasis by parasitological and real-time PCR tests. Conclusions/Significance Our Strong-LAMP assay is an useful molecular tool in research of a strongyloidiasis experimental infection model in both stool and urine samples. After further validation, the Strong-LAMP could also be potentially

  9. Severe community-acquired pneumonia and positive urinary antigen test for S. pneumoniae: amoxicillin is associated with a favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Blanc, V; Mothes, A; Smetz, A; Timontin, I; Guardia, M D; Billiemaz, A; Dellamonica, J; Vassallo, M; Néri, D; Chadapaud, S; Toyer, A-L; Del Guidice, P; Fribourg, A; Léotard, S; Nicolle, I; Roger, P-M

    2015-12-01

    Positive urinary antigen tests (UAT) for pneumococcal infection in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may lead to targeted antibiotic therapy. We report an audit aimed at defining the link between mortality and targeted therapy. We conducted a retrospective multicentre audit of patients with severe CAP for whom a UAT was positive for S. pneumoniae. Patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2013 to 8 medical centres (from A to H) were included. Co-morbidities were defined by the specific treatment administered before hospital care, or if the diagnosis was newly established during the hospital stay. We used the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) to assess disease severity. Only patients with PSI > 90 were included. Antibiotic treatments and the PSI were extracted from patients' charts. Amoxicillin had to be prescribed as a targeted antibiotic treatment or at the time of antibiotic reassessment. A total of 389 patients were included. The mean (±STD) PSI score was 128 ± 29; 38.9% of the patients had a class 5 PSI score. Intensive care was required for 36.6% of the patients. Amoxicillin was initially prescribed in 47 cases (12.1%) and in 34 cases after reassessment (8.7%). In logistic regression analysis, we found three parameters associated with mortality: being hospitalised in institution D, class 5 PSI score, and metastatic cancer. In contrast, three antibiotic regimens were protective factors, including targeted therapy: OR = 0.09, p < 0.001. In the context of severe CAP with positive UAT for S. pneumoniae, targeted therapy was associated with a reduction in mortality.

  10. Usefulness of PCR and Antigen Latex Agglutination Test with Samples Obtained by Transthoracic Needle Aspiration for Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    García, Amparo; Rosón, Beatriz; Pérez, José Luis; Verdaguer, Ricard; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi; Casanova, Aurora; Manresa, Frederic; Gudiol, Francesc

    1999-01-01

    In a large number of cases, the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not established. Some cases are probably caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) culture has a limited sensitivity which might be improved by antigen detection or gene amplification techniques. We evaluated the capacity of a PCR assay and a latex agglutination test to detect S. pneumoniae in samples obtained by TNA from 95 patients with moderate-to-severe CAP. Latex agglutination and PCR had sensitivities of 52.2 and 91.3%, specificities of 88.7 and 83.3%, positive predictive values of 62.3 and 65.6%, and negative predictive values of 83.3 and 96.5%, respectively, when culture techniques were used as the “gold standard.” When we considered expanded criteria for the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia as a standard for our calculations, latex agglutination and PCR had sensitivities of 53.6 and 89.7%, specificities of 93.0 and 90.0%, positive predictive values of 78.9 and 81.3%, and negative predictive values of 80.3 and 94.7%, respectively. The additional diagnosis provided by the PCR assay compared to latex agglutination was 12.2% (95% confidence interval of the difference from 0.4 to 20.1%). PCR was more sensitive than TNA culture, particularly in patients who had received prior antibiotic therapy (83.3 versus 33.3%). Although PCR is a very sensitive and specific technique, it has not proved to be cost-effective in clinical practice. Conversely, latex agglutination is a fast and simple method whose results might have significant implications for initial antibiotic therapy. PMID:9986837

  11. Study of Helicobacter pylori genotype status in saliva, dental plaques, stool and gastric biopsy samples

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hassan; Souod, Negar; Dabiri, Hossein; Sarshar, Meysam

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare genotype of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolated from saliva, dental plaques, gastric biopsy, and stool of each patient in order to evaluate the mode of transmission of H. pylori infection. METHODS: This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on 300 antral gastric biopsy, saliva, dental plaque and stool samples which were obtained from patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy referred to endoscopy centre of Hajar hospital of Shahrekord, Iran from March 2010 to February 2011. Initially, H. pylori strains were identified by rapid urease test (RUT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied to determine the presence of H. pylori (ureC) and for genotyping of voculating cytotoxin gene A (vacA) and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) genes in each specimen. Finally the data were analyzed by using statistical formulas such as Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests to find any significant relationship between these genes and patient’s diseases. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Of 300 gastric biopsy samples, 77.66% were confirmed to be H. pylori positive by PCR assay while this bacterium were detected in 10.72% of saliva, 71.67% of stool samples. We were not able to find it in dental plaque specimens. The prevalence of H. pylori was 90.47% among patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD), 80% among patients with gastric cancer, and 74.13% among patients with none ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) by PCR assay. The evaluation of vacA and cagA genes showed 6 differences between gastric biopsy and saliva specimens and 11 differences between gastric and stool specimens. 94.42% of H. pylori positive specimens were cagA positive and all samples had amplified band both for vacA s and m regions. There was significant relationship between vacA s1a/m1a and PUD diseases (P = 0.04), s2/m2 genotype and NUD diseases (P = 0.05). No statically significant relationship was found between cagA status with clinical outcomes and

  12. Comparison of slide coagglutination test and countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis for detection of group B streptococcal antigen in cerebrospinal fluid from infants with meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, B J; Edwards, M S; Baker, C J

    1980-01-01

    The usefulness of Phadebact streptococcus reagents for the detection of group B streptococcal antigen in cerebrospinal fluid was evaluated in 54 infants with meningitis and in 22 normal infants. Antigens was detected by slide coagglutination in 19 (82.6%) and by countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis in 20 (87.0%) of 23 cerebrospinal fluid specimens from infants with group B streptococcal meningitis at admission. After initiation of antimicrobial therapy, antigen could be detected in 11 of 19 (by slide coagglutination) and 7 of 18 (by countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis) cerebrospinal fluids. False-positive reactions were noted by slide coagglutination in one infant with S. bovis meningitis and one with group B streptococcal bacteremia without meningitis; none occurred with countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis. The commercial availiability, simplicity, sensitivity (82.6%), and specificity (96.4%) of the Phadebact slide coaggluatination test for detecting group B streptococcal antigen in cerebrospinal fluid suggest that it may be useful for the early and rapid diagnosis of group B streptococcal meningitis. PMID:6991524

  13. Country-wide assessment of the genetic polymorphism in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antigens detected with rapid diagnostic tests for malaria.

    PubMed

    Mariette, Natacha; Barnadas, Céline; Bouchier, Christiane; Tichit, Magali; Ménard, Didier

    2008-10-28

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are becoming increasingly indispensable in malaria management, as a means of increasing the accuracy of diagnosis. The WHO has issued recommendations, but the selection of the most suitable RDT remains difficult for users in endemic countries. The genetic variability of the antigens detected with RDTs has been little studied, but may affect the sensitivity of RDTs. This factor has been studied by comparisons between countries at continental level, but little information is available concerning antigen variability within a given country. A country-wide assessment of polymorphism of the PfHRP2, PfHRP3, pLDH and aldolase antigens was carried out in 260 Plasmodium falciparum and 127 Plasmodium vivax isolates, by sequencing the genes encoding these antigens in parasites originating from the various epidemiological strata for malaria in Madagascar. Higher levels of polymorphism were observed for the pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 genes than for the P. falciparum and P. vivax aldolase and pldh genes. Pfhrp2 sequence analysis predicted that 9% of Malagasy isolates would not be detected at parasite densities < or = 250 parasites/mul (ranging from 6% in the north to 14% in the south), although RDTs based on PfHRP2 detection are now recommended in Madagascar. These findings highlight the importance of training of health workers and the end users of RDTs in the provision of information about the possibility of false-negative results for patients with clinical symptoms of malaria, particularly in the south of Madagascar.

  14. Preparation and diagnostic utility of a hemagglutination inhibition test antigen derived from the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kye, Soo-Jeong; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Kim, Saeromi; Seul, Hee-Jung; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (rHN) protein from Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with hemagglutination (HA) activity was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells using a baculovirus expression system. The rHN protein extracted from infected cells was used as an antigen in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection and titration of NDV-specific antibodies present in chicken sera. The rHN antigen produced high HA titers of 2(13) per 25 μL, which were similar to those of the NDV antigen produced using chicken eggs, and it remained stable without significant loss of the HA activity for at least 12 weeks at 4°C. The rHN-based HI assay specifically detected NDV antibodies, but not the sera of other avian pathogens, with a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 98.0%, respectively, in known positive and negative chicken sera (n = 430). Compared with an NDV-based HI assay, the rHN-based HI assay had a relative sensitivity and specificity of 96.1% and 95.5%, respectively, when applied to field chicken sera. The HI titers of the rHN-based HI assay were highly correlated with those in an NDV-based HI assay (r = 0.927). Overall, these results indicate that rHN protein provides a useful alternative to NDV antigen in HI assays.

  15. Digestion-resistant maltodextrin effects on colonic transit time and stool weight: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Abellán Ruiz, María Salud; Barnuevo Espinosa, María Dolores; Contreras Fernández, Carlos J; Luque Rubia, Antonio J; Sánchez Ayllón, Francisca; Aldeguer García, Miriam; García Santamaría, Carlos; López Román, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-01

    Increased awareness of the importance of dietary fibre has led to increased interest in "functional" fibre components like digestion-resistant maltodextrin (RMD). This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study assessed the effects of RMD in the colonic transit time (CTT) and defecation characteristics (frequency, stool volume and consistency). Sixty-six healthy adult volunteers (32 men) who did not have a daily defecation habit had a 7-day run-in period before the 21-day intervention period with RMD or placebo. CTT and segmental CTT (SCTT) were assessed by a single abdominal X-ray film taken at the end of both periods after radiopaque marker ingestion. Defecation characteristics and intestinal functions were also assessed, which were self-reported by patients. Intragroup comparisons were evaluated by Student's paired t test, Bonferroni test and Chi-square test, while time comparisons by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and time-by-treatment interaction by repeated-measures ANOVA. Fifty-seven subjects were assessed for CTT (placebo, n = 28; RMD, n = 29). In the RMD group, the total CTT, left SCTT and rectosigmoidal SCTT decreased significantly compared to baseline (p < 0.01 each; -13.3, -4.7, -8.7 h, respectively). Significant differences between groups were observed in total CTT and left SCTT. Significant time-by-treatment interaction was observed in the RMD group for stool volume (p = 0.014), increasing 56 % compared to baseline (p < 0.01), while remained unchanged in the placebo group. Stool consistency was improved only in the RMD group (p < 0.01). No adverse effects related to study products were observed. The results show that RMD improved CTT, stool volume, stool consistency and some intestinal functions in a healthy population.

  16. Sensitivity and Specificity of a Urine Circulating Anodic Antigen Test for the Diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium in Low Endemic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Stefanie; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.; Koukounari, Artemis; Cercamondi, Colin I.; Ame, Shaali M.; Ali, Said M.; de Dood, Claudia J.; Mohammed, Khalfan A.; Utzinger, Jürg; Rollinson, David; van Dam, Govert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Elimination of schistosomiasis as a public health problem and interruption of transmission in selected areas are key goals of the World Health Organization for 2025. Conventional parasitological methods are insensitive for the detection of light-intensity infections. Techniques with high sensitivity and specificity are required for an accurate diagnosis in low-transmission settings and verification of elimination. We determined the accuracy of a urine-based up-converting phosphor-lateral flow circulating anodic antigen (UCP-LF CAA) assay for Schistosoma haematobium diagnosis in low-prevalence settings in Zanzibar, Tanzania. Methodology A total of 1,740 urine samples were collected in 2013 from children on Pemba Island, from schools where the S. haematobium prevalence was <2%, 2–5%, and 5–10%, based on a single urine filtration. On the day of collection, all samples were tested for microhematuria with reagent strips and for the presence of S. haematobium eggs with microscopy. Eight months later, 1.5 ml of urine from each of 1,200 samples stored at -20°C were analyzed by UCP-LF CAA assay, while urine filtration slides were subjected to quality control (QCUF). In the absence of a true ‘gold’ standard, the diagnostic performance was calculated using latent class analyses (LCA). Principal Findings The ‘empirical’ S. haematobium prevalence revealed by UCP-LF CAA, QCUF, and reagent strips was 14%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. LCA revealed a sensitivity of the UCP-LF CAA, QCUF, and reagent strips of 97% (95% confidence interval (CI): 91–100%), 86% (95% CI: 72–99%), and 67% (95% CI: 52–81%), respectively. Test specificities were consistently above 90%. Conclusions/Significance The UCP-LF CAA assay shows high sensitivity for the diagnosis of S. haematobium in low-endemicity settings. Empirically, it detects a considerably higher number of infections than microscopy. Hence, the UCP-LF CAA employed in combination with QCUF, is a promising tool for

  17. Social ecological predictors of prostate-specific antigen blood test and digital rectal examination in black American men.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, V. Diane; Montgomery, Susanne B.; Herring, R. Patti; Gardner, Robert W.; Stokols, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Black American men continue to suffer disproportionately from epidemically higher rates of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that complex reasons for persistently higher death rates of prostate cancer in this group are steeped in social factors associated with health access. METHODS: We utilized data from the It's All About U prostate cancer prevention study among black men to investigate: 1) what social ecological factors were predictive of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examinations (DRE); 2) if black men were aware of prostate cancer screening and, if screening was available, would they take the PSA and DRE? Quantitative cross-sectional data from a cohort of 276 black men with no diagnosis of prostate cancer were analyzed to identify characteristics, beliefs, practices and attitudes of this group toward prostate cancer screening. We created a social ecological model to examine which social factors (i.e., environmental, personal, person/environment interplay, black culture and institutional policy) were predictive of PSA and DRE, PSA only and DRE only. To reduce data and identify data patterns, factor analyses (tested for reliability by calculating Cronbach alpha scores) were performed. Variables were standardized with Z scores and analyzed with predictive analytic software technology (SPSS, version 12). A multivariate binary logistic regression was conducted to identify predictors of PSA and DRE. RESULTS: A significant predictor of both PSA and DRE was the physician's direct prostate cancer communication message (P<0.010). Significant correlations exist in PSA and DRE outcomes with a physician's engaging communication style (P<0.012), encouragement to screen (P<0.001) and sharing prostate cancer information (P<0.001); as was men understanding the serious risk of prostate cancer (P<0.001), culture (P<0.004), positive interaction with healthcare staff, significant other(s) and providers (P<0.001), and environmental dimensions

  18. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection of 9 pathogens directly from stools of travelers with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Antikainen, Jenni; Kantele, Anu; Pakkanen, Sari H; Lääveri, Tinja; Riutta, Jukka; Vaara, Martti; Kirveskari, Juha

    2013-10-01

    Every year, 80 million tourists traveling to tropical and subtropical areas contract traveler's diarrhea (TD). Forty percent to 80% of cases are caused by bacteria, yet clinical diagnostic tests are available to identify only a few of the strains that cause TD. We aimed to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay to identify all major pathogens in stool samples. We developed a low-cost, high-throughput, multiplex qPCR assay for simultaneous detection of 9 bacterial pathogens in stool samples: Salmonella, Yersinia, Campylobacter, and Vibrio cholerae, as well as Shigella or enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic E coli, enterotoxigenic E coli (ETEC), enteroaggregative E coli (EAEC), and enteropathogenic E coli (EPEC). The assay was validated using positive (n = 245) and negative (n = 243) control strains, as well as preselected positive and negative stool samples. In addition, stool samples were collected from 96 returning travelers with TD. The findings were compared with those from routine diagnostic tests. The assay detected the bacterial strains with 100% sensitivity and specificity, compared with results from the reference tests. Of all stool samples collected from travelers with TD, EPEC was found in 47%, EAEC in 46%, ETEC in 22%, enterohemorrhagic E coli in 7%, Campylobacter in 6%, Shigella or enteroinvasive E coli in 2%, and Salmonella in 2%. Multiple pathogens were found in 37% of all samples. We developed a low-cost, high-throughput qPCR assay for use in routine diagnostic analysis and research. It detects the pathogenic bacteria most commonly associated with TD in stool samples with 100% sensitivity and specificity, compared with reference methods. The assay requires 4 hours, whereas current detection methods require 1 to 7 days. At least 1 TD pathogen was identified in stool samples from 76% of returning travelers, whereas conventional methods found a pathogen in only 17%. The most commonly detected bacteria were EPEC

  19. Evaluation of Two Rapid Assays for Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxin A in Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Fedorko, Daniel P.; Engler, Howard D.; O’Shaughnessy, Elizabeth M.; Williams, Esther C.; Reichelderfer, Cynthia J.; Smith, William I.

    1999-01-01

    Rapid laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is highly desirable in the setting of hospital cost containment. We tested 654 stool specimens to compare the performance of two assays for rapid detection of toxin A, the Immunocard Toxin A test (Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.) and the Culturette Brand Toxin CD enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems), with a cytotoxin assay (Cytotoxi Test; Advanced Clinical Diagnostics) and culture on cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar followed by determination of the production of toxins A and B. A chart review was performed for patients whose stool specimens provided positive results on one to three of the assays. With the “gold standard” of all four assays positive or chart review evidence of CDAD, 97 (14.8%) stool specimens were positive by one or more assays and 557 (85.2%) were negative by all methods. Total agreement for all assays was 90.5% (592 of 654). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for toxigenic culture were 94.7, 98.6, 87.1, and 99.5%, respectively, for toxigenic culture; 87.7, 98.6, 86.2, and 98.8%, respectively, for the cytotoxin assay; 71.9, 99.3, 91.1, and 97.3%, respectively, for the Immunocard; and 68.4, 99.1, 88.6, and 96.9%, respectively, for the Culturette EIA. While easy to perform and highly specific, these rapid assays do not appear to be sufficient for accurate diagnosis of CDAD. PMID:10449503

  20. Evaluation of two rapid assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin A in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Fedorko, D P; Engler, H D; O'Shaughnessy, E M; Williams, E C; Reichelderfer, C J; Smith, W I

    1999-09-01

    Rapid laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is highly desirable in the setting of hospital cost containment. We tested 654 stool specimens to compare the performance of two assays for rapid detection of toxin A, the Immunocard Toxin A test (Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.) and the Culturette Brand Toxin CD enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems), with a cytotoxin assay (Cytotoxi Test; Advanced Clinical Diagnostics) and culture on cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar followed by determination of the production of toxins A and B. A chart review was performed for patients whose stool specimens provided positive results on one to three of the assays. With the "gold standard" of all four assays positive or chart review evidence of CDAD, 97 (14.8%) stool specimens were positive by one or more assays and 557 (85.2%) were negative by all methods. Total agreement for all assays was 90.5% (592 of 654). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for toxigenic culture were 94.7, 98.6, 87.1, and 99.5%, respectively, for toxigenic culture; 87.7, 98.6, 86.2, and 98.8%, respectively, for the cytotoxin assay; 71.9, 99.3, 91.1, and 97.3%, respectively, for the Immunocard; and 68.4, 99.1, 88.6, and 96.9%, respectively, for the Culturette EIA. While easy to perform and highly specific, these rapid assays do not appear to be sufficient for accurate diagnosis of CDAD.

  1. Bloody Stools in a 3-Day-Old Term Infant.

    PubMed

    Bray-Aschenbrenner, Amelia; Feldenberg, L Richard; Kirby, Amelia; Fitzpatrick, Colleen M; Josephsen, Justin B

    2017-09-01

    A 3-day-old term, male infant presented to the emergency department for evaluation of bloody stools. The infant was born after an uncomplicated pregnancy followed by a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. The mother was group B Streptococcus colonized, and received antenatal penicillin prophylaxis. The infant received routine delivery room care, and was given ophthalmic erythromycin and intramuscular vitamin K. Circumcision was performed without bleeding and he was discharged from the newborn nursery and the hospital after 48 hours. On the day of presentation, he had streaky bright red blood in 4 consecutive stools. After discussion with the infant's pediatrician, the parents took him to the emergency department. The infant was afebrile, nursing well without emesis, and had made ∼10 wet diapers that day. The physical examination revealed a fussy infant with mild tachycardia, tachypnea, and scleral icterus. The complete blood count was unremarkable. Serum total bilirubin was 11.9 mg/dL, sodium 156 mmol/L, chloride 120 mmol/L, potassium 4.7 mmol/L, and bicarbonate 16 mmol/L. International normalized ratio was prolonged at 2.7, prothrombin time 26.6 seconds, partial thromboplastin time 38.9 seconds. The stool was hemeoccult positive. An obstructive radiograph series of the abdomen showed a nonobstructed gas pattern. Official radiology interpretation the following day reported possible pneumatosis intestinalis in the left and right colon. Our multidisciplinary panel will discuss the assessment of bloody stools in the term newborn, evaluation of electrolyte abnormalities, the diagnosis, and patient management. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Patch test reactions to mite antigens: a GERDA multicentre study. Groupe d'Etudes et de Recherches en Dermato-Allergie.

    PubMed

    Castelain, M; Birnbaum, J; Castelain, P Y; Ducombs, G; Grosshans, E; Jelen, G; Lacroix, M; Meynadier, J; Mougeolle, J M; Lachapelle, J M

    1993-11-01

    We performed patch tests with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) antigens from 2 different sources in 355 non-randomly selected patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and 398 subjects of a control group. The study demonstrated that contact sensitization to mites occurred in an appreciable % of AD cases (20.8%), using commonly available assay products. The differences recorded between the 2 materials tested were related to the concentration of P1 antigen. Non-atopic patients rarely showed positive reactions to Dp (0.75%), when strict criteria for readings were applied and if 2 readings were performed. Patients with positive patch tests did not necessarily show positive immediate skin tests. It would be useful to carry out tests systematically in atopic patients, even if it is not yet known what modern treatment would be best for the patient. Laboratories still do not provide standardized house dust mite preparations--measuring and codifying their biological activity--for use in patch tests. It is to be hoped that the extension of this type of test will lead to the production of better test materials, in syringes with homogeneous dispersion and concentration.

  3. Screening for hepatitis C virus infection in a high prevalence country by an antigen/antibody combination assay versus a rapid test.

    PubMed

    Tagny, Claude Tayou; Mbanya, Dora; Murphy, Edward L; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Laperche, Syria

    2014-04-01

    In low-income-countries, screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is often based on rapid tests (RT). Their lower sensitivity compared to enzyme immunoassay (EIA) suggests that newer HCV Antigen/Antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assays might have a role in such countries. To test this idea, 1998 blood donors were tested at the University Teaching Hospital blood bank in Yaoundé, Cameroon simultaneously with a RT (HCV rapid test, Human Diagnostics, Berlin, Germany) according to standard practice (S1) and with an Ag/Ab assay (Monolisa HCV Ag/Ab Ultra, Biorad, France) (S2). All discordant, borderline and reactive samples were submitted to confirmatory testing by immunoblot and/or HCV-RNA. Of the 86 (4.3%) samples positive with one or both strategies, 29 were confirmed negative, 37 positive and 20 were false positive or resolved infection. There was a significant difference in test sensitivity (p=0.01) between S1 (70.3%) and S2 (91.9%) but not in test specificity (99.4% and 98.6%, respectively). The benefit of the Ag/Ab assay in the detection of recent HCV seronegative infections could not be evaluated since no Antigen-only donations were identified. However, better Ag/Ab test sensitivity compared to RT supports the implementation of these newer immunoassays for HCV screening in the African blood bank setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae stool isolates circulating in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz A; Erwin, Daniel P; Odundo, Elizabeth A; Kipkemoi, Nancy C; Ndonye, Janet N; Kirera, Ronald K; Ombogo, Abigael N; Walson, Judd L; Pavlinac, Patricia B; Hulseberg, Christine; Vora, Gary J

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine the genetic and phenotypic antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles of commensal Klebsiella spp. circulating in Kenya by testing human stool isolates of 87 K. pneumoniae and three K. oxytoca collected at eight locations. Over one-third of the isolates were resistant to ≥3 categories of antimicrobials and were considered multidrug-resistant (MDR). We then compared the resistance phenotype to the presence/absence of 238 AMR genes determined by a broad-spectrum microarray and PCR. Forty-six genes/gene families were identified conferring resistance to β-lactams (ampC/blaDHA, blaCMY/LAT, blaLEN-1, blaOKP-A/OKP-B1, blaOXA-1-like family, blaOXY-1, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCTX-M-1 and blaCTX-M-2 families), aminoglycosides (aac(3)-III, aac(6)-Ib, aad(A1/A2), aad(A4), aph(AI), aph3/str(A), aph6/str(B), and rmtB), macrolides (mac(A), mac(B), mph(A)/mph(K)), tetracyclines (tet(A), tet(B), tet(D), tet(G)), ansamycins (arr), phenicols (catA1/cat4, floR, cmlA, cmr), fluoroquinolones (qnrS), quaternary amines (qacEΔ1), streptothricin (sat2), sulfonamides (sul1, sul2, sul3), and diaminop