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Sample records for stool antigen test

  1. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  2. [A new method for detection and erradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigens test].

    PubMed

    Amèndola, R; Doweck, J; Katz, J; Racca, J; Menendez, G; Schenone, L; Farìas, R; Barrantes, C; Quintanta, C; Zerbo, O; Kogan, Z; Valero, J; Bartellini, M A; Questa, U; Luna, P; Corti, R E

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays technics for Helicobacter pylori detection in stools like culture, and PCR, are expensive and difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate ELISA test efficacy for detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools comparing this results with standarized technics like histology (Giemsa), ureasa test and UBT C 14. 26 patients were evaluated in this study, ages between 15-75 with upper gastrointestinal symptoms; all of them required gastroduodenal endoscopy, status H. Pylori was determined with methods upon mentioned. 24 hours after endoscopy H. Pylori antigens in stools with the technique Premier Platinum Htsa, Elisa were determined. The detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools accurately identified active H. Pylori infection. The performance characteristics of this non-invasive method was similar in sensibility and specificity to conventional tests.

  3. Stool Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... living in the intestines are necessary for normal digestion. If the intestines become infected with harmful bacteria ... which live there normally and are necessary for digestion. In a stool culture, lab technicians are most ...

  4. Evaluation of an enzyme immunoassay-based stool antigen test to detect Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Tissari, Päivi; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2007-06-01

    An enzyme immunoassay-based antigen test (Ridascreen Campylobacter; R-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany) was evaluated for the detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in 1050 clinical stool samples as compared with culture on selective medium. After routine inoculation for Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, and Campylobacter, the same swab specimens were used for the antigen test. The positivity rate for Campylobacter was 9.3% in culture, and the antigen test gave a sensitivity of 69%. Forty-six stool samples culture-negative for Campylobacter grew other enteropathogens; one (positive for Salmonella sp.) was positive in the antigen test. Of all the 952 Campylobacter culture-negative samples, 830 were negative in the antigen test, giving a specificity of 87%. Almost 5% of the samples showed equivocal antigen test results. If the moderate sensitivity of the antigen test was due to a low sensitivity of culture or receiving the stool samples in transportation tubes remains to be studied.

  5. [Stool antigen test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Merely a research opportunity, or an effective diagnostic tool?].

    PubMed

    Trevisani, Lucio; Simone, Loredana; Matarese, Vincenzo; Cifalà, Viviana; Sartori, Sergio; Abbasciano, Vincenzo

    2005-06-01

    Since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was recognized as a major cause of peptic ulcer disease and an important risk factor for gastric malignancy, several strategies have been used to diagnose it. These methods are split up along two lines: 1) direct detection of the bacteria, and 2) detection of antigen-antibody assay against H. pylori, or anyhow detection of H. pylori by indirect methods. In this review of literature about the methods to diagnose H. pylori infection, we focused in particular on the non-invasive tests based on H. pylori antigens detection in faeces. Some meta-analyses showed that immunoenzymatic stool tests can be considered reliable in untreated patients, whereas further confirmations are needed before extending their use also in anti-H. pylori treated patients. As it concerns cost-analysis, immunoenzymatic stool test is the most cost-effective among the tests today available. Finally, a newly developed office-based stool test has been evaluated. It does not require laboratory assay, and the results are available within 10 minutes. Preliminary data about its clinical usefulness are promising, but further and wider confirmations are needed, as it has been put on the market quite recently.

  6. Stool guaiac test

    MedlinePlus

    gFOBT; Guaiac smear test; Fecal occult blood test - guaiac smear; Stool occult blood test - guaiac smear ... This test detects blood in the digestive tract. It may be done if: You are being screened or tested for colon cancer You ...

  7. Efficiency of Direct Microscopy of Stool Samples Using an Antigen-Specific Adhesin Test for Entamoeba Histolytica

    PubMed Central

    İrvem, Arzu; Özdil, Kamil; Çalışkan, Zuhal; Yücel, Muhterem

    2016-01-01

    Background: E. histolytica is among the common causes of acute gastroenteritis. The pathogenic species E. histolytica and the nonpathogenic species E. dispar cannot be morphologically differentiated, although correct identification of these protozoans is important for treatment and public health. In many laboratories, the screening of leukocytes, erythrocytes, amoebic cysts, trophozoites and parasite eggs is performed using Native-Lugol’s iodine for pre-diagnosis. Aims: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of E. histolytica in stool samples collected from 788 patients residing in the Anatolian region of İstanbul who presented with gastrointestinal complaints. We used the information obtained to evaluate the effectiveness of microscopic examinations when used in combination with the E. histolytica adhesin antigen test. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study Methods: Preparations of stool samples stained with Native-Lugol’s iodine were evaluated using the E. histolytica adhesin test and examined using standard light microscopy at ×40 magnification. Pearson’s Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis. Results: Of 788 samples, 38 (4.8%) were positive for E. histolytica adhesin antigens. When evaluated together with the presences of erythrocytes, leukocytes, cysts, and trophozoites, respectively, using logistic regression analysis, leukocyte positivity was significantly higher. The odds ratio of leukocyte positivity increased adhesin test-positivity by 2,530-fold (95% CI=1.01–6.330). Adhesin test-positivity was significant (p=0.047). Conclusion: In line with these findings, the consistency between the presence of cysts and erythrocytes and adhesin test-positivity was found to be highly significant, but that of higher levels of leukocytes was found to be discordant. It was concluded that leukocytes and trophozoites were easily misjudged

  8. Performances of Four Helicobacter pylori Serological Detection Kits Using Stool Antigen Test as Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine the performances of four Helicobacter pylori serological detection kits in different target groups, using Amplified IDEIA™ Hp StAR™ as gold standard. Kits studied were Rapid Immunochromatoghraphic Hexagon, Helicoblot 2.1, an EIA IgG kit and EIA IgA kit. Methods: Stool and blood samples were collected from 162 apparently healthy participants (control) and 60 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Results: The performances of the four serological detection kits were found to be affected by gender, age, health status and ethnicity of the participants. In the control group, the Helicoblot 2.1 kit had the best performance (AUC = 0.85; p<0.05, accuracy = 86.4%), followed by EIA IgG (AUC = 0.75; p<0.05, accuracy = 75.2%). The Rapid Hexagon and EIA IgA kits had relatively poor performances. In the T2DM subgroup, the kits H2.1 and EIA IgG had best performances, with accuracies of 96.5% and 93.1% respectively. The performance of EIA IgG improved with adjustment of its cut-off value. Conclusion: The performances of the detection kits were affected by various factors which should be taken into consideration. PMID:27736910

  9. Flushable reagent stool blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Stool occult blood test - flushable home test; Fecal occult blood test - flushable home test ... This test is performed at home with disposable pads. You can buy the pads at the drug store without ...

  10. Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin Print A A A Text Size ... Questions en español Muestra de materia fecal: toxina C. difficile What It Is A stool (feces) sample ...

  11. Detection of non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter species from stool specimens with an immunochromatographic antigen detection assay.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Couturier, Marc Roger; Kalp, Kim J; Fisher, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    The STAT! Campy immunochromatographic assay for Campylobacter antigen was compared to culture for 500 clinical stool specimens. Antigen was detected in six culture-negative, PCR-positive specimens. C. upsaliensis, a pathogenic species that is traditionally difficult to recover in routine stool cultures, was detected in two of these culture-negative specimens. This study provides evidence that antigen testing may cross-react with at least one additional non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter species that may be missed by routine culture for campylobacteriosis.

  12. Comparison of Stool Antigen Detection Kits to PCR for Diagnosis of Amebiasis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; van Hal, S.; Fotedar, R.; Butcher, A.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare two stool antigen detection kits with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infections by using fecal specimens submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, Australia. A total of 279 stool samples containing the E complex (E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii) were included in this study. The stool specimens were tested by using two commercially produced enzyme immunoassays (the Entamoeba CELISA PATH and TechLab E. histolytica II kits) to detect antigens of E. histolytica. DNA was extracted from all of the samples with a Qiagen DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), and a PCR targeting the small-subunit ribosomal DNA was performed on all of the samples. When PCR was used as a reference standard, the CELISA PATH kit showed 28% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The TechLab ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) kit did not prove to be useful in detecting E. histolytica, as it failed to identify any of the E. histolytica samples which were positive by PCR. With the TechLab kit, cross-reactivity was observed for three specimens, one of which was positive for both E. dispar and E. moshkovskii while the other two samples contained E. moshkovskii. Quantitative assessment of the PCR and ELISA results obtained showed that the ELISA kits were 1,000 to 10,000 times less sensitive, and our results show that the CELISA PATH kit and the TechLab ELISA are not useful for the detection of E. histolytica in stool samples from patients in geographical regions where this parasite is not endemic. PMID:18367563

  13. A double-antibody sandwich ELISA for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigen in stool samples of humans.

    PubMed

    Baumann, D; Gottstein, B

    1987-06-01

    A double-antibody sandwich ELISA was developed to detect detergent-solubilized antigens of Entamoeba histolytica in stool samples of humans. The test system was evaluated for its methodical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. In recovery experiments the lower limit of detection was 400 ng E. histolytica (HK9) protein/ml stool, corresponding to approximately 2000 amoebic trophozoites/ml stool. Samples of 97 patients with suspected intestinal amoebiasis were examined. Specific antigens were detected by ELISA (= positive reaction) in 14 (93%) out of 15 stool samples containing trophozoites of E. histolytica. In contrast, 68 (93%) of 73 samples with other protozoa, including Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii and Giardia lamblia, did not react in the test system (= negative reaction). The test was shown to detect only trophozoites of E. histolytica and not the cyst stage. This fact could facilitate the differentiation between cyst carriers and persons excreting trophozoites. The results of this preliminary study justify a further large scale evaluation of the test system. PMID:2888183

  14. Rotavirus antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not found in the stool. Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

  15. Blastocystis surface antigen is stable in chemically preserved stool samples for at least 1 year.

    PubMed

    Gould, Rick; Boorom, Kenneth

    2013-07-01

    Blastocystis spp. refer to a group of prevalent enteric protists found in humans and animals. Detection of Blastocystis spp. in fecal samples is often performed by clinicians with direct microscopy, which provides low sensitivity, or with culture and polymerase chain reaction testing, a method which is problematic when used with formalin-preserved stool samples. Prior study of Blastocystis and other enteric protists suggests that immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) stain could provide sensitivity and compatibility with formalin, but no information is available on the longevity of Blastocystis sp.'s surface antigens in formalin. We collected fecal samples from animals at a country fair held in the summer of 2009 in Oregon, USA. Samples were tested for the presence of Blastocystis infection using an IFA stain shortly after collection, and again after 1 year, with samples stored refrigerated at 4-8 °C. Most samples collected from steer, pigs, and goats were found to be Blastocystis positive. All fecal samples that were Blastocystis positive initially remained positive after 1 year. Blastocystis-negative samples remained negative. Minimal degradation was observed in stained slides. Blastocystis surface antigens detected by a polyclonal stain remained stable in formalin for a period of at least 1 year.

  16. Yield of stool culture with isolate toxin testing versus a two-step algorithm including stool toxin testing for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Lema, Clara A; Perl, Trish M; Cai, Mian; Ross, Tracy L; Speck, Kathleen A; Carroll, Karen C

    2007-11-01

    We examined the incremental yield of stool culture (with toxin testing on isolates) versus our two-step algorithm for optimal detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile. Per the two-step algorithm, stools were screened for C. difficile-associated glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen and, if positive, tested for toxin by a direct (stool) cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). In parallel, stools were cultured for C. difficile and tested for toxin by both indirect (isolate) CCNA and conventional PCR if the direct CCNA was negative. The "gold standard" for toxigenic C. difficile was detection of C. difficile by the GDH screen or by culture and toxin production by direct or indirect CCNA. We tested 439 specimens from 439 patients. GDH screening detected all culture-positive specimens. The sensitivity of the two-step algorithm was 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 70 to 84%), and that of culture was 87% (95% CI, 80 to 92%). PCR results correlated completely with those of CCNA testing on isolates (29/29 positive and 32/32 negative, respectively). We conclude that GDH is an excellent screening test and that culture with isolate CCNA testing detects an additional 23% of toxigenic C. difficile missed by direct CCNA. Since culture is tedious and also detects nontoxigenic C. difficile, we conclude that culture is most useful (i) when the direct CCNA is negative but a high clinical suspicion of toxigenic C. difficile remains, (ii) in the evaluation of new diagnostic tests for toxigenic C. difficile (where the best reference standard is essential), and (iii) in epidemiologic studies (where the availability of an isolate allows for strain typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing).

  17. DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER ANTIGEN IN STOOL SAMPLES AND ITS RELATION TO H. PYLORI POSITIVE CHOLECYSTITIS IN EGYPTIAN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC CALCULAR CHOLECYSTITIS.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ehsan H; Gerges, Shawkat S; Ahmed, Rehab; Mostafa, Zeinab M; Al-Hamid, Hager Abd; Abd El-Galil, Heba; Thabet, Suzan

    2015-12-01

    Evidences supporting the association between H. pylori infection and chronic cholecystitis could be found by using direct culture or staining of H. pylori in gallbladder tissues as well as indirect techniques. Stool antigen test has been widely used due to its noninvasive nature. Various stool antigen tests were developed to detect H. pylori using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) based on monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies This study evaluated the frequency of H. pylori antigen in stool samples of patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis as regard gall bladder histopathological changes. Fifty patients were included presented with symptomatic qholecystolithiasis recruited from the outpatient clinic of National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institute during 2014-2015. Full history and clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography were performed. Stool samples were collected, prepared and examined for detection of H. pylori antigen. Cholecystectomy was done for all patients; 45 patients (90%) by laparoscopic Cholecystectomy and 5 patients (10%) by open surgery and removed gallbladders were submitted to pathology department for detection of H. pylori in tissue under microscope using Giemsa stain. The results showed that (82%) were females with mean age (42.6 +/- 1 years). The mean BMI was (29 + 7.2) H. pylori-specific antigen in stool samples was detected in 40% of patients and 38% were detected in patients; tissue, with significant correlation between H. pylori-specific antigen in stool and in tissue. Histopathological pictures infection in tissue were 68.4% mucosal erosions, 63.2% mucosal atrophy, 57.9% mucosal hyperplasia, 26.3% metaplasia, 42.1% musculosa hypertrophy, 26.3% fibrosis, but lymphoid aggregates were in 42.1% of cases. PMID:26939235

  18. Stool Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bacterial Culture, stool; Feces Culture Formal name: Enteric Pathogens Culture, stool Related tests: Ova and Parasite Exam , ... Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli , Widal Test , Gastrointestinal Pathogens Panel All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  19. Multisite clinical evaluation of a rapid test for Entamoeba histolytica in stool.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, Hans P; Hanbury, Blake; Siddique, Abdullah; Samie, Amidou; Haque, Rashidul; Herbein, Joel; Petri, William A

    2015-02-01

    Rapid point-of-care detection of enteric protozoa in diarrheal stool is desirable in clinical and research settings to efficiently determine the etiology of diarrhea. We analyzed the ability of the third-generation E. histolytica Quik Chek assay developed by Techlab to detect amebic antigens in fecal samples collected from independent study populations in South Africa and Bangladesh. We compared the performance of this recently released rapid test to that of the commercially available ProSpecT Entamoeba histolytica microplate assay from Remel and the E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from Techlab, using real-time and nested-PCR for Entamoeba species to resolve any discrepant results. After discrepant resolution, The E. histolytica Quik Chek assay exhibited sensitivity and specificity compared to the E. histolytica II ELISA of 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.9% to 99.8%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%), respectively. Compared to the ProSpecT microplate assay, the E. histolytica Quik Chek (Quik Chek) assay exhibited 97.0% sensitivity (95% CI, 91.5% to 99.4%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%). Our results indicate that the Quik Chek is a robust assay for the specific detection of E. histolytica trophozoites in unfixed frozen clinical stool samples.

  20. Evaluation of a latex agglutination test (PYLOGEN) for the detection of Helicobacter pylori in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Silvia; Forné, Montse; Lacoma, Alicia; Prat, Cristina; Cuesta, Miguel Angel; Fuenzalida, Loreto; Viver, Josep Maria; Domínguez, Jose

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess a new latex agglutination (LA) stool antigen assay (PYLOGEN; CerTest Biotec, Zaragoza, Spain) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and to monitor its eradication after treatment. The LA test has been approved for sale in Europe, and its approval from the US Food and Drug Administration is still pending. The individuals enrolled were classified into 3 groups of patients: Group 1 consisted of 38 patients who are H. pylori positive. The diagnosis of H. pylori infection was established if there was concordance between 2 test results (urea breath test [UBT], rapid urease test, and histopathologic study) or if the culture alone was positive. Patients with only 1 positive test were considered indeterminate and were excluded from the study. Group 2 comprised 9 patients without positive tests and who were considered to be H. pylori negative. Group 3 consisted of 57 patients who received eradication treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were 78.9% and 100%, respectively. The results of the UBT of the patients were studied 6 weeks after eradication therapy. The sensitivity and specificity of the LA test relative to UBT for patients after treatment were 75% and 93.3%, respectively.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... pylori stool antigen test; H. pylori breath test; Urea breath test; CLO test; Rapid urease test (RUT) ... of H. pylori antigen in a stool sample Urea breath test A person drinks a liquid containing ...

  2. Comparison of a Stool Antigen Detection Kit and PCR for Diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar Infections in Asymptomatic Cyst Passers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Rezaian, Mostafa; Babaei, Zahra; Rajabpour, Azam; Meamar, Ahmad R.; Pourbabai, Ahmad A.; Petri, William A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare stool antigen detection with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba sp. infection in asymptomatic cyst passers from Iran. Entamoeba dispar and, in one case, E. moshkovskii were the Entamoeba spp. found in the amebic cyst passers. There was a 100% correlation between the results from the TechLab E. histolytica II stool antigen kit and those from nested PCR. We concluded that E. dispar is much more common in asymptomatic cyst passers in Iran and that antigen detection and PCR are comparable diagnostic modalities. PMID:16757634

  3. Fecal Immunochemical Tests Combined With Other Stool Tests for Colorectal Cancer and Advanced Adenoma Detection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Niedermaier, Tobias; Weigl, Korbinian; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite moderate to high detection rates of fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) of colorectal cancer (CRC), detection of adenomas remains limited. Further stool tests exist, which are not used in routine practice, such as DNA or RNA markers and protein markers. We aimed at systematically investigating and summarizing evidence for diagnostic performance of combinations of FIT with other stool tests compared with FIT alone in early detection of CRC and its precursors. METHODS: We systematically reviewed studies that evaluated FITs in combination with other stool tests and compared measures of diagnostic accuracy with and without additional stool tests. PubMed and Web of Science were searched from inception to May 2015. Reference lists of eligible studies were also screened. Two reviewers extracted data independently. RESULTS: Some of the reports on DNA, RNA, or tissue tests, including tests based on DNA mutations, methylation, and integrity in selected genes as well as microRNA expression, showed some improvements of diagnostic test accuracy. In contrast, so far assessed stool protein markers did generally not lead to substantial improvements in performance of FIT when added to the latter. Many marker combinations were reported only in one study each, and few studies were conducted in a true screening setting. CONCLUSIONS: Several stool markers show potential to improve performance of FITs. However, the results require confirmation in further studies, which should also evaluate the costs and cost-effectiveness of combined screening strategies. PMID:27253514

  4. Prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica -like cysts compared to E. histolytica antigens detected by ELISA in the stools of 600 patients from three socioeconomic communities in the Metropolitan City of Lahore, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muhammad Azhar; Maqbool, Azhar; Nazir, Muhammad Mudasser; Lateef, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Sarwar; Ahmed, Atif Nisar; Ziaullah, M; Lindsay, David S

    2015-04-01

    Amoebiasis, caused by Entamoeba histolytica , has a worldwide distribution and is of public health significance in many developing countries. It has a fecal-oral transmission cycle and is most prevalent in developing countries in regions where substandard sanitary conditions exist due to poverty. Little is known about the epidemiology of E. histolytica infection and its presence in different socioeconomic communities in developing countries. We undertook the present study in the city of Lahore, Pakistan, and our prediction was that the prevalence of E. histolytica -like cysts and E. histolytica stool antigen would be lower in patients from upper socioeconomic levels than in individuals from middle or lower socioeconomic levels. We investigated the prevalence of E. histolytica in humans from 3 socioeconomic communities in territories of Lahore, Pakistan. Six hundred fecal samples were collected and examined using both microscopy (triple fecal test) to detect cysts of E. histolytica -like amoeba and ELISA (stool antigen ELISA) to demonstrate diagnostic stool antigens of E. histolytica . Samples were from individuals living under conditions deemed to be upper socioeconomic class (n = 287), middle socioeconomic class (n = 172), and lower socioeconomic class (n = 141). The total prevalence of positive samples was 22.5% (135/600) by triple test and 16.8% (101/600) by stool antigen ELISA in the 600 fecal samples. Statistically, significant (P < 0.05) differences in prevalence were seen between the 3 socioeconomic class groups. Forty-four (15.3%) and 32 (11.1%) of 287 in the fecal samples from the upper socioeconomic class were positive by triple test and by antigen ELISA, respectively. Thirty-nine (22.6%) and 29 (16.8%) of 172 in the fecal samples from the middle socioeconomic class were positive by the triple test and by antigen ELISA, respectively. Fifty-two (36.8%) and 40 (28.3%) of 141 in the fecal samples from the lower socioeconomic class were positive by the triple

  5. Multicenter Evaluation of Clinical Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Isolation of Campylobacter spp. from Stool.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Collette; Patrick, Mary; Gonzalez, Anthony; Akin, Joshua; Polage, Christopher R; Wymore, Kate; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Xavier, Karen; Sadlowski, Jennifer; Monahan, Jan; Hurd, Sharon; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Jerris, Robert; Watson, Renee; Santovenia, Monica; Mitchell, David; Harrison, Cassandra; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; DeMartino, Mary; Pentella, Michael; Razeq, Jafar; Leonard, Celere; Jung, Carrianne; Achong-Bowe, Ria; Evans, Yaaqobah; Jain, Damini; Juni, Billie; Leano, Fe; Robinson, Trisha; Smith, Kirk; Gittelman, Rachel M; Garrigan, Charles; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-05-01

    The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), such as stool antigen tests, as standalone tests for the detection of Campylobacter in stool is increasing. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate the performance of stool antigen CIDTs compared to culture and PCR for Campylobacter detection. Between July and October 2010, we tested 2,767 stool specimens from patients with gastrointestinal illness with the following methods: four types of Campylobacter selective media, four commercial stool antigen assays, and a commercial PCR assay. Illnesses from which specimens were positive by one or more culture media or at least one CIDT and PCR were designated "cases." A total of 95 specimens (3.4%) met the case definition. The stool antigen CIDTs ranged from 79.6% to 87.6% in sensitivity, 95.9 to 99.5% in specificity, and 41.3 to 84.3% in positive predictive value. Culture alone detected 80/89 (89.9% sensitivity) Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli-positive cases. Of the 209 noncases that were positive by at least one CIDT, only one (0.48%) was positive by all four stool antigen tests, and 73% were positive by just one stool antigen test. The questionable relevance of unconfirmed positive stool antigen CIDT results was supported by the finding that noncases were less likely than cases to have gastrointestinal symptoms. Thus, while the tests were convenient to use, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Campylobacter stool antigen tests were highly variable. Given the relatively low incidence of Campylobacter disease and the generally poor diagnostic test characteristics, this study calls into question the use of commercially available stool antigen CIDTs as standalone tests for direct detection of Campylobacter in stool.

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of Clinical Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Isolation of Campylobacter spp. from Stool.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Collette; Patrick, Mary; Gonzalez, Anthony; Akin, Joshua; Polage, Christopher R; Wymore, Kate; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Xavier, Karen; Sadlowski, Jennifer; Monahan, Jan; Hurd, Sharon; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Jerris, Robert; Watson, Renee; Santovenia, Monica; Mitchell, David; Harrison, Cassandra; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; DeMartino, Mary; Pentella, Michael; Razeq, Jafar; Leonard, Celere; Jung, Carrianne; Achong-Bowe, Ria; Evans, Yaaqobah; Jain, Damini; Juni, Billie; Leano, Fe; Robinson, Trisha; Smith, Kirk; Gittelman, Rachel M; Garrigan, Charles; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-05-01

    The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), such as stool antigen tests, as standalone tests for the detection of Campylobacter in stool is increasing. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate the performance of stool antigen CIDTs compared to culture and PCR for Campylobacter detection. Between July and October 2010, we tested 2,767 stool specimens from patients with gastrointestinal illness with the following methods: four types of Campylobacter selective media, four commercial stool antigen assays, and a commercial PCR assay. Illnesses from which specimens were positive by one or more culture media or at least one CIDT and PCR were designated "cases." A total of 95 specimens (3.4%) met the case definition. The stool antigen CIDTs ranged from 79.6% to 87.6% in sensitivity, 95.9 to 99.5% in specificity, and 41.3 to 84.3% in positive predictive value. Culture alone detected 80/89 (89.9% sensitivity) Campylobacter jejuni/Campylobacter coli-positive cases. Of the 209 noncases that were positive by at least one CIDT, only one (0.48%) was positive by all four stool antigen tests, and 73% were positive by just one stool antigen test. The questionable relevance of unconfirmed positive stool antigen CIDT results was supported by the finding that noncases were less likely than cases to have gastrointestinal symptoms. Thus, while the tests were convenient to use, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of Campylobacter stool antigen tests were highly variable. Given the relatively low incidence of Campylobacter disease and the generally poor diagnostic test characteristics, this study calls into question the use of commercially available stool antigen CIDTs as standalone tests for direct detection of Campylobacter in stool. PMID:26962088

  7. Evaluation of the positive predictive value of a rapid Immunochromatographic test to detect Campylobacter in stools.

    PubMed

    Floch, Pauline; Goret, Julien; Bessède, Emilie; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed rapid immunochromatographic tests (ICT) have the potential to provide a quick and easy diagnosis of Campylobacter enteritis in comparison to culture. In a previous study we found them sensitive but lacking in specificity. The aim of the present study was to focus on the problem of specificity and determine the positive predictive value (PPV) of a positive result of the ImmunoCard Stat! Campy (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH, USA). For this purpose, the stools positive by ICT were cultured according to 3 different protocols: Karmali agar, Preston enrichment broth subcultured on Karmali agar, and a filtration method on a blood agar without antibiotics, all incubated for 7 days at 37°C. Out of 609 stools from adults and children with community acquired enteritis, the reference methods detected 25 positive cases (4.1%) (culture: 19, specific PCR and ELISA both positive: 6) and the ICT: 31 including the 25 true positives. The PPV was 80.6%. We conclude that ICT is a good method to screen Campylobacter positive stools but because of its lack of specificity the positive stools must be tested by another method. PMID:23206554

  8. Schistosoma mansoni Infections in Young Children: When Are Schistosome Antigens in Urine, Eggs in Stool and Antibodies to Eggs First Detectable?

    PubMed Central

    Stothard, J. Russell; Sousa-Figuereido, Jose C.; Betson, Martha; Adriko, Moses; Arinaitwe, Moses; Rowell, Candia; Besiyge, Fred; Kabatereine, Narcis B.

    2011-01-01

    Background In Uganda, control of intestinal schistosomiasis with preventive chemotherapy is typically focused towards treatment of school-aged children; the needs of younger children are presently being investigated as in lakeshore communities very young children can be infected. In the context of future epidemiological monitoring, we sought to compare the detection thresholds of available diagnostic tools for Schistosoma mansoni and estimate a likely age of first infection for these children. Methods and Findings A total of 242 infants and preschool children (134 boys and 108 girls, mean age 2.9 years, minimum 5 months and maximum 5 years) were examined from Bugoigo, a well-known disease endemic village on Lake Albert. Schistosome antigens in urine, eggs in stool and host antibodies to eggs were inspected to reveal a general prevalence of 47.5% (CI95 41.1–54.0%), as ascertained by a positive criterion from at least one diagnostic method. Although children as young as 6 months old could be found infected, the average age of infected children was between 3¼–3¾ years, when diagnostic techniques became broadly congruent. Conclusion Whilst different assays have particular (dis)advantages, direct detection of eggs in stool was least sensitive having a temporal lag behind antigen and antibody methods. Setting precisely a general age of first infection is problematic but if present Ugandan policies continue, a large proportion of infected children could wait up to 3–4 years before receiving first medication. To better tailor treatment needs for this younger ageclass, we suggest that the circulating cathodic antigen urine dipstick method to be used as an epidemiological indicator. PMID:21245910

  9. Stools - floating

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorption of nutrients ( malabsorption ) or too much gas (flatulence). Considerations Most causes of floating stools are harmless. ... Bailey J. FPIN's Clinical Inquiries: Effective management of flatulence. Am Fam Physician Ohge H, Levitt MD. Intestinal ...

  10. Dipstick Test for Rapid Diagnosis of Shigella dysenteriae 1 in Bacterial Cultures and Its Potential Use on Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Neelam; Nato, Faridabano; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Sire, Jean Marie; Garin, Benoit; Thi Phuong, Lan Nguyen; Diep, Tai The; Shako, Jean Christophe; Bimet, François; Filliol, Ingrid; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Ungeheuer, Marie Noëlle; Ottone, Catherine; Sansonetti, Philippe; Germani, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Background We describe a test for rapid detection of S. dysenteriae 1 in bacterial cultures and in stools, at the bedside of patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The test is based on the detection of S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using serotype 1-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to gold particles and displayed on a one-step immunochromatographic dipstick. A concentration as low as 15 ng/ml of LPS was detected in distilled water and in reconstituted stools in 10 minutes. In distilled water and in reconstituted stools, an unequivocal positive reaction was obtained with 1.6×106 CFU/ml and 4.9×106 CFU/ml of S. dysenteriae 1, respectively. Optimal conditions to read the test have been determined to limit the risk of ambiguous results due to appearance of a faint yellow test band in some negative samples. The specificity was 100% when tested with a battery of Shigella and unrelated strains in culture. When tested on 328 clinical samples in India, Vietnam, Senegal and France by laboratory technicians and in Democratic Republic of Congo by a field technician, the specificity (312/316) was 98.7% (95% CI:96.6–99.6%) and the sensitivity (11/12) was 91.7% (95% CI:59.8–99.6%). Stool cultures and the immunochromatographic test showed concordant results in 98.4 % of cases (323/328) in comparative studies. Positive and negative predictive values were 73.3% (95% CI:44.8–91.1%) and 99.7% (95% CI:98–100%). Conclusion The initial findings presented here for a simple dipstick-based test to diagnose S. dysenteriae 1 demonstrates its promising potential to become a powerful tool for case management and epidemiological surveys. PMID:21984895

  11. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    PubMed

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  12. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  13. Evaluation of a New Device for Simplifying and Standardizing Stool Sample Preparation for Viral Molecular Testing with Limited Hands-On Time

    PubMed Central

    Feghoul, Linda; Salmona, Maud; Cherot, Janine; Fahd, Mony; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Vachon, Carole; Perrod, Aurélie; Bourgeois, Philippe; Scieux, Catherine; Baruchel, André; Simon, François

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive molecular assays have greatly improved the diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis. However, the proper preparation of stool samples for clinical testing remains an issue. bioMérieux has developed a stool preprocessing device (SPD) that includes a spoon for calibrated sampling and a vial containing buffer, glass beads, and two filters. The resulting stool filtrate is used for nucleic acid extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SPD for the quantification of human adenovirus (HAdV) DNA in stool samples collected from hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. HAdV DNA was quantified with the Adenovirus R-gene kit. The suitability of the device to reproducibly quantify HAdV DNA in stools using different extraction platforms (easyMAG and QIAsymphony) was determined using archived HAdV-positive stool samples. Coefficients of variation of HAdV DNA quantifications ranged from 1.79% to 1.83%, and no difference in quantification was observed between the two extraction systems. The HAdV DNA limit of quantification using the SPD was 3.75 log10 copies/g of stool. HAdV DNA quantification using the SPD was then compared to that of the routine preprocessing technique on 75 fresh stool samples collected prospectively from pediatric HSCT recipients at risk for HAdV infections. Thirty-eight samples were HAdV DNA positive with both the SPD and routine preprocessing methods. HAdV DNA loads were on average 1.14-log10 copies/g of stool higher with the SPD (P < 0.0001) than with routine methods. This new device enabled a standardized preparation of stool samples in <5 min and a reproducible and sensitive quantification of HAdV DNA. The use of the SPD for the detection of other gastrointestinal infections warrants further evaluation. PMID:26763967

  14. Stool Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... it in a container. Do not take stool samples from the water in the toilet bowl. Doing this can cause an inaccurate test result. Do not mix urine, water, or toilet tissue with the sample. For children wearing diapers: Line the diaper with ...

  15. A new rapid method for Clostridium difficile DNA extraction and detection in stool: toward point-of-care diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Freifeld, Alison G; Simonsen, Kari A; Booth, Christine S; Zhao, Xing; Whitney, Scott E; Karre, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Viljoen, Hendrik J

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new method for the rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection, with stool sample preparation and DNA extraction by heat and physical disruption in a single-use lysis microreactor (LMR), followed by a rapid PCR amplification step. All steps can be accomplished in <20 minutes overall. Gel electrophoresis is currently used to detect the amplification product, pending real-time availability with an ultra-rapid thermocycler. Compared with the dual enzyme immunoassay (EIA) screening test (C. diff Quik Chek Complete; Techlab, Blacksburg, VA), the novel LMR/PCR assay showed complete concordance with all glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) results (GDH(+)/toxin(+), n = 48; GDH(-)/toxin(-), n = 81). All 69 stool samples with discordant EIA results (GDH(+)/toxin(-)) were tested by both the LMR/PCR assay and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification test (LAMP) (Illumigene C. difficile; Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH). In 64/69 EIA-discordant samples, LAMP and LMR/PCR results matched (both positive in 29 sample and both negative in 35 samples); in the remaining 5 samples, results were discrepant between the LAMP assay (all five negative) and the LMR/PCR assay (all 5 positive). Overall, LMR/PCR testing matched the current algorithm of EIA and/or LAMP reflex testing in 193/198 (97.5%) samples. The present proof-of-concept study suggests that the novel LMR/PCR technique described here may be developed as an inexpensive, rapid, and reliable point-of-care diagnostic test for C. difficile infection and other infectious diseases.

  16. Folic acid absorption determined by a single stool sample test--a double-isotope technique. The folic acid absorption capacity in children

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The fractional folic acid absorption (FAFol) was determined in 66 patients with various gastrointestinal diseases by a double-isotope technique, employing a single stool sample test (SSST) as well as a complete stool collection. The age of the patients ranged from 2.5 months to 16.8 years (mean 6.3 years). The test dose was administered orally and consisted of 50 micrograms of (3H)folic acid (monoglutamate) (approximately 20 muCi), carmine powder, and 2 mg 51CrCl3 (approximately 1.25 muCi) as the unabsorbable tracer. The whole-body radiation given to a 1-year-old child averaged 4.8 mrad only. The stool and napkin contents were collected and homogenized by the addition of 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid. A 300-ml sample of the homogenized stool and napkin contents, as well as 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid (75% vol/vol) containing the standards, were counted for the content of 51Cr in a broad-based well counter. The quantity of (3H)folic acid was determined by liquid scintillation, after duplicate distillation. Estimated by SSST, the FAFol, which employs the stool with the highest content of 51Cr corresponding to the most carmine-colored stool, correlated closely with the FAFol based on complete stool collection (r = 0.96, n = 39, p less than 0.0001). The reproducibility of FAFol determined by SSST was assessed from repeated tests in 18 patients. For a mean of 81%, the SD was 4.6%, which corresponded to a coefficient of variation of 5.7%.

  17. Detection of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infections with toxigenic strains despite negative toxin A and B testing on stool samples.

    PubMed

    Stahlmann, J; Schönberg, M; Herrmann, M; von Müller, L

    2014-09-01

    A two-step diagnostic algorithm is recommended to detect Clostridium difficile infections; however, samples are regularly found that are glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) positive but stool toxin negative. In the present single-centre prospective study we focused on these 'difficult-to-interpret' samples and characterized them by anaerobic culture, toxigenic culture, slpA sequence typing and multiplex PCR (GenoType CDiff). The majority of stool toxin A and B-negative samples have been caused by toxigenic strains including ribotype 027. The multiplex PCR was faster and more sensitive compared with culture and allowed preliminary identification of hypervirulent strains in stool samples on the same day.

  18. Novel Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Simultaneous Clarithromycin Susceptibility Testing of Stool and Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Schabereiter-Gurtner, Claudia; Hirschl, Alexander M.; Dragosics, Brigitte; Hufnagl, Peter; Puz, Sonja; Kovách, Zsuzsanna; Rotter, Manfred; Makristathis, Athanasios

    2004-01-01

    A biprobe real-time PCR protocol, followed by hybridization melting point analysis, to detect point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of Helicobacter pylori associated with clarithromycin resistance was established and evaluated in a clinical study. Of 92 patients who underwent endoscopy, 45 were found to be H. pylori infected and invariably were also culture positive. Of the 45 isolates, 11 were shown to be resistant to clarithromycin by E-test. With respect to the detection of H. pylori infection, PCR showed sensitivities of 100% in biopsies and 98% in stool specimens and a specificity of 98% in both biopsy and stool samples. All clarithromycin-sensitive cases were identified as such by PCR in both biopsy and stool samples. Of the cases with a resistant strain, eight were identified as such in stool DNA and nine were identified in biopsy DNA. Failure of PCR to detect the resistant genotype in the biopsy DNA, stool DNA, or both (one case) was associated with mixed populations. In these cases, patients had not been treated for H. pylori infection before, and the sensitive population showed to be present in considerably higher numbers than the resistant population. In five of six cases in which infection with a resistant genotype only was identified by PCR, the patients had received clarithromycin-based eradication therapy in the past. Thus, the assay presented provides a highly accurate noninvasive method to detect H. pylori infection in stool and at the same time allows for culture-independent clarithromycin susceptibility testing. PMID:15472302

  19. Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027: Relationship to Age, Detectability of Toxins A or B in Stool With Rapid Testing, Severe Infection, and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Micic, Dejan; Natarajan, Mukil; Winters, Spencer; Kiel, Mark J.; Walk, Seth T.; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A.; Galecki, Andrzej T.; LeBar, William; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can cause severe disease and death, especially in older adults. A better understanding of risk factors for adverse outcomes is needed. This study tests the hypotheses that infection with specific ribotypes and presence of stool toxins independently associate with severity and constructs predictive models of adverse outcomes. Methods. Cases of non-recurrent CDI were prospectively included after positive stool tests for toxins A and/or B by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) or tcdB by polymerase chain reaction. Outcomes included severe CDI (intensive care unit admission, colectomy, or death attributable to CDI within 30 days of diagnosis) and 30-day all-cause mortality. Adjusted models were developed to test hypotheses and predict outcomes. Results. In total, 1144 cases were included. The toxin EIA was positive in 37.2% and 35.6% of patients were of age >65 years. One of the 137 unique ribotypes was ribotype 027 (16.2%). Detectable stool toxin did not associate with outcomes. Adjusting for covariates, including age, Ribotype 027 was a significant predictor of severe CDI (90 cases; odds ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–2.89; P = .037) and mortality (89 cases; OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.19–3.43; P = .009). Concurrent antibiotic use associated with both outcomes. Both multivariable predictive models had excellent performance (area under the curve >0.8). Conclusions. Detection of stool toxin A and/or B by EIA does not predict severe CDI or mortality. Infection with ribotype 027 independently predicts severe CDI and mortality. Use of concurrent antibiotics is a potentially modifiable risk factor for severe CDI. PMID:25828993

  20. Evaluation of immunochromatographic tests for the rapid detection of the emerging GII.17 norovirus in stool samples, January 2016.

    PubMed

    Théry, Lucie; Bidalot, Maxime; Pothier, Pierre; Ambert-Balay, Katia

    2016-01-01

    A novel GII.17 norovirus emerged in Asia in the winter of 2014/15. A worldwide spread is conceivable and norovirus diagnostic assays need to be evaluated to investigate if they adequately detect this emerging genotype. Seven immunochromatographic kits commercially available in Europe were evaluated on ten stool samples where GII.17 virus had been quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. All the kits detected GII.17 with various sensitivities, partly depending on the virus titre. PMID:26848594

  1. Serodiagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infections in an endemic area of Burkina Faso: performance of several immunological tests with different parasite antigens.

    PubMed

    Sorgho, Hermann; Bahgat, Mahmoud; Poda, Jean-Noel; Song, Wenjian; Kirsten, Christa; Doenhoff, Michael J; Zongo, Issaka; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Ruppel, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    The performance of indirect haemagglutination assays (IHA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT) were compared with 450 sera from a Schistosoma mansoni-endemic area in Burkina Faso. All participants in this survey provided at least one sample each of stool, urine and serum. From those with an egg-negative Kato-Katz thick smear, a second stool sample was examined. IHA was based on either extracts of adult S. mansoni worms (SmIHA) or S. japonicum egg antigen (SjIHA). For ELISA, three antigen preparations were used, namely: (i) soluble S. mansoni adult worm antigens (SWAP); (ii) soluble S. mansoni egg antigens (SEA); and (iii) a cationic exchange fraction of S. mansoni eggs (CEF6). IFAT was performed with S. mansoni male worm sections. Among the egg-excretors, the sensitivity of ELISA was high and egg antigens performed slightly better (SEA, 96%; CEF6, 97%) than worm antigen (94%). Sensitivity of IHA was satisfactory with homologous (Sm, >85%), but not heterologous (Sj, 56%) parasite antigen. In IFAT, the parenchyma-associated fluorescence showed high sensitivity (95%), but gut-associated fluorescence, which is known to be a sensitive diagnostic marker for schistosome-infected European travelers, was observed only in 76% of a sub-sample of 100 of the endemic sera. Among sera from egg-negative individuals, many gave positive reactions in several or all of the tests employed. These reactions (formally "false positive") are considered to represent true infections, since chemotherapy had not yet been delivered to this population. For the purpose of further surveys in Burkina Faso or other resource-poor settings, we suggest IHA as an accurate diagnostic test and propose to further improve its performance by including egg rather than worm antigens.

  2. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... C diff antigen; GDH Formal name: Clostridium difficile Culture; C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. difficile Cytotoxin Assay; Glutamate Dehydrogenase Test Related tests: Stool Culture ; O&P At a Glance Test Sample The ...

  3. Bloody or tarry stools

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the cause: Angiography Barium studies Bleeding scan (nuclear medicine) Blood studies, including a complete blood count ( CBC ) and differential , serum chemistries , clotting studies Colonoscopy Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD Stool culture ...

  4. Emerging stool-based and blood-based non-invasive DNA tests for colorectal cancer screening: the importance of cancer prevention in addition to cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can be undertaken utilizing a variety of distinct approaches, which provides both opportunities and confusion. Traditionally, there has often been a trade-off between the degree of invasiveness of a screening test and its ability to prevent cancer, with fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and optical colonoscopy (OC) at each end of the spectrum. CT colonography (CTC), although currently underutilized for CRC screening, represents an exception since it is only minimally invasive, yet provides accurate evaluation for advanced adenomas. More recently, the FDA approved a multi-target stool DNA test (Cologuard) and a blood-based test (Epi proColon) for average-risk CRC screening. This commentary will provide an overview of these two new non-invasive tests, including the clinical indications, mechanism of action, and diagnostic performance. Relevance to radiology practice, including a comparison with CTC, will also be discussed. PMID:27259335

  5. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are some of the limitations and potential harms of the PSA test for prostate cancer screening? ... has been learned about both the benefits and harms of prostate cancer screening, a number of organizations ...

  6. Comparison of Various Methods in the Diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica in Stool and Serum Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Hakan; Aktas, Osman; Uyanik, Muhammet Hamidullah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Entamoeba histolytica is indistinguishable from Entamoeba dispar in direct microscopic examination. A definitive diagnosis of E. histolytica is important in terms of the treatment of the patient and to avoid unnecessary costs. This study’s aim is to determine the prevalence of E. histolytica and to make a comparison of the different diagnostic tests in the patients specimens defined as E. histolytica/E. dispar infection. Materials and Methods: Faecal and serum specimens of 90 patients defined as E. histolytica/E. dispar with microscopy (wet mount examination with 0.85% saline and Lugol’s iodine) were examined. Stool samples were examined by trichrome staining for trophozoites and cysts and by immunoassay methods for specific adhesin antigens (Wampole ® E. histolytica II antigen testing) and for specific serine-rich 30 kD membrane protein (Serazym® E. histolytica antigen testing). Anti-E. histolytica antibodies were investigated using a latex slide test and indirect hemagglutination methods in serum specimens. Results: Presence of E. histolytica was not confirmed in 31.1% cases with trichrome staining, 62.2% of the Wampole antigen test, 64.4%, of the Serazym antigen test, 73.3% of the indirect hemagglutination test and 75.6%. of the latex agglutination. Considering the common results from Wampole and Serazym antigen testing as a reference standard, the specificity/sensitivity is 100/53.85% for trichrome staining, 75.00/98.11% for the latex agglutination test and 78.57/96.77% for the indirect hemagglutination test. Conclusion: It has been shown that investigation of E. histolytica in stools by direct wet-smear microscopy alone can cause significant false positive results. To obtain a reliable diagnosis for E. histolytica and to avoid unnecessary treatment for this parasite, at least one more specific assay, particularly an antigen testing and microscopy, is required. PMID:27551176

  7. Performance of the Fecal Immunochemical Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening Using Different Stool-Collection Devices: Preliminary Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye Young; Suh, Mina; Baik, Hyung Won; Choi, Kui Son; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Lee, Chan Wha; Oh, Jae Hwan; Lee, You Kyoung; Han, Dong Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims We are in the process of conducting a randomized trial to determine whether compliance with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for colorectal cancer screening differs according to the stool-collection method. This study was an interim analysis of the performance of two stool-collection devices (sampling bottle vs conventional container). Methods In total, 1,701 individuals (age range, 50 to 74 years) were randomized into the sampling bottle group (intervention arm) or the conventional container group (control arm). In both groups, we evaluated the FIT positivity rate, the positive predictive value for advanced neoplasia, and the detection rate for advanced neoplasia. Results The FIT positivity rates were 4.1% for the sampling bottles and 2.0% for the conventional containers; these values were significantly different. The positive predictive values for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 11.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], −3.4 to 25.6) and 12.0% (95% CI, −0.7 to 24.7), respectively. The detection rates for advanced neoplasia in the sampling bottles and conventional containers were 4.5 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 2.0 to 11.0) and 2.4 per 1,000 persons (95% CI, 0.0 to 5.0), respectively. Conclusions The impact of these findings on FIT screening performance was unclear in this interim analysis. This impact should therefore be evaluated in the final analysis following the final enrollment period. PMID:27282262

  8. Stool ova and parasites exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... stool sample. The parasites are associated with intestinal infections. ... An abnormal result means parasites or eggs are present in the stool. This is a sign of a parasitic infection, such as: Amebiasis Giardiasis Strongyloidiasis Taeniasis

  9. Stool microbiome reveals diverse bacterial ureases as confounders of oral urea breath testing for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Bamako, Mali.

    PubMed

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Cohen, Keira; Baya, Bocar; Srikrishna, Geetha; Siddiqui, Sophia; Sanogo, Moumine; Somboro, Anou M; Diarra, Bassirou; Diallo, Mariam H; Mazumdar, Varun; Yoder, Christian; Orsega, Susan; Belson, Michael; Kassambara, Hamadoun; Goita, Drissa; Murphy, Robert L; Dao, Sounkalo; Polis, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane; Timmins, Graham S; Dodd, Lori; Earl, Ashlee M; Bishai, William R

    2016-01-01

    Detection of bacterial urease activity has been utilized successfully to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) also possesses an active urease, it is unknown whether detection of mycobacterial urease activity by oral urease breath test (UBT) can be exploited as a rapid point of care biomarker for tuberculosis (TB) in humans. We enrolled 34 individuals newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB and 46 healthy subjects in Bamako, Mali and performed oral UBT, mycobacterial sputum culture and H. pylori testing. Oral UBT had a sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) of 70% (46-88%) and 11% (3-26%), respectively, to diagnose culture-confirmed M. tuberculosis disease among patients without H. pylori, and 100% sensitivity (69-100%) and 11% specificity (3-26%) to diagnose H. pylori among patients without pulmonary TB. Stool microbiome analysis of controls without TB or H. pylori but with positive oral UBT detected high levels of non-H. pylori urease producing organisms, which likely explains the low specificity of oral UBT in this setting and in other reports of oral UBT studies in Africa. PMID:27532494

  10. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Tumor Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  11. Circulating antigen tests and urine reagent strips for diagnosis of active schistosomiasis in endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Ochodo, Eleanor A; Gopalakrishna, Gowri; Spek, Bea; Reitsma, Johannes B; van Lieshout, Lisette; Polman, Katja; Lamberton, Poppy; Bossuyt, Patrick Mm; Leeflang, Mariska Mg

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care (POC) tests for diagnosing schistosomiasis include tests based on circulating antigen detection and urine reagent strip tests. If they had sufficient diagnostic accuracy they could replace conventional microscopy as they provide a quicker answer and are easier to use. Objectives To summarise the diagnostic accuracy of: a) urine reagent strip tests in detecting active Schistosoma haematobium infection, with microscopy as the reference standard; and b) circulating antigen tests for detecting active Schistosoma infection in geographical regions endemic for Schistosoma mansoni or S. haematobium or both, with microscopy as the reference standard. Search methods We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, MEDION, and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) without language restriction up to 30 June 2014. Selection criteria We included studies that used microscopy as the reference standard: for S. haematobium, microscopy of urine prepared by filtration, centrifugation, or sedimentation methods; and for S. mansoni, microscopy of stool by Kato-Katz thick smear. We included studies on participants residing in endemic areas only. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data, assessed quality of the data using QUADAS-2, and performed meta-analysis where appropriate. Using the variability of test thresholds, we used the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model for all eligible tests (except the circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) POC for S. mansoni, where the bivariate random-effects model was more appropriate). We investigated heterogeneity, and carried out indirect comparisons where data were sufficient. Results for sensitivity and specificity are presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Main results We included 90 studies; 88 from field settings in Africa. The median S. haematobium infection prevalence was 41% (range 1% to 89%) and 36% for S. mansoni (range 8

  12. Rapid Antigen Testing for Trichomoniasis in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Postenrieder, Nikki R.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Hesse, Elizabeth; Kahn, Jessica A.; Ding, Lili; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Rompalo, Anne; Widdice, Lea E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trichomoniasis is a prevalent cause of vaginitis among adolescents that increases the risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections and is associated with negative pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, treatment of trichomoniasis is essential for improving sexual and reproductive health outcomes. A timely, sensitive diagnostic test for T vaginalis may increase accuracy of clinician's treatment decisions resulting in more infected women receiving treatment and fewer uninfected women receiving treatment. Methods Retrospective observational study of electronic medical records during 2 time periods: before (pre-POC) and after (post-POC) implementation of the rapid antigen test. Records were collected from women aged 14-20 years who received a T vaginalis test in the emergency department during either study period. The main outcome measures were the rates of accurate treatment, inaccurate treatment, and missed treatment of trichomoniasis in each study period. Results Overall rates of accurate treatment increased from 78.7% pre-POC to 87.7% post-POC (P=0.02). Specifically, rates of not treating uninfected women increased from 61.4% pre-POC to 70.4% post-POC (P=0.06) and rates of treating infected women were the same pre-POC (17.3) and post-POC (17.3, P=0.99). Rates of inaccurate treatment decreased from 23.1% pre-POC to 13.1% post-POC (P=.02). Changes in rates of missed treatment (14.0% pre-POC and 8.8% post-POC, P=0.73) were not statistically significant. Conclusions Point-of-care testing can impact clinical care by decreasing use of antibiotics in uninfected women. The results of this study provide support for the use of a T vaginalis rapid antigen POC test for adolescents presenting to the emergency department. PMID:27207490

  13. The current state of prostate-specific antigen testing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan; Hornberger, Brad

    2016-09-01

    Since prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing was approved in 1994, the incidence of metastasis and mortality from prostate cancer have significantly decreased. However, PSA screening for prostate cancer has limitations and few large randomized controlled trials have been conducted to determine the mortality benefit of PSA screening. Two studies that have been conducted are the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial and the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). These were the two main studies the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) used in its recommendation against prostate cancer screening in 2012. However, new evidence has demonstrated that the PLCO trial had significant limitations and the results of the ERSPC trial were more significant than previously thought. This article describes the strengths and weaknesses of the USPSTF's recommendation, along with current guidelines for prostate cancer screening. PMID:27575906

  14. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The...

  15. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The...

  16. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The...

  17. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The...

  18. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  19. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... immunological Test Systems § 866.6010 Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  1. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  2. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  3. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  4. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  5. Rapid Diagnosis of Diarrhea Caused by Shigella sonnei Using Dipsticks; Comparison of Rectal Swabs, Direct Stool and Stool Culture

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Claudia; Nato, Faridabano; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Thi Phuong, Lan Nguyen; Taneja, Neelam; Ungeheuer, Marie Noëlle; Soza, Guillermo; Anderson, Leslie; Benadof, Dona; Zamorano, Agustín; Diep, Tai The; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Nguyen, Vu Hoang; Ottone, Catherine; Bégaud, Evelyne; Pahil, Sapna; Prado, Valeria; Sansonetti, Philippe; Germani, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated a dipstick test for rapid detection of Shigella sonnei on bacterial colonies, directly on stools and from rectal swabs because in actual field situations, most pathologic specimens for diagnosis correspond to stool samples or rectal swabs. Methodology/Principal Findings The test is based on the detection of S. sonnei lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-side chains using phase I-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to gold particles, and displayed on a one-step immunochromatographic dipstick. A concentration as low as 5 ng/ml of LPS was detected in distilled water and in reconstituted stools in 6 minutes. This is the optimal time for lecture to avoid errors of interpretation. In distilled water and in reconstituted stools, an unequivocal positive reaction was obtained with 4 x 106 CFU/ml of S. sonnei. The specificity was 100% when tested with a battery of Shigella and different unrelated strains. When tested on 342 rectal swabs in Chile, specificity (281/295) was 95.3% (95% CI: 92.9% - 97.7%) and sensitivity (47/47) was 100%. Stool cultures and the immunochromatographic test showed concordant results in 95.5 % of cases (328/342) in comparative studies. Positive and negative predictive values were 77% (95% CI: 65% - 86.5%) and 100% respectively. When tested on 219 stools in Chile, Vietnam, India and France, specificity (190/198) was 96% (95% CI 92%–98%) and sensitivity (21/21) was 100%. Stool cultures and the immunochromatographic test showed concordant results in 96.3 % of cases (211/219) in comparative studies. Positive and negative predictive values were 72.4% (95% CI 56.1%–88.6%) and 100 %, respectively. Conclusion This one-step dipstick test performed well for diagnosis of S. sonnei both on stools and on rectal swabs. These data confirm a preliminary study done in Chile. PMID:24278267

  6. Direct Testing of Blood Cultures for Detection of Streptococcal Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Wetkowski, Maryellen A.; Peterson, Ellena M.; De La Maza, Luis M.

    1982-01-01

    A direct, rapid, and simple method for the detection of streptococcal antigens of Lancefield groups A, B, C, D, and G from blood cultures was developed by using a coagglutination test. Fifty-five clinical specimens and 117 simulated blood cultures containing gram-positive cocci were tested. Out of 6,261 clinical blood cultures screened, 55 cultures from 53 patients were positive, with organisms resembling streptococci, by Gram stain. Of these cultures, 78% (43 of 55) were pure cultures of streptococci, and 22% (12 of 55) were mixed with at least one other organism. Of the 43 pure cultures only, correct reactions were obtained (grouping correctly or giving no cross-reactions, or both) with 86% (37 of 43) of the isolates, 12% (5 of 43) exhibited cross-reactions, and 2% (1 of 43) gave false-negative reactions. All of the cross-reacting isolates were Streptococcus pneumoniae, which reacted with the group C reagent, and the false-negative reaction occurred with a Streptococcus bovis isolate. However, by using a direct modified bile solubility test, the correct identification of the S. pneumoniae isolates was obtained. Therefore, by using the modified bile solubility test in conjunction with the direct grouping method, 98% (42 of 43) of the isolates in pure culture could be identified accurately and rapidly after the detection of a positive Gram stain. Correct grouping reactions were obtained with 83% (10 of 12) of the mixed blood cultures, and false-negative results occurred with 17% (2 of 12) of them. Both cultures contained an enterococcus and a gram-negative rod. Of the 117 simulated blood cultures, there was only one incorrect grouping reaction; this occurred with an S. bovis isolate that cross-reacted with the group C reagent. The direct grouping reaction was positive when blood cultures contained a minimum of 1 × 108 to 8 × 108 colony-forming units per ml. In general, this procedure provided information on the identification of the organism 24 h earlier than by

  7. [Procedure and indications of stool examination in parasitology].

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Sonia; Aouinet, Amira; Khaled, Samira

    2012-06-01

    Intestinal parasites are a public health problem in the world especially in tropical and subtropical countries. Despite the improvement in living standards and healthy conditions, these parasitoses remain relatively frequent in Tunisia. Stool specimen examination keeps the fundamental test for screening and diagnosis. It is to directly search the parasite. Respect for the right procedure of collection of stool is an essential step for the reliability and proper interpretation of results of this examination.

  8. Leucocyte migration inhibition test with two gastric antigens in pernicious anaemia and in simple atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Nozicka, Z

    1979-02-01

    Leucocyte migration inhibition test was used for evaluation of cell-mediated immunity in patients with pernicious anaemia (PA) and simple atrophic gastritis (SAG). As antigens microsomal antigen from gastric mucosa of swine foetus and relatively pure hog intrinsic factor (IF) were used. Significant differences were found between PA and SAG with microsomal antigen, but not with IF. It was concluded, that the microsomal antigen might be more active than IF. This observation could contribute to explane the higher incidence of parietal cell antibody than that of IF antibody in PA patients.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen testing to detect HIV infection in female sex workers in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, R K; Ali, K; Thoe, S Y

    1995-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterised by seroconversion after a ¿window¿ period of 2 to 3 months. After this period antibodies are usually detectable by screening tests (enzyme immunoassay or particle agglutination) confirmed by Western blot analysis. We studied 1000 newly enrolled female sex workers who had not been previously tested for HIV to assess the usefulness of HIV antigen testing to improve the efficacy of HIV infection detection. Blood was taken at enrollment for HIV antigen and HIV antibody testing. The Abbott HIVAG-1 test was used to detect antigen; antibody detection was by the Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test, the Fujirebio Serodia-HIV particle agglutination (PA) test for screening, and the Diagnostic Biotechnology HIV Blot 2.2 Western blot (WB) test for antibody confirmation. Of the 1000 samples, 26 were positive for HIV antibody testing (26/26 for EIA, 25/25 for PA, 26/26 for WB), giving a prevalence rate of 2.6%, Of these 26 seropositive samples 1 was positive on HIV antigen testing. There were no samples which were antigen-positive and antibody-negative. HIV antigen testing does not add to increased efficacy of HIV detection among female sex workers in Singapore.

  10. Buffered Plate Antigen Test as a Screening Test for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Nidia E.; Bolpe, Jorge E.

    1998-01-01

    Brucellosis in Argentina is currently investigated in bank donor blood by the standard plate agglutination test (PAT). This study evaluated the buffered plate antigen test (BPA), now used to screen for bovine brucellosis, as a screen for human disease. Of 57 sera from patients with culture-confirmed brucellosis, 100% were detected with the BPA. Of 142 sera positive by rose bengal (RB) and complement fixation (CF), from patients with clinical evidence of brucellosis, the BPA detected 100%. Of 307 sera from a nonsymptomatic population that were RB and CF negative, the BPA detected 99.67% of the negative sera. The data indicate that the BPA is satisfactory compared to the other agglutination tests employed. It is an inexpensive and practical screening test and reduces the nonspecific reactions detected by the PAT. PMID:9574720

  11. Evaluation of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R D; Jaeger, K L; Wuhib, T; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of the small (4- to 6-microns) Cryptosporidium oocysts is labor intensive and relies on stool concentration, with subsequent staining and microscopy. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (LMD Laboratories, Carlsbad, Calif.) in detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in human stools. A total of 591 specimens (76 diarrheal, 515 control) obtained from 213 inhabitants of an urban slum in northeastern Brazil were examined by both ELISA and conventional microscopic examination (CME) of formalin-ethyl acetate-concentrated stool samples stained with modified acid-fast and auramine stains. Forty-eight diarrheal stools (63.2%) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts by CME, with 40 of these positive by ELISA. Thirty-five control stools (6.8%) had Cryptosporidium oocysts detected by CME, with 15 of these also positive by ELISA. All of the 480 nondiarrheal stools and all but one of the diarrheal stools negative by CME were negative by ELISA. The test had an overall sensitivity of 66.3% and a specificity of 99.8% (positive predictive value, 98.2%; negative predictive value, 94.8%). In the evaluation of human diarrheal stool samples, the test sensitivity increased to 83.3%, with a specificity of 96.4%, and, in analysis of samples from individual patients with diarrhea, the sensitivity was 87.9%, with a specificity of 100%. These results indicate that this stool ELISA is sensitive and specific for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in human diarrheal stool specimens but has limited use in epidemiologic studies for the diagnosis of asymptomatic Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:8370732

  12. Heat treatment prior to testing allows detection of antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in feline serum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis infection in cats is complicated by the difficulty associated with reliable detection of antigen in feline blood and serum samples. Methods To determine if antigen-antibody complex formation may interfere with detection of antigen in feline samples, we evaluated the performance of four different commercially available heartworm tests using serum samples from six cats experimentally infected with D. immitis and confirmed to harbor a low number of adult worms (mean = 2.0). Sera collected 168 (n = 6), 196 (n = 6), and 224 (n = 6) days post infection were tested both directly and following heat treatment. Results Antigen was detected in serum samples from 0 or 1 of 6 infected cats using the assays according to manufacturer’s directions, but after heat treatment of serum samples, as many as 5 of 6 cats had detectable antigen 6–8 months post infection. Antibodies to D. immitis were detected in all six infected cats by commercial in-clinic assay and at a reference laboratory. Conclusions These results indicate that heat treatment of samples prior to testing can improve the sensitivity of antigen assays in feline patients, supporting more accurate diagnosis of this infection in cats. Surveys conducted by antigen testing without prior heat treatment of samples likely underestimate the true prevalence of infection in cats. PMID:24411014

  13. Application of stool-PCR for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori from stool in Nigeria- a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stella I; Fowora, Muinah A; Lesi, Olufunmilayo A; Agbebaku, Elizabeth; Odeigah, Peter; Abdulkareem, Fatimah B; Onyekwere, Charles A; Agomo, Chimere A; Contreras, Monica

    2012-12-01

    There are various methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori and the gold standard for non-invasive detection is the urea breath test (UBT). The aim of the study is therefore to detect H. pylori from the stool of patients with dyspepsia by PCR and compare results obtained with UBT. A total of 97 stool samples from patients presenting with dyspeptic symptoms in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) were screened for urea breath test (UBT) and the presence of H. pylori DNA using stool-PCR. Out of 97 stool samples analysed, 38 (39.2%) were positive for Helicobacter spp. and 20 (20.6%) positive for H. pylori by PCR, through amplification of 16S rRNA and glmMgenes respectively. Of the 20 positive by glmM gene, the cagAgene was detected in 8 (40%) samples, while 47 (48.5%) out of 97 stool samples were positive for H. pylori by UBT. The sensitivity and specificity of the glmM gene compared with UBT as the gold standard is 42.6% and 100% respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 100% while the negative predictive value (NPV) was 60%.The method may be useful for detecting H. pylori from stool amongst children especially where most hospitals lack endoscope for children although the method is expensive. PMID:23419882

  14. Screening for enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Aitchison, Alan; Purcell, Rachel V; Greenlees, Rosie; Pearson, John F; Frizelle, Frank A

    2016-08-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most humans, however enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains (ETBF) have been associated with diarrhoea and colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to establish a method of screening for the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft) gene in stool samples, as a means of determining if carriage of ETBF is detected more often in CRC patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Stool samples from 71 patients recently diagnosed with CRC, and 71 age-matched controls, were screened by standard and quantitative PCR using primers specific for the detection of the bft gene. Bacterial template DNA from stool samples was prepared by two methods: a sweep, where all colonies growing on Bacteroides Bile Esculin agar following stool culture for 48 h at 37 °C in an anaerobic environment were swept into sterile water and heat treated; and a direct DNA extraction from each stool sample. The bft gene was detected more frequently from DNA isolated from bacterial sweeps than from matched direct DNA extractions. qPCR was found to be more sensitive than standard PCR in detecting bft. The cumulative total of positive qPCR assays from both sample types revealed that 19 of the CRC patients had evidence of the toxin gene in their stool sample (27%), compared to seven of the age-matched controls (10%). This difference was significant (P = 0.016). Overall, ETBF carriage was detected more often in CRC patient stool samples compared to controls, but disparate findings from the different DNA preparations and testing methods suggests that poor sensitivity may limit molecular detection of ETBF in stool samples. PMID:27166180

  15. Comparative evaluation of three commercially available complement fixation test antigens for the diagnosis of glanders.

    PubMed

    Khan, I; Wieler, L H; Melzer, F; Gwida, M; Santana, V L de A; de Souza, M M A; Saqib, M; Elschner, M C; Neubauer, H

    2011-11-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of three commercially available complement fixation test (CFT) antigens from c.c.pro (c.c.pro), Central Veterinary Institute of Wageningen UR (CIDC) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) were comparatively evaluated by testing 410 sera collected from glanders-endemic and non-endemic areas (200 true-negative randomly collected sera and 210 sera collected from experimentally immunised animals (12 rabbits, 19 horses), clinically positive (135) and culture-positive (44) horses, donkeys and mules). Immunoblotting (IB) was used as the gold standard test. Highest sensitivity was shown for the CIDC antigen (100 per cent) followed by the c.c.pro antigen (99.39 per cent). However, the USDA antigen showed substantially less (p<0.05) sensitivity (62.19 per cent). Highest specificity was found for the USDA antigen (100 per cent) followed by the CIDC (97.5 per cent) and c.c.pro antigen (96.5 per cent). Positive and negative predictive values (assumed glanders prevalence of <0.1 per cent) for each antigen were calculated to be 95.88 and 99.48 (c.c.pro), 97.04 and 100 (CIDC), 100 and 76.33 per cent (USDA), respectively. Almost perfect agreement (0.96) was found between CFT using either c.c.pro or CIDC and IB.

  16. Evaluation of a Rapid Lateral Flow Point-of-Care Test for Detection of Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Fleece, Molly E.; Heptinstall, Jack; Khan, Shaila S.; Kabir, Mamum; Herbein, Joel; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A new rapid lateral flow fecal antigen detection test for Cryptosporidium was evaluated using diarrheal stool samples from a cohort of children in Bangladesh. The test had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 94% when compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen detection. PMID:27573629

  17. Evaluation of urine pneumococcal antigen test performance among adults in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Bigogo, Godfrey; Jagero, Geofrey; da Gloria Carvalho, Maria; Pimenta, Fabiana; Junghae, Muthoni; Breiman, Robert F; Whitney, Cynthia G; Feikin, Daniel R; Conklin, Laura M

    2016-08-01

    When used in an area of rural western Kenya, the BinaxNOW® urine antigen test had a sensitivity of 67% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 43-85%) among 21 adults ≥15 years old with acute respiratory illnesses and pneumococcal bacteremia and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 96-99%) among 660 adults ≥15 years old without fever or cough. The specificity of the test was not significantly affected by pneumococcal colonization, regardless of patients' HIV status, age, or sex. Use of the pneumococcal urine antigen test in clinical assessments of adults in Africa with acute respiratory illness is a viable option regardless of whether a patient is colonized by pneumococci, even among HIV-infected adults, although the moderate sensitivity of the urine antigen test indicates that the test is probably best used clinically as part of a panel with other tests that can detect pneumococci. PMID:27220607

  18. Stool Microbiota and Vaccine Responses of Infants

    PubMed Central

    Huda, M. Nazmul; Lewis, Zachery; Kalanetra, Karen M.; Rashid, Mamunur; Ahmad, Shaikh M.; Raqib, Rubhana; Qadri, Firdausi; Underwood, Mark A.; Mills, David A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Oral vaccine efficacy is low in less-developed countries, perhaps due to intestinal dysbiosis. This study determined if stool microbiota composition predicted infant oral and parenteral vaccine responses. METHODS: The stool microbiota of 48 Bangladeshi infants was characterized at 6, 11, and 15 weeks of age by amplification and sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene V4 region and by Bifidobacterium-specific, quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Responses to oral polio virus (OPV), bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), tetanus toxoid (TT), and hepatitis B virus vaccines were measured at 15 weeks by using vaccine-specific T-cell proliferation for all vaccines, the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test response for BCG, and immunoglobulin G responses using the antibody in lymphocyte supernatant method for OPV, TT, and hepatitis B virus. Thymic index (TI) was measured by ultrasound. RESULTS: Actinobacteria (predominantly Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis) dominated the stool microbiota, with Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes increasing by 15 weeks. Actinobacteria abundance was positively associated with T-cell responses to BCG, OPV, and TT; with the delayed-type hypersensitivity response; with immunoglobulin G responses; and with TI. B longum subspecies infantis correlated positively with TI and several vaccine responses. Bacterial diversity and abundance of Enterobacteriales, Pseudomonadales, and Clostridiales were associated with neutrophilia and lower vaccine responses. CONCLUSIONS: Bifidobacterium predominance may enhance thymic development and responses to both oral and parenteral vaccines early in infancy, whereas deviation from this pattern, resulting in greater bacterial diversity, may cause systemic inflammation (neutrophilia) and lower vaccine responses. Vaccine responsiveness may be improved by promoting intestinal bifidobacteria and minimizing dysbiosis early in infancy. PMID:25002669

  19. Comparison of antigenic heterogeneity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains by micro-immunofluorescence and serum bactericidal tests.

    PubMed Central

    Mark, J A; Wang, S P

    1978-01-01

    The antigenic heterogeneity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains was assessed by the micro-immunofluorescence (micro-IF) and the serum bactericidal tests. The micro-IF test verified the antigenic heterogeneity of nine strains received from the Center for Disease Control and placed them into immunotypes A and B. The serum bactericidal system also detected different antigenic determinants among the strains. Although the micro-IF and bactericidal assays did not correspond in each instance, the overall pattern of similarities and differences among these gonococcal strains was similar. The micro-IF pattern obtained with mouse antisera was identical to the pattern revealed with guinea pig antisera. Different colony type organisms showed similar sensitivity in the bactericidal test. The micro-IF test is a rapid technique for the immunotyping of N. gonorrhoeae and has the additional advantages of reproducibility and simplicity. PMID:83299

  20. Formalinized Chlamydia trachomatis organisms as antigen in the micro-immunofluorescence test.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S P; Kuo, C C; Grayston, J T

    1979-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis organisms grown in HeLa 229 cell cultures were purified and formalinized for use in the micro-immunofluorescence test. As test antigens, they were stable when stored unfrozen at 4 degrees C for a long period of time without loss of type specificity and sensitivity. PMID:389953

  1. Development and evaluation of immunochromatographic assay for simple and rapid detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in human stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Kentaro; Kumeda, Yuko; Taguchi, Masumi; Yamazaki-Matsune, Wataru; Kanki, Masashi; Inoue, Kiyoshi

    2008-04-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (Campy-ICA) using a newly generated single monoclonal antibody against a 15-kDa cell surface protein of Campylobacter jejuni was developed. When cell suspensions of 86 C. jejuni strains and 27 Campylobacter coli strains were treated with a commercially available bacterial protein extraction reagent and the resulting extracts were tested with the Campy-ICA, they all yielded positive results. The minimum detectable limits for the C. jejuni strains ranged from 1.8 x 10(4) to 8.2 x 10(5) CFU/ml of cell suspension, and those for the C. coli strains ranged from 1.4 x 10(5) to 4.6 x 10(6) CFU/ml of cell suspension. All 26 non-Campylobacter species tested yielded negative results with the Campy-ICA. To evaluate the ability of the Campy-ICA to detect C. jejuni and C. coli in human stool specimens, suspensions of 222 stool specimens from patients with acute gastroenteritis were treated with the bacterial protein extraction reagent, and the resulting extracts were tested with the Campy-ICA. The Campy-ICA results showed a sensitivity of 84.8% (28 of 33 specimens) and a specificity of 100% (189 of 189 specimens) compared to the results of isolation of C. jejuni and C. coli from the stool specimens by a bacterial culture test. The Campy-ICA was simple to perform and was able to detect Campylobacter antigen in a fecal extract within 15 min. These results suggest that Campy-ICA testing of fecal extracts may be useful as a simple and rapid adjunct to stool culture for detecting C. jejuni and C. coli in human stool specimens.

  2. [Comparison of a rapid antigen test and cultures for diagnosis of meningitis in children].

    PubMed

    Hashikita, Giichi; Kishi, Etsuko; Takahashi, Shun; Kawamura, Toru; Tachi, Yoshimi; Koyama, Sachie; Suto, Yukie; Itabashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Harashima, Hiroko; Uehara, Suzuko; Sasaki, Nozomu; Maesaki, Sigefumi

    2003-01-01

    Fourteen pediatric patients diagnosed as bacterial meningitis between August 1997 and April 2002 were enrolled in this study. Both rapid antigen detection test, Slidex Meningite 5 Kit (Biomerieux) and culture were performed using cerebrospinal fluids (CSF). H. influenzae was isolated from 11 samples and was the most frequently isolated bacteria, followed by S. pneumoniae from 4 samples and enteric bacteriae from 2 samples. Five out of six samples with positive result by culture were also positive by the rapid antigen test. Gram-negative rod was identified in smear specimens of CSF from all these 5 samples. Significance of the rapid antigen test should be recognized under drug resistance of those bacteriae are increasing. PMID:15552835

  3. Rapid antigen testing for group A Streptococcus by DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Heelan, J S; Wilbur, S; Depetris, G; Letourneau, C

    1996-02-01

    The Gen-probe group A Streptococcus direct test (GASD), a nucleic acid probe assay for detecting GAS from throat swabs, has recently been developed. The test uses an acridium ester-labeled DNA probe which is complementary to the rRNA of Streptococcus pyogenes. In this study, 318 single culturette throat swabs were tested by this method using culture as a "gold standard." After plating onto trypticase soy agar plates with 5% sheep blood, swabs were stored at 4 degrees C for no more than 72 h before the probe assay was performed. Our patient population consisted of symptomatic outpatients seen in the Memorial Hospital Emergency Department and in the Family Care Center. After discrepancy testing, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 91.4%, 97%, 91.4%, and 97%. The GASD is a rapid, easy-to-perform method for batch screening for streptococcal pharyngitis.

  4. Immuno-biochemical evaluations of phenol and thimerosal as antigen preservatives in Montenegro skin test.

    PubMed

    Mayrink, Wilson; Coelho, George Luis Lins Machado; Guimarães, Tânia Mara P D; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; de Castro Peres, Elúzia; da Costa, Carlos Alberto; de Toledo, Vicente de Paulo Coelho Peixoto

    2006-04-01

    Montenegro skin test (MST) represents the main complementary diagnostic test for tegumentary leishmaniases (TL) in endemic regions. Most antigen formulations used for the MST contain thimerosal as preservative. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), however, recommended reducing or eliminating thimerosal from vaccines and other biological reagents and the Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA) in Brazil, prohibited the use of mercurial compounds in immunobiologicals. In the search for an alternative stabilizer, phenol and thimerosal were tested as antigen preservatives in MST. Formulations were tested when fresh and after a 12-month storage at 4 degrees C in TL confirmed mice and human patients, and were evaluated for protein constitution by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and anti-gp63 ELISA. In mice, a decrease in the diagnostic effectiveness in merthiolate formulation was observed after a 12-month storage. SDS-PAGE, Western blot and anti-gp63 ELISA analyses showed a degradation of antigen proteins in both formulations after 12-month storage and that phenol-preserved antigen was quantitatively and qualitatively better than the merthiolate-preserved one. In patients, the average of induration diameter was larger in fresh antigens (p<0.05). However, storage time did not jeopardize their diagnostic capacity. No non-specific reactions produced by phenol or merthiolate were observed neither in humans nor in mice. Phenol could be a good alternative to replace the merthiolate in MST, and despite the proteolytic activity, antigens remain viable for at least 12 months.

  5. Viral hepatitis and tests for the Australia (hepatitis-associated) antigen and antibody*

    PubMed Central

    1970-01-01

    ”Australia” antigen has been shown to be closely associated with serum hepatitis. The presence of the antigen and its corresponding antiserum can be detected in human beings (and in certain primates) by a number of laboratory tests. This is of great potential importance to blood transfusion and similar services because detection and exclusion of blood donors carrying the antigen might significantly reduce the risk of hepatitis from transfusions and other procedures. In this paper the present state of knowledge of ”Australia” or ”hepatitis-associated” antigen is reviewed. The currently employed tests are described in detail and their use, interpretation and limitations are discussed. Though it appears from early studies that the application of routine screening tests to blood donors would only reduce the risk to recipients by less than 25%, the more sensitive tests becoming available may increase this percentage and it is recommended that where competent laboratory services are available steps should be taken to set up a scheme for testing donors—provided that the current limitations of such a scheme are clearly recognized. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 1FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4991606

  6. Prostate-specific antigen testing in Ontario: reasons for testing patients without diagnosed prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, P S; Goel, V; Williams, J I; Iscoe, N A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test has been increasing rapidly in Canada since its introduction in 1988. The reasons for using the PSA test in patients without known prostate cancer are unclear. This paper reports on the first study in Canada to use physician records to assess the use of PSA testing. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to physicians attending 475 patients without diagnosed prostate cancer. The patients were randomly selected from 2 laboratory databases of PSA test records in the greater Toronto area during 1995. The physicians were asked to consult their patient records to avoid recall bias. Information obtained included physician's specialty, patient's age at time of PSA test and reason(s) for the test. RESULTS: There were 264 responses (56%), of which 240 (91%) were usable. Of these 240, 63% (95% confidence interval [Cl] 58%-70%) indicated that the test was conducted to screen for prostate cancer, 40% (95% Cl 34%-47%) said it was to investigate urinary symptoms, and 33% (95% Cl 27%-40%) responded that it was a follow-up to a medical procedure or drug therapy. More than one reason was permitted. Of 151 responses indicating screening as one reason for testing, 64% (95% Cl 56%-72%) stated that it was initiated by the patient, and 73% (95% Cl 65%-80%) stated that it was part of a routine examination. For 19%, both investigation of symptoms and screening asymptomatic patients were given as reasons for testing, and for another 19% both follow-up of a medical procedure and screening were given as reasons. Screening was recorded as a reason for testing far more commonly for patients seen by family physicians and general practitioners than for patients seen by urologists (67% v. 29%, p < 0.001). In contrast, the use of PSA testing to diagnose urinary symptoms was more common for patients seen by urologists than for those seen by family physicians and general practitioners (52% v. 37%, p = 0.044). No significant difference was

  7. Rapid detection of human rotavirus strains in stools by single-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gerna, G; Sarasini, A; Di Matteo, A; Parea, M; Torsellini, M; Battaglia, M

    1989-01-01

    Using murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against the common antigen of group A rotavirus (RV), two single-sandwich ELISA systems were developed for detection of RV in stools: one using polyclonal antibody (PAb) as capture and a MAb as detector antibody (referred to as PAb-MAb assay); and the other based on the use of two different MAbs as capture and detector antibodies (referred to as MAb-MAb assay). In each single-sandwich ELISA system, samples and peroxidase-labeled MAb were incubated sequentially (two-step method) or simultaneously (one-step method). Using the two-step procedure on purified RV, 50 pg of protein was detected in the PAb-MAb as well as in the MAb-MAb assay, whereas the one-step method detected 0.4 ng and a conventional double-sandwich ELISA detected 3.2 ng of viral protein. Titration of RV samples from stools and cell cultures showed that single-sandwich ELISA titers were, on the average, 10-100-fold higher than those obtained by electron microscopy (EM), but 10-100-fold lower than those obtained by solid-phase immune EM (SPIEM). However, when 200 stool samples previously examined by EM or SPIEM were tested by the single-sandwich ELISA systems, specificity and sensitivity of these assays were 100%, and comparable to SPIEM. No false positive results were obtained when 54 samples of meconium and 91 stools from newborns in the first five days of life were tested. The two-step procedure appeared to be somewhat preferable over the one-step method, which, although faster, gave a marked prozone with a few samples in the MAb-MAb assay. The use of MAbs in rapid single-sandwich ELISA systems for RV detection in stools appears highly convenient, due to reliable results and short test performance times.

  8. Bristol Stool Form Scale reliability and agreement decreases when determining Rome III stool form designations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rater reproducibility of the Bristol Stool Form Scale (BSFS), which categorizes stools into one of seven types, is unknown. We sought to determine reliability and agreement by individual stool type and when responses are categorized by Rome III clinical designation as normal or abnormal (constipatio...

  9. Cross-reactivity in Cryptococcus antigen latex agglutination test in two commercial kits.

    PubMed

    Tone, Kazuya; Umeda, Yoshiko; Makimura, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    This article presents an examination of the cross-reactivity of pathogenic fungi with Cryptococcus neoformans in two commercial Cryptococcus antigen latex agglutination tests performed across 39 fungal strains. Some fungi were newly indicated as Cryptococcus cross-reactive, and the two kits showed differences in cross-reactive fungi. PMID:26922300

  10. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., plasma, urine, or other body fluids. This device is intended as an aid in monitoring patients for...

  11. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system. 866.6010 Section 866.6010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., plasma, urine, or other body fluids. This device is intended as an aid in monitoring patients for...

  12. The skin test antigen stimulated killer (STAK) cell mediating NK like CMC is OKM1 positive and OKT3 negative.

    PubMed Central

    Tartof, D; Curran, J J; Levitt, D; Loken, M R

    1983-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated that candida antigen stimulated natural killer cell like cell-mediated cytolysis (NK like CMC) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) isolated from normal individuals (Tartof et al., 1980). Utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed against human mononuclear cell subpopulations in conjunction with a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) we determined that, similar to the previously described NK cell, the skin test antigen stimulated killer (STAK) cell is a larger OKM1 positive, OKT3 negative cell. We obtained similar results using two different skin test antigens. Thus, stimulation of NK like CMC in PBMNC by skin test antigens probably represents activation of NK or NK like cells. PMID:6360439

  13. A novel agglutination test for antigen-specific detection of platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Agaylan, Ashraf; Borchert, Hans-Hubert; Aslan, Tunay; Bombard, Stéphane; Kiesewetter, Holger; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2006-10-15

    A simple and rapid antigen-specific assay for the identification antibodies to platelets is lacking, yet. Red-dyed polystyrene microbeads were coated with monoclonal antibodies to various platelet glycoprotein complexes, and used for the detection of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies. The results were largely identical with those obtained by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay (MAIPA). The new test is reliable yet less complex and time-consuming than the currently available assays, and it can be implemented in any routine laboratory. PMID:16933262

  14. Stool microbiota and vaccine responses of infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Vaccination decreases morbidity and mortality. Vaccine efficacy may be lower in less-developed countries due to environmental enteropathy. This study determined if relative abundance of stool bacteria predicted infant vaccine responses. Methods: The stool microbiome of 48 breastfed Ba...

  15. A flow cytometric screening test for detergent-resistant surface antigens in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zsuzsanna; Orsó, Evelyn; Werner, Tobias; Boettcher, Alfred; Schmitz, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    Rafts resemble cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-enriched, liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomains, showing resistance to nonionic detergents, and are involved in various cellular processes. In the present study, we have tested surface antigens on resting and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood monocytes for their detergent resistance (i.e. raft-association), by flow cytometry. Constitutive (CD14, CD32, CD55), or LPS-induced (CD81) raft-association, and detergent solubility (i.e. exclusion of rafts) (CD71) of monocyte antigens in the presence of 0.01% Triton X-100 are clearly demonstrated. Flow cytometric detergent insolubility is a powerful tool for rapid screening the raft-association of monocyte antigens in a whole-blood assay.

  16. Comparison of Marketed Cosmetic Products Constituents with the Antigens Included in Cosmetic-related Patch Test

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Seung Hyun; Choi, You Won; Myung, Ki Bum

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently, cosmetic series (Chemotechnique Diagnostics, Sweden) is the most widely used cosmetic-related patch test in Korea. However, no studies have been conducted on how accurately it reflects the constituents of the cosmetics in Korea. Objective We surveyed the constituents of various cosmetics and compare with the cosmetic series, to investigate whether it is accurate in determining allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetics sold in Korea. Methods Cosmetics were classified into 11 categories and the survey was conducted on the constituents of 55 cosmetics, with 5 cosmetics in each category. The surveyed constituents were classified by chemical function and compared with the antigens of cosmetic series. Results 155 constituents were found in 55 cosmetics, and 74 (47.7%) of constituents were included as antigen. Among them, only 20 constituents (27.0%) were included in cosmetic series. A significant number of constituents, such as fragrance, vehicle and surfactant were not included. Only 41.7% of antigens in cosmetic series were found to be in the cosmetics sampled. Conclusion The constituents not included in the patch test but possess antigenicity are widely used in cosmetics. Therefore, the patch test should be modified to reflect ingredients in the marketed products that may stimulate allergies. PMID:20711261

  17. Rapid antigen-based testing for respiratory syncytial virus: moving diagnostics from bench to bedside?

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Caitlin; Papenburg, Jesse

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of infantile bronchiolitis and pneumonia. It is ubiquitous, with most children acquiring their primary infection within the first year of life and with subsequent reinfection occurring in all age groups. Clinically, RSV is virtually indistinguishable from other viral respiratory infections. Traditionally, the microbiologic diagnosis of RSV has been based on moderate to complex techniques performed in a laboratory (cell culture, nucleic acid amplification and immunofluorescence assays); however, rapid antigen-detection tests offer potential advantages associated with point-of-care testing. This review seeks to familiarize the readers with RSV rapid antigen-detection tests, describe their performance characteristics and comment on their strengths and weaknesses. The authors will discuss the impact of rapid RSV testing on clinical practice, with a look to the future of what the field ultimately requires of a point-of-care diagnostic technique.

  18. Safety and Efficacy Assessment of Two New Leprosy Skin Test Antigens: Randomized Double Blind Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivoire, Becky L.; Groathouse, Nathan A.; TerLouw, Stephen; Neupane, Kapil Dev; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Khadge, Saraswoti; Kunwar, Chatra B.; Macdonald, Murdo; Hawksworth, Rachel; Thapa, Min B.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Tibbals, Melinda; Smith, Carol; Dube, Tina; She, Dewei; Wolff, Mark; Zhou, Eric; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Mason, Robin; Sizemore, Christine; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Background New tools are required for the diagnosis of pre-symptomatic leprosy towards further reduction of disease burden and its associated reactions. To address this need, two new skin test antigens were developed to assess safety and efficacy in human trials. Methods A Phase I safety trial was first conducted in a non-endemic region for leprosy (U.S.A.). Healthy non-exposed subjects (n = 10) received three titrated doses (2.5 µg, 1.0 µg and 0.1 µg) of MLSA-LAM (n = 5) or MLCwA (n = 5) and control antigens [Rees MLSA (1.0 µg) and saline]. A randomized double blind Phase II safety and efficacy trial followed in an endemic region for leprosy (Nepal), but involved only the 1.0 µg (high dose) and 0.1 µg (low dose) of each antigen; Tuberculin PPD served as a control antigen. This Phase II safety and efficacy trial consisted of three Stages: Stage A and B studies were an expansion of Phase I involving 10 and 90 subjects respectively, and Stage C was then conducted in two parts (high dose and low dose), each enrolling 80 participants: 20 borderline lepromatous/lepromatous (BL/LL) leprosy patients, 20 borderline tuberculoid/tuberculoid (BT/TT) leprosy patients, 20 household contacts of leprosy patients (HC), and 20 tuberculosis (TB) patients. The primary outcome measure for the skin test was delayed type hypersensitivity induration. Findings In the small Phase I safety trial, reactions were primarily against the 2.5 µg dose of both antigens and Rees control antigen, which were then excluded from subsequent studies. In the Phase II, Stage A/B ramped-up safety study, 26% of subjects (13 of 50) showed induration against the high dose of each antigen, and 4% (2 of 50) reacted to the low dose of MLSA-LAM. Phase II, Stage C safety and initial efficacy trial showed that both antigens at the low dose exhibited low sensitivity at 20% and 25% in BT/TT leprosy patients, but high specificity at 100% and 95% compared to TB patients. The high dose of both antigens

  19. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  20. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  1. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  2. Cell surface antigens detected on mature and leukemic granulocytic populations by cytotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Drew, S I; Carter, B M; Terasaki, P I; Naiem, F; Nathanson, D S; Abromowitz, B; Gale, R P

    1978-08-01

    Using a microcytotoxicity assay, the serological reactivity of human granulocytes, namely neutrophils and eosinophils, and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and cultured CML cell lines (K562, NALM-1) were examined. Mature granulocyte forms and cord granulocytes are readily lysed by specific granulocyte cytotoxins that do not react with random T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, red blood cells, or platelets. Furthermore, certain antisera were preferentially cytotoxic for eosinophil-enriched populations. Granulocytotoxin detected antigens on one of three CML blast cell populations tested and K562, but failed to react with NALM-1. By cytotoxicity, mature granulocytes were poor targets for B2-microglobulin and the appropriate HLA antisera although both sera types are absorbed with granulocytes. Furthermore, granulocytes did not possess B-lymphocytes (Ia-like) or blood group A, B, and Rh (D) antigens. Except for K562, both HLA and heterologous B-lymphocyte antisera were cytotoxic for the CML blast cell populations tested.

  3. Cost-Effective and Rapid Presumptive Identification of Gram-Negative Bacilli in Routine Urine, Pus, and Stool Cultures: Evaluation of the Use of CHROMagar Orientation Medium in Conjunction with Simple Biochemical Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2000-01-01

    The algorithm for a new identification system was designed on the basis of colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests such as indole (IND), lysine decarboxylase (LDC), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) utilization tests with gram-negative bacilli isolated from urine samples as well as pus, stool, and other clinical specimens by the following colony characteristics, biochemical reactions, and serological results: pinkish to red, IND positive (IND+), Escherichia coli; metallic blue, IND+, LDC+, and ODC negative (ODC−), Klebsiella oxytoca; IND+, LDC−, and ODC+, Citrobacter diversus; IND+ or IND−, LDC−, and ODC−, Citrobacter freundii; IND−, LDC+, and ODC+, Enterobacter aerogenes; IND−, LDC−, and ODC+, Enterobacter cloacae; IND−, LDC+, and ODC−, Klebsiella pneumoniae; diffuse brown and IND+, Morganella morganii; IND−, Proteus mirabilis; aqua blue, Serratia marcescens; bluish green and IND+, Proteus vulgaris; transparent yellow-green, serology positive, Pseudomonas aeruginosa; clear and serology positive, Salmonella sp.; other colors and reactions, the organism was identified by the full identification methods. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of this new system were prospectively evaluated. During an 8-month period, a total of 345 specimens yielded one or more gram-negative bacilli. A total of 472 gram-negative bacillus isolates were detected on CHROMagar Orientation medium. For 466 of the isolates (98.7%), no discrepancies in the results were obtained on the basis of the identification algorithm. The cost of identification of gram-negative bacilli during this period was reduced by about 70%. The results of this trial for the differentiation of the most commonly encountered gram-negative pathogens in clinical specimens with the new algorithm were favourable in that it permitted reliable detection and presumptive identification. In addition, this rapid identification system not only

  4. Cost-effective and rapid presumptive identification of gram-negative bacilli in routine urine, pus, and stool cultures: evaluation of the use of CHROMagar orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests.

    PubMed

    Ohkusu, K

    2000-12-01

    The algorithm for a new identification system was designed on the basis of colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests such as indole (IND), lysine decarboxylase (LDC), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) utilization tests with gram-negative bacilli isolated from urine samples as well as pus, stool, and other clinical specimens by the following colony characteristics, biochemical reactions, and serological results: pinkish to red, IND positive (IND(+)), Escherichia coli; metallic blue, IND(+), LDC(+), and ODC negative (ODC(-)), Klebsiella oxytoca; IND(+), LDC(-), and ODC(+), Citrobacter diversus; IND(+) or IND(-), LDC(-), and ODC(-), Citrobacter freundii; IND(-), LDC(+), and ODC(+), Enterobacter aerogenes; IND(-), LDC(-), and ODC(+), Enterobacter cloacae; IND(-), LDC(+), and ODC(-), Klebsiella pneumoniae; diffuse brown and IND(+), Morganella morganii; IND(-), Proteus mirabilis; aqua blue, Serratia marcescens; bluish green and IND(+), Proteus vulgaris; transparent yellow-green, serology positive, Pseudomonas aeruginosa; clear and serology positive, Salmonella sp.; other colors and reactions, the organism was identified by the full identification methods. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of this new system were prospectively evaluated. During an 8-month period, a total of 345 specimens yielded one or more gram-negative bacilli. A total of 472 gram-negative bacillus isolates were detected on CHROMagar Orientation medium. For 466 of the isolates (98.7%), no discrepancies in the results were obtained on the basis of the identification algorithm. The cost of identification of gram-negative bacilli during this period was reduced by about 70%. The results of this trial for the differentiation of the most commonly encountered gram-negative pathogens in clinical specimens with the new algorithm were favourable in that it permitted reliable detection and presumptive identification. In addition, this rapid

  5. Bloody Stools in Children (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or parasite that can cause bloody stools in preschool and school-aged children, as well as in ... to read the same materials their doctors are reading. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Causes and diagnostic ...

  6. Identification of sVSG117 as an Immunodiagnostic Antigen and Evaluation of a Dual-Antigen Lateral Flow Test for the Diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lauren; Fleming, Jennifer; Sastry, Lalitha; Mehlert, Angela; Wall, Steven J.; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT). There is no immunodiagnostic for HAT caused by T. b. rhodesiense. Our principle aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test that might be an improvement on CATT. Methodology/Principle Findings Pools of infection and control sera were screened against four different soluble form variant surface glycoproteins (sVSGs) by ELISA and one, sVSG117, showed particularly strong immunoreactivity to pooled infection sera. Using individual sera, sVSG117 was shown to be able to discriminate between T. b. gambiense infection and control sera by both ELISA and lateral flow test. The sVSG117 antigen was subsequently used with a previously described recombinant diagnostic antigen, rISG65, to create a dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype. The latter was used blind in a virtual field trial of 431 randomized infection and control sera from the WHO HAT Specimen Biobank. Conclusion/Significance In the virtual field trial, using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, the sVSG117 and rISG65 dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype showed a sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI: 93.3 to 99.2) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI: 76.4 to 88.9) for the detection of T. b. gambiense infections. The device was not as good for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, with a sensitivity of 58.9% (95% CI: 44.9 to 71.9) and specificity of 97.3% (95% CI: 90.7 to 99.7). However, using one or both positive antigen band(s) as the criterion for T. b. rhodesiense infection improved the sensitivity to 83.9% (95% CI: 71.7 to 92.4) with a specificity of 85.3% (95% CI: 75.3 to 92.4). These results encourage further development of the dual-antigen device for clinical use. PMID:25033401

  7. A new virion precipitation test for oncovirus envelope antigens which detects common antigenic determinants in mammalian type-C viruses and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus.

    PubMed

    Altstein, A D; Zakharova, L G; Zhdanov, V M

    1979-03-15

    A method for the study of oncovirus envelope antigens was developed, bases on the precipitation of intact virions by a double antibody technique. The amount of precipitated virus was then measured as reverse transcriptase activity. The method was designated the virion precipitation test (VPT). It has been used for titration of antibodies to envelope antigens of oncoviruses. The study of envelop antigens of 11 different oncoviruses permitted their differentiation into the following groups: (1) murine type-C viruses: (2) feline type-C viruses; (3) simian type-C viruses; (4) the RD-114/BEV group; (5) Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV); (6) bovine leukemia virus; (7) avian type-C viruses; (8) mouse mammary tumor virus. No common antigenic determinants were detected in the last three groups. Mammalian type-C viruses (RD-114, NIH-MuLV, G-MuLV) had common antigenic determinants in the envelope, as demonstrated with an anti-RD-114 serum. Mammalian type-C viruses also shared antigenic determinants with M-PMV. The relationship of type-C viruses to M-PMV decreased in the following order: RD-114--NIH-MuLV--G-MuLV. It was also shown that the endogenous xenotropic feline RD-114 virus was more closely related to xenotropic NIH-MuLV than to ecotropic G-MuLV. The nature of the common antigenic determinants, as demonstrated by VPT on the surface of mammalian type-C viruses and M-PMV, and their significance for the concept of oncovirus evolution are discussed.

  8. Detection of urinary Vi antigen as a diagnostic test for typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D N; Harris, J R; Barrett, T J; Hargrett, N T; Prentzel, I; Valdivieso, C; Palomino, C; Levine, M M; Blake, P A

    1983-01-01

    Since Vi antigen is limited primarily to Salmonella typhi, it has been thought that detection of the antigen may be a useful method for diagnosing acute typhoid fever. The slide coagglutination method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have recently been suggested as ways to detect small quantities of Vi antigen in urine. In Santiago, Chile, we compared the results of these two methods in patients with acute typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and other febrile illnesses and in afebrile control subjects. Using a cut-off value that maximally separated typhoid patients from controls, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive in 62.4% of 141 patients with culture-proven typhoid infections and in 13.2% of 159 afebrile control subjects. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was false positive in 64.7% of 34 culture-proven paratyphoid A or B patients and 47.1% of 21 patients with other nontyphoidal febrile illnesses. The coagglutination test was positive in 34% of typhoid patients, 14% of afebrile control subjects, and 46% of febrile control subjects. We conclude that these tests when performed with the Vi antibodies employed in this study are of little value for the diagnosis of typhoid fever in this setting. PMID:6630465

  9. Detection of urinary Vi antigen as a diagnostic test for typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D N; Harris, J R; Barrett, T J; Hargrett, N T; Prentzel, I; Valdivieso, C; Palomino, C; Levine, M M; Blake, P A

    1983-10-01

    Since Vi antigen is limited primarily to Salmonella typhi, it has been thought that detection of the antigen may be a useful method for diagnosing acute typhoid fever. The slide coagglutination method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have recently been suggested as ways to detect small quantities of Vi antigen in urine. In Santiago, Chile, we compared the results of these two methods in patients with acute typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and other febrile illnesses and in afebrile control subjects. Using a cut-off value that maximally separated typhoid patients from controls, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive in 62.4% of 141 patients with culture-proven typhoid infections and in 13.2% of 159 afebrile control subjects. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was false positive in 64.7% of 34 culture-proven paratyphoid A or B patients and 47.1% of 21 patients with other nontyphoidal febrile illnesses. The coagglutination test was positive in 34% of typhoid patients, 14% of afebrile control subjects, and 46% of febrile control subjects. We conclude that these tests when performed with the Vi antibodies employed in this study are of little value for the diagnosis of typhoid fever in this setting.

  10. Comparison of serologic tests for detection of antigen in canine heartworm infections.

    PubMed

    Brunner, C J; Hendrix, C M; Blagburn, B L; Hanrahan, L A

    1988-05-15

    In 30 random-source dogs, we determined sensitivity and specificity of 5 serologic tests for detection of canine heartworm antigens. Seventeen of the dogs were infected naturally with adult Dirofilaria immitis, and 4 of the infected dogs were amicrofilaremic. The ability of the serologic tests to predict whether a dog was infected or uninfected (overall test accuracy) ranged from 73 to 97%. Sensitivity was not affected by circulating D immitis microfilariae, but was markedly influenced by the number of adult D immitis present. False-positive reactions were rare and were not associated with intestinal parasites or Dipetalonema reconditum microfilariae. Modifications of some of the test procedures were necessary to maximize test accuracy and reproducibility. These modifications and other technical details might limit the usefulness of some of the tests in a veterinary practice.

  11. [Development of a novel Francisella tularensis antigen stained with tetrazolium-blue for tularemia microagglutination test].

    PubMed

    Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2013-07-01

    The isolation of Francisella tularensis in cultures is the reference method for the laboratory diagnosis of tularemia. However, due to the limitations such as the low sensitivity and need for high safety level and equipped laboratories, serologic methods are frequently used as diagnostic tools. F.tularensis-specific antibodies may be demonstrated by several methods, however microagglutination test (MA) remains the most common method with its high sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a novel MA test antigen prepared from whole F.tularensis cells and stained with tetrazolium-blue for more clear and easier evaluation. F.tularensis NCTC 10857 strain was cultured on the cysteine heart agar supplemented with 9% sheep blood and bacterial cells were harvested by scraping, collected in physiological saline (PS) and centrifuged at 1500 rpm for 10 minutes. For preparing stock antigen suspension cell concentration was adjusted to OD600=1.5, spectrophotometrically. Tetrazolium-blue solution (BTC [3,3'-(3,3'-Dimethoxy[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-diyl) bis [2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium dichloride], T4375 Sigma-Aldrich) at the final concentration of 1% was added to cell suspension and incubated at 37°C for 5 hours for absorption. Then, the living cells were chemically inactivated by formaldehyde. Repeating centrifugations were performed to discard excess dye and formaline, then 0.4% formaline saline was added on the sediment. Optimum concentration of this novel antigen (BTC-Ag) for MA test was determined by plate titration method by using standard serum sample with a known MA titer (1/128). The performance of BTC-Ag in MA test was evaluated by using 100 patient sera positive for F.tularensis antibodies, and 100 tularemia negative patient sera (of them 50 were seropositive for brucellosis). All of the results were compared with standard MA test in which safranin-O stained antigen (SO-Ag) was used. There was 100% agreement between the two tests performed with

  12. The interpretation of rapid antigen testing for respiratory syncytial virus is more complicated than positive or negative

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Paul; Cabangangan, Juanito; Overmeyer, Christina; Pusavat, James; Hancock, Christine; Shanholtzer, Lucas; Nguyen, Thienphuc; Heffner, Jacquelyn; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E.; Iacono, Kathryn T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the performance characteristics of an immunochromatographic rapid antigen test for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and determine how its interpretation should be contextualized in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with bronchiolitis. Design Diagnostic accuracy study of a rapid RSV test. Setting County hospital emergency department. Intervention We took paired nasal samples from consecutively enrolled infants with bronchiolitis and tested them with a rapid immunochromatographic antigen test and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction gold standard. Outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, predictive values, evidence of spectrum bias and clinical characteristics of the patients. Using these we constructed a graphical contextual model to show how the results of RSV antigen tests from infants presenting within 24 hours should influence interpretation of subsequent antigen tests. Results We analyzed 607 patients. The sensitivity and specificity for immunochromatographic testing was 79.4% (95% CI 73.9%, 84.2%) and 67.1% (95% CI 61.9%, 72%) respectively. We found little evidence of spectrum bias. In our contextual model the best predictor of a positive RT-PCR test was a positive antigen test OR 5.47 (95%CI 3.65, 8.18) and the number of other infants having positive tests within 24 hours OR 1.48 (95%CI 1.26, 1.72) per infant. Increasing numbers presenting to the ED with bronchiolitis in a given day increases the probability of RSV infection. Conclusion The RSV antigen test we examined had modest performance characteristics. The results of the antigen test should be interpreted in the context of the results of previous tests. PMID:23964062

  13. Comparative evaluation of two commercial multiplex panels for detection of gastrointestinal pathogens by use of clinical stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Khare, Reeti; Espy, Mark J; Cebelinski, Elizabeth; Boxrud, David; Sloan, Lynne M; Cunningham, Scott A; Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Binnicker, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    The detection of pathogens associated with gastrointestinal disease may be important in certain patient populations, such as immunocompromised hosts, the critically ill, or individuals with prolonged disease that is refractory to treatment. In this study, we evaluated two commercially available multiplex panels (the FilmArray gastrointestinal [GI] panel [BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT] and the Luminex xTag gastrointestinal pathogen panel [GPP] [Luminex Corporation, Toronto, Canada]) using Cary-Blair stool samples (n = 500) submitted to our laboratory for routine GI testing (e.g., culture, antigen testing, microscopy, and individual real-time PCR). At the time of this study, the prototype (non-FDA-cleared) FilmArray GI panel targeted 23 pathogens (14 bacterial, 5 viral, and 4 parasitic), and testing of 200 μl of Cary-Blair stool was recommended. In contrast, the Luminex GPP assay was FDA cleared for the detection of 11 pathogens (7 bacterial, 2 viral, and 2 parasitic), but had the capacity to identify 4 additional pathogens using a research-use-only protocol. Importantly, the Luminex assay was FDA cleared for 100 μl raw stool; however, 100 μl Cary-Blair stool was tested by the Luminex assay in this study. Among 230 prospectively collected samples, routine testing was positive for one or more GI pathogens in 19 (8.3%) samples, compared to 76 (33.0%) by the FilmArray and 69 (30.3%) by the Luminex assay. Clostridium difficile (12.6 to 13.9% prevalence) and norovirus genogroup I (GI)/GII (5.7 to 13.9% prevalence) were two of the pathogens most commonly detected by both assays among prospective samples. Sapovirus was also commonly detected (5.7% positive rate) by the FilmArray assay. Among 270 additional previously characterized samples, both multiplex panels demonstrated high sensitivity (>90%) for the majority of targets, with the exception of several pathogens, notably Aeromonas sp. (23.8%) by FilmArray and Yersinia enterocolitica (48.1%) by the Luminex

  14. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  15. Monoclonal antibodies directed against human Rh antigens in tests with the red cells of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Ruffie, J

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against Rh related antigens on human red cells often crossreact with the red cells of the highest subhuman primate species. Depending on specificity of antibody, the species tested, and technique used, these reactions can be either species-specific or type specific. In tests with chimpanzee red cells, some of the latter type reactions have specificities related to the R antigen of the R-C-E-F blood group system of chimpanzee; specificities of some others seem to be unrelated to any known chimpanzee blood groups. Monoclonal anti-D reagents that give uniformly positive reactions with human D-positive (common and rare types) red cells, display wide individual differences in tests with chimpanzee blood. This indicates that there are minute structural variations of antibody molecules from one monoclonal anti-D antibodies apparently have no bearing on recognition of the D combining site on the human red cells, but come into play when in contact with chimpanzee rbcs. Some of the monoclonal antibodies directed against Rh and LW molecules are distinguished by unusually strong reactions with the red cells of the Old World monkeys (macaques and baboons), which is in contrast with negative or weak reactions of the same antibodies with the red cells of anthropoid apes and human bloods. One may recall, that polyclonal anti-Rh sera do not react with the blood of rhesus monkeys, the phenomenon that was the source of controversy surrounding the discovery of the rhesus factor of the human blood.

  16. Reduction of prostate cancer mortality in Tyrol, Austria, after introduction of prostate-specific antigen testing.

    PubMed

    Oberaigner, Willi; Horninger, Wolfgang; Klocker, Helmut; Schönitzer, Dieter; Stühlinger, Wolf; Bartsch, Georg

    2006-08-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze in detail the time trend in prostate cancer mortality in the population of Tyrol, Austria. In Tyrol, prostate-specific antigen tests were introduced in 1988-1989 and, since 1993, have been offered to all men aged 45-74 years free of charge. More than three quarters of all men in this age group had at least one such test in the last decade. The authors applied the age-period-cohort model by Poisson regression to mortality data covering more than three decades, from 1970 to 2003. For Tyrol, the full model with age and period and cohort terms fit fairly well. Period terms showed a significant reduction in prostate cancer mortality in the last 5 years, with a risk ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.98) for Tyrol; for Austria without Tyrol, no effect was seen, with a risk ratio of 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.05). Each was compared with the mortality rate in the period 1989-1993. Although the results of randomized screening trials are not expected until 2008-2010, these findings support the evidence that prostate-specific antigen testing offered to a population free of charge can reduce prostate cancer mortality.

  17. Evaluation of two rapid group B streptococcal antigen tests in labor and delivery patients.

    PubMed

    Skoll, M A; Mercer, B M; Baselski, V; Gray, J P; Ryan, G; Sibai, B M

    1991-02-01

    Two rapid group B streptococcal antigen tests were compared with nonselective blood agar culture in 1062 unselected patients admitted to labor and delivery. Vaginal specimens taken from each patient on admission were used to perform each of two rapid tests and corresponding cultures. The rapid tests were the Streptex latex agglutination assay and the Equate Strep B test, which uses a solid-phase immunoassay. Overall, 105 patients (9.9%) had at least one positive culture. The sensitivities for the rapid tests were 15.1% for Streptex and 21.5% for Equate. Specificities were 99.3 and 98.7%, respectively. Sensitivity was minimally increased in the setting of ruptured membranes for both tests. Likewise, use of separate swabs for streaking the culture plate and performing the rapid test increased the sensitivity, but this was not significant for either test. In control experiments, the limit of sensitivity of both rapid tests was 5 x 10(6) colony-forming units. We conclude that at present, these tests are not sensitive enough for routine use in this type of clinical setting.

  18. Pathfinder direct fluorescent antigen test for diagnosing maternal chlamydial infections. An evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grossman, J H; Rivlin, M E; Morrison, J C

    1992-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a frequent cause of genital infections in young women. Chlamydial infections may adversely affect perinatal outcome. We compared the Pathfinder direct fluorescent antigen (DFA) test for chlamydial infections to tissue culture isolation in an obstetric population. Among 984 samples, 152 (15.4%) were inadequate for evaluation using the Pathfinder DFA test. Among 783 evaluable specimen pairs, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the Pathfinder, as compared to tissue culture isolation, were 25%, 97.5%, 32.1% and 96.4%, respectively. On the basis of that experience, we do not recommend the Pathfinder DFA test as a clinical screening device for detecting chlamydial infections complicating pregnancy.

  19. Effective detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile by a two-step algorithm including tests for antigen and cytotoxin.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, John R; Aird, Deborah Z; Dam, Lisa M; Borek, Anita P; Hargrove, John T; Carroll, Karen C

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated a two-step algorithm for detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile: an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (Ag-EIA) and then, for antigen-positive specimens, a concurrent cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Antigen-negative results were > or = 99% predictive of CCNA negativity. Because the Ag-EIA reduced cell culture workload by approximately 75 to 80% and two-step testing was complete in < or = 3 days, we decided that this algorithm would be effective. Over 6 months, our laboratories' expenses were US dollar 143,000 less than if CCNA alone had been performed on all 5,887 specimens.

  20. Evaluation of the antigenicity of hydrolyzed cow's milk protein formulas using the mouse basophil activation test.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Takeshi; Nakazato, Yuki; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Takeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Hypoallergenic infant formulas are widely used for infants with cow's milk allergy. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of the mouse basophil activation test (BAT) in the evaluation of residual antigenicity in these formulas. Whole blood samples derived from β-lactoglobulin- or casein-immunized mice were incubated with one of the following formulas: conventional, partially hydrolyzed, or extensively hydrolyzed. Basophilic activation was analyzed by flow cytometry using an IgE-dependent activation marker CD200R1 and an IgG-dependent activation marker CD200R3. Systemic anaphylaxis was induced by i.v. injection of milk formula and results were compared. Conventional formula induced pronounced changes in CD200R1 and CD200R3 expression on basophils, whereas extensively hydrolyzed formulas did not elicit any changes in these markers. Similarly, challenge with conventional formula induced anaphylaxis, whereas extensively hydrolyzed formulas did not induce anaphylaxis. Although the partially hydrolyzed formula also induced basophilic activation and systemic anaphylaxis, the magnitude of these effects was smaller than that observed with the conventional formula. Compared to CD200R1, the observed trend in CD200R3 expression resembled the results obtained from systemic anaphylaxis test more closely. These findings show that mouse BAT, in particular using CD200R3, is highly useful for the evaluation of antigenicity of milk formulas. PMID:26626100

  1. Recombinase polymerase amplification-based assay to diagnose Giardia in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Cabada, Miguel Mauricio; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Irani, Ayesha; White, Arthur Clinton; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most commonly identified parasites in stool samples. Although relatively easy to treat, giardiasis can be difficult to detect as it presents similar to other diarrheal diseases. Here, we present a recombinase polymerase amplification-based Giardia (RPAG) assay to detect the presence of Giardia in stool samples. The RPAG assay was characterized on the bench top using stool samples spiked with Giardia cysts where it showed a limit-of-detection nearly as low as the gold standard polymerase chain reaction assay. The RPAG assay was then tested in the highlands of Peru on 104 stool samples collected from the surrounding communities where it showed 73% sensitivity and 95% specificity against a polymerase chain reaction and microscopy composite gold standard. Further improvements in clinical sensitivity will be needed for the RPAG assay to have clinical relevance.

  2. Detection of chikungunya virus antigen by a novel rapid immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Tamaki; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Masrinoul, Promsin; Chantawat, Nantarat; Yoksan, Sutee; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chusri, Sarunyou; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Grandadam, Marc; Brey, Paul T; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Mulyantno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Sow, Abdourahmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Puiprom, Orapim; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Kurosu, Takeshi; Kato, Seiji; Kosaka, Mieko; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Chikungunya fever is a mosquito-borne disease of key public health importance in tropical and subtropical countries. Although severe joint pain is the most distinguishing feature of chikungunya fever, diagnosis remains difficult because the symptoms of chikungunya fever are shared by many pathogens, including dengue fever. The present study aimed to develop a new immunochromatographic diagnosis test for the detection of chikungunya virus antigen in serum. Mice were immunized with isolates from patients with Thai chikungunya fever, East/Central/South African genotype, to produce mouse monoclonal antibodies against chikungunya virus. Using these monoclonal antibodies, a new diagnostic test was developed and evaluated for the detection of chikungunya virus. The newly developed diagnostic test reacted with not only the East/Central/South African genotype but also with the Asian and West African genotypes of chikungunya virus. Testing of sera from patients suspected to have chikungunya fever in Thailand (n = 50), Laos (n = 54), Indonesia (n = 2), and Senegal (n = 6) revealed sensitivity, specificity, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) agreement values of 89.4%, 94.4%, and 91.1%, respectively. In our study using serial samples, a new diagnostic test showed high agreement with the RT-PCR within the first 5 days after onset. A rapid diagnostic test was developed using mouse monoclonal antibodies that react with chikungunya virus envelope proteins. The diagnostic accuracy of our test is clinically acceptable for chikungunya fever in the acute phase.

  3. Prostate-specific antigen testing in inner London general practices: are those at higher risk most likely to get tested?

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Ashworth, Mark; Mathur, Rohini; Hull, Sally; Dudek, Alexandra; Chowdhury, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between factors influencing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing prevalence including prostate cancer risk factors (age, ethnicity, obesity) and non-risk factors (social deprivation and comorbidity). Setting A cross-sectional database of 136 inner London general practices from 1 August 2009 to 31 July 2014. Participants Men aged ≥40 years without prostate cancer were included (n=150 481). Primary outcome Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association between PSA testing and age, ethnicity, social deprivation, body mass index (BMI) and comorbidity while adjusting for age, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostatitis and tamsulosin or finasteride use. Results PSA testing prevalence was 8.2% (2013–2014), and the mean age was 54 years (SD 11). PSA testing was positively associated with age (OR 70–74 years compared to 40–44 years: 7.34 (95% CI 6.82 to 7.90)), ethnicity (black) (OR compared to white: 1.78 (95% CI 1.71 to 1.85)), increasing BMI and cardiovascular comorbidity. Testing was negatively associated with Chinese ethnicity and with increasing social deprivation. Conclusions PSA testing among black patients was higher compared to that among white patients, which differs from lower testing rates seen in previous studies. PSA testing was positively associated with prostate cancer risk factors and non-risk factors. Association with non-risk factors may increase the risk of unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:27406644

  4. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test. PMID:27185543

  5. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

  6. ‘It's a maybe test’: men's experiences of prostate specific antigen testing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhodri; Edwards, Adrian GK; Elwyn, Glyn; Watson, Eila; Grol, Richard; Brett, Jo; Austoker, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing in primary care is an important and contentious issue. Due to concerns about the test and the value of early detection, countries such as the UK advocate ‘informed choice’ instead of population screening. It is not known whether this policy is actually adhered to in primary care. Furthermore, little is known of the experiences of men who face this decision. Aim To explore the experiences, understanding, and views of men who considered or undertook PSA testing in UK primary care. Design of study Qualitative interview-based study. Setting Primary care, Wales, UK. Method Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were conducted with 28 men, representing a range of clinical outcomes. Transcripts were coded and subjected to thematic analysis. Results Three themes were identified: the decision-making context, the locus of decision making, and uncertainty related to the PSA test. Conclusion The decision to undertake PSA testing was affected by both social and media factors and it did not appear to be a patient-led decision. The decision created considerable uncertainty for men and this uncertainty persisted after the test, even if the result was normal. Raised PSA led to further investigations and this exacerbated the uncertainty. Anxiety and regret were consequences of this uncertainty. PMID:17394734

  7. ELISA testing for soy antigens in dry dog foods used in dietary elimination trials.

    PubMed

    Willis-Mahn, Christine; Remillard, Rebecca; Tater, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The use of elimination diet trials is necessary in the diagnosis of food allergies and intolerances. The objective of this study was to determine in vitro if four over-the-counter (OTC) dry dog foods carrying a "no soy" claim and seven veterinary therapeutic dry dog foods designed for food elimination trials were suitable for a soybean elimination trial. A 100 g sample of each diet plus one soy positive and one soy negative control diet were submitted for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing to an independent food laboratory. The positive control diet contained >25 ppm soy protein antigens and the negative control contained <2.5 ppm. Three of the four OTC "no soy" claiming diets were positive for soy antigen. Two of the three soy-containing diets had >25 ppm. Three veterinary therapeutic diets had less than the lowest detectable limit of soy protein and four were positive (>2.5 ppm). OTC dog food diets that claim to contain "no soy" may contain high concentrations of soy protein and, therefore, should not be used in soy elimination trials in suspect food allergic dogs. The veterinary therapeutic diet selected for a soy elimination trial needs to be carefully chosen based on diet history.

  8. Stool consistency is strongly associated with gut microbiota richness and composition, enterotypes and bacterial growth rates

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Doris; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Tito, Raul Y; Joossens, Marie; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The assessment of potentially confounding factors affecting colon microbiota composition is essential to the identification of robust microbiome based disease markers. Here, we investigate the link between gut microbiota variation and stool consistency using Bristol Stool Scale classification, which reflects faecal water content and activity, and is considered a proxy for intestinal colon transit time. Design Through 16S rDNA Illumina profiling of faecal samples of 53 healthy women, we evaluated associations between microbiome richness, Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, enterotypes, and genus abundance with self-reported, Bristol Stool Scale-based stool consistency. Each sample’s microbiota growth potential was calculated to test whether transit time acts as a selective force on gut bacterial growth rates. Results Stool consistency strongly correlates with all known major microbiome markers. It is negatively correlated with species richness, positively associated to the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, and linked to Akkermansia and Methanobrevibacter abundance. Enterotypes are distinctly distributed over the BSS-scores. Based on the correlations between microbiota growth potential and stool consistency scores within both enterotypes, we hypothesise that accelerated transit contributes to colon ecosystem differentiation. While shorter transit times can be linked to increased abundance of fast growing species in Ruminococcaceae-Bacteroides samples, hinting to a washout avoidance strategy of faster replication, this trend is absent in Prevotella-enterotyped individuals. Within this enterotype adherence to host tissue therefore appears to be a more likely bacterial strategy to cope with washout. Conclusions The strength of the associations between stool consistency and species richness, enterotypes and community composition emphasises the crucial importance of stool consistency assessment in gut metagenome-wide association studies. PMID:26069274

  9. Impact of Adenoviral Stool Load on Adenoviremia in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Klepper, Corie; Sunkara, Anusha; Kang, Guolian; Carr, Jeanne; Gu, Zhengming; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenoviremia adversely affects prognosis in the post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting. Methods We sought to determine retrospectively the cutoff load of adenovirus in the stool as a predictor of adenoviremia, in children who underwent an allogeneic HSCT. The prevalence of sapovirus, norovirus and astrovirus in the stool was also studied. Results The study cohort consisted of 117 patients, of which 71 (60%) had diarrhea. Adenovirus was detected in the stool in 39 out of 71 (55%) patients. Age ≤ 10 years (P = 0.05; odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval: 0.98–6.75), and male sex (P = 0.04; odds ratio 2.67; 95% confidence interval: 1.02–6.99) increased risk for detection of adenovirus in stool on univariate analysis. Co-infections with enteric pathogens were infrequent. Viral load > 106 copies / gram stool predicted adenoviremia with a sensitivity and specificity of 82%. Sapovirus, norovirus, and astrovirus were detected in 3, 4 and one patient, respectively. Conclusions Quantitative detection of adenovirus in stool may have implications for pre-emptive therapy. Testing for other enteric viruses may have implications for infection control. PMID:25742243

  10. Comparison of two extractable nuclear antigen testing algorithms: ALBIA versus ELISA/line immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chandratilleke, Dinusha; Silvestrini, Roger; Culican, Sue; Campbell, David; Byth-Wilson, Karen; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Lin, Ming-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibody testing is often requested in patients with suspected connective tissue diseases. Most laboratories in Australia use a two step process involving a high sensitivity screening assay followed by a high specificity confirmation test. Multiplexing technology with Addressable Laser Bead Immunoassay (e.g., FIDIS) offers simultaneous detection of multiple antibody specificities, allowing a single step screening and confirmation. We compared our current diagnostic laboratory testing algorithm [Organtec ELISA screen / Euroimmun line immunoassay (LIA) confirmation] and the FIDIS Connective Profile. A total of 529 samples (443 consecutive+86 known autoantibody positivity) were run through both algorithms, and 479 samples (90.5%) were concordant. The same autoantibody profile was detected in 100 samples (18.9%) and 379 were concordant negative samples (71.6%). The 50 discordant samples (9.5%) were subdivided into 'likely FIDIS or current method correct' or 'unresolved' based on ancillary data. 'Unresolved' samples (n = 25) were subclassified into 'potentially' versus 'potentially not' clinically significant based on the change to clinical interpretation. Only nine samples (1.7%) were deemed to be 'potentially clinically significant'. Overall, we found that the FIDIS Connective Profile ENA kit is non-inferior to the current ELISA screen/LIA characterisation. Reagent and capital costs may be limiting factors in using the FIDIS, but potential benefits include a single step analysis and simultaneous detection of dsDNA antibodies.

  11. A comparative study of antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from patients and soil of ornamental plants in the immunodiffusion test.

    PubMed

    Staib, F; Folkens, U; Tompak, B; Abel, T; Thiel, D

    1978-11-01

    The strikingly frequent and constant presence of Aspergillus fimigatus in the soil of potted ornamental plants kept in private houses and hospitals has been the reason for studying the antigens of the strains found from the diagnostic and epidemiological angles. Culture-filtrate antigens of A. fumigatus strains isolated from the soil of 4 different ornamental plants, epiphyllum (Epiphyllum truncatum), orange tree (Citrus sinensis), Alpine rose (Azalea indica) and Christmas flower (Euphorbia pulcherrima), were compared, in the immunodiffusion test, with antigens of A. fumigatus strains from aspergillosis patients prepared in an identical way. When tested against 8 different sera from different aspergillosis patients there was a good coincidence of results. Control sera from patients suffering from diseases other than aspergillosis, no false-positive reactions could be observed. The findings are discussed in respect of diagnosis and epidemiology.

  12. The challenge of producing skin test antigens with minimal resources suitable for human application against a neglected tropical disease; leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rivoire, Becky L; TerLouw, Stephen; Groathouse, Nathan A; Brennan, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3-10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan) and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens). In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial. PMID:24874086

  13. The Challenge of Producing Skin Test Antigens with Minimal Resources Suitable for Human Application against a Neglected Tropical Disease; Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rivoire, Becky L.; TerLouw, Stephen; Groathouse, Nathan A.; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3–10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan) and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens). In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial. PMID:24874086

  14. Variation in the limit-of-detection of the ProSpecT Campylobacter microplate enzyme immunoassay in stools spiked with emerging Campylobacter species.

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Krunoslav; Midwinter, Anne Camilla; Marshall, Jonathan Craig; Rogers, Lynn Elizabeth; Biggs, Patrick Jon; Acke, Els

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans is primarily associated with C. jejuni/coli infection. The impact of other Campylobacter spp. is likely to be underestimated due to the bias of culture methods towards Campylobacter jejuni/coli diagnosis. Stool antigen tests are becoming increasingly popular and appear generally less species-specific. A review of independent studies of the ProSpecT® Campylobacter Microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) developed for C. jejuni/coli showed comparable diagnostic results to culture methods but the examination of non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter spp. was limited and the limit-of-detection (LOD), where reported, varied between studies. This study investigated LOD of EIA for Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter helveticus spiked in human stools. Multiple stools and Campylobacter isolates were used in three different concentrations (10(4)-10(9)CFU/ml) to reflect sample heterogeneity. All Campylobacter species evaluated were detectable by EIA. Multivariate analysis showed LOD varied between Campylobacter spp. and faecal consistency as fixed effects and individual faecal samples as random effects. EIA showed excellent performance in replicate testing for both within and between batches of reagents, in agreement between visual and spectrophotometric reading of results, and returned no discordance between the bacterial concentrations within independent dilution test runs (positive results with lower but not higher concentrations). This study shows how limitations in experimental procedures lead to an overestimation of consistency and uniformity of LOD for EIA that may not hold under routine use in diagnostic laboratories. Benefits and limitations for clinical practice and the influence on estimates of performance characteristics from detection of multiple Campylobacter spp. by EIA are discussed.

  15. Variation in the limit-of-detection of the ProSpecT Campylobacter microplate enzyme immunoassay in stools spiked with emerging Campylobacter species.

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Krunoslav; Midwinter, Anne Camilla; Marshall, Jonathan Craig; Rogers, Lynn Elizabeth; Biggs, Patrick Jon; Acke, Els

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans is primarily associated with C. jejuni/coli infection. The impact of other Campylobacter spp. is likely to be underestimated due to the bias of culture methods towards Campylobacter jejuni/coli diagnosis. Stool antigen tests are becoming increasingly popular and appear generally less species-specific. A review of independent studies of the ProSpecT® Campylobacter Microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) developed for C. jejuni/coli showed comparable diagnostic results to culture methods but the examination of non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter spp. was limited and the limit-of-detection (LOD), where reported, varied between studies. This study investigated LOD of EIA for Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter helveticus spiked in human stools. Multiple stools and Campylobacter isolates were used in three different concentrations (10(4)-10(9)CFU/ml) to reflect sample heterogeneity. All Campylobacter species evaluated were detectable by EIA. Multivariate analysis showed LOD varied between Campylobacter spp. and faecal consistency as fixed effects and individual faecal samples as random effects. EIA showed excellent performance in replicate testing for both within and between batches of reagents, in agreement between visual and spectrophotometric reading of results, and returned no discordance between the bacterial concentrations within independent dilution test runs (positive results with lower but not higher concentrations). This study shows how limitations in experimental procedures lead to an overestimation of consistency and uniformity of LOD for EIA that may not hold under routine use in diagnostic laboratories. Benefits and limitations for clinical practice and the influence on estimates of performance characteristics from detection of multiple Campylobacter spp. by EIA are discussed. PMID:27317896

  16. Brucella abortus RB51 and hot saline extract from Brucella ovis as antigens in a complement fixation test used To detect sheep vaccinated with Brucella abortus RB51.

    PubMed

    Adone, R; Ciuchini, F

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of Brucella abortus RB51 and hot saline extract (HSE) from Brucella ovis as antigens in complement fixation (CF) tests was comparatively evaluated in detecting immune responses of sheep vaccinated with B. abortus strain RB51. For this study, four 5-month-old sheep were vaccinated subcutaneously with 5 x 10(9) CFU of RB51, and two sheep received saline. Serum samples collected at different times after vaccination were tested for the presence of antibodies to RB51 by a CF test with RB51 as antigen, previously deprived of anticomplementary activity, and with HSE antigen, which already used as the official antigen to detect B. ovis-infected sheep. The results showed that vaccinated sheep developed antibodies which reacted weakly against HSE antigen and these antibodies were detectable for 30 days after vaccination. However, antibodies to RB51 could be detected for a longer period after vaccination by using homologous RB51 antigen in CF tests. In fact, high titers were still present at 110 days postvaccination with RB51 antigen. Sera from sheep naturally infected with B. ovis also reacted to RB51 but gave lower titers than those detected by HSE antigen. As expected, all sera from RB51-vaccinated sheep remained negative when tested with standard S-type Brucella standard antigens.

  17. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... then should be rinsed in clean water and dried by touching it to a piece of clean blotting paper, if... still clearly visible clumps of antigen surrounded by spaces only partially clear. Between this...

  18. Clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile cultivated from stool samples of hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Predrag, Stojanovic; Branislava, Kocic; Miodrag, Stojanovic; Biljana, Miljkovic – Selimovic; Suzana, Tasic; Natasa, Miladinovic – Tasic; Tatjana, Babic

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to fortify the clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from stool samples of hospitalized patients. This survey included 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea and positive findings of Clostridium difficile in stool samples, and 100 hospitalized patients with formed stool as a control group. Bacteriological examination of a stool samples was conducted using standard microbiological methods. Stool sample were inoculated directly on nutrient media for bacterial cultivation (blood agar using 5% sheep blood, Endo agar, selective Salmonella Shigella agar, Selenite-F broth, CIN agar and Skirrow’s medium), and to selective cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar (CCFA) (Biomedics, Parg qe tehnicologico, Madrid, Spain) for isolation of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile toxin was detected by ELISA-ridascreen Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B (R-Biopharm AG, Germany) and ColorPAC ToxinA test (Becton Dickinson, USA). Examination of stool specimens for the presence of parasites (causing diarrhea) was done using standard methods (conventional microscopy), commercial concentration test Paraprep S Gold kit (Dia Mondial, France) and RIDA®QUICK Cryptosporidium/Giardia Combi test (R-Biopharm AG, Germany). Examination of stool specimens for the presence of fungi (causing diarrhea) was performed by standard methods. All stool samples positive for Clostridium difficile were tested for Rota, Noro, Astro and Adeno viruses by ELISA – ridascreen (R-Biopharm AG, Germany). In this research we isolated 99 Clostridium difficile strains from 116 stool samples of 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea. The 53 (66.25%) of patients with diarrhea were positive for toxins A and B, one (1.25%) were positive for only toxin B. Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from samples of 26 (32.5%) patients. However, other pathogenic microorganisms of intestinal tract cultivated from samples of 16 patients

  19. Clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile cultivated from stool samples of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Predrag, Stojanovic; Branislava, Kocic; Miodrag, Stojanovic; Biljana, Miljkovic-Selimovic; Suzana, Tasic; Natasa, Miladinovic-Tasic; Tatjana, Babic

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to fortify the clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from stool samples of hospitalized patients. This survey included 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea and positive findings of Clostridium difficile in stool samples, and 100 hospitalized patients with formed stool as a control group. Bacteriological examination of a stool samples was conducted using standard microbiological methods. Stool sample were inoculated directly on nutrient media for bacterial cultivation (blood agar using 5% sheep blood, Endo agar, selective Salmonella Shigella agar, Selenite-F broth, CIN agar and Skirrow's medium), and to selective cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar (CCFA) (Biomedics, Parg qe tehnicologico, Madrid, Spain) for isolation of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile toxin was detected by ELISA-ridascreen Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B (R-Biopharm AG, Germany) and ColorPAC ToxinA test (Becton Dickinson, USA). Examination of stool specimens for the presence of parasites (causing diarrhea) was done using standard methods (conventional microscopy), commercial concentration test Paraprep S Gold kit (Dia Mondial, France) and RIDA(®)QUICK Cryptosporidium/Giardia Combi test (R-Biopharm AG, Germany). Examination of stool specimens for the presence of fungi (causing diarrhea) was performed by standard methods. All stool samples positive for Clostridium difficile were tested for Rota, Noro, Astro and Adeno viruses by ELISA - ridascreen (R-Biopharm AG, Germany). In this research we isolated 99 Clostridium difficile strains from 116 stool samples of 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea. The 53 (66.25%) of patients with diarrhea were positive for toxins A and B, one (1.25%) were positive for only toxin B. Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from samples of 26 (32.5%) patients. However, other pathogenic microorganisms of intestinal tract cultivated from samples of 16 patients

  20. A prospective study on defecation frequency, stool weight, and consistency.

    PubMed Central

    Myo-Khin; Thein-Win-Nyunt; Kyaw-Hla, S; Thein-Thein-Myint; Bolin, T D

    1994-01-01

    It has been commonly believed that children in developing countries pass stools that are very different from those of developed countries. A community based study on defecation frequency, stool weight, and consistency was conducted in a cohort of 300 Myanmar (Burmese) children aged 1 to 4 years. Most (80.3%) children opened their bowels daily and none passed more than three stools a day. The mean (SD) defecation frequency was 6.98 (1.94) times a week and total stool weight was 596 (221) g a week. The majority (61%) of children passed soft stools. At all ages, there was no significant difference in the defecation frequency, stool weight, and consistency between boys and girls, those on adult style diet and those partially weaned, and between age groups. PMID:7979522

  1. Epidemiological analysis of the significance of low-positive test results for antibody to hepatitis B surface and core antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, S C; Murphy, B L; Schable, C A; Heyward, W L; Francis, D P; Kane, M A

    1984-01-01

    To determine the significance of certain serological test results commonly encountered in hepatitis B virus testing, we reviewed serological test data from nine studies of hepatitis B conducted between 1980 and 1982. Three tests, for hepatitis B surface antigen and for antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBs and anti-HBc), were used to measure hepatitis B virus infection risk in various populations. Two results, low levels of anti-HBs alone and low levels of anti-HBc alone, occurred at constant frequencies (2.72 and 0.4%, respectively), regardless of the prevalence of HBV infection in the population. Positivity for low levels of anti-HBs alone persisted for 1 year in less than one-half of those studied; in addition, response to hepatitis B virus vaccine was augmented in only one-third of this group. Positivity for low levels of anti-HBc alone did not persist in any of 11 persons studied. These findings indicate that presently available tests for anti-HBs and anti-HBc at low levels are often nonspecific and should be interpreted with caution. PMID:6715519

  2. Novel aspects of the Z and R3 antigens of Streptococcus agalactiae revealed by immunological testing.

    PubMed

    Maeland, Johan A; Radtke, Andreas; Lyng, Randi V; Mavenyengwa, Rooyen T

    2013-04-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) are important human and bovine pathogens which can be classified by a variety of phenotype- and gene-based techniques. The capsular polysaccharide and strain-variable, surface-anchored proteins are particularly important phenotypic markers. In an earlier study, a previously unrecognized protein antigen called Z was described. It was expressed by 27.2% of GBS strains from Zimbabwe, usually in combination with R3 protein expression. In this study, a putative Z-specific antiserum actually contained antibodies against two different antigens named Z1 and Z2; Z1 was >250 kDa in molecular mass. Z1, Z2, and R3 generated multiple stained bands on Western blots and showed similar chromatographic characteristics with respect to molecular mass, aggregate formation, and charge. Of 28 reference and prototype GBS strains examined, 8/28 (28.5%) isolates expressed one, two, or all three of the Z1, Z2, and R3 antigens; 4/28 expressed all three antigens; 2/28 expressed Z2 and R3; 1/28 expressed Z1 only; and 1/28 expressed R3 only. Twenty (71.5%) of the 28 isolates expressed none of the three antigens. Expression of one or more of these antigens was shown by isolates of the capsular polysaccharide types Ia, Ib, V, and IX and NT strains and occurred in combination with expression of various other strain-variable and surface-localized protein antigens. When used as serosubtype markers, Z1, Z2, and R3 affected existing GBS serotype designations for some of the isolates. For instance, the R3 reference strain Prague 10/84 (ATCC 49447) changed serotype markers from V/R3 to V/R3, Z1, and Z2. Other isolates may change correspondingly, implying consequences for GBS serotyping and research. PMID:23408530

  3. Enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative E. coli in stools of children with acute gastroenteritis in Davidson County, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Foster, Monique A; Iqbal, Junaid; Zhang, Chengxian; McHenry, Rendie; Cleveland, Brent E; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia; Fonnesbeck, Chris; Payne, Daniel C; Chappell, James D; Halasa, Natasha; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-11-01

    This prospective acute gastroenteritis (AGE) surveillance was conducted in the inpatient and emergency room settings at a referral pediatric hospital to determine the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in children <12years of age with AGE in Davidson County, Tennessee. Subjects 15 days to 11 years of age, who presented with diarrhea and/or vomiting, were enrolled. Stool specimens were processed for detection of DEC using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. From December 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, a total of 79 (38%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE tested positive for E. coli. A total of 12 (5.8%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE were positive for a DEC. Eight (67%) out of these 12 were positive for enteropathogenic E. coli, and the remaining 4 were positive for enteroaggregative E. coli. DEC clinical isolates clustered with known E. coli enteropathogens according to multilocus sequencing typing.

  4. PCR Detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii in Stool Samples from Sydney, Australia▿

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, R.; Stark, D.; Beebe, N.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii in stool samples from a patient population in Sydney, Australia. Stool samples were tested by microscopy and PCR. Five patients were found with E. histolytica infections, while E. dispar and E. moshkovskii were observed in 63 (70.8%) and 55 (61.8%) patients, respectively, by PCR. This is the first study in Australia using molecular techniques to determine the presence of E. histolytica, E. dispar, and E. moshkovskii. PMID:17229864

  5. Field evaluation of two diagnostic antigen tests for Wuchereria bancrofti infection among Indian expatriates in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Omar, M S; Sheikha, A K; Al-Amari, O M; Abdalla, S E; Musa, R A

    2000-06-01

    Two commercially available diagnostic tools (Tro-Bio ELISA and ICT card test) were used to detect circulating filarial antigen of Wuchereria bancrofti infections among Indian expatriate workers in Saudi Arabia. Daytime serum samples collected from 302 individuals (210 men and 92 women) were tested. Night blood surveys for microfilaraemia were restricted to those individuals who became positive for the trop-Bio assay test. The overall prevalence of filarial antigeaemia was 10.6% (32 individuals). Of these 32 antigen positive cases, microfilariae were found in 10 men (31.3%), with a mean microfilarial count of 105 mff/ml. No positive antigen results were found in control sera from 200 native healthy Saudis or from patients with helminthic infections (schistosomiasis, echinicoccosis, hookworm, ascariasis and trichuriasis). All 32 positive sera with the Trop-Bio ELISA showed a positive ICT card reaction (specificity and sensitivity 100%). It is concluded that, in Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states, where a continuous flow of south- and southeastern workers coming from areas endemic for bancroftian filariasis, the ICT card test may be useful in monitoring the potential risk of introducing bacncroftian filariasis to the host countries.

  6. Accurate, noninvasive detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA from stool samples: potential usefulness for monitoring treatment.

    PubMed

    Shuber, Anthony P; Ascaño, Jennifer J; Boynton, Kevin A; Mitchell, Anastasia; Frierson, Henry F; El-Rifai, Wa'el; Powell, Steven M

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA assay demonstrating sensitive and accurate detection of Helicobacter pylori from stool samples is reported. Moreover, in three individuals tested for therapeutic response, the assay showed the disappearance of H. pylori DNA during treatment. Thus, this noninvasive molecular biology-based assay has the potential to be a powerful diagnostic tool given its ability to specifically identify H. pylori DNA.

  7. Immunoblot Assay Using Recombinant Antigens as a Supplemental Test To Confirm the Presence of Antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi▿

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kevin Y.; Chang, Chi-Deu; Salbilla, Vince A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Leiby, David A.; Schochetman, Gerald; Shah, Dinesh O.

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic Chagas' disease is generally made by detecting antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. Most conventional serological tests are based on lysates of whole parasites or semipurified antigen fractions from T. cruzi epimastigotes grown in culture. The occurrence of inconclusive and false-positive results has been a persistent problem with the conventional assays, and there is no universally accepted gold standard for confirmation of positive test results. We describe here an immunoblot assay for detecting antibodies to T. cruzi in which four chimeric recombinant antigens (rAgs), designated FP3, FP6, FP10, and TcF, are used as target antigens. Each of these rAgs is composed of several antigenically distinct regions and includes repetitive as well as nonrepetitive sequences. Each rAg is coated as a discrete line on a nitrocellulose strip. Assay sensitivity was assessed by testing 345 specimens known to be positive for antibodies to T. cruzi. All 345 of these samples showed two to four reactive test bands in addition to the three on-board control bands that are on each strip. Assay specificity was determined by testing 500 specimens from random U.S. blood donors, all of which gave negative results. Based on the results obtained in this study, we propose the following scheme for interpretation of test results: (i) no bands or a single test band = a negative result; (ii) two or more test bands with at least one band showing intensity of 1+ or higher = a positive result; and (iii) multiple faint test bands (±) = indeterminate result. Based on this scheme, the prototype immunoblot assay showed sensitivity of 100% (n = 345) and specificity of 100% (n = 500). Additionally, all 269 potentially cross-reacting and T. cruzi antibody-negative specimens tested negative in our immunoblot assay. The rAg-based immunoblot assay has potential as a supplemental test for confirming the presence of antibodies to T. cruzi in blood specimens and for identifying false

  8. Expression of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Antigens in Leishmania tarentolae. Potential for Use in Rapid Serodiagnostic Tests (RDTs)

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Barrie; Piening, Turid; Büscher, Philippe; Rogé, Stijn; Smales, C. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The development of rapid serodiagnostic tests for sleeping sickness and other diseases caused by kinetoplastids relies on the affordable production of parasite-specific recombinant antigens. Here, we describe the production of recombinant antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T.b. gambiense) in the related species Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae), and compare their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to native antigens currently used in diagnostic kits against a panel of human sera. A number of T.b. gambiense protein antigen candidates were chosen for recombinant expression in L. tarentolae based on current diagnostics in field use and recent findings on immunodiagnostic antigens found by proteomic profiling. In particular, the extracellular domains of invariant surface glycoprotein 65 (ISG65), variant surface glycoproteins VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 were fused with C-terminal histidine tags and expressed as soluble proteins in the medium of cultured, recombinant L. tarentolae. Using affinity chromatography, on average 10 mg/L of recombinant protein was purified from cultures and subsequently tested against a panel of sera from sleeping sickness patients from controls, i.e. persons without sleeping sickness living in HAT endemic countries. The evaluation on sera from 172 T.b. gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients and from 119 controls showed very high diagnostic potential of the two recombinant VSG and the rISG65 fragments with areas under the curve between 0.97 and 0.98 compared to 0.98 and 0.99 with native VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 (statistically not different). Evaluation on sera from 78 T.b. rhodesiense HAT patients and from 100 controls showed an acceptable diagnostic potential of rISG65 with an area under the curve of 0.83. These results indicate that a combination of these recombinant antigens has the potential to be used in next generation rapid serodiagnostic tests. In addition, the L. tarentolae expression system

  9. The variability in immunofluorescent viral capsid antigen antibody tests in population surveys of Epstein—Barr virus infections*

    PubMed Central

    Geser, A.; Day, N. E.; de-Thé, G. B.; Chew, B. K.; Freund, R. J.; Kwan, H. C.; Lavoue, M. F.; Simkovic, D.; Sohier, R.

    1974-01-01

    A comparative study of the extent of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections in populations that differ with respect to the incidence of tumours associated with this virus is now in progress in different countries. In these surveys of antibody titres from the various study populations, it is of critical importance that strict comparability be maintained. Despite standardization of techniques and reagents in the cooperating laboratories, considerable variation in the results has remained. The components of the total variability in the results of the immunofluorescence test for estimating the antibody titres against viral capsid antigens (VCA) of the EBV have been investigated. With repeated tests on the same sera, four sources of variation were measured: the reading of the slides, the performance of the tests, the use of various batches of the same cell line as antigen, and the use of different cell lines. The greatest variations were due to the use of different cell lines and to differences in performing the test; the reading of the slides caused only minor variations. Both the systematic and unsystematic variations were measured. The systematic variation was great in tests between laboratories and when different cell lines were used as antigens. Most of the systematic variation resulting from the use of different cell batches from the same cell line could be accounted for by the differing proportions of brilliant fluorescent cells. Adjustments are possible to correct the systematic variation whenever this has been measured, but not the unsystematic “residual” variability, which presents the real obstacle to the comparison of results obtained in different laboratories or by different observers. To attain full comparability of VCA antibody tests the sera from the different surveys should all be tested in the same laboratory. PMID:4376066

  10. [The evaluation of the techniques used for diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica in stool specimens].

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Sema; Inceboz, Tonay; Over, Leyla; Yalçin, Gülter; Usluca, Selma; Sahin, Serap; Delibaş, Songül Bayram; Aksoy, Umit

    2007-01-01

    In this study, stool samples of 9378 patients from different clinics, who presented at the laboratory of the department of parasitology of the Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Medicine with several gastrointestinal complaints from January 2004 to May 2006, were examined. All stool samples were examined with the saline-Lugol method and, in suspicious cases, by trichrome staining, cultivation in Robinson's medium and/or antigen detection in stool with the Entamoeba CELISA Path kit. Forty-one cases (0.44%), in which Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar cysts and/or trophozoites were detected by at least one method, were found to be positive. Out of these 41 cases, four methods were used in 24 cases, three methods in 14 cases, whereas only saline-Lugol and trichrome staining methods were used in 3 cases. Even though all 41 positive cases had been examined with the saline-Lugol method, only 25 cases were found to be positive with this method for E. histolytica/E. dispar cysts and/or trophozoites. The remaining 16 cases were diagnosed by the other three methods. Today it is necessary to distinguish E. histolytica from E. dispar because the patient does not need to be treated if E. dispar is identified whereas if E. histolytica is identified the patient needs urgent treatment. That's why it is necessary to get reliable results using diagnostic methods together and, when needed, by ELISA specific for E. histolytica.

  11. Accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the detection of schistosome infection: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Minton, Jonathan; Boamah, Daniel; Otchere, Joseph; Asmah, Richard H; Rodgers, Mark; Bosompem, Kwabena M; Eusebi, Paolo; De Vlas, Sake J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the diagnosis of schistosome infection. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and other bibliographic databases for studies published until 30 September 2015 that described circulatory cathodic antigen testing compared against one to three Kato–Katz tests per subject – for Schistosoma mansoni – or the filtration of one 10-ml urine sample per subject – for S. haematobium. We extracted the numbers of true positives, false positives, true negatives and false negatives for the antigen testing and performed meta-analyses using a bivariate hierarchical regression model. Findings Twenty-six studies published between 1994 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. In the detection of S. mansoni, a single antigen test gave a pooled sensitivity of 0.90 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.84–0.94) and a pooled specificity of 0.56 (95% CI: 0.39–0.71; n = 7) when compared against a single Kato–Katz test. The corresponding values from comparisons with two to three Kato–Katz tests per subject were 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80–0.88) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.53–0.76; n = 14), respectively. There appeared to be no advantage in using three antigen tests per subject instead of one. When compared against the results of urine filtration, antigen testing for S. haematobium showed poor sensitivity and poor specificity. The performance of antigen testing was better in areas of high endemicity than in settings with low endemicity. Conclusion Antigen testing may represent an effective tool for monitoring programmes for the control of S. mansoni. PMID:27429491

  12. Detection of IgG Anti-Leishmania Antigen by Flow Cytometry as a Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Schriefer, Albert; Magalhães, Andréa; Meyer, Roberto; Glesby, Marshall J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Carvalho, Lucas P.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) relies on clinical presentation, parasite isolation, histopathologic evaluation and positive Montenegro skin test. However, the low amounts of parasites in the lesion of these individuals make parasite isolation and histopatologic diagnosis unreliable, often leading to false-negative results. Also, 15% of people living in endemic areas have sub-clinical infection characterized by positive Montenegro skin test, which may contribute to misdiagnosis. Although the main Leishmania killing mechanism is through cell-mediated immune response, antibodies against Leishmania antigens are found in infected individuals. Here our goal was to develop a new serological technique using polystyrene microspheres sensitized with soluble Leishmania antigens as a tool for the detection of IgG in serum from CL patients by flow cytometry. To validate the assay we carried out a comparative test (ELISA) commonly used as a diagnostic test for parasitic diseases. To determine cross-reactivity we used serum from patients with Chagas disease, caused by a trypanosome that has several proteins with high homology to those of the Leishmania genus. We observed that the flow cytometry technique was more sensitive than the ELISA, but, less specific. Our results show that the flow cytometry serologic test can be used to confirm CL cases in L. braziliensis transmission areas, however, presence of Chagas disease has to be ruled out in these individuals. PMID:27622535

  13. Detection of IgG Anti-Leishmania Antigen by Flow Cytometry as a Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Pedral-Sampaio, Geraldo; Alves, Jessé S; Schriefer, Albert; Magalhães, Andréa; Meyer, Roberto; Glesby, Marshall J; Carvalho, Edgar M; Carvalho, Lucas P

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) relies on clinical presentation, parasite isolation, histopathologic evaluation and positive Montenegro skin test. However, the low amounts of parasites in the lesion of these individuals make parasite isolation and histopatologic diagnosis unreliable, often leading to false-negative results. Also, 15% of people living in endemic areas have sub-clinical infection characterized by positive Montenegro skin test, which may contribute to misdiagnosis. Although the main Leishmania killing mechanism is through cell-mediated immune response, antibodies against Leishmania antigens are found in infected individuals. Here our goal was to develop a new serological technique using polystyrene microspheres sensitized with soluble Leishmania antigens as a tool for the detection of IgG in serum from CL patients by flow cytometry. To validate the assay we carried out a comparative test (ELISA) commonly used as a diagnostic test for parasitic diseases. To determine cross-reactivity we used serum from patients with Chagas disease, caused by a trypanosome that has several proteins with high homology to those of the Leishmania genus. We observed that the flow cytometry technique was more sensitive than the ELISA, but, less specific. Our results show that the flow cytometry serologic test can be used to confirm CL cases in L. braziliensis transmission areas, however, presence of Chagas disease has to be ruled out in these individuals. PMID:27622535

  14. Accurate detection of Campylobacter spp. antigens by immunochromatography and enzyme immunoassay in routine microbiological laboratory.

    PubMed

    Regnath, Thomas; Ignatius, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter spp. are fastidious microorganisms, and their detection by culture depends on the freshness of the stool sample and the skills of the laboratory staff. To improve laboratory diagnosis, assays for the detection of specific antigens have been developed. Here, we evaluated two assays for the detection of Campylobacter spp.-specific antigens, i.e., one immunochromatographic test and one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), in 38 frozen Campylobacter spp.-positive specimens and prospectively in 533 fresh stool samples with a conventional enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and culture. Both assays were positive for 36 samples with Campylobacter jejuni and one with Campylobacter coli among 38 Campylobacter spp.-positive frozen samples. One Campylobacter lari-positive sample was identified by the immunochromatographic assay (ICA) only. In a prospective study performed within the course of routine microbiology, both assays were positive for 24/25 C. jejuni culture-positive samples (positive percent agreement, 96.0% [95% CI: 78.9-100%]). ICA and EIA also were positive for 14 and 10 culture-negative samples, respectively (negative percent agreement: ICA, 97.2% [95% CI: 95.4-98.4%]; EIA, 98.0% [95% CI: 96.4-99.0%]). In conclusion, the high agreement between both antigen-detection assays and culture indicates that both assays may be initially performed followed by culture only upon a positive test result.

  15. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  16. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  17. Dot-ELISA Rapid Test Using Recombinant 56-kDa Protein Antigens for Serodiagnosis of Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Rodkvamtook, Wuttikon; Zhang, Zhiwen; Chao, Chien-Chung; Huber, Erin; Bodhidatta, Dharadhida; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Grieco, John; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Kityapan, Manerat; Lewis, Michael; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2015-05-01

    We developed a rapid dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) using the combination of recombinant 56-kDa protein antigens that exhibited broad reactivity with serum antibodies against the four most prevalent strains (Karp, Kato, Gilliam, and TA763) of Orientia tsutsugamushi. The assay is rapid (30 minutes), and can be done at room temperature, and results can be read by the naked eye. Only a simple shaker is required to wash the membrane. Sera from 338 patients suspected of being ill with scrub typhus from rural hospitals around Thailand were tested using this dot-ELISA. Seventy-five (22.2%) patients were found to be positive. The sensitivity and specificity of dot-ELISA were determined using the indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) test as the gold standard, with the cutoff titer of immunoglobulin peroxidase conjugate M (IgM)/G (IgG) greater than 1:400/1:400. The dot-ELISA had a sensitivity of 98.5%, a specificity of 96.3%, a positive predictive value of 86.7%, and a negative predictive value of 99.6% for the acute-phase specimens. The results indicate that dot-ELISA rapid test using recombinant 56-kDa protein antigen was comparable with the IFA test and may be very useful for the diagnosis of scrub typhus in rural hospitals, where IFA is not available.

  18. Dot-ELISA Rapid Test Using Recombinant 56-kDa Protein Antigens for Serodiagnosis of Scrub Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Rodkvamtook, Wuttikon; Zhang, Zhiwen; Chao, Chien-Chung; Huber, Erin; Bodhidatta, Dharadhida; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Grieco, John; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Kityapan, Manerat; Lewis, Michael; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2015-01-01

    We developed a rapid dot–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) using the combination of recombinant 56-kDa protein antigens that exhibited broad reactivity with serum antibodies against the four most prevalent strains (Karp, Kato, Gilliam, and TA763) of Orientia tsutsugamushi. The assay is rapid (30 minutes), and can be done at room temperature, and results can be read by the naked eye. Only a simple shaker is required to wash the membrane. Sera from 338 patients suspected of being ill with scrub typhus from rural hospitals around Thailand were tested using this dot-ELISA. Seventy-five (22.2%) patients were found to be positive. The sensitivity and specificity of dot-ELISA were determined using the indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) test as the gold standard, with the cutoff titer of immunoglobulin peroxidase conjugate M (IgM)/G (IgG) greater than 1:400/1:400. The dot-ELISA had a sensitivity of 98.5%, a specificity of 96.3%, a positive predictive value of 86.7%, and a negative predictive value of 99.6% for the acute-phase specimens. The results indicate that dot-ELISA rapid test using recombinant 56-kDa protein antigen was comparable with the IFA test and may be very useful for the diagnosis of scrub typhus in rural hospitals, where IFA is not available. PMID:25802430

  19. A TeGM6-4r antigen-based immunochromatographic test (ICT) for animal trypanosomosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu-Thuy; Ruttayaporn, Ngasaman; Goto, Yasuyuki; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru

    2015-11-01

    Animal trypanosomosis is a disease that is distributed worldwide which results in huge economic losses due to reduced animal productivity. Endemic regions are often located in the countryside where laboratory diagnosis is costly or inaccessible. The establishment of simple, effective, and accurate field tests is therefore of great interest to the farming and veterinary sectors. Our study aimed to develop a simple, rapid, and sensitive immunochromatographic test (ICT) for animal trypanosomosis utilizing the recombinant tandem repeat antigen TeGM6-4r, which is conserved amongst salivarian trypanosome species. In the specificity analysis, TeGM6-4r/ICT detected all of Trypanosoma evansi-positive controls from experimentally infected water buffaloes. As expected, uninfected controls tested negative. All sera samples collected from Tanzanian and Ugandan cattle that were Trypanosoma congolense- and/or Trypanosoma vivax-positive by microscopic examination of the buffy coat were found to be positive by the newly developed TeGM6-4r/ICT, which was comparable to results from TeGM6-4r/ELISA (kappa coefficient [κ] = 0.78). TeGM6/ICT also showed substantial agreement with ELISA using Trypanosoma brucei brucei (κ = 0.64) and T. congolense (κ = 0.72) crude antigen, suggesting the high potential of TeGM6-4r/ICT as a field diagnostic test, both for research purposes and on-site diagnosis of animal trypanosomosis.

  20. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  1. Detection and monitoring of human bocavirus 1 infection by a new rapid antigen test

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, A.H.L.; Susi, P.; Toivola, H.; Christensen, A.; Söderlund-Venermo, M.; Hedman, K.; Aatola, H.; Zvirbliene, A.; Koskinen, J.O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically relevant diagnosis of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is challenging, as the virus is frequently detected in asymptomatic patients, and cofindings with other respiratory viruses are common. The clinical value of current diagnostic methods, such as PCR, is therefore low, and alternative diagnostic strategies are needed. We describe for the first time the use of an antigen detection assay for the rapid identification of HBoV1 in a paediatric patient with respiratory tract infection symptoms. We estimate the duration of active HBoV1 infection to be 6 days. PMID:27014463

  2. Detection and monitoring of human bocavirus 1 infection by a new rapid antigen test.

    PubMed

    Bruning, A H L; Susi, P; Toivola, H; Christensen, A; Söderlund-Venermo, M; Hedman, K; Aatola, H; Zvirbliene, A; Koskinen, J O

    2016-05-01

    Clinically relevant diagnosis of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is challenging, as the virus is frequently detected in asymptomatic patients, and cofindings with other respiratory viruses are common. The clinical value of current diagnostic methods, such as PCR, is therefore low, and alternative diagnostic strategies are needed. We describe for the first time the use of an antigen detection assay for the rapid identification of HBoV1 in a paediatric patient with respiratory tract infection symptoms. We estimate the duration of active HBoV1 infection to be 6 days. PMID:27014463

  3. Development of an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test for the identification of blowfly (Calliphoridae) species of forensic significance.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Laura; Thornton, Chris; Wallman, James F; Stevens, Jamie R

    2009-06-01

    In this study we examine the limitations of currently used sequence-based approaches to blowfly (Calliphoridae) identification and evaluate the utility of an immunological approach to discriminate between blowfly species of forensic importance. By investigating antigenic similarity and dissimilarity between the first instar larval stages of four forensically important blowfly species, we have been able to identify immunoreactive proteins of potential use in the development of species-specific immuno-diagnostic tests. Here we outline our protein-based approach to species determination, and describe how it may be adapted to develop rapid diagnostic assays for the 'on-site' identification of blowfly species.

  4. Development and Clinical Evaluation of a Rapid Serodiagnostic Test for Toxoplasmosis of Cats Using Recombinant SAG1 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Chom-Kyu; Jeong, Wooseog; Kim, Hak-Yong; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Ryu, Jeong-Eun; Ko, A-Ra; Kim, Yong-Joo; Hong, Sung-Jong; Yang, Zhaoshou

    2011-01-01

    Rapid serodiagnostic methods for Toxoplasma gondii infection in cats are urgently needed for effective control of transmission routes toward human infections. In this work, 4 recombinant T. gondii antigens (SAG1, SAG2, GRA3, and GRA6) were produced and tested for the development of rapid diagnostic test (RDT). The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and applied onto the nitrocellulose membrane of the test strip. The recombinant SAG1 (rSAG1) showed the strongest antigenic activity and highest specificity among them. We also performed clinical evaluation of the rSAG1-loaded RDT in 182 cat sera (55 household and 127 stray cats). The kit showed 0.88 of kappa value comparing with a commercialized ELISA kit, which indicated a significant correlation between rSAG1-loaded RDT and the ELISA kit. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the RDT were 100% (23/23) and 99.4% (158/159), respectively. The rSAG1-loaded RDT is rapid, easy to use, and highly accurate. Thus, it would be a suitable diagnostic tool for rapid detection of antibodies in T. gondii-infected cats under field conditions. PMID:22072819

  5. Development and clinical evaluation of a rapid serodiagnostic test for toxoplasmosis of cats using recombinant SAG1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Chong, Chom-Kyu; Jeong, Wooseog; Kim, Hak-Yong; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Ryu, Jeong-Eun; Ko, A-Ra; Kim, Yong-Joo; Hong, Sung-Jong; Yang, Zhaoshou; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2011-09-01

    Rapid serodiagnostic methods for Toxoplasma gondii infection in cats are urgently needed for effective control of transmission routes toward human infections. In this work, 4 recombinant T. gondii antigens (SAG1, SAG2, GRA3, and GRA6) were produced and tested for the development of rapid diagnostic test (RDT). The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and applied onto the nitrocellulose membrane of the test strip. The recombinant SAG1 (rSAG1) showed the strongest antigenic activity and highest specificity among them. We also performed clinical evaluation of the rSAG1-loaded RDT in 182 cat sera (55 household and 127 stray cats). The kit showed 0.88 of kappa value comparing with a commercialized ELISA kit, which indicated a significant correlation between rSAG1-loaded RDT and the ELISA kit. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the RDT were 100% (23/23) and 99.4% (158/159), respectively. The rSAG1-loaded RDT is rapid, easy to use, and highly accurate. Thus, it would be a suitable diagnostic tool for rapid detection of antibodies in T. gondii-infected cats under field conditions. PMID:22072819

  6. Clinical illnesses associated with isolation of dysgonic fermenter 3 from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Blum, R N; Berry, C D; Phillips, M G; Hamilos, D L; Koneman, E W

    1992-02-01

    The clinical significance of the fastidious organism DF-3 isolated from stool cultures is unclear. We sought to improve our understanding of this organism and to further define its association with human disease. Stool cultures for DF-3 were obtained from three sources: an ongoing study of enteric pathogens in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, a screening procedure in which all stool samples submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin assay were cultured for DF-3, and stool samples submitted specifically for DF-3 culture. Retrospective clinical data were obtained from chart reviews of patients with positive cultures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and cell wall fatty acid analysis were performed for each DF-3 isolated. Eight isolates of DF-3 were obtained over a period of 8 months. All patients either had severe underlying disease or were immunocompromised, including three patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and two patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of clinical disease ranged from chronic diarrhea with a well-defined response to therapy for DF-3 to an asymptomatic carrier state. Cell wall fatty acid analysis of these isolates demonstrated a consistent pattern with a large peak of 12-methyltetradecanoate. DF-3, a fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus, can be recovered from stool cultures of immunocompromised patients by using selective media. The presence of 12-methyltetradecanoate in cell wall fatty acid analysis assists in identification. The increased use of a selective medium-(cefoperazone-vancomycin-amphotericin B) in the evaluation of diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts, including persons with inflammatory bowel disease, may better define the association of DF-3 with human gastrointestinal disease.

  7. Isolation of a Trypanosoma cruzi antigen by affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody. Preliminary evaluation of its possible applications in serological tests.

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetto, C H; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M; Durante de Isola, E; Fossati, C A; Margni, R A

    1990-01-01

    By affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody (163B6), obtained in our laboratory, we have isolated a T. cruzi antigen which could be useful for differential diagnosis of Chagas' disease from leishmaniasis. This antigen, a 52-kD protein, reacted with all sera from Chagas' disease patients tested but not with sera from patients with leishmania, in ELISA. The 52-kD antigen is widely distributed in the Trypanosoma genus since the 163B6 monoclonal antibody reacts with T. rangeli and 8 strains and a clone of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2119921

  8. There is need for antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests to identify common acute tropical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Henry; Suankratay, Chusana

    2007-01-01

    Enteric fever, typhus, leptospirosis, dengue, melioidosis, and tuberculous meningitis present urgent diagnostic problems that require experience and clinical judgment to make early evidence-based management decisions. Basic and applied research dealing with reliable antigen-based diagnostics has been published and confirmed for several of these infections. This should have initiated commercial production but has not. Established international firms see little profit in such diagnostic kits since they would be used in poor countries with little prospects for return of investment capital. We attempt to illustrate this issue, using common causes of acute febrile illnesses in the Southeast Asian region. We believe that rapid diagnostic technology could prevent significant delay in starting appropriate therapy, reduce hospital expenses, and even save lives.

  9. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine. PMID:25659268

  10. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine.

  11. The effects of serial skin testing with purified protein derivative on the level and quality of antibodies to complex and defined antigens in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several serologic tests designed to detect antibodies to immunodominant Mycobacterium bovis antigens have recently emerged as ancillary tests for the detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle, particularly when applied after injection of purified protein derivative (PPD) for skin test that signific...

  12. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Testing Hepatitis B–Positive Pregnant Women for Hepatitis B e Antigen or Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the cost-effectiveness of testing pregnant women with hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive) for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and administering maternal antiviral prophylaxis if indicated, to decrease breakthrough perinatal HBV transmission from the U.S. health care perspective. METHODS A Markov decision model was constructed for a 2010 birth cohort of 4 million neonates to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two strategies: testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for 1) HBeAg or 2) HBV load. Maternal antiviral prophylaxis is given from 28 weeks of gestation through 4 weeks postpartum when HBeAg is positive or HBV load is high (108 copies/mL or greater). These strategies were compared with the current recommendation. All neonates born to HBsAg-positive women received recommended active-passive immunoprophylaxis. Effects were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and all costs were in 2010 U.S. dollars. RESULTS The HBeAg testing strategy saved $3.3 million and 3,080 QALYs and prevented 486 chronic HBV infections compared with the current recommendation. The HBV load testing strategy cost $3 million more than current recommendation, saved 2,080 QALYs, and prevented 324 chronic infections with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,583 per QALY saved compared with the current recommendations. The results remained robust over a wide range of assumptions. CONCLUSION Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBeAg or HBV load followed by maternal antiviral prophylaxis if HBeAg-positive or high viral load to reduce perinatal hepatitis B transmission in the United States is cost-effective. PMID:24785842

  14. Hepatitis C core antigen testing: a reliable, quick, and potentially cost-effective alternative to hepatitis C polymerase chain reaction in diagnosing acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Fiona V; Fisher, Martin; Hughes, Daniel J; Shaw, Simon G; Homer, Gary; Hassan-Ibrahim, Mohammed O

    2015-01-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasingly common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated the efficacy of HCV core antigen in diagnosing acute HCV in an HIV-infected cohort. Compared with HCV polymerase chain reaction, core antigen proved sensitive (100%) and specific (97.9%). As a quick, simple, and cost-effective test, it has considerable utility in screening for acute HCV.

  15. A novel nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for differential detection of Entamoeba histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash C

    2007-01-01

    Background E. histolytica, a pathogenic amoeba, is indistinguishable in its cyst and trophozoite stages from those of non-pathogenic E. moshkovskii and E. dispar by light microscopy. We have developed a nested multiplex PCR targeting a 16S-like rRNA gene for differential detection of all the three morphologically similar forms of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar simultaneously in stool samples. Results The species specific product size for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar was 439, 553 and 174 bp respectively, which was clearly different for all the three Entamoeba species. The nested multiplex PCR showed a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 100% for the demonstration of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples. The PCR was positive for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar in a total of 190 out of 202 stool specimens (94% sensitive) that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture. All the 35 negative control stool samples that were negative for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by microscopy and culture were also found negative by the nested multiplex PCR (100% specific). The result from the study shows that only 34.6% of the patient stool samples that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture, were actually positive for pathogenic E. histolytica and the remaining majority of the stool samples were positive for non-pathogenic E. dispar or E. moshkovskii as demonstrated by the use of nested multiplex PCR. Conclusion The present study reports a new nested multiplex PCR strategy for species specific detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii DNA in stool specimens. The test is highly specific, sensitive and also rapid, providing the results within 12 hours of receiving stool specimens. PMID:17524135

  16. Rapid detection of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) virus antigen in Sudan by agar gel precipitation (AGPT) and haemagglutination (HA) tests.

    PubMed

    Osman, Nussieba A; A/Rahman, Mahasin E; Ali, A S; Fadol, M A

    2008-06-01

    AGPT and HA tests were employed for rapid diagnosis of PPRV infection in sheep and goats in Sudan. Forty lymph nodes and spleen samples from suspected cases of PPR in both sheep and goats were examined by AGPT and HA tests for detection of PPRV antigen. Viral antigen was detected from (77.5%) of the samples tested by AGPT and (92.5%) tested by HA test. The results of both tests revealed that HA test was more sensitive than AGPT for detection of PPRV antigen (Kappa statistics 0.4366). Another advantage of the HA test over AGPT was that it can differentiate PPRV from RPV. Thus the HA test represents a quick, easy, simple, cheap and reliable confirmatory test for the diagnosis of PPR and differential diagnosis of PPRV and RPV. The HA test was carried out using chicken, goat and pig RBCs. Chicken RBCs were found to be the most sensitive for detection of PPRV antigen, followed by goat then pig RBCs. The HA time when using chicken RBCs was 20-25 minutes, using goat RBCs was 25-30 minutes and using pig RBCs was 40-45 minutes. The distribution of PPR infection in four different regions of Sudan was investigated.

  17. A multicenter evaluation of a new antibody test kit for lymphatic filariasis employing recombinant Brugia malayi antigen Bm-14

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Gary J.; Curtis, Kurt C.; Fischer, Peter U.; Won, Kimberly Y.; Lammie, Patrick J.; Joseph, Hayley; Melrose, Wayne D.; Brattig., Norbert W.

    2010-01-01

    Antibody tests are useful for mapping the distribution of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in countries and regions and for monitoring progress in elimination programs based on mass drug administration (MDA). Prior antibody tests have suffered from poor sensitivity and/or specificity or from a lack of standardization. We conducted a multicenter evaluation of a new commercial ELISA that detects IgG4 antibodies to the recombinant filarial antigen Bm14. Four laboratories tested a shared panel of coded serum or plasma samples that included 55 samples from people with microfilaremic Wuchereria bancrofti or Brugia infections and 26 control samples. Qualitative results were identical in all four test sites. In addition, each laboratory tested samples from their own serum banks. The test detected antibodies in 32 of 36 samples (91%) from people with Brugian filariasis and in 96 of 98 samples (98%) from people with Bancroftian filariasis. Specificity testing showed that many serum or plasma samples from patients with other filarial infections such as onchocerciasis had positive antibody tests. Specificity was otherwise excellent, although 3 of 30 samples from patients with ascariasis and 4 of 51 with strongyloidiasis had positive antibody tests; it is likely that some or all of these people had previously lived in filariasis-endemic areas. Antibody test results obtained with eluates from blood dried on filter paper were similar to those obtained with plasma tested at the same dilution. This test may be helpful for diagnosing LF in patients with clinical signs of filariasis. It may also be a useful tool for use in LF endemic countries to monitor the progress of filariasis elimination programs and for post-MDA surveillance. PMID:20430004

  18. A multicenter evaluation of a new antibody test kit for lymphatic filariasis employing recombinant Brugia malayi antigen Bm-14.

    PubMed

    Weil, Gary J; Curtis, Kurt C; Fischer, Peter U; Won, Kimberly Y; Lammie, Patrick J; Joseph, Hayley; Melrose, Wayne D; Brattig, Norbert W

    2011-09-01

    Antibody tests are useful for mapping the distribution of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in countries and regions and for monitoring progress in elimination programs based on mass drug administration (MDA). Prior antibody tests have suffered from poor sensitivity and/or specificity or from a lack of standardization. We conducted a multicenter evaluation of a new commercial ELISA that detects IgG4 antibodies to the recombinant filarial antigen Bm14. Four laboratories tested a shared panel of coded serum or plasma samples that included 55 samples from people with microfilaremic Wuchereria bancrofti or Brugia infections and 26 control samples. Qualitative results were identical in all four test sites. In addition, each laboratory tested samples from their own serum banks. The test detected antibodies in 32 of 36 samples (91%) from people with Brugian filariasis and in 96 of 98 samples (98%) from people with Bancroftian filariasis. Specificity testing showed that many serum or plasma samples from patients with other filarial infections such as onchocerciasis had positive antibody tests. Specificity was otherwise excellent, although 3 of 30 samples from patients with ascariasis and 4 of 51 with strongyloidiasis had positive antibody tests; it is likely that some or all of these people had previously lived in filariasis-endemic areas. Antibody test results obtained with eluates from blood dried on filter paper were similar to those obtained with plasma tested at the same dilution. This test may be helpful for diagnosing LF in patients with clinical signs of filariasis. It may also be a useful tool for use in LF endemic countries to monitor the progress of filariasis elimination programs and for post-MDA surveillance.

  19. A TeGM6-4r antigen-based immunochromatographic test (ICT) for animal trypanosomosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu-Thuy; Ruttayaporn, Ngasaman; Goto, Yasuyuki; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru

    2015-11-01

    Animal trypanosomosis is a disease that is distributed worldwide which results in huge economic losses due to reduced animal productivity. Endemic regions are often located in the countryside where laboratory diagnosis is costly or inaccessible. The establishment of simple, effective, and accurate field tests is therefore of great interest to the farming and veterinary sectors. Our study aimed to develop a simple, rapid, and sensitive immunochromatographic test (ICT) for animal trypanosomosis utilizing the recombinant tandem repeat antigen TeGM6-4r, which is conserved amongst salivarian trypanosome species. In the specificity analysis, TeGM6-4r/ICT detected all of Trypanosoma evansi-positive controls from experimentally infected water buffaloes. As expected, uninfected controls tested negative. All sera samples collected from Tanzanian and Ugandan cattle that were Trypanosoma congolense- and/or Trypanosoma vivax-positive by microscopic examination of the buffy coat were found to be positive by the newly developed TeGM6-4r/ICT, which was comparable to results from TeGM6-4r/ELISA (kappa coefficient [κ] = 0.78). TeGM6/ICT also showed substantial agreement with ELISA using Trypanosoma brucei brucei (κ = 0.64) and T. congolense (κ = 0.72) crude antigen, suggesting the high potential of TeGM6-4r/ICT as a field diagnostic test, both for research purposes and on-site diagnosis of animal trypanosomosis. PMID:26290217

  20. Colonic mucosal microbiome differs from stool microbiome in cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy and is linked to cognition and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Hylemon, Phillip B; Ridlon, Jason M; Heuman, Douglas M; Daita, Kalyani; White, Melanie B; Monteith, Pamela; Noble, Nicole A; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2012-09-15

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is linked to the gut microbiota, stool microbiome analysis has not found differences between HE and no-HE patients. This study aimed to compare sigmoid mucosal microbiome of cirrhotic patients to controls, between HE vs. no-HE patients, and to study their linkage with cognition and inflammation. Sixty cirrhotic patients (36 HE and 24 no-HE) underwent cognitive testing, stool collection, cytokine (Th1, Th2, Th17, and innate immunity), and endotoxin analysis. Thirty-six patients (19 HE and 17 no-HE) and 17 age-matched controls underwent sigmoid biopsies. Multitag pyrosequencing (including autochthonous genera, i.e., Blautia, Roseburia, Fecalibacterium, Dorea) was performed on stool and mucosa. Stool and mucosal microbiome differences within/between groups and correlation network analyses were performed. Controls had significantly higher autochthonous and lower pathogenic genera compared with cirrhotic patients, especially HE patients. HE patients had worse MELD (model for end-stage liver disease) score and cognition and higher IL-6 and endotoxin than no-HE. Mucosal microbiota was different from stool within both HE/no-HE groups. Between HE/no-HE patients, there was no difference in stool microbiota but mucosal microbiome was different with lower Roseburia and higher Enterococcus, Veillonella, Megasphaera, and Burkholderia abundance in HE. On network analysis, autochthonous genera (Blautia, Fecalibacterium, Roseburia, and Dorea) were associated with good cognition and decreased inflammation in both HE/no-HE, whereas genera overrepresented in HE (Enterococcus, Megasphaera, and Burkholderia) were linked to poor cognition and inflammation. Sigmoid mucosal microbiome differs significantly from stool microbiome in cirrhosis. Cirrhotic, especially HE, patients' mucosal microbiota is significantly different from controls with a lack of potentially beneficial autochthonous and overgrowth of potentially pathogenic genera, which are

  1. A promising new ELISA diagnostic test for cattle babesiosis based on Babesia bigemina Apical Membrane Antigen-1.

    PubMed

    Torina, Alessandra; Cordaro, Antonio; Blanda, Valeria; D'Agostino, Rosalia; Scimeca, Salvatore; Scariano, Maria E; Sireci, Guido; Lelli, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Babesiosis due to Babesia bigemina is a relevant tick-borne disease, affecting cattle worldwide. Many surface proteins of the pathogen including the Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA-1) - have been analysed for vaccine and diagnostic purposes. This study focused on B. bigemina AMA-1 and on its use for the assessment of diagnostic tests. After bioinformatic analyses, AMA-1 codifying region was amplified and cloned into an expression vector used to induce protein synthesis in Escherichia coli cells. AMA-1 was purified by affinity chromatography and used to set up the best condition for an ELISA protocol. Bovine field sera positive to B. bigemina were used to evaluate the presence of anti-AMA-1 antibodies. In order to verify the assay specificity, sera positive to Babesia bovis or to the piroplasm Theileria annulata were also included. Significant differences were obtained between sera negative to both B. bigemina and B. bovis and samples positive to B. bigemina, to B. bovis or to both pathogens. No significant reaction was observed with T. annulata positive sera. The results showed that AMA-1 protein is suitable to be used as antigen in diagnostic assays for babesiosis diagnosis in cattle, as it does not show any cross reaction with anti-T. annulata antibodies. PMID:27033532

  2. Combined stool-based multiplex PCR and microscopy for enhanced pathogen detection in patients with persistent diarrhoea and asymptomatic controls from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Becker, S L; Chatigre, J K; Gohou, J-P; Coulibaly, J T; Leuppi, R; Polman, K; Chappuis, F; Mertens, P; Herrmann, M; N'Goran, E K; Utzinger, J; von Müller, L

    2015-06-01

    Infectious diarrhoea ranks among the leading causes of morbidity worldwide. Although most acute diarrhoeal episodes are self-limiting, the diagnosis and treatment of persistent diarrhoea (≥2 weeks) are cumbersome and require laboratory identification of the causative pathogen. Stool-based PCR assays have greatly improved the previously disappointing pathogen detection rates in high-income countries, but there is a paucity of quality data from tropical settings. We performed a case-control study to elucidate the spectrum of intestinal pathogens in patients with persistent diarrhoea and asymptomatic controls in southern Côte d'Ivoire. Stool samples from 68 patients and 68 controls were obtained and subjected to molecular multiplex testing with the Luminex(®) Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP), microscopy and rapid antigen detection tests for the diagnosis of diarrhoeagenic pathogens. Overall, 20 different bacteria, parasites and viruses were detected by the suite of diagnostic methods employed. At least one pathogen was observed in 84% of the participants, and co-infections were observed in >50% of the participants. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (32%), Giardia intestinalis (29%) and Shigella species (20%) were the predominant pathogens, and Strongyloides stercoralis (10%) was the most prevalent helminth. Pathogen frequencies and numbers of co-infections were similar in patients and controls. Although the Luminex(®) GPP detects a broad range of pathogens, microscopy for helminths and intestinal protozoa remains necessary to cover the full aetiological spectrum in tropical settings. We conclude that highly sensitive multiplex PCR assays constitute a useful screening tool, but that positive results might need to be confirmed by independent methods to discriminate active infection from asymptomatic faecal shedding of nucleic acids.

  3. Evaluation of a New Immunochromatographic Test Using Recombinant Antigen B8/1 for Diagnosis of Cystic Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Mary L.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Sako, Yashuito; Nkouawa, Agathe; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Sotomayor, Alfredo L.; Peralta, Julio E.; Valcarcel, Maria; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, Hector H.; Ito, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis (CE) is based on the identification of the cyst(s) by imaging, using immunodiagnostic tests mainly as complementary tools in clinical settings. Among the antigens used for immunodiagnosis, previous studies described a good performance of the recombinant antigen B8/1 (rAgB) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format; however, in remote parts of areas where the disease is endemic, the implementation of an ELISA is difficult, so a more simple, rapid, and reliable method such as the immunochromatographic test (ICT) is required. In this study, using a set of 50 serum samples from patients with surgically confirmed CE, we compared the performance of an ICT and that of an ELISA using the rAgB. The overall sensitivities of ICT and ELISA were not statistically different (78% versus 72%; P = 0.36). The overall agreement between both tests was moderate (κ = 0.41; P < 0.01). Concordance between ICT and ELISA was substantial or almost perfect for patients with liver involvement (κ = 0.65; P < 0.001) and patients with more than one hydatid cyst (κ = 0.82; P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, specificity analysis using a total of 88 serum samples from healthy individuals (n = 20) and patients (n = 68) with other parasitic infections revealed that ICT had a specificity of 89.8%. ICT and ELISA had similar performance for the detection of specific antibodies to E. granulosus, and ICT had a high specificity, opening the possibility of using ICT as a screening tool in rural settings. PMID:26447116

  4. Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite controversy about the benefits of routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, rates of participation continue to rise. It is important to ensure that men are fully informed about the potential risks associated with this test. Little is known about the processes of shared decision making for PSA testing in the family practice setting. This study aimed to explore men’s experiences of PSA testing participation and risk disclosure for PSA testing. Methods A cross-sectional survey of male family practice attendees aged 40 years or older, with no previous history of prostate cancer, between June 2010 and November 2011. Questions related to whether participants had undertaken PSA testing or discussed this with their doctor over the past 5 years, whether the patient or doctor had initiated the discussion, reasons for undergoing testing, and whether their doctor had discussed particular risks associated with PSA testing. Results Sixty-seven percent (215/320) of men recalled having a PSA test in the past five years. Of the respondents who reported not having a test, 14% had discussed it with their doctor. The main reasons for having a PSA test were doctor recommendation and wanting to keep up to date with health tests. Thirty-eight percent or fewer respondents reported being advised of each potential risk. Conclusions Despite debate over the benefits of routine PSA testing, a high proportion of male family practice attendees report undertaking this test. Risks associated with testing appear to be poorly disclosed by general practitioners. These results suggest the need to improve the quality of informed consent for PSA testing in the family practice setting. PMID:24321004

  5. False positive dengue NS1 antigen test in a traveller with an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gyurech, Danielle; Schilling, Julian; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Cassinotti, Pascal; Kaeppeli, Franz; Dobec, Marinko

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland by a traveller returning from Canoa Quebrada, Ceará state, in the north-eastern part of Brazil. Due to a false positive dengue virus NS1 antigen test, IgG antibody seroconversion and a suggestive clinical picture,an acute dengue fever was initially considered. However, because of lack of specific IgM-antibodies, stationary IgG antibody titre and a negative dengue virus PCR test result, a dengue virus infection was excluded and a cross-reaction with other, causative flaviviruses was postulated. Based on recent reports of Zika fever cases in the north-eastern parts of Brazil, an acute Zika virus infection was suspected. Because of a lack of commercially available Zika virus diagnostic tests, the case was confirmed in the WHO reference laboratory. As the clinical presentation of Zika virus infection can be confused with dengue fever and chikungunya fever, and because of possible public health implications, all patients returning from affected areas should be additionally tested for Zika virus. This case illustrates the urgent medical need for a broadly available assay capable of differentiating Zika from Dengue infections.

  6. Seroepidemiology of varicella-zoster virus in Korean adolescents and adults using fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen test.

    PubMed

    Han, S B; Kang, K R; Huh, D H; Lee, H C; Kim, J H; Kang, J H; Ma, S H

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional seroepidemiological study in 2012-2013 to determine the seroprevalence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in adolescents and adults living in Korea, where varicella vaccination has been recommended universally at age 12-15 months since 2005. Residual serum samples were collected from 1196 healthy adults and adolescents aged ⩾10 years between November 2012 and March 2013. The fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen (FAMA) test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to determine the seroprevalence of VZV. The seroprevalences of VZV were compared between six age groups: 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, and ⩾60 years. The seroprevalence of VZV in the entire study cohort was 99·1% according to the FAMA test and 93·1% as determined by ELISA. The seroprevalences of the six age groups were as follows: 96·0%, 99·5%, 99·5%, 99·5%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, by the FAMA test, and 83·3%, 93·0%, 93·0%, 97·5%, 94·5%, and 97·5%, respectively, by ELISA. Seroprevalence increased significantly with age (P < 0·001); moreover, the seroprevalence in subjects aged 10-19 years was significantly lower than in other age groups (P < 0·001), as measured by both the FAMA test and ELISA. Thus, strategies to increase protective immunity against VZV in teenagers are necessary.

  7. Evaluation of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) membrane test assays for the forensic identification of seminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Rudin, O; Gehrig, C; Borer, U; Thali, M; Dirnhofer, R

    1999-09-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA, also known as p30), a glycoprotein produced by the prostatic gland and secreted into seminal plasma, is a marker used for demonstrating the presence of seminal fluid. Methods for the detection of PSA include Ouchterlony double diffusion, crossover electrophoresis, rocket immuno-electrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion, and ELISA. The extremely sensitive ELISA technique can detect PSA in concentrations as low as approximately 4 ng/mL. However, all these techniques are cumbersome and time consuming to perform in forensic laboratories, especially when only a few samples per week are processed. Various membrane tests are currently used in clinical settings to screen a patient's serum for the presence of PSA at levels greater than 4 ng/mL. In this study we evaluated three immunochromatographic PSA membrane tests by analyzing semen stains stored at room temperature for up to 30 years, post-coital vaginal swabs taken at different time after intercourse, semen-free vaginal swabs, and various female and male body fluids, including urine. The data demonstrate that PSA membrane test assays offer the same sensitivity as ELISA-based tests and provide a rapid approach for the forensic identification of seminal fluid. Furthermore, when the supernatant from a DNA extraction is used for the assay, there is essentially no DNA consumption for determining the presence of PSA in a forensic sample.

  8. R-ELISA: repeated use of antigen-coated plates for ELISA and its application for testing of antibodies to HIV and other pathogens.

    PubMed

    Baunoch, D A; Das, P; Browning, M E; Hari, V

    1992-03-01

    In this paper we report on the evaluation of several procedures that allow for the repeated use of an antigen-coated, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plate for enzyme immunoassay (EIA). We have shown that antigen-coated ELISA plates that were incubated once with an aqueous solution containing 8 M urea, 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2% mercaptoethanol, after an EIA, can be reused again for EIA without loss of antigenic capacity. Thus, in this procedure, after an EIA, the ELISA plates were washed once with the above solution and then in a buffer containing 20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, 0.1% Tween 20 and 500 mM NaCl. This washing protocol was shown to remove the primary antibody, enzyme-conjugated secondary antibody and substrate without removing the antigen from the ELISA plate microwells. Thus, an antigen-coated ELISA plate previously used for an assay could be reused. We tested this repeat ELISA (R-ELISA) procedure on high antigen-binding ELISA plates coated with two different plant virus proteins, a synthetic peptide, the p25/24 gag and the gp120 proteins of the human immuno-deficiency virus, or the staphylococcus enterotoxin protein. In each case tested, the procedure allowed for the repeated use of the same antigen-coated plates for EIA of the respective antibodies. This procedure should prove to be particularly valuable for mass screening of samples tested for HIV and other disease-causing agents. PMID:1571153

  9. Discriminating antigen and non-antigen using proteome dissimilarity: bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Flower, Darren R

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that immunogenicity results from the overall dissimilarity of pathogenic proteins versus the host proteome. We have sought to use this concept to discriminate between antigens and non-antigens of bacterial origin. Sets of 100 known antigenic and nonantigenic peptide sequences from bacteria were compared to human and mouse proteomes. Both antigenic and non-antigenic sequences lacked human or mouse homologues. Observed distributions were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. The statistical null hypothesis was accepted, indicating that antigen and non-antigens did not differ significantly. Likewise, we were unable to determine a threshold able to separate meaningfully antigen from non-antigen. Thus, antigens cannot be predicted from pathogen genomes based solely on their dissimilarity to the human genome. PMID:20975907

  10. Evaluation of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards as sampling devices for detection of rotavirus in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Tam, Ka Ian; Esona, Mathew D; Williams, Alice; Ndze, Valantine N; Boula, Angeline; Bowen, Michael D

    2015-09-15

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are available and rotavirus surveillance is carried out to assess vaccination impact. In surveillance studies, stool samples are stored typically at 4°C or frozen to maintain sample quality. Uninterrupted cold storage is a problem in developing countries because of power interruptions. Cold-chain transportation of samples from collection sites to testing laboratories is costly. In this study, we evaluated the use of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards for storage and transportation of samples for virus isolation, EIA, and RT-PCR testing. Infectious rotavirus was recovered after 30 days of storage on Sensi-Discs™ at room temperature. We were able to genotype 98-99% of samples stored on Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards at temperatures ranging from -80°C to 37°C up to 180 days. A field sampling test using samples prepared and shipped from Cameroon, showed that both matrices yielded 100% genotyping success compared with whole stool and Sensi-Discs™ demonstrated 95% concordance with whole stool in EIA testing. The utilization of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards for stool sample storage and shipment has the potential to have great impact on global public health by facilitating surveillance and epidemiological investigations of rotavirus strains worldwide at a reduced cost.

  11. A five-country evaluation of a point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen urine assay for the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Colley, Daniel G; Binder, Sue; Campbell, Carl; King, Charles H; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Erko, Berhanu; Karanja, Diana M S; Kabatereine, Narcis B; van Lieshout, Lisette; Rathbun, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated a commercial point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) test for assessing Schistosoma mansoni infection prevalence in areas at risk. Overall, 4,405 school-age children in Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda provided urine for POC-CCA testing and stool for Kato-Katz assays. By latent class analysis, one POC-CCA test was more sensitive (86% versus 62%) but less specific (72% versus ~100%) than multiple Kato-Katz smears from one stool. However, only 1% of POC-CCA tests in a non-endemic area were false positives, suggesting the latent class analysis underestimated the POC-CCA specificity. Multivariable modeling estimated POC-CCA as significantly more sensitive than Kato-Katz at low infection intensities (< 100 eggs/gram stool). By linear regression, 72% prevalence among 9-12 year olds by POC-CCA corresponded to 50% prevalence by Kato-Katz, whereas 46% POC-CCA prevalence corresponded to 10% Kato-Katz prevalence. We conclude that one urine POC-CCA test can replace Kato-Katz testing for community-level S. mansoni prevalence mapping.

  12. Risk of underdiagnosing amebic dysentery due to false-negative Entamoeba histolytica antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Escamilla, Pilar; Solé, Roser; Llovet, Teresa; Soriano, Germán; Muñoz, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica antigen assays on stool are widely used to diagnose amebiasis. We report a case of confirmed amebic colitis with a false-negative antigen detection that became positive after treatment. Our results indicate that these assays may underdiagnose acute amebic infection when used alone and should be used cautiously.

  13. STUDIES IN THE SEROLOGY OF SYPHILIS : III. EXPLANATION OF THE FORTIFYING EFFECT OF CHOLESTERIN UPON THE ANTIGEN AS USED IN THE WASSERMANN AND FLOCCULATION TESTS.

    PubMed

    Eagle, H

    1930-10-31

    :1, when there is not sufficient antigen to act as an efficient protective colloid. Cholesterin therefore causes a coarsened dispersion of antigen by forming a relatively large nucleus upon which antigen is adsorbed. As shown in the text, the larger the antigen particle the greater is its avidity for reagin per unit surface or mass. Thus, the coarse sol formed by dropping water-into-antigen is about twice as efficient as a finely dispersed antigen-into-water sol of the same concentration. The coarsened dispersion caused by cholesterin completely explains the greater sensitivity of the cholesterinized antigen in complement fixation. The same factor obtains in the flocculation reactions. In addition, the coarsened dispersion acts as a preliminary quasi-aggregation, facilitating by just so much the subsequent formation of visible clumps (or sedimenting aggregates) upon the addition of syphilitic serum; moreover, there is less surface in a coarse sol, with more reagin per unit surface, and correspondingly more efficient flocculation. The foregoing would be of purely academic interest were it not for the following considerations. From several points of view cholesterin is unsatisfactory as a sensitizer for antigen. Its solubility in alcohol is small. Even the 0.6 per cent concentration used in the Kahn test is difficult to keep in solution. Yet, as our experiments show, its sensitizing action increases indefinitely with its concentration. If it were sufficiently soluble, even 3 per cent could be used to advantage, increasing the sensitivity of 1(1/2) per cent antigen for complement fixation some 200 to 400 per cent, instead of about 50 per cent, as does 0.2 per cent cholesterin. Since, as we have shown, the sensitizing action of cholesterin upon antigen is due solely to the coarse dispersion it causes, and since it is quite inert during the actual combination of the lipoid particles with reagin, it can be replaced by any substance with similar physical properties. The problem

  14. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Penney, Carla; Porter, Robert; O'Brien, Mary; Daley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18-24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = -11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  15. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18–24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = −11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  16. 6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. PROTRUSION ON UPPER RIGHT HAND SIDE OF LUT IS SWING ARM NINE WHICH PROVIDED ACCESS TO CAPSULE OF LAUNCH VEHICLE WHILE ON LAUNCHER. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  17. Serological tests in leprosy. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of ELISA tests based on phenolic glycolipid antigens, and the implications for their use in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Burgess, P J; Fine, P E; Ponnighaus, J M; Draper, C

    1988-08-01

    This paper examines the sensitivity and specificity of two ELISA assays for IgM antibodies to Mycobacterium leprae, one employing natural phenolic glycolipid and the other employing a synthetic disaccharide glycoconjugate as antigen. Estimates of sensitivity and specificity are derived, based on a panel of sera from leprosy cases in Malawi and various non-leprosy controls from the UK. Though both assays were able to identify a high proportion of multibacillary patients, neither was able to detect a high proportion of paucibacillary patients without considerable loss of specificity. The implications of the inverse relationship between sensitivity and specificity are discussed with reference to the predictive value of such tests in such areas as Malawi, where the large majority of cases are paucibacillary.

  18. Relationship of phospholipid chemistry to serological reactivity in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory slide test antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, M W; McGrew, B E; McLaurin, B; Pine, L

    1981-01-01

    A total of 13 egg lecithins, 12 beef heart lecithins, and 15 beef heart cardiolipins were assayed for the ability to function in the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory microflocculation test, as well as for purity, fatty acid composition, free amines, metals, and products of oxidation. We found that the presence of peroxides and oxidation-related ultraviolet-absorbing chromophores showed a close inverse relationship to acceptable serological activity. The degree of purity of the lipids had only a slight influence on serological activity, whereas fatty acid composition, saturation, and configuration had none at all. We did not detect contaminating iron, copper, cobalt, nickel, or free amines in these lipids. We discuss the implications of our findings for improving the chemical standards for these lipids. Images PMID:7263853

  19. Generation of a Recombinant Gag Virus-Like-Particle Panel for the Evaluation of p24 Antigen Detection by Diagnostic HIV Tests

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Beatrice N.; Orlowski, Vanessa; Fransen, Katrien; Niederhauser, Christoph; Aubert, Vincent; Brandenberger, Marcel; Ciardo, Diana; Dollenmaier, Günter; Klimkait, Thomas; Regenass, Stephan; Schmid, Patrick; Schottstedt, Volkmar; Suter-Riniker, Franziska; Yerly, Sabine; Shah, Cyril; Böni, Jürg; Schüpbach, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen permits early identification of primary HIV infection and timely intervention to limit further spread of the infection. Principally, HIV screening should equally detect all viral variants, but reagents for a standardised test evaluation are limited. Therefore, we aimed to create an inexhaustible panel of diverse HIV-1 p24 antigens. Methods We generated a panel of 43 recombinantly expressed virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the structural Gag proteins of HIV-1 subtypes A-H and circulating recombinant forms (CRF) CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, CRF12_BF, CRF20_BG and group O. Eleven 4th generation antigen/antibody tests and five antigen-only tests were evaluated for their ability to detect VLPs diluted in human plasma to p24 concentrations equivalent to 50, 10 and 2 IU/ml of the WHO p24 standard. Three tests were also evaluated for their ability to detect p24 after heat-denaturation for immune-complex disruption, a pre-requisite for ultrasensitive p24 detection. Results Our VLP panel exhibited an average intra-clade p24 diversity of 6.7%. Among the 4th generation tests, the Abbott Architect and Siemens Enzygnost Integral 4 had the highest sensitivity of 97.7% and 93%, respectively. Alere Determine Combo and BioRad Access were least sensitive with 10.1% and 40.3%, respectively. Antigen-only tests were slightly more sensitive than combination tests. Almost all tests detected the WHO HIV-1 p24 standard at a concentration of 2 IU/ml, but their ability to detect this input for different subtypes varied greatly. Heat-treatment lowered overall detectability of HIV-1 p24 in two of the three tests, but only few VLPs had a more than 3-fold loss in p24 detection. Conclusions The HIV-1 Gag subtype panel has a broad diversity and proved useful for a standardised evaluation of the detection limit and breadth of subtype detection of p24 antigen-detecting tests. Several tests exhibited problems, particularly with non-B subtypes. PMID:25343245

  20. Strong-LAMP: A LAMP Assay for Strongyloides spp. Detection in Stool and Urine Samples. Towards the Diagnosis of Human Strongyloidiasis Starting from a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gandasegui, Javier; Bajo Santos, Cristina; López-Abán, Julio; Saugar, José María; Rodríguez, Esperanza; Vicente, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis, the chief causative agent of human strongyloidiasis, is a nematode globally distributed but mainly endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. Chronic infection is often clinically asymptomatic but it can result in severe hyperinfection syndrome or disseminated strongyloidiasis in immunocompromised patients. There is a great diversity of techniques used in diagnosing the disease, but definitive diagnosis is accomplished by parasitological examination of stool samples for morphological identification of parasite. Until now, no molecular method has been tested in urine samples as an alternative to stool samples for diagnosing strongyloidiasis. This study aimed to evaluate the use of a new molecular LAMP assay in a well-established Wistar rat experimental infection model using both stool and, for the first time, urine samples. The LAMP assay was also clinically evaluated in patients´ stool samples. Methodology/Principal Findings Stool and urine samples were obtained daily during a 28-day period from rats infected subcutaneously with different infective third-stage larvae doses of S. venezuelensis. The dynamics of parasite infection was determined by daily counting the number of eggs per gram of feces from day 1 to 28 post-infection. A set of primers for LAMP assay based on a DNA partial sequence in the 18S rRNA gene from S. venezuelensis was designed. The set up LAMP assay (namely, Strong-LAMP) allowed the sensitive detection of S. venezuelensis DNA in both stool and urine samples obtained from each infection group of rats and was also effective in S. stercoralis DNA amplification in patients´ stool samples with previously confirmed strongyloidiasis by parasitological and real-time PCR tests. Conclusions/Significance Our Strong-LAMP assay is an useful molecular tool in research of a strongyloidiasis experimental infection model in both stool and urine samples. After further validation, the Strong-LAMP could also be potentially

  1. Diagnostic microRNA markers to screen for sporadic human colon cancer in stool: I. Proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E; Ahmed, Nancy C; Vos, Paul W; Bonnerup, Chris; Atkins, James N; Casey, Michelle; Nuovo, Gerard J; Naziri, Wade; Wiley, John E; Mota, Helvecio; Allison, Ron R

    2013-01-01

    R-222 and miR-938) had decreased expression in the stool of patients with colon cancer, which was also more pronounced from early to later TNM stages. Results from colon mucosal tissues were similar to those from stool samples, although with more apparent changes in expression. Cytological studies on purified stool colonocytes that employed Giemsa staining showed 80% sensitivity for detecting tumor cells in stool smears. The performance characteristics of the test confirmed that stool is a medium well-suited for colon cancer screening, and that the quantitative changes in the expression of few mature miRNA molecules in stool associated with colon cancer progression provided for more sensitive and specific non-invasive diagnostic markers than tests currently available on the market. Thus, a larger prospective and properly randomized validation study of control individuals and patients exhibiting various stages of colon cancer progression (TNM stages 0-IV) is now needed in order to standardize test conditions, and provide a means for determining the true sensitivity and specificity of a miRNA screening approach in stool for the non-invasive detection of colon cancer, particularly at an early stage (0-I). Eventually, we will develop a chip to enhance molecular screening for colon cancer, as has been accomplished for the detection of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) in foods. PMID:23741026

  2. A Protein-Conjugate Approach to Develop a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Antigen Detection Test for the Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Kailash P.; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L.; Rolán, Hortensia G.; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsolis, Renee M.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize a monoclonal antibody-based assay to detect Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide in blood by conjugating B. melitensis LPS to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an immunogenic protein carrier to maximize IgG affinity of monoclonal antibodies. A panel of specific of monoclonal antibodies was obtained that recognized both B. melitensis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes. An antigen capture assay was developed that detected B. melitensis in the blood of experimentally infected mice and, in a pilot study, in naturally infected Peruvian subjects. As a proof of principle, a majority (7/10) of the patients with positive blood cultures had B. melitensis lipopolysaccharide detected in the initial blood specimen obtained. One of 10 patients with relapsed brucellosis and negative blood culture had a positive serum antigen test. No seronegative/blood culture negative patients had a positive serum antigen test. Analysis of the pair of monoclonal antibodies (2D1, 2E8) used in the capture ELISA for potential cross-reactivity in the detection of lipopolysaccharides of E. coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica O9 showed specificity for Brucella lipopolysaccharide. This new approach to develop antigen-detection monoclonal antibodies against a T cell-independent polysaccharide antigen based on immunogenic protein conjugation may lead to the production of improved rapid point-of-care-deployable assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis and other infectious diseases. PMID:24901521

  3. Reassessment of the Role of Rapid Antigen Detection Tests in Diagnosis of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gazzano, Vincent; Berger, Anne; Benito, Yvonne; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Tristan, Anne; Boisset, Sandrine; Carricajo, Anne; Poyart, Claire; Vandenesch, François

    2016-01-01

    Rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for group A streptococci (GAS) are widely used for diagnosing acute pharyngitis, which has led to a considerable reduction in antibiotic prescriptions over the past decade. Beyond this intended use, their reassessment on invasive samples may be relevant in the management of life-threatening GAS infections. To this end, we evaluated the performances of three RADTs, culture, GAS PCR, and 16S rRNA gene PCR assays, and compared them with a composite gold standard (GAS-PCR assay and/or culture) for the diagnosis of severe GAS infection. A total of 192 specimens from deep-tissue (mostly normally sterile) sites enriched for 75 GAS-positive samples were enrolled in the study. The three evaluated RADTs showed sensitivities ranging from 88.0% to 94.7% versus 98.7% for GAS PCR, 84% for 16S rRNA gene PCR, and 77.3% for culture. The sensitivities of the ImmunoCard STAT! Strep A test (Meridian Bioscience) and the NADAL Strep A strip (Nal Von Minden) were similar to that of GAS PCR (P = 0.25 and 0.03, respectively) and higher than that of culture (P = 0.001 and 0.006, respectively), whereas the SD Bioline Strep A test strip (Standard Diagnostics) showed a performance similar to that of culture (P = 0.02). The three RADTs detected 10 distinct emm types, including a predominance of emm 1 (33.3%), emm 89 (10.6%), and emm 12 (7.6%). No false-positive results were observed, leading to a specificity of 100% for all the evaluated RADTs. The GAS RADTs turned out to be sensitive, specific, and easy-to-use tools that may aid in the management of invasive GAS infections in 24/7 point-of-care laboratories by enabling early diagnosis and focused therapy. PMID:26818671

  4. Reassessment of the Role of Rapid Antigen Detection Tests in Diagnosis of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections.

    PubMed

    Gazzano, Vincent; Berger, Anne; Benito, Yvonne; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Tristan, Anne; Boisset, Sandrine; Carricajo, Anne; Poyart, Claire; Vandenesch, François; Descours, Ghislaine

    2016-04-01

    Rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for group A streptococci (GAS) are widely used for diagnosing acute pharyngitis, which has led to a considerable reduction in antibiotic prescriptions over the past decade. Beyond this intended use, their reassessment on invasive samples may be relevant in the management of life-threatening GAS infections. To this end, we evaluated the performances of three RADTs, culture, GAS PCR, and 16S rRNA gene PCR assays, and compared them with a composite gold standard (GAS-PCR assay and/or culture) for the diagnosis of severe GAS infection. A total of 192 specimens from deep-tissue (mostly normally sterile) sites enriched for 75 GAS-positive samples were enrolled in the study. The three evaluated RADTs showed sensitivities ranging from 88.0% to 94.7% versus 98.7% for GAS PCR, 84% for 16S rRNA gene PCR, and 77.3% for culture. The sensitivities of the ImmunoCardSTAT! Strep A test (Meridian Bioscience) and the NADAL Strep A strip (Nal Von Minden) were similar to that of GAS PCR (P= 0.25 and 0.03, respectively) and higher than that of culture (P= 0.001 and 0.006, respectively), whereas the SD Bioline Strep A test strip (Standard Diagnostics) showed a performance similar to that of culture (P= 0.02). The three RADTs detected 10 distinctemmtypes, including a predominance ofemm1 (33.3%),emm89 (10.6%), andemm12 (7.6%). No false-positive results were observed, leading to a specificity of 100% for all the evaluated RADTs. The GAS RADTs turned out to be sensitive, specific, and easy-to-use tools that may aid in the management of invasive GAS infections in 24/7 point-of-care laboratories by enabling early diagnosis and focused therapy. PMID:26818671

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Alone and Compared to Urinary Antigen Testing for Detection of Legionella spp.: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Green, Hefziba; Steinmetz, Tali; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease (LD) is based on the isolation of Legionella spp., a 4-fold rise in antibodies, a positive urinary antigen (UA), or direct immunofluorescence tests. PCR is not accepted as a diagnostic tool for LD. This systematic review assesses the diagnostic accuracy of PCR in various clinical samples with a direct comparison versus UA. We included prospective or retrospective cohort and case-control studies. Studies were included if they used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention consensus definition criteria of LD or a similar one, assessed only patients with clinical pneumonia, and reported data for all true-positive, false-positive, true-negative, and false-negative results. Two reviewers abstracted data independently. Risk of bias was assessed using Quadas-2. Summary sensitivity and specificity values were estimated using a bivariate model and reported with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Thirty-eight studies were included. A total of 653 patients had confirmed LD, and 3,593 patients had pneumonia due to other pathogens. The methodological quality of the studies as assessed by the Quadas-2 tool was poor to fair. The summary sensitivity and specificity values for diagnosis of LD in respiratory samples were 97.4% (95% CI, 91.1% to 99.2%) and 98.6% (95% CI, 97.4% to 99.3%), respectively. These results were mainly unchanged by any covariates tested and subgroup analysis. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was much better than that of UA. Compared to UA, PCR in respiratory samples (especially in sputum samples or swabs) revealed a significant advantage in sensitivity and an additional diagnosis of 18% to 30% of LD cases. The diagnostic performance of PCR in respiratory samples was excellent and preferable to that of the UA. Results were independent on the covariate tested. PCR in respiratory samples should be regarded as a valid tool for the diagnosis of LD. PMID:26659202

  6. Collaborative evaluation of antigen detection by a commercial latex agglutination test and enzyme immunoassay in the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, C; St-Germain, G; Vincelette, J; Kaufman, L; de Repentigny, L

    1990-01-01

    The Cand-Tec Candida detection system and enzyme immunoassay for serum mannan were retrospectively compared in a controlled collaborative evaluation of antigen detection in 32 patients with candidiasis proven by biopsy or culture from a normally sterile site and with sera drawn within 7 days of inclusion. With a threshold titer of 1/8, which excluded false-positive results in 17 hospitalized patients without candidiasis, sensitivities for all 32 patients with candidiasis were 44% for the Cand-Tec assay and 17% for the enzyme immunoassay. Both assays provided greater sensitivity when sera were drawn within 24 h of inclusion in the study and in the category of patients with invasive candidiasis (57% by Cand-Tec and 33% by enzyme immunoassay). The Cand-Tec assay gave false-positive results (titer, greater than or equal to 1/8) in 4 of 6 patients with transient candidemia, in 1 of 20 otherwise healthy patients with rheumatoid factor, and in 1 patient with a positive cryptococcal latex agglutination test. Three serum specimens from 3 of 32 patients with candidiasis contained rheumatoid factor and gave titers of greater than or equal to 1/8 by the Cand-Tec assay. Detection of serum mannan by enzyme immunoassay was less sensitive but more specific than the Cand-Tec Candida detection system for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. PMID:2179258

  7. Clinical relevance of total HCV core antigen testing for hepatitis C monitoring and for predicting patients' response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Maynard, M; Pradat, P; Berthillon, P; Picchio, G; Voirin, N; Martinot, M; Marcellin, P; Trepo, C

    2003-07-01

    To study the correlation between total Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core antigen (Ag) and HCV-RNA, and to assess the proficiency of HCV Core Ag testing in monitoring and predicting virologic response during and after pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin combination therapy. A total of 307 samples from treated and untreated patients were used to assess the correlation between the total HCV Core Ag test and quantitative HCV-RNA assays (Superquant, and Quantiplex branched DNA 2.0 assay). Twenty-four patients received combination therapy for 48 weeks. Blood samples were collected at day 0, and week 2, 4, 12, 24, 48 and 72 for virologic evaluation. A linear relation exists between total HCV Core Ag and HCV-RNA levels. At 3 months the positive predictive value (PPV) of response to therapy was 100% with either HCV Core Ag or HCV-RNA. For HCV Core Ag the negative predictive value (NPV) was 100% whereas for HCV-RNA the NPV was 80% (P > 0.05). At month 1, the PPV was 95% and 100% when determined by HCV Core Ag and HCV-RNA, respectively. The NPV value was 100% for HCV Core Ag and 33% for HCV-RNA (P = 0.005). HCV Core Ag quantification could be useful in clinical practice to predict a sustained virological response early during therapy (4 weeks), reaching an optimal performance at month 3. The determination of total HCV Core Ag levels in serum, constitutes an accurate and reliable alternative to HCV-RNA for monitoring and predicting treatment outcome in patients receiving PEG-IFN/Ribavirin combination therapy.

  8. A Rapid Diagnostic Test for Toxoplasmosis using Recombinant Antigenic N-terminal Half of SAG1 Linked with Intrinsically Unstructured Domain of GRA2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyoung Ju; Yang, Zhaoshou; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Kyung Chan; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite with a broad host range of most warm-blooded mammals including humans, of which one-thirds of the human population has been infected worldwide which can cause congenital defects, abortion, and neonatal complications. Here, we developed a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for T. gondii infection. Antigenic N-terminal half of the major surface antigen (SAG1) was linked with intrinsically unstructured domain (IUD) of dense granule protein 2 (GRA2). The recombinant GST-GRA2-SAG1A protein was successfully expressed and purified as 51 kDa of molecular weight. Furthermore, antigenicity and solubility of the rGST-GRA2-SAG1A protein were significantly increased. The overall specificity and sensitivity of GST-GRA2-SAG1A loaded RDT (TgRDT) were estimated as 100% and 97.1% by comparing with ELISA result which uses T. gondii whole cell lysates as the antigen. The TgRDT tested with Uganda people sera for field trial and showed 31.9% of seroprevalence against T. gondii antibody. The TgRDT is proved to be a kit for rapid and easy to use with high accuracy, which would be a suitable serodiagnostic tool for toxoplasmosis. PMID:24327774

  9. Rapid identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae in blood cultures by using the ImmuLex, Slidex and Wellcogen latex agglutination tests and the BinaxNOW antigen test.

    PubMed

    Altun, O; Athlin, S; Almuhayawi, M; Strålin, K; Özenci, V

    2016-04-01

    Rapid identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae in blood culture (BC) bottles is important for early directed antimicrobial therapy in pneumococcal bacteraemia. We evaluated a new latex agglutination (LA) test on BC bottles, the ImmuLex™ S. pneumoniae Omni (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark), and compared the performance with the Slidex® pneumo-Kit (bioMérieux, France) and the Wellcogen™ S. pneumoniae (Remel, UK) LA tests, as well as the BinaxNOW® S. pneumoniae (Alere, USA) antigen test. The four tests were directly applied on 358 positive BC bottles with Gram-positive cocci in pairs or chains and on 15 negative bottles. Valid test results were recorded in all cases for ImmuLex and BinaxNOW and in 88.5 % (330/373) and 94.1 % (351/373) of cases for Slidex and Wellcogen, respectively. Based on bottles positive for S. pneumoniae by conventional methods, the sensitivity of ImmuLex was 99.6 %, similar to the other tests (range, 99.6-100 %). Based on bottles positive for non-pneumococcal pathogens, the specificity of ImmuLex was 82.6 %, in comparison to 97.6 % for Slidex (p < 0.01) and 85.4 % for Wellcogen (p = ns). The BinaxNOW test had a lower specificity (64.1 %) than any LA test (p < 0.01). On BC bottles positive for α-haemolytic streptococci, ImmuLex was positive in 12/67 (17.9 %) cases, Slidex in 2/59 (3.4 %) cases, Wellcogen in 11/64 (17.2 %) cases and BinaxNOW in 25/67 (37.3 %) cases. In conclusion, the ImmuLex test provides a valid and sensitive technique for the rapid detection of S. pneumoniae in BC bottles, similar to the other compared methods. However, the specificity was sub-optimal, since the test may cross-react with other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26796552

  10. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also be used as a marker for medullary thyroid cancer and cancers of the rectum, lung , ... ulcerative colitis , rectal polyps , emphysema , and benign breast disease. ^ Back to top Proudly sponsored by ... Learn more ...

  11. Histocompatibility antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the surface of almost all cells in the human body. HLAs are found in large amounts on the surface of white blood cells. They help the immune system tell the difference between body tissue and substances ...

  12. Are antigen test kits efficient for detecting heartworm-infected dogs at the southern distribution limit of the parasite in South America? Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, D; Fontanarrosa, M F; Eiras, D F

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of commercial heartworm antigen tests in dogs harbouring Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae near its distribution limit in South America. A total of 4934 blood samples of adult dogs from Southern Greater Buenos Aires were examined to detect circulating microfilariae in the buffy coat interface between December 2005 and April 2006. Microfilariae were detected in 88 (1.8%) blood samples and all the microfilariae observed were identified as D. immitis by acid phosphatase stain technique. In a first trial, 69 (78.4%) out of the 88 serum were positive by Speed((R)) Diro. Then, a new test was performed over 25 microfilariae-positive serum samples randomly selected among the 88 previously tested samples and using simultaneously Speed((R)) Diro, Witness((R)) Dirofilaria and Snap((R)) 3dx. This second trial showed identical results for the three different tests, in which 19 (76%) samples were positive. Therefore, more than 20% of microfilaremic dogs were antigen negative. The main hypothesis that could explain our finding is a low worm burden in the study area. According to our preliminary results, it is highly recommendable the complementary use of antigen tests and other procedures to obtain an accurate diagnostic near the distribution limit of the parasite.

  13. Effect of dilution of stool soluble component on growth and development of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Anamnart, Witthaya; Intapan, Pewpan Maleewong; Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Chamavit, Pennapa; Kaewsawat, Supreecha; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion or dilution of stool by water from heavy rainfall may affect Strongyloides stercoralis free-living development producing infective filariform larvae (FL). This study examined effect of water dilution of stool on survival of S. stercoralis free-living development. One g of stool was prepared in water so that its soluble component was diluted sequentially from 1:2 to 1:480. Three dishes were used to compare FL production in three culture conditions: stool suspension, stool sediment deposited in soil, and isolated rhabditiform larvae (RhL) deposited in soil. The fourth dish was for developmental observation of RhL into free-living stages. Numerous FL were generated from undiluted or 1:2 diluted stool and stool sediment placed on soil. However, starting from dilution 1:5, FL production continuously decreased in both stool suspensions and stool sediments placed on soil. RhL isolated from stool dilutions placed on soil gave rise to few FL. Worm mating were seen at 24-30 hours in dilutions 1:20-1:120 only. Highest numbers of FL from indirect free-living cycle were 1/3 of those from control. FL production decreased as stool dilution increased, and reached zero production at 1:160 dilution. Rainfall may disperse or dilute stool so that nutritional supplement for S. stercoralis free-living development is insufficient.

  14. Effect of dilution of stool soluble component on growth and development of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Anamnart, Witthaya; Intapan, Pewpan Maleewong; Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Chamavit, Pennapa; Kaewsawat, Supreecha; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion or dilution of stool by water from heavy rainfall may affect Strongyloides stercoralis free-living development producing infective filariform larvae (FL). This study examined effect of water dilution of stool on survival of S. stercoralis free-living development. One g of stool was prepared in water so that its soluble component was diluted sequentially from 1:2 to 1:480. Three dishes were used to compare FL production in three culture conditions: stool suspension, stool sediment deposited in soil, and isolated rhabditiform larvae (RhL) deposited in soil. The fourth dish was for developmental observation of RhL into free-living stages. Numerous FL were generated from undiluted or 1:2 diluted stool and stool sediment placed on soil. However, starting from dilution 1:5, FL production continuously decreased in both stool suspensions and stool sediments placed on soil. RhL isolated from stool dilutions placed on soil gave rise to few FL. Worm mating were seen at 24-30 hours in dilutions 1:20-1:120 only. Highest numbers of FL from indirect free-living cycle were 1/3 of those from control. FL production decreased as stool dilution increased, and reached zero production at 1:160 dilution. Rainfall may disperse or dilute stool so that nutritional supplement for S. stercoralis free-living development is insufficient. PMID:26035061

  15. Usefulness of PCR and Antigen Latex Agglutination Test with Samples Obtained by Transthoracic Needle Aspiration for Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    García, Amparo; Rosón, Beatriz; Pérez, José Luis; Verdaguer, Ricard; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi; Casanova, Aurora; Manresa, Frederic; Gudiol, Francesc

    1999-01-01

    In a large number of cases, the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not established. Some cases are probably caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) culture has a limited sensitivity which might be improved by antigen detection or gene amplification techniques. We evaluated the capacity of a PCR assay and a latex agglutination test to detect S. pneumoniae in samples obtained by TNA from 95 patients with moderate-to-severe CAP. Latex agglutination and PCR had sensitivities of 52.2 and 91.3%, specificities of 88.7 and 83.3%, positive predictive values of 62.3 and 65.6%, and negative predictive values of 83.3 and 96.5%, respectively, when culture techniques were used as the “gold standard.” When we considered expanded criteria for the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia as a standard for our calculations, latex agglutination and PCR had sensitivities of 53.6 and 89.7%, specificities of 93.0 and 90.0%, positive predictive values of 78.9 and 81.3%, and negative predictive values of 80.3 and 94.7%, respectively. The additional diagnosis provided by the PCR assay compared to latex agglutination was 12.2% (95% confidence interval of the difference from 0.4 to 20.1%). PCR was more sensitive than TNA culture, particularly in patients who had received prior antibiotic therapy (83.3 versus 33.3%). Although PCR is a very sensitive and specific technique, it has not proved to be cost-effective in clinical practice. Conversely, latex agglutination is a fast and simple method whose results might have significant implications for initial antibiotic therapy. PMID:9986837

  16. Specificity of the rapid rK39 antigen-based immunochromatographic test Kalazar Detect(r) in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Molinet, Félix Javier León; Ampuero, Julia Sonia; Costa, Rodrigo Diniz; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the specificity of a rapid immunochromatographic test that was developed to detect antibodies against the rK39 antigen for the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). This evaluation was performed using sera from patients with a confirmed diagnosis of active cutaneous leishmaniasis. The sera from 272 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of localised cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) who resided in an area endemic for Leishmania braziliensis in Brazil were obtained before the initiation of antileishmanial treatment. Kalazar Detect(r)(InBios, Seattle, WA) recombinant K39 antigen-based immunochromatographic strips were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. The test results were evaluated independently by two examiners in sequential order. The positive controls for the test included five serum samples from five patients with parasitologically confirmed diagnosis of VL caused by Leishmania infantum in Brazil. Overall, 100% of the samples obtained from patients with CL were negative, confirming the absence of a serological cross-reaction for individuals with cutaneous disease when these patients were evaluated using the rapid test. The lack of a cross-reaction in patients who were infected by parasites of the same genus highlights the specificity of the rK39 antigen for the diagnosis of VL in areas with the sympatric circulation of L. braziliensis and L. infantum.

  17. Preparation and diagnostic utility of a hemagglutination inhibition test antigen derived from the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kye, Soo-Jeong; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Kim, Saeromi; Seul, Hee-Jung; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (rHN) protein from Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with hemagglutination (HA) activity was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells using a baculovirus expression system. The rHN protein extracted from infected cells was used as an antigen in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection and titration of NDV-specific antibodies present in chicken sera. The rHN antigen produced high HA titers of 2(13) per 25 μL, which were similar to those of the NDV antigen produced using chicken eggs, and it remained stable without significant loss of the HA activity for at least 12 weeks at 4°C. The rHN-based HI assay specifically detected NDV antibodies, but not the sera of other avian pathogens, with a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 98.0%, respectively, in known positive and negative chicken sera (n = 430). Compared with an NDV-based HI assay, the rHN-based HI assay had a relative sensitivity and specificity of 96.1% and 95.5%, respectively, when applied to field chicken sera. The HI titers of the rHN-based HI assay were highly correlated with those in an NDV-based HI assay (r = 0.927). Overall, these results indicate that rHN protein provides a useful alternative to NDV antigen in HI assays.

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of a Urine Circulating Anodic Antigen Test for the Diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium in Low Endemic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Stefanie; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.; Koukounari, Artemis; Cercamondi, Colin I.; Ame, Shaali M.; Ali, Said M.; de Dood, Claudia J.; Mohammed, Khalfan A.; Utzinger, Jürg; Rollinson, David; van Dam, Govert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Elimination of schistosomiasis as a public health problem and interruption of transmission in selected areas are key goals of the World Health Organization for 2025. Conventional parasitological methods are insensitive for the detection of light-intensity infections. Techniques with high sensitivity and specificity are required for an accurate diagnosis in low-transmission settings and verification of elimination. We determined the accuracy of a urine-based up-converting phosphor-lateral flow circulating anodic antigen (UCP-LF CAA) assay for Schistosoma haematobium diagnosis in low-prevalence settings in Zanzibar, Tanzania. Methodology A total of 1,740 urine samples were collected in 2013 from children on Pemba Island, from schools where the S. haematobium prevalence was <2%, 2–5%, and 5–10%, based on a single urine filtration. On the day of collection, all samples were tested for microhematuria with reagent strips and for the presence of S. haematobium eggs with microscopy. Eight months later, 1.5 ml of urine from each of 1,200 samples stored at -20°C were analyzed by UCP-LF CAA assay, while urine filtration slides were subjected to quality control (QCUF). In the absence of a true ‘gold’ standard, the diagnostic performance was calculated using latent class analyses (LCA). Principal Findings The ‘empirical’ S. haematobium prevalence revealed by UCP-LF CAA, QCUF, and reagent strips was 14%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. LCA revealed a sensitivity of the UCP-LF CAA, QCUF, and reagent strips of 97% (95% confidence interval (CI): 91–100%), 86% (95% CI: 72–99%), and 67% (95% CI: 52–81%), respectively. Test specificities were consistently above 90%. Conclusions/Significance The UCP-LF CAA assay shows high sensitivity for the diagnosis of S. haematobium in low-endemicity settings. Empirically, it detects a considerably higher number of infections than microscopy. Hence, the UCP-LF CAA employed in combination with QCUF, is a promising tool for

  19. Social ecological predictors of prostate-specific antigen blood test and digital rectal examination in black American men.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, V. Diane; Montgomery, Susanne B.; Herring, R. Patti; Gardner, Robert W.; Stokols, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Black American men continue to suffer disproportionately from epidemically higher rates of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that complex reasons for persistently higher death rates of prostate cancer in this group are steeped in social factors associated with health access. METHODS: We utilized data from the It's All About U prostate cancer prevention study among black men to investigate: 1) what social ecological factors were predictive of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examinations (DRE); 2) if black men were aware of prostate cancer screening and, if screening was available, would they take the PSA and DRE? Quantitative cross-sectional data from a cohort of 276 black men with no diagnosis of prostate cancer were analyzed to identify characteristics, beliefs, practices and attitudes of this group toward prostate cancer screening. We created a social ecological model to examine which social factors (i.e., environmental, personal, person/environment interplay, black culture and institutional policy) were predictive of PSA and DRE, PSA only and DRE only. To reduce data and identify data patterns, factor analyses (tested for reliability by calculating Cronbach alpha scores) were performed. Variables were standardized with Z scores and analyzed with predictive analytic software technology (SPSS, version 12). A multivariate binary logistic regression was conducted to identify predictors of PSA and DRE. RESULTS: A significant predictor of both PSA and DRE was the physician's direct prostate cancer communication message (P<0.010). Significant correlations exist in PSA and DRE outcomes with a physician's engaging communication style (P<0.012), encouragement to screen (P<0.001) and sharing prostate cancer information (P<0.001); as was men understanding the serious risk of prostate cancer (P<0.001), culture (P<0.004), positive interaction with healthcare staff, significant other(s) and providers (P<0.001), and environmental dimensions

  20. Screening for hepatitis C virus infection in a high prevalence country by an antigen/antibody combination assay versus a rapid test

    PubMed Central

    Tagny, Claude Tayou; Mbanya, Dora; Murphy, Edward L.; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Laperche, Syria

    2016-01-01

    In low-income-countries, screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is often based on rapid tests (RT). Their lower sensitivity compared to enzyme immunoassay (EIA) suggests that newer HCV Antigen/Antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assays might have a role in such countries. To test this idea, 1998 blood donors were tested at the University Teaching Hospital blood bank in Yaoundé, Cameroon simultaneously with a RT (HCV rapid test, Human Diagnostics, Berlin, Germany) according to standard practice (S1) and with an Ag/Ab assay (Monolisa HCV Ag/Ab Ultra, Biorad, France) (S2). All discordant, borderline and reactive samples were submitted to confirmatory testing by immunoblot and/or HCV-RNA. Of the 86 (4.3%) samples positive with one or both strategies, 29 were confirmed negative, 37 positive and 20 were false positive or resolved infection. There was a significant difference in test sensitivity (p = 0.01) between S1 (70.3%) and S2 (91.9%) but not in test specificity (99.4% and 98.6%, respectively). The benefit of the Ag/Ab assay in the detection of recent HCV seronegative infections could not be evaluated since no Antigen-only donations were identified. However, better Ag/Ab test sensitivity compared to RT supports the implementation of these newer immunoassays for HCV screening in the African blood bank setting. PMID:24487098

  1. Patch test reactions to mite antigens: a GERDA multicentre study. Groupe d'Etudes et de Recherches en Dermato-Allergie.

    PubMed

    Castelain, M; Birnbaum, J; Castelain, P Y; Ducombs, G; Grosshans, E; Jelen, G; Lacroix, M; Meynadier, J; Mougeolle, J M; Lachapelle, J M

    1993-11-01

    We performed patch tests with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) antigens from 2 different sources in 355 non-randomly selected patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and 398 subjects of a control group. The study demonstrated that contact sensitization to mites occurred in an appreciable % of AD cases (20.8%), using commonly available assay products. The differences recorded between the 2 materials tested were related to the concentration of P1 antigen. Non-atopic patients rarely showed positive reactions to Dp (0.75%), when strict criteria for readings were applied and if 2 readings were performed. Patients with positive patch tests did not necessarily show positive immediate skin tests. It would be useful to carry out tests systematically in atopic patients, even if it is not yet known what modern treatment would be best for the patient. Laboratories still do not provide standardized house dust mite preparations--measuring and codifying their biological activity--for use in patch tests. It is to be hoped that the extension of this type of test will lead to the production of better test materials, in syringes with homogeneous dispersion and concentration.

  2. The Role of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Testing in the Era of Direct Acting Antiviral Therapies: What We Can Learn from the Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh Thuy; Gray, Emma; O'Leary, Aisling; Carr, Michael; De Gascun, Cillian F.

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies have revolutionised the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The financial cost of DAAs however is significant, and first generation protease inhibitors (PIs) also require frequent monitoring of viral RNA levels to guide treatment. In this context, we examined the relevance of HCV antigen testing to evaluate the potential role in monitoring virological response to HCV antiviral treatment with the PI-based triple therapies, telaprevir (TVR) and boceprevir (BOC). Chronic HCV-infected individuals (n = 152) enrolled in the Irish Hepatitis C Outcomes Research Network (ICORN) study were prospectively analysed for baseline markers and the early viral kinetics associated with SVR. The sustained virological response (SVR) rates in the cohort receiving TVR and BOC were 87.3% and 73.8%, respectively. Baseline factors associated with successful outcome in TVR therapy were age (P = 0.0098), IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0330) and viral load (P = 0.0456). RNA level at week 4 (P = 0.0068) and viral antigen negativity at week 2 (P = 0.0359) were predictive of SVR for TVR-based therapy. In BOC therapy, prior interferon treatment (P = 0.0209) and IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0410) were baseline predictors of SVR. Evidence of viraemia based either on viral RNA or antigen at week 4 predicted SVR in these patients. Our data showed that rapid decline of HCV antigen to negative level at week 2 in TVR treatment and <0.96 log fmol/l in BOC treatment after commencement of PI triple therapy were associated with SVR. HCV antigen measurement should be considered as a potential alternative for monitoring treatment response during DAA-based regimens. PMID:27711230

  3. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Zachary P; Crew, Rebecca M; Brandt, Kevin S; Ullmann, Amy J; Schriefer, Martin E; Molins, Claudia R; Gilmore, Robert D

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing.

  4. Field validation of the use of RB51 as antigen in a complement fixation test to identify calves vaccinated with Brucella abortus RB51.

    PubMed

    Adone, R; Ciuchini, F; Olsen, S

    2001-03-01

    In order to confirm the efficiency of an experimental RB51-based complement fixation (CF) test in identifying cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51, 831 sera from 110 vaccinated and 48 unvaccinated Hereford heifers of Iowa, collected for studies conducted in different years, were sent to Italy without coding to be tested in a CF test using RB51 as antigen. Most of the calves, aged from 3 to 10 months, were vaccinated subcutaneously with the recommended dosage of 10(10) CFU of RB51 commercial vaccine, while only six calves received 10(9) CFU of the same vaccine. Serum samples for serologic testing, collected until 16 postinoculation weeks (PIW), were also tested by routine surveillance tests for brucellosis such as rose bengal plate and CF tests performed with B. abortus smooth strain 99 as control antigen. RB51 CF test results obtained by testing sera from cattle vaccinated in 1999 indicate that the sensitivity of the reaction is 97% at 2 to 3 PIW and 90% until 8 PIW and decreases to 65% at 12 PIW, the specificity remaining at 100%. Collectively, the results of this study confirm that serologic standard tests fail to detect antibodies to RB51 while the RB51-based CF test is able to monitor antibody responses to RB51 until 15 to 16 PIW with a specificity of 100%. In addition, unlike the RB51-based dot blot assay, which is the only test currently used to monitor antibody responses to RB51, the CF test also detected specific responses following vaccination with 10(9) CFU of RB51, although seroconversion was only 50% at 8 PIW. In conclusion, because of high specificity and sensitivity, the CF test described here can be used to efficaciously monitor serologic responses following RB51 vaccination in cattle and could also be employed to detect RB51 infection in humans exposed to this strain.

  5. Application of latex beads agglutination test for the detection of the antibody against virus-infection-associated (VIA) antigen of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, T; Suzuki, T; Chatchawanchonteera, A; Sinuwonkwat, P; Tsuda, T; Murakami, Y

    2000-07-01

    Latex beads agglutination (LA) for the detection of the antibody against virus infection-associated (VIA) antigen of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus was estimated using experimentally infected animals. The VIA antibody titer by the LA test were compared with the neutralization titer and the titer by agarose gel diffusion (AGD) test, which has been used as a standard method for VIA antibody titration. The latex beads were coated with VIA antigen in carbonate buffer solution (0.5 M, pH 9.6) for the test. The sensitivity of the LA test was clearly higher than that of the AGD test in the results for cattle and swine infected experimentally. The antibody was detected in the bovine serum obtained at the 13th week after inoculation by the LA but not by the AGD test. The LA test appears to be simple, rapid and sensitive for the detection of the antibody of FMD virus in the surveillance of FMD and the FMD quarantine of imported animals.

  6. Is PCR the Next Reference Standard for the Diagnosis of Schistosoma in Stool? A Comparison with Microscopy in Senegal and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Meurs, Lynn; Brienen, Eric; Mbow, Moustapha; Ochola, Elizabeth A.; Mboup, Souleymane; Karanja, Diana M. S.; Secor, W. Evan; Polman, Katja; van Lieshout, Lisette

    2015-01-01

    Background The current reference test for the detection of S. mansoni in endemic areas is stool microscopy based on one or more Kato-Katz stool smears. However, stool microscopy has several shortcomings that greatly affect the efficacy of current schistosomiasis control programs. A highly specific multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the Schistosoma internal transcriber-spacer-2 sequence (ITS2) was developed by our group a few years ago, but so far this PCR has been applied mostly on urine samples. Here, we performed more in-depth evaluation of the ITS2 PCR as an alternative method to standard microscopy for the detection and quantification of Schistosoma spp. in stool samples. Methodology/Principal findings Microscopy and PCR were performed in a Senegalese community (n = 197) in an area with high S. mansoni transmission and co-occurrence of S. haematobium, and in Kenyan schoolchildren (n = 760) from an area with comparatively low S. mansoni transmission. Despite the differences in Schistosoma endemicity the PCR performed very similarly in both areas; 13–15% more infections were detected by PCR when comparing to microscopy of a single stool sample. Even when 2–3 stool samples were used for microscopy, PCR on one stool sample detected more infections, especially in people with light-intensity infections and in children from low-risk schools. The low prevalence of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in both populations was confirmed by an additional multiplex PCR. Conclusions/Significance The ITS2-based PCR was more sensitive than standard microscopy in detecting Schistosoma spp. This would be particularly useful for S. mansoni detection in low transmission areas, and post-control settings, and as such improve schistosomiasis control programs, epidemiological research, and quality control of microscopy. Moreover, it can be complemented with other (multiplex real-time) PCRs to detect a wider range of helminths and thus enhance effectiveness of

  7. Microscale sample preparation for PCR of C. difficile infected stool

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Sara; Atkinson, Christopher D.; Bartoo, Aaron C.; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Boylan, Michael O.; Schwartz, John H.; Klapperich, Catherine; Singh, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a microfluidic sample preparation chip for human stool samples infected with Clostridium difficile. We established a polymerase chain reaction able to distinguish C. difficile in the presence of several other organisms found in the normal intestinal flora. A protocol for on-chip extraction of nucleic acids from clinical samples is described that can detect target DNA down to 5.0×10−3 ng of template. The assay and sample preparation chip were then validated using known positive and known negative clinical samples. The work presented has potential applications in both the developed and developing world. PMID:19505511

  8. Enterotoxin-producing bacteria and parasites in stools of Ethiopian children with diarrhoeal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wadström, T; Aust-Kettis, A; Habte, D; Holmgren, J; Meeuwisse, G; Möllby, R; Söderlind, O

    1976-01-01

    Enterotoxinogenic bacteria were isolated from 131 (37%) of 354 Ethiopian infants and children with acute gastrointestinal symptoms. Only one of these isolates belonged to the classical enteropathogenic serotypes of Esch. coli. Two colonies from each patient were isolated and tested for production of enterotoxin by the rabbit ileal loop test, the rabbit skin test, and an adrenal cell assay. However, only 38% of the isolated enterotoxinogenic strains were Esch. coli; the others belonged to Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus, Citrobacter, Serratia, and Aeromonas. In 18 patients both isolates were toxinogenic and belonged to different species. The incidence of intestinal parasites was 35% with no apparent correlation to the occurrence of toxinogenic bacteria in the stools. PMID:1008593

  9. Enterotoxin-producing bacteria and parasites in stools of Ethiopian children with diarrhoeal disease.

    PubMed

    Wadström, T; Aust-Kettis, A; Habte, D; Holmgren, J; Meeuwisse, G; Möllby, R; Söderlind, O

    1976-11-01

    Enterotoxinogenic bacteria were isolated from 131 (37%) of 354 Ethiopian infants and children with acute gastrointestinal symptoms. Only one of these isolates belonged to the classical enteropathogenic serotypes of Esch. coli. Two colonies from each patient were isolated and tested for production of enterotoxin by the rabbit ileal loop test, the rabbit skin test, and an adrenal cell assay. However, only 38% of the isolated enterotoxinogenic strains were Esch. coli; the others belonged to Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus, Citrobacter, Serratia, and Aeromonas. In 18 patients both isolates were toxinogenic and belonged to different species. The incidence of intestinal parasites was 35% with no apparent correlation to the occurrence of toxinogenic bacteria in the stools. PMID:1008593

  10. Evaluation of adenosine deaminase activity and antibody to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 5 in cerebrospinal fluid and the radioactive bromide partition test for the early diagnosis of tuberculosis meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Coovadia, Y M; Dawood, A; Ellis, M E; Coovadia, H M; Daniel, T M

    1986-01-01

    A number of different biochemical and serological tests have been described recently for the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. None of these tests has yet gained widespread acceptance in clinical medicine or in microbiology laboratories. To investigate this problem we evaluated adenosine deaminase activity (ADA), an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects antibody to antigen 5 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the radioactive bromide partition test (BPT) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from children with tuberculous, pyogenic, and viral meningitis as well as from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis without meningitis and from controls with normal CSFs were included inn the study. In addition, we estimated ADAs in serum samples from selected children in these groups. The sensitivity and specificity of the three tests evaluated in the CSF were: ADA assay 73% and 71%; BPT 92% and 92%; and ELISA for antibody to antigen 5, 53% and 90%, 40% and 94%, and 27% and 100%, respectively, at tires of more than or equal to 1:20, 1:40, and 1:80. The serum ADA was lower (11.0 +/- 6.15 IU/l) in children with tuberculous meningitis when compared with those with pulmonary tuberculosis alone (25.8 +/- 20.9 IU/l). The BPT was found to be the most reliable test in the early differentiation of tuberculous from other causes of meningitis and remained abnormal for a period of up to five months after the beginning of treatment. Accordingly, we believe that the BPT should be used in conjunction with bacterial and fungal antigen detection systems for the initial differentiation of clinically suspicious tuberculous meningitis from Gram or culture negative cases, or both, of bacterial and fungal meningitis. PMID:3087296

  11. The use of trypan blue for counterstaining in the Sepharose bead immunofluorescence test. The application of the test for the demonstration of primate retrovirus-specific antibodies and antigens.

    PubMed

    Micheel, B

    1978-01-01

    The Sepharose bead immunoflurorescence test was performed by counterstaining the beads with trypan blue. This results in a red staining of negative beads which allows an easy distinction from positive green-fluorescent beads. Sepharose beads conjugated with viral proteins or antiviral antibodies were used to demonstrate Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMW)- and simian sarcoma virus (SSV) - specific antigens or antibodies. The test shows a high sensitivity and specificity and needs a small amount of material.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus S99: Designated Antigenic Smooth Reference Strain Used in Diagnostic Tests in India

    PubMed Central

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Padmashree, B. S.; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S.; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rahman, Habibur

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus strain S99 is widely used for the preparation of colored, plain, recombinant and smooth lipopolysaccharide antigens for the preparation of Brucella diagnostic kits. The genome of this strain was sequenced and the length of the genome was 3,253,175 bp, with 57.2% G+C content. A total of 3,365 protein coding genes and 53 RNA genes were predicted. PMID:25146137

  13. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Cédric B; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  14. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Cédric B.; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D.; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J.; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  15. Rapid Detection of Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia Using a Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific Antigen Detection Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    March, J. B.; Gammack, C.; Nicholas, R.

    2000-01-01

    Latex microspheres (diameter, 8 μm) were coated with anti-Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antiserum (anti-F38 biotype). The coated microspheres, when used in a latex agglutination test (LAT), detected M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae antigen in the serum of goats with contagious caprine pleuropneumoniae (CCPP). Beads also agglutinated strongly in the presence of purified M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Preabsorption of CPS-specific antibodies prior to coating of the beads removed agglutinating activity in the presence of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, strongly suggesting that CPS is the likely soluble antigen recognized by the test. In addition, the specificity of the LAT exactly mirrored that of an M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae CPS-specific monoclonal antibody (WM25): of the 8 other mycoplasma species tested, agglutination was observed only with bovine serogroup 7. The LAT detected all 11 strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 1.7 × 104 CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml of serum. With field sera from goats with CCPP, the results of the LAT exhibited a 67% correlation with the results of the currently used complement fixation test (CFT), with the main discrepancy in diagnosis resulting from the increased sensitivity of the LAT compared to that of CFT. This antigen-detection LAT should prove particularly useful in identifying animals in the earliest stages of CCPP and combines sensitivity and low cost with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:11060083

  16. Rapid Detection of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia by a Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific Antigen Detection Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    March, John B.; Kerr, Karen; Lema, Benedict

    2003-01-01

    A latex agglutination test (LAT) has been developed for the diagnosis of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). The latex microspheres were coated with MmmSC polyclonal immunoglobulin G antiserum and detected MmmSC antigen in the serum of cattle infected with CBPP and in growth medium containing MmmSC. The specific antigen recognizsed by this test appeared to be the capsular polysaccharide (CPS). The LAT recognized all 23 strains of MmmSC examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 5 × 103 CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml. Therefore, rapid identification of MmmSC cultures should be possible. Agglutination was also observed with the related goat pathogens and “Mycoplasma mycoides” cluster members Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large colony biotype (four of six strains positive) and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (three of six strains positive), in agreement with the suggestion that these latter two mycoplasmas may in fact represent a single species (although collectively exhibiting two capsular serotypes). Comparisons in diagnosis with the complement fixation test (CFT) were made by using African field sera from CBPP-infected cattle. After 2 (or 3) min of incubation, the test detected 55% (or 61%) of CFT-positive sera and 29% (or 40%) of CFT-negative sera, with an overall correlation in diagnosis of 62% (or 61%). The rates for false-positive diagnoses made by using “known” CBPP-negative sera from the United Kingdom were 3 or 13% after 2 or 3 min of incubation, respectively. The data agree with previous findings that some CBPP CFT-negative misdiagnoses may occur due to “antibody eclipsing” by excess circulating antigen. The LAT combines low cost and high specificity with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:12626448

  17. Efficacy of Several Serological Tests and Antigens for Diagnosis of Bovine Brucellosis in the Presence of False-Positive Serological Results Due to Yersinia enterocolitica O:9

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, P. M.; Marín, C. M.; Monreal, D.; González, D.; Garin-Bastuji, B.; Díaz, R.; Mainar-Jaime, R. C.; Moriyón, I.; Blasco, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 bears a smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) of Brucella sp. O-chain A + C/Y epitopic structure and is a cause of false-positive serological reactions (FPSR) in standard tests for cattle brucellosis. Brucella S-LPS, cross-reacting S-LPSs representing several O-chain epitope combinations, Brucella core lipid A epitopes (rough LPS), Brucella abortus S-LPS-derived polysaccharide, native hapten polysaccharide, rough LPS group 3 outer membrane protein complexes, recombinant BP26, and cytosolic proteins were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and precipitation tests to detect cattle brucellosis (sensitivity) and to differentiate it from FPSR (specificity). No single serological test and antigen combination showed 100% sensitivity and specificity simultaneously. Immunoprecipitation tests with native hapten polysaccharide, counterimmunoelectrophoresis with cytosolic proteins, and a chaotropic ELISA with Brucella S-LPS were 100% specific but less sensitive than the Rose Bengal test, complement fixation, and indirect ELISA with Brucella S-LPSs and native hapten or S-LPS-derived polysaccharides. A competitive ELISA with Brucella S-LPS and M84 C/Y-specific monoclonal antibody was not 100% specific and was less sensitive than other tests. ELISA with Brucella suis bv. 2 S-LPS (deficient in C epitopes), Escherichia hermannii S-LPSs [lacking the contiguous α-(1-2)-linked perosamine residues characteristic of Y. enterocolitica S-LPS], BP26 recombinant protein, and Brucella cytosolic fractions did not provide adequate sensitivity/specificity ratios. Although no serological test and antigen combination fully resolved the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in the presence of FPSR, some are simple and practical alternatives to the brucellin skin test currently recommended for differential diagnosis. PMID:15642999

  18. Enhanced performance of an innovative dengue IgG/IgM rapid diagnostic test using an anti-dengue EDI monoclonal antibody and dengue virus antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Young-Eun; Kim, Hak-Yong; Sinniah, Mangalam; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    High levels of anti-dengue IgM or IgG can be detected using numerous rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). However, the sensitivity and specificity of these tests are reduced by changes in envelope glycoprotein antigenicity that inevitably occur in limited expression systems. A novel RDT was designed to enhance diagnostic sensitivity. Dengue viruses cultured in animal cells were used as antigens to retain the native viral coat protein. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were then developed, for the first time, against domain I of envelope glycoprotein (EDI). The anti-dengue EDI mAb was employed as a capturer, and EDII and EDIII, which are mainly involved in the induction of neutralizing antibodies in patients, were fully available to bind to anti-dengue IgM or IgG in patients. A one-way automatic blood separation device prevented reverse migration of plasma and maximize the capture of anti-dengue antibodies at the test lines. A clinical evaluation in the field proved that the novel RDT (sensitivities of 96.5% and 96.7% for anti-dengue IgM and IgG) is more effective in detecting anti-dengue antibodies than two major commercial tests (sensitivities of 54.8% and 82% for SD BIOLINE; 50.4% and 75.3% for PanBio). The innovative format of RDT can be applied to other infectious viral diseases. PMID:26655854

  19. Comparative evaluation of commercially available manual and automated nucleic acid extraction methods for rotavirus RNA detection in stools.

    PubMed

    Esona, Mathew D; McDonald, Sharla; Kamili, Shifaq; Kerin, Tara; Gautam, Rashi; Bowen, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    Rotaviruses are a major cause of viral gastroenteritis in children. For accurate and sensitive detection of rotavirus RNA from stool samples by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the extraction process must be robust. However, some extraction methods may not remove the strong RT-PCR inhibitors known to be present in stool samples. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of six extraction methods used commonly for extraction of rotavirus RNA from stool, which have never been formally evaluated: the MagNA Pure Compact, KingFisher Flex and NucliSENS easyMAG instruments, the NucliSENS miniMAG semi-automated system, and two manual purification kits, the QIAamp Viral RNA kit and a modified RNaid kit. Using each method, total nucleic acid or RNA was extracted from eight rotavirus-positive stool samples with enzyme immunoassay optical density (EIA OD) values ranging from 0.176 to 3.098. Extracts prepared using the MagNA Pure Compact instrument yielded the most consistent results by qRT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR. When extracts prepared from a dilution series were extracted by the 6 methods and tested, rotavirus RNA was detected in all samples by qRT-PCR but by conventional RT-PCR testing, only the MagNA Pure Compact and KingFisher Flex extracts were positive in all cases. RT-PCR inhibitors were detected in extracts produced with the QIAamp Viral RNA Mini kit. The findings of this study should prove useful for selection of extraction methods to be incorporated into future rotavirus detection and genotyping protocols. PMID:24036075

  20. Measurement of antibodies to varicella-zoster virus using a virus-free fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test.

    PubMed

    Park, Rackhyun; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Kang Il; Namkoong, Sim; Choi, Seuk-Keun; Park, Songyong; Park, Hosun; Park, Junsoo

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test is regarded as the "gold standard" to detect protective antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) because of its high sensitivity and specificity. Because the classic FAMA test uses an infectious virus for detection of antibodies to VZV, it is labor-intensive, and also requires special equipment for handling the virus. For this reason, we attempted to develop a simple and safe FAMA assay. Because VZV glycoprotein E (gE) is one of the major VZV glycoproteins, we used the gE protein for the FAMA test (gE FAMA). Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of gE in HEK293T cells can be used to measure antibodies in human serum, and that gE FAMA titers are closely correlated with gpEIA ELISA data. These results indicate that our gE FAMA test has the potential to measure antibodies to VZV.

  1. Immunodiagnosis of Paracoccidioidomycosis due to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Using a Latex Test: Detection of Specific Antibody Anti-gp43 and Specific Antigen gp43

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Priscila Oliveira; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; da Silva, Silvia Helena Marques; Burger, Eva; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a life-threatening systemic disease and is a neglected public health problem in many endemic regions of Latin America. Though several diagnostic methods are available, almost all of them present with some limitations. Method/Principle Findings A latex immunoassay using sensitized latex particles (SLPs) with gp43 antigen, the immunodominant antigen of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, or the monoclonal antibody mAb17c (anti-gp43) was evaluated for antibody or antigen detection in sera, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from patients with PCM due to P. brasiliensis. The gp43-SLPs performed optimally to detect specific antibodies with high levels of sensitivity (98.46%, 95% CI 91.7–100.0), specificity (93.94%, 95% CI 87.3–97.7), and positive (91.4%) and negative (98.9%) predictive values. In addition, we propose the use of mAb17c-SLPs to detect circulating gp43, which would be particularly important in patients with immune deficiencies who fail to produce normal levels of immunoglobulins, achieving good levels of sensitivity (96.92%, 95% CI 89.3–99.6), specificity (88.89%, 95% CI 81.0–94.3), and positive (85.1%) and negative (97.8%) predictive values. Very good agreement between latex tests and double immune diffusion was observed for gp43-SLPs (k = 0.924) and mAb17c-SLPs (k = 0.850), which reinforces the usefulness of our tests for the rapid diagnosis of PCM in less than 10 minutes. Minor cross-reactivity occurred with sera from patients with other fungal infections. We successfully detected antigens and antibodies from CSF and BAL samples. In addition, the latex test was useful for monitoring PCM patients receiving therapy. Conclusions/Significance The high diagnostic accuracy, low cost, reduced assay time, and simplicity of this new latex test offer the potential to be commercialized and makes it an attractive diagnostic assay for use not only in clinics and medical mycology laboratories, but

  2. Additional Evaluation of the Point-of-Contact Circulating Cathodic Antigen Assay for Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mwinzi, Pauline N. M.; Kittur, Nupur; Ochola, Elizabeth; Cooper, Philip J.; Campbell, Carl H.; King, Charles H.; Colley, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the urine-based point-of-contact cathodic circulating antigen test (POC-CCA) in Schistosoma mansoni-endemic settings in Africa indicate it has good sensitivity in detecting infections, but in areas of low prevalence, the POC-CCA can be positive for persons who are egg-negative by Kato-Katz stool assays. We examined the POC-CCA assay for: (a) batch-to-batch stability; (b) intra-reader and inter-reader variability; (c) day-to-day variability compared to Kato-Katz stool assays, and (d) to see if praziquantel (PZQ) treatment converted Kato-Katz-negative/POC-CCA positive individuals to POC-CCA negativity. We found essentially no batch-to-batch variation, negligible intra-reader variability (2%), and substantial agreement for inter-reader reliability. Some day-to-day variation was observed over 5 days of urine collection, but less than the variation in Kato-Katz stool assays over 3 days. To evaluate the effect of treatment on Kato-Katz(−)/POC-CCA(+) children, 149 children in an area of 10–15% prevalence who were Kato-Katz(−) based on 3 stool samples but POC-CCA(+) were enrolled. Seven days after treatment (PZQ 40 mg/kg) samples were again collected and tested. Almost half (47%) POC-CCA positive children turned negative. Those still POC-CCA positive received a second treatment, and 34% of them turned POC-CCA negative upon this second treatment. Most who remained POC-CCA positive shifted each time to a “lesser” POC-CCA “level of positivity.” The data suggest that most Kato-Katz-negative/POC-CCA positive individuals harbor low-intensity infections, and each treatment kills all or some of their adult worms. The data also suggest that when evaluated by a more sensitive assay, the effective cure rates for PZQ are significantly less than those inferred from fecal testing. These findings have public health significance for the mapping and monitoring of Schistosoma infections and in planning the transition from schistosomiasis morbidity control to

  3. Evaluation of the ELISA test for detection of Entamoeba histolytica in feces.

    PubMed

    Merino, E; Glender, W; del Muro, R; Ortiz-Ortiz, L

    1990-01-01

    The clinical utility of an ELISA test with monoclonal antibodies to detect antigen of Entamoeba histolytica in feces was evaluated in 150 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. Each subject was examined by rectosigmoidoscopy with rectal smear and/or a triple stool search for ova-bacteria-parasite (OBP); in addition, one stool sample was collected for the ELISA test. All the tests were independent and double blind. E. histolytica was detected by OBP and/or rectosigmoidoscopy in 66 patients; 61 patients had other parasites; and in 23, no parasites were identified. Of all patients, 116 were positive for the ELISA test. Of these, E. histolytica was identified in 52. In 47, other parasites were identified and in 17, no parasites were found. The ELISA test with a monoclonal antibody against E. histolytica antigen showed higher sensitivity than the standard diagnostic methods: the ability to detect the presence of E. histolytica antigen regardless of the destruction of the parasite or of the error due to misidentification of the parasite resulting from faulty preparation of the samples.

  4. Point-Counterpoint: A Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Streptococcus pyogenes Should Replace Antigen Detection and Culture for Detection of Bacterial Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Kirn, Thomas J; Thomson, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have frequently been the standard diagnostic approach when specific infectious agents are sought in a clinic specimen. They can be applied for specific agents such as S. pyogenes, or commercial multiplex NAATs for detection of a variety of pathogens in gastrointestinal, bloodstream, and respiratory infections may be used. NAATs are both rapid and sensitive. For many years, S. pyogenes testing algorithms used a rapid and specific group A streptococcal antigen test to screen throat specimens, followed, in some clinical settings, by a throat culture for S. pyogenes to increase the sensitivity of its detection. Now S. pyogenes NAATs are being used with increasing frequency. Given their accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use, should they replace antigen detection and culture for the detection of bacterial pharyngitis? Bobbi Pritt and Robin Patel of the Mayo Clinic, where S. pyogenes NAATs have been used for well over a decade with great success, will explain the advantages of this approach, while Richard (Tom) Thomson and Tom Kirn of the NorthShore University HealthSystem will discuss their concerns about this approach to diagnosing bacterial pharyngitis.

  5. Proteomic Identification of Immunodiagnostic Antigens for Trypanosoma vivax Infections in Cattle and Generation of a Proof-of-Concept Lateral Flow Test Diagnostic Device

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Steven J.; Sullivan, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma vivax is one of the causative agents of Animal African Trypanosomosis in cattle, which is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and transmitted primarily by the bite of the tsetse fly vector. The parasite can also be mechanically transmitted, and this has allowed its spread to South America. Diagnostics are limited for this parasite and in farm settings diagnosis is mainly symptom-based. We set out to identify, using a proteomic approach, candidate diagnostic antigens to develop into an easy to use pen-side lateral flow test device. Two related members the invariant surface glycoprotein family, TvY486_0045500 and TvY486_0019690, were selected. Segments of these antigens, lacking N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal transmembrane domains, were expressed in E. coli. Both were developed into ELISA tests and one of them, TvY486_0045500, was developed into a lateral flow test prototype. The tests were all evaluated blind with 113 randomised serum samples, taken from 37 calves before and after infection with T. vivax or T. congolense. The TvY486_0045500 and TvY486_0019690 ELISA tests gave identical sensitivity and specificity values for T. vivax infection of 94.5% (95% CI, 86.5% to 98.5%) and 88.0% (95% CI, 75.7% to 95.5%), respectively, and the TvY486_0045500 lateral flow test prototype a sensitivity and specificity of 92.0% (95% CI, 83.4% to 97.0%) and 89.8% (95% CI, 77.8% to 96.6%), respectively. These data suggest that recombinant TvY486_0045500 shows promise for the development of a pen-side lateral flow test for the diagnosis of T. vivax animal African trypanosomosis. PMID:27606593

  6. Proteomic Identification of Immunodiagnostic Antigens for Trypanosoma vivax Infections in Cattle and Generation of a Proof-of-Concept Lateral Flow Test Diagnostic Device.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jennifer R; Sastry, Lalitha; Wall, Steven J; Sullivan, Lauren; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma vivax is one of the causative agents of Animal African Trypanosomosis in cattle, which is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and transmitted primarily by the bite of the tsetse fly vector. The parasite can also be mechanically transmitted, and this has allowed its spread to South America. Diagnostics are limited for this parasite and in farm settings diagnosis is mainly symptom-based. We set out to identify, using a proteomic approach, candidate diagnostic antigens to develop into an easy to use pen-side lateral flow test device. Two related members the invariant surface glycoprotein family, TvY486_0045500 and TvY486_0019690, were selected. Segments of these antigens, lacking N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal transmembrane domains, were expressed in E. coli. Both were developed into ELISA tests and one of them, TvY486_0045500, was developed into a lateral flow test prototype. The tests were all evaluated blind with 113 randomised serum samples, taken from 37 calves before and after infection with T. vivax or T. congolense. The TvY486_0045500 and TvY486_0019690 ELISA tests gave identical sensitivity and specificity values for T. vivax infection of 94.5% (95% CI, 86.5% to 98.5%) and 88.0% (95% CI, 75.7% to 95.5%), respectively, and the TvY486_0045500 lateral flow test prototype a sensitivity and specificity of 92.0% (95% CI, 83.4% to 97.0%) and 89.8% (95% CI, 77.8% to 96.6%), respectively. These data suggest that recombinant TvY486_0045500 shows promise for the development of a pen-side lateral flow test for the diagnosis of T. vivax animal African trypanosomosis.

  7. Proteomic Identification of Immunodiagnostic Antigens for Trypanosoma vivax Infections in Cattle and Generation of a Proof-of-Concept Lateral Flow Test Diagnostic Device.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jennifer R; Sastry, Lalitha; Wall, Steven J; Sullivan, Lauren; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma vivax is one of the causative agents of Animal African Trypanosomosis in cattle, which is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and transmitted primarily by the bite of the tsetse fly vector. The parasite can also be mechanically transmitted, and this has allowed its spread to South America. Diagnostics are limited for this parasite and in farm settings diagnosis is mainly symptom-based. We set out to identify, using a proteomic approach, candidate diagnostic antigens to develop into an easy to use pen-side lateral flow test device. Two related members the invariant surface glycoprotein family, TvY486_0045500 and TvY486_0019690, were selected. Segments of these antigens, lacking N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal transmembrane domains, were expressed in E. coli. Both were developed into ELISA tests and one of them, TvY486_0045500, was developed into a lateral flow test prototype. The tests were all evaluated blind with 113 randomised serum samples, taken from 37 calves before and after infection with T. vivax or T. congolense. The TvY486_0045500 and TvY486_0019690 ELISA tests gave identical sensitivity and specificity values for T. vivax infection of 94.5% (95% CI, 86.5% to 98.5%) and 88.0% (95% CI, 75.7% to 95.5%), respectively, and the TvY486_0045500 lateral flow test prototype a sensitivity and specificity of 92.0% (95% CI, 83.4% to 97.0%) and 89.8% (95% CI, 77.8% to 96.6%), respectively. These data suggest that recombinant TvY486_0045500 shows promise for the development of a pen-side lateral flow test for the diagnosis of T. vivax animal African trypanosomosis. PMID:27606593

  8. From Stool Transplants to Next-generation Microbiota Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The epidemic of Clostridium difficile infection fueled by new virulent strains of the organism has led to increased use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). The procedure is effective for even the most desperate cases, after failure of multiple courses of antibiotics. The approach recognizes microbiota to be integral to normal human physiology, and microbiota being used in FMT represents a new class of therapeutics. Imbalance in the composition and altered activity of the microbiota are associated with many diseases. Consequently, there is growing interest in applying FMT to non-C. difficile indications. However, this may succeed only if microbiota therapeutics are developed systematically, based on mechanistic understanding, and applying updo-date principles of microbial ecology. We discuss two pathways in development of this new therapeutic class: whole microbial communities separated from donor stool and an assembly of specific fecal microorganisms grown in vitro. PMID:24412527

  9. From stool transplants to next-generation microbiota therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Petrof, Elaine O; Khoruts, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The epidemic of Clostridium difficile infection fueled by new virulent strains of the organism has led to increased use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). The procedure is effective for even the most desperate cases after failure of multiple courses of antibiotics. The approach recognizes microbiota to be integral to normal human physiology, and microbiota being used in FMT represents a new class of therapeutics. Imbalance in the composition and altered activity of the microbiota are associated with many diseases. Consequently, there is growing interest in applying FMT to non-C difficile indications. However, this may succeed only if microbiota therapeutics are developed systematically, based on mechanistic understanding, and applying up-to-date principles of microbial ecology. We discuss 2 pathways in the development of this new therapeutic class: whole microbial communities separated from donor stool and an assembly of specific fecal microorganisms grown in vitro.

  10. Real-time PCR using SYBR Green for the detection of Shigella spp. in food and stool samples.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, W; Nsaibia, S; Gharbi, A; Aouni, M

    2013-02-01

    Shigella spp are exquisitely fastidious Gram negative organisms that frequently get missed in the detection by traditional culture methods. For this reason, this work has adapted a classical PCR for detection of Shigella in food and stool specimens to real-time PCR using the SYBR Green format. This method follows a melting curve analysis to be more rapid and provide both qualitative and quantitative data about the targeted pathogen. A total of 117 stool samples with diarrhea and 102 food samples were analyzed in Public Health Regional Laboratory of Nabeul by traditional culture methods and real-time PCR. To validate the real-time PCR assay, an experiment was conducted with both spiked and naturally contaminated stool samples. All Shigella strains tested were ipaH positive and all non-Shigella strains yielded no amplification products. The melting temperature (T(m) = 81.5 ± 0.5 °C) was consistently specific for the amplicon. Correlation coefficients of standard curves constructed using the quantification cycle (C(q)) versus copy numbers of Shigella showed good linearity (R² = 0.995; slope = 2.952) and the minimum level of detection was 1.5 × 10³ CFU/g feces. All food samples analyzed were negative for Shigella by standard culture methods, whereas ipaH was detected in 8.8% culture negative food products. Moreover, the ipaH specific PCR system increased the detection rate over that by culture alone from 1.7% to 11.1% among patients with diarrhea. The data presented here shows that the SYBR Green I was suitable for use in the real-time PCR assay, which provided a specific, sensitive and efficient method for the detection and quantification of Shigella spp in food and stool samples.

  11. Bladder tumour antigen (BTA stat) test compared to the urine cytology in the diagnosis of bladder cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aiye; Wang, Xiuhua; Gao, Lan; Shi, Juan; Sun, Changyi; Wan, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the diagnostic value of bladder tumour antigen (BTA stat) tests compared with urine cytology test in detecting bladder cancer. Methods: We searched public databases including PubMed, MEDLINE Springer, Elsevier Science Direct, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar before December 2012. To collect relevant data of BTA stat tests and urine cytology tests in patients with bladder cancer, we studied meta-analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR), negative LR and diagnostic odds ratios (DOR) of BTA stat tests and cytology tests from published studies. We applied the software of Rev. Man 5.1 and Stata 11.0 to the meta-analysis. Results: A total of 13 separate studies consisting of 3462 patients with bladder cancer were considered in the meta-analysis. We found that the BTA stat test had a higher sensitivity than the urine cytology test (0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64 to 0.69 vs. 0.43, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.46), but the specificity, positive LR, negative LR, DOR, the area under the curve (AUC) and Q index of the BTA stat test were lower compared with the urine cytology test. The results of the Egger’s linear regression test showed no publication bias (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Specificity, positive LR, negative LR, DOR, the AUC and the Q index of the urine cytology test may be superior to the BTA stat test, but the BTA stat test has greater sensitivity than the urine cytology test. PMID:24940462

  12. Evaluation of the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ Kit for Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B in Clinical Stool Specimens.

    PubMed

    Jazmati, Nathalie; Wiegel, Pia; Ličanin, Božica; Plum, Georg

    2015-06-01

    We compared the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ kit, a new nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Clostridium difficile toxins in stool specimens, with the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ test were 100%, 89.5%, 60.9%, and 100%, and those for the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test were 100%, 90%, 62.2%, and 100%, respectively.

  13. A two-step lyssavirus real-time polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers with superior sensitivity to the fluorescent antigen test.

    PubMed

    Suin, Vanessa; Nazé, Florence; Francart, Aurélie; Lamoral, Sophie; De Craeye, Stéphane; Kalai, Michael; Van Gucht, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A generic two-step lyssavirus real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), based on a nested PCR strategy, was validated for the detection of different lyssavirus species. Primers with 17 to 30% of degenerate bases were used in both consecutive steps. The assay could accurately detect RABV, LBV, MOKV, DUVV, EBLV-1, EBLV-2, and ABLV. In silico sequence alignment showed a functional match with the remaining lyssavirus species. The diagnostic specificity was 100% and the sensitivity proved to be superior to that of the fluorescent antigen test. The limit of detection was ≤ 1 50% tissue culture infectious dose. The related vesicular stomatitis virus was not recognized, confirming the selectivity for lyssaviruses. The assay was applied to follow the evolution of rabies virus infection in the brain of mice from 0 to 10 days after intranasal inoculation. The obtained RNA curve corresponded well with the curves obtained by a one-step monospecific RABV-qRT-PCR, the fluorescent antigen test, and virus titration. Despite the presence of degenerate bases, the assay proved to be highly sensitive, specific, and reproducible.

  14. Development and clinical evaluation of a highly accurate dengue NS1 rapid test: from the preparation of a soluble NS1 antigen to the construction of an RDT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) is important. There are numerous products on the market claiming to detect DENV NS1, but these are not always reliable. In this study, a highly sensitive and accurate rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was developed using anti-dengue NS1 monoclonal antibodies. A recombinant NS1 protein was produced with high antigenicity and purity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against this purified NS1 antigen. The RDT was constructed using a capturing (4A6A10, Kd=7.512±0.419×10(-9)) and a conjugating antibody (3E12E6, Kd=7.032±0.322×10(-9)). The diagnostic performance was evaluated with NS1-positive clinical samples collected from various dengue endemic countries and compared to SD BioLine Dengue NS1 Ag kit. The constructed RDT exhibited higher sensitivity (92.9%) with more obvious diagnostic performance than the commercial kit (83.3%). The specificity of constructed RDT was 100%. The constructed RDT could offer a reliable point-of-care testing tool for the early detection of dengue infections in remote areas and contribute to the control of dengue-related diseases. PMID:25824725

  15. Development and clinical evaluation of a highly accurate dengue NS1 rapid test: from the preparation of a soluble NS1 antigen to the construction of an RDT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoo; Kim, Hak-Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Ok

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) is important. There are numerous products on the market claiming to detect DENV NS1, but these are not always reliable. In this study, a highly sensitive and accurate rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was developed using anti-dengue NS1 monoclonal antibodies. A recombinant NS1 protein was produced with high antigenicity and purity. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against this purified NS1 antigen. The RDT was constructed using a capturing (4A6A10, Kd=7.512±0.419×10(-9)) and a conjugating antibody (3E12E6, Kd=7.032±0.322×10(-9)). The diagnostic performance was evaluated with NS1-positive clinical samples collected from various dengue endemic countries and compared to SD BioLine Dengue NS1 Ag kit. The constructed RDT exhibited higher sensitivity (92.9%) with more obvious diagnostic performance than the commercial kit (83.3%). The specificity of constructed RDT was 100%. The constructed RDT could offer a reliable point-of-care testing tool for the early detection of dengue infections in remote areas and contribute to the control of dengue-related diseases.

  16. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time PCR kit Amplidiag® Bacterial GE in the detection of bacterial pathogens from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Anniina; Munukka, Eveliina; Weintraub, Andrej; Ullberg, Måns; Eerola, Erkki

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available multiplex real-time PCR kit Amplidiag® Bacterial GE in the systematic screening of bacterial pathogens causing gastroenteritis. Stool samples from 1168 patients were analyzed with Amplidiag® Bacterial GE, stool culture, and molecular reference tests, and the sensitivity and specificity of Amplidiag® Bacterial GE were determined by comparing the results to the reference tests. The evaluation showed good performance for Amplidiag® Bacterial GE: sensitivity and specificity of the test was 100/99.7% for Salmonella, 100/99.8% for Yersinia, 98.8/99.2% for Campylobacter, 92.9/100% for Shigella/EIEC, 100/99.9% for EHEC, 92.9/99.8% for ETEC, 98.9/99.2% for EPEC, and 100/99.8% EAEC, respectively. When compared with stool culture, Amplidiag® Bacterial GE was found to be more sensitive. This study suggests that Amplidiag® Bacterial GE is suitable for screening bacterial pathogens from stool samples. However, this study only demonstrates the performance of Amplidiag® Bacterial GE in low endemic settings, as the number of positive findings in this study was relatively low. PMID:27425376

  17. Constipation, hard stools, fecal urgency, and incomplete evacuation, but not diarrhea is associated with diabetes and its related factors

    PubMed Central

    Ihana-Sugiyama, Noriko; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Izawa, Eiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Kakei, Masafumi; Uemura, Naomi; Akiyama, Junichi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the bowel symptoms associated with diabetes and diabetes-related factors after excluding gastrointestinal (GI) organic diseases. METHODS: Participants were 4738 (603 diabetic and 4135 non-diabetic) patients who underwent colonoscopy and completed a questionnaire. On the day of pre-colonoscopy, 9 symptoms (borborygmus, abdominal distension, increased flatus, constipation, diarrhea, loose stools, hard stools, fecal urgency, and incomplete evacuation) were prospectively evaluated on a 7-point Likert scale. The test-retest reliability of the bowel symptom scores from the baseline and second questionnaires was analyzed using kappa statistics. Associations between bowel symptom scores and diabetes or diabetes-related factors were analyzed by a rank-ordered logistic model adjusted for related confounders, and odds ratios (ORs) were estimated. RESULTS: In multivariate analysis, constipation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.57, CI: 1.33-1.85, P < 0.01] and hard stools (AOR = 1.56, CI: 1.33-1.84, P < 0.01) were associated with diabetes, and fecal urgency (AOR = 1.16, CI: 0.99-1.37, P = 0.07) and incomplete evacuation (AOR = 1.16, CI: 1.00-1.36, P = 0.06) were marginally associated with diabetes. These symptoms remained associated even after excluding organic GI diseases on colonoscopy. Test-retest reliability of symptom score with a mean duration of 3.2 mo was good (mean kappa, 0.69). Associations of symptoms with diabetes-related factors were found; constipation with HbA1c ≥ 8.0% (AOR = 2.11, CI: 1.19-3.73), body mass index (BMI) < 25 (AOR = 2.11, CI: 1.22-3.66), and insulin use (AOR = 1.90, CI: 1.08-3.36); hard stools with diabetes duration (AOR = 1.03, CI: 1.00-1.07); fecal urgency with BMI < 25 (AOR = 1.73, CI: 1.00-2.98); and incomplete evacuation with BMI < 25 (AOR = 2.60, CI: 1.52-4.43), serum creatinine level (AOR = 1.27, CI: 1.10-1.47), and insulin use (AOR = 1.92, CI: 1.09-3.38). CONCLUSION: Diabetes is associated with constipation, hard stools

  18. Stool microbiome and metabolome differences between colorectal cancer patients and healthy adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we used stool profiling to identify intestinal bacteria and metabolites that are differentially represented in humans with colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to healthy controls to identify how microbial functions may influence CRC development. Stool samples were collected from healthy a...

  19. Novel method for digital subtraction of tagged stool in virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendel, Lutz; Suehling, Michael; Eckert, Helmut

    2008-03-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death. CT colonography is a novel method for the detection of polyps and early cancer. The general principle of CT colonography includes a cathartic bowel preparation. The resulting discomfort for patients leads to limited patient acceptance and therefore to limited cancer detection rates. Reduced bowel preparation, techniques for stool tagging, and electronic cleansing, however, improve the acceptance rates. Hereby, the high density of oral contrast material highlights residual stool and can be digitally removed. Known subtraction methods cause artifacts: additional 3D objects are introduced and small bowel folds are perforated. We propose a new algorithm that is based on the 2 nd derivative of the image data using the Hessian matrix and the following principal axis transform to detect tiny folds which shall not be subtracted together with tagged stool found by a thresholding method. Since the stool is usually not homogenously tagged with contrast media a detection algorithm for island-like structures is incorporated. The interfaces of air-stool level and colon wall are detected by a 3-dimensional difference of Gaussian module. A 3-dimensional filter smoothes the transitions between removed stool and colon tissue. We evaluated the efficacy of the new algorithm with 10 patient data sets. The results showed no introduced artificial objects and no perforated folds. The artifacts at the air-stool and colon tissue-stool transitions are considerably reduced compared to those known from the literature.

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Seven Commercial Assays for Rapid Detection of Group A Rotavirus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fremy, Céline; Pillet, Sylvie; Mendes Martins, Lucile; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aho, Serge L.; Pothier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Seven commercial immunochromatographic assays intended for the detection of group A rotavirus antigens in human stool samples were evaluated. These assays showed similar levels of diagnostic accuracy and were suitable for the detection of rotavirus in patients with acute gastroenteritis but missed some asymptomatic rotavirus shedding identified by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. PMID:26378280

  1. Antigens and allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.E.; Swanson, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    There are few reliable epidemiologic data on the overall frequency and importance of allergy. We describe a practical method for quantifying the concentration of both amorphous and morphologically defined antigens in the air. A high volume air sampler is used to collect airborne particles and has a facility to separate samples into different particle sizes. Samples are tested for allergenic activity by radioallergosorbent test inhibition assay. Preliminary findings from studies of community wide, amorphous and common household allergens are reported.

  2. Validation of Rapid Point-of-Care (POC) Tests for Detection of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Field and Laboratory Settings in the Gambia, Western Africa

    PubMed Central

    Njai, Harr Freeya; Shimakawa, Yusuke; Sanneh, Bakary; Ferguson, Lynne; Ndow, Gibril; Mendy, Maimuna; Sow, Amina; Lo, Gora; Toure-Kane, Coumba; Tanaka, Junko; Taal, Makie; D'alessandro, Umberto; Njie, Ramou; Thursz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Point-of-care tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) could be an ideal tool for a large-scale HBV screening/treatment program in SSA. Using data from the PROLIFICA (Prevention of Liver Fibrosis and Cancer in Africa) program, we conducted a cross-sectional study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of three point-of-care tests (Determine, Vikia, and Espline) for the detection of HBsAg in the field or a laboratory setting in the Gambia. In the field, we used finger-prick whole blood for the Determine and Vikia tests and dried blood spots for the reference standard test (AxSYM HBsAg enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]). In the laboratory we used serum for the Determine, Espline, and reference test (Architect chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay). Of 773 participants recruited at the community and 227 known chronic HBV carriers (1,000 subjects in total), 293 were positive for HBsAg. The sensitivity and specificity of the Determine test were 88.5% and 100% in the field and 95.3% and 93.3% in the laboratory setting, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% and 99.8% for the Vikia test (in the field) and 93.9% and 94.7% for the Espline test (in the laboratory). There was no evidence that one kit was better than another. Most of the patients with false-negative results (18/19) were classified as inactive chronic carriers. In summary, the three point-of-care tests had acceptable ranges of diagnostic accuracy. These tests may represent accurate, rapid, and inexpensive alternatives to serology testing for the screening of HBV infection at field level in SSA. PMID:25631805

  3. Comparison of the Raji cell line fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen test and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of immunity to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed Central

    Iltis, J P; Castellano, G A; Gerber, P; Le, C; Vujcic, L K; Quinnan, G V

    1982-01-01

    A prospective study was performed comparing the fluorescent antibody to membrane antigen (FAMA) test and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for identifying susceptibility and seroconversion to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection. A total of 75 sera were collected from index cases and from sibling and parent contacts in 10 families. Varicella-zoster virus-infected human diploid embryonic fibroblasts and continuous lymphoblastoid cells (Raji cells) were compared as indicator cells in the FAMA test. Equivalent results were obtained with both types of cell. Results of the FAMA test and the ELISA were identical in two ways. (i) The same 11 individuals were initally defined as susceptible (seronegative), and 9 of them (82%) developed fourfold rises in antibody titers, clinical varicella, or both. (ii) Of 21 immune (seropositive) individuals, 4 developed fourfold antibody rises by FAMA tests, and 3 of these 4 responded by ELISA. Infection was asymptomatic in these individuals. The geometric mean titer by ELISA was significantly higher than by the FAMA test. The results indicated that the ELISA and the FAMA test have similar capacities to define susceptibility to varicella-zoster virus and that subclinical infection with varicella-zoster virus may be common. PMID:6759530

  4. The serum D-xylose test as a useful tool to identify malabsorption in rats with antigen specific gut inflammatory reaction.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Danielle Mota Fontes; da Costa, Janilda Pacheco; Campos, Sylvia Maria Nicolau; Paschoal, Patrícia Olaya; Garrido, Valéria; Siqueira, Munique; Teixeira, Gerlinde Agate Platais Brasil; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez

    2009-04-01

    The inappropriate immune response to foods, such as peanut, wheat and milk may be the basis in the pathogenesis of enteropathies like coeliac and Crohn disease, which present small intestinal malabsorption. A number of recent studies have utilized d-xylose absorption as an investigative tool to study small intestinal function in a variety of clinical settings. Thus, the aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the intestinal absorption of D-xylose in an antigen-specific gut inflammatory reaction rat model. Animals of the experimental group were inoculated with peanut protein extract before their exposure to a challenge diet containing exclusively peanut seeds to induce the gut inflammatory reaction caused by peanut allergy. Our results show that systemic inoculation with peanut protein extract renders significantly higher antibody titres (5.085 +/- 0.126 units) (P < 0.0001) than control rats (0.905 +/- 0.053 units) and that the antibody titres correlate positively to an inflammatory alteration of the gut morphology (P < 0.0001). Animals pertaining to the experimental group showed an intestinal absorption of D-xylose lower than control rats (P < 0.0001). We also observed that D-xylose absorption correlates negatively with IgG titres and positively with morphometric parameters (Pearson correlation). In conclusion, the use of serum D-xylose test was useful to identify the presence of small intestinal malabsorption in our antigen specific gut inflammatory reaction rat model.

  5. [Influence of different products of platelet membrane glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies used internationally on tests for monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens].

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiu-Min; Shen, Wei-Dong; Zhong, Zhou-Lin; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Guo-Guang

    2009-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of different platelet membrane glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies (McAb) which are common used in laboratories on the monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) technique according to the request of 14th International Society of Blood Transfusion Platelet Immunology Workshop. 30 participant laboratories were provided with 10 known human platelet antigen (HPA) antibodies, 1 normal serum, 9 different McAbs (against GPIIb/IIIa, GPIa/IIa, GPIb/IX and GPIV respectively), and the same protocol. Each participant laboratory carried out the test as the protocol to compare the results of different McAbs against the same glycoprotein and submitted the data to organizer. The results indicated that in McAbs against GPIIb/IIIa, AP2, Gi-5 and PL2-73 showed higher mean S/CO than that of others; in GPIa/IIa, MBC202.2 and 143.1 showed higher mean S/CO than that of others; in GPIb/IX, 142.11 and CLB-MB45 (CD42b) showed higher mean S/CO than that of others; as to GPIV, 131.4 showed higher mean S/CO. In conclusion, capture effects of various McAbs are different, so that different products of McAbs exert influences on the sensitivity of MAIPA. To use a panel of McAbs against the same glycoprotein may avoid the false negative results. PMID:19698264

  6. Evaluation of Antigen Detection Tests, Microscopy, and Polymerase Chain Reaction for Diagnosis of Malaria in Peripheral Blood in Asymptomatic Pregnant Women in Nanoro, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Kattenberg, Johanna H.; Tahita, Christian M.; Versteeg, Inge A. J.; Tinto, Halidou; Traoré/Coulibaly, Maminata; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.; Mens, Petra F.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid diagnostics tests (RDTs) detect malaria specific antigen(s) in the circulation, even when parasites are sequestered in the placenta and not visible by microscopy. However, research on their diagnostic accuracy during pregnancy is limited. Pregnant women (n = 418) were screened for malaria during routine antenatal care by using two RDTs that detect histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) or Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with antibodies that detect dihydrofolate reductase–thymidylate synthase or heme-detoxification protein, and compared with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and microscopy for evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy. Prevalence of malaria infection was high (53% by PCR). The RT-PCR and the HRP2 RDT detected most cases of malaria during pregnancy, whereas microscopy, the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase RDT, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for dihydrofolate reductase–thymidylate synthase and heme-detoxification protein antibodies did not detect several low-density infections. Therefore, the HRP2 RDT could be a useful tool in high-transmission areas for diagnosis of malaria in asymptomatic pregnant women. PMID:22859362

  7. Comparative studies of strains Ictero No. I and RGA as the type strain of Leptospira interrogans: agglutinin absorption test, protein and antigen profiles, and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hata, K; Ono, E; Yanagawa, R

    1988-01-01

    Strain Ictero No. I, the first isolate of Leptospira, isolated by Inada and Ido in 1914, was found to be sufficiently qualified to be the type strain of Leptospira interrogans rather than strain RGA. In an agglutinin absorption test, anti-Ictero No. I serum was not absorbed completely with strain RGA, and 25% of the homologous titer remained unabsorbed, while anti-RGA serum was completely absorbed with strain Ictero No. I. Thus, strain Ictero No. I was not serologically identical with strain RGA, and the two strains were considered to be different serovars. A protein band with a molecular weight of approximately 33,000 daltons was detected in strain Ictero No. I but not in strain RGA by SDS-PAGE. By Western blotting, this protein band was detectable with anti-Ictero No. I serum but not with anti-RGA serum. The presence of the 33K protein in strain Ictero No. I, but not in strain RGA, was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation using [125I]-labeled antigens, indicating that the protein antigen was surface-exposed. Only 8 of the 89 enzymes activities were different between strains Ictero No. I and RGA (line Sapporo). From the above results, we propose that strain Ictero No. I should be designated as the type strain of L. interrogans instead of strain RGA.

  8. Direct Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Genes Associated with Inflammation in DNA Isolated from Stool

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Moreno, Ramón; Robledo, Iraida E.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Although predominantly associated with health benefits, the gut microbiota has also been shown to harbor genes that promote inflammation. In this work, we report a method for the direct detection and quantification of these pro-inflammatory bacterial genes by PCR and qPCR in DNA extracted from human stool samples. PCR reactions were performed to detect (i) the pks island genes, (ii) tcpC, which is present in some strains of Escherichia coli and (iii) gelE presented in some strains of Enterococcus faecalis. Additionally, we screened for the presence of the following genes encoding cyclomodulins that disrupted mammalian cell division: (iv) cdt (which encodes the cytolethal distending toxin) and (v) cnf-1 (which encodes the cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1). Our results show that 20% of the samples (N = 41) tested positive for detectable amounts of pks island genes, whereas 10% of individuals were positive for tcpC or gelE and only one individual was found to harbor the cnf-1 gene. Of the 13 individuals that were positive for at least one of the pro-inflammatory genes, 5 were found to harbor more than one. A quantitative version of the assay, which used real-time PCR, revealed the pro-inflammatory genes to be in high copy numbers: up to 1.3 million copies per mg of feces for the pks island genes. Direct detection of specific genes in stool could prove useful toward screening for the presence of pro-inflammatory bacterial genes in individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases or colorectal cancer. PMID:25635239

  9. Accuracy of early detection of colorectal tumours by stool methylation markers: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hu; Qi, Jian; Wu, Ya-Qiong; Zhang, Ping; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Qi-Xian; Zhu, You-Qing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the accuracy of methylation of genes in stool samples for diagnosing colorectal tumours. METHODS: Electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese Journals Full-Text Database and Wanfang Journals Full-Text Database were searched to find relevant original articles about methylated genes to be used in diagnosing colorectal tumours. A quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies tool (QADAS) was used to evaluate the quality of the included articles, and the Meta-disc 1.4 and SPSS 13.0 software programs were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria, and 4484 patients were included. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) were 73% (95%CI: 71%-75%) and 92% (95%CI: 90%-93%), respectively. For adenoma, the sensitivity and specificity were 51% (95%CI: 47%-54%) and 92% (95%CI: 90%-93%), respectively. Pooled diagnostic performance of SFRP2 methylation for CRC provided the following results: the sensitivity was 79% (95%CI: 75%-82%), the specificity was 93% (95%CI: 90%-96%), the diagnostic OR was 47.57 (95%CI: 20.08-112.72), the area under the curve was 0.9565. Additionally, the results of accuracy of SFRP2 methylation for detecting colorectal adenomas were as follows: sensitivity was 43% (95%CI: 38%-49%), specificity was 94% (95%CI: 91%-97%), the diagnostic OR was 11.06 (95%CI: 5.77-21.18), and the area under the curve was 0.9563. CONCLUSION: Stool-based DNA testing may be useful for noninvasively diagnosing colorectal tumours and SFRP2 methylation is a promising marker that has great potential in early CRC diagnosis. PMID:25320544

  10. Pentaplex PCR assay for detection of hemorrhagic bacteria from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Talib, Hassanain; Latif, Baha; Mohd-Zain, Zaini

    2014-09-01

    Diarrheal diseases cause illness and death among children younger than 10 years in developing countries. Conventional testing for the detection of hemorrhagic bacteria takes 2 to 5 days to yield complete information on the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Hence, in the present study, we developed a molecular-based diagnostic assay that identifies common hemorrhagic bacteria in stool samples. A set of specific primers were designed for the detection of Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), and Campylobacter spp., suitable for use in a one-tube PCR assay. The assay in the present study simultaneously detected five genes, namely, ompC for the Salmonella genus, virA for the Shigella genus, eaeA for EHEC, 16S rRNA for the Campylobacter genus, and hemA for an internal control. Specific primer pairs were successfully designed and simultaneously amplified the targeted genes. Validation with 20 Gram-negative and 17 Gram-positive strains yielded 100% specificity. The limit of detection of the multiplex PCR assay was 1 × 10(3) CFU at the bacterial cell level and 100 pg at the genomic DNA level. Further evaluation of the multiplex PCR with 223 bacterium-spiked stool specimens revealed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We conclude that the developed multiplex PCR assay was rapid, giving results within 4 h, which is essential for the identification of hemorrhagic bacteria, and it might be useful as an additional diagnostic tool whenever time is important in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic bacteria that cause diarrhea. In addition, the presence of an internal control in the multiplex PCR assay is important for excluding false-negative cases.

  11. An uncooked vegan diet shifts the profile of human fecal microflora: computerized analysis of direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography profiles of bacterial cellular fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, R; Ling, W H; Hänninen, O; Eerola, E

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an uncooked extreme vegan diet on fecal microflora was studied by direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of bacterial cellular fatty acids and by quantitative bacterial culture by using classical microbiological techniques of isolation, identification, and enumeration of different bacterial species. Eighteen volunteers were divided randomly into two groups. The test group received an uncooked vegan diet for 1 month and a conventional diet of mixed Western type for the other month of the study. The control group consumed a conventional diet throughout the study period. Stool samples were collected. Bacterial cellular fatty acids were extracted directly from the stool samples and measured by GLC. Computerized analysis of the resulting fatty acid profiles was performed. Such a profile represents all bacterial cellular fatty acids in a sample and thus reflects its microflora and can be used to detect changes, differences, or similarities of bacterial flora between individual samples or sample groups. GLC profiles changed significantly in the test group after the induction and discontinuation of the vegan diet but not in the control group at any time, whereas quantitative bacterial culture did not detect any significant change in fecal bacteriology in either of the groups. The results suggest that an uncooked extreme vegan diet alters the fecal bacterial flora significantly when it is measured by direct stool sample GLC of bacterial fatty acids. PMID:1482187

  12. Comparison of Buffered, Acidified Plate Antigen to Standard Serologic Tests for the Detection of Serum Antibodies to Brucella abortus in Elk (Cervus canadensis).

    PubMed

    Clarke, P Ryan; Edwards, William H; Hennager, Steven G; Block, Jean F; Yates, Angela M; Ebel, Eric; Knopp, Douglas J; Fuentes-Sanchez, Antonio; Jennings-Gaines, Jessica; Kientz, Rebecca L; Simunich, Marilyn

    2015-07-01

    Brucellosis (caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus) is a zoonotic disease endemic in wild elk (Cervus canadensis) of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, US. Because livestock and humans working with elk or livestock are at risk, validated tests to detect the B. abortus antibody in elk are needed. Using the κ-statistic, we evaluated the buffered, acidified plate antigen (BAPA) assay for agreement with the results of the four serologic tests (card test [card], complement fixation test [CF], rivanol precipitation plate agglutination test [RIV], standard plate agglutination test [SPT]) that are approved by the US Department of Agriculture for the detection of the B. abortus antibody in elk. From 2006 to 2010, serum samples collected from elk within B. abortus-endemic areas (n = 604) and nonendemic areas (n = 707) and from elk culture-positive for B. abortus (n = 36) were split and blind tested by four elk serum diagnostic laboratories. κ-Values showed a high degree of agreement for the card (0.876), RIV (0.84), and CF (0.774) test pairings and moderate agreement for the SPT (0.578). Sensitivities for the BAPA, card, RIV, CF, and SPT were 0.859, 0.839, 0.899, 1.00, and 0.813, whereas specificities were 0.986, 0.993, 0.986, 0.98, and 0.968, respectively. The positive predictive values and the negative predictive values were calculated for 2.6%, 8.8%, and 16.2% prevalence levels. These findings suggest the BAPA test is a suitable screening test for the B. abortus antibodies in elk.

  13. Sensitivity and specificity of the Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary antigen test for unconcentrated urine from adult patients with pneumonia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Horita, Nobuyuki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kojima, Ryota; Kimura, Naoko; Inoue, Miyo; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-11-01

    Studies on the sensitivity and specificity of the Binax Now Streptococcus pneumonia urinary antigen test (index test) show considerable variance of results. Those written in English provided sufficient original data to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the index test using unconcentrated urine to identify S. pneumoniae infection in adults with pneumonia. Reference tests were conducted with at least one culture and/or smear. We estimated sensitivity and two specificities. One was the specificity evaluated using only patients with pneumonia of identified other aetiologies ('specificity (other)'). The other was the specificity evaluated based on both patients with pneumonia of unknown aetiology and those with pneumonia of other aetiologies ('specificity (unknown and other)') using a fixed model for meta-analysis. We found 10 articles involving 2315 patients. The analysis of 10 studies involving 399 patients yielded a pooled sensitivity of 0.75 (95% confidence interval: 0.71-0.79) without heterogeneity or publication bias. The analysis of six studies involving 258 patients yielded a pooled specificity (other) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.98) without no heterogeneity or publication bias. We attempted to conduct a meta-analysis with the 10 studies involving 1916 patients to estimate specificity (unknown and other), but it remained unclear due to moderate heterogeneity and possible publication bias. In our meta-analysis, sensitivity of the index test was moderate and specificity (other) was high; however, the specificity (unknown and other) remained unclear.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of the Novel bioNexia Legionella Test with the BinaxNOW Legionella Card Assay and the Sofia Legionella FIA Assay for Detection of Legionella pneumophila (Serogroup 1) Antigen in Urine Samples.

    PubMed

    Congestrì, Francesco; Crepaldi, Elisabetta; Gagliardi, Marina; Pedna, Maria Federica; Sambri, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    A new immunochromatographic test (bioNexiaLegionella; bioMérieux) for the detection ofLegionella pneumophilaurinary antigen was evaluated in 255 urine samples. The results were compared with those obtained by the BinaxNOW and SofiaLegionellatests. The novel test compared well with those currently in use. PMID:26865691

  15. Evaluation of six commercial point-of-care tests for diagnosis of acute dengue infections: the need for combining NS1 antigen and IgM/IgG antibody detection to achieve acceptable levels of accuracy.

    PubMed

    Blacksell, Stuart D; Jarman, Richard G; Bailey, Mark S; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Gibbons, Robert V; Paris, Daniel H; Premaratna, Ranjan; de Silva, H Janaka; Lalloo, David G; Day, Nicholas P J

    2011-12-01

    Six assays were evaluated in this study to determine their suitability for the diagnosis of acute dengue infection using samples from 259 Sri Lankan patients with acute fevers (99 confirmed dengue cases and 160 patients with other confirmed acute febrile illnesses): (i) the Merlin dengue fever IgG & IgM combo device (Merlin), (ii) the Standard Diagnostics Dengue Duo nonstructural 1 (NS1) antigen and IgG/IgM combo device (Standard Diagnostics, South Korea), (iii) the Biosynex Immunoquick dengue fever IgG and IgM (Biosynex, France) assay, (iv) the Bio-Rad NS1 antigen strip (Bio-Rad, France), (v) the Panbio Dengue Duo IgG/IgM Cassette (Inverness, Australia), and (vi) the Panbio dengue NS1 antigen strip (Inverness, Australia). The median number of days of fever prior to admission sample collection was 5 days (interquartile range, 3 to 7 days). Sensitivity and specificity of the NS1 antigen tests ranged from 49 to 59% and from 93 to 99%, respectively, and sensitivity and sensitivity of the IgM antibody test ranged from 71 to 80% and from 46 to 90%, respectively. Combining the NS1 antigen and IgM antibody results from the Standard Diagnostics Dengue Duo test gave the best compromise of sensitivity and specificity (93% and 89%, respectively) and provided the best sensitivity in patients presenting at different times after fever onset. The Merlin IgM/IgG antibody tests correctly classified 64% and 86% of the primary and secondary dengue infection cases, respectively, and the Standard Diagnostics IgM/IgG antibody tests correctly classified 71% and 83% of the primary and secondary dengue infection cases, respectively. This study provides strong evidence of the value of combining dengue antigen- and antibody-based test results in the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) format for the acute diagnosis of dengue.

  16. [Evaluation of the usefulness of the latex test for detection and identification of O-antigens of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Jagielski, M; Kochman, M; Szych, J; Kałuzewski, S; Rastawicki, W

    1996-01-01

    In the study latex reagents of own production were used, in which latex of 0.9 microns particle diameter was coated with globulins salted out from rabbit sera against Y. enterocolitica groups 03, 05, 06, 08 and 09, and Y. pseudotuberculosis groups I and III. The study was carried out with five standard strains of Y. enterocolitica representing groups 03, 05, 06, 08 and 09, two standard strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis representing group antigens I and III, and 110 strains identified as Yersinia organisms, including 83 strains of Y. enterocolitica, 12 - Y. pseudotuberculosis, 7 - Y. frederiksenii, 4 - Y. intermedia, 2 - Y. kristensenii, and 2 strain of unknown species. Besides that, 54 laboratory strains of Enterobacteriaceae not belonging to Yersinia genus were studied. Latex test was done with bacterial suspensions of 6 x 10(8) cell/ml density of standard Yersinia strains and laboratory strains of Enterobacteriaceae, and with 110 Yersinia strains cultured in broth and peptone water media with tryptophan 0.1%. It was found that the prepared latex reagents reacted in the agglutination test on slide only with the suspensions of homologus. Yersinia organisms but not with suspensions of other Enterobacteriaceae. Among 83 strains identified as Y. enterocolitica 24 belonged to group 03, 19 to 05, 10 to 06, 2 to 08, 2 to 09. In the 12 strains identified as Y. pseudotuberculosis 9 belonged to group I and 2 to group III. The study showed that the latex reagents prepared by us can be used for identification of O-antigen of Yersinia organism immediately in liquid media.

  17. Immunochromatographic antigen testing alone is sufficient to identify asymptomatic refugees at risk of severe malaria presenting to a single health service in Victoria.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Pasquale L; Wheeler, Michael; Lemoh, Christopher; Chunilal, Sanjeev

    2014-10-01

    Current screening guidelines for malaria in new refugees include a combination of thick and thin film examination and immunochromatographic antigen test (ICT). However, as the prevalence of malaria in our population has decreased due to changing refugee demographics, we sought to determine if an ICT alone can reliably exclude malaria in our asymptomatic refugee population.A retrospective analysis was conducted of all investigations for malaria performed from 1 August 2011 to 31 July 2013, including thick and thin blood film examination, BinaxNOW ICT, and external morphological and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) validation where applicable.Malaria was diagnosed in 45 of 1248 (3.6%) patients investigated, all of whom were symptomatic and the majority (71.1%) returned travellers. All 599 asymptomatic refugees screened were negative. Overall, 42 of 45 malaria cases were detected by the ICT; sensitivity 93.3% (95% CI 80.7-98.3%) and negative predictive value (NPV) 99.8% (99.2-99.9%). All 21 cases of Plasmodium falciparum and 20 of 22 cases of Plasmodium vivax were detected, giving a sensitivity of 100% (80.8-100%) and 90.9% (69.4-98.4%) respectively. Too few cases of Plasmodium malariae and no cases of Plasmodium ovale or Plasmodium knowlesi were diagnosed for adequate assessment to be carried out.These data suggest that full malaria screening in all asymptomatic refugees with the combination of thick and thin blood films and rapid antigen test may not be warranted. Alternative screening approaches should be considered, including the use of ICT alone, or limiting screening of asymptomatic refugees to only those originating from countries with high incidence of malaria. PMID:25158813

  18. Antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from stool samples of children aged 3 to 14 years from Ujjain, India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a major global public health concern, particularly in settings where few treatment options are available. Limited research has been done on antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli of Indian children at community level. Therefore we studied antibiotic resistance patterns in E. coli isolates from stool samples of children aged 3-14 years from Ujjain, Central India, to investigate associations of resistance with demographic variables. Methods Children, 3-14 years of age, were included from 30 randomly selected villages of Palwa demographic surveillance site, Ujjain, India. Parents were interviewed using a questionnaire, and stool samples were collected from participating children. E. coli were isolated from stool samples (n = 529), and susceptibility testing to 18 different antibiotics was done using standard methods. Results The proportions of isolates resistant to various antibiotics were, nalidixic acid, (45%), tetracycline (37%), ampicillin (37%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (29%) and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (29%). No isolates were resistant to imipenem. Overall, 72% of isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic and 33% were multi-drug resistant. High rates of cross-resistance were seen for 15 (83%) of the antibiotics studied. E. coli isolates from children with literate mothers were more resistant to penicillins and fluoroquinolones. ESBL-producers comprised 9% of the isolates. Conclusion Antibiotic resistance and cross-resistance were common in E. coli from stools of children. Resistance rates were associated with maternal literacy. PMID:24124728

  19. CHROMagar Yersinia, a New Chromogenic Agar for Screening of Potentially Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates in Stools

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Nicolas; Lecci, Laetitia; Courcol, René J.; Simonet, Michel

    2013-01-01

    CHROMagar Yersinia (CAY) is a new chromogenic medium for the presumptive detection of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica in stools. Based on a comparative analysis of 1,494 consecutive stools from hospitalized patients, CAY was found to be just as sensitive as the reference medium (cefsulodin-irgasan-novobiocin agar) but was significantly more specific and had a very low false-positive rate. CAY reduces the workload (and thus costs) for stool analysis and can therefore be recommended for routine laboratory use. PMID:23363840

  20. Detection of gastric Helicobacter spp. in stool samples of dogs with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and identify the species of gastric Helicobacter in the stool of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on thirty dogs of different breeds, of both genders and of various ages, diagnosed with gastritis. Helicobacter spp. was detected in stool samples using the nested-PCR method. Helicobacter bacteria were identified in stool samples from seven (23.3%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was found to be the most common species of gastric Helicobacter. Helicobacter salomonis was identified much less frequently, while Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter bizzozeronii were not detected in any of the samples. PMID:27487496

  1. Analysis of the Optimal Cut-point for HIV-p24 Antigen Testing to Diagnose HIV Infection in HIV-Exposed Children from Resource-Constrained Settings

    PubMed Central

    Tamhane, M.; Gautney, B.; Shiu, C.; Segaren, N.; Jeannis, L.; Eustache, C.; Simeon-Fadois, Y.; Chen, Y. H.; De, D.; Irivinti, S.; Tamma, P.; Thompson, C. B.; Khamadi, S.; Siberry, G.K.; Persaud, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nucleic-acid-testing (NAT) to diagnose HIV infection in children under age 18 months provides a barrier to HIV-testing in exposed children from resource-constrained settings. The ultrasensitive HIV- p24- antigen (Up24) assay is cheaper and easier to perform and is sensitive (84–98%) and specific (98–100%). The cut-point optical density (OD) selected for discriminating between positive and negative samples may need assessment due to regional differences in mother-to-child HIV-transmission rates. Objectives We used receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves and logistic regression analyses to assess the effect of various cut-points on the diagnostic performance of Up24 for HIV-infection status among HIV-exposed children. Positive and negative predictive values at different rates of disease prevalence were also estimated. Study design A study of Up24 testing on dried blood spot (DBS) samples collected from 278 HIV-exposed Haitian children, 3–24-months of age, in whom HIV-infection status was determined by NAT on the same DBS card. Results The sensitivity and specificity of Up24 varied by the cut-point-OD value selected. At a cut-point-OD of 8-fold the standard deviation of the negative control (NCSD), sensitivity and specificity of Up24 were maximized [87.8% (95% CI, 83.9–91.6) and 92% (95% CI, 88.8–95.2), respectively]. In lower prevalence settings (5%), positive and negative predictive values of Up24 were maximal (75.9% and 98.8%, respectively) at a cut-point-OD that was 15-fold the NCSD. Conclusions In low prevalence settings, a high degree of specificity can be achieved with Up24 testing of HIV-exposed children when a higher cut-point OD is used; a feature that may facilitate more frequent use of Up24 antigen testing for HIV-exposed children. PMID:21330193

  2. The use of sucrose-acetone-extracted Rift Valley fever virus antigen derived from cell culture in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and haemagglutination-inhibition test.

    PubMed

    Paweska, J T; Barnard, B J; Williams, R

    1995-12-01

    A sucrose-acetone-extracted, Madin-Darby-bovine-kidney (MDBK)-derived Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) antigen was tested both in an indirect ELISA and a haemagglutination-inhibition test for its ability to detect serum antibodies to RVFV. Optimal conditions for antigen concentration, serum and conjugate dilutions for the ELISA were established by checkerboard titration. The specificity and sensitivity of ELISA were determined by the use of paired pre- and post-vaccination sheep-serum samples. Compared with the virus neutralization test, the overall ELISA specificity and sensitivity were 97.4 and 97.3%, respectively. There was a 100% correlation between the results obtained in haemagglutination-inhibition tests with a RVFV sucrose-acetone-extracted antigen derived from hamster liver, and from MDBK cells. A total of 10 582 field-serum samples (84 cattle, 3,659 sheep, 6,839 goats) collected in 1994-1995 from animals of unknown vaccination status in different regions of South Africa were tested with ELISA for antibodies against RVFV. There were no seropositive cattle, 0.16% seropositive sheep and 0.12% seropositive goats. This study demonstrates the potential diagnostic application of cell-culture-derived, sucrose-acetone-extracted RVFV antigen in an indirect ELISA and HI test.

  3. Tulane Virus Recognizes the A Type 3 and B Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Huang, Pengwei; Zou, Lu; Lowary, Todd L.; Tan, Ming

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tulane virus (TV), the prototype of the Recovirus genus in the calicivirus family, was isolated from the stools of rhesus monkeys and can be cultivated in vitro in monkey kidney cells. TV is genetically closely related to the genus Norovirus and recognizes the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), similarly to human noroviruses (NoVs), making it a valuable surrogate for human NoVs. However, the precise structures of HBGAs recognized by TV remain elusive. In this study, we performed binding and blocking experiments on TV with extended HBGA types and showed that, while TV binds all four types (types 1 to 4) of the B antigens, it recognizes only the A type 3 antigen among four types of A antigens tested. The requirements for HBGAs in TV replication were demonstrated by blocking of TV replication in cell culture using the A type 3/4 and B saliva samples. Similar results were also observed in oligosaccharide-based blocking assays. Importantly, the previously reported, unexplained increase in TV replication by oligosaccharide in cell-based blocking assays has been clarified, which will facilitate the application of TV as a surrogate for human NoVs. IMPORTANCE Our understanding of the role of HBGAs in NoV infection has been significantly advanced in the past decade, but direct evidence for HBGAs as receptors for human NoVs remains lacking due to a lack of a cell culture method. TV recognizes HBGAs and can replicate in vitro, providing a valuable surrogate for human NoVs. However, TV binds to some but not all saliva samples from A-positive individuals, and an unexplained observation of synthetic oligosaccharide blocking of TV binding has been reported. These issues have been resolved in this study. PMID:25392226

  4. Specific testing for “isolated” anti‐52 kDa SSA/Ro antibodies during standard anti‐extractable nuclear antigen testing is of limited clinical value

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, Daman M; Morris, Samantha; Clifford, Lynette; Wilson, Robert J; Neil, John; Hogan, Patrick G; Wong, Richard C W

    2007-01-01

    Aim To ascertain whether specific testing for “isolated” anti‐52 kDa SSA/Ro antibodies (a‐SSA/Ro52) during standard anti‐extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) testing is clinically useful. Methods 1438 consecutive sera submitted for anti‐ENA testing over 1 year were evaluated for a‐SSA/Ro52 using various assays. Results 7 of 1438 (0.48%) patients were found to have a‐SSA/Ro52 without SSA/Ro60 antibodies. Subsequent testing detected a further five patients. Clinical follow‐up was possible in 10/12 patients. 2 of these 10 patients had evidence of primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and one had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with sicca symptoms and abnormal Schirmer's tests. Five other patients had sicca symptoms, of which four had abnormal Schirmer's tests. Conclusions “Isolated” anti‐52 kDa SSA/Ro antibodies were detected in approximately 0.5% of standard anti‐ENA requests, in which their presence was generally not associated with underlying SS or SLE. In view of the increased testing complexity and costs in detecting and confirming these antibodies, specific testing for isolated a‐SSA Ro52 antibodies during standard anti‐ENA testing seems to be of limited clinical value in a non‐obstetric population. PMID:17557869

  5. 34. GENERAL VIEW OF ML9. TOP OF 'MILK STOOL' HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. GENERAL VIEW OF ML-9. TOP OF 'MILK STOOL' HAS BEEN REMOVED (LEFT) AND MACHINE ROOM OF HAMMERHEAD CRANE IS VISIBLE ON GROUND AT RIGHT. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  6. HIV Incidence Estimates Using the Limiting Antigen Avidity EIA Assay at Testing Sites in Kiev City, Ukraine: 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Kruglov, Yuri; Yurchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate HIV incidence and highlight the characteristics of persons at greatest risk of HIV in the Ukraine capital, Kiev. Method Residual samples from newly-diagnosed persons attending the Kiev City AIDS Centre were tested for evidence of recent HIV infection using an avidity assay. Questions on possible risk factors for HIV acquisition and testing history were introduced. All persons (≥16yrs) presenting for an HIV test April’13–March’14 were included. Rates per 100,000 population were calculated using region-specific denominators. Results During the study period 6370 individuals tested for HIV. Of the 467 individuals newly-diagnosed with HIV, 21 had insufficient samples for LAg testing. Of the remaining 446, 39 (8.7%) were classified as recent with an avidity index <1.5ODn, 10 were reclassified as long-standing as their viral load was <1000 copies/mL, resulting in 29 (6.5%) recent HIV infections. The only independent predictor for a recent infection was probable route of exposure, with MSM more likely to present with a recent infection compared with heterosexual contact [Odds Ratio 8.86; 95%CI 2.65–29.60]. We estimated HIV incidence at 21.5 per 100,000 population, corresponding to 466 new infections. Using population estimates for MSM and PWID, incidence was estimated to be between 2289.6 and 6868.7/100,000 MSM, and 350.4 for PWID. Conclusion A high proportion of persons newly-infected remain undiagnosed, with MSM disproportionally affected with one in four newly-HIV-diagnosed and one in three recently-HIV-infected. Our findings should be used for targeted public health interventions and health promotion. PMID:27276170

  7. Simple Fecal Flotation Is a Superior Alternative to Guadruple Kato Katz Smear Examination for the Detection of Hookworm Eggs in Human Stool

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Dalsgaard, Anders; Marti, Hanspeter; Traub, Rebecca J.; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Microscopy-based identification of eggs in stool offers simple, reliable and economical options for assessing the prevalence and intensity of hookworm infections, and for monitoring the success of helminth control programs. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the diagnostic parameters of the Kato-Katz (KK) and simple sodium nitrate flotation technique (SNF) in terms of detection and quantification of hookworm eggs, with PCR as an additional reference test in stool, collected as part of a baseline cross-sectional study in Cambodia. Methods/Principle Findings Fecal samples collected from 205 people in Dong village, Rovieng district, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia were subjected to KK, SNF and PCR for the detection (and in case of microscopy-based methods, quantification) of hookworm eggs in stool. The prevalence of hookworm detected using a combination of three techniques (gold standard) was 61.0%. PCR displayed a highest sensitivity for hookworm detection (92.0%) followed by SNF (44.0%) and quadruple KK smears (36.0%) compared to the gold standard. The overall eggs per gram feces from SNF tended to be higher than for quadruple KK and the SNF proved superior for detecting low egg burdens. Conclusion/Significance As a reference, PCR demonstrated the higher sensitivity compared to SNF and the quadruple KK method for detection of hookworm in human stool. For microscopic-based quantification, a single SNF proved superior to the quadruple KK for the detection of hookworm eggs in stool, in particular for low egg burdens. In addition, the SNF is cost-effective and easily accessible in resource poor countries. PMID:25521997

  8. Stool submission by general practitioners in SW England - when, why and how? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We know little about when and why general practitioners (GPs) submit stool specimens in patients with diarrhoea. The recent UK-wide intestinal infectious disease (IID2) study found ten GP consultations for every case reported to national surveillance. We aimed to explore what factors influence GP’s decisions to send stool specimens for laboratory investigation, and what guidance, if any, informs them. Methods We used qualitative methods that enabled us to explore opinions and ask open questions through 20 telephone interviews with GPs with a range of stool submission rates in England, and a discussion group with 24 GPs. Interviews were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. Results Interviews: GPs only sent stool specimens to microbiology if diarrhoea persisted for over one week, after recent travel, or the patient was very unwell. Very few had a systematic approach to determine the clinical or public health need for a stool specimen. Only two GPs specifically asked patients about blood in their stool; only half asked about recent antibiotics, or potential food poisoning, and few asked about patients’ occupations. Few GPs gave patients advice on how to collect specimens. Results from interviews and discussion group in relation to guidance: All reported that the HPA stool guidance and patient collection instructions would be useful in their clinical work, but only one GP (an interviewee) had previously accessed them. The majority of GPs would value links to guidance on electronic requests. Most GPs were surprised that a negative stool report did not exclude all the common causes of IID. Conclusions GPs value stool culture and laboratories should continue to provide it. Patient instructions on how to collect stool specimens should be within stool collection kits. Through readily accessible guidance and education, GPs need to be encouraged to develop a more systematic approach to eliciting and recording details in the patient’s history that

  9. [Screening tests combined with p24 antigen and anti-HIV antibodies in early detection of HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Laperche, S; Maniez-Montreuil, M; Couroucé, A M

    2000-06-01

    The five available p24 Ag/anti-HIV combined tests were compared to the six third-generation anti-HIV assays mainly used in blood transfusion centers. Among 70 selected HIV-1 positive samples (12 samples from early infected blood donors and 58 from ten commercial panels), 59 were positive with at least one assay. False negative results were observed for zero to six samples with p24 Ag/Ab assays versus seven to 19 with antibody (Ab) tests. In five cases, one or more combined assays gave a positive signal later than the most sensitive Ab screening test. One sample with a high p24 Ag titer was missed by one combined test. The mean time delay between the most sensitive test and the second one was 0.3 to 2 days. The p24 Ag limit of detection was investigated with seven dilutions of the HIV Ag reference. The threshold of the p24 Ag detection was found to be between 65 and 250 pg/mL of HIV Ag. For four of the five combined assays, p24 Ag detectability was assessed with dilutions of infected culture cell supernatants from 13 HIV-1 different genotype strains exhibiting HIV Ag titers from 300 to 450 pg/mL. One of the four combined assays gave negative results but close to the cut-off for three supernatant dilutions (1 B, 1 F, 1 HIV-1/O) and one missed the HIV-1/O dilution. The p24 Ag/Ab combined assays permit an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection than third generation assays even if the yield in terms of reduction of the window period is moderate. They are less sensitive than p24 Ag screening assays for the detection of this marker. Consequently, the p24 Ag/Ab assays have not been used for the diagnosis of a primary infection instead of p24 Ag screening tests. They must be considered only as good tools for the detection of HIV infection.

  10. Modification of stool's water content in constipated infants: management with an adapted infant formula

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Constipation is a common occurrence in formula-fed infants. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the impact of a formula with high levels of lactose and magnesium, in compliance with the official regulations, on stool water content, as well as a parental assessment of constipation. Materials and methods Thirty healthy term-born, formula-fed infants, aged 4-10 weeks, with functional constipation were included. All infants were full-term and fed standard formula. Exclusion criteria were preterm and/or low birth weight, organic constipation, being breast fed or fed a formula specially designed to treat constipation. Stool composition was measured by near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and parents answered questions about crying associated with defecation and stool consistency at baseline and after two weeks of the adapted formula. Results After 2 weeks of the adapted formula, stool water content increased from 71 +/- 8.1% to 84 +/- 5.9%, (p < 0.02). There was no significant change in the stool's fat, protein or carbohydrate content. Parental impressions of constipation were improved with the decrease in stool hardness (100% with hard stools at baseline, 10% after 2 weeks), pain with defecation (90% at baseline, 10% after 2 weeks), and the requirement for rectal stimulation to achieve defecation (70% at baseline, 30% after 2 weeks, p < 0.001 for all three indicators). Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that an adapted formula with high levels of lactose and magnesium increases stool water content and improves symptoms of constipation in term-born, formula-fed infants. A larger randomized placebo-controlled trial is indicated. PMID:21595890

  11. Evaluation of a Single Procedure Allowing the Isolation of Enteropathogenic Yersinia along with Other Bacterial Enteropathogens from Human Stools

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Cyril; Leclercq, Alexandre; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia are among the most frequent agents of human diarrhea in temperate and cold countries. However, the incidence of yersiniosis is largely underestimated because of the peculiar growth characteristics of pathogenic Yersinia, which make their isolation from poly-contaminated samples difficult. The use of specific procedures for Yersinia isolation is required, but is expensive and time consuming, and therefore is not systematically performed in clinical pathology laboratories. A means to circumvent this problem would be to use a single procedure for the isolation of all bacterial enteropathogens. Since the Statens Serum Institut enteric medium (SSI) has been reported to allow the growth at 37°C of most Gram-negative bacteria, including Yersinia, our study aimed at evaluating its performances for Yersinia isolation, as compared to the commonly used Yersinia-specific semi-selective Cefsulodin-Irgasan-Novobiocin medium (CIN) incubated at 28°C. Our results show that Yersinia pseudotuberculosis growth was strongly inhibited on SSI at 37°C, and therefore that this medium is not suitable for the isolation of this species. All Yersinia enterocolitica strains tested grew on SSI, while some non-pathogenic Yersinia species were inhibited. The morphology of Y. enterocolitica colonies on SSI allowed their differentiation from various other Gram-negative bacteria commonly isolated from stool samples. However, in artificially contaminated human stools, the recovery of Y. enterocolitica colonies on SSI at 37°C was difficult and was 3 logs less sensitive than on CIN at 28°C. Therefore, despite its limitations, the use of a specific procedure (CIN incubated at 28°C) is still required for an efficient isolation of enteropathogenic Yersinia from stools. PMID:22911756

  12. Comparison of the OptiMAL rapid antigen test with field microscopy for the detection of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: considerations for the application of the rapid test in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Kolaczinski, J; Mohammed, N; Ali, I; Ali, M; Khan, N; Ezard, N; Rowland, M

    2004-01-01

    To establish the sensitivity and specificity of a batch of 'OptiMAL 48' rapid antigen tests procured by the World Health Organization in Afghanistan, a sample was tested, in parallel with routine, microscopical diagnosis, at basic health units (BHU) within Afghan refugee camps in Pakistan. The results of both methods of field diagnosis were compared with those of cross-checking microscopy at a reference laboratory, which were taken as the 'gold standard'. Out of 499 patients examined, 36% were diagnosed as malaria cases by field microscopy and 34% by the rapid test. For the OptiMAL 48 test, cross-checking of the corresponding smears at the reference laboratory gave a sensitivity of 79.3% and a specificity of 99.7% for Plasmodium falciparum and corresponding values of 86.1% and 98.7% for P. vivax infections. The performance of the field microscopy was better, with a sensitivity and specificity of 85.2% and 99.7% for P. falciparum, and 90.4% and 98.7% for P. vivax, respectively. These results show that the performance of OptiMAL 48 is adequate for acute- and post-emergency situations when the alternative is just clinical diagnosis. However, in the developing health system of Afghanistan, the main focus should be on the expansion of the existing network for microscopical diagnosis and quality control, to meet the needs of a stable situation. Rapid antigen tests are more suited to investigations of outbreaks in remote situations, where health services are deficient or absent. PMID:15000726

  13. Effect of test system on the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect antigenic drift in influenza A(H1N1) virus haemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Kendal, A P; Phillips, D J; Webster, R G; Galland, G G; Reimer, C B

    1981-06-01

    Results of analysing antigenic variation in the haemagglutinin (HA) molecule of naturally occurring influenza A (H1N1) viruses from 1977 to 1979 with monoclonal antibodies were found to be dependent in some instances on the test system used. In several instances A/USSR/90/77 HA-specific monoclonal antibodies had sharply reduced haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) titres with variant virus although they bound to the variant and A/USSR/90/77 HAs with similar efficiencies as judged by titration in a sensitive and accurate solid-phase immunofluorimetric assay. In another instance, the converse situation was observed: monoclonal antibodies having a reduced efficiency of binding to the HA of a variant virus nevertheless had comparable HI titres with the variant and with A/USSR/90/77. The chemical basis and epidemiological significance of these observations remain to be elucidated. Nevertheless, the finding that the reaction of monoclonal antibodies can, in some cases, be markedly dependent on the test system employed is of significance for the efficient design and correct interpretation of immunochemical studies which employ monoclonal antibodies to investigate the basis for variation in influenza strains.

  14. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  15. The fibrinogen antigenic turbidimetric assay (FIATA): the X2x test--the corrected chi-square comparison against the control-mean.

    PubMed

    Stief, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    Vancomycin precipitates fibrinogen. The turbidity induced by this vancomycin-fibrinogen interaction is used to establish a simple standardized antigenic assay for plasmatic fibrinogen, the FIATA. 1 mM vancomycin or 2 mM chloramine-T inactivates 50% of fibrinogen in human plasma. In contrast to chloramine-T, vancomycin does not react in NaJ-based photometric assay for chloramines,vancomycin does not inactivate the singlet oxygen-sensible antithrombin III, and the vancomycin action against fibrinogen is not changed in spite of the presence of the 1O2 quenchers methionine or ascorbic acid. The FIATA is performed as follows: to 25 microL plasma 50 microL PBS are added and the absorbance (A) at 405 nm is read. Then 50 microL FIATA-reagent, consisting of 4.4 mM vancomycin in PBS, are added. After 2 minutes (RT) DeltaA is determined and standardized against a plasma pool of 100% of norm (2.8 g/L) fibrinogen. The FIATA is nearly linear up to a fibrinogen concentration of about 150% of norm (4.2 g/L), resulting in a DeltaA of about 600 mA. The lower detection limit is 4% of norm (0.1 g/L). The intra-assay and interessay CV values are < 4%. The normal range of FIATA is 100% +/-20% (x- +/- 1 SD). In = 321 or 344 unselected patient plasmas the FIATA (x- = 130%; SD = 52% or 43%) correlated with the functional fibrinogen assays a) modified Clauss-Method (x- = 4.1 g/L; SD =1.7 g/L) with r = 0.755 and b) FIFTA (x- = 124%; SD = 40%) with r = 0.813. The vancomycin/fibrinogen interaction (binding of about 16 molecules of vancomycin/molecule of fibrinogen) can be used to purify fibrinogen out of plasma. Vancomycin also clouds dysfunctional fibrinogen (fibrinogen in presence of EDTA or chloramine-T)or soluble fibrin. Vancomycin-reacted fibrinogen stimulates tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) up to about 20-fold. The experimental data are analyzed by a new significance test: the two foldYates-corrected chi-square comparison against the mean value ofthe control-collective, called

  16. A new human IgG avidity test, using mixtures of recombinant antigens (rROP1, rSAG2, rGRA6), for the diagnosis of difficult-to-identify phases of toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Drapała, Dorota; Holec-Gąsior, Lucyna; Kur, Józef; Ferra, Bartłomiej; Hiszczyńska-Sawicka, Elżbieta; Lautenbach, Dariusz

    2014-07-01

    The preliminary diagnostic utility of two mixtures of Toxoplasma gondii recombinant antigens (rROP1+rSAG2 and rROP1+rGRA6) in IgG ELISA and IgG avidity test has been evaluated. A total of 173 serum samples from patients with toxoplasmosis and seronegative people were examined. The sensitivity of IgG ELISA for rROP1+rSAG2 and rROP1+rGRA6 was 91.1% and 76.7%, respectively, while the reactivity for sera from patients where acute toxoplasmosis was suspected was higher, at 100% and 95.4%, respectively, than for people with chronic infection, at 88.2% and 70.6%. In this study a different trend in avidity maturation of IgG antibodies for two mixtures of proteins in comparison with native antigen was observed. The results suggest that a new IgG avidity test using the mixtures of recombinant antigens may be useful for the diagnosis of difficult-to-identify phases of toxoplasmosis. For this reason, selected mixtures after the additional tests on groups of sera with well-defined dates of infection could be used as a better alternative to the native antigens of the parasite in the serodiagnosis of human T. gondii infection.

  17. Stool characteristics of infants receiving short-chain galacto-oligosaccharides and long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides: a review.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Petra A M J; Goossens, Dominique A M; Staiano, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Human milk is considered to be the optimal source of infant nutrition. Some of the benefits of breastfeeding have been ascribed to human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). For instance, HMO can affect faecal characteristics such as stool consistency and stool frequency. Such effects on stool characteristics can be beneficial for young infants as hard stools and even constipation is common in that age group. Prebiotics in infant milk formulas have been introduced to exert similar functionalities. A specific mixture of prebiotics consists of a combination of short chain galacto-oligosaccharides and long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS) in a ratio of 9:1. This specific mixture has been developed to closely resemble the molecular size composition of HMO. Many studies have been done with scGOS/lcFOS, and indicators for digestive comfort have often been included as secondary outcomes. This review summarizes the effects of scGOS/lcFOS (9:1) on stool consistency, stool frequency and transit time in healthy term and preterm infants. In several of the studies with scGOS/lcFOS in a ratio of 9:1 in infant milk formulas, positive effects of this mixture on stool characteristics such as stool consistency and stool frequency were observed. As stool consistency was shown to be correlated to whole gut transit time, scGOS/lcFOS can be hypothesised to have a role in reducing the risk of constipation.

  18. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  19. Effect of climatic conditions on epidemic patterns of influenza in Okinawa, Japan, during the pandemic of 2009: surveillance of rapid antigen test results.

    PubMed

    Iha, Yoshikazu; Higa, Futoshi; Sunagawa, Satoko; Naka, Masamitsu; Cash, Haley L; Miyagi, Kazuya; Haranaga, Shusaku; Tateyama, Masao; Uno, Tsukasa; Fujita, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Climatic conditions may have affected the incidence of influenza during the pandemic of 2009 as well as at other times. This study evaluated the effects of climatic conditions on influenza incidence in Okinawa, a subtropical region in Japan, during the 2009 pandemic using surveillance data from rapid antigen test (RAT) results. Weekly RAT results performed in four acute care hospitals in the Naha region of the Okinawa Islands from January 2007 to July 2011 were anonymously collected for surveillance of regional influenza prevalence. Intense epidemic peaks were noted in August 2009 and December 2009-January 2010 during the influenza pandemic of 2009. RAT positivity rates were lower during the pandemic period than during the pre- and post-pandemic periods. Lower ambient temperature was associated with higher influenza incidence during pre- and post-pandemic periods but not during the pandemic of 2009. Lower relative humidity was associated with higher influenza incidence during the pandemic as well as during the other two periods. The association of climatic conditions and influenza incidence was less prominent during the pandemic of 2009 than during pre- and post-pandemic periods.

  20. The Effect of Rapid Antigen Detection Test on Antibiotic Prescription Decision of Clinicians and Reducing Antibiotic Costs in Children with Acute Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Kose, Engin; Sirin Kose, Seda; Akca, Deniz; Yildiz, Kerem; Elmas, Cengizhan; Baris, Mustafa; Anil, Murat

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of rapid antigen detection test (RADT) in the diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis, its impact on antibiotic prescription decision of pediatricians and influence on reduction of antibiotic treatment costs in children with pharyngitis. The study group consisted of 223 patients who were diagnosed with pharyngitis by pediatricians. The sensitivity and specificity of RADT were 92.1% (95% Cl: 78.6-98.3%) and 97.3% (95% Cl: 93.8-99.1%), respectively. In the first assessment, before performing RADT, pediatricians decided to prescribe antibiotics for 178 (79.8%) patients with pharyngitis. After learning RADT results, pediatricians finally decided to prescribe antibiotics for 83 (37.2%) patients with pharyngitis, and antibiotic prescription decreased by 42.6%. Antibiotic costs in non-Group A streptococcus pharyngitis, Group A streptococcus pharyngitis and all subjects groups decreased by 80.8%, 48%, and 76.4%, respectively. Performing RADT in children with pharyngitis has an important impact on treatment decision of clinicians, reduction of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions and antibiotic costs. PMID:26999012

  1. Impact of rapid antigen detection testing on antibiotic prescription in acute pharyngitis in adults. FARINGOCAT STUDY: a multicentric randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute pharyngitis is one of the most frequent consultations to the general practitioner and in most of the cases an antibiotic is prescribed in primary care in Spain. Bacterial etiology, mainly by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), accounts for 10-20% of all these infections in adults. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of rapid antigen detection testing (RADT) to identify GABHS in acute pharyngitis on the utilization of antibiotics in primary care. Methods/design Multicentric randomized controlled trial in which antibiotic prescription between two groups of patients with acute pharyngitis will be compared. The trial will include two arms, a control and an intervention group in which RADT will be performed. The primary outcome measure will be the proportion of inappropriate antibiotic prescription in each group. Two hundred seventy-six patients are required to detect a reduction in antibiotic prescription from 85% in the control group to 75% in the intervention group with a power of 90% and a level of significance of 5%. Secondary outcome measures will be specific antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance rates, secondary effects, days without working, medical visits during the first month and patient satisfaction. Discussion The implementation of RADT would allow a more rational use of antibiotics and would prevent adverse effects of antibiotics, emergence of antibiotic resistance and the growth of inefficient health expenses. Trial registration ISRCTN23587778 PMID:20331895

  2. Chlamydia Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amplification Test (NAAT); Chlamydia trachomatis Culture; Chlamydia trachomatis DNA Probe Related tests: Gonorrhea Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  3. A Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Early Detection of Schistosoma mansoni in Stool Samples: A Diagnostic Approach in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Gandasegui Arahuetes, Javier; Sánchez Hernández, Alicia; López Abán, Julio; Vicente Santiago, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background Human schistosomiasis, mainly due to Schistosoma mansoni species, is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases worldwide. To overcome the drawbacks of classical parasitological and serological methods in detecting S. mansoni infections, especially in acute stage of the disease, development of cost-effective, simple and rapid molecular methods is still needed for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis. A promising approach is the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technology. Compared to PCR-based assays, LAMP has the advantages of reaction simplicity, rapidity, specificity, cost-effectiveness and higher amplification efficiency. Additionally, as results can be inspected by the naked eye, the technique has great potential for use in low-income countries. Methodology/Principal findings A sequence corresponding to a mitochondrial S. mansoni minisatellite DNA region was selected as a target for designing a LAMP-based method to detect S. mansoni DNA in stool samples. We used a S. mansoni murine model to obtain well defined stool and sera samples from infected mice with S. mansoni cercariae. Samples were taken weekly from week 0 to 8 post-infection and the Kato-Katz and ELISA techniques were used for monitoring the infection. Primer set designed were tested using a commercial reaction mixture for LAMP assay and an in house mixture to compare results. Specificity of LAMP was tested using 16 DNA samples from different parasites, including several Schistosoma species, and no cross-reactions were found. The detection limit of our LAMP assay (SmMIT-LAMP) was 1 fg of S. mansoni DNA. When testing stool samples from infected mice the SmMIT-LAMP detected S. mansoni DNA as soon as 1 week post-infection. Conclusions/Significance We have developed, for the first time, a cost-effective, easy to perform, specific and sensitive LAMP assay for early detection of S. mansoni in stool samples. The method is potentially and readily adaptable for field diagnosis and

  4. Acquired loss of red cell Kell antigens.

    PubMed

    Vengelen-Tyler, V; Gonzalez, B; Garratty, G; Kruppe, C; Johnson, C L; Mueller, K A; Marsh, W L

    1987-02-01

    A 19-year-old patient with a long history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura developed a potent antibody against a high-incidence antigen in the Kell blood group system. The direct antiglobulin test on his red cells was negative. His cells exhibited profound depression of Kell blood group antigens, but antigens of other blood groups were normal. Transfusion of incompatible blood was well tolerated and differential agglutination tests, using selected Rh antisera, showed in vivo survival of the transfused red cells for more than 8 weeks. However, the transfused red cells also showed acquired loss of Kell antigens. Five months after the initial findings, Kell-related antibody disappeared and Kell antigens reappeared on his red cells. The patient's serum stored from the initial investigation now reacted with his freshly collected red cells. These data suggest that an environmental agent in the patient's plasma was responsible for the temporary loss of Kell antigens from red cells in his circulation.

  5. Evaluation of the performance of four methods for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen and their application for testing 116,455 specimens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Chen, Tianbin; Lin, Jinpiao; Chen, Huijuan; Chen, Jing; Lin, Sheng; Yang, Bin; Shang, Hongyan; Ou, Qishui

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is a crucial serum marker for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. It is imperative to compare test results from different detection methods based on different principles. Four methods, chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA), electrochemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and golden immunochromato-graphic assay (GICA) were applied to test the HBsAg level in 250 specimens. According to the EP12-A2 and EP15-A2 documents from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the concentration at which repeated results are 50% positive (C50) of HBsAg detected by CMIA, ECLIA, ELISA and GICA was 0.05, 0.08, 0.15 and 15.0IU/ml, respectively. When the detection concentration of HBsAg was 0.5IU/ml, the imprecision degree of CMIA, ECLIA and ELISA was 8.1%, 5.9% and 14.9% respectively. When detecting high HBsAg level (≥20.0IU/ml) and HBsAg negative specimens, the consistency of the four methods was high, while for the low level (0.05-20.0IU/ml), the consistency was poor (except for the CMIA and ECLIA, P<0.05). When evaluation of the four methods in qualitative diagnosis of HBsAg level in the 116,455 specimens, there was no significant discrepancy among CMIA, CMIA and ECLIA, however, GICA was significantly different from the other 3 methods. Compared with CMIA, the false negative rate of ECLIA, ELISA and GICA was 0.2%, 1.3% and 12.3% respectively. In conclusion, GICA was only suitable for the preliminary screening of HBsAg positive individuals and ELISA can be applied to the qualitative diagnosis of HBsAg. Both CMIA and ECLIA were suitable for the quantitative determination of HBsAg.

  6. An algorithm to diagnose influenza infection: evaluating the clinical importance and impact on hospital costs of screening with rapid antigen detection tests.

    PubMed

    González-Del Vecchio, M; Catalán, P; de Egea, V; Rodríguez-Borlado, A; Martos, C; Padilla, B; Rodríguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2015-06-01

    Rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) are immunoassays that produce results in 15 min or less, have low sensitivity (50 %), but high specificity (95 %). We studied the clinical impact and laboratory savings of a diagnostic algorithm for influenza infection using RADTs as a first-step technique during the influenza season. From January 15th to March 31st 2014, we performed a diagnostic algorithm for influenza infection consisting of an RADT for all respiratory samples received in the laboratory. We studied all the patients with positive results for influenza infection, dividing them into two groups: Group A with a negative RADT but positive reference tests [reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or culture] and Group B with an initial positive RADT. During the study period, we had a total of 1,156 patients with suspicion of influenza infection. Of them, 217 (19 %) had a positive result for influenza: 132 (11 %) had an initial negative RADT (Group A) and 85 (7 %) had a positive RADT (Group B). When comparing patients in Group A and Group B, we found significant differences, as follows: prescribed oseltamivir (67 % vs. 82 %; p = 0.02), initiation of oseltamivir before 24 h (89 % vs. 97 %; p = 0.03), antibiotics prescribed (89 % vs. 67 %; p = <0.01), intensive care unit (ICU) admissions after diagnosis (23 % vs. 14 %; p = 0.05), and need for supplementary oxygen (61 % vs. 47 %; p = 0.01). An influenza algorithm including RADTs as the first step improves the time of administration of proper antiviral therapy, reduces the use of antibiotics and ICU admissions, and decreases hospital costs.

  7. Identification of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar cysts in stool by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, J; Asai, T; Okuzawa, E; Kobayashi, S; Takeuchi, T

    1997-01-01

    An attempt to identify cysts of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar in human stool was conducted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two sets of primers (p11 plus p12 and p13 plus p14) specific for either species of ameba. The cysts in stool specimens obtained from 12 infected individuals were concentrated, freeze-thawed, and treated with Triton X-100 before their examination by PCR. The results of PCR on the cysts were generally consistent with data obtained by PCR on ameba trophozoites hatched from the cysts, by zymodeme analysis, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and with clinical findings. This PCR was negative for the stool containing large numbers of cysts of either E. coli, E. hartmanni, or Giardia lamblia as well as for the stool specimens obtained from uninfected individuals. The ameba cyst in stool processed using the present method was effective for the PCR analysis even after 1 month of storage at 4 degrees C. The present PCR was sensitive enough to detect ten cysts of either of the amebae. PMID:9000244

  8. Distinction between persistent and transient infection in a bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) control programme: appropriate interpretation of real-time RT-PCR and antigen-ELISA test results.

    PubMed

    Hanon, J-B; Van der Stede, Y; Antonissen, A; Mullender, C; Tignon, M; van den Berg, T; Caij, B

    2014-04-01

    Control of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) in Belgium is currently implemented on a voluntary basis at herd level and mainly relies on detection and culling of persistently infected (PI) animals. The present field study was conducted during the winter of 2010/2011 to assess the performances of diagnostic assays used in the testing scheme for BVD as proposed by the two Belgian regional laboratories. Individual blood samples were collected from 4972 animals, and individual samples from the same herd were pooled (maximum of 30 individual samples per pool) and screened for the presence of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV)-specific RNA using a commercial real-time RT-PCR test (ADIAGENE). Individual samples from positive pools were then tested in parallel with the same RT-PCR test and with an antigen-capture ELISA test (IDEXX) to detect viremic animals. This study demonstrated that individual results differed according to the type of assay used (P < 0.001): 140 animals (2.8%) were positive by RT-PCR and 72 (1.4%) by antigen-ELISA. A second blood sample was taken 40 days later from 74 PCR positive animals to detect persistent viremia: 17 (23%) of these were still PCR positive and considered to be PI and the 57 that no longer tested positive were assumed to be transiently infected (TI) animals. All PI animals were positive also by antigen-ELISA at both time points. Among TI animals, 10 (16%) were positive by antigen-ELISA at the first but none at the second sampling. A highly significant difference in cycle threshold (Ct ) values obtained by RT-PCR was observed between PI and TI animals. ROC analysis was performed to establish thresholds to confirm with high probability that an animal is PI, based on the result of RT-PCR test performed on a single individual blood sample.

  9. Evaluation of the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ Kit for Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B in Clinical Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wiegel, Pia; Ličanin, Božica; Plum, Georg

    2015-01-01

    We compared the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ kit, a new nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Clostridium difficile toxins in stool specimens, with the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ test were 100%, 89.5%, 60.9%, and 100%, and those for the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test were 100%, 90%, 62.2%, and 100%, respectively. PMID:25809977

  10. Magnetic bead-based nucleic acid purification kit: Clinical application and performance evaluation in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihoon G; Kang, Jin Seok; Hwang, Seung Yong; Song, Jaewoo; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Two different methods - the semi-automated magnetic bead-based kit (SK, Stool DNA/RNA Purification kit®) and the manual membrane column-based kit (QS, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini kit) - for purifying nucleic acids from clinical stool samples were compared and evaluated. The SK kit was more user-friendly than QS due to the reduced manual processing, partial automation, and short turnaround time with half cost. Furthermore, SK produced high yields in both DNA and RNA extractions but poor purity in RNA extraction. In the assessment of rotavirus and Clostridium difficile infection, both kits had equivalent or more sensitive performance compared with the standard method. Although SK showed some interference and inhibition in nucleic acid extraction, the performance, including the repeatability, linearity, analytical sensitivity, and matrix effect, was sufficient for routine clinical use. PMID:27030641

  11. Gonorrhea Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gonorrhoeae Culture; Neisseria gonorrhoeae Gram Stain; Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA Probe Related tests: Chlamydia Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  12. Development of a novel universal immune receptor for antigen targeting

    PubMed Central

    Urbanska, Katarzyna; Powell, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) possess fixed specificity for a single antigen and require empirical testing in T cells. To address this, we have developed a novel, adaptable immune receptor strategy that allows for the rapid generation and testing of T cells of nearly infinite antigen specificity. PMID:22934280

  13. Metagenomic Approach for Identification of the Pathogens Associated with Diarrhea in Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanjiao; Wylie, Kristine M.; El Feghaly, Rana E.; Mihindukulasuriya, Kathie A.; Elward, Alexis; Haslam, David B.; Storch, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    The potential to rapidly capture the entire microbial community structure and/or gene content makes metagenomic sequencing an attractive tool for pathogen identification and the detection of resistance/virulence genes in clinical settings. Here, we assessed the consistency between PCR from a diagnostic laboratory, quantitative PCR (qPCR) from a research laboratory, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and metagenomic shotgun sequencing (MSS) for Clostridium difficile identification in diarrhea stool samples. Twenty-two C. difficile-positive diarrhea samples identified by PCR and qPCR and five C. difficile-negative diarrhea controls were studied. C. difficile was detected in 90.9% of C. difficile-positive samples using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and C. difficile was detected in 86.3% of C. difficile-positive samples using MSS. CFU inferred from qPCR analysis were positively correlated with the relative abundance of C. difficile from 16S rRNA gene sequencing (r2 = −0.60) and MSS (r2 = −0.55). C. difficile was codetected with Clostridium perfringens, norovirus, sapovirus, parechovirus, and anellovirus in 3.7% to 27.3% of the samples. A high load of Candida spp. was found in a symptomatic control sample in which no causative agents for diarrhea were identified in routine clinical testing. Beta-lactamase and tetracycline resistance genes were the most prevalent (25.9%) antibiotic resistance genes in these samples. In summary, the proof-of-concept study demonstrated that next-generation sequencing (NGS) in pathogen detection is moderately correlated with laboratory testing and is advantageous in detecting pathogens without a priori knowledge. PMID:26637379

  14. Detection of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium parvum Antigens in Human Fecal Specimens Using the Triage Parasite Panel Enzyme Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Lynne S.; Shimizu, Robyn Y.; Bernard, Caroline N.

    2000-01-01

    The Triage parasite panel (BIOSITE Diagnostics, San Diego, Calif.) is a new qualitative enzyme immunoassay (EIA) panel for the detection of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, and Cryptosporidium parvum in fresh or fresh, frozen, unfixed human fecal specimens. By using specific antibodies, antigens specific for these organisms are captured and immobilized on a membrane. Panel performance was evaluated with known positive and negative stool specimens (a total of 444 specimens) that were tested by the standard ova and parasite (O&P) examination as the “gold standard,” including staining with both trichrome and modified acid-fast stains. Specimens with discrepant results between the reference and Triage methods were retested by a different method, either EIA or immunofluorescence. A number of samples with discrepant results with the Triage device were confirmed to be true positives. After resolution of discrepant results, the number of positive specimens and the sensitivity and specificity results were as follows: for G. lamblia, 170, 95.9%, and 97.4%, respectively; for E. histolytica/E. dispar, 99, 96.0%, and 99.1%, respectively; and for C. parvum, 60, 98.3%, and 99.7%, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity with other parasites found in stool specimens, including eight different protozoa (128 challenges) and three different helminths (83 challenges). The ability to perform the complete O&P examination should remain an option for those patients with negative parasite panel results but who are still symptomatic. PMID:10970380

  15. Dog leukocyte antigen class II-associated genetic risk testing for immune disorders of dogs: simplified approaches using Pug dog necrotizing meningoencephalitis as a model.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Niels; Liu, Hongwei; Millon, Lee; Greer, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    A significantly increased risk for a number of autoimmune and infectious diseases in purebred and mixed-breed dogs has been associated with certain alleles or allele combinations of the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex containing the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 genes. The exact level of risk depends on the specific disease, the alleles in question, and whether alleles exist in a homozygous or heterozygous state. The gold standard for identifying high-risk alleles and their zygosity has involved direct sequencing of the exon 2 regions of each of the 3 genes. However, sequencing and identification of specific alleles at each of the 3 loci are relatively expensive and sequencing techniques are not ideal for additional parentage or identity determination. However, it is often possible to get the same information from sequencing only 1 gene given the small number of possible alleles at each locus in purebred dogs, extensive homozygosity, and tendency for disease-causing alleles at each of the 3 loci to be strongly linked to each other into haplotypes. Therefore, genetic testing in purebred dogs with immune diseases can be often simplified by sequencing alleles at 1 rather than 3 loci. Further simplification of genetic tests for canine immune diseases can be achieved by the use of alternative genetic markers in the DLA class II region that are also strongly linked with the disease genotype. These markers consist of either simple tandem repeats or single nucleotide polymorphisms that are also in strong linkage with specific DLA class II genotypes and/or haplotypes. The current study uses necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs as a paradigm to assess simple alternative genetic tests for disease risk. It was possible to attain identical necrotizing meningoencephalitis risk assessments to 3-locus DLA class II sequencing by sequencing only the DQB1 gene, using 3 DLA class II-linked simple tandem repeat markers, or with a small single nucleotide polymorphism array

  16. PoopMD, a Mobile Health Application, Accurately Identifies Infant Acholic Stools

    PubMed Central

    Franciscovich, Amy; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Doyle, Joe; Bolinger, Josh; Capdevila, Montserrat; Rice, Marcus; Hancock, Leslie; Mahr, Tanya; Mogul, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is the leading cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. Education of parents in the perinatal period with stool cards depicting acholic and normal stools has been associated with improved time-to-diagnosis and survival in BA. PoopMD is a mobile application that utilizes a smartphone’s camera and color recognition software to analyze an infant’s stool and determine if additional follow-up is indicated. PoopMD was developed using custom HTML5/CSS3 and wrapped to work on iOS and Android platforms. In order to define the gold standard regarding stool color, seven pediatricians were asked to review 45 photographs of infant stool and rate them as acholic, normal, or indeterminate. Samples for which 6+ pediatricians demonstrated agreement defined the gold standard, and only these samples were included in the analysis. Accuracy of PoopMD was assessed using an iPhone 5s with incandescent lighting. Variability in analysis of stool photographs as acholic versus normal with intermediate rating weighted as 50% agreement (kappa) was compared between three laypeople and one expert user. Variability in output was also assessed between an iPhone 5s and a Samsung Galaxy S4, as well as between incandescent lighting and compact fluorescent lighting. Six-plus pediatricians agreed on 27 normal and 7 acholic photographs; no photographs were defined as indeterminate. The sensitivity was 7/7 (100%). The specificity was 24/27 (89%) with 3/27 labeled as indeterminate; no photos of normal stool were labeled as acholic. The Laplace-smoothed positive likelihood ratio was 6.44 (95% CI 2.52 to 16.48) and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.13 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.83). kappauser was 0.68, kappaphone was 0.88, and kappalight was 0.81. Therefore, in this pilot study, PoopMD accurately differentiates acholic from normal color with substantial agreement across users, and almost perfect agreement across two popular smartphones and ambient light settings

  17. PoopMD, a Mobile Health Application, Accurately Identifies Infant Acholic Stools.

    PubMed

    Franciscovich, Amy; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Doyle, Joe; Bolinger, Josh; Capdevila, Montserrat; Rice, Marcus; Hancock, Leslie; Mahr, Tanya; Mogul, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is the leading cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. Education of parents in the perinatal period with stool cards depicting acholic and normal stools has been associated with improved time-to-diagnosis and survival in BA. PoopMD is a mobile application that utilizes a smartphone's camera and color recognition software to analyze an infant's stool and determine if additional follow-up is indicated. PoopMD was developed using custom HTML5/CSS3 and wrapped to work on iOS and Android platforms. In order to define the gold standard regarding stool color, seven pediatricians were asked to review 45 photographs of infant stool and rate them as acholic, normal, or indeterminate. Samples for which 6+ pediatricians demonstrated agreement defined the gold standard, and only these samples were included in the analysis. Accuracy of PoopMD was assessed using an iPhone 5s with incandescent lighting. Variability in analysis of stool photographs as acholic versus normal with intermediate rating weighted as 50% agreement (kappa) was compared between three laypeople and one expert user. Variability in output was also assessed between an iPhone 5s and a Samsung Galaxy S4, as well as between incandescent lighting and compact fluorescent lighting. Six-plus pediatricians agreed on 27 normal and 7 acholic photographs; no photographs were defined as indeterminate. The sensitivity was 7/7 (100%). The specificity was 24/27 (89%) with 3/27 labeled as indeterminate; no photos of normal stool were labeled as acholic. The Laplace-smoothed positive likelihood ratio was 6.44 (95% CI 2.52 to 16.48) and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.13 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.83). kappauser was 0.68, kappaphone was 0.88, and kappalight was 0.81. Therefore, in this pilot study, PoopMD accurately differentiates acholic from normal color with substantial agreement across users, and almost perfect agreement across two popular smartphones and ambient light settings. Poop

  18. PoopMD, a Mobile Health Application, Accurately Identifies Infant Acholic Stools.

    PubMed

    Franciscovich, Amy; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Doyle, Joe; Bolinger, Josh; Capdevila, Montserrat; Rice, Marcus; Hancock, Leslie; Mahr, Tanya; Mogul, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is the leading cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. Education of parents in the perinatal period with stool cards depicting acholic and normal stools has been associated with improved time-to-diagnosis and survival in BA. PoopMD is a mobile application that utilizes a smartphone's camera and color recognition software to analyze an infant's stool and determine if additional follow-up is indicated. PoopMD was developed using custom HTML5/CSS3 and wrapped to work on iOS and Android platforms. In order to define the gold standard regarding stool color, seven pediatricians were asked to review 45 photographs of infant stool and rate them as acholic, normal, or indeterminate. Samples for which 6+ pediatricians demonstrated agreement defined the gold standard, and only these samples were included in the analysis. Accuracy of PoopMD was assessed using an iPhone 5s with incandescent lighting. Variability in analysis of stool photographs as acholic versus normal with intermediate rating weighted as 50% agreement (kappa) was compared between three laypeople and one expert user. Variability in output was also assessed between an iPhone 5s and a Samsung Galaxy S4, as well as between incandescent lighting and compact fluorescent lighting. Six-plus pediatricians agreed on 27 normal and 7 acholic photographs; no photographs were defined as indeterminate. The sensitivity was 7/7 (100%). The specificity was 24/27 (89%) with 3/27 labeled as indeterminate; no photos of normal stool were labeled as acholic. The Laplace-smoothed positive likelihood ratio was 6.44 (95% CI 2.52 to 16.48) and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.13 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.83). kappauser was 0.68, kappaphone was 0.88, and kappalight was 0.81. Therefore, in this pilot study, PoopMD accurately differentiates acholic from normal color with substantial agreement across users, and almost perfect agreement across two popular smartphones and ambient light settings. Poop

  19. Clostridium difficile testing algorithms using glutamate dehydrogenase antigen and C. difficile toxin enzyme immunoassays with C. difficile nucleic acid amplification testing increase diagnostic yield in a tertiary pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kaede V; McGowan, Karin L

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of the rapid C. diff Quik Chek Complete's glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (GDH) and toxin A/B (CDT) tests in two algorithmic approaches for a tertiary pediatric population: algorithm 1 entailed initial testing with GDH/CDT followed by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and algorithm 2 entailed GDH/CDT followed by cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) for adjudication of discrepant GDH-positive/CDT-negative results. A true positive (TP) was defined as positivity by CCNA or positivity by LAMP plus another test (GDH, CDT, or the Premier C. difficile toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay [P-EIA]). A total of 141 specimens from 141 patients yielded 27 TPs and 19% prevalence. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 56%, 100%, 100%, and 90% for P-EIA and 81%, 100%, 100%, and 96% for both algorithm 1 and algorithm 2. In summary, GDH-based algorithms detected C. difficile infections with superior sensitivity compared to P-EIA. The algorithms allowed immediate reporting of half of all TPs, but LAMP or CCNA was required to confirm the presence or absence of toxigenic C. difficile in GDH-positive/CDT-negative specimens.

  20. Killed poliovirus antigen titration in humans.

    PubMed

    Salk, J; Cohen, H; Fillastre, C; Stoeckel, P; Rey, J L; Schlumberger, M; Nicolas, A; van Steenis, G; van Wezel, A L; Triau, R; Saliou, P; Barry, L F; Moreau, J P; Mérieux, C

    1978-01-01

    To establish the antigen content of a killed poliovirus vaccine sufficiently potent to induce immunity with one or two doses and to establish a reference standard vaccine which has been tested under field conditions, a titration was carried out in infants to determine the amount of each of the three antigenic types of poliovirus vaccine required to induce seroconversion with a single dose. It has been observed that over a critical range of antigen concentration there is an essentially linear relationship between antibody response and quantity of antigen administered. More than 90 percent of the groups studied had detectable antibody after receiving single injections of 80, 8 and 64 D-antigen units of Types I, II and III, respectively. Four-fold less antigen for each of the three types was less effective. The implications of these findings for an efficient immunization procedure are discussed.

  1. A conventional polymerase chain reaction-based method for the diagnosis of human schistosomiasis in stool samples from individuals in a low-endemicity area

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Teiliane Rodrigues; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Pinheiro, Marta Cristhiany Cunha; de Oliveira, Sara Menezes; Peralta, José Mauro; Bezerra, Fernando Schemelzer Moraes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method to detect Schistosoma mansoni DNA in stool samples from individuals living in a low-endemicity area in Brazil. Of the 125 initial stool samples, 80 were ELISA reactive and eggs were identified in 19 of the samples by parasitological examination. For the PCR evaluations, 56 stool samples were selected and divided into five groups. Groups I-IV were scored negative for S. mansoni eggs by parasitological examination. Groups I and II were ELISA reactive, whereas Groups III and IV were ELISA nonreactive. Groups II and III were positive for other intestinal parasites. PCR testing scored eight samples as positive from these four groups. Group V represented the S. mansoni -positive group and it included ELISA-reactive samples that were scored positive for S. mansoni by one or more parasitological examinations (6/19 were positive by Kato-Katz method, 9/17 by saline gradient and 10/13 by Helmintex®). PCR scored 13 of these 19 samples as positive for S. mansoni . We conclude that while none of these methods yielded 100% sensitivity, a combination of techniques should be effective for improving the detection of S. mansoni infection in low-endemicity areas. PMID:24402156

  2. Comparison of the Compositions of the Stool Microbiotas of Infants Fed Goat Milk Formula, Cow Milk-Based Formula, or Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Gowri Pathmanathan, Siva; Zhou, Shao J.; Makrides, Maria; Gibson, Robert A.; Sullivan, Thomas; Prosser, Colin G.; Lowry, Dianne; Hodgkinson, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the compositions of the fecal microbiotas of infants fed goat milk formula to those of infants fed cow milk formula or breast milk as the gold standard. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences was used in the analysis of the microbiotas in stool samples collected from 90 Australian babies (30 in each group) at 2 months of age. Beta-diversity analysis of total microbiota sequences and Lachnospiraceae sequences revealed that they were more similar in breast milk/goat milk comparisons than in breast milk/cow milk comparisons. The Lachnospiraceae were mostly restricted to a single species (Ruminococcus gnavus) in breast milk-fed and goat milk-fed babies compared to a more diverse collection in cow milk-fed babies. Bifidobacteriaceae were abundant in the microbiotas of infants in all three groups. Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most commonly detected bifidobacterial species. A semiquantitative PCR method was devised to differentiate between B. longum subsp. longum and B. longum subsp. infantis and was used to test stool samples. B. longum subsp. infantis was seldom present in stools, even of breast milk-fed babies. The presence of B. bifidum in the stools of breast milk-fed infants at abundances greater than 10% of the total microbiota was associated with the highest total abundances of Bifidobacteriaceae. When Bifidobacteriaceae abundance was low, Lachnospiraceae abundances were greater. New information about the composition of the fecal microbiota when goat milk formula is used in infant nutrition was thus obtained. PMID:23455335

  3. Comparison of the compositions of the stool microbiotas of infants fed goat milk formula, cow milk-based formula, or breast milk.

    PubMed

    Tannock, Gerald W; Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Gowri Pathmanathan, Siva; Zhou, Shao J; Makrides, Maria; Gibson, Robert A; Sullivan, Thomas; Prosser, Colin G; Lowry, Dianne; Hodgkinson, Alison J

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the compositions of the fecal microbiotas of infants fed goat milk formula to those of infants fed cow milk formula or breast milk as the gold standard. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences was used in the analysis of the microbiotas in stool samples collected from 90 Australian babies (30 in each group) at 2 months of age. Beta-diversity analysis of total microbiota sequences and Lachnospiraceae sequences revealed that they were more similar in breast milk/goat milk comparisons than in breast milk/cow milk comparisons. The Lachnospiraceae were mostly restricted to a single species (Ruminococcus gnavus) in breast milk-fed and goat milk-fed babies compared to a more diverse collection in cow milk-fed babies. Bifidobacteriaceae were abundant in the microbiotas of infants in all three groups. Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most commonly detected bifidobacterial species. A semiquantitative PCR method was devised to differentiate between B. longum subsp. longum and B. longum subsp. infantis and was used to test stool samples. B. longum subsp. infantis was seldom present in stools, even of breast milk-fed babies. The presence of B. bifidum in the stools of breast milk-fed infants at abundances greater than 10% of the total microbiota was associated with the highest total abundances of Bifidobacteriaceae. When Bifidobacteriaceae abundance was low, Lachnospiraceae abundances were greater. New information about the composition of the fecal microbiota when goat milk formula is used in infant nutrition was thus obtained.

  4. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  5. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Brianne A.; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  6. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigens in faecal material.

    PubMed

    Grundy, M S; Voller, A; Warhurst, D

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigens in stool samples using a multi-layer ELISA. The method is sensitive and specific, showing no interference with other intestinal parasites, e.g. E. coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii, Hymenolepis nana, Giardia lamblia, Trichomonas and Ascaris. The method provides a rapid and simple screening assay for E. histolytica infections and should assist in diagnosis and epidemiological studies of the disease. PMID:2895514

  7. Evaluation of a Combination Rapid Immunoassay for Detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raymond; Chen, Jing; York, Mary K.; Setijono, Norman; Kaplan, Raymond L.; Graham, Fitzroy; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2000-01-01

    A combination cassette format nonenzymatic rapid immunoassay for detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium antigens was evaluated by using 556 patient stool specimens from three clinical laboratories. This assay (Genzyme Diagnostics Contrast Giardia/Cryptosporidium), which can be used with fresh or formalin-fixed specimens, had unadjusted sensitivities and specificities of 96.1 and 98.5% for Giardia and 100 and 98.7% for Cryptosporidium, respectively, in this study. PMID:10618122

  8. LUMINEX®: a new technology for the simultaneous identification of five Entamoeba spp. commonly found in human stools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Six species of the genus Entamoeba, i.e., E. histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, E. polecki, E. coli, and E. hartmanii can be found in human stools. Among these, only E. histolytica is considered to be pathogenic, causing intestinal and extra-intestinal disease, but it is morphologically identical to E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. In general, E. polecki, E. coli, and E. hartmanii can be differentiated morphologically from E. histolytica, but some of their diagnostic morphologic features may overlap creating issues for the differential diagnosis. Moreover, the previous inability to differentiate among Entamoeba species has limited epidemiologic information on E histolytica. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, high-throughput screening method using Luminex technique for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of Entamoeba species. Methods PCR amplification was performed with biotinylated Entamoeba sp 18S rRNA gene primers, designed to amplify a fragment ranging from 382 to 429 bp of the Entamoeba spp studied. Regions of this fragment that could differentiate among E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii, E. dispar, E. hartmanii and E. coli were selected to design hybridization probes to link to Luminex beads. The assay was standardized with cloned DNA samples of each species and evaluated with 24 DNA extracts from samples obtained from individuals diagnosed with these amebas in their stools. Results Using this approach we were able to correctly identify E. histoltyica, E. dispar, E hartmanni, E. coli and E. moshkovskii in all specimens studied. From twenty four samples tested by microscopy, PCR/DNA Sequencing and real-time PCR, 100% agreed with PCR-Luminex assay for identification of E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, E. hartmanni, E. histolytica, and E. coli. Conclusion These results show that this method could be used in the diagnostic detection of Entamoeba spp in fecal samples. This diagnostic test was useful to clearly distinguish E

  9. Driver Gene Mutations in Stools of Colorectal Carcinoma Patients Detected by Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Armengol, Gemma; Sarhadi, Virinder K; Ghanbari, Reza; Doghaei-Moghaddam, Masoud; Ansari, Reza; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kokkola, Arto; Malekzadeh, Reza; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-07-01

    Detection of driver gene mutations in stool DNA represents a promising noninvasive approach for screening colorectal cancer (CRC). Amplicon-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a good option to study mutations in many cancer genes simultaneously and from a low amount of DNA. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of identifying mutations in 22 cancer driver genes with Ion Torrent technology in stool DNA from a series of 65 CRC patients. The assay was successful in 80% of stool DNA samples. NGS results showed 83 mutations in cancer driver genes, 29 hotspot and 54 novel mutations. One to five genes were mutated in 75% of cases. TP53, KRAS, FBXW7, and SMAD4 were the top mutated genes, consistent with previous studies. Of samples with mutations, 54% presented concomitant mutations in different genes. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes were mutated in 70% of samples, with 58% having alterations in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. Because mutations in these genes can compromise the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in CRC patients, identifying mutations that confer resistance to some targeted treatments may be useful to guide therapeutic decisions. In conclusion, the data presented herein show that NGS procedures on stool DNA represent a promising tool to detect genetic mutations that could be used in the future for diagnosis, monitoring, or treating CRC. PMID:27155048

  10. Organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units: chain configuration and stimulated solution behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Ward, Jonathan; Amos, Ryan C; Jeong, Moon Gon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Gauthier, Mario; Foucher, Daniel; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-09-11

    Theoretical calculations illustrate that organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units (Fe-acyl complex) adopt linear chain configuration with a P-Fe-C backbone surrounded by aromatic groups. The macromolecules show molecular weight-dependent and temperature stimulated solution behaviour in DMSO.

  11. Stool-based biomarkers of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Braundmeier-Fleming, A.; Russell, Nathan T.; Yang, Wenbin; Nas, Megan Y.; Yaggie, Ryan E.; Berry, Matthew; Bachrach, Laurie; Flury, Sarah C.; Marko, Darlene S.; Bushell, Colleen B.; Welge, Michael E.; White, Bryan A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Klumpp, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC) is associated with significant morbidity, yet underlying mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers remain unknown. Pelvic organs exhibit neural crosstalk by convergence of visceral sensory pathways, and rodent studies demonstrate distinct bacterial pain phenotypes, suggesting that the microbiome modulates pelvic pain in IC. Stool samples were obtained from female IC patients and healthy controls, and symptom severity was determined by questionnaire. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified by16S rDNA sequence analysis. Machine learning by Extended Random Forest (ERF) identified OTUs associated with symptom scores. Quantitative PCR of stool DNA with species-specific primer pairs demonstrated significantly reduced levels of E. sinensis, C. aerofaciens, F. prausnitzii, O. splanchnicus, and L. longoviformis in microbiota of IC patients. These species, deficient in IC pelvic pain (DIPP), were further evaluated by Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analyses, and DIPP species emerged as potential IC biomarkers. Stool metabolomic studies identified glyceraldehyde as significantly elevated in IC. Metabolomic pathway analysis identified lipid pathways, consistent with predicted metagenome functionality. Together, these findings suggest that DIPP species and metabolites may serve as candidates for novel IC biomarkers in stool. Functional changes in the IC microbiome may also serve as therapeutic targets for treating chronic pelvic pain. PMID:27188581

  12. Human carbonic anhydrase II as a host for piano-stool complexes bearing a sulfonamide anchor.

    PubMed

    Monnard, Fabien W; Heinisch, Tillmann; Nogueira, Elisa S; Schirmer, Tilman; Ward, Thomas R

    2011-08-01

    d(6)-piano-stool complexes bearing an arylsulfonamide anchor display sub-micromolar affinity towards human Carbonic Anhydrase II (hCA II). The 1.3 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of [(η(6)-C(6)Me(6))Ru(bispy 3)Cl](+)⊂ hCA II highlights the nature of the host-guest interactions. PMID:21706094

  13. Organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units: chain configuration and stimulated solution behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Ward, Jonathan; Amos, Ryan C; Jeong, Moon Gon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Gauthier, Mario; Foucher, Daniel; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-09-11

    Theoretical calculations illustrate that organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units (Fe-acyl complex) adopt linear chain configuration with a P-Fe-C backbone surrounded by aromatic groups. The macromolecules show molecular weight-dependent and temperature stimulated solution behaviour in DMSO. PMID:25036387

  14. Restoration of hookworm egg development after prolonged storage in stool suspension.

    PubMed

    Na-Ek, Prasit; Sanpool, Oranuch; Jongthawin, Jurairat; Anamnart, Witthaya; Intapan, Pewpan M; Chamavit, Pennapa; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-07-01

    Hookworm infection is still prevalent in southern Thailand despite control measures. Hookworm eggs submerged for an extended period under water from rainfall or in latrines may not survive, but they may recover their ability to develop into infective larvae when exposed to atmospheric air. This study examined the survival of the hookworm eggs in stool suspension and the restoration of development capability after prolonged storage. In stool mass, eggs developed normally and yielded infective filariform larvae (FL) in 7 days. On the contrary, in 1:10 stool suspension, hookworm eggs were found to remain at the 4-8 cell stage; degenerated eggs were observed after 15 days of storage, and the number of degenerated eggs reached 80 % on day 30. Aeration of the suspension, or transferring to a Petri dish or agar plate, restored the capacity of eggs stored for up to 15 days to develop into FL; thereafter, the capacity declined sharply. Retardation of egg development under water or in stool suspension may be due to a lack of atmospheric air. Use of "night soil" from latrines as fertilizer may be one factor in maintaining hookworm transmission, as worm eggs can undergo normal development upon exposure to atmospheric air. PMID:27053130

  15. Utility of Multiple-Stool-Specimen Ova and Parasite Examinations in a High-Prevalence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Charles P.

    1999-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of the results of 2,704 ova and parasite (O & P) examinations performed on stool specimens collected from 1,374 patients between October 1996 and September 1997 was performed to evaluate the utility of performing O & P examinations on multiple, independently collected stool specimens in a high-prevalence setting. A total of 995 specimens (36.8%) examined during the study contained parasites; 546 (20.2%) contained pathogenic organisms. The positivity rate (54.5%) for the patients from whom three specimens were examined was significantly higher than for the patients from whom either two specimens (33.3%) or a single specimen (19.8%) was submitted for examination. For the group of patients from whom at least 3 specimens were submitted for O & P examination, 373 independent opportunities for diagnosing infection with intestinal parasites could be analyzed. The first stool specimen collected proved to be adequate in only 75.9% (283 of 373) of evaluated cases; however, examination of two specimens increased the sensitivity of O & P detection to 92% (343 of 373). The third specimen collected provided additional information on only 30 of 373 occasions (8%). These data indicate that in populations with a high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections, two independently collected stool specimens should be subjected to O & P examination to ensure adequate diagnostic sensitivity. PMID:10405376

  16. Rice solution and World Health Organization solution by gastric infusion for high stool output diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Bross-Soriano, D; Pérez-Ricardez, M L; Velásquez-Jones, L

    1991-08-01

    We sought to determine the efficacy of three different types of treatment in children with acute diarrhea who, during the oral rehydration period, had high stool output (greater than 10 mL/kg per hour). Sixty-six children, aged 1 to 18 months, with an average stool output of 22.6 mL/kg per hour were randomly distributed into three groups: group 1 received a rice flour solution, group 2 received the World Health Organization rehydration solution by gastric infusion, and group 3 continued to receive this solution orally. In all three groups, a decrease in stool output was observed, with the higher decrease observed in group 1 patients. Such a decrease facilitated rehydration of all 22 patients in group 1 (100%) in 3.3 +/- 1.5 hours, 16 (73%) in group 2 in 4.3 +/- 2.1 hours, and 15 (69%) in group 3 in 4.9 +/- 2.0 hours. No complications were observed. These data indicate that the rice flour solution is effective in children with high stool output diarrhea.

  17. Bead-beating artefacts in the Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio of the human stool metagenome.

    PubMed

    Vebø, Heidi C; Karlsson, Magdalena Kauczynska; Avershina, Ekaterina; Finnby, Lene; Rudi, Knut

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated bead-beating cell-lysis in analysing the human stool metagenome, since this is a key step. We observed that two different bead-beating instruments from the same producer gave a three-fold difference in the Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio. This illustrates that bead-beating can have a major impact on downstream metagenome analyses. PMID:27498349

  18. Not Your Run-of-the-Mill Art-Room Stools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrzanowski, Rose-Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    An art room should be a garden of visual stimulation, born of creativity, inquiry, critical thinking and intellectual conversation--and a little collaboration is not a bad thing either! When the author unpacked the new stools for her art room at the high school, she envisioned something more beautiful than the brown masonite circles that…

  19. Comparison of polycarbonate and cellulose acetate membrane filters for isolation of Campylobacter concisus from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Linde; Engberg, Jørgen; Ejlertsen, Tove; Nielsen, Henrik

    2013-08-01

    One thousand seven hundred ninety-one diarrheic stool samples were cultivated for Campylobacter spp. We found a high prevalence of Campylobacter concisus with use of a polycarbonate filter (n = 114) compared to a cellulose acetate filter (n = 79) (P < .0001). The polycarbonate filter is superior to the commonly used cellulose acetate filter for detection of C. concisus.

  20. Organ-Specific Membrane Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sell, K. W.; Mori, W.; Rack, J. H.; Gurner, B. W.; Coombs, R. R. A.

    1969-01-01

    A satisfactory system for testing the reaction of rabbit antisera with membrane antigens of human tissue cells is described. This method allows the differentiation between IgG and IgM antibodies and provides an extremely sensitive method for the detection of antigens on all cells including non-viable fixed cells. Anti-organ serum before selective absorption showed very little organ specificity in their reactions, but may be made specific by extensive absorption although often the resulting specific titre was very low. Organ-specific membrane antigens were also identified and shown to be represented on tumour cells, although in some cases such as the colon the reactions were weaker with tumour cells than with normal parenchymal cells of an organ. On the other hand, in one case of carcinoma of the kidney the organ-specific antigens were detectably stronger on tumour cells than on normal kidney cells. Preliminary studies on human ascitic tumour cells from 4 different cancer patients show that species-specific membrane antigens can be demonstrated. Unfortunately none of the cases were derived from organs whose origin could be identified with the antisera which had been prepared for this series of experiments. ImagesFigs. 2-3 PMID:5806432

  1. Multicenter clinical evaluation of the portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains in clinical stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Blake W; Mackey, Tami-Lea A; Daly, Judy A; Alger, Garrison; Denys, Gerald A; Peterson, Lance R; Kehl, Sue C; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2012-12-01

    We compared the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay, a new semiautomated sample-to-result molecular test, to a toxigenic bacterial culture/cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (TBC/CCNA) for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in 549 stool specimens. Stool specimens were also tested by one of three alternative FDA-cleared molecular tests for toxigenic C. difficile (Xpert C. difficile, Illumigene C. difficile, or GeneOhm Cdiff). The sensitivities and specificities of the molecular tests compared to TBC/CCNA were as follows: 98.2% and 92.8% for the Portrait assay, 100% and 91.7% for the Xpert assay, 93.3% and 95.1% for the Illumigene assay, and 97.4% and 98.5% for the GeneOhm assay, respectively. The majority of Portrait false-positive results (20/31; 64.5%) were also positive for C. difficile by an alternative molecular test, suggesting an increased sensitivity compared to the culture-based "gold standard" method. The Portrait test detected an assay input of 30 CFU in 100% of spiked samples and detected an input of 10 CFU in 96.7% of samples tested.

  2. Development and Validation of a Novel Diagnostic Test for Human Brucellosis Using a Glyco-engineered Antigen Coupled to Magnetic Beads

    PubMed Central

    Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Rey Serantes, Diego A.; Melli, Luciano J.; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A.; Deodato, Bettina; Wallach, Jorge; Feldman, Mario F.; Ugalde, Juan E.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis and still a major human health problem in endemic areas of the world. Although several diagnostic tools are available, most of them are difficult to implement especially in developing countries where complex health facilities are limited. Taking advantage of the identical structure and composition of the Brucella spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 O-polysaccharide, we explored the application of a recombinant Y. enterocolitica O:9-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA) as a novel antigen for diagnosis of human brucellosis. We have developed and validated an indirect immunoassay using OAg-AcrA coupled to magnetic beads. OAg-AcrA was produced and purified with high yields in Y. enterocolitica O:9 cells co-expressing the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB and the protein acceptor AcrA of Campylobacter jejuni without the need for culturing Brucella. Expression of PglB and AcrA in Y. enterocolitica resulted in the transfer of the host O-polysaccharide from its lipid carrier to AcrA. To validate the assay and determine the cutoff values, a receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed using a panel of characterized serum samples obtained from healthy individuals and patients of different clinical groups. Our results indicate that, using this assay, it is possible to detect infection caused by the three main human brucellosis agents (B. abortus, B. melitensis and B. suis) and select different cutoff points to adjust sensitivity and specificity levels as needed. A cutoff value of 13.20% gave a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98.57%, and a cutoff value of 16.15% resulted in a test sensitivity and specificity of 93.48% and 100%, respectively. The high diagnostic accuracy, low cost, reduced assay time and simplicity of this new glycoconjugate-magnetic beads assay makes it an attractive diagnostic tool for using not only in clinics and brucellosis reference laboratories but also in locations with limited

  3. Multitarget stool DNA for colorectal cancer screening: A review and commentary on the United States Preventive Services Draft Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Barry M; Levin, Bernard; Hilsden, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) testing was approved for average risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by the United States Food and Drug Administration and thereafter reimbursed for use by the Medicare program (2014). The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) October 2015 draft recommendation for CRC screening included mt-sDNA as an “alternative” screening test that “may be useful in select clinical circumstances”, despite its very high sensitivity for early stage CRC. The evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening use is robust. The clinical efficacy of mt-sDNA as measured by sensitivity, specificity, life-years gained (LYG), and CRC deaths averted is similar to or exceeds that of the other more specifically recommended screening options included in the draft document, especially those requiring annual testing adherence. In a population with primarily irregular screening participation, tests with the highest point sensitivity and reasonable specificity are more likely to favorably impact CRC related morbidity and mortality than those depending on annual adherence. This paper reviews the evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening and demonstrates, using USPSTF’s modeling data, that mt-sDNA at three-year intervals provides significant clinical net benefits and fewer complications per LYG than annual fecal immunochemical testing, high sensitivity guaiac based fecal occult blood testing and 10-year colonoscopy screening. PMID:27190584

  4. Multitarget stool DNA for colorectal cancer screening: A review and commentary on the United States Preventive Services Draft Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Berger, Barry M; Levin, Bernard; Hilsden, Robert J

    2016-05-15

    Multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) testing was approved for average risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by the United States Food and Drug Administration and thereafter reimbursed for use by the Medicare program (2014). The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) October 2015 draft recommendation for CRC screening included mt-sDNA as an "alternative" screening test that "may be useful in select clinical circumstances", despite its very high sensitivity for early stage CRC. The evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening use is robust. The clinical efficacy of mt-sDNA as measured by sensitivity, specificity, life-years gained (LYG), and CRC deaths averted is similar to or exceeds that of the other more specifically recommended screening options included in the draft document, especially those requiring annual testing adherence. In a population with primarily irregular screening participation, tests with the highest point sensitivity and reasonable specificity are more likely to favorably impact CRC related morbidity and mortality than those depending on annual adherence. This paper reviews the evidence supporting mt-sDNA for routine screening and demonstrates, using USPSTF's modeling data, that mt-sDNA at three-year intervals provides significant clinical net benefits and fewer complications per LYG than annual fecal immunochemical testing, high sensitivity guaiac based fecal occult blood testing and 10-year colonoscopy screening. PMID:27190584

  5. Development of an in vitro antigen-detection test as an alternative method to the in vivo plaque reduction neutralization test for the quality control of Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Keun; Kim, Hye-Youn; Kim, Joo-Young; Ye, Michael B; Park, Kee-Bum; Han, Euiri; Kim, Jaeok; Ja Ban, Sang; Hong, Seung Hwa; Park, Yong Keun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2012-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) causes diseases that attack the human central nervous system. Traditionally, the quality control for JEV vaccines, in which the plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) titer is measured by the national control laboratories before the vaccine batches are marketed, has required laboratory animal testing. However, classical animal tests have inherent problems, including the very fact that animals are used, ethical issues, and the possibility of error. In this study, JEV antigen was measured in an in vitro assay to assess the feasibility of replacing in vivo assays that measure the PRN titers of JEV vaccines. We constructed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DS-ELISA) that could detect JEV envelope (E). Initially, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the JEV E protein were generated and characterized. We isolated 18 mAbs against JEV E protein, and most were the IgG1 or IgG2a isotype. The mAbs (5F15 and 7D71) were selected as the most suitable mAb pair to detect JEV E protein. DS-ELISA with this pair detected as little as approximately 3 μg/mL JEV E protein and demonstrated a relationship between the amount of JEV E protein and the PRN titer. From these results, we surmise that this DS-ELISA may be useful, not only in terms of measuring the amount of JEV E protein, but also as a substitute for the PRN test for JEV vaccine evaluation.

  6. Common antigenic structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Kreiter, V. P.; Pressman, D.

    1974-01-01

    Spent culture media of all the human cell lines tested have been found to contain the antigenic activity present on the 11,000-Dalton HL-A common portion fragment of the HL-A antigen molecule that appears to be a characteristic, invariant portion of HL-A antigen molecules. From the culture medium of one of these lines, RPMI 1788, a lymphoid cell line, the substance carrying HL-A common activity was isolated, which was shown to be identical to the HL-A common portion fragment with respect to molecular size, electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric focusing patterns, and certain antigenic characteristics. By an isolation procedure involving differential ultrafiltration, gel filtration, and column electrophoresis, 8 litres of the culture medium yielded 1.5–2.0 A280 units of the substance representing 15–20 per cent of the HL-A common antigenic activity originally present. A single protein band with a Rf of 0.47 was obtained by disc electrophoresis. The molecular size was shown to be about 11,000 Daltons by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulphate—acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon isoelectric focusing two bands were obtained which corresponded exactly to those obtained with HL-A common portion fragment prepared from papain-solubilized HL-A antigen preparations by acid dissociation. The isoelectric point of the major band was 5.0. The reactions of this substance with rabbit antisera against human lymphoid cell membrane and against the substance were essentially identical to the reactions of HL-A common portion fragment with these same antisera. ImagesFIG. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4476726

  7. A Low Complexity Rapid Molecular Method for Detection of Clostridium difficile in Stool

    PubMed Central

    McElgunn, Cathal J.; Pereira, Clint R.; Parham, Nicholas J.; Smythe, James E.; Wigglesworth, Michael J.; Smielewska, Anna; Parmar, Surendra A.; Gandelman, Olga A.; Brown, Nicholas M.; Tisi, Laurence C.; Curran, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a method for the detection of Clostridium difficile from stool using a novel low-complexity and rapid extraction process called Heat Elution (HE). The HE method is two-step and takes just 10 minutes, no specialist instruments are required and there is minimal hands-on time. A test method using HE was developed in conjunction with Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) combined with the real-time bioluminescent reporter system known as BART targeting the toxin B gene (tcdB). The HE-LAMP-BART method was evaluated in a pilot study on clinical fecal samples (tcdB+, n =  111; tcdB−, n  = 107). The HE-LAMP-BART method showed 95.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity against a gold standard reference method using cytotoxigenic culture and also a silica-based robotic extraction followed by tcdB PCR to control for storage. From sample to result, the HE-LAMP-BART method typically took 50 minutes, whereas the PCR method took >2.5 hours. In a further study (tcdB+, n =  47; tcdB−, n  = 28) HE-LAMP-BART was compared to an alternative commercially available LAMP-based method, Illumigene (Meridian Bioscience, OH), and yielded 87.2% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the HE-LAMP-BART method compared to 76.6% and 100%, respectively, for Illumigene against the reference method. A subset of 27 samples (tcdB+, n =  25; tcdB−, n  = 2) were further compared between HE-LAMP-BART, Illumigene, GeneXpert (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) and RIDA®QUICK C. difficile Toxin A/B lateral flow rapid test (R-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany) resulting in sensitivities of HE-LAMP-BART 92%, Illumigene 72% GeneXpert 96% and RIDAQuick 76% against the reference method. The HE-LAMP-BART method offers the advantages of molecular based approaches without the cost and complexity usually associated with molecular tests. Further, the rapid time-to-result and simple protocol means the method can be applied away from the centralized laboratory settings. PMID:24416173

  8. Evaluation of point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen assays for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in low-, moderate-, and high-prevalence schools in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Foo, Karen T; Blackstock, Anna J; Ochola, Elizabeth A; Matete, Daniel O; Mwinzi, Pauline N M; Montgomery, Susan P; Karanja, Diana M S; Secor, W Evan

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of a point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen assay (POC-CCA) to detect schistosome infections in primary school children (N = 1,801) living in areas with low, moderate, and high Schistosoma mansoni prevalence in western Kenya. The commercially available assay (CCA-1) and a second, experimental formulation (CCA-2) were compared against Kato-Katz stool examinations and an anti-schistosome enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A latent class model based on the four tests was used to establish "true infection status" in three different zones based on their distance from Lake Victoria. As a screening tool for community treatment according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, the Kato-Katz examination was in closest agreement with the latent class model, followed by the experimental CCA-2, soluble adult worm antigen preparation (SWAP) ELISA, and CCA-1, which had high sensitivity compared with the other tests but was consistently the least specific. Our experience suggests that POC-CCA tests offer a field-friendly alternative to Kato-Katz, but need further interpretation for appropriate field use. PMID:25870418

  9. Evaluation of point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen assays for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in low-, moderate-, and high-prevalence schools in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Foo, Karen T; Blackstock, Anna J; Ochola, Elizabeth A; Matete, Daniel O; Mwinzi, Pauline N M; Montgomery, Susan P; Karanja, Diana M S; Secor, W Evan

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of a point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen assay (POC-CCA) to detect schistosome infections in primary school children (N = 1,801) living in areas with low, moderate, and high Schistosoma mansoni prevalence in western Kenya. The commercially available assay (CCA-1) and a second, experimental formulation (CCA-2) were compared against Kato-Katz stool examinations and an anti-schistosome enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A latent class model based on the four tests was used to establish "true infection status" in three different zones based on their distance from Lake Victoria. As a screening tool for community treatment according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, the Kato-Katz examination was in closest agreement with the latent class model, followed by the experimental CCA-2, soluble adult worm antigen preparation (SWAP) ELISA, and CCA-1, which had high sensitivity compared with the other tests but was consistently the least specific. Our experience suggests that POC-CCA tests offer a field-friendly alternative to Kato-Katz, but need further interpretation for appropriate field use.

  10. Geographical Variation in Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Stool, Cow-Dung and Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Krushna Chandra; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Sahoo, Soumyakanta; Sahu, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan; Klintz, Senia Rosales; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2012-01-01

    Little information is available on relationships between the biophysical environment and antibiotic resistance. This study was conducted to investigate the antibiotic resistance pattern of Escherichia coli isolated from child stool samples, cow-dung and drinking water from the non-coastal (230 households) and coastal (187 households) regions of Odisha, India. Susceptibility testing of E. coli isolates (n = 696) to the following antibiotics: tetracycline, ampicillin/sulbactam, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, cefixime, cotrimoxazole, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid was performed by the disk diffusion method. Ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates (n = 83). Resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 90% or more of the E. coli isolates. Ciprofloxacin MIC values ranged from 8 to 32 µg/mL. The odds ratio (OR) of resistance in E. coli isolates from children’s stool (OR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.18–8.01), cow-dung (OR = 3.6, 95% CI 1.59–8.03, P = 0.002) and drinking water (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.00–14.44, P = 0.049) were higher in non-coastal compared to coastal region. Similarly, the co-resistance in cow-dung (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.39–4.37, P = 0.002) and drinking water (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.36–7.41, P = 0.008) as well as the multi-resistance in cow-dung (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.12–4.34, P = 0.022) and drinking water (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.06–7.07, P = 0.036) were also higher in the non-coastal compared to the coastal region. PMID:22690160

  11. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  12. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  13. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  14. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  15. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  16. MicroRNAs in stool samples as potential screening biomarkers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Yu; Sun, Yong-Wei; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Li, Jiao; Hua, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounts for approximately 90-95% exocrine malignant tumors of the pancreas. The high prevalence of metastasis and the difficulty of early diagnosis lead to a dismal prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in extensive biological processes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of stool miRNAs as novel biomarker for PDAC screening. MiRNAs were extracted from clinical specimens which included cancer and matched adjacent benign pancreatic tissues of 30 PDAC patients, pancreatic juice of 20 from the 30 PDAC patients and 10 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients, stool samples of the 30 PDAC patients, the 10 CP patients and 15 healthy volunteers. Relative expression of a panel of 5 dysregulated miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-196a, miR-216 and miR-217) was analyzed with qRT-PCR. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the diagnosing value of stool miRNAs in PDAC patients. The study showed that our methods of extracting and detecting miRNAs from pancreatic juice and stool specimens had high reproducibility. Compared to matched adjacent benign pancreatic tissues and pancreatic juice of CP patients, the expression of miR-21 (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.0027) as well as miR-155 (P = 0.0087 and P = 0.0067) was significantly higher and the expression of miR-216 (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0044) was significantly lower in primary tumor tissues and pancreatic juice of PDAC patients. PDAC patients had a significantly higher stool miR-21 and miR-155 (P = 0.0049 and P = 0.0112) and lower miR-216 level (P = 0.0002) compared to normal controls. The same results were obtained in the expression levels of stool miR-21, miR-155 and miR-216 between PDAC and CP patients (P = 0.0337, P = 0.0388 and P = 0.0117, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis by using stool miRNAs expression indicated that combination of miR-21 and miR-155 had best sensitivity of 93.33% while the

  17. Surface antigens of smooth brucellae.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R; Jones, L M; Leong, D; Wilson, J B

    1968-10-01

    Surface antigens of smooth brucellae were extracted by ether-water, phenol-water, trichloroacetic acid, and saline and examined by immunoelectrophoresis and gel diffusion with antisera from infected and immunized rabbits. Ether-water extracts of Brucella melitensis contained a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was specific for the surface of smooth brucellae and was correlated with the M agglutinogen of Wilson and Miles, a polysaccharide protein component devoid of lipid which was not restricted to the surface of smooth brucellae and was not correlated with the smooth agglutinogen (component 1), and several protein components which were associated with internal antigens of rough and smooth brucellae. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis of ether-water extracts of B. abortus revealed only two components, a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was correlated with the A agglutinogen, and component 1. Component 1 from B. melitensis and B. abortus showed identity in gel diffusion tests, whereas component M from B. melitensis and component A from B. abortus showed partial identity with unabsorbed antisera and no cross-reactions with monospecific sera. Attempts to prepare monospecific sera directly by immunization of rabbits with cell walls or ether-water extracts were unsuccessful. Absorption of antisera with heavy fraction of ether-water extracts did not always result in monospecific sera. It was concluded (as has been described before) that the A and M antigens are present on a single antigenic complex, in different proportions depending upon the species and biotype, and that this component is a lipopolysaccharide protein complex of high molecular weight that diffuses poorly through agar gel. Components 1, A, and M were also demonstrated in trichloroacetic acid and phenol-water extracts. With all extracts, B. melitensis antigen showed greater diffusibility in agar than B. abortus antigens. After mild acid hydrolysis, B. abortus ether-water extract was able

  18. Blastocystis sp. in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)--Detection in Stool Aspirates during Colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ragavan, Nanthiney Devi; Kumar, Suresh; Chye, Tan Tian; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Shiaw-Hooi, Ho

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis is one of the most common gut parasites found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Its' association with IBS is controversial, possibly as a result of irregular shedding of parasites in stool and variation in stool detection. We aimed to screen for Blastocystis in colonic stool aspirate samples in adult patients with and without IBS undergoing colonoscopy for various indications and measure the interleukin levels (IL-8, IL-3 and IL-5). In addition to standard stool culture techniques, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were employed to detect and subtype Blastocystis. All the serum samples collected were subjected for ELISA studies to measure the interleukin levels (IL-8, IL-3 and IL-5). Among 109 (IBS n = 35 and non-IBS n = 74) adults, direct stool examination and culture of colonic aspirates were initially negative for Blastocystis. However, PCR analysis detected Blastocystis in 6 (17%) IBS and 4 (5.5%) non-IBS patients. In the six positive IBS patients by PCR method, subtype 3 was shown to be the most predominant (3/6: 50%) followed by subtype 4 (2/6; 33.3%) and subtype 5 (1/6; 16.6%). IL-8 levels were significantly elevated in the IBS Blasto group and IBS group (p<0.05) compared to non-IBS and non-IBS Blasto group. The level of IL-3 in were seen to be significantly higher in than IBS Blasto group and IBS group (p<0.05) compared to non-IBS. Meanwhile, the IL-5 levels were significantly higher in IBS Blasto group (p<0.05) compared to non-IBS and non-IBS Blasto group. This study implicates that detecting Blastosystis by PCR method using colonic aspirate samples during colonoscopy, suggests that this may be a better method for sample collection due to the parasite's irregular shedding in Blastocystis-infected stools. Patients with IBS infected with parasite showed an increase in the interleukin levels demonstrate that Blastocystis does have an effect in the immune system. PMID:26375823

  19. Home Use Tests: Fecal Occult Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Fecal Occult Blood Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... test kit to measure the presence of hidden (occult) blood in your stool (feces). What is fecal ...

  20. Limitations in the use of /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath and stool bile acid determinations in patients with chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.; Walker, K.; Thomson, A.B.

    1986-06-01

    Analysis of a modified /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath test on 165 consecutive in-patients being investigated for chronic diarrhea showed that the measurement of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between 3 and 6 h after oral dosing of 5 microCi of /sup 14/C-glycocholic acid was of only limited use to distinguish between patients with Crohn's disease (CD), idiopathic bile salt wastage (IBW), or ileal resection (IR) from those with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Continuing /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collections for up to 24 h was of little more help in establishing the presence of bacterial overgrowth syndrome (BOS) and in distinguishing between BOS and CD. Stool bile acid measurements were of use in differentiating between IBW and IBS, but did not distinguish between CD and BOS or between CD and IR. Since the range of normal values was defined by measurements in the IBS group, a positive test was specific for an organic cause of chronic diarrhea. Even so, the sensitivity of the test was relatively low: CD, 53%; IR, 23%; IBW, /sup 14/%; and BOS, 10%. We believe that the 24-h /sup 14/C-glycocholic breath test combined with the measurement of stool bile acids represents a screening test of only limited use for the identification of organic causes of chronic diarrhea.

  1. Evaluation of the Triage Micro Parasite Panel for Detection of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium parvum in Patient Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Susan E.; Suarez, Clarisa A.; Duran, Yolanda; Poppiti, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A study comparing the Triage Micro Parasite Panel (Biosite Diagnostics, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) to conventional O&P examination (O&P) was performed using patient fecal specimens. Five hundred twenty-three stool samples were compared. Nineteen specimens were found to be positive by Triage, and 29 were found to be positive by O&P. Seven specimens were positive for Giardia lamblia, four were positive for Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, and three were positive for Cryptosporidium parvum as determined by both methods. There was one false positive by Triage (C. parvum) and four false negatives by O&P (two G. lamblia, one E. histolytica/E. dispar, and one C. parvum). The Triage test accurately detected all 18 specimens that contained one of the three organisms that it was designed to detect. The Triage test is a rapid, easy-to-use enzyme immunoassay for the detection of G. lamblia, E. histolytica/E. dispar, and C. parvum in fresh or fresh-frozen fecal specimens. These data suggest that the Triage test can be used as a screen for the immediate testing of stool specimens for these three pathogenic parasites. If Triage test results are negative, O&P can be performed if parasitic infections other than G. lamblia, E. histolytica/E. dispar, or C. parvum are suspected. PMID:11136793

  2. Evaluation of a new commercial TaqMan PCR assay for direct detection of the clostridium difficile toxin B gene in clinical stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Paul D; Babiker, Wisal; Alcabasa, Romina; Aird, Deborah; Wehrlin, Jennifer; Ikpeama, Ijeoma; Gluck, Linda; Carroll, Karen C

    2009-12-01

    The ProGastro Cd assay (Prodesse, Inc., Waukesha, WI) is a new commercial TaqMan PCR assay that detects tcdB. The ProGastro Cd assay was compared to the Wampole Clostridium difficile toxin B test (TOX-B test; TechLab, Blacksburg, VA), a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCCNA), and to anaerobic toxigenic bacterial culture, as the "gold standard," for 285 clinical stool specimens. Assays were independently performed according to manufacturers' directions. A 1.0-ml sample was removed from the stool specimen, of which 20 microl was used for extraction on the NucliSENS easyMAG platform (bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) for the Prodesse ProGastro Cd assay and 200 microl of the stool filtrate was used for the TOX-B CCCNA. Anaerobic toxigenic culture was done by heating an additional 1.0 ml of the stool sample to 80 degrees C for 10 min before inoculation onto modified cycloserine, cefoxitin, and fructose agar with horse blood (Remel, Lenexa, KS) and into a prereduced chopped meat glucose broth (BBL, BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD). The prevalence of toxin-producing strains of C. difficile was 15.7% (n = 44) as determined by anaerobic toxigenic culture. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the Prodesse ProGastro Cd assay compared to the TOX-B test were 83.3%, 95.6%, 69.4%, and 98%, respectively. Compared to toxigenic culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the Prodesse ProGastro Cd assay were 77.3%, 99.2%, 94.4%, and 95.9%, respectively, and those of the TOX-B test were 63.6%, 99.2%, 93.3%, and 93.6%, respectively. Although no statistical difference (Fisher's exact test) was detected (P = 0.242) between the sensitivities of the Prodesse ProGastro Cd assay and a standard CCCNA compared to anaerobic culture for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile, the Prodesse ProGastro Cd assay did detect more toxigenic C. difficile isolates than the CCCNA.

  3. Quantitative Detection of Shiga Toxins Directly from Stool Specimens of Patients Associated with an Outbreak of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in Japan—Quantitative Shiga toxin detection from stool during EHEC outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Eiki; Watahiki, Masanori; Isobe, Junko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Nair, G. Balakrish; Kurazono, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Detection of Shiga toxins (Stx) is important for accurate diagnosis of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed Stx protein in nine patients’ stool during an outbreak that occurred in Japan. Highly sensitive immunoassay (bead enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bead-ELISA)) revealed that the concentrations of toxins in stool of patients ranged from 0.71 to 10.44 ng/mL for Stx1 and 2.75 to 51.61 ng/mL for Stx2. To our knowledge, this is the first report that reveals the range of Stx protein concentrations in human stools. PMID:26516915

  4. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  5. Morganella morganii causing fatal sepsis in a platelet recipient and also isolated from a donor's stool.

    PubMed

    Golubić-Cepulić, B; Budimir, A; Plecko, V; Plenković, F; Mrsić, M; Sarlija, D; Vuk, T; Skrlin, J; Kalenić, S; Labar, B

    2004-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products causes significant patient morbidity and mortality. Contaminated platelet transfusion is a frequent cause of bacteraemia and sepsis because of the storage conditions of platelets. A fatal case of Morganella morganii platelet transfusion associated with sepsis is described, along with procedures traced back to the isolation of M. morganii from a donor's stool. Molecular typing was performed, and the same M. morganii strain was found in blood and post-mortem organ cultures of platelet recipient and platelet bag and in the donor's stool. The route of contamination is unknown. The contamination could be due to either insufficient venipuncture site disinfection or the donor's transient bacteraemia. Patient died 5 days after the transfusion.

  6. Feasible method for routine surveillance culturing of stools from neutropenic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Sherlock, C H; Burdge, D R

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop an accurate, yet inexpensive, method for determining whether the bowel of a neutropenic patient is colonized with bacteria resistant to the antimicrobial agents used in empiric therapy. Selective agar media were prepared in which Mueller-Hinton agar or MacConkey agar were supplemented with one of the following antimicrobial agents: carbenicillin (16 micrograms/ml), gentamicin (4 micrograms/ml), or tobramycin (4 micrograms/ml). Moxalactam was incorporated initially at 16 micrograms/ml and subsequently at 8 micrograms/ml. Stools from neutropenic patients and bone marrow transplant recipients were inoculated on these media and on unsupplemented MacConkey agar. All bacteria that grew on the antibiotic-containing media were categorized as resistant to the supplementing drug; failure to detect an organism that did grow on the antibiotic-free MacConkey agar indicated susceptibility. These results were compared with those obtained for all isolates on all media by agar disk diffusion. There were 512 gram-negative enteric isolates from 320 stools obtained from 98 patients. The antibiotic-containing media suppressed the growth of 95% of bacteria that were identified as susceptible by agar disk diffusion. In detecting resistant organisms, the correlation between agar disk diffusion and direct stool screening with Mueller-Hinton agar ranged from 73 to 83%, and on MacConkey agar it ranged from 87 to 97%. The predictive value of a resistant result was 80 to 97% for the four antimicrobial agents when MacConkey agar was used. MacConkey agar performed better than Mueller-Hinton agar because of the greater ease of detecting different bacterial morphotypes. The cost of direct stool screening with antibiotic-supplemented MacConkey agar is approximately half the cost of routine methods of surveillance. Its cost and accuracy make the method a useful adjunct to the routine management of neutropenic patients. PMID:6394620

  7. Viral load of human bocavirus-1 in stools from children with viral diarrhoea in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Proenca-Modena, J L; Martinez, M; Amarilla, A A; Espínola, E E; Galeano, M E; Fariña, N; Russomando, G; Aquino, V H; Parra, G I; Arruda, E

    2013-12-01

    Since their discovery, four species of human bocavirus (HBoV) have been described in patients with respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. However, a clear causal association between HBoV-1 and gastroenteritis has not been demonstrated. In this study, we describe the detection and quantification of HBoV-1 in stools from children with acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HBoV-1 genome was detected in 10.6% of stools with frequent association with rotavirus and norovirus. The median of HBoV-1 viral load was 1.88 × 104 genome/ml, lower than previously shown in secretions of patients with respiratory infections, without any obvious association between high viral load and presence of HBoV as single agent. Thus, although HBoV-1 was frequently detected in these patients, there is no clear causal association of this agent with diarrhoea. Indeed, HBoV-1 DNA in stools of patients with gastroenteritis without respiratory symptoms may be a remnant of previous infections or associated with prolonged shedding of virus in the respiratory or digestive tracts.

  8. Habitual dietary intake is associated with stool microbiota composition in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Simões, Catarina D; Maukonen, Johanna; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Saarela, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The impact of diet on the gut microbiota has usually been assessed by subjecting people to the same controlled diet and thereafter following the shifts in the microbiota. In the present study, we used habitual dietary intake, clinical data, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to characterize the stool microbiota of Finnish monozygotic twins. The effect of diet on the numbers of bacteria was described through a hierarchical linear mixed model that included the twin individuals, stratified by body mass index, and their families as random effects. The abundance and diversity of the bacterial groups studied did not differ between normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals with the techniques used. Intakes of energy, monounsaturated fatty acids, n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), n6 PUFAs, and soluble fiber had significant associations with the stool bacterial numbers (e.g., increased energy intake was associated with reduced numbers of Bacteroides spp.). In addition, co-twins with identical energy intake had more similar numbers and DGGE-profile diversities of Bacteroides spp. than did the co-twins with different intake. Moreover, the co-twins who ingested the same amounts of saturated fatty acids had very similar DGGE profiles of Bacteroides spp., whereas the co-twins with similar consumption of fiber had a very low bifidobacterial DGGE-profile similarity. In conclusion, our findings confirm that the diet plays an important role in the modulation of the stool microbiota, in particular Bacteroides spp. and bifidobacteria. PMID:23343669

  9. [Rice water with and without electrolytes in diarrhea with a high stool output].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Posadas-Tello, N M; Rodríguez-Leyva, G

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy and safety of two rice-based oral rehydration solutions, with and without added electrolyte in children presenting acute diarrheal dehydration with high stool output (> 10 mL/kg/h) during a two-hour rehydration period. Twenty-two patients of one to 18 months old were recruited and randomly distributed into two groups: group A received the rice-based solution without electrolytes, and group B received the rice-based solution with electrolytes. A stool output diminishing was observed in both groups and rehydration was achieved in 4.0 +/- 0.9 hours in 21 patients from group A and in 4.6 +/- 0.9 hours in 13 patients group group B. There was not a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the laboratory results. The rice-based oral rehydration solution without added electrolytes was useful for rehydration of children presenting high stool output, after administering the WHO/ORS recommended formula during a two-hour period.

  10. Stool Softeners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for ...

  11. Detection and Identification of Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon Species in Stool and Urine Specimens by PCR and Differential Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Notermans, Daan W.; Peek, Ron; de Jong, Menno D.; Wentink-Bonnema, Ellen M.; Boom, René; van Gool, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Several species of microsporidia can cause disease in humans in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis are most commonly associated with chronic diarrhea. All Encephalitozoon species, including E. intestinalis, E. hellem, and E. cuniculi, also cause disseminated infections. As distinctive treatment options are available for the different genera, identification is clinically important. We evaluated a PCR with primers directed to a conserved region of the small subunit rRNA gene of microsporidia. Hybridization with a generic microsporidium probe and specific probes for each of the four different species was used for identification. Probes were labeled with ruthenium and detected by electrochemiluminescence. The sensitivity of the assay was tested with plasmids containing the region of interest from each of the four different species and Vittaforma corneae as a control. In addition, the assay was tested with feces spiked with cultured spores from each of the three Encephalitozoon species and V. corneae. An analytical sensitivity of 3.5 × 102 to 3.5 × 103 spores per g of feces, corresponding to 17 to 170 gene copies per PCR, was found, which is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than microscopy after Uvitex 2B fluorescent staining. Stool samples from 22 microscopically diagnosed patients and from 61 uninfected controls were evaluated, showing a sensitivity of at least 95% and a specificity of 100% compared to microscopy. The method was further tested by spiking urine samples with spores of the different Encephalitozoon species. PMID:15695653

  12. Signal sequence deletion and fusion to tetanus toxoid epitope augment antitumor immune responses to a human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) plasmid DNA vaccine in a murine test system.

    PubMed

    Lund, Lars H; Andersson, Karolina; Zuber, Bartek; Karlsson, Anneli; Engström, Gunnel; Hinkula, Jorma; Wahren, Britta; Winberg, Gösta

    2003-05-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) is expressed on several human carcinomas including colon cancer. CEA contains signal peptides that target the protein through the endoplasmic reticulum and to the cell membrane. We constructed a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding a truncated CEA (deltaCEA), devoid of its signal peptides, and demonstrated that it was retained inside the cell, while full-length CEA (wtCEA) was expressed on the membrane. We hypothesized that intracellular retention of deltaCEA would enhance MHC class I presentation of CEA peptides, thus favoring cellular immune responses. In addition, a promiscuous T-helper epitope (Q830-L844 of tetanus toxoid) was fused to the N-terminal of the truncated CEA gene (tetdeltaCEA). C57BL/6 mice immunized with DNA encoding wtCEA or tetdeltaCEA developed both humoral and cellular immune responses to CEA. SCID mice transplanted with spleen cells from tetdeltaCEA but not wtCEA-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed strong suppression of tumor growth after inoculation of human CEA-expressing colon carcinoma cells. Immune spleen cell populations depleted for either B, T or both B and T cells were active, indicating that effector cells might also reside in other populations. The present approach to manipulating antigen presentation may open new possibilities for immunotherapy against colon and other CEA-secreting carcinomas.

  13. Evaluation of 3 automated real-time PCR (Xpert C. difficile assay, BD MAX Cdiff, and IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000 assay) for detecting Clostridium difficile toxin gene compared to toxigenic culture in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jaeeun; Lee, Hyeyoung; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Gun Dong; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of the 3 automated systems (Cepheid Xpert, BD MAX, and IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000) detecting Clostridium difficile toxin gene compared to toxigenic culture. Of the 254 stool specimens tested, 87 (48 slight, 35 moderate, and 4 heavy growth) were toxigenic culture positive. The overall sensitivities and specificities were 82.8% and 98.8% for Xpert, 81.6% and 95.8% for BD MAX, and 62.1% and 99.4% for IMDx, respectively. The specificity was significantly higher in IMDx than BD MAX (P= 0.03). All stool samples underwent toxin A/B enzyme immunoassay testing, and of the 254 samples, only 29 samples were positive and 2 of them were toxigenic culture negative. Considering the rapidity and high specificity of the real-time PCR assays compared to the toxigenic culture, they can be used as the first test method for C. difficile infection/colonization.

  14. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-01-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects. Images PMID:2715318

  15. Estimating the sensitivity and specificity of Kato-Katz stool examination technique for detection of hookworms, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infections in humans in the absence of a 'gold standard'.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, M R; Carabin, H; Joseph, L; Balolong, E; Olveda, R; McGarvey, S T

    2010-03-15

    The accuracy of the Kato-Katz technique in identifying individuals with soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is limited by day-to-day variation in helminth egg excretion, confusion with other parasites and the laboratory technicians' experience. We aimed to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the Kato-Katz technique to detect infection with Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Trichuris trichiura using a Bayesian approach in the absence of a 'gold standard'. Data were obtained from a longitudinal study conducted between January 2004 and December 2005 in Samar Province, the Philippines. Each participant provided between one and three stool samples over consecutive days. Stool samples were examined using the Kato-Katz technique and reported as positive or negative for STHs. In the presence of measurement error, the true status of each individual is considered as latent data. Using a Bayesian method, we calculated marginal posterior densities of sensitivity and specificity parameters from the product of the likelihood function of observed and latent data. A uniform prior distribution was used (beta distribution: alpha=1, beta=1). A total of 5624 individuals provided at least one stool sample. One, two and three stool samples were provided by 1582, 1893 and 2149 individuals, respectively. All STHs showed variation in test results from day to day. Sensitivity estimates of the Kato-Katz technique for one stool sample were 96.9% (95% Bayesian Credible Interval [BCI]: 96.1%, 97.6%), 65.2% (60.0%, 69.8%) and 91.4% (90.5%, 92.3%), for A. lumbricoides, hookworm and T. trichiura, respectively. Specificity estimates for one stool sample were 96.1% (95.5%, 96.7%), 93.8% (92.4%, 95.4%) and 94.4% (93.2%, 95.5%), for A. lumbricoides, hookworm and T. trichiura, respectively. Our results show that the Kato-Katz technique can perform with reasonable accuracy with one day's stool collection for A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura. Low sensitivity of the Kato-Katz for detection

  16. Preponderance of toxigenic Escherichia coli in stool pathogens correlates with toxin detection in accessible drinking-water sources.

    PubMed

    Igbokwe, H; Bhattacharyya, S; Gradus, S; Khubbar, M; Griswold, D; Navidad, J; Igwilo, C; Masson-Meyers, D; Azenabor, A A

    2015-02-01

    Since early detection of pathogens and their virulence factors contribute to intervention and control strategies, we assessed the enteropathogens in diarrhoea disease and investigated the link between toxigenic strains of Escherichia coli from stool and drinking-water sources; and determined the expression of toxin genes by antibiotic-resistant E. coli in Lagos, Nigeria. This was compared with isolates from diarrhoeal stool and water from Wisconsin, USA. The new Luminex xTAG GPP (Gastroplex) technique and conventional real-time PCR were used to profile enteric pathogens and E. coli toxin gene isolates, respectively. Results showed the pathogen profile of stool and indicated a relationship between E. coli toxin genes in water and stool from Lagos which was absent in Wisconsin isolates. The Gastroplex technique was efficient for multiple enteric pathogens and toxin gene detection. The co-existence of antibiotic resistance with enteroinvasive E. coli toxin genes suggests an additional prognostic burden on patients.

  17. Real-time PCR for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in human stool samples from Côte d'Ivoire: diagnostic accuracy, inter-laboratory comparison and patterns of hookworm co-infection.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sören L; Piraisoody, Nivetha; Kramme, Stefanie; Marti, Hanspeter; Silué, Kigbafori D; Panning, Marcus; Nickel, Beatrice; Kern, Winfried V; Herrmann, Mathias; Hatz, Christoph F; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Utzinger, Jürg; von Müller, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Human infections with the helminth species Strongyloides stercoralis encompass a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening disease. The diagnosis of S. stercoralis is cumbersome and the sensitivity of conventional stool microscopy is low. New molecular tools have been developed to increase sensitivity. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of real-time PCR with microscopy for the detection of S. stercoralis and hookworm in human stool samples, and investigated the inter-laboratory agreement of S. stercoralis-specific real-time PCR in two European laboratories. Stool specimens from 256 randomly selected individuals in rural Côte d'Ivoire were examined using three microscopic techniques (i.e. Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate (KAP) and Baermann (BM)). Additionally, ethanol-fixed stool aliquots were subjected to molecular diagnosis. The prevalence of S. stercoralis and hookworm infection was 21.9% and 52.0%, respectively, whilst co-infections were detected in 35 (13.7%) participants. The diagnostic agreement between real-time PCR and microscopy was excellent when both KAP and BM tested positive for S. stercoralis, but was considerably lower when only one microscopic technique was positive. The sensitivity of KAP, BM and real-time PCR for detection of S. stercoralis as compared to a combination of all diagnostic techniques was 21.4%, 37.5% and 76.8%, respectively. The inter-laboratory agreement of S. stercoralis-specific PCR was substantial (κ=0.63, p<0.001). We conclude that a combination of real-time PCR and stool microscopy shows high accuracy for S. stercoralis diagnosis. Besides high sensitivity, PCR may also enhance specificity by reducing microscopic misdiagnosis of morphologically similar helminth larvae (i.e. hookworm and S. stercoralis) in settings where both helminth species co-exist.

  18. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  19. The significance of erythrocyte antigen site density

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Leon W.; Trabold, Norma C.

    1971-01-01

    The importance of antigen site density has been studied by means of a model passive hemolysis system using red cells coupled with sulfanilic acid groups. Relative site numbers were estimated from the covalent linkage of sulfanilic acid-35S to red cell membrane protein, and the effective antigen site number was determined with 125I-labeled rabbit IgG anti-sulfanilic acid (anti-S). Immune hemolysis was demonstrated for red cells which had greater than a threshold number of antigen sites, the value of which was different for normal human cells (80,000 sites/cell), cells from a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) (40,000 sites/cell), and sheep red blood cells (RBC) (15,000 sites/cell). Cells with antigen site densities below these values did not hemolyze when tested with 1 mg/ml purified rabbit IgM anti-S. 2-8 times greater antigen site densities were required to obtain hemolysis with IgG anti-S. Above the threshold value, hemolysis titers were proportional to the antigen site number until maximal values were obtained. The greater hemolytic efficiency of IgM antibody was demonstrated in this system, and it was established that the magnitude of the difference was related to the test cell antigen site density. These data, taken with previously reported hemagglutination studies, have been used to develop a general classification of immune hemolysis and hemagglutination based on antigen site density and antibody class. It is suggested that the heterogeneity of blood group systems is caused by differences in the site separation of erythrocyte membrane antigens. PMID:5105661

  20. Caecal and faecal short-chain fatty acids and stool output in rats fed on diets containing non-starch polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C A; Eastwood, M A

    1995-05-01

    The exact mechanisms by which non-starch polysaccharides increase stool output are unknown. In the present study the hypothesis that the site of fermentation and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) accumulation is related to the action of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) on stool output was tested. The basal diet (45 g NSP/kg) of forty-three male Wistar rats was supplemented with 50 g/kg of either guar, karaya, tragacanth, gellan, xanthan or ispaghula for 28 d. A further twenty-three rats were maintained on the basal diet for the same time period. Faeces were then collected over 2 d and caecal contents obtained post-mortem. Caecal and faecal wet and dry weights and SCFA were measured. Each supplement had a different effect on the caecal and faecal contents but they appeared to fall into three groups when compared with the basal diet. In group 1, guar gum affected only caecal SCFA. It had no effect on stool output or faecal SCFA. In group 2, karaya increased caecal SCFA and tragacanth, karaya and xanthan increased faecal SCFA and faecal water. In group 3, ispaghula and gellan had no consistent effect on caecal or faecal SCFA concentrations but increased total faecal SCFA output and increased faecal wet and dry weight. Although the knowledge that SCFA are rapidly absorbed in the large intestine has led us to believe that they play no role in determining faecal output, these results suggest that in some cases where NSP are slowly fermented, and increase faecal SCFA, the role of the SCFA may need to be reassessed.

  1. Use of integrin alpha 6 transcripts in a stool mRNA assay for the detection of colorectal cancers at curable stages

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-François; Herring, Elizabeth; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Tremblay, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Objective An important criterion for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is the ability to detect lesions at a curable stage. In the present study, we have assessed the integrin α6 subunit transcript (ITGA6) as part of a stool assay for the detection of colorectal lesions. Results In comparison with control samples, ITGA6 levels were found to be significantly increased at all stages (P < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed areas under the curve of 0.89 for the prediction of CRC with 81% sensitivity and 88% specificity and of 0.90 for the prediction of advanced adenomas (Ad) with 75% sensitivity and 88% specificity. The ITGA6A variant was also found to be increased relative to ITGA6 in stage II and III CRCs. Combining ITGA6 with other selected transcripts and/or immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) results further increased sensitivity and specificity for the detection of colorectal lesions. Patients and Methods ITGA6 detection used alone and under various combinations including detection of other mRNA markers and iFOBT was assessed on stool samples obtained from 175 patients (91 CRCs, 24 Ad and 60 healthy controls). Conclusions These data confirm the usefulness and reliability of an mRNA stool assay for the detection of colorectal lesions. The validation of additional candidate genes and their analysis in multiplex qPCR represents a powerful and robust approach that can be combined with iFOBT results to improve the detection of colorectal lesions. PMID:26895101

  2. Effect of an α-Lactalbumin-Enriched Infant Formula Supplemented With Oligofructose on Fecal Microbiota, Stool Characteristics, and Hydration Status

    PubMed Central

    Northington, Robert; Kullen, Martin J.; Yao, Manjiang; Bettler, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To evaluate the impact of oligofructose (OF)-supplemented infant formula on fecal microbiota, stool characteristics, and hydration. Methods. Ninety-five formula-fed infants were randomized to α-lactalbumin-enriched control formula (CF) or identical formula with 3.0 g/L OF (EF) for 8 weeks; 50 infants fed human milk (HM) were included. Results. Eighty-four infants completed the study, 70 met per-protocol criteria. Over 8 weeks, bifidobacteria increased more in EF than CF group (0.70 vs 0.16 log10 bacterial counts/g dry feces, P = .008); EF was not significantly different from HM group (P = .32). EF group stool consistency was intermediate between CF and HM groups; at week 8, EF group had softer stools than CF (5-point scale: 1 = hard, 5 = watery; consistency score 3.46 vs 2.82, P = .015) without significant differences in stool frequency. Physician-assessed hydration status was normal for all infants. Conclusions. Infant formula with 3.0 g/L OF promoted bifidobacteria growth and softer stools without adversely affecting stool frequency or hydration. PMID:25297064

  3. The hybrid EIA test: a specific and sensitive assay for the detection of woodchuck antibody to hepatitis surface antigen (anti-WHs).

    PubMed

    Millman, I; Glass, R G

    1988-05-01

    'Ausria II' polystyrene beads (Abbott Labs, N. Chicago) are reacted with woodchuck serum positive for WHsAg in a dilution predetermined by titration. This modified bead is used in a blocking assay to detect the presence of antibody to the surface antigen of woodchuck hepatitis virus (anti-WHs). Serum containing woodchuck anti-WHs and commercial horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled anti-HBs are sequentially added. A drop in optical density at 492 nm of 50% or more due to the blocking of HRP conjugated anti-HBs by anti-WHs compared with a control (negative woodchuck serum) is a measure of anti-WHs. The ease and simplicity of converting readily available 'Ausria II' beads to specific reagents for detecting anti-WHs should be welcomed by investigators studying WHV. The method described is both sensitive and reproducible.

  4. Identification of nonspecific reactions in laboratory rodent specimens tested by Rotazyme rotavirus ELISA.

    PubMed

    Jure, M N; Morse, S S; Stark, D M

    1988-06-01

    Fecal specimens from several laboratory animal species were tested for rotavirus antigen by Rotazyme II, a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that is widely used in human diagnostic studies. Fecal samples from rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, dogs, and cats tested negative; whereas those from rats and mice yielded a high proportion of positive results. Rats had the highest rate with 82% of the samples being positive. However, the presence of rotavirus in positive rodent samples could not be confirmed by virus isolation, electron microscopy or blocking ELISA using anti-EDIM mouse rotavirus serum. Several lines of evidence indicated that these positive reactions were false positives, apparently due to a non-specifically reacting substance in the diet of rats and mice. All the positive fecal samples were from rats and mice that had been fed nonautoclaved diet. Samples from rodents fed autoclaved diet were consistently negative in the Rotazyme test. When rats fed autoclaved diet were subsequently fed nonautoclaved diet, their stool converted from negative to positive within 6 hours. Conversely, rats with positive stool samples converted to negative within 15 hours when fed autoclaved diet. Similar results were found with mice. Positive fecal specimens and nonautoclaved rodent diet both contained a substance that apparently attached nonspecifically to the antibody coated beads used in the ELISA and reacted directly with the substrate in the absence of the conjugate. This substance was heat labile and trypsin sensitive, suggesting that it was a protein. PMID:2842540

  5. Lymphocyte activation by streptococcal antigens in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gross, W L; Packhäuser, U; Hahn, G; Westphal, E; Christophers, E; Schlaak, M

    1977-11-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses in 28 hospitalized patients with psoriasis and in 36 healthy controls were studied using the two-step leukocyte migration agarose test. Specific cell-mediated immunity to A-streptococcal cell wall and cell membrane antigens occurred significantly more often in patients with psoriasis than in the control group. A statistically significant correlation between psoriasis-associated antigens of the HLA-B locus and cellular immune reactivity to A-streptococcal antigens or clinical course was not found. When patients with guttate psoriasis were compared separately with the control group, leukocyte migration inhibition induced by cell-free supernatants of A-streptococcal antigen-exposed mononuclear cell cultures was found to be more frequent than in other forms of psoriasis.

  6. Comparison of a commercial dengue IgM capture ELISA with dengue antigen focus reduction microneutralization test and the Centers for Disease Control dengue IgM capture-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ryan J; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Litwin, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Dengue (DENV) infection is caused by an arbovirus that is a member of the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus. The diagnosis of acute dengue infection using clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult since the manifestations cannot be readily differentiated from other infections. Therefore the diagnosis of acute dengue infection depends upon laboratory assays. Dengue virus ELISAs have been designed for the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies in addition to nonstructural 1 (NS1) antigens. The InBios IgM Dengue ELISA was compared to the Antigen Focus Reduction Microneutralization Test (FRμNT90) and Centers for Disease Control Dengue IgM Capture-ELISA (CDC MAC-ELISA). The calculated sensitivity, specificity and agreement of the InBios ELISA compared to FRμNT90 and CDC MAC-ELISA was 88.7% (C.I. 81.4-93.7), 93.1% (C.I. 89.1-95.8) and 91.5% (C.I. 86.3-95.0), respectively. In summary the InBios IgM Dengue ELISA sensitivity and specificity is comparable to other commercially available IgM Capture-ELISAs.

  7. The stool microbiota of insulin resistant women with recent gestational diabetes, a high risk group for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Marina; Breier, Michaela; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Banning, Friederike; Ferrari, Uta; Sacco, Vanessa; Grallert, Harald; Parhofer, Klaus G; Seissler, Jochen; Clavel, Thomas; Lechner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to metabolic diseases. However, information on the microbiome of young adults at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) is lacking. The aim of this cross-sectional analysis was to investigate whether insulin resistant women with previous gestational diabetes (pGDM), a high risk group for T2D, differ in their stool microbiota from women after a normoglycemic pregnancy (controls). Bacterial communities were analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing using fecal samples from 42 pGDM and 35 control subjects 3-16 months after delivery. Clinical characterization included a 5-point OGTT, anthropometrics, clinical chemistry markers and a food frequency questionnaire. Women with a Prevotellaceae-dominated intestinal microbiome were overrepresented in the pGDM group (p < 0.0001). Additionally, the relative abundance of the phylum Firmicutes was significantly lower in women pGDM (median 48.5 vs. 56.8%; p = 0.013). Taxa richness (alpha diversity) was similar between the two groups and with correction for multiple testing we observed no significant differences on lower taxonomic levels. These results suggest that distinctive features of the intestinal microbiota are already present in young adults at risk for T2D and that further investigations of a potential pathophysiological role of gut bacteria in early T2D development are warranted. PMID:26279179

  8. Lateral Flow Test Using Echinococcus granulosus Native Antigen B and Comparison of IgG and IgG4 Dipsticks for Detection of Human Cystic Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Khalilpour, Akbar; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Moghadam, Zohreh Kazemi; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Zakaria, Nor Dyana; Osman, Sabariah; Noordin, Rahmah

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by infection with Echinococcus granulosus is of major concern for humans in many parts of the world. Antigen B was prepared from E. granulosus hydatid fluid, and Western blots confirmed eight batches showing a band corresponding to the 8-/12-kDa subunit with positive serum and no low-molecular mass band (< 15 kDa) with negative serum. The batches were pooled and used to prepare lateral flow immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) and IgG dipsticks. Diagnostic sensitivity was determined using serum samples from 21 hydatidosis patients, and diagnostic specificity was established using sera from 17 individuals infected with other parasites and 15 healthy people. IgG4 dipstick had a diagnostic sensitivity of 95% (20 of 21) and a specificity of 100% (32 of 32). The IgG dipstick had a sensitivity of 100% (21 of 21) and a specificity of 87.5% (28 of 32). Thus, both IgG and IgG4 dipsticks had high sensitivities, but IgG4 had greater specificity for the diagnosis of human CE. PMID:25200268

  9. Optimal attenuation of a PR8-derived mouse pathogenic H5N1 recombinant virus for testing antigenicity and protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Hwan; Kwon, Hyuk-Joon; Park, Jae-Keun; Song, Chang-Seon; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2015-11-17

    The PR8-based reverse genetics vector system is widely used to generate commercial vaccine strains, but the pathogenicity of PR8-derived recombinant viruses in mice hinders further immunological studies. In the present study, we generated PR8-derived H5N1 recombinant viruses, in which haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) originated from a mouse-pathogenic H5N1 low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV), and the non-structural proteins (NS) and polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) originated from different H9N2 LPAIVs. In contrast to the control H5N1 recombinant virus, harboring six internal genes from PR8, the NS and PB2 recombinant viruses did not cause body weight loss in mice. However, the NS recombinant virus replicated in the lungs of mice. It was more immunogenic than the PB2 recombinant virus to protect efficiently against a lethal challenge of a H5N1 highly pathogenic AIV with 89 and 88% amino acid identity in HA and NA, respectively. Therefore, the NS gene may be useful for generating nonpathogenic and immunogenic PR8-derived recombinant viruses for studies of antigenicity and protective efficacy in mice.

  10. Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: Yeast Species Isolated from Stool Samples of Children with Suspected or Diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorders and In Vitro Susceptibility Against Nystatin and Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kantarcioglu, A Serda; Kiraz, Nuri; Aydin, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a general term for a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders of brain development that limits a person's ability to function normally. Etiology has not been clearly defined up to date. However, gut microbiota and the bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and brain, the so-called microbiota-gut-brain axis, are hypothesized, which may be involved in the etiology of several mental disorders. Recent reports suggest that Candida, particularly Candida albicans, growth in intestines may cause lower absorption of carbohydrates and minerals and higher toxin levels which are thought to contribute autistic behaviors. The aim of this study was to identify the 3-year deposited yeasts isolated from stool samples of children with diagnosed or suspected ASD and to determine in vitro activity of nystatin and fluconazole against these isolates using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 guidelines. A 17-year retrospective assessment was also done using our laboratory records. Among the species identified, intrinsically fluconazole-resistant Candida krusei (19.8 %) and Candida glabrata (14.8 %) with elevated MICs were remarkable. Overall, C. albicans (57.4 %) was the most commonly isolated species in 17 years. The species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility tests have to be performed using the strain isolated from stool sample, to select the appropriate antifungal agent, if antimycotic therapy is needed.

  11. Performance of chromID Clostridium difficile agar compared with BBL C. difficile selective agar for detection of C. difficile in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Bong; Chang, Jiyoung; Shin, Sang Hyun; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Gun Dong; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new chromogenic medium for detection of Clostridium difficile, chromID C. difficile agar (CDIF; bioMérieux, France), by comparison with BBL C. difficile Selective Agar (CDSA; Becton Dickinson and Company, USA). After heat pre-treatment (80℃, 5 min), 185 diarrheal stool samples were inoculated onto the two media types and incubated anaerobically for 24 hr and 48 hr for CDIF and for 48 hr and 72 hr for CDSA. All typical colonies on each medium were examined by Gram staining, and the gram-positive rods confirmed to contain the tpi gene by PCR were identified as C. difficile. C. difficile was recovered from 36 samples by using a combination of the two media. The sensitivity with CDIF 48 hr was highest (100%) and was significantly higher than that with CDIF 24 hr (58.3%; P<0.001), because samples with a low burden of C. difficile tended to require prolonged incubation up to 48 hr (P<0.001). The specificity of CDIF 24 hr and CDIF 48 hr (99.3% and 90.6%, respectively) was significantly higher than that of CDSA 48 hr and CDSA 72 hr (72.5% and 67.1%, respectively; P<0.001). CDIF was effective for detecting C. difficile in heat-pretreated stool specimens, thus reducing unnecessary testing for toxin production in non-C. difficile isolates and turnaround time.

  12. Latex agglutination using the periplasmic proteins antigen of Brucella melitensis is a successful, rapid, and specific serodiagnostic test for ovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Alaa Bassuny; Swelum, Ayman Abdel-Aziz; Mostafa, Salama A-H; Alhumiany, Abdel-Rahman A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis, especially caused by Brucella melitensis, is considered the most-widespread zoonosis in the world, particularly in developing countries. This study was planned to develop an accurate test for diagnosis of ovine brucellosis using a specific hot saline extracted soluble Brucella melitensis periplasmic proteins (SBPPs). The efficacy of the latex agglutination test (LAT) using SBPPs compared to the Rose Bengal test (RBT), buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT), serum agglutination test (SAT), and an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA) was evaluated in the field diagnosis of ovine brucellosis. The test performance was evaluated by estimating sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), disease prevalence (DP), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) using test agreement and bacteriological culture in 1777 samples. The false-positive result was significantly (P ⩽0.05) lower in LAT than RBT, BPAT, SAT, and i-ELISA. With reference to test agreement, the Se, Sp, PPV, and PLR were highest (P ⩽0.05) in LAT 99.33%, 99.88%, 98.68%, and 827.25%, respectively. With reference to bacteriological culture, the LAT and i-ELISA tests showed a significant difference in Se with SAT. However, no significant difference in specificity was detected. The DP was 8.44% in the five tests. In conclusion, LAT using SBPPs of B. melitensis could be a suitable serodiagnostic field test for ovine brucellosis, with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27207442

  13. Comparison of CHROMagar Salmonella Medium and Hektoen Enteric Agar for Isolation of Salmonellae from Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gaillot, Olivier; Di Camillo, Patrick; Berche, Patrick; Courcol, René; Savage, Colette

    1999-01-01

    CHROMagar Salmonella (CAS), a new chromogenic medium, was retrospectively compared to Hektoen enteric agar (HEA) with 501 Salmonella stock isolates and was then prospectively compared to HEA for the detection and presumptive identification of Salmonella spp. with 508 stool samples before and after enrichment. All stock cultures (100%), including cultures of H2S-negative isolates, yielded typical mauve colonies on CAS, while 497 (99%) isolates produced typical lactose-negative, black-centered colonies on HEA. Following overnight incubation at 37°C, a total of 20 Salmonella strains were isolated from the 508 clinical samples. Sensitivities for primary plating and after enrichment were 95% (19 isolates) and 100% (20 isolates), respectively, for CAS and 80% (16 isolates) and 100% (20 isolates), respectively, for HEA. The specificity of CAS (88.9%) was significantly higher than that of HEA (78.5%; P < 0.0001). On the basis of its good sensitivity and specificity, CAS medium can be recommended for use for primary plating when human stool samples are screened for Salmonella spp. PMID:9986847

  14. Selection of nonfastidious adenovirus species in 293 cells inoculated with stool specimens containing adenovirus 40.

    PubMed

    Brown, M

    1985-08-01

    Of 35 stool specimens isolated and examined in 293 cells, 15 isolates contained adenovirus species 40 (Ad40), and 4 of these 15 isolates also contained a nonfastidious adenovirus species (Ad1 in two cases, Ad18 or Ad31) which was selected over Ad40 during serial passage in the 293 cells. The selection of Ad1 over Ad40 was examined in detail. Restriction analysis of intracellular DNA and the relative infectivity titers of Ad40 and Ad1 at each passage level after the inoculation of 293 cells with a particular stool specimen demonstrated that although the amount of Ad40 DNA synthesized far exceeded that of Ad1, the relative infectivity titer of Ad40 was low. The growth characteristics of Ad40 were then compared with those of Ad1, Ad18, and Ad41 in singly infected 293 cell cultures. One-step growth curves showed the same growth rate in each case, with a latent period of 12 h and a maximum titer at 24 to 36 h postinfection. Yields of infectious Ad40 virus were consistently 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those of Ad1. This difference was reflected by a reduced yield of total AD40 virions (p1.34) as determined by 35S labeling experiments. However, the 3- to 10-fold reduction in total yield of Ad40 virions did not account for the 100- to 1,000-fold reduction in the yield of infectious virus. PMID:2993350

  15. Dietary Shifts May Trigger Dysbiosis and Mucous Stools in Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Williams, Candace L; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A; Vandewege, Michael W; Sparks, Darrell L; Willard, Scott T; Kouba, Andrew J; Suen, Garret; Brown, Ashli E

    2016-01-01

    Dietary shifts can result in changes to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota, leading to negative outcomes for the host, including inflammation. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are physiologically classified as carnivores; however, they consume an herbivorous diet with dramatic seasonal dietary shifts and episodes of chronic GIT distress with symptoms including abdominal pain, loss of appetite and the excretion of mucous stools (mucoids). These episodes adversely affect the overall nutritional and health status of giant pandas. Here, we examined the fecal microbiota of two giant pandas' non-mucoid and mucoid stools and compared these to samples from a previous winter season that had historically few mucoid episodes. To identify the microbiota present, we isolated and sequenced the 16S rRNA using next-generation sequencing. Mucoids occurred following a seasonal feeding switch from predominately bamboo culm (stalk) to leaves. All fecal samples displayed low diversity and were dominated by bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes and to a lesser extent, Proteobacteria. Fecal samples immediately prior to mucoid episodes had lower microbial diversity as compared to mucoids. Mucoids were mostly comprised of common mucosal-associated taxa including Streptococcus and Leuconostoc species, and exhibited increased abundance for bacteria in the family Pasteurellaceae. Taken together, these findings indicate that mucoids may represent an expulsion of the mucosal lining that is driven by changes in diet. We suggest that these occurrences serve to reset their GIT microbiota following changes in bamboo part preference, as giant pandas have retained a carnivorous GIT anatomy while shifting to an herbivorous diet.

  16. Toward a Broadly Applicable Force Field for d(6)-Piano Stool Complexes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Maurus H; Ward, Thomas R; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-05-14

    Three-legged piano stool complexes are prototypical organometallic complexes relevant to a wide range of chemically relevant questions. Force field parametrization of transition-metal complexes is difficult and underdeveloped, and metal-specific force fields and software are required. Here we report our efforts to derive parameters for the conventional CHARMM and the Valbond-CHARMM force fields for d(6)-piano stool complexes. In Valbond-CHARMM, the usual angular term is replaced with hybrid orbital strength functions. These functions describe the energy not only of distorted bond angles around the minimum but also at very large distortions. Structure optimizations led to a good agreement between the calculated force field and the X-ray structures. They were comparable to RMSDs obtained between X-ray and DFT structures. In addition, and contrary to treating the systems with DFT, molecular dynamics simulations on the multiple nanosecond time scale are possible and allow to compute meaningful structural and energetic observables. Explicit solvent simulations of the complexes in methanol and water allow to determine the solvent distribution around the complexes. The parametrization presented here will be a useful starting point for dynamics investigations of catalysts in structurally more demanding environments. PMID:26583724

  17. Hollow silica microspheres for buoyancy-assisted separation of infectious pathogens from stool.

    PubMed

    Weigum, Shannon E; Xiang, Lichen; Osta, Erica; Li, Linying; López, Gabriel P

    2016-09-30

    Separation of cells and microorganisms from complex biological mixtures is a critical first step in many analytical applications ranging from clinical diagnostics to environmental monitoring for food and waterborne contaminants. Yet, existing techniques for cell separation are plagued by high reagent and/or instrumentation costs that limit their use in many remote or resource-poor settings, such as field clinics or developing countries. We developed an innovative approach to isolate infectious pathogens from biological fluids using buoyant hollow silica microspheres that function as "molecular buoys" for affinity-based target capture and separation by floatation. In this process, antibody functionalized glass microspheres are mixed with a complex biological sample, such as stool. When mixing is stopped, the target-bound, low-density microspheres float to the air/liquid surface, which simultaneously isolates and concentrates the target analytes from the sample matrix. The microspheres are highly tunable in terms of size, density, and surface functionality for targeting diverse analytes with separation times of ≤2min in viscous solutions. We have applied the molecular buoy technique for isolation of a protozoan parasite that causes diarrheal illness, Cryptosporidium, directly from stool with separation efficiencies over 90% and low non-specific binding. This low-cost method for phenotypic cell/pathogen separation from complex mixtures is expected to have widespread use in clinical diagnostics as well as basic research. PMID:27614729

  18. Toward a Broadly Applicable Force Field for d(6)-Piano Stool Complexes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Maurus H; Ward, Thomas R; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-05-14

    Three-legged piano stool complexes are prototypical organometallic complexes relevant to a wide range of chemically relevant questions. Force field parametrization of transition-metal complexes is difficult and underdeveloped, and metal-specific force fields and software are required. Here we report our efforts to derive parameters for the conventional CHARMM and the Valbond-CHARMM force fields for d(6)-piano stool complexes. In Valbond-CHARMM, the usual angular term is replaced with hybrid orbital strength functions. These functions describe the energy not only of distorted bond angles around the minimum but also at very large distortions. Structure optimizations led to a good agreement between the calculated force field and the X-ray structures. They were comparable to RMSDs obtained between X-ray and DFT structures. In addition, and contrary to treating the systems with DFT, molecular dynamics simulations on the multiple nanosecond time scale are possible and allow to compute meaningful structural and energetic observables. Explicit solvent simulations of the complexes in methanol and water allow to determine the solvent distribution around the complexes. The parametrization presented here will be a useful starting point for dynamics investigations of catalysts in structurally more demanding environments.

  19. Methods for Improving Human Gut Microbiome Data by Reducing Variability through Sample Processing and Storage of Stool.

    PubMed

    Gorzelak, Monika A; Gill, Sandeep K; Tasnim, Nishat; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Jay, Michael; Gibson, Deanna L

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiome community analysis is used to understand many diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and diabetes. Sampling methods are an important consideration for human microbiome research, yet are not emphasized in many studies. In this study, we demonstrate that the preparation, handling, and storage of human faeces are critical processes that alter the outcomes of downstream DNA-based bacterial community analyses via qPCR. We found that stool subsampling resulted in large variability of gut microbiome data due to different microenvironments harbouring various taxa within an individual stool. However, we reduced intra-sample variability by homogenizing the entire stool sample in liquid nitrogen and subsampling from the resulting crushed powder prior to DNA extraction. We experimentally determined that the bacterial taxa varied with room temperature storage beyond 15 minutes and beyond three days storage in a domestic frost-free freezer. While freeze thawing only had an effect on bacterial taxa abundance beyond four cycles, the use of samples stored in RNAlater should be avoided as overall DNA yields were reduced as well as the detection of bacterial taxa. Overall we provide solutions for processing and storing human stool samples that reduce variability of microbiome data. We recommend that stool is frozen within 15 minutes of being defecated, stored in a domestic frost-free freezer for less than three days, and homogenized prior to DNA extraction. Adoption of these simple protocols will have a significant and positive impact on future human microbiome research. PMID:26252519

  20. Methods for Improving Human Gut Microbiome Data by Reducing Variability through Sample Processing and Storage of Stool.

    PubMed

    Gorzelak, Monika A; Gill, Sandeep K; Tasnim, Nishat; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Jay, Michael; Gibson, Deanna L

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiome community analysis is used to understand many diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and diabetes. Sampling methods are an important consideration for human microbiome research, yet are not emphasized in many studies. In this study, we demonstrate that the preparation, handling, and storage of human faeces are critical processes that alter the outcomes of downstream DNA-based bacterial community analyses via qPCR. We found that stool subsampling resulted in large variability of gut microbiome data due to different microenvironments harbouring various taxa within an individual stool. However, we reduced intra-sample variability by homogenizing the entire stool sample in liquid nitrogen and subsampling from the resulting crushed powder prior to DNA extraction. We experimentally determined that the bacterial taxa varied with room temperature storage beyond 15 minutes and beyond three days storage in a domestic frost-free freezer. While freeze thawing only had an effect on bacterial taxa abundance beyond four cycles, the use of samples stored in RNAlater should be avoided as overall DNA yields were reduced as well as the detection of bacterial taxa. Overall we provide solutions for processing and storing human stool samples that reduce variability of microbiome data. We recommend that stool is frozen within 15 minutes of being defecated, stored in a domestic frost-free freezer for less than three days, and homogenized prior to DNA extraction. Adoption of these simple protocols will have a significant and positive impact on future human microbiome research.

  1. Diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection: A serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) in mother-child binomial samples.

    PubMed

    Volta, Bibiana J; Russomando, Graciela; Bustos, Patricia L; Scollo, Karenina; De Rissio, Ana M; Sánchez, Zunilda; Cardoni, Rita L; Bua, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    Chagas congenital infection is an important health problem in endemic and non-endemic areas in which Trypanosoma cruzi-infected women can transmit the parasite to their offspring. In this study, we evaluated the antibody levels against the T. cruzi Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) in 91 binomial samples of seropositive pregnant women and their infected and non-infected children by ELISA. In 70 children without congenital T. cruzi transmission, the titers of anti-SAPA antibodies were lower than those of their seropositive mothers. In contrast, 90.5% of 21 congenitally infected children, at around 1 month of age, showed higher anti-SAPA antibody levels than their mothers. Subtracting the SAPA-ELISA mother OD value to the SAPA-ELISA child OD allowed efficient detection of most T. cruzi congenitally infected children immediately after birth, when total anti-parasite antibodies transferred during pregnancy are still present in all children born to seropositive women. A positive correlation was observed between parasitemia levels in mothers and infants evaluated by quantitative DNA amplification and anti-SAPA antibody titers by ELISA. As SAPA serology has proved to be very efficient to detect T. cruzi infection in mother-child binomial samples, it could be of extreme help for early diagnosis of newborns, in maternities and hospitals where DNA amplification is not available. This prompt diagnosis may prevent drop out of the long-term follow-up for future diagnosis and may ensure early trypanocidal treatment, which has proved to be efficient to cure infants with congenital Chagas disease. PMID:25847262

  2. Diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection: A serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) in mother-child binomial samples.

    PubMed

    Volta, Bibiana J; Russomando, Graciela; Bustos, Patricia L; Scollo, Karenina; De Rissio, Ana M; Sánchez, Zunilda; Cardoni, Rita L; Bua, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    Chagas congenital infection is an important health problem in endemic and non-endemic areas in which Trypanosoma cruzi-infected women can transmit the parasite to their offspring. In this study, we evaluated the antibody levels against the T. cruzi Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) in 91 binomial samples of seropositive pregnant women and their infected and non-infected children by ELISA. In 70 children without congenital T. cruzi transmission, the titers of anti-SAPA antibodies were lower than those of their seropositive mothers. In contrast, 90.5% of 21 congenitally infected children, at around 1 month of age, showed higher anti-SAPA antibody levels than their mothers. Subtracting the SAPA-ELISA mother OD value to the SAPA-ELISA child OD allowed efficient detection of most T. cruzi congenitally infected children immediately after birth, when total anti-parasite antibodies transferred during pregnancy are still present in all children born to seropositive women. A positive correlation was observed between parasitemia levels in mothers and infants evaluated by quantitative DNA amplification and anti-SAPA antibody titers by ELISA. As SAPA serology has proved to be very efficient to detect T. cruzi infection in mother-child binomial samples, it could be of extreme help for early diagnosis of newborns, in maternities and hospitals where DNA amplification is not available. This prompt diagnosis may prevent drop out of the long-term follow-up for future diagnosis and may ensure early trypanocidal treatment, which has proved to be efficient to cure infants with congenital Chagas disease.

  3. Giardiasis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... That Pets Carry Amebiasis First Aid: Diarrhea E. Coli Stool Test: Giardia Antigen Stool Test: Ova and ... Hands Without Spreading Germs? Shigellosis Hand Washing E. Coli Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea Contact Us Print Resources ...

  4. Intestinal Parasite Profile in the Stool of HIV Positive Patients in relation to Immune Status and Comparison of Various Diagnostic Techniques with Special Reference to Cryptosporidium at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Moorkoth, Anitha Puduvail; Mathew, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and related opportunistic infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in susceptible population. This study aims to negate the paucity of data regarding the relation between CD4 levels, prevalence of enteric parasites, and the outcome of treatment with HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) and Cotrimoxazole in Kerala, India. Multiple stool samples from 200 patients in a cross-sectional study were subjected to microscopy and Cryptosporidium stool antigen ELISA. Parasites were identified in 18 samples (9%). Cystoisospora and Cryptosporidium spp. were seen in 9 cases (4.5%) and 5 cases (2.5%), respectively. Microsporidium spores and Chilomastix mesnili cysts were identified in 1 case each (0.5% each). Seven cases of Cystoisospora diarrhoea recovered after treatment with Cotrimoxazole. Diarrhoea due to Cryptosporidium spp. in all 5 cases subsided after immune reconstitution with HAART. This study concludes that a positive association was seen between low CD4 count (<200 cells/μL) and overall parasite positivity (P value < 0.01). ELISA is a more sensitive modality for the diagnosis of Cryptosporidium diarrhoea. Chilomastix mesnili, generally considered a nonpathogen, may be a cause of diarrhoeal disease in AIDS. Immune reconstitution and Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis remain to be the best therapeutic approach in AIDS-related diarrhoea. PMID:27493988

  5. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  6. DIAGNOSTIC PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE SD BIOLINE MALARIA ANTIGEN AG PF/PAN TEST (05FK60) IN A MALARIA ENDEMIC AREA OF SOUTHERN ETHIOPIA

    PubMed Central

    TADESSE, Endale; WORKALEMAHU, Bereket; SHIMELIS, Techalew

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) capable of detecting and differentiating Plasmodium species are needed in areas in which microscopy is unsuitable. This study was conducted to assess the diagnostic performance of the rapid test kit - SD BIOLINE Malaria Ag Pf/Pan(r) (05FK60) in an endemic area. Microscopy of Giemsa-stained blood films were performed to detect and estimate the Plasmodium density in malaria suspected patients. The performance of the SD BIOLINE Malaria Ag Pf/Pan test was evaluated using 272 Plasmodium-positive and 102 negative blood samples. The overall sensitivity of the SD BIOLINE Malaria Ag Pf/Pan test was 99.5% for P. falciparum and 92.6% for non-P. falciparum malaria infections. The respective specificity, PPV, and NPV of the test were 98.0, 98.4, and 99.0% for the diagnosis of P. falciparum, and 100.0 %, 100.0%, and 94.4% for non-P. falciparum species. The SD BIOLINE Malaria Ag Pf/Pan test showed an excellent performance in diagnosing Plasmodium infections in an endemic setting. Therefore, this point-of-care test could be used as an alternative to microscopy in places where P. falciparum is endemic and microscopy is unsuitable. PMID:27680164

  7. Coombs antiglobulin test using Brucella abortus 99 as antigen to detect incomplete antibodies induced by B abortus RB51 vaccine in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ciuchini, Franco; Adone, Rosanna; Pasquali, Paolo

    2002-11-01

    This study showed that vaccination of cattle with Brucella abortus rough strain RB51 induces incomplete antibodies that can be detectable by a Coombs antiglobulin test using the B. abortus 99 smooth strain.

  8. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Real-Time PCR Methods for Human Noroviruses in Wastewater and Human Stool.

    PubMed

    Masago, Yoshifumi; Konta, Yoshimitsu; Kazama, Shinobu; Inaba, Manami; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Tohma, Kentaro; Saito, Mayuko; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Omura, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Selecting the best quantitative PCR assay is essential to detect human norovirus genome effectively from clinical and environmental samples because no cell lines have been developed to propagate this virus. The real-time PCR methods for noroviruses GI (4 assays) and GII (3 assays) were evaluated using wastewater (n = 70) and norovirus-positive stool (n = 77) samples collected in Japan between 2012 and 2013. Standard quantitative PCR assays recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, International Organization for Standardization, and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, together with recently reported assays were included. Significant differences in positive rates and quantification cycles were observed by non-parametric analysis. The present study identifies the best assay for norovirus GI and GII to amplify norovirus genomes efficiently. PMID:27525654

  10. Detection of Encephalitozoon spp. from human diarrheal stool and farm soil samples in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungjin; Yoon, Sejoung; Cheun, Hyeng-Il; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Sim, Seobo; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2015-03-01

    Microsporidia are eukaryotic organisms that cause zoonosis and are major opportunistic pathogens in HIV-positive patients. However, there is increasing evidence that these organisms can also cause gastrointestinal and ocular infections in immunocompetent individuals. In Korea, there have been no reports on human infections with microsporidia to date. In the present study, we used real-time PCR and nucleotide sequencing to detect Encephalitozoon intestinalis infection in seven of 139 human diarrheal stool specimens (5%) and Encephalitozoon hellem in three of 34 farm soil samples (8.8%). Genotype analysis of the E. hellem isolates based on the internal transcribed spacer 1 and polar tube protein genes showed that all isolates were genotype 1B. To our knowledge, this is the first report on human E. intestinalis infection in Korea and the first report revealing farm soil samples as a source of E. hellem infection. Because microsporidia are an important public health issue, further large-scale epidemiological studies are warranted.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Real-Time PCR Methods for Human Noroviruses in Wastewater and Human Stool

    PubMed Central

    Konta, Yoshimitsu; Kazama, Shinobu; Inaba, Manami; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Tohma, Kentaro; Saito, Mayuko; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Omura, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Selecting the best quantitative PCR assay is essential to detect human norovirus genome effectively from clinical and environmental samples because no cell lines have been developed to propagate this virus. The real-time PCR methods for noroviruses GI (4 assays) and GII (3 assays) were evaluated using wastewater (n = 70) and norovirus-positive stool (n = 77) samples collected in Japan between 2012 and 2013. Standard quantitative PCR assays recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, International Organization for Standardization, and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, together with recently reported assays were included. Significant differences in positive rates and quantification cycles were observed by non-parametric analysis. The present study identifies the best assay for norovirus GI and GII to amplify norovirus genomes efficiently. PMID:27525654

  12. Genotype identification of Enterocytozoon bieneusi isolates from stool samples of HIV-infected Tunisian patients

    PubMed Central

    Chabchoub, N.; Abdelmalek, R.; Breton, J.; Kanoun, F.; Thellier, M.; Bouratbine, A.; Aoun, K.

    2012-01-01

    The microsporidian species Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a major cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption in patients with AIDS. Genotyping was performed on seven E. bieneusi strains for the first time in Tunisia. All the strains were isolated from stool samples of humans with immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Analysis of the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer (rDNA ITS) allowed the identification of three distinct genotypes previously described in other studies. Genotypes D and B were characterized in four and two respectively. The Peruvian genotype (Peru 8) was detected in the last isolate. These results indicate a genetic diversity in E. bieneusi strains from HIV Tunisian patients and suggest the coexistence of both zoonotic and anthroponotic route of transmission. PMID:22550625

  13. Genotype identification of Enterocytozoon bieneusi isolates from stool samples of HIV-infected Tunisian patients.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, N; Abdelmalek, R; Breton, J; Kanoun, F; Thellier, M; Bouratbine, A; Aoun, K

    2012-05-01

    The microsporidian species Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a major cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption in patients with AIDS. Genotyping was performed on seven E. bieneusi strains for the first time in Tunisia. All the strains were isolated from stool samples of humans with immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Analysis of the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer (rDNA ITS) allowed the identification of three distinct genotypes previously described in other studies. Genotypes D and B were characterized in four and two respectively. The Peruvian genotype (Peru 8) was detected in the last isolate. These results indicate a genetic diversity in E. bieneusi strains from HIV Tunisian patients and suggest the coexistence of both zoonotic and anthroponotic route of transmission.

  14. Fungal Antigens Expressed during Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Denikus, Nicole; Orfaniotou, Foteini; Wulf, Gerald; Lehmann, Paul F.; Monod, Michel; Reichard, Utz

    2005-01-01

    Rabbits that had been infected intravenously with conidiospores of Aspergillus fumigatus were used as sources of antibody for screening a λ phage cDNA expression library. The cDNA was derived from A. fumigatus mRNA that had been extracted from newly formed, germling hyphae. Thirty-six antigens were identified using antisera from six rabbits. Though many of these antigens were expected to be intracellular proteins because their genes did not encode a signal sequence, the antisera showed consistently a stronger immunoblot reaction with a cell fraction enriched for the fungal cell wall than with a fraction of predominantly intracellular components. Antibodies to eight antigens, including the glycosylhydrolase Asp f 16, were produced by more than one rabbit. In current vaccine studies, Asp f 16 is the only single antigen which has been reported to be capable of inducing protection against invasive aspergillosis in mice (S. Bozza et al., Microb. Infect. 4:1281-1290, 2002). Enolase and Aspergillus HSP90 were detected also; their homologues in Candida albicans have been tested as vaccines and have been reported to provide a partially protective response against invasive candidiasis in mice. The Aspergillus antigens reported here may have value both in diagnostic tests for different forms of aspergillosis and as vaccine candidates for protection against invasive disease. PMID:16040983

  15. Serodiagnosis of Lyme disease by kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant VlsE1 or peptide antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi compared with 2-tiered testing using whole-cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Rendi Murphree; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Schriefer, Martin E; Gilmore, Robert D; Philipp, Mario T; Steere, Allen C; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Johnson, Barbara J B

    2003-04-15

    In a study of US patients with Lyme disease, immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM antibody responses to recombinant Borrelia burgdorferi antigen VlsE1 (rVlsE1), IgG responses to a synthetic peptide homologous to a conserved internal sequence of VlsE (C6), and IgM responses to a synthetic peptide comprising the C-terminal 10 amino acid residues of a B. burgdorferi outer-surface protein C (pepC10) were evaluated by kinetic enzyme-linked immunoassay. At 99% specificity, the overall sensitivities for detecting IgG antibody to rVlsE1 or C6 in samples from patients with diverse manifestations of Lyme disease were equivalent to that of 2-tiered testing. When data were considered in parallel, 2 combinations (IgG responses to either rVlsE1 or C6 in parallel with IgM responses to pepC10) maintained high specificity (98%) and were significantly more sensitive than 2-tiered analysis in detecting antibodies to B. burgdorferi in patients with acute erythema migrans. In later stages of Lyme disease, the sensitivities of the in parallel tests and 2-tiered testing were high and statistically equivalent.

  16. Evaluation of commercially available diagnostic tests for the detection of dengue virus NS1 antigen and anti-dengue virus IgM antibody.

    PubMed

    Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Yoksan, Sutee; Buchy, Philippe; Nguyen, Vinh Chau; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Enria, Delia A; Vazquez, Susana; Cartozian, Elizabeth; Pelegrino, Jose L; Artsob, Harvey; Guzman, Maria G; Olliaro, Piero; Zwang, Julien; Guillerm, Martine; Kliks, Susie; Halstead, Scott; Peeling, Rosanna W; Margolis, Harold S

    2014-10-01

    Commercially available diagnostic test kits for detection of dengue virus (DENV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) and anti-DENV IgM were evaluated for their sensitivity and specificity and other performance characteristics by a diagnostic laboratory network developed by World Health Organization (WHO), the UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI). Each network laboratory contributed characterized serum specimens for the panels used in the evaluation. Microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and rapid diagnostic test (RDT formats) were represented by the kits. Each ELISA was evaluated by 2 laboratories and RDTs were evaluated by at least 3 laboratories. The reference tests for IgM anti-DENV were laboratory developed assays produced by the Armed Forces Research Institute for Medical Science (AFRIMS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the NS1 reference test was reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results were analyzed to determine sensitivity, specificity, inter-laboratory and inter-reader agreement, lot-to-lot variation and ease-of-use. NS1 ELISA sensitivity was 60-75% and specificity 71-80%; NS1 RDT sensitivity was 38-71% and specificity 76-80%; the IgM anti-DENV RDTs sensitivity was 30-96%, with a specificity of 86-92%, and IgM anti-DENV ELISA sensitivity was 96-98% and specificity 78-91%. NS1 tests were generally more sensitive in specimens from the acute phase of dengue and in primary DENV infection, whereas IgM anti-DENV tests were less sensitive in secondary DENV infections. The reproducibility of the NS1 RDTs ranged from 92-99% and the IgM anti-DENV RDTs from 88-94%. PMID:25330157

  17. Dietary Shifts May Trigger Dysbiosis and Mucous Stools in Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Williams, Candace L; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A; Vandewege, Michael W; Sparks, Darrell L; Willard, Scott T; Kouba, Andrew J; Suen, Garret; Brown, Ashli E

    2016-01-01

    Dietary shifts can result in changes to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota, leading to negative outcomes for the host, including inflammation. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are physiologically classified as carnivores; however, they consume an herbivorous diet with dramatic seasonal dietary shifts and episodes of chronic GIT distress with symptoms including abdominal pain, loss of appetite and the excretion of mucous stools (mucoids). These episodes adversely affect the overall nutritional and health status of giant pandas. Here, we examined the fecal microbiota of two giant pandas' non-mucoid and mucoid stools and compared these to samples from a previous winter season that had historically few mucoid episodes. To identify the microbiota present, we isolated and sequenced the 16S rRNA using next-generation sequencing. Mucoids occurred following a seasonal feeding switch from predominately bamboo culm (stalk) to leaves. All fecal samples displayed low diversity and were dominated by bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes and to a lesser extent, Proteobacteria. Fecal samples immediately prior to mucoid episodes had lower microbial diversity as compared to mucoids. Mucoids were mostly comprised of common mucosal-associated taxa including Streptococcus and Leuconostoc species, and exhibited increased abundance for bacteria in the family Pasteurellaceae. Taken together, these findings indicate that mucoids may represent an expulsion of the mucosal lining that is driven by changes in diet. We suggest that these occurrences serve to reset their GIT microbiota following changes in bamboo part preference, as giant pandas have retained a carnivorous GIT anatomy while shifting to an herbivorous diet. PMID:27199976

  18. Dietary Shifts May Trigger Dysbiosis and Mucous Stools in Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Candace L.; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A.; Vandewege, Michael W.; Sparks, Darrell L.; Willard, Scott T.; Kouba, Andrew J.; Suen, Garret; Brown, Ashli E.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary shifts can result in changes to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota, leading to negative outcomes for the host, including inflammation. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are physiologically classified as carnivores; however, they consume an herbivorous diet with dramatic seasonal dietary shifts and episodes of chronic GIT distress with symptoms including abdominal pain, loss of appetite and the excretion of mucous stools (mucoids). These episodes adversely affect the overall nutritional and health status of giant pandas. Here, we examined the fecal microbiota of two giant pandas’ non-mucoid and mucoid stools and compared these to samples from a previous winter season that had historically few mucoid episodes. To identify the microbiota present, we isolated and sequenced the 16S rRNA using next-generation sequencing. Mucoids occurred following a seasonal feeding switch from predominately bamboo culm (stalk) to leaves. All fecal samples displayed low diversity and were dominated by bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes and to a lesser extent, Proteobacteria. Fecal samples immediately prior to mucoid episodes had lower microbial diversity as compared to mucoids. Mucoids were mostly comprised of common mucosal-associated taxa including Streptococcus and Leuconostoc species, and exhibited increased abundance for bacteria in the family Pasteurellaceae. Taken together, these findings indicate that mucoids may represent an expulsion of the mucosal lining that is driven by changes in diet. We suggest that these occurrences serve to reset their GIT microbiota following changes in bamboo part preference, as giant pandas have retained a carnivorous GIT anatomy while shifting to an herbivorous diet. PMID:27199976

  19. Detrimental effect of water submersion of stools on development of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Anamnart, Witthaya; Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Intapan, Pewpan Maleewong; Morakote, Nimit; Janwan, Penchom; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is prevalent in Thailand, yet its prevalence in the south is lower than in other parts of the country. This might be due to the long rainy season in the south resulting in stool submersion in water inhibiting worm development. In this study, the effect of water submersion of fecal samples on development of Strongyloides stercoralis was investigated. Ten ml of a 1 ∶ 5 fecal suspension were placed in 15-ml tubes, 35-mm dishes, and 90-mm dishes producing the depths of 80 mm, 11 mm and 2 mm-suspensions, respectively. The worm development was followed at 1/6, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 24, and 36 h, by determining the number of filariform larva (FL) generated from agar-plate cultures (APC). Fecal suspensions kept in tubes and 35-mm dishes showed a decline in FL yield relative to incubation time and reached zero production 14 h after incubation. In contrast, the number of FL generated from the suspension kept in 90-mm dishes remained stable up to 36 h. Cumulatively, all tubes and 35-mm dishes became negative in APC after 14 h while 90-mm dishes remained APC-positive up to 36 h. Adding more water or stool suspension to dishes resulted in a decreased number of FL. Mechanical aeration of the suspensions in tubes restored an almost normal FL yield. It appears that the atmospheric air plays a significant role in growth and development of S. stercoralis in the environment and may be one of factors which contribute to a lower prevalence of human strongyloidiasis in the south of Thailand. PMID:24358173

  20. Breed differences in the frequency of bovine lymphocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Stear, M J; Brown, S C; Dimmock, C K; Dufty, J H; Hetzel, D J; Mackie, J T; Nicholas, F W; Tierney, T J; Wetherall, J D

    1987-01-01

    Lymphocytes from 1,564 cattle of 18 breeds and cross-bred groups in Australia were tested for major histocompatibility system class 1 antigens. Gene frequencies were calculated for the Angus, Belmont Red, Brahman, Hereford and Holstein-Friesian breeds. There were substantial differences among these breeds in antigen and gene frequency. There were striking differences among all 18 breeds in the presence or absence of certain antigens. Two antigens, CA13 and CA36, were strongly associated in Hereford cattle but occurred independently of each other in the other breeds. PMID:3273412

  1. Evaluation of Xpert C. difficile, BD MAX Cdiff, IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000, and Illumigene C. difficile Assays for Direct Detection of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile in Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sun Mee; Shin, Won Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the performance of four commercial nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs: Xpert C. difficile, BD MAX Cdiff, IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000, and Illumigene C. difficile) for direct and rapid detection of Clostridium difficile toxin genes. Methods We compared four NAATs on the same set of 339 stool specimens (303 prospective and 36 retrospective specimens) with toxigenic culture (TC). Results Concordance rate among four NAATs was 90.3% (306/339). Based on TC results, the sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% and 92.9% for Xpert; 86.3% and 89.3% for Max; 84.3% and 94.4% for IMDx; and 82.4% and 93.7% for Illumigene, respectively. For 306 concordant cases, there were 11 TC-negative/NAATs co-positive cases and 6 TC-positive/NAATs co-negative cases. Among 33 discordant cases, 18 were only single positive in each NAAT (Xpert, 1; Max, 12; IMDx, 1; Illumigene, 4). Positivity rates of the four NAATs were associated with those of semi-quantitative cultures, which were maximized in grade 3 (>100 colony-forming unit [CFU]) compared with grade 1 (<10 CFU). Conclusions Commercial NAATs may be rapid and reliable methods for direct detection of tcdA and/or tcdB in stool specimens compared with TC. Some differences in the sensitivity of the NAATs may partly depend on the number of toxigenic C. difficile in stool specimens. PMID:26709260

  2. Lessons learned from cancer vaccine trials and target antigen choice.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of tumor antigens have been targeted in cancer immunotherapy studies. Traditionally, the focus has been on commonly overexpressed antigens shared across many patients and/or tumor types. As the field has progressed, the identity of human tumor rejection antigens has broadened. Immunologic monitoring of clinical trials has slowly elucidated candidate biomarkers of immune response and clinical response, and conversely, of immune dysfunction and suppression. We have utilized MART-1/Melan-A in our melanoma studies and observed a high frequency of immune responses and several significant clinical responses in patients vaccinated with this melanosomal protein. Alpha-fetoprotein is a shared, overexpressed tumor antigen and secreted glycoprotein that we have tested in hepatocellular cancer vaccines. Our recent studies have identified immunosuppressive and immune-skewing activities of this antigen. The choice of target antigen and its form can have unexpected effects.

  3. Evaluation of ImmunoCard STAT test and ELISA versus light microscopy in diagnosis of giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Sadaka, H A; Gaafar, M R; Mady, R F; Hezema, N N

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate ImmunoCard STAT Cryptosporidium/Giardia rapid assay and ELISA copro-antigen assays in detecting Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium species in fecal samples in comparison to microscopy. Both ImmunoCard STAT and ELISA assays were evaluated with 90 stool specimens that were tested by the standard ova and parasite examination including staining with both iron hematoxylin stain and modified Ziehl Neelson stains. Counting the number of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidia oocysts in the positive stool samples was done in order to quantify the lower limit of parasite number that was able to be detected by all included assays. Both ImmunoCard STAT and ELISA assays were compared on the basis of the attributes which are number of detected cases, sensitivity, specificity, time required for the procedure and screening, ease of performance and interpretation, and cost. Microscopic examination revealed that 13.3% of the samples were positive for Giardia and 2.2% for Cryptosporidium. By ELISA, 16.7% of the samples were infected with Giardia and 3.3% with Cryptosporidium, while by ImmunoCard STAT, 17.8 and 4.45% of the samples were positive for Giardia and Cryptosporidium, respectively. There is no statistically significant difference between the results of ELISA and ImmunoCard STAT assays. The lowest concentration detected in the stool samples was 10.50 ± 1.05 Giardia cysts and 2.83 ± 1.72 Cryptosporidium oocysts. The ImmunoCard STAT was extremely easy to read, thus requiring much less time, but its cost was much higher than ELISA. We concluded that although the overall ranking of both assays was high, the ImmunoCard STAT rapid assay was a more desirable test despite its higher cost.

  4. Cost Analysis of Tests for the Detection of Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Children in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Worrell, Caitlin M.; Bartoces, Monina; Karanja, Diana M. S.; Ochola, Elizabeth A.; Matete, Daniel O.; Mwinzi, Pauline N. M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Secor, W. Evan

    2015-01-01

    Financial resources tend to be limited in schistosomiasis endemic areas, forcing program managers to balance financial and scientific considerations when selecting detection assays. Therefore, we compared the costs of using single stool Kato-Katz, triplicate stool Kato-Katz, and point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) assays for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection. Economic and financial costs were estimated from the viewpoint of a schistosomiasis control program using the ingredients approach. Costs related to specimen collection, sample processing and analysis, and treatment delivery were considered. Analysis inputs and assumptions were tested using one-way and two-way sensitivity analysis. The total per-person cost of performing the single Kato-Katz, triplicate Kato-Katz, and POC-CCA was US$6.89, US$17.54, and US$7.26, respectively. Major cost drivers included labor, transportation, and supplies. In addition, we provide a costing tool to guide program managers in evaluating detection costs in specific settings, as costs may vary temporally and spatially. PMID:25870422

  5. Cost analysis of tests for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in children in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Worrell, Caitlin M; Bartoces, Monina; Karanja, Diana M S; Ochola, Elizabeth A; Matete, Daniel O; Mwinzi, Pauline N M; Montgomery, Susan P; Secor, W Evan

    2015-06-01

    Financial resources tend to be limited in schistosomiasis endemic areas, forcing program managers to balance financial and scientific considerations when selecting detection assays. Therefore, we compared the costs of using single stool Kato-Katz, triplicate stool Kato-Katz, and point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) assays for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection. Economic and financial costs were estimated from the viewpoint of a schistosomiasis control program using the ingredients approach. Costs related to specimen collection, sample processing and analysis, and treatment delivery were considered. Analysis inputs and assumptions were tested using one-way and two-way sensitivity analysis. The total per-person cost of performing the single Kato-Katz, triplicate Kato-Katz, and POC-CCA was US$6.89, US$17.54, and US$7.26, respectively. Major cost drivers included labor, transportation, and supplies. In addition, we provide a costing tool to guide program managers in evaluating detection costs in specific settings, as costs may vary temporally and spatially.

  6. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  7. Antigen-presenting cells in the female reproductive tract: influence of sex hormones on antigen presentation in the vagina.

    PubMed Central

    Wira, C R; Rossoll, R M

    1995-01-01

    We report here that the stage of the reproductive cycle and the administration of physiological amounts of oestradiol to ovariectomized rats influences antigen presentation by macrophage/dendritic cells in the vagina. Antigen presentation is elevated when oestradiol levels in blood are low, and reduced just prior to ovulation. Of those hormones tested, only oestradiol lowered vaginal antigen presentation. When progesterone was given along with oestradiol, the inhibitory effect of oestradiol on vaginal antigen presentation was reversed. These studies demonstrate that the vagina is an inductive site and that antigen presentation is under hormonal control. Our results suggest that immunization studies designed to enhance mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract should take into account the stage of the reproductive cycle when antigen is deposited. PMID:7790022

  8. Epidemiology of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli in the Stools of Returning Japanese Travelers, and the Risk Factors for Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Yaita, Kenichiro; Aoki, Kotaro; Suzuki, Takumitsu; Nakaharai, Kazuhiko; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Harada, Sohei; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tachikawa, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Travel overseas has recently been considered a risk factor for colonization with drug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study was to establish the epidemiology and risk factors associated with the acquisition of drug-resistant bacteria by Japanese travelers. Methods Between October 2011 and September 2012, we screened the stools of 68 Japanese returning travelers for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli. All specimens were sampled for clinical reasons. Based on the results, the participants were divided into an ESBL-producing E. coli positive group (18 cases; 26%) and an ESBL-producing E. coli negative group (50 cases; 74%), and a case-control study was performed. Microbiological analyses of ESBL-producing strains, including susceptibility tests, screening tests for metallo-β-lactamase, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of blaCTX-M genes, multilocus sequence typing, and whole genome sequencing, were also conducted. Results In a univariate comparison, travel to India was a risk factor (Odds Ratio 13.6, 95% Confidence Interval 3.0–75.0, p<0.0001). There were no statistical differences in the characteristics of the travel, such as backpacking, purpose of travel, interval between travel return and sampling stool, and duration of travel. Although 10 of 13 analyzed strains (77%) produced CTX-M-15, no ST131 clone was detected. Conclusion We must be aware of the possibilities of acquiring ESBL-producing E. coli during travel in order to prevent the spread of these bacteria not only in Japan but globally. PMID:24836896

  9. Morphological diversity of Blastocystis hominis in sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin-preserved stool samples stained with iron hematoxylin.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, D W; MacQueen, W M

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the morphological characteristics of Blastocystis hominis in sodium acetate-acetic acid-Formalin-preserved stool samples. Routinely processed samples were examined for morphological detail, including size, shape, nuclear detail, and central body characteristics. Morphological findings revealing the importance of recognizing B. hominis in the diagnostic laboratory are described. PMID:7510311

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas caviae 8LM, Isolated from Stool Culture of a Child with Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moriel, Bárbara; Cruz, Leonardo M; Dallagassa, Cibelle B; Faoro, Helisson; de Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Rego, Fabiane G M; Picheth, Geraldo; Fadel-Picheth, Cyntia M T

    2015-05-21

    Aeromonas spp. are Gram-negative rods ubiquitous in aquatic environments; however, some species are able to cause a variety of infections in humans. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas caviae 8LM isolated from stool culture from a child with diarrhea in southern Brazil.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas caviae 8LM, Isolated from Stool Culture of a Child with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Moriel, Bárbara; Dallagassa, Cibelle B.; Faoro, Helisson; de Souza, Emanuel M.; Pedrosa, Fábio O.; Rego, Fabiane G. M.; Picheth, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas spp. are Gram-negative rods ubiquitous in aquatic environments; however, some species are able to cause a variety of infections in humans. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas caviae 8LM isolated from stool culture from a child with diarrhea in southern Brazil. PMID:25999559

  12. Characterization of a complete genome of a circular single-stranded DNA virus from porcine stools in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, A Reum; Chung, Hee Chun; Kim, Hye Kwon; Kim, Eun Ok; Nguyen, Van Giap; Choi, Min Gyung; Yang, Hye Jung; Kim, Jung Ah; Park, Bong Kyun

    2014-02-01

    Porcine circular single-stranded DNA viruses have been just identified from swine feces in Korea. This virus was mentioned as bovine stool-associated circular DNA virus (BoSCV)-like virus discovered from porcine stools. However, the thorough characteristics of the virus were not identified. Therefore, this research focuses on finding a full genome sequence and analyzing the genetic features of the virus. The virus, now called porcine stool-associated circular DNA virus in Korea (PoSCV Kor), consists of 2,589 bases forming circular structure. It has two major ORFs inversely encoding replicase and capsid protein, with each stem-loop structure between 5' ends and 3' ends of the two putative ORFs. This characteristics is the same as PoSCV in New Zealand, but different from chimpanzee stool-associated circular virus (ChiSCVs) and BoSCV, which have one stem-loop structure. Therefore, it would be sure that PoSCV Kor is very similar to PoSCV in respect to the genetic aspect; the same number of nucleotide bases and the amino acid identity of replicase and capsid protein (96 and 93 %, respectively). This fact could be certified through the finding that PoSCV Kor and PoSCV are in the same cluster by phylogenetic analysis based on the comparison with full-sequences of other circular ssDNA viruses.

  13. 75 FR 38124 - In the Matter of Certain Foldable Stools; Notice of a Commission Determination Not To Review an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...'') of Denver, Colorado. 74 FR. 65155-6 (Dec. 9, 2009). The complaint, as amended, alleges violations of... foldable stools by reason of infringement of U.S. Patent No. D460,566. 75 FR 6706 (Feb. 10, 2010). The... names of certain respondents. 75 FR 6706 (Feb. 10, 2010). On March 18, 2010, the Commission...

  14. Echinococcus granulosus: specific quantification of the two most immunoreactive antigens in hydatid fluids

    PubMed Central

    Musiani, P.; Piantelli, M.; Lauriola, L.; Arru, E.; Pozzuoli, R.

    1978-01-01

    Preparations of the two most immunoreactive Echinococcus granulosus antigens (antigens 4 and 5) from sheep hydatid fluid, purified by a simplified method, and monospecific antisera against antigens 4 and 5, prepared by a new procedure, were used to measure the antigenic concentrations of antigens 4 and 5 in swine, sheep, and human hydatid fluids from pulmonary or hepatic cysts. Two bovine samples and two commercial preparations were also tested. The concentration of both antigens was significantly higher in sheep and human hydatid fluids than in swine hydatid fluid. The antigenic content of the two bovine samples and of the two commercial preparations was below the sensitivity level of the method employed. Independently of the species tested, the amount of Echinococcus antigens was greater in hepatic than in pulmonary cysts. The ratio between the concentrations of antigens 4 and 5 was constant at about 1:10 in the samples from various organs and from different species. When there were enough samples for statistical analysis a linear correlation was found between the contents of these two antigenic components but there was none between the amounts of proteins and the antigenic concentrations in the single cysts. Sheep hydatid fluid must therefore be considered the best source of antigenic material for diagnostic purposes even though in human cysts the antigenic fraction is less contaminated by serum proteins. We describe a reliable method of standardising antigenic material for the immunodiagnosis of hydatid disease. Imagesp476-a PMID:649773

  15. Evaluation of a New Selective Medium, BD BBL CHROMagar MRSA II, for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Stool Specimens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Havill, Nancy L.; Boyce, John M.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the recovery of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on a new selective chromogenic agar, BD BBL CHROMagar MRSA II (CMRSAII), to that on traditional culture media with 293 stool specimens. The recovery of MRSA was greater on the CMRSAII agar. Screening of stool samples can identify patients who were previously unknown carriers of MRSA. PMID:20392908

  16. Diagnostic Methods of Helicobacter pylori Infection for Epidemiological Studies: Critical Importance of Indirect Test Validation

    PubMed Central

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Among the methods developed to detect H. pylori infection, determining the gold standard remains debatable, especially for epidemiological studies. Due to the decreasing sensitivity of direct diagnostic tests (histopathology and/or immunohistochemistry [IHC], rapid urease test [RUT], and culture), several indirect tests, including antibody-based tests (serology and urine test), urea breath test (UBT), and stool antigen test (SAT) have been developed to diagnose H. pylori infection. Among the indirect tests, UBT and SAT became the best methods to determine active infection. While antibody-based tests, especially serology, are widely available and relatively sensitive, their specificity is low. Guidelines indicated that no single test can be considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and that one should consider the method's advantages and disadvantages. Based on four epidemiological studies, culture and RUT present a sensitivity of 74.2–90.8% and 83.3–86.9% and a specificity of 97.7–98.8% and 95.1–97.2%, respectively, when using IHC as a gold standard. The sensitivity of serology is quite high, but that of the urine test was lower compared with that of the other methods. Thus, indirect test validation is important although some commercial kits propose universal cut-off values. PMID:26904678

  17. Antigenic Properties of N Protein of Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus causes two important rodent-borne viral zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North and South America. Twenty-four species that represent sero- and genotypes have been registered within the genus Hantavirus by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Among the viral proteins, nucleocapsid (N) protein possesses an immunodominant antigen. The antigenicitiy of N protein is conserved compared with that of envelope glycoproteins. Therefore, N protein has been used for serological diagnoses and seroepidemiological studies. An understanding of the antigenic properties of N protein is important for the interpretation of results from serological tests using N antigen. N protein consists of about 430 amino acids and possesses various epitopes. The N-terminal quarter of N protein bears linear and immunodominant epitopes. However, a serotype-specific and multimerization-dependent antigenic site was found in the C-terminal half of N protein. In this paper, the structure, function, and antigenicity of N protein are reviewed. PMID:25123683

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of loop-mediated isothermal amplification in detection of Clostridium difficile in stool samples: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chen; Yang-Ming, Li; Shan, Luo; Yi-Ming, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. More recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has become readily available for the diagnosis of CDI, and many studies have investigated the usefulness of LAMP for rapid and accurate diagnosis of CDI. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of LAMP for CDI remains unclear. In this meta-analysis, our aim was to establish the overall diagnostic accuracy of LAMP in detection of Clostridium difficile (CD) in stool samples. Material and methods A search was done in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases up to February 2014 to identify published studies that evaluated the diagnostic role of LAMP for CD. Methodological quality was assessed according to the quality assessment for studies of diagnostic accuracy (QUADAS) instrument. The sensitivities (SEN), specificities (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were pooled statistically using random effects models. Statistical analysis was performed by employing Meta-Disc 1.4 software. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were used to summarize overall test performance. Funnel plots were used to test the potential publication bias. Result A total of 9 studies met inclusion criteria for the present meta-analysis. The pooled SEN and SPE for diagnosing CD were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.95) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.98–0.99), respectively. The PLR was 47.72 (95% CI: 15.10–150.82), NLR was 0.07 (95% CI: 0.04–0.14) and DOR was 745.19 (95% CI: 229.30−2421.72). The area under the ROC was 0.98. Meta-regression indicated that the total number of samples was a source of heterogeneity for LAMP in detection of CD. The funnel plots suggested no publication bias. Conclusions The LAMP meets the minimum desirable characteristics of a diagnostic test of SEN, SPE and other measures of accuracy in the diagnosis of CD, and it is suitable

  19. MicroRNA expression in relation to different dietary habits: a comparison in stool and plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Sonia; Pardini, Barbara; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Rosa, Fabio; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosina, Floriano; Vineis, Paolo; Naccarati, Alessio

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, are fundamental for the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Altered expression of miRNAs has been detected in cancers, not only in primary tissue but also in easily obtainable specimens like plasma and stools. miRNA expression is known to be modulated by diet (micro and macronutrients, phytochemicals) and possibly by other lifestyle factors; however, such influence has not yet been exhaustively explored in humans. In the present study, we analysed the expression levels of a panel of seven human miRNAs in plasma and stool samples of a group of 24 healthy individuals characterised by different dietary habits (eight vegans, eight vegetarians and eight subjects with omnivorous diet, all groups with similar age and sex distribution). The dual aim of the study was to identify possible differences in miRNA expression due to diet (or other lifestyle factors recorded from questionnaires) and to compare results in both types of specimens. miR-92a was differentially expressed in both plasma and stool samples and with the same trend, among the three groups with different diets (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.02, respectively, with expression levels of vegans>vegetarians>omnivores). miR-92a was also associated with low body mass index (P = 0.04 and P = 0.05, respectively) in both types of specimens, and with several dietary factors. Other analysed miRNAs (miR-16, miR-21, mir-34a and miR-222) were associated with dietary and lifestyle factors, but not consistently in both stool and plasma. Our pilot study provides the first evidence of miRNA modulation by diet and other factors, that can be detected consistently in both plasma and stools samples. PMID:25150024

  20. Comparative Detection and Quantification of Arcobacter butzleri in Stools from Diarrheic and Nondiarrheic People in Southwestern Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Andrew L.; Boras, Valerie F.; Kruczkiewicz, Peter; Selinger, L. Brent

    2016-01-01

    Arcobacter butzleri has been linked to enteric disease in humans, but its pathogenicity and epidemiology remain poorly understood. The lack of suitable detection methods is a major limitation. Using comparative genome analysis, we developed PCR primers for direct detection and quantification of A. butzleri DNA in microbiologically complex matrices. These primers, along with existing molecular and culture-based methods, were used to detect A. butzleri and enteric pathogens in stools of diarrheic and nondiarrheic people (n = 1,596) living in southwestern Alberta, Canada, from May to November 2008. In addition, quantitative PCR was used to compare A. butzleri densities in diarrheic and nondiarrheic stools. Arcobacter butzleri was detected more often by PCR (59.6%) than by isolation methods (0.8%). Comparison by PCR-based detection found no difference in the prevalence of A. butzleri between diarrheic (56.7%) and nondiarrheic (45.5%) individuals. Rates of detection in diarrheic stools peaked in June (71.1%) and October (68.7%), but there was no statistically significant correlation between the presence of A. butzleri and patient age, sex, or place of habitation. Densities of A. butzleri DNA in diarrheic stools (1.6 ± 0.59 log10 copies mg−1) were higher (P = 0.007) than in nondiarrheic stools (1.3 ± 0.63 log10 copies mg−1). Of the 892 diarrheic samples that were positive for A. butzleri, 74.1% were not positive for other bacterial and/or viral pathogens. The current study supports previous work suggesting that A. butzleri pathogenicity is strain specific and/or dependent on other factors, such as the level of host resistance. PMID:26865686

  1. Kiwifruit-derived supplements increase stool frequency in healthy adults: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Juliet; Butts, Christine A; Paturi, Gunaranjan; Eady, Sarah L; Wallace, Alison J; Hedderley, Duncan; Gearry, Richard B

    2015-05-01

    The worldwide growth in the incidence of gastrointestinal disorders has created an immediate need to identify safe and effective interventions. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we examined the effects of Actazin and Gold, kiwifruit-derived nutritional ingredients, on stool frequency, stool form, and gastrointestinal comfort in healthy and functionally constipated (Rome III criteria for C3 functional constipation) individuals. Using a crossover design, all participants consumed all 4 dietary interventions (Placebo, Actazin low dose [Actazin-L] [600 mg/day], Actazin high dose [Actazin-H] [2400 mg/day], and Gold [2400 mg/day]). Each intervention was taken for 28 days followed by a 14-day washout period between interventions. Participants recorded their daily bowel movements and well-being parameters in daily questionnaires. In the healthy cohort (n = 19), the Actazin-H (P = .014) and Gold (P = .009) interventions significantly increased the mean daily bowel movements compared with the washout. No significant differences were observed in stool form as determined by use of the Bristol stool scale. In a subgroup analysis of responders in the healthy cohort, Actazin-L (P = .005), Actazin-H (P < .001), and Gold (P = .001) consumption significantly increased the number of daily bowel movements by greater than 1 bowel movement per week. In the functionally constipated cohort (n = 9), there were no significant differences between interventions for bowel movements and the Bristol stool scale values or in the subsequent subgroup analysis of responders. This study demonstrated that Actazin and Gold produced clinically meaningful increases in bowel movements in healthy individuals.

  2. MicroRNA expression in relation to different dietary habits: a comparison in stool and plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Sonia; Pardini, Barbara; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Rosa, Fabio; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosina, Floriano; Vineis, Paolo; Naccarati, Alessio

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, are fundamental for the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Altered expression of miRNAs has been detected in cancers, not only in primary tissue but also in easily obtainable specimens like plasma and stools. miRNA expression is known to be modulated by diet (micro and macronutrients, phytochemicals) and possibly by other lifestyle factors; however, such influence has not yet been exhaustively explored in humans. In the present study, we analysed the expression levels of a panel of seven human miRNAs in plasma and stool samples of a group of 24 healthy individuals characterised by different dietary habits (eight vegans, eight vegetarians and eight subjects with omnivorous diet, all groups with similar age and sex distribution). The dual aim of the study was to identify possible differences in miRNA expression due to diet (or other lifestyle factors recorded from questionnaires) and to compare results in both types of specimens. miR-92a was differentially expressed in both plasma and stool samples and with the same trend, among the three groups with different diets (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.02, respectively, with expression levels of vegans>vegetarians>omnivores). miR-92a was also associated with low body mass index (P = 0.04 and P = 0.05, respectively) in both types of specimens, and with several dietary factors. Other analysed miRNAs (miR-16, miR-21, mir-34a and miR-222) were associated with dietary and lifestyle factors, but not consistently in both stool and plasma. Our pilot study provides the first evidence of miRNA modulation by diet and other factors, that can be detected consistently in both plasma and stools samples.

  3. Socioeconomic determinants of prostate-specific antigen testing and estimation of the prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer in an elderly Polish population based on the PolSenior study

    PubMed Central

    Prajsner, Andrzej; Szybalska, Aleksandra; Piotrowicz, Karolina; Zejda, Jan; Więcek, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Socioeconomic determinants of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer (PCa) in the Polish population are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with PSA testing in elderly Polish men, and estimate the size of the population at risk of PCa related to PSA non-testing. Material and methods We analyzed questionnaire-derived data concerning PSA testing, obtained in 2567 elderly and 332 younger (age: 55–59) participants of the population-based PolSenior study. Additionally, PSA was measured in 2414 subjects. Results The PSA had previously been tested in 41.2% of elderly and in 24.8% of younger participants. Non-smoking status (OR = 2.06, p < 0.001), higher personal income (OR = 1.56, p < 0.001), better education (OR = 1.49, p = 0.001), previous white-collar work (OR = 1.37, p = 0.005), alcohol abstinence (OR = 1.28, p = 0.02), married status (OR = 1.24, p = 0.04), dependence in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) but not in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) (OR = 0.65, p < 0.001), and dependence in ADL (OR = 0.55, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of previous PSA testing in elderly participants. There were 31 elderly previously treated for PCa (calculated standardized prevalence: 935 per 100,000 elderly population). The PSA levels > 4 ng/ml were found in 12.8% of 65–74-year-old and 4.5% of 55–59-year-old previously non-tested participants. We calculated the standardized prevalence rate of undiagnosed PCa as approximately 1370 and 2352 cases per 100,000 population aged 55–59 and 65–74 years, respectively. Conclusions In Poland, 58.8% of elderly men have never had PSA tested. These were less likely to be functionally independent, married, better educated, non-smokers or to have previous office employment or higher than average personal income. Our data suggest substantial underdiagnosis of prostate cancer among Polish men. PMID:27695494

  4. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  5. Introduction to Antigen and Antibody Assays.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Serological tests are used widely in veterinary practice; most often in the diagnosis of infectious disease. Such tests may be used to detect antigen from an infectious agent within a biological sample or to detect the presence of serum antibody specific for the pathogen as evidence of immunological exposure. These tests are all based on the fundamental principles of interaction between antigenic epitopes and antibodies of either the immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, IgA, or IgE classes. The relative concentration of specific antibody within a sample is traditionally determined by calculation of the titer of antibody. With few exceptions, the primary interaction between an antigen and antibody in vitro cannot be visualized and so serological tests generally employ a secondary indicator system based on the use of a polyclonal antiserum or monoclonal antibody. A range of such tests has been developed, but many in veterinary medicine are based on the principle of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which is described in detail in this article. The interpretation of serological tests must be made carefully, taking into consideration the sensitivity and specificity of the test and the possible reasons for false-positive and false-negative outcomes. PMID:27154595

  6. [Investigation of the presence of Blastocystis spp. in stool samples with microscopic, culture and molecular methods].

    PubMed

    Adıyaman Korkmaz, Gülcan; Doğruman Al, Funda; Mumcuoğlu, İpek

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis species are enteric protozoa frequently detected in human and animals. Seventeen subtypes (STs) have now been identified, nine of them isolating from humans. The pleomorphic structure and genetic diversity of Blastocystis spp. and the absence of standardized diagnostic methods complicate the evaluation of current data. Microscopic methods such as native-lugol and trichrome staining are most frequently used methods in routine diagnosis, while culture and molecular methods are preferred for research purposes. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of Blastocystis spp. in the stool samples of patients with gastrointestinal complaints by microscopic and culture methods, and to detect the subtypes of isolates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 350 stool samples collected from patients with diarrhea (n= 157) and without diarrhea (n= 193) were included in the study. Presence of Blastocystis spp. in the samples were investigated by native-lugol examination, trichrome staining and direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) methods. Ringer's solution containing 10% horse serum and 0.05% asparagine was used for cultivation. The cultures were evaluated after 3-4 days of incubation at 37°C by microscopic examination. The subtypes of Blastocystis spp. strains isolated from the cultures have been identified by PCR using sequence-tagged site primers. A total of 66 (19%) stool samples, of them 26 (16.6%) were from diarrheal and 40 (21%) from non-diarrheal cases, yielded Blastocystis sp. growth in culture. Among the evaluated samples, 12% (42/350) were found positive with native-lugol examination, 17% (58/350) with trichrome staining, and 19% (66/350) with DFA method. The agreement of culture and native-lugol method was estimated as strong (κ= 0.752), while it was very strong between culture with trichrome staining and DFA methods (κ= 0.922 and κ= 1.00, respectively). When the culture was accepted as reference method, the sensitivity and

  7. [Investigation of adenovirus isolation frequency from the stool samples of patients suspected with acute flaccid paralysis].

    PubMed

    Bayrakdar, Fatma; Coşgun, Yasemin; Salman Atak, Tunca; Karademir, Hülya; Korukluoğlu, Gülay

    2016-04-01

    Although adenoviruses (AdVs) generally cause upper respiratory tract infections, conjunctivitis/epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and pneumonia, they can lead to the involvement of central nervous system. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a type of seizure, characterized by rapid and sudden onset of extreme weakness in hands and feet, including (less frequently) weakness of respiratory and swallowing, representing with decreased muscle tone, especially in children below 15-year-old. The major viral cause of AFP is polioviruses, however non-polio enteroviruses, mumps virus, rabies virus and flaviviruses can also be responsible for AFP. The data of some recent studies have pointed out the probable aetiological role of AdVs in AFP. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of AdVs from stool samples of AFP-suspected patients and their contacts. A total of 6130 stool samples from patients (age range: 0-15 years) prediagnosed as AFP (n= 3185) and their contacts (n= 2945), which were sent to our laboratory from the health care centers located at different regions of Turkey for the monitorization of poliomyelitis as part of national AFP surveillance programme, between 2000-2014, have been retrospectively evaluated in terms of adenovirus isolation frequency. Samples were analyzed according to the algorithm recommended by World Health Organization and inoculated in Hep-2, RD, and L20B cell lines for cultivation. Apart from enteroviruses, in case of the presence of characteristic cytopathic effects for AdVs observed in L20B cells were confirmed by a commercial Adeno agglutination kit (Diarlex Adeno; Orion Diagnostica, Finland). It was noted that AdVs have been isolated from 1.6% (97/6130) of the samples, and out of positive samples 76.3% (74/97) were from AFP-suspected cases, while 23.7% (23/97) were from their contacts. Accordingly the frequencies of AdVs from AFP-suspected cases and their contacts were found as 2.3% (74/3185) and 0.8% (23

  8. Enzyme immunoassay for swine trichinellosis using antigens purified by immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Seawright, G L; Despommier, D; Zimmermann, W; Isenstein, R S

    1983-11-01

    Various preparations of crude and a purified preparation of Trichinella spiralis antigens were compared in a rapid, micro-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for detecting trichinellosis in swine. The crude antigen preparations (XM-300 or S3 fraction) were lipid-free, cell-free fractions of muscle larvae, and the purified antigen was prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography of the soluble fraction of stichocyte secretory granules from rat muscle larvae. The antigens were tested against normal and immune swine sera for sensitivity and specificity, and for their ability to detect seroconversions early in the immune response. At optimum concentrations, absorbance values from immune and nonimmune sera produced sample to noise (S/N) ratios three-fold higher for the column antigen than for XM-300. Tests of sequential sera from experimentally-infected pigs showed that the column antigen produced lower absorbances with pre-infection sera and, from 18 days post-infection, higher absorbances with positive sera. From 21-28 days post-infection, absorbances and S/N ratios with column antigen were nearly twice those with XM-300. Column antigen detected antibodies more often than XM-300 antigen in sera collected prior to the appearance of larvae. Crude antigen did not distinguish all true negatives from weakly positives in a study involving 100 sera from muscle digestion-negative pigs and 75 sera from experimentally infected pigs, whereas the column antigen distinguished all negatives from positives. In a larger scale test of the column antigen, 1,130 pigs from Puerto Rico were tested in the micro-EIA test. Puerto Rico has no endogenous trichinellosis, and all 1,130 pigs were shown to be muscle digestion negative. These same pigs were all negative using the column antigen. These results show that the column antigen out-performs the crude antigens in sensitivity, specificity, and early detection. The column antigen is therefore a major improvement in the EIA for swine trichinellosis.

  9. Comparison of CHROMagar Salmonella Medium and Xylose-Lysine-Desoxycholate and Salmonella-Shigella Agars for Isolation of Salmonella Strains from Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Susan; Olma, Tom; Chen, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    The growth and appearance of 115 stock Salmonella isolates on a new formulation of CHROMagar Salmonella (CAS) medium were compared to those on xylose-lysine-desoxycholate agar (XLD), Salmonella-Shigella agar (SS), and Hektoen enteric agar (HEA) media. CAS medium was then compared prospectively to XLD and SS for the detection and presumptive identification of Salmonella strains in 500 consecutive clinical stool samples. All stock Salmonella isolates produced typical mauve colonies on CAS medium. Nine Salmonella strains were isolated from clinical specimens. The sensitivities for the detection of salmonellae after primary plating on CAS medium and the combination of XLD and SS after enrichment were 100%. The specificity for the detection of salmonellae after primary plating on CAS medium (83%) was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher than that after primary plating on the combination of SS and XLD media (55%) (a 28% difference in rates; 95% confidence interval, 23.0 to 34%). Twenty-nine non-Salmonella organisms produced mauve colonies on CAS medium, including 17 Candida spp. (59%) and 8 Pseudomonas spp. (28%). These were easily excluded as salmonellae by colony morphology, microscopic examination of a wet preparation, or oxidase testing. One biochemically inert Escherichia coli isolate required further identification to differentiate it from Salmonella spp. The use of plating on CAS medium demonstrated high levels of sensitivity and specificity and reduced the time to final identification of Salmonella spp., resulting in substantial cost savings. It can be recommended for use for the primary isolation of Salmonella spp. from stool specimens. Other media (e.g., XLD) are required to detect Shigella spp. concurrently. PMID:12149365

  10. Development and evaluation of a real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of blastocystis parasites in human stool samples: prospective study of patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Albert, Aurélie; El Alaoui, Hicham; Delbac, Frédéric; Livrelli, Valérie

    2011-03-01

    Blastocystis anaerobic parasites are widespread worldwide in the digestive tract of many animal species, including humans. Epidemiological Blastocystis studies are often limited by the poor sensitivity of standard parasitological assays for its detection. This report presents a highly sensitive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay developed to detect Blastocystis parasites in stool samples. The assay targets a partial sequence of the Blastocystis small ribosomal subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, allowing subtyping (ST) of Blastocystis isolates by direct sequencing of qPCR products. This qPCR method was assessed in a prospective study of 186 patients belonging to two cohorts--a group of 94 immunocompromised patients presenting hematological malignancies and a control group of 92 nonimmunocompromised patients. Direct-light microscopy and xenic in vitro stool culture analysis showed only 29% and 52% sensitivity, respectively, compared to our qPCR assay. Of the 27 (14.5%) Blastocystis-positive patients, 8 (4%) experienced digestive symptoms. No correlation was found between symptomatic patients and immune status, parasite load, or parasite subtypes, although subtyping of all isolates revealed a high (63.0%) prevalence of ST4. Two unexpected avian subtypes were found, i.e., ST6 and ST7, which are frequently isolated in Asia but rarely present in Western countries. In conclusion, this qPCR proved by far the most sensitive of the tested methods and allowed subtype determination by direct sequencing of qPCR products. New diagnostic tools such as the qPCR are essential for evaluating the clinical relevance of Blastocystis subtypes and their role in acute or chronic digestive disorders. PMID:21177897

  11. Collaborative study on antigens for immunodiagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Mott, K E; Dixon, H; Carter, C E; Garcia, E; Ishii, A; Matsuda, H; Mitchell, G; Owhashi, M; Tanaka, H; Tsang, V C

    1987-01-01

    Six research laboratories in Australia, Japan, the Philippines and the USA participated in a collaborative evaluation of immunodiagnostic tests for Schistosoma japonicum infections. The serum bank consisted of 385 well-documented sera from Brazil, Kenya, Philippines, Republic of Korea and Europe. Twelve S. japonicum antigen/test system combinations were evaluated.Crude S. japonicum egg antigens showed the highest sensitivity and specificity. The defined or characterized antigens showed no advantage over the crude antigens. Quantitative seroreactivity of all S. japonicum antigens showed a positive correlation with faecal egg counts (log x + 1) in all age groups. The performance of the circumoval precipitin test was satisfactory within the same laboratory but with differences in the results between laboratories. A monoclonal antibody used in a competitive radioimmunoassay test system performed as well as the crude egg antigens.The high sensitivity of crude S. japonicum antigens now permits further evaluation for wide-scale use in public health laboratories of endemic areas to support control efforts. PMID:3111737

  12. H-Y antigen in transsexuality, and how to explain testis differentiation in H-Y antigen-negative males and ovary differentiation in H-Y antigen-positive females.

    PubMed

    Engel, W; Pfäfflin, F; Wiedeking, C

    1980-01-01

    H-Y antigen was determined in eight transsexual patients. Two of the four male-to-female transsexual patients typed as H-Y antigen-negative, while the other two typed as expected from their phenotypic and gonadal sex, namely H-Y antigen-positive. Of the four female-to-male transsexual patients, three typed as H-Y antigen-positive and one was H-Y antigen-negative, as expected. The presence of normal testes in H-Y antigen-negative males is assumed to result from a mutation of nucleotide sequences of the H-Y structural gene for antigenic determinants. Thus, an H-Y is produced with normal receptor-binding activity which can sustain the testis determination of the bipotent gonadal anlage. In the case of H-Y antigen-positive females with normal ovaries a deletion of the autosomally located H-Y structural gene is assumed. This deletion should affect sequences for repressor-binding (as was suggested for H-Y antigen-positive XX-males) and for receptor-binding activity of the H-Y antigen molecule. The resulting H-Y antigen is unable to bind to the gonadal receptor of the bipotent gonadal anlage. Thus an ovary is determined. The relevance of H-Y antigen for the aetiology of transsexualism is discussed.

  13. Safety Assessment of Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 Isolated from Stools of Healthy Breast-Fed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Sanz, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 is a potential probiotic strain, originally isolated from the stools of healthy breast-feed infants. The strain showed pre-clinical efficacy in a mouse obesity model. The objective of this study was to evaluate its potential toxicity and translocation ability after acute oral administration to mice. Methods and Findings A safety study was conducted in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed C57BL-6 mice. Both mouse groups (n = 10 per group) were fed orally 2 x 109 colony forming units (cfu)/day of B. uniformis CECT 7771 or placebo by gavage for 6 days. Throughout this time, feed and water intake and body weight were monitored. Afterwards, mice were sacrificed and biological samples were collected to analyze blood and urine biochemistry, inflammatory and immune markers; gut mucosal histology and bacterial translocation to peripheral tissues. The results demonstrated that acute ingestion of this Bacteroides strain had no adverse effects on the animals’ general health status or food intake, nor did it affect biochemical indicators of liver, kidney and pancreatic function or gut mucosal histology. Findings also demonstrated that administration did not lead to bacterial translocation to blood, liver or mesenteric lymph nodes. B. uniformis CECT 7771 also downregulated gene and protein expression (iNOS and PPAR-γ) and inflammatory cytokines induced by immunosuppression. Conclusions The findings indicate that the acute oral consumption of B. uniformis CECT 7771 does not raise safety concerns in mice. Further studies in humans should be conducted. PMID:26784747

  14. New π-arene ruthenium(II) piano-stool complexes with nitrogen ligands.

    PubMed

    Grau, Jordi; Noe, Verónica; Ciudad, Carles; Prieto, Maria J; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Moreno, Virtudes

    2012-04-01

    The synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and antiproliferative behavior of new π-arene ruthenium(II) piano-stool complexes with nitrogen ligands are described. Three series of organometallic compounds of formulae [RuCl(2)(η(6)-p-cym)L] were synthesized (with L=2-, 3- or 4-methylpyridine; L=2,3-, 2,4-, 2,5-, 3,4-, 3,5-dimethylpyridine and L=1,2-, 1,3- 1,4-methylaminobenzene). The crystal structures of [RuCl(2)(p-cym)(4-methylpyridine)], [RuCl(2)(p-cym)(3,4-dimethylpyridine)] and [RuCl(2)(p-cym)(1,4-methylaminobenzene)] were resolved and the characterization was completed by spectroscopic UV-vis, FT-IR and (1)H NMR studies. Electrochemical experiments were performed by cyclic voltammetry to estimate the redox potential of the Ru(II)/Ru(III) couple. The interaction with plasmid pBR322 DNA was studied through the examination of the electrophoretical mobility and atomic force microscopy, and interaction with ct-DNA by circular dichroism, viscosity measurements and fluorescence studies based on the DNA-ethidium bromide complex. The antiproliferative behavior of the series with L=methylpyridine was assayed against two tumor cell lines, i.e. LoVo and MiaPaca. The results revealed a moderate cytotoxicity with a higher activity for the LoVo cell line compared to the MiaPaca one. PMID:22387934

  15. Binding of piano-stool Ru(II) complexes to DNA; QM/MM study.

    PubMed

    Futera, Zdeněk; Platts, James A; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2012-10-01

    Ru(II) "piano-stool" complexes belong to group of biologically active metallocomplexes with promising anticancer activity. In this study, we investigate the reaction mechanism of [(η(6)-benzene)Ru(II)(en)(H(2)O)](2+) (en = ethylenediamine) complex binding to DNA by hybrid QM/MM computational techniques. The reaction when the Ru(II) complex is coordinated on N7-guanine from major groove is explored. Two reaction pathways, direct binding to N7 position and two-step mechanism passing through O6 position, are considered. It was found that the reaction is exothermic and the direct binding process is preferred kinetically. In analogy to cisplatin, we also explored the possibility of intrastrand cross-link formation where the Ru(II) complex makes a bridge between two adjacent guanines. Two different pathways were found, leading to a final structure with released benzene ligand. This process is exothermic; however, one pathway is blocked by relatively high initial activation barrier. Geometries, energies, and electronic properties analyzed by atoms in molecules and natural population analysis methods are discussed. PMID:22707416

  16. [Isolation rate and susceptibilities of candida species from blood, vascular catheter, urine and stool].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Masato; Murakami, Hinako; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated species distribution and antifungal susceptibility of Candida isolates during 2002-2008. Of 177 Candida isolates from blood, species distribution was 90 (51%) Candida albicans, 30 (17%) C. parapsilosis, 22 (12%) C. glabrata, 6 (3%) C. tropicalis and 29 (16%) other Candida spp.. Of 162 Candida isolates from vascular catheter, species distribution was 87 (54%) C. albicans, 14 (9%) C. parapsilosis, 36 (22%) C. glabrata, 5 (3%), C. tropicalis, 2 (1%) C. krusei and 18 (11%) other Candida spp.. Of 1889 Candida isolates from urine, species distribution was 1165 (62%) C. albicans, 22 (1%) C. parapsilosis, 484 (26%) C. glabrata, 83 (4%) C. tropicalis, 26 (1%) C. krusei and 109 (6%) other Candida spp.. Of 782 Candida isolates from stool, species distribution was 425 (54%) C. albicans, 3 (1%) C. parapsilosis, 103 (13%) C. glabrata, 28 (4%) C. tropicalis, 5 (1%), C. krusei and 218 (28%) other Candida spp. Both C. albicans and non-Candida spp. isolated from urine increased slightly over the past 7 years. Flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole and micafungin still have strong activity against Candida isolates.

  17. [Isolation rate and susceptibilities of Candida species from blood, vascular catheter, urine and stool].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Masato; Murakami, Hinako; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated species distribution and antifungal susceptibility of Candida isolates during 2002-2008. Of 177 Candida isolates from blood, species distribution was 90 (51%) Candida albicans, 30 (17%) C. parapsilosis, 22 (12%) C. glabrata, 6 (3%) C. tropicalis and 29 (16%) other Candida spp.. Of 162 Candida isolates from vascular catheter, species distribution was 87 (54%) C. albicans, 14 (9%) C. parapsilosis, 36 (22%) C. glabrata, 5 (3%), C. tropicalis, 2 (1%) C. krusei and 18 (11%) other Candida spp.. Of 1889 Candida isolates from urine, species distribution was 1165 (62%) C. albicans, 22 (1%) C. parapsilosis, 484 (26%) C. glabrata, 83 (4%) C. tropicalis, 26 (1%) C. krusei and 109 (6%) other Candida spp.. Of 782 Candida isolates from stool, species distribution was 425 (54%) C. albicans, 3 (1%) C. parapsilosis, 103 (13%) C. glabrata, 28 (4%) C. tropicalis, 5 (1%), C. krusei and 218 (28%) other Candida spp.. Both C. albicans and non-Candida spp. isolated from urine increased slightly over the past 7 years. Flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole and micafungin still have strong activity against Candida isolates.

  18. Systematic detection and association of Entamoeba species in stool samples from selected sites in India.

    PubMed

    Nath, J; Banyal, N; Gautam, D S; Ghosh, S K; Singha, B; Paul, J

    2015-01-01

    This study developed a fast and high throughput dot-blot technique to evaluate the presence of Entamoeba in stool samples (n = 643) followed by a PCR-based method to validate and differentiate the two species E. histolytica and E. dispar. The prevalence rate of the parasite has been detected in a cross-sectional study carried out in the population of the Eastern and Northern parts of India. Of the various demographic features, prevalence was highest in the monsoon season (P = 0·017), in the <15 years age group (P = 0·015). In HIV-positive individuals, the prevalence rate was significantly high (P = 0·008) in patients with a CD4 cell count <200 as well as in patients without antiretroviral therapy (ART) (P = 0·011). Our analysis further confirmed that risk factors such as toilet facilities, living conditions, hygienic practices, drinking water source, occupation and level of education are important predictors as they were found to contribute significantly in the prevalence of the parasite.

  19. Nested culture method improves detection of Fusobacterium from stool in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Toyokazu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Mitobe, Jimi; Takakura, Kazuki; Takahara, Akitaka; Odahara, Shunichi; Matsudaira, Hiroshi; Nagatsuma, Keisuke; Kitahara, Takuya; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Koido, Shigeo; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium varium is an elusive pathogenic factor in ulcerative colitis (UC); conventional methods of fecal culture rarely recover F. varium. We have developed a nested culture method to recover Fusobacterium and we used it to investigate whether F. varium could be isolated from UC patients. We enrolled 50 consecutive patients in this study; 26 received combination antibiotic therapy that included amoxicillin, tetracycline, and metronidazole (ATM) for 2 weeks and were thus assigned to the ATM group, and the remaining 24 were assigned to the non-ATM group and did not receive any antibiotics. Stool samples were added to 10 ml of GAM broth that contained neomycin and crystal violet. The samples were vortexed and incubated under anaerobic conditions. The preincubated broth was streaked onto a Fusobacterium-selective agar plate and then incubated under anaerobic conditions. The species of the colonies isolated were identified using the Vitek Automated system and PCR analysis. We recoverd F. varium from 7 of the 24 non-ATM patients (29.2%) and none from the ATM patients (0%) (P = 0.0035). All of the F. varium isolates were susceptible to ATM. This study suggests that the recovery of F. varium is related to UC, which aligns with results from previous studies that used mucosal culture, immunostaining, real-time PCR, and serological studies.

  20. Pomegranate extract induces ellagitannin metabolite formation and changes stool microbiota in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Thames, Gail; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Finegold, Sydney M; Heber, David

    2015-08-01

    The health benefits of pomegranate (POM) consumption are attributed to ellagitannins and their metabolites, formed and absorbed in the intestine by the microbiota. In this study twenty healthy participants consumed 1000 mg of POM extract daily for four weeks. Based on urinary and fecal content of the POM metabolite urolithin A (UA), we observed three distinct groups: (1) individuals with no baseline UA presence but induction of UA formation by POM extract consumption (n = 9); (2) baseline UA formation which was enhanced by POM extract consumption (N = 5) and (3) no baseline UA production, which was not inducible (N = 6). Compared to baseline the phylum Actinobacteria was increased and Firmicutes decreased significantly in individuals forming UA (producers). Verrucomicrobia (Akkermansia muciniphila) was 33 and 47-fold higher in stool samples of UA producers compared to non-producers at baseline and after 4 weeks, respectively. In UA producers, the genera Butyrivibrio, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Prevotella, Serratia and Veillonella were increased and Collinsella decreased significantly at week 4 compared to baseline. The consumption of pomegranate resulted in the formation of its metabolites in some but not all participants. POM extract consumption may induce health benefits secondary to changes in the microbiota.

  1. Genetic analysis for brix weight per stool and its component traits in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum).

    PubMed

    Liu, Gui-fu; Zhou, Hong-kai; Hu, Han; Zhu, Zi-hong; Hayat, Yousaf; Xu, Hai-ming; Yang, Jian

    2007-12-01

    Brix weight per stool (BW) of sugarcane is a complex trait, which is the final product of a combination of many components. Diallel cross experiments were conducted during a period of two years for BW and its five component traits, including stalk diameter (SD), stalk length (SL), stalk number (SN), stalk weight (SW), and brix scale (BS) of sugarcane. Phenotypic data of all the six traits were analyzed by mixed linear model and their phenotype variances were portioned into additive (A), dominance (D), additive x environment interaction (AE) and dominance x environment interaction (DE) effects, and the correlations of A, D, AE and DE effects between BW and its components were estimated. Conditional analysis was employed to investigate the contribution of the components traits to the variances of A, D, AE and DE effects of BW. It was observed that the heritabilities of BW were significantly attributed to A, D and DE by 23.9%, 30.9% and 28.5%, respectively. The variance of A effect for BW was significantly affected by SL, SN and BS by 25.3%, 93.7% and 17.4%, respectively. The variances of D and DE effects for BW were also significantly influenced by all the five components by 5.1%(85.5%. These determinants might be helpful in sugarcane breeding and provide valuable information for multiple-trait improvement of BW.

  2. A Novel Astrovirus-Like RNA Virus Detected in Human Stool

    PubMed Central

    Oude Munnink, Bas B.; Cotten, Matthew; Canuti, Marta; Deijs, Martin; Jebbink, Maarten F.; van Hemert, Formijn J.; Phan, My V. T.; Bakker, Margreet; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Kellam, Paul; van der Hoek, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Several novel clades of astroviruses have recently been identified in human faecal samples. Here, we describe a novel astrovirus-like RNA virus detected in human stools, which we have tentatively named bastrovirus. The genome of this novel virus consists of 6,300 nucleotides organized in three open reading frames. Several sequence divergent strains were detected sharing 67–93 per cent nucleotide identity. Bastrovirus encodes a putative structural protein that is homologous to the capsid protein found in members of the Astroviridae family (45% amino acid identity). The virus also encodes a putative non-structural protein that is genetically distant from astroviruses but shares some homology to the non-structural protein encoded by members of the Hepeviridae family (28% amino acid identity). This novel bastrovirus is present in 8.7 per cent (35/400) of faecal samples collected from 300 HIV-1-positive and 100 HIV-1-negative individuals suggesting common occurrence of the virus. However, whether the source of the virus is infected human cells or other, for example, dietary, remains to be determined. PMID:27774298

  3. Pomegranate extract induces ellagitannin metabolite formation and changes stool microbiota in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Thames, Gail; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Finegold, Sydney M; Heber, David

    2015-08-01

    The health benefits of pomegranate (POM) consumption are attributed to ellagitannins and their metabolites, formed and absorbed in the intestine by the microbiota. In this study twenty healthy participants consumed 1000 mg of POM extract daily for four weeks. Based on urinary and fecal content of the POM metabolite urolithin A (UA), we observed three distinct groups: (1) individuals with no baseline UA presence but induction of UA formation by POM extract consumption (n = 9); (2) baseline UA formation which was enhanced by POM extract consumption (N = 5) and (3) no baseline UA production, which was not inducible (N = 6). Compared to baseline the phylum Actinobacteria was increased and Firmicutes decreased significantly in individuals forming UA (producers). Verrucomicrobia (Akkermansia muciniphila) was 33 and 47-fold higher in stool samples of UA producers compared to non-producers at baseline and after 4 weeks, respectively. In UA producers, the genera Butyrivibrio, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Prevotella, Serratia and Veillonella were increased and Collinsella decreased significantly at week 4 compared to baseline. The consumption of pomegranate resulted in the formation of its metabolites in some but not all participants. POM extract consumption may induce health benefits secondary to changes in the microbiota. PMID:26189645

  4. Comparison of stool containment in cloth and single-use diapers using a simulated infant feces.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, M; Kressner, B; Raynor, W; Davis, J; Syverson, R E

    1993-03-01

    Single-use diapers and cloth diapers with vinyl pants were compared for their relative abilities to contain stool within the diaper. Artificial feces with carbon black as an additive allowed a quantitative measure of fecal containment by image analysis in 60 infants. This method showed complete containment of feces in the diaper in 50% of the single-use diapers whereas only 10% of the cloth diapers showed complete containment. In infants where the border of the vinyl pants was used as the boundary of containment with the cloth diapers, complete containment occurred only 33% of the time. Fluorescein dye ratings for containment/leakage in 69 infants showed that 83% of single-use diapers and 30% of the cloth diapers were rated as having no or minor leakage of feces. Cultures were taken of laundered vinyl pants that had previously been used over cloth diapers to determine microbial contamination. Thirty-nine percent of the pants contained Gram-negative, lactose-fermenting bacilli indicating fecal contamination. This study comparing single-use and cloth diapers for containment of artificial feces by use of image analysis and fluorescein dye ratings showed better containment by single-use diapers. The study also raises the question of possible spread of feces-borne pathogens by the vinyl pants used over cloth diapers, particularly in a day-care center. PMID:8441572

  5. A large spectrum of alpha and beta papillomaviruses are detected in human stool samples.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, Paola; Della Libera, Simonetta; Petricca, Sabrina; Iaconelli, Marcello; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Graffeo, Rosalia; Accardi, Luisa; La Rosa, Giuseppina

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been detected in urban wastewaters, demonstrating that epitheliotropic viruses can find their way into sewage through the washing of skin and mucous membranes. Papillomavirus shedding through faeces is still an unexplored issue. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence of HPVs in stool samples. We analysed 103 faecal specimens collected from hospitalized patients with diarrhoea using validated primers able to detect α, β and γ HPVs. PCR products underwent sequencing analysis and sequences were aligned to reference genomes from the Papillomavirus Episteme database. A total of 15 sequences were characterized from the faecal samples. Thirteen samples (12.6 %) were positive for nine genotypes belonging to the α and β genera: HPV32 (LR, α1), HPV39 (HR, α7), HPV44 (LR, α10), HPV8 (β1), HPV9, HPV23, HPV37, HPV38 and HPV120 (β2). Two putative novel genotypes of the β genus, species 1 and 2, were also detected. The tissue(s) of origin is unknown, since faeces can collect HPVs originating from or passing through the entire digestive system. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the occurrence and diversity of HPVs in faecal samples. Results from this study demonstrate that HPVs can find their way into sewage as a consequence of shedding in the faeces. This highlights the need for further studies aimed at understanding the prevalence of HPV in different water environments and the potential for waterborne transmission.

  6. Comparison of the direct platelet immunofluorescence test (direct PIFT) with a modified direct monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (direct MAIPA) in detection of platelet-associated IgG.

    PubMed

    Joutsi, L; Kekomäki, R

    1997-01-01

    Glycoprotein (GP)-specific platelet-associated IgG (PA-IgG) may be demonstrable in autoimmune-mediated thrombocytopenia. We studied 159 consecutive patients with histories of thrombocytopenia by a modified direct monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (direct MAIPA) assay, which immobilizes GP IIb/ IIIa, GP Ib/IX and GP Ia/IIa simultaneously. This modification requires smaller quantities of platelets than standard measurements performed separately. PA-IgG was present in 84/159 (53%) patients, as shown by the direct platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) with flow cytometry as a reference. PA-IgG against GP IIb/IIIa and/or GP Ib/IX and/or GP Ia/IIa was noted in 46 patients (29%), of whom 93% (43/46)-were also PA-IgG positive. The amount of PA-IgG detected by PIFT correlated directly with that detected by direct MAIPA (r = 0.71; P < 0.001). Only three patients 12548 with negative direct PIFT had GP-specific PA-IgG. GPV-specific PA-IgG was detected in 13 (10%) of the 125 patients, in whom further studies could be performed. In the subgroup of patients with GP-specific PA-IgG, the median fluorescence intensities of direct PIFT were higher than in patients with no GP-specific PA-IgG (P < 0.001). Direct PIFT and direct MAIPA divided the patients into asymmetric subgroups. However, the relative roles of these tests in the diagnosis of autoimmune-mediated thrombocytopenia await further studies. PMID:9012711

  7. Frequency of Mia antigen: A pilot study among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Rosamma, N.L.; Karna, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The Miltenberger (Mi) classes represent a group of phenotypes for red cells that carry low frequency antigens associated with the MNSs blood group system. This pilot study was aimed at determining the Mia antigen positivity in the blood donor population in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. The study was performed between June to August 2014 on eligible blood donors willing to participate. Antigen typing was performed using monoclonal anti-Mia antiserum by tube technique. Only one of the 1000 blood donors (0.1%) tested was found to be Mia antigen positive. The Mia antigen can, therefore, be considered as being rare in the Indian blood donor population. PMID:27488007

  8. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  9. Stool screening of Syrian refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, 2013/2014: Identification of Sabin like polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Sindy; Neubauer, Katrin; Baillot, Armin; Rieder, Gabriele; Adam, Maja; Diedrich, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Germany is a partner of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Assurance of polio free status is based on enterovirus surveillance, which focuses on patients with signs of acute flaccid paralysis or aseptic meningitis/encephalitis, representing the key symptoms of poliovirus infection. In response to the wild poliovirus outbreak in Syria 2013 and high number of refugees coming from Syria to Germany, stool samples from 629 Syrian refugees/asylum seekers aged <3 years were screened for wild poliovirus between November 2013 and April 2014. Ninety-three samples (14.8%) were positive in an enterovirus specific PCR. Of these, 12 contained Sabin-like polioviruses. The remaining 81 samples were characterized as non-polio enteroviruses representing several members of groups A-C as well as rhinovirus. Wild-type poliovirus was not detected via stool screening involving molecular and virological methods, indicating a very low risk for the importation by Syrian refugees and asylum seekers at that time.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Method for Simultaneous Identification and Toxigenic Type Characterization of Clostridium difficile From Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mohammad J.; Tisdel, Naradah L.; Shah, Dhara N.; Yapar, Mehmet; Lasco, Todd M.; Garey, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and validate a multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous identification and toxigenic type characterization of Clostridium difficile. Methods The multiplex real-time PCR assay targeted and simultaneously detected triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) and binary toxin (cdtA) genes, and toxin A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) genes in the first and sec tubes, respectively. The results of multiplex real-time PCR were compared to those of the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay, targeting the tcdB gene alone. The toxigenic culture was used as the reference, where toxin genes were detected by multiplex real-time PCR. Results A total of 351 stool samples from consecutive patients were included in the study. Fifty-five stool samples (15.6%) were determined to be positive for the presence of C. difficile by using multiplex real-time PCR. Of these, 48 (87.2%) were toxigenic (46 tcdA and tcdB-positive, two positive for only tcdB) and 11 (22.9%) were cdtA-positive. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV) of the multiplex real-time PCR compared with the toxigenic culture were 95.6%, 98.6%, 91.6%, and 99.3%, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was determined to be 103colonyforming unit (CFU)/g spiked stool sample and 0.0625 pg genomic DNA from culture. Analytical specificity determined by using 15 enteric and non-clostridial reference strains was 100%. Conclusions The multiplex real-time PCR assay accurately detected C. difficile isolates from diarrheal stool samples and characterized its toxin genes in a single PCR run. PMID:25932438

  12. Evaluation of the Cult-a-Box gas generator system for isolation of Campylobacter spp. from stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Kosunen, T U

    1983-10-01

    The Cult-a-Box gas generator tablet method for isolating Campylobacter spp. from stool cultures was evaluated by comparison with a standard gas mixture of 5% oxygen, 10% carbon dioxide, and 85% nitrogen. Of the 186 positive cultures, 90.3% were found by both methods. Of the remaining 9.7% which were positive in one system only, 11 were found by the tablet method and 7 by the standard gas method.

  13. Culture of intestinal biopsy specimens and stool culture for detection of bacterial enteropathogens in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The Berlin Diarrhea/Wasting Syndrome Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Liesenfeld, O; Schneider, T; Schmidt, W; Sandforth, J; Weinke, T; Zeitz, M; Riecken, E O; Ullrich, R

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic yields of stool cultures and biopsy specimens for the detection of enteric bacterial pathogens in 213 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were compared. Forty-five percent (19 of 42) of the pathogens were detected exclusively by stool culture, 2% (1 of 42) of the isolates were detected exclusively by culture of biopsy specimens, and 53% (22 of 42) were detected by both methods. Repeated stool cultures remain the most important means of diagnosing enteric bacterial pathogens, which were encountered in 20% (40 of 213) of all patients. The additional culture of biopsy specimens should be reserved for patients with suspected mycobacteriosis. PMID:7751389

  14. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    The asexual blood stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce many antigens, only some of which are important for protective immunity. Most of the putative protective antigens are believed to be expressed in schizonts and merozoites, the late stages of the asexual cycle. With the aim of cloning and characterizing genes for important parasite antigens, we used late-stage P. falciparum mRNA to construct a library of cDNA sequences inserted in the Escherichia coli expression vector pUC8. Nine thousand clones from the expression library were immunologically screened in situ with serum from Aotus monkeys immune to P. falciparum, and 95 clones expressing parasite antigens were identified. Mice were immunized with lysates from 49 of the bacterial clones that reacted with Aotus sera, and the mouse sera were tested for their reactivity with parasite antigens by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting assays. Several different P. falciparum antigens were identified by these assays. Indirect immunofluorescence studies of extracellular merozoites showed that three of these antigens appear to be located on the merozoite surface. Thus, we have identified cDNA clones to three different P. falciparum antigens that may be important in protective immunity. Images PMID:3887406

  15. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  16. Application of density gradient for the isolation of the fecal microbial stool component and the potential use thereof

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Delgado, Susana; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The idea of considering the gut microbiota as a virtual human organ has led to the concept of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), which has recently been extremely successful in the treatment of cases of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Administration of safe, viable, and representative fecal microbiota is crucial for FMT. To our knowledge, suitable techniques and systematic conditions for separating the fecal microbiota from stool samples have not been thoroughly investigated. In this work we show the potential to separate stool microorganisms from the rest of fecal material using a procedure with a Nycodenz® density gradient, yielding 1010 viable bacteria per two grams of feces. This procedure did not affect the original microbiota composition in terms of viability, distribution and proportions, as assessed by a phylogenetic metagenomic approach. Obtaining the fecal microbiota by concentration and separation of the microorganisms from the rest of the stool components would allow the standardization of its recovery and its long-term preservation. FMT or similar microbiota restoration therapies could be used for the treatment of several disorders, or even for aesthetic purposes, so the method described in our work may contribute to the setting of the basis for the development of safe and standardized products. PMID:26581409

  17. Long-term effect of wholemeal bread on stool weight, transit time, fecal bile acids, fats, and neutral sterols.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, M A; Elton, R A; Smith, J H

    1986-03-01

    Stool weight, fecal constituents, bile acids, fat, neutral sterols, and intestinal transit time were recorded in 28 subjects over 18 mo. During the first 12 mo the subjects ate white bread. They were studied for an initial period of 7 days, and after 6 mo (study period 1). For the first 6 mo they ate their usual intake of bread, they then increased their white bread intake by 62 g/day for 6 mo (study period 2). The subjects ate a self-selected diet throughout the 18 mo study. During the last 6 mo (study period 3) the subjects replaced white bread by the same amount of wholemeal bread as in study period 2. No increase in stool weight occurred until study period 3 when there was an increase of 20%. There developed a linear relationship between stool weight and intestinal transit time which was not found during the initial first and second study periods. A seasonal influence on serum cholesterol was not observed during the wholemeal bread period. Fecal bile acid excretion was unchanged throughout the experiment.

  18. Intestinal microbiota and secretory immunoglobulin A in feces of exclusively breast-fed infants with blood-streaked stools.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Hideki; Maisawa, Shun-ichi; Tanaka, Mamoru; Takahashi, Motomichi; Takasago, Yuhei; Nishijima, Asaka; Watanabe, Shuhka

    2012-10-01

    Episodes of blood-streaked stools are not uncommon in exclusively breast-fed infants under 6 months of age. Such bleeding is thought to be associated with food protein-induced proctocolitis, however the pathomechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate intestinal microbiota and secretory immunoglobulin A in the feces of exclusively breast-fed infants with blood-streaked stools. Fecal specimens from 15 full-term infants with blood-streaked stools and 15 breast-fed healthy infants were studied and the results compared. All infants had been delivered vaginally and exclusively breast-fed. The fecal microbiota were investigated by phylogenetic analysis combined with culture methods for some bacterial species, and feces were assessed for the presence of fecal secretory immunoglobulin A by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Phylogenetic cluster analysis revealed four major clusters of fecal bacteria, cluster A being found only in healthy infants. The Bacteroides fragilis group was observed more frequently in controls than in patients (P < 0.05). In the controls, the predominant species belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae group was Escherichia coli, whereas in the patients it was Klebsiella (P < 0.05). Concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A were high in one third of the healthy controls. In conclusion, the pathomechanism of rectal bleeding in exclusively breast-fed infants may be related to differences in the composition of their intestinal flora.

  19. Methylation of TFPI2 in stool DNA: a potential novel biomarker for the detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Sabine C; Dhir, Mashaal; Yi, Joo Mi; McGarvey, Kelly E; Van Neste, Leander; Louwagie, Joost; Chan, Timothy A; Kleeberger, Wolfram; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Smits, Kim M; Khalid-de Bakker, Carolina A J; Jonkers, Daisy M A E; Stockbrügger, Reinhold W; Meijer, Gerrit A; Oort, Frank A; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Bierau, Katja; Herman, James G; Baylin, Stephen B; Van Engeland, Manon; Schuebel, Kornel E; Ahuja, Nita

    2009-06-01

    We have used a gene expression array-based strategy to identify the methylation of tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (TFPI2), a potential tumor suppressor gene, as a frequent event in human colorectal cancers (CRC). TFPI2 belongs to the recently described group of embryonic cell Polycomb group (PcG)-marked genes that may be predisposed to aberrant DNA methylation in early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis. Aberrant methylation of TFPI2 was detected in almost all CRC adenomas (97%, n = 56) and stages I to IV CRCs (99%, n = 115). We further explored the potential of TFPI2 as a biomarker for the early detection of CRC using stool DNA-based assays in patients with nonmetastatic CRC and average-risk noncancer controls who were candidates for screening. TFPI2 methylation was detected in stool DNA from stage I to III CRC patients with a sensitivity of 76% to 89% and a specificity of 79% to 93%. Detection of TFPI2 methylation in stool DNA may act as a useful adjunct to the noninvasive strategies for screening of CRCs in the future.

  20. Application of density gradient for the isolation of the fecal microbial stool component and the potential use thereof.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Arancha; Delgado, Susana; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The idea of considering the gut microbiota as a virtual human organ has led to the concept of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), which has recently been extremely successful in the treatment of cases of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Administration of safe, viable, and representative fecal microbiota is crucial for FMT. To our knowledge, suitable techniques and systematic conditions for separating the fecal microbiota from stool samples have not been thoroughly investigated. In this work we show the potential to separate stool microorganisms from the rest of fecal material using a procedure with a Nycodenz® density gradient, yielding 10(10) viable bacteria per two grams of feces. This procedure did not affect the original microbiota composition in terms of viability, distribution and proportions, as assessed by a phylogenetic metagenomic approach. Obtaining the fecal microbiota by concentration and separation of the microorganisms from the rest of the stool components would allow the standardization of its recovery and its long-term preservation. FMT or similar microbiota restoration therapies could be used for the treatment of several disorders, or even for aesthetic purposes, so the method described in our work may contribute to the setting of the basis for the development of safe and standardized products.

  1. A diverse group of small circular ssDNA viral genomes in human and non-human primate stools

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Zhang, Wen; Sachsenröder, Jana; Kondov, Nikola O.; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Vega, Everardo; Holtz, Lori R.; Wu, Guang; Wang, David; Stine, Colin O.; Antonio, Martin; Mulvaney, Usha S.; Muench, Marcus O.; Deng, Xutao; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Pothier, Pierre; Vinjé, Jan; Delwart, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics sequencing of fecal samples from outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis from the US revealed the presence of small circular ssDNA viral genomes encoding a replication initiator protein (Rep). Viral genomes were ∼2.5 kb in length, with bi-directionally oriented Rep and capsid (Cap) encoding genes and a stem loop structure downstream of Rep. Several genomes showed evidence of recombination. By digital screening of an in-house virome database (1.04 billion reads) using BLAST, we identified closely related sequences from cases of unexplained diarrhea in France. Deep sequencing and PCR detected such genomes in 7 of 25 US (28 percent) and 14 of 21 French outbreaks (67 percent). One of eighty-five sporadic diarrhea cases in the Gambia was positive by PCR. Twenty-two complete genomes were characterized showing that viruses from patients in the same outbreaks were closely related suggesting common origins. Similar genomes were also characterized from the stools of captive chimpanzees, a gorilla, a black howler monkey, and a lemur that were more diverse than the human stool-associated genomes. The name smacovirus is proposed for this monophyletic viral clade. Possible tropism include mammalian enteric cells or ingested food components such as infected plants. No evidence of viral amplification was found in immunodeficient mice orally inoculated with smacovirus-positive stool supernatants. A role for smacoviruses in diarrhea, if any, remains to be demonstrated. PMID:27774288

  2. Evaluating treatments in health care: The instability of a one-legged stool

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both scientists and the public routinely refer to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as being the 'gold standard' of scientific evidence. Although there is no question that placebo-controlled RCTs play a significant role in the evaluation of new pharmaceutical treatments, especially when it is important to rule out placebo effects, they have many inherent limitations which constrain their ability to inform medical decision making. The purpose of this paper is to raise questions about over-reliance on RCTs and to point out an additional perspective for evaluating healthcare evidence, as embodied in the Hill criteria. The arguments presented here are generally relevant to all areas of health care, though mental health applications provide the primary context for this essay. Discussion This article first traces the history of RCTs, and then evaluates five of their major limitations: they often lack external validity, they have the potential for increasing health risk in the general population, they are no less likely to overestimate treatment effects than many other methods, they make a relatively weak contribution to clinical practice, and they are excessively expensive (leading to several additional vulnerabilities in the quality of evidence produced). Next, the nine Hill criteria are presented and discussed as a richer approach to the evaluation of health care treatments. Reliance on these multi-faceted criteria requires more analytical thinking than simply examining RCT data, but will also enhance confidence in the evaluation of novel treatments. Summary Excessive reliance on RCTs tends to stifle funding of other types of research, and publication of other forms of evidence. We call upon our research and clinical colleagues to consider additional methods of evaluating data, such as the Hill criteria. Over-reliance on RCTs is similar to resting all of health care evidence on a one-legged stool. PMID:21569350

  3. Molecular Detection of Eukaryotes in a Single Human Stool Sample from Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Ibrahim; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier; Bittar, Fadi

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial eukaryotes represent an important component of the human gut microbiome, with different beneficial or harmful roles; some species are commensal or mutualistic, whereas others are opportunistic or parasitic. The diversity of eukaryotes inhabiting humans remains relatively unexplored because of either the low abundance of these organisms in human gut or because they have received limited attention from a whole-community perspective. Methodology/Principal Finding In this study, a single fecal sample from a healthy African male was studied using both culture-dependent methods and extended molecular methods targeting the 18S rRNA and ITS sequences. Our results revealed that very few fungi, including Candida spp., Galactomyces spp., and Trichosporon asahii, could be isolated using culture-based methods. In contrast, a relatively a high number of eukaryotic species could be identified in this fecal sample when culture-independent methods based on various primer sets were used. A total of 27 species from one sample were found among the 977 analyzed clones. The clone libraries were dominated by fungi (716 clones/977, 73.3%), corresponding to 16 different species. In addition, 187 sequences out of 977 (19.2%) corresponded to 9 different species of plants; 59 sequences (6%) belonged to other micro-eukaryotes in the gut, including Entamoeba hartmanni and Blastocystis sp; and only 15 clones/977 (1.5%) were related to human 18S rRNA sequences. Conclusion Our results revealed a complex eukaryotic community in the volunteer’s gut, with fungi being the most abundant species in the stool sample. Larger investigations are needed to assess the generality of these results and to understand their roles in human health and disease. PMID:22808282

  4. [Comparative studies of sera from cattle with complete leukemia virus and glycoprotein antigens].

    PubMed

    Mateva, V; Vasileva, L

    1980-01-01

    One hundred cattle serums were investigated by the AGTD-test with two antigens: an antigen produced by the whole virus and an antigen containing glycoproteins. Of all serums studied 44 showed a specific precipitation in case the glycoprotein antigen was used. In case the antigen from the whole virus was used 41 serums showed a specific precipitation line, while in 3 of the serums two precipitation lines were observed. Fifty six serums proved negative, containing no antibodies against bovine leucosis virus, after antigens were used. In 2 of the serums non specific precipitation lines were obtained when the antigen from whole virus was used. the precipitation lines produced by both antigenes did not differ in intensity and time of manifestation. PMID:6251597

  5. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  6. Circulating filarial antigen detection in brugian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Praveen Kumar; Mahajan, Ramesh Chander; Malla, Nancy; Mewara, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Shailja Misra; Shenoy, Ranganatha Krishna; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major cause of disability globally. The success of global elimination programmes for LF depends upon effectiveness of tools for diagnosis and treatment. In this study on stage-specific antigen detection in brugian filariasis, L3, adult worm (AW) and microfilarial antigenaemia were detected in around 90-95% of microfilariae carriers (MF group), 50-70% of adenolymphangitis (ADL) patients, 10-25% of chronic pathology (CP) patients and 10-15% of endemic normal (EN) controls. The sensitivity of the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detection in serum samples from MF group was up to 95%. In sera from ADL patients, unexpectedly, less antigen reactivity was observed. In CP group all the CFA positive individuals were from CP grade I and II only and none from grade III or IV, suggesting that with chronicity the AWs lose fecundity and start to disintegrate and die. Amongst EN subject, 10-15% had CFA indicating that few of them harbour filarial AWs, thus they might not be truly immune as has been conventionally believed. The specificity for antigen detection was 100% when tested with sera from various other protozoan and non-filarial helminthic infections.

  7. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ngoepe, Ernest; Fehlner-Gardiner, Christine; Wandeler, Alex; Sabeta, Claude

    2014-01-01

    There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns o