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Sample records for strand breaks dna

  1. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  2. Error-Prone Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kasey; McVey, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Preserving the integrity of the DNA double helix is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability. Therefore, DNA double-strand breaks represent a serious threat to cells. In this review, we describe the two major strategies used to repair double strand breaks: non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination, emphasizing the mutagenic aspects of each. We focus on emerging evidence that homologous recombination, long thought to be an error-free repair process, can in fact be highly mutagenic, particularly in contexts requiring large amounts of DNA synthesis. Recent investigations have begun to illuminate the molecular mechanisms by which error-prone double-strand break repair can create major genomic changes, such as translocations and complex chromosome rearrangements. We highlight these studies and discuss proposed models that may explain some of the more extreme genetic changes observed in human cancers and congenital disorders.

  3. A method for assessing strand breaks in DNA.

    PubMed

    Peng, L; Brisco, M J; Morley, A A

    1998-08-15

    A simple method has been developed to assess strand breaks in extracted DNA. The method uses the enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TDT) to incorporate labeled deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) in the presence of dideoxy-CTP (ddCTP) which is added to ensure that the reaction goes to completion. Following development of the method, the extent of DNA degradation in 21 blood or bone marrow samples, which had varying degrees of DNA degradation, was measured by the TDT assay, by gel electrophoresis, or by a laborious PCR-based method which quantifies the number of amplifiable N-ras targets in a sample. The TDT assay was more sensitive at detecting strand breaks than electrophoresis and there was good correlation between the results of the TDT assay and the N-ras assay. The TDT assay was also used to demonstrate the development of strand breaks during induced apoptosis. The TDT assay is thus a simple and semiquantitative method to study strand breaks produced by DNA damage.

  4. DNA ligase III acts as a DNA strand break sensor in the cellular orchestration of DNA strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Ismail; Poirier, Guy G.; Hendzel, Michael J.; Weinfeld, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the current model of DNA SSBR, PARP1 is regarded as the sensor of single-strand breaks (SSBs). However, biochemical studies have implicated LIG3 as another possible SSB sensor. Using a laser micro-irradiation protocol that predominantly generates SSBs, we were able to demonstrate that PARP1 is dispensable for the accumulation of different single-strand break repair (SSBR) proteins at sites of DNA damage in live cells. Furthermore, we show in live cells for the first time that LIG3 plays a role in mediating the accumulation of the SSBR proteins XRCC1 and PNKP at sites of DNA damage. Importantly, the accumulation of LIG3 at sites of DNA damage did not require the BRCT domain-mediated interaction with XRCC1. We were able to show that the N-terminal ZnF domain of LIG3 plays a key role in the enzyme's SSB sensing function. Finally, we provide cellular evidence that LIG3 and not PARP1 acts as the sensor for DNA damage caused by the topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan. Our results support the existence of a second damage-sensing mechanism in SSBR involving the detection of nicks in the genome by LIG3. PMID:25539916

  5. Electromagnetic fields and the induction of DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Gómez, Miguel J; Martínez-Morillo, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified the extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) as "possible carcinogenic" based on the reported effects. The purpose of this work is to review and compare the recent findings related to the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA-SB) by magnetic field (MF) exposure. We found 29 studies (genotoxic and epigenetic) about the induction of DNA-SB by MF. 50% showed effect of MF and 50% showed no DNA-SB. Nevertheless, considering only genotoxic or only epigenetic studies, 37.5% and 69.2% found induction of DNA-SB by MF, respectively. In relation to these data it seems that MF could act as a co-inductor of DNA damage rather than as a genotoxic agent per se. Nevertheless, the published results, in some cases conflicting with negative findings, do not facilitate to obtain a common consensus about MF effects and biophysical interaction mechanisms.

  6. Nucleolar responses to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-29

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is key to prevent transformation and disease. The cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, primarily orchestrated by the ATM/ATR kinases is one of many mechanisms that serve to uphold genome stability and homeostasis. Upon detection of double-strand breaks (DSBs), several signaling cascades are activated to halt cell cycle progression and initiate repair. Furthermore, the DNA damage response (DDR) controls cellular processes such as transcription, splicing and metabolism. Recent studies have uncovered aspects of how the DDR operates within nucleoli. It appears that the DDR controls transcription in the nucleoli, not only when DNA breaks occur in the rDNA repeats, but also when a nuclear DDR is activated. In addition, we have gained first insights into how repair of DSBs is organized in the nucleolus. Collectively, these recent studies provide a more comprehensive picture of how the DDR regulates basic cellular functions to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we will summarize recent findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of how the DDR regulates transcription and repair in the nucleolus.

  7. Nucleolar responses to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is key to prevent transformation and disease. The cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, primarily orchestrated by the ATM/ATR kinases is one of many mechanisms that serve to uphold genome stability and homeostasis. Upon detection of double-strand breaks (DSBs), several signaling cascades are activated to halt cell cycle progression and initiate repair. Furthermore, the DNA damage response (DDR) controls cellular processes such as transcription, splicing and metabolism. Recent studies have uncovered aspects of how the DDR operates within nucleoli. It appears that the DDR controls transcription in the nucleoli, not only when DNA breaks occur in the rDNA repeats, but also when a nuclear DDR is activated. In addition, we have gained first insights into how repair of DSBs is organized in the nucleolus. Collectively, these recent studies provide a more comprehensive picture of how the DDR regulates basic cellular functions to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we will summarize recent findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of how the DDR regulates transcription and repair in the nucleolus. PMID:26615196

  8. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity.

  9. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity. PMID:25960340

  10. Do DNA Double-Strand Breaks Drive Aging?

    PubMed

    White, Ryan R; Vijg, Jan

    2016-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rare, but highly toxic, lesions requiring orchestrated and conserved machinery to prevent adverse consequences, such as cell death and cancer-causing genome structural mutations. DSBs trigger the DNA damage response (DDR) that directs a cell to repair the break, undergo apoptosis, or become senescent. There is increasing evidence that the various endpoints of DSB processing by different cells and tissues are part of the aging phenotype, with each stage of the DDR associated with specific aging pathologies. In this Perspective, we discuss the possibility that DSBs are major drivers of intrinsic aging, highlighting the dynamics of spontaneous DSBs in relation to aging, the distinct age-related pathologies induced by DSBs, and the segmental progeroid phenotypes in humans and mice with genetic defects in DSB repair. A model is presented as to how DSBs could drive some of the basic mechanisms underlying age-related functional decline and death. PMID:27588601

  11. Repair of DNA double strand breaks: in vivo biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) can cause damage to the genomic integrity of a cell as well as initiate genetic recombination processes. The HO and I-SceI endonucleases from budding yeast have provided a way to study these events by inducing a unique DSB in vivo under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter. The GAL::HO construct has been used extensively to study processes such as nonhomologous end joining, intra- and interchromosomal gene conversion, single strand annealing and break-induced recombination. Synchronously induced DSBs have also been important in the study of the DNA damage checkpoint, adaptation, and recovery pathways of yeast. This chapter describes methods of using GAL::HO to physically monitor the progression of events following a DSB, specifically the events leading to the switching of mating type by gene conversion of MAT using the silent donors at HML and HMR. Southern blot analysis can be used to follow the overall events in this process such as the formation of the DSB and product. Denaturing alkaline gels and slot blot techniques can be employed to follow the 5' to 3' resection of DNA starting at the DSB. After resection, the 3' tail initiates a homology search and then strand invades its homologous sequence at the donor cassette. Polymerase chain reaction is an important means to assay strand invasion and the priming of new DNA synthesis as well as the completion of gene conversion. Methods such as chromatin immunoprecipitation have provided a means to study many proteins that associate with a DSB, including not only recombination proteins, but also proteins involved in nonhomologous end joining, cell cycle arrest, chromatin remodeling, cohesin function, and mismatch repair.

  12. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Ade, Catherine M.; Ortego, Jonathan C.; Stark, Jeremy; Deininger, Prescott L.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR) and single strand annealing (SSA), which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the “error prone” non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair. PMID:26966913

  13. Entropy in DNA Double-Strand Break, Detection and Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Schindler, Christina; Heermann, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    In biology, the term entropy is often understood as a measure of disorder - a restrictive interpretation that can even be misleading. Recently it has become clearer and clearer that entropy, contrary to conventional wisdom, can help to order and guide biological processes in living cells. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most dangerous lesions and efficient damage detection and repair is essential for organism viability. However, what remains unknown is the precise mechanism of targeting the site of damage within billions of intact nucleotides and a crowded nuclear environment, a process which is often referred to as recruitment or signaling. Here we show that the change in entropy associated with inflicting a DSB facilitates the recruitment of damage sensor proteins. By means of computational modeling we found that higher mobility and local chromatin structure accelerate protein association at DSB ends. We compared the effect of different chromatin architectures on protein dynamics and concentrations in the vicinity of DSBs, and related these results to experiments on repair in heterochromatin. Our results demonstrate how entropy contributes to a more efficient damage detection. We identify entropy as the physical basis for DNA double-strand break signaling.

  14. Chromatin modifications and DNA repair: beyond double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    House, Nealia C. M.; Koch, Melissa R.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair must take place in the context of chromatin, and chromatin modifications and DNA repair are intimately linked. The study of double-strand break repair has revealed numerous histone modifications that occur after induction of a DSB, and modification of the repair factors themselves can also occur. In some cases the function of the modification is at least partially understood, but in many cases it is not yet clear. Although DSB repair is a crucial activity for cell survival, DSBs account for only a small percentage of the DNA lesions that occur over the lifetime of a cell. Repair of single-strand gaps, nicks, stalled forks, alternative DNA structures, and base lesions must also occur in a chromatin context. There is increasing evidence that these repair pathways are also regulated by histone modifications and chromatin remodeling. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of chromatin modifications that occur during non-DSB repair, highlighting similarities and differences to DSB repair as well as remaining questions. PMID:25250043

  15. DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Tomas; Baer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Since DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contribute to the genomic instability that drives cancer development, DSB repair pathways serve as important mechanisms for tumor suppression. Thus, genetic lesions, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, that disrupt DSB repair are often associated with cancer susceptibility. In addition, recent evidence suggests that DSB “mis-repair”, in which DSBs are resolved by an inappropriate repair pathway, can also promote genomic instability and presumably tumorigenesis. This notion has gained currency from recent cancer genome sequencing studies which have uncovered numerous chromosomal rearrangements harboring pathological DNA repair signatures. In this perspective, we discuss the factors that regulate DSB repair pathway choice and their consequences for genome stability and cancer. PMID:24746645

  16. DNA strand breaks (comet assay) in blood lymphocytes from wild bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard F; Bulski, Karrie; Adams, Jeffrey D; Peden-Adams, Margie; Bossart, Gregory D; King, Lydia; Fair, Patricia A

    2013-12-15

    The comet assay was carried out on blood lymphocytes from a large number of wild dolphins (71 from Indian River Lagoon, FL, USA; 51 from Charleston Harbor, SC, USA) and provides a baseline study of DNA strand breaks in wild dolphin populations. There were no significant differences in the comet assay (% DNA in tail) results between the different age and sex categories. Significant difference in DNA strand breaks were found between Charleston Harbor dolphins (median--17.4% DNA in tail) and Indian River Lagoon dolphins (median--14.0% DNA in tail). A strong correlation found between T-cell proliferation and DNA strand breaks in dolphin lymphocytes suggests that dolphins with a high numbers of DNA strand breaks have a decreased ability to respond to infection. Higher concentrations of genotoxic agents in Charleston Harbor compared with Indian River lagoon may have been one of the causes of higher DNA strand breaks in these dolphins.

  17. Buried territories: heterochromatic response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi-Li; Xiang, Ji-Feng; Kong, Na; Cai, Xiu-Jun; Xie, An-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious type of DNA damage, is highly influenced by higher-order chromatin structure in eukaryotic cells. Compared with euchromatin, the compacted structure of heterochromatin not only protects heterochromatic DNA from damage, but also adds an extra layer of control over the response to DSBs occurring in heterochromatin. One key step in this response is the decondensation of heterochromatin structure. This decondensation process facilitates the DNA damage signaling and promotes proper heterochromatic DSB repair, thus helping to prevent instability of heterochromatic regions of genomes. This review will focus on the functions of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling cascade involving ATM, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein-1 (KAP-1), tat-interacting protein 60 (Tip60), and many other protein factors in DSB-induced decondensation of heterochromatin and subsequent repair of heterochromatic DSBs. As some subsets of DSBs may be repaired in heterochromatin independently of the ATM signaling, a possible repair model is also proposed for ATM-independent repair of these heterochromatic DSBs.

  18. Double-strand breaks from a radical commonly produced by DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Taverna Porro, Marisa L; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-04-20

    Double-strand breaks are widely accepted to be the most toxic form of DNA damage. Molecules that produce double-strand breaks via a single chemical event are typically very cytotoxic and far less common than those that form single-strand breaks. It was recently reported that a commonly formed C4'-radical produces double-strand breaks under aerobic conditions. Experiments described herein indicate that a peroxyl radical initiates strand damage on the complementary strand via C4'-hydrogen atom abstraction. Inferential evidence suggests that a C3'-peroxyl radical induces complementary strand damage more efficiently than does a C4'-peroxyl radical. Complementary strand hydrogen atom abstraction by the peroxyl radical is efficiently quenched by thiols. This mechanism could contribute to the higher than expected yield of double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation.

  19. Sources of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Models of Recombinational DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anuja; Haber, James E.

    2014-01-01

    DNA is subject to many endogenous and exogenous insults that impair DNA replication and proper chromosome segregation. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most toxic of these lesions and must be repaired to preserve chromosomal integrity. Eukaryotes are equipped with several different, but related, repair mechanisms involving homologous recombination, including single-strand annealing, gene conversion, and break-induced replication. In this review, we highlight the chief sources of DSBs and crucial requirements for each of these repair processes, as well as the methods to identify and study intermediate steps in DSB repair by homologous recombination. PMID:25104768

  20. Evidence that single-stranded DNA breaks are a normal feature of koala sperm chromatin, while double-stranded DNA breaks are indicative of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zee, Yeng Peng; López-Fernández, Carmen; Arroyo, F; Johnston, Stephen D; Holt, William V; Gosalvez, Jaime

    2009-08-01

    In this study, we have used single and double comet assays to differentiate between single- and double-stranded DNA damage in an effort to refine the interpretation of DNA damage in mature koala spermatozoa. We have also investigated the likelihood that single-stranded DNA breakage is part of the natural spermiogenic process in koalas, where its function would be the generation of structural bends in the DNA molecule so that appropriate packaging and compaction can occur. Koala spermatozoa were examined using the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCDt) and comet assays to investigate non-orthodox double-stranded DNA. Comet assays were conducted under 1) neutral conditions; and 2) neutral followed by alkaline conditions (double comet assay); the latter technique enabled simultaneous visualisation of both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA breaks. Following the SCDt, there was a continuum of nuclear morphotypes, ranging from no apparent DNA fragmentation to those with highly dispersed and degraded chromatin. Dispersion morphotypes were mirrored by a similar diversity of comet morphologies that could be further differentiated using the double comet assay. The majority of koala spermatozoa had nuclei with DNA abasic-like residues that produced single-tailed comets following the double comet assay. The ubiquity of these residues suggests that constitutive alkali-labile sites are part of the structural configuration of the koala sperm nucleus. Spermatozoa with 'true' DNA fragmentation exhibited a continuum of comet morphologies, ranging from a more severe form of alkaline-susceptible DNA with a diffuse single tail to nuclei that exhibited both single- and double-stranded breaks with two comet tails. PMID:19494045

  1. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks. PMID:27652321

  2. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks.

  3. DNA Strand Breaks in Mitotic Germ Cells of Caenorhabditis elegans Evaluated by Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sojin; Choi, Seoyun; Ahn, Byungchan

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage responses are important for the maintenance of genome stability and the survival of organisms. Such responses are activated in the presence of DNA damage and lead to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. In Caenorhabditis elegans, double-strand breaks induced by DNA damaging agents have been detected indirectly by antibodies against DSB recognizing proteins. In this study we used a comet assay to detect DNA strand breaks and to measure the elimination of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. We found that C. elegans brc-1 mutants were more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin than the N2 wild-type strain and repaired DNA strand breaks less efficiently than N2. This study is the first demonstration of direct measurement of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. This newly developed assay can be applied to detect DNA strand breaks in different C. elegans mutants that are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. PMID:26903030

  4. DNA Strand Breaks in Mitotic Germ Cells of Caenorhabditis elegans Evaluated by Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Sojin; Choi, Seoyun; Ahn, Byungchan

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage responses are important for the maintenance of genome stability and the survival of organisms. Such responses are activated in the presence of DNA damage and lead to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. In Caenorhabditis elegans, double-strand breaks induced by DNA damaging agents have been detected indirectly by antibodies against DSB recognizing proteins. In this study we used a comet assay to detect DNA strand breaks and to measure the elimination of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. We found that C. elegans brc-1 mutants were more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin than the N2 wild-type strain and repaired DNA strand breaks less efficiently than N2. This study is the first demonstration of direct measurement of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. This newly developed assay can be applied to detect DNA strand breaks in different C. elegans mutants that are sensitive to DNA damaging agents.

  5. DNA Double-Strand Break Rejoining in Complex Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Kuehne, Martin; Fricke, Andreas

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The clinical radiation responses of different organs vary widely and likely depend on the intrinsic radiosensitivities of their different cell populations. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the cells' capacity to rejoin radiation-induced DSBs is known to affect their intrinsic radiosensitivity. To date, only little is known about the induction and processing of radiation-induced DSBs in complex normal tissues. Using an in vivo model with repair-proficient mice, the highly sensitive {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence was established to investigate whether differences in DSB rejoining could account for the substantial differences in clinical radiosensitivity observed among normal tissues. Methods and Materials: After whole body irradiation of C57BL/6 mice (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy), the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed by enumerating {gamma}H2AX foci in various organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding (lung, brain, heart, kidney) tissues. Results: The linear dose correlation observed in all analyzed tissues indicated that {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence allows for the accurate quantification of DSBs in complex organs. Strikingly, the various normal tissues exhibited identical kinetics for {gamma}H2AX foci loss, despite their clearly different clinical radiation responses. Conclusion: The identical kinetics of DSB rejoining measured in different organs suggest that tissue-specific differences in radiation responses are independent of DSB rejoining. This finding emphasizes the fundamental role of DSB repair in maintaining genomic integrity, thereby contributing to cellular viability and functionality and, thus, tissue homeostasis.

  6. Low concentration of arsenite exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Xujun; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Wenlan; Timmins, Graham S.; Liu Kejian

    2008-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated arsenic exposure with many types of human cancers. Arsenic has also been shown to act as a co-carcinogen even at low concentrations. However, the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is unknown. Recent studies indicate that arsenic can interfere with DNA-repair processes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 is a zinc-finger DNA-repair protein, which can promptly sense DNA strand breaks and initiate DNA-repair pathways. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low concentrations of arsenic could inhibit PAPR-1 activity and so exacerbate levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA strand breaks. HaCat cells were treated with arsenite and/or UVR, and then DNA strand breaks were assessed by comet assay. Low concentrations of arsenite ({<=} 2 {mu}M) alone did not induce significant DNA strand breaks, but greatly enhanced the DNA strand breaks induced by UVR. Further studies showed that 2 {mu}M arsenite effectively inhibited PARP-1 activity. Zinc supplementation of arsenite-treated cells restored PARP-1 activity and significantly diminished the exacerbating effect of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA strand breaks. Importantly, neither arsenite treatment, nor zinc supplementation changed UVR-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, suggesting that their effects upon UVR-induced DNA strand breaks are not through a direct free radical mechanism. Combination treatments of arsenite with PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide or PARP-1 siRNA demonstrate that PARP-1 is the target of arsenite. Together, these findings show that arsenite at low concentration exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity, which may represent an important mechanism underlying the co-carcinogenicity of arsenic.

  7. Protein ADP-ribosylation and the cellular response to DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Caldecott, K W

    2014-07-01

    DNA strand breaks arise continuously in cells and can lead to chromosome rearrangements and genome instability or cell death. The commonest DNA breaks are DNA single-strand breaks, which arise at a frequency of tens-of-thousands per cell each day and which can block the progression of RNA/DNA polymerases and disrupt gene transcription and genome duplication. If not rapidly repaired, SSBs can be converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during genome duplication, eliciting a complex series of DNA damage responses that attempt to protect cells from irreversible replication fork collapse. DSBs are the most cytotoxic and clastogenic type of DNA breaks, and can also arise independently of DNA replication, albeit at a frequency several orders of magnitude lower than SSBs. Here, I discuss the evidence that DNA single- and double -strand break repair pathways, and cellular tolerance mechanisms for protecting replication forks during genome duplication, utilize signalling by protein ADP-ribosyltransferases to protect cells from the harmful impact of DNA strand breakage.

  8. A kinetic analysis of strand breaks on large DNA induced by cigarette smoke extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Takata, Tatsuya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We report a kinetic analysis of strand breakages on large DNA molecules induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE), an extract of soluble cigarette smoke components. Previously, this DNA damage was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, whereas we used fluorescence to kinetically analyze damage to individual DNA molecules. CSE caused a marked change in length of DNA molecules. The rate of CSE-induced double-strand breakage on large random-coiled DNA molecules was determined using a simple theoretical model, allowing the facile estimation of the rate of double-strand breaks on large DNA molecules.

  9. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, Viliam; Čuba, Václav; Grisham, Michael E; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J

    2015-04-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugars, and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9-nm (26.5 eV) radiation provided by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Doses up to 45 kGy were delivered with a repetition rate of 3 Hz. We studied the dependence of the yield of SSBs and DSBs of a simple model of DNA molecule (pBR322) on the CDL pulse fluence. Agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. The action cross sections of the single- and double-strand breaks of pBR322 plasmid DNA in solid state were determined. We observed an increase in the efficiency of strand-break induction in the supercoiled DNA as a function of laser pulse fluence. Results are compared to those acquired at synchrotron radiation facilities and other sources of extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation.

  10. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, Viliam; Čuba, Václav; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2015-04-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugars, and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9-nm (26.5 eV) radiation provided by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Doses up to 45 kGy were delivered with a repetition rate of 3 Hz. We studied the dependence of the yield of SSBs and DSBs of a simple model of DNA molecule (pBR322) on the CDL pulse fluence. Agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. The action cross sections of the single- and double-strand breaks of pBR322 plasmid DNA in solid state were determined. We observed an increase in the efficiency of strand-break induction in the supercoiled DNA as a function of laser pulse fluence. Results are compared to those acquired at synchrotron radiation facilities and other sources of extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation.

  11. DNA phosphorothioate modifications influence the global transcriptional response and protect DNA from double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Rui; Wu, Xiaolin; He, Wei; Liu, Zhenhua; Wu, Shuangju; Chen, Chao; Chen, Si; Xiang, Qianrong; Deng, Zixin; Liang, Dequan; Chen, Shi; Wang, Lianrong

    2014-01-01

    The modification of DNA by phosphorothioate (PT) occurs when the non-bridging oxygen in the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA is replaced with sulfur. This DNA backbone modification was recently discovered and is governed by the dndABCDE genes in a diverse group of bacteria and archaea. However, the biological function of DNA PT modifications is poorly understood. In this study, we employed the RNA-seq analysis to characterize the global transcriptional changes in response to PT modifications. Our results show that DNA without PT protection is susceptible to DNA damage caused by the dndFGHI gene products. The DNA double-stranded breaks then trigger the SOS response, cell filamentation and prophage induction. Heterologous expression of dndBCDE conferring DNA PT modifications at GPSA and GPST prevented the damage in Salmonella enterica. Our data provide insights into the physiological role of the DNA PT system. PMID:25319634

  12. Multiple pathways of DNA double-strand break processing in a mutant Indian muntjac cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, S.D.; Jha, B.; Johnson, R.T. )

    1990-09-01

    DNA break processing is compared in the Indian muntjac cell lines, SVM and DM. The initial frequencies and resealing of X-ray generated single- and double-strand breaks are similar in the two cell lines. Inhibiting the repair of UV damage leads to greater double-strand breakage in SVM than in DM, and some of these breaks are not repaired; however, repair-associated single-strand breakage and resealing are normal. Dimethylsulfate also induces excess double-strand breakage in SVM, and these breaks are irreparable. Restricted plasmids are reconstituted correctly in SVM at approximately 30% of the frequency observed in DM. Thus SVM has a reduced capacity to repair certain types of double-strand break. This defect is not due to a DNA ligase deficiency. We conclude that DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by a variety of pathways within mammalian cells and that the structure of the break or its mode of formation determines its subsequent fate.

  13. Single-stranded DNA orchestrates an ATM-to-ATR switch at DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Bunsyo; Zou, Lee

    2009-03-13

    ATM and ATR are two master checkpoint kinases activated by double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). ATM is critical for the initial response and the subsequent ATR activation. Here we show that ATR activation is coupled with loss of ATM activation, an unexpected ATM-to-ATR switch during the biphasic DSB response. ATM is activated by DSBs with blunt ends or short single-stranded overhangs (SSOs). Surprisingly, the activation of ATM in the presence of SSOs, like that of ATR, relies on single- and double-stranded DNA junctions. In a length-dependent manner, SSOs attenuate ATM activation and potentiate ATR activation through a swap of DNA-damage sensors. Progressive resection of DSBs directly promotes the ATM-to-ATR switch in vitro. In cells, the ATM-to-ATR switch is driven by both ATM and the nucleases participating in DSB resection. Thus, single-stranded DNA orchestrates ATM and ATR to function in an orderly and reciprocal manner in two distinct phases of DSB response.

  14. Specific local induction of DNA strand breaks by infrared multi-photon absorption

    PubMed Central

    Träutlein, D.; Deibler, M.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Ferrando-May, E.

    2010-01-01

    Highly confined DNA damage by femtosecond laser irradiation currently arises as a powerful tool to understand DNA repair in live cells as a function of space and time. However, the specificity with respect to damage type is limited. Here, we present an irradiation procedure based on a widely tunable Er/Yb : fiber femtosecond laser source that favors the formation of DNA strand breaks over that of UV photoproducts by more than one order of magnitude. We explain this selectivity with the different power dependence of the reactions generating strand breaks, mainly involving reactive radical intermediates, and the direct photochemical process leading to UV-photoproducts. Thus, localized multi-photon excitation with a wavelength longer than 1 µm allows for the selective production of DNA strand breaks at sub-micrometer spatial resolution in the absence of photosensitizers. PMID:19906733

  15. Quantitative assay of photoinduced DNA strand breaks by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wiczk, Justyna; Westphal, Kinga; Rak, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) - a modern methodology primarily used for studying gene expression has been employed for the quantitative assay of an important class of DNA damage - single strand breaks. These DNA lesions which may lead to highly cytotoxic double strand breaks were quantified in a model system where double stranded DNA was sensitized to UV photons by labeling with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The amount of breaks formed due to irradiation with several doses of 320nm photons was assayed by two independent methods: LC-MS and qPCR. A very good agreement between the relative damage measured by the two completely different analytical tools proves the applicability of qPCR for the quantitative analysis of SSBs. Our results suggest that the popularity of the hitherto underestimated though accurate and site-specific technique of real-time PCR may increase in future DNA damage studies.

  16. High-throughput detection of DNA double-strand breaks using image cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Tyler L.; Bailey, Alison M.; Bednarz, Bryan P.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of γH2AX expression for studying DNA double-strand break formation is often performed by manual counting of foci using immunofluorescence microscopy, an approach that is laborious and subject to significant foci selection bias. Here we present a novel high-throughput method for detecting DNA double-strand breaks using automated image cytometry assessment of cell average γH2AX immunofluorescence. Our technique provides an expedient, high-throughput, objective, and cost-effective method for γH2AX analysis. PMID:25605579

  17. DNA double-strand-break sensitivity, DNA replication, and cell cycle arrest phenotypes of Ku-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Georjana; Rio, Donald

    1997-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku heterodimer is involved in DNA double-strand-break recognition and repair. We have established in yeast a connection between Ku activity and DNA double-strand-break damage repair, and a connection between Ku activity and commitment to DNA replication. We generated double-stranded DNA breaks in yeast cells in vivo by expressing a restriction endonuclease and have shown that yeast mutants lacking Ku p70 activity died while isogenic wild-type cells did not. Moreover, we have discovered that DNA damage occurs spontaneously during normal yeast mitotic growth, and that Ku functions in repair of this damage. We also observed that mitotically growing Ku p70 mutants have an anomalously high DNA content, suggesting a role for Ku in regulation of DNA synthesis. Finally, we present evidence that Ku p70 function is conserved between yeast, Drosophila, and humans. PMID:9023348

  18. Biochemical studies of DNA strand break repair and molecular characterization of mei-41, a gene involved in DNA break repair

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to repair X-irradiation induced single-strand DNA breaks was examined in mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis demonstrated that examined stocks possess a normal capacity to repair X-ray induced single-strand breaks. One of the mutants in this study, mei-41, has been shown to be involved in a number of DNA metabolizing functions. A molecular characterization of this mutant is presented. A cDNA hybridizing to genomic DNA both proximal and distal to a P element inducing a mei-41 mutation was isolated from both embryonic and adult female recombinant lambda phage libraries. A 2.2 kilobase embryonic cDNA clone was sequenced; the sequence of an open reading frame was identified which would predict a protein of 384 amino acids with a molecular weight of 43,132 daltons. An examination of homologies to sequences in protein and nucleic acid data bases revealed no sequences with significant homology to mei-41, however, two potential Zinc-finger domains were identified. Analysis of RNA hybridizing to the embryonic cDNA demonstrated the existence of a major 2.2 kilobase transcript expressed primarily in embryos and adult flies. An examination of the transcription of this gene in mei-41 mutants revealed significant variation from wild-type, an indication that the embryonic cDNA does represent a mei-41 transcript. Expression in tissues from adult animals demonstrated that the 2.2 kilobase RNA is expressed primarily in reproductive tissues. A 3.8kb transcript is the major species of RNA in the adult head and thorax. Evidence is presented which implies that expression of the mei-41 gene is strongly induced by exposure of certain cells to mutagens.

  19. Single-cell microarray enables high-throughput evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weingeist, David M.; Ge, Jing; Wood, David K.; Mutamba, James T.; Huang, Qiuying; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Floyd, Scott; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2013-01-01

    A key modality of non-surgical cancer management is DNA damaging therapy that causes DNA double-strand breaks that are preferentially toxic to rapidly dividing cancer cells. Double-strand break repair capacity is recognized as an important mechanism in drug resistance and is therefore a potential target for adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, spontaneous and environmentally induced DSBs are known to promote cancer, making DSB evaluation important as a tool in epidemiology, clinical evaluation and in the development of novel pharmaceuticals. Currently available assays to detect double-strand breaks are limited in throughput and specificity and offer minimal information concerning the kinetics of repair. Here, we present the CometChip, a 96-well platform that enables assessment of double-strand break levels and repair capacity of multiple cell types and conditions in parallel and integrates with standard high-throughput screening and analysis technologies. We demonstrate the ability to detect multiple genetic deficiencies in double-strand break repair and evaluate a set of clinically relevant chemical inhibitors of one of the major double-strand break repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining. While other high-throughput repair assays measure residual damage or indirect markers of damage, the CometChip detects physical double-strand breaks, providing direct measurement of damage induction and repair capacity, which may be useful in developing and implementing treatment strategies with reduced side effects. PMID:23422001

  20. FEN1 participates in repair of the 5'-phosphotyrosyl terminus of DNA single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yukiko; Takahata, Chiaki; Narita, Takashi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Etoposide is a widely used anticancer drug and a DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) inhibitor. Etoposide produces Top2-attached single-strand breaks (Top2-SSB complex) and double-strand breaks (Top2-DSB complex) that are thought to induce cell death in tumor cells. The Top2-SSB complex is more abundant than the Top2-DSB complex. Human tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is required for efficient repair of Top2-DSB complexes. However, the identities of the proteins involved in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes are unknown, although yeast genetic data indicate that 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease activity is required for alternative repair of Top2 DNA damage. In this study, we purified a flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) in the 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease family and synthesized single-strand break DNA substrates containing a 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond, mimicking the Top2-SSB complex. We found that FEN1 and XPG did not remove the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing DSB substrates but removed the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates. Under DNA repair conditions, FEN1 efficiently repaired the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates in the presence of DNA ligase and DNA polymerase. Therefore, FEN1 may play an important role in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes in etoposide-treated cells.

  1. INDUCTION OF DNA STRAND BREAKS BY TRIHALOMETHANES IN PRIMARY HUMAN LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract

    Trihalomethanes (TEMs) are disinfection by-products and suspected human carcinogens present in chlorinated drinking water. Previous studies have shown that many THMs induce sister chromatid exchanges and DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocyte...

  2. ANALYSIS OF IN VITRO AND IN VIVO DNA STRAND BREAKS INDUCED BY TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of In Vitro and In Vivo DNA Strand Breaks Induced by Trihalomethanes (TRMs)

    The THMs are the most widely distributed and the most concentrated of the cWorine disinfection by-products (D BPs) found in finished drinking water. All of the THMs, cWoroform (CHCI3), br...

  3. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.

  4. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-05-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data.

  5. RecG Directs DNA Synthesis during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Azeroglu, Benura; Mawer, Julia S P; Cockram, Charlotte A; White, Martin A; Hasan, A M Mahedi; Filatenkova, Milana; Leach, David R F

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination provides a mechanism of DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) that requires an intact, homologous template for DNA synthesis. When DNA synthesis associated with DSBR is convergent, the broken DNA strands are replaced and repair is accurate. However, if divergent DNA synthesis is established, over-replication of flanking DNA may occur with deleterious consequences. The RecG protein of Escherichia coli is a helicase and translocase that can re-model 3-way and 4-way DNA structures such as replication forks and Holliday junctions. However, the primary role of RecG in live cells has remained elusive. Here we show that, in the absence of RecG, attempted DSBR is accompanied by divergent DNA replication at the site of an induced chromosomal DNA double-strand break. Furthermore, DNA double-stand ends are generated in a recG mutant at sites known to block replication forks. These double-strand ends, also trigger DSBR and the divergent DNA replication characteristic of this mutant, which can explain over-replication of the terminus region of the chromosome. The loss of DNA associated with unwinding joint molecules previously observed in the absence of RuvAB and RecG, is suppressed by a helicase deficient PriA mutation (priA300), arguing that the action of RecG ensures that PriA is bound correctly on D-loops to direct DNA replication rather than to unwind joint molecules. This has led us to put forward a revised model of homologous recombination in which the re-modelling of branched intermediates by RecG plays a fundamental role in directing DNA synthesis and thus maintaining genomic stability.

  6. PARP-1 and Ku compete for repair of DNA double strand breaks by distinct NHEJ pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minli; Wu, Weizhong; Wu, Wenqi; Rosidi, Bustanur; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) recognizes DNA strand interruptions in vivo and triggers its own modification as well as that of other proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose to form polymers. This modification causes a release of PARP-1 from DNA ends and initiates a variety of responses including DNA repair. While PARP-1 has been firmly implicated in base excision and single strand break repair, its role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. Here, we show that PARP-1, probably together with DNA ligase III, operates in an alternative pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that functions as backup to the classical pathway of NHEJ that utilizes DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos and Artemis. PARP-1 binds to DNA ends in direct competition with Ku. However, in irradiated cells the higher affinity of Ku for DSBs and an excessive number of other forms of competing DNA lesions limit its contribution to DSB repair. When essential components of the classical pathway of NHEJ are absent, PARP-1 is recruited for DSB repair, particularly in the absence of Ku and non-DSB lesions. This form of DSB repair is sensitive to PARP-1 inhibitors. The results define the function of PARP-1 in DSB repair and characterize a candidate pathway responsible for joining errors causing genomic instability and cancer. PMID:17088286

  7. Interspecies differences in DNA single strand breaks caused by benzo(a)pyrene and marine environment.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Nevenka; Fafandel, Maja

    2004-08-18

    The presence of DNA single strand breaks in untreated specimens of selected species, mosquito fish Gambusia affinis, painted comber Serranus scriba, blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, spiny crab Maja crispata and sea cucumber Holothuria tubulosa as well as in 10 microg/g benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) treated mosquito fish, blue mussel and spiny crab was measured, using alkaline filter elution. Interspecies differences in alkaline elution profiles were observed and attributed to different lengths of DNA from different sources and to differences in the number of strand breaks present during normal cellular events in different phyla. Spiny crab hemocytes are more sensitive to action of BaP then blue mussel hemocytes and mosquito fish hepatocytes that could be explained by differences in the rates of distinct metabolic reactions and DNA repair among the investigated species. In field study, DNA single strand breaks were measured in hepatocytes of painted comber and in hemocytes of blue mussel and spiny crab from natural population specimens collected at eight sampling sites along Istrian coast, Croatia. Spatial variations in DNA integrity for each species were detected and revealed for the first time that spiny crab is responsive to different environmental conditions. Interspecies variations in the DNA integrity due to environmental conditions, confirmed species specific susceptibility to genotoxicity of certain environment that in long-term may modify the structure of marine communities. The multi-species approach in designing biomonitoring studies was suggested.

  8. Tetrameric Ctp1 coordinates DNA binding and bridging in DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Sara N.; Appel, C. Denise; Westmoreland, Jim; Williams, Jessica S.; Nguyen, Yvonne; Robertson, Patrick D.; Resnick, Michael A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Ctp1 (aka CtIP or Sae2) collaborates with Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 to initiate repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), but its function(s) remain enigmatic. We report that tetrameric Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ctp1 harbors multivalent DNA-binding and bridging activities. Through structural and biophysical analyses of the Ctp1 tetramer we define the salient features of Ctp1 architecture: an N-terminal interlocking tetrameric helical dimer-of-dimers (THDD) domain and a central intrinsically disordered region (IDR) linked to C-terminal “RHR” DNA interaction motifs. The THDD, IDR and RHR are required for Ctp1 DNA bridging activity in vitro and both the THDD and RHR are required for efficient DSB repair in S. pombe. Our results establish non-nucleolytic roles for Ctp1 in binding and coordination of DSB repair intermediates and suggest that ablation of human CtIP DNA binding by truncating mutations underlie the CTIP-linked Seckel and Jawad syndromes. PMID:25580577

  9. The Mechanism of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair by the Nonhomologous DNA End Joining Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks are common events in eukaryotic cells, and there are two major pathways for repairing them: homologous recombination and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ). The diverse causes of DSBs result in a diverse chemistry of DNA ends that must be repaired. Across NHEJ evolution, the enzymes of the NHEJ pathway exhibit a remarkable degree of structural tolerance in the range of DNA end substrate configurations upon which they can act. In vertebrate cells, the nuclease, polymerases and ligase of NHEJ are the most mechanistically flexible and multifunctional enzymes in each of their classes. Unlike repair pathways for more defined lesions, NHEJ repair enzymes act iteratively, act in any order, and can function independently of one another at each of the two DNA ends being joined. NHEJ is critical not only for the repair of pathologic DSBs as in chromosomal translocations, but also for the repair of physiologic DSBs created during V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination. Therefore, patients lacking normal NHEJ are not only sensitive to ionizing radiation, but also severely immunodeficient. PMID:20192759

  10. Cell transcriptional state alters genomic patterns of DNA double-strand break repair in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yong, Raymund L; Yang, Chunzhang; Lu, Jie; Wang, Huaien; Schlaff, Cody D; Tandle, Anita; Graves, Christian A; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lonser, Russell R

    2014-01-01

    The misrepair of DNA double-strand breaks in close spatial proximity within the nucleus can result in chromosomal rearrangements that are important in the pathogenesis of haematopoietic and solid malignancies. It is unknown why certain epigenetic states, such as those found in stem or progenitor cells, appear to facilitate neoplastic transformation. Here we show that altering the transcriptional state of human astrocytes alters patterns of DNA damage repair from ionizing radiation at a gene locus-specific and genome-wide level. Astrocytes induced into a reactive state exhibit increased DNA repair, compared with non-reactive cells, in actively transcribed chromatin after irradiation. In mapping these repair sites, we identify misrepair events and repair hotspots that are unique to each state. The precise characterization of genomic regions susceptible to mutation in specific transcriptional states provides new opportunities for addressing clonal evolution in solid cancers, in particular those where double-strand break induction is a cornerstone of clinical intervention. PMID:25517576

  11. Dissociative Electron Attachment to Phosphoric Acid Esters: The Direct Mechanism for Single Strand Breaks in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Constanze; Kopyra, Janina; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen

    2006-07-07

    We use dibutyl phosphate to simulate the behavior of the phosphate group in DNA towards the attack of low energy electrons. We find that the compound undergoes effective dissociative electron attachment within a low energy resonant feature at 1 eV and a further resonance peaking at 8 eV. The dissociative electron attachment (DEA) reactions are associated with the direct cleavage of the C-O and the P-O bond but also the excision of the PO{sup -}, PO{sub 3}{sup -}, H{sub 2}PO{sub 3}{sup -} units. For the phosphate group coupled in the DNA network these reactions represent single strand breaks. We hence propose that the most direct mechanism of single strand breaks occurring in DNA at subexcitation energies (<4 eV) is due to DEA directly to the phosphate group.

  12. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Edlarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  13. The cytotoxicity of (-)-lomaiviticin A arises from induction of double-strand breaks in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colis, Laureen C.; Woo, Christina M.; Hegan, Denise C.; Li, Zhenwu; Glazer, Peter M.; Herzon, Seth B.

    2014-06-01

    The metabolite (-)-lomaiviticin A, which contains two diazotetrahydrobenzo[b]fluorene (diazofluorene) functional groups, inhibits the growth of cultured human cancer cells at nanomolar-picomolar concentrations; however, the mechanism responsible for the potent cytotoxicity of this natural product is not known. Here we report that (-)-lomaiviticin A nicks and cleaves plasmid DNA by a pathway that is independent of reactive oxygen species and iron, and that the potent cytotoxicity of (-)-lomaiviticin A arises from the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs). In a plasmid cleavage assay, the ratio of single-strand breaks (ssbs) to dsbs is 5.3 ± 0.6:1. Labelling studies suggest that this cleavage occurs via a radical pathway. The structurally related isolates (-)-lomaiviticin C and (-)-kinamycin C, which contain one diazofluorene, are demonstrated to be much less effective DNA cleavage agents, thereby providing an explanation for the enhanced cytotoxicity of (-)-lomaiviticin A compared to that of other members of this family.

  14. RECQL4 Promotes DNA End Resection in Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Keijzers, Guido; Anand, Roopesh; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Cejka, Petr; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-06-28

    The RecQ helicase RECQL4, mutated in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, regulates genome stability, aging, and cancer. Here, we identify a crucial role for RECQL4 in DNA end resection, which is the initial and an essential step of homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Depletion of RECQL4 severely reduces HR-mediated repair and 5' end resection in vivo. RECQL4 physically interacts with MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN), which senses DSBs and initiates DNA end resection with CtIP. The MRE11 exonuclease regulates the retention of RECQL4 at laser-induced DSBs. RECQL4 also directly interacts with CtIP via its N-terminal domain and promotes CtIP recruitment to the MRN complex at DSBs. Moreover, inactivation of RECQL4's helicase activity impairs DNA end processing and HR-dependent DSBR without affecting its interaction with MRE11 and CtIP, suggesting an important role for RECQL4's unwinding activity in the process. Thus, we report that RECQL4 is an important participant in HR-dependent DSBR.

  15. Induction and repair of DNA strand breaks in bovine lens epithelial cells after high LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.; Heilmann, J.; Rink, H.

    The lens epithelium is the initiation site for the development of radiation induced cataracts. Radiation in the cortex and nucleus interacts with proteins, while in the epithelium, experimental results reveal mutagenic and cytotoxic effects. It is suggested that incorrectly repaired DNA damage may be lethal in terms of cellular reproduction and also may initiate the development of mutations or transformations in surviving cells. The occurrence of such genetically modified cells may lead to lens opacification. For a quantitative risk estimation for astronauts and space travelers it is necessary to know the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), because the spacial and temporal distribution of initial physical damage induced by cosmic radiation differ significantly from that of X-rays. RBEs for the induction of DNA strand breaks and the efficiency of repair of these breaks were measured in cultured diploid bovine lens epithelial cells exposed to different LET irradiation to either 300 kV X-rays or to heavy ions at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. Accelerated ions from Z=8 (O) to Z=92 (U) were used. Strand breaks were measured by hydroxyapatite chromatography of alkaline unwound DNA (overall strand breaks). Results showed that DNA damage occurs as a function of dose, of kinetic energy and of LET. For particles having the same LET the severity of the DNA damage increases with dose. For a given particle dose, as the LET rises, the numbers of DNA strand breaks increase to a maximum and then reach a plateau or decrease. Repair kinetics depend on the fluence (irradiation dose). At any LET value, repair is much slower after heavy ion exposure than after X-irradiation. For ions with an LET of less than 10,000 keV μ -1 more than 90 percent of the strand breaks induced are repaired within 24 hours. At higher particle fluences, especially for low energetic particles with a very high local density of energy deposition within the particle track, a higher proportion of non

  16. Induction and repair of DNA strand breaks in bovine lens epithelial cells after high LET irradiation.

    PubMed

    Baumstark-Khan, C; Heilmann, J; Rink, H

    2003-01-01

    The lens epithelium is the initiation site for the development of radiation induced cataracts. Radiation in the cortex and nucleus interacts with proteins, while in the epithelium, experimental results reveal mutagenic and cytotoxic effects. It is suggested that incorrectly repaired DNA damage may be lethal in terms of cellular reproduction and also may initiate the development of mutations or transformations in surviving cells. The occurrence of such genetically modified cells may lead to lens opacification. For a quantitative risk estimation for astronauts and space travelers it is necessary to know the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), because the spacial and temporal distribution of initial physical damage induced by cosmic radiation differ significantly from that of X-rays. RBEs for the induction of DNA strand breaks and the efficiency of repair of these breaks were measured in cultured diploid bovine lens epithelial cells exposed to different LET irradiation to either 300 kV X-rays or to heavy ions at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. Accelerated ions from Z=8 (O) to Z=92 (U) were used. Strand breaks were measured by hydroxyapatite chromatography of alkaline unwound DNA (overall strand breaks). Results showed that DNA damage occurs as a function of dose, of kinetic energy and of LET. For particles having the same LET the severity of the DNA damage increases with dose. For a given particle dose, as the LET rises, the numbers of DNA strand breaks increase to a maximum and then reach a plateau or decrease. Repair kinetics depend on the fluence (irradiation dose). At any LET value, repair is much slower after heavy ion exposure than after X-irradiation. For ions with an LET of less than 10,000 keV micrometers-1 more than 90 percent of the strand breaks induced are repaired within 24 hours. At higher particle fluences, especially for low energetic particles with a very high local density of energy deposition within the particle track, a higher proportion of

  17. Seasonal and PAH impact on DNA strand-break levels in gills of transplanted zebra mussels.

    PubMed

    Michel, Cécile; Bourgeault, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Palais, Frédéric; Geffard, Alain; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxicity endpoints are useful tools to biomonitor the physicochemical and biological quality of aquatic ecosystems. A caging study on the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha was planned to run over four seasons in the Seine River basin in order to assess whether DNA damage measured in transplanted mussels to polluted area vary according to seasonal changes. Three sites were chosen along the Seine River, one upstream from Paris and two downstream, corresponding to a chemical gradient of water contamination. The DNA strand break (comet assay) and chromosomal damage (micronucleus test) were measured in caged mussels at each site and in winter, spring and summer, along with PAH water contamination, PAH bioaccumulation, the mussel condition index (CI), the gonado-somatic index (GSI) and the filtration rate (FR). The level of DNA strand break measured in winter was low and increased in spring, concomitantly with FR and GSI. Over the same period, micronucleus (MN) frequency and PAH bioaccumulation decreased significantly in caged mussels, with both parameters positively correlated to each other. DNA strand-break levels and MN frequencies showed inter-site variations corresponding to the chemical contamination gradient. These two genotoxicity endpoints usefully complement each other in field studies. These results show that the MN test and comet assay, when applied to gill cells of caged zebra mussels, are sensitive tools for freshwater genotoxicity monitoring. PMID:23490194

  18. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  19. Double-strand break damage and associated DNA repair genes predispose smokers to gene methylation

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Willink, Randy; Bernauer, Amanda; Do, Kieu; Picchi, Maria A.; Sheng, Xin; Frasco, Melissa, A.; Berg, David Van Den; Gilliland, Frank D.; Zima, Christopher; Crowell, Richard E.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene promoter hypermethylation in sputum is a promising biomarker for predicting lung cancer. Identifying factors that predispose smokers to methylation of multiple gene promoters in the lung could impact strategies for early detection and chemoprevention. This study evaluated the hypothesis that double-strand break repair capacity and sequence variation in genes in this pathway are associated with a high methylation index in a cohort of current and former cancer-free smokers. A 50% reduction in the mean level of double-strand break repair capacity was seen in lymphocytes from smokers with a high methylation index, defined as ≥ 3 of 8 genes methylated in sputum, compared to smokers with no genes methylated. The classification accuracy for predicting risk for methylation was 88%. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within the MRE11A, CHEK2, XRCC3, DNA-Pkc, and NBN DNA repair genes were highly associated with the methylation index. A 14.5-fold increased odds for high methylation was seen for persons with ≥ 7 risk alleles of these genes. Promoter activity of the MRE11A gene that plays a critical role in recognition of DNA damage and activation of ATM was reduced in persons with the risk allele. Collectively, ours is the first population-based study to identify double-strand break DNA repair capacity and specific genes within this pathway as critical determinants for gene methylation in sputum, that is, in turn, associated with elevated risk for lung cancer. PMID:18413776

  20. Seasonal and PAH impact on DNA strand-break levels in gills of transplanted zebra mussels.

    PubMed

    Michel, Cécile; Bourgeault, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Palais, Frédéric; Geffard, Alain; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxicity endpoints are useful tools to biomonitor the physicochemical and biological quality of aquatic ecosystems. A caging study on the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha was planned to run over four seasons in the Seine River basin in order to assess whether DNA damage measured in transplanted mussels to polluted area vary according to seasonal changes. Three sites were chosen along the Seine River, one upstream from Paris and two downstream, corresponding to a chemical gradient of water contamination. The DNA strand break (comet assay) and chromosomal damage (micronucleus test) were measured in caged mussels at each site and in winter, spring and summer, along with PAH water contamination, PAH bioaccumulation, the mussel condition index (CI), the gonado-somatic index (GSI) and the filtration rate (FR). The level of DNA strand break measured in winter was low and increased in spring, concomitantly with FR and GSI. Over the same period, micronucleus (MN) frequency and PAH bioaccumulation decreased significantly in caged mussels, with both parameters positively correlated to each other. DNA strand-break levels and MN frequencies showed inter-site variations corresponding to the chemical contamination gradient. These two genotoxicity endpoints usefully complement each other in field studies. These results show that the MN test and comet assay, when applied to gill cells of caged zebra mussels, are sensitive tools for freshwater genotoxicity monitoring.

  1. DNA strand breaks induced in cultured human and rodent cells by chlorohydroxyfuranones--mutagens isolated from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B.; DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Chlorohydroxyfuranones, by-products of chlorine disinfection and drinking water contaminants, are shown to produce DNA strand breaks in human and rodent cells. One chlorohydroxyfuranone, 3-chloro-4-dichloromethyl-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), a potent bacterial mutagen, induces 232 +/- 89 DNA strand breaks.(cell-microM)-1 in human CCRF-CEM cells over a concentration range of 4.4 to 220 microM. This constitutes a DNA damage potency comparable to dimethylsulfate (DMS). By comparison, 3,4-dichloro-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MA), another chlorohydroxyfuranone which is approximately four orders of magnitude less mutagenic than MX in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100, is only about tenfold less potent as an inducer of DNA strand breaks in these cells, i.e., 18.2 +/- 3.1 strand breaks.(cell-microM)-1. The DNA strand-breaking potential of MX is inactivated by prior incubation with a rat liver S9 homogenate. In addition, both chlorohydroxyfuranones are ineffective at producing DNA strand breaks in primary rate hepatocytes (PRH) at concentrations below those which produce cytotoxicity as assessed by release of the cellular enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Prior treatment of the PRH with 750 microM diethyl maleate, a glutathione-depleting agent, did not enhance the cytotoxicity nor the DNA strand-breaking potential of either chlorohydroxyfuranone. This could indicate that glutathione-glutathione-S-transferase is not an important mechanism for the detoxification of these compounds in PRH.

  2. Histone modifications and DNA double-strand break repair after exposure to ionizing radiations.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Clayton R; Ramnarain, Deepti; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Iyengar, Puneeth; Pandita, Raj K; Shay, Jerry W; Pandita, Tej K

    2013-04-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all phases of the cell cycle. After DSBs are detected by the cellular machinery, these breaks are repaired by either of two mechanisms: (1) nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination (HR), that makes use of an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. DNA DSB repair must occur within the context of the natural cellular DNA structure. Among the major factors influencing DNA organization are specific histone and nonhistone proteins that form chromatin. The overall chromatin structure regulates DNA damage responses since chromatin status can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. During the process of DNA DSB repair, several chromatin alterations are required to sense damage and facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. The DNA DSB response is also facilitated by hierarchical signaling networks that orchestrate chromatin structural changes that may coordinate cell-cycle checkpoints involving multiple enzymatic activities to repair broken DNA ends. During DNA damage sensing and repair, histones undergo posttranslational modifications (PTMs) including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation. Such histone modifications represent a histone code that directs the recruitment of proteins involved in DNA damage sensing and repair processes. In this review, we summarize histone modifications that occur during DNA DSB repair processes.

  3. Targeted generation of DNA strand breaks using pyrene-conjugated triplex-forming oligonucleotides†

    PubMed Central

    Benfield, Aaron P.; Macleod, Michael C.; Liu, Yaobin; Wu, Qi; Wensel, Theodore G.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Gene targeting by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) 1 has proven useful for gene modulation in vivo. Photoreactive molecules have been conjugated to TFOs to direct sequence-specific damage in double-stranded DNA. However, the photoproducts are often repaired efficiently in cells. This limitation has led to the search for sequence-specific photoreactive reagents that can produce more genotoxic lesions. Here we demonstrate that photoactivated pyrene-conjugated TFOs (pyr-TFOs) induce DNA strand breaks near the pyrene moiety with remarkably high efficiency, and also produce covalent pyrene-DNA adducts. Free radical scavenging experiments demonstrated a role for singlet oxygen activated by the singlet-excited state of pyrene in the mechanism of pyr-TFO-induced DNA damage. In cultured mammalian cells, the effect of photoactivated pyr-TFO-directed DNA damage was to induce mutations, in the form of deletions, ~7-fold over background levels, at the targeted site. Thus, pyr-TFOs represent a potentially powerful new tool for directing DNA strand breaks to specific chromosomal locations for biotechnological and potential clinical applications. PMID:18473480

  4. Crosslinks rather than strand breaks determine access to ancient DNA sequences from frozen sediments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders J; Mitchell, David L; Wiuf, Carsten; Paniker, Lakshmi; Brand, Tina B; Binladen, Jonas; Gilichinsky, David A; Rønn, Regin; Willerslev, Eske

    2006-06-01

    Diagenesis was studied in DNA obtained from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil) ranging from 10,000 to 400,000 years in age. Despite optimal preservation conditions, we found the sedimentary DNA to be severely modified by interstrand crosslinks; single- and double-stranded breaks; and freely exposed sugar, phosphate, and hydroxyl groups. Intriguingly, interstrand crosslinks were found to accumulate approximately 100 times faster than single-stranded breaks, suggesting that crosslinking rather than depurination is the primary limiting factor for ancient DNA amplification under frozen conditions. The results question the reliability of the commonly used models relying on depurination kinetics for predicting the long-term survival of DNA under permafrost conditions and suggest that new strategies for repair of ancient DNA must be considered if the yield of amplifiable DNA from permafrost sediments is to be significantly increased. Using the obtained rate constant for interstrand crosslinks the maximal survival time of amplifiable 120-bp fragments of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA was estimated to be approximately 400,000 years. Additionally, a clear relationship was found between DNA damage and sample age, contradicting previously raised concerns about the possible leaching of free DNA molecules between permafrost layers.

  5. Crosslinks Rather Than Strand Breaks Determine Access to Ancient DNA Sequences From Frozen Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anders J.; Mitchell, David L.; Wiuf, Carsten; Paniker, Lakshmi; Brand, Tina B.; Binladen, Jonas; Gilichinsky, David A.; Rønn, Regin; Willerslev, Eske

    2006-01-01

    Diagenesis was studied in DNA obtained from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil) ranging from 10,000 to 400,000 years in age. Despite optimal preservation conditions, we found the sedimentary DNA to be severely modified by interstrand crosslinks; single- and double-stranded breaks; and freely exposed sugar, phosphate, and hydroxyl groups. Intriguingly, interstrand crosslinks were found to accumulate ∼100 times faster than single-stranded breaks, suggesting that crosslinking rather than depurination is the primary limiting factor for ancient DNA amplification under frozen conditions. The results question the reliability of the commonly used models relying on depurination kinetics for predicting the long-term survival of DNA under permafrost conditions and suggest that new strategies for repair of ancient DNA must be considered if the yield of amplifiable DNA from permafrost sediments is to be significantly increased. Using the obtained rate constant for interstrand crosslinks the maximal survival time of amplifiable 120-bp fragments of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA was estimated to be ∼400,000 years. Additionally, a clear relationship was found between DNA damage and sample age, contradicting previously raised concerns about the possible leaching of free DNA molecules between permafrost layers. PMID:16582426

  6. Radiosensitivity of human squamous carcinoma cell lines is associated with amount of spontaneous DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Polischouk, A G; Grénman, R; Granath, F; Lewensohn, R

    2001-01-01

    We asked whether the constitutive level of DNA strand breaks (SBs) in four human squamous carcinoma cell lines is associated with their radiosensitivity, measured by the clonogenic assay. Because impairment in DNA replication and the action of endogenous deoxyribonucleases are two major sources of DNA strand breaks under normal cell metabolism, we also analyzed DNA polymerase and DNA ligase activities as well as the functional status of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and nucleolytic degradation of genomic DNA. We showed that the two relatively radioresistant cell lines, UM-SCC-1 and UT-SCC-5, had a statistically significant lower constitutive level of DNA SBs, as measured by DNA precipitation technique, compared with the two relatively radiosensitive cell lines, UM-SCC-14A and UT-SCC-9. We found that cell lines with a higher level of broken DNA tended to have a higher constitutive level of DNA polymerase alpha activity, measured by incorporation of [(3)H]dTTP in DNase I-activated DNA. UM-SCC-1, UT-SCC-5, and UM-SCC-14A did not show any difference in DNA ligase activity when a nicked oligonucleotide was used as substrate. The most radiosensitive cell line, UT-SCC-9, had a significantly lower ligation efficiency compared to the other three cell lines. The functional status of the PARP was the same in the four cell lines. Although none of the four cell lines showed a characteristic apoptotic or necrotic degradation of genomic DNA, when tested with the "plasmid rejoining assay," a significant degradation of the plasmid DNA in UT-SCC-9 was detected. We conclude that the high fraction of DNA SBs for UT-SCC-9, the most radiosensitive cell line, is most likely a consequence of low ligation efficiency combined with a relatively high DNA polymerase alpha activity and the nuclease degradation of DNA. PMID:11992385

  7. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Schafer, M; Schmitz, C; Bucker, H

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA.

  8. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, H.; Schäfer, M.; Schmitz, C.; Bücker, H.

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA.

  9. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Schafer, M; Schmitz, C; Bucker, H

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA. PMID:11539954

  10. DNA Strand Breaks in Fibroblasts Exposed to a 50-Hz Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Maresuke; Hondou, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Hidetake

    A large number of studies have reported DNA damages caused by low frequency magnetic field (LFMF). However, the mechanism of the DNA damage is not well understood, partly because of a lack of reproducibility. Because DNA integrity is essential for the activities of life, the present study focused on DNA damages induced by LFMF. Fibroblast cells (3T3 Swiss albino) were exposed for various periods (15, 18 and 24 h) to 50-Hz magnetic fields (MF) of various intensities (100, 500 and 1000 µT). Two modes of exposure, intermittent (on for 5 min, off for 10 min) and continuous, were employed. DNA damages were evaluated by the alkaline comet assay. This assay semi-quantify the degree of DNA strand breaks. With the intermittent 500 µT MF, the degree of DNA strand breaks was higher in the exposed cells than non-exposed cells, and the difference was maximal at 18 h (statistically significant difference was observed at 18 and 24 h). Also with the intermittexnt, 100 and 1000 µT MFs, the degree of DNA strand breaks of exposed cells was higher than non-exposed cells, but the statistically significant difference was observed only at 1000 µT, 18 h exposure. The continuous exposure for 15, 18 and 24 h at 500 µT exhibited a significant difference between the exposed and non-exposed cells only at 18 h, but the difference was not as prominent as that observed under the intermittent exposure.

  11. Molecular Basis for DNA Double-Strand Break Annealing and Primer Extension by an NHEJ DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Brissett, Nigel C.; Martin, Maria J.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Bianchi, Julie; Blanco, Luis; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. The mechanisms by which breaks are competently brought together and extended during NHEJ is poorly understood. As polymerases extend DNA in a 5′-3′ direction by nucleotide addition to a primer, it is unclear how NHEJ polymerases fill in break termini containing 3′ overhangs that lack a primer strand. Here, we describe, at the molecular level, how prokaryotic NHEJ polymerases configure a primer-template substrate by annealing the 3′ overhanging strands from opposing breaks, forming a gapped intermediate that can be extended in trans. We identify structural elements that facilitate docking of the 3′ ends in the active sites of adjacent polymerases and reveal how the termini act as primers for extension of the annealed break, thus explaining how such DSBs are extended in trans. This study clarifies how polymerases couple break-synapsis to catalysis, providing a molecular mechanism to explain how primer extension is achieved on DNA breaks. PMID:24239356

  12. The 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp coordinates resection at DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Greg H.P.; Lydall, David

    2015-01-01

    DNA-end resection, the generation of single-stranded DNA at DNA double strand break (DSB) ends, is critical for controlling the many cellular responses to breaks. Here we show that the conserved DNA damage checkpoint sliding clamp (the 9-1-1 complex) plays two opposing roles coordinating DSB resection in budding yeast. We show that the major effect of 9-1-1 is to inhibit resection by promoting the recruitment of Rad953BP1 near DSBs. However, 9-1-1 also stimulates resection by Exo1- and Dna2-Sgs1-dependent nuclease/helicase activities, and this can be observed in the absence of Rad953BP1. Our new data resolve the controversy in the literature about the effect of the 9-1-1 complex on DSB resection. Interestingly, the inhibitory role of 9-1-1 on resection is not observed near uncapped telomeres because less Rad953BP1 is recruited near uncapped telomeres. Thus, 9-1-1 both stimulates and inhibits resection and the effects of 9-1-1 are modulated by different regions of the genome. Our experiments illustrate the central role of the 9-1-1 checkpoint sliding clamp in the DNA damage response network that coordinates the response to broken DNA ends. Our results have implications in all eukaryotic cells. PMID:25925573

  13. Yields of single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA irradiated in aqueous solution in the presence of oxygen and scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Udovicic, Lj.; Mark, F.; Bothe, E.

    1994-11-01

    Yields of radiation-induced single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA have been measured as a function of OH scavenger concentration in N{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}-saturated aqueous solution. The experimental data are well represented by a theoretical model based on non-homogeneous reaction kinetics, without the need to adjust any parameter. The good agreement between experimental and theoretical data is taken as evidence that, in the presence of oxygen, the main effect of added scavengers with respect to the formation of single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA is OH radical scavenging. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. SMCHD1 accumulates at DNA damage sites and facilitates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Coker, Heather; Brockdorff, Neil

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT SMCHD1 is a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family protein involved in epigenetic gene silencing and chromosome organisation on the female inactive X chromosome and at a limited number of autosomal loci. Here, we demonstrate that SMCHD1 also has a role in DNA repair of double-strand breaks; SMCHD1 is recruited to sites of laser micro-irradiated damage along with other DNA repair factors, including Ku80 (also known as XRCC5 in mammals) and RAD51. Cells deficient in SMCHD1 show evidence of decreased efficiency of repair and cell viability after DNA damage. We suggest that SMCHD1 responds to DNA double-strand breaks in a manner that is likely to involve its ability to alter chromatin states to facilitate DNA repair. PMID:24790221

  15. Conservative Inheritance of Newly Synthesized DNA in Double-Strand Break-Induced Gene Conversion▿

    PubMed Central

    Ira, Grzegorz; Satory, Dominik; Haber, James E.

    2006-01-01

    To distinguish among possible mechanisms of repair of a double-strand break (DSB) by gene conversion in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed isotope density transfer to analyze budding yeast mating type (MAT) gene switching in G2/M-arrested cells. Both of the newly synthesized DNA strands created during gene conversion are found at the repaired locus, leaving the donor unchanged. These results support suggestions that mitotic DSBs are primarily repaired by a synthesis-dependent strand-annealing mechanism. We also show that the proportion of crossing-over associated with DSB-induced ectopic recombination is not affected by the presence of nonhomologous sequences at one or both ends of the DSB or the presence of additional sequences that must be copied from the donor. PMID:17030630

  16. Nuclear organization in DNA end processing: Telomeres vs double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Marcomini, Isabella; Gasser, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    Many proteins ligands are shared between double-strand breaks and natural chromosomal ends or telomeres. The structural similarity of the 3' overhang, and the efficiency of cellular DNA end degradation machineries, highlight the need for mechanisms that resect selectively to promote or restrict recombination events. Here we examine the means used by eukaryotic cells to suppress resection at telomeres, target telomerase to short telomeres, and process broken ends for appropriate repair. Not only molecular ligands, but the spatial sequestration of telomeres and damage likely ensure that these two very similar structures have very distinct outcomes with respect to the DNA damage response and repair.

  17. DNA strand breaking capacity of acrylamide and glycidamide in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puppel, Nicole; Tjaden, Zeina; Fueller, Florian; Marko, Doris

    2005-02-01

    We compared the DNA damaging potency of acrylamide (AA) and its metabolite glycidamide (GA) in the comet assay in cell systems differing with respect to species origin and cytochrome P450-depended monooxygenase (CYP2E1) expression (V79, Caco-2, primary rat hepatocytes). Only after 24 h incubation in the highest concentration of AA (6 mM) a slight but significant increase in DNA damage was observed in V79 and Caco-2 cells. In primary rat hepatocytes, however, expressing substantial amounts of CYP2E1, no induction of DNA strand breaks was found. At the end of the incubation time period (24 h), still 67+/-19% of the CYP2E1 protein was detected by Western blotting. Direct treatment with GA resulted in a significant increase in DNA damage in V79 cells and primary rat hepatocytes at concentrations > or =100 microM (24 h). Caco-2 cells were found to be less sensitive, exhibiting an increase in DNA strand breaks at concentrations > or 300 microM GA. These data confirm the higher genotoxic potential of GA compared to AA but also indicate that high expression of CYP2E1 per se is not necessarily associated with increased genotoxicity of AA. We, therefore, investigated whether the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level might be a critical determinant for the genotoxicity of AA in cells with different CYP2E1 status. Depletion of intracellular GSH by dl-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoxime (BSO) in rat hepatocytes and V79 cells resulted in a significant induction of DNA strand breaks after incubation with 1 mM AA. However, at higher concentrations (> or =1.25 mM) a strong increase in cytotoxicity, resulting in a severe loss of viability, was observed. In summary, the DNA strand breaking effect of AA appeared not to be directly correlated with the CYP2E1 status of the cells. Depletion of GSH is associated with an increase in AA genotoxicity but seems also to lead to a substantial enhancement of cytotoxicity.

  18. Splicing controls the ubiquitin response during DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Pederiva, C; Böhm, S; Julner, A; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Although evidence that splicing regulates DNA repair is accumulating, the underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear. Here, we report that short-term inhibition of pre-mRNA splicing by spliceosomal inhibitors impairs cellular repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Indeed, interference with splicing as little as 1 h prior to irradiation reduced ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin and impaired recruitment of the repair factors WRAP53β, RNF168, 53BP1, BRCA1 and RAD51 to sites of DNA damage. Consequently, splicing-deficient cells exhibited significant numbers of residual γH2AX foci, as would be expected if DNA repair is defective. Furthermore, we show that this is due to downregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF8 and that re-introduction of this protein into splicing-deficient cells restores ubiquitylation at sites of DNA damage, accumulation of downstream factors and subsequent repair. Moreover, downregulation of RNF8 explains the defective repair associated with knockdown of various splicing factors in recent genome-wide siRNA screens and, significantly, overexpression of RNF8 counteracts this defect. These discoveries reveal a mechanism that may not only explain how splicing regulates repair of double-strand breaks, but also may underlie various diseases caused by deregulation of splicing factors, including cancer. PMID:27315300

  19. The distinctive cellular responses to DNA strand breaks caused by a DNA topoisomerase I poison in conjunction with DNA replication and RNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Sakasai, Ryo; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) inhibits DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) through a non-catalytic mechanism that stabilizes the Top1-DNA cleavage complex (Top1cc) and blocks the DNA re-ligation step, resulting in the accumulation in the genome of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), which are converted to secondary strand breaks when they collide with the DNA replication and RNA transcription machinery. DNA strand breaks mediated by replication, which have one DNA end, are distinct in repair from the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that have two ends and are caused by ionizing radiation and other agents. In contrast to two-ended DSBs, such one-ended DSBs are preferentially repaired through the homologous recombination pathway. Conversely, the repair of one-ended DSBs by the non-homologous end-joining pathway is harmful for cells and leads to cell death. The choice of repair pathway has a crucial impact on cell fate and influences the efficacy of anticancer drugs such as CPT derivatives. In addition to replication-mediated one-ended DSBs, transcription also generates DNA strand breaks upon collision with the Top1cc. Some reports suggest that transcription-mediated DNA strand breaks correlate with neurodegenerative diseases. However, the details of the repair mechanisms of, and cellular responses to, transcription-mediated DNA strand breaks still remain unclear. In this review, combining our recent results and those of previous reports, we introduce and discuss the responses to CPT-induced DNA damage mediated by DNA replication and RNA transcription.

  20. DNA double-strand break formation and repair in Tetrahymena meiosis.

    PubMed

    Loidl, Josef; Lorenz, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The molecular details of meiotic recombination have been determined for a small number of model organisms. From these studies, a general picture has emerged that shows that most, if not all, recombination is initiated by a DNA double-strand break (DSB) that is repaired in a recombinogenic process using a homologous DNA strand as a template. However, the details of recombination vary between organisms, and it is unknown which variant is representative of evolutionarily primordial meiosis or most prevalent among eukaryotes. To answer these questions and to obtain a better understanding of the range of recombination processes among eukaryotes, it is important to study a variety of different organisms. Here, the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is introduced as a versatile meiotic model system, which has the additional bonus of having the largest phylogenetic distance to all of the eukaryotes studied to date. Studying this organism can contribute to our understanding of the conservation and diversification of meiotic recombination processes.

  1. DNA double-strand breaks with 5' adducts are efficiently channeled to the DNA2-mediated resection pathway.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, Margaret; Liao, Shuren; Beeharry, Neil; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with 5' adducts are frequently formed from many nucleic acid processing enzymes, in particular DNA topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). The key intermediate of TOP2 catalysis is the covalent complex (TOP2cc), consisting of two TOP2 subunits covalently linked to the 5' ends of the nicked DNA. In cells, TOP2ccs can be trapped by cancer drugs such as etoposide and then converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that carry adducts at the 5' end. The repair of such DSBs is critical to the survival of cells, but the underlying mechanism is still not well understood. We found that etoposide-induced DSBs are efficiently resected into 3' single-stranded DNA in cells and the major nuclease for resection is the DNA2 protein. DNA substrates carrying model 5' adducts were efficiently resected in Xenopus egg extracts and immunodepletion of Xenopus DNA2 also strongly inhibited resection. These results suggest that DNA2-mediated resection is a major mechanism for the repair of DSBs with 5' adducts.

  2. Processing of 3'-Phosphoglycolate-Terminated DNA Double-StrandBreaks by Artemis Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Povrik, Lawrence F.; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J.; Yannone, Steven M.

    2005-10-01

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis functions on oxidatively modified double-strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3{prime}-hydroxyl or 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3{prime} overhangs (>9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3{prime}-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted selective Artemis-mediated trimming of a single 3{prime}-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3{prime} overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was dependent upon Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase, and ATP. Together, these data suggest that Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3{prime} overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3{prime} to the cleavage site. Shorter 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis, but much less efficiently. Consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of Artemis, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to X-rays, bleomycin and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated double-strand breaks. Collectively, these results suggest that 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate termini and/or specific classes of DNA ends that arise from such blocked termini are relevant Artemis substrates in vivo.

  3. DNA polymerase θ (POLQ), double-strand break repair, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    DNA polymerase theta (pol θ) is encoded in the genomes of many eukaryotes, though not in fungi. Pol θ is encoded by the POLQ gene in mammalian cells. The C-terminal third of the protein is a family A DNA polymerase with additional insertion elements relative to prokaryotic homologs. The N-terminal third is a helicase-like domain with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Pol θ is important in the repair of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) from many sources. These include breaks formed by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase inhibitors, breaks arising at stalled DNA replication forks, breaks introduced during diversification steps of the mammalian immune system, and DSB induced by CRISPR-Cas9. Pol θ participates in a route of DSB repair termed "alternative end-joining" (altEJ). AltEJ is independent of the DNA binding Ku protein complex and requires DNA end resection. Pol θ is able to mediate joining of two resected 3' ends harboring DNA sequence microhomology. "Signatures" of Pol θ action during altEJ are the frequent utilization of longer microhomologies, and the insertion of additional sequences at joining sites. The mechanism of end-joining employs the ability of Pol θ to tightly grasp a 3' terminus through unique contacts in the active site, allowing extension from minimally paired primers. Pol θ is involved in controlling the frequency of chromosome translocations and preserves genome integrity by limiting large deletions. It may also play a backup role in DNA base excision repair. POLQ is a member of a cluster of similarly upregulated genes that are strongly correlated with poor clinical outcome for breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancer types. Inhibition of pol θ is a compelling approach for combination therapy of radiosensitization. PMID:27264557

  4. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lettier, Gaëlle; Feng, Qi; de Mayolo, Adriana Antúnez; Erdeniz, Naz; Reid, Robert J D; Lisby, Michael; Mortensen, Uffe H; Rothstein, Rodney

    2006-11-10

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a source of genomic instability and the loss of heterozygosity in mitotic cells. Since these events pose a severe health risk, it is important to understand the molecular events that cause spontaneous HR. In eukaryotes, high levels of HR are a normal feature of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most spontaneous mitotic HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by DNA lesions other than DSBs. Specifically, we describe a class of rad52 mutants that are fully proficient in inter- and intra-chromosomal mitotic HR, yet at the same time fail to repair DNA DSBs. The conclusions are drawn from genetic analyses, evaluation of the consequences of DSB repair failure at the DNA level, and examination of the cellular re-localization of Rad51 and mutant Rad52 proteins after introduction of specific DSBs. In further support of our conclusions, we show that, as in wild-type strains, UV-irradiation induces HR in these rad52 mutants, supporting the view that DNA nicks and single-stranded gaps, rather than DSBs, are major sources of spontaneous HR in mitotic yeast cells.

  5. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  6. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Eldarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  7. DNA double strand breaks in the acute phase after synchrotron pencilbeam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Palomo, C.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Trippel, M.; Schroll, C.; Requardt, H.; Bartzsch, S.; Nikkhah, G.; Schültke, E.

    2013-07-01

    Introduction. At the biomedical beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we have established a method to study pencilbeam irradiation in-vivoin small animal models. The pencilbeam irradiation technique is based on the principle of microbeam irradiation, a concept of spatially fractionated high-dose irradiation. Using γH2AX as marker, we followed the development of DNA double strand breaks over 48 hrs after whole brain irradiation with the pencilbeam technique. Method. Almost square pencilbeams with an individual size of 51 × 50 μm were produced with an MSC collimator using a step and shoot approach, while the animals were moved vertically through the beam. The center-to-center distance (ctc) was 400 μm, with a peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) of about 400. Five groups of healthy adult mice received peak irradiation doses of either 330 Gy or 2,460 Gy and valley doses of 0.82 Gy and 6.15 Gy, respectively. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 12 and 48 hrs after irradiation. Results. DNA double strand breaks are observed in the path of the pencilbeam. The size of the damaged volume undergoes changes within the first 48 hours after irradiation. Conclusions. The extent of DNA damage caused by pencilbeam irradiation, as assessed by H2AX antibody staining, is dose- dependent.

  8. Novel apparatus to measure hyperthermal heavy ion damage to DNA: Strand breaks, base loss, and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, L.; Lacombe, S.; Hunting, D.; Wagner, R. J.; Huels, M. A.

    2007-08-01

    We have developed a novel apparatus that allows us to irradiate nonvolatile organic films of high mass (1-100μg range) spread out over a large surface area (42cm2) with low energy (kT-100eV) heavy ions and to quantitatively analyze the film substance via standard biochemical techniques afterwards. Here we discuss the details of the apparatus and method and show that it allows us to measure substantial damage to double stranded DNA molecules (plasmids) and its fundamental subunits induced by heavy ions with unprecedented low energies, i.e., 2.5eV/amu; these energies correspond to track end energies of stopping ions or secondary ions created along primary ion tracks. We find that hyperthermal Ar+ ions interacting with plasmid DNA will lead to the formation of single and double strand breaks, as well as fragmentation of nucleosides, which also involve chemical modifications and site specific rupture along the N1-C1 glycosidic bond, resulting in base release. In cells, such localized clustered damage will enhance the severity of DNA strand lesions, thus making them harder to repair.

  9. γ-H2AX as a biomarker for DNA double-strand breaks in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Gerić, Marko; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2014-07-01

    The visualisation of DNA damage response proteins enables the indirect measurement of DNA damage. Soon after the occurrence of a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the formation of γ-H2AX histone variants is to be expected. This review is focused on the potential use of the γ-H2AX foci assay in assessing the genotoxicity of environmental contaminants including cytostatic pharmaceuticals, since standard methods may not be sensitive enough to detect the damaging effect of low environmental concentrations of such drugs. These compounds are constantly released into the environment, potentially representing a threat to water quality, aquatic organisms, and, ultimately, human health. Our review of the literature revealed that this method could be used in the biomonitoring and risk assessment of aquatic systems affected by wastewater from the production, usage, and disposal of cytostatic pharmaceuticals.

  10. RNF20-SNF2H Pathway of Chromatin Relaxation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Akihiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in the study on the association of histone modifications with chromatin remodeling factors has broadened our understanding of chromatin dynamics in DNA transactions. In DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, the well-known mark of histones is the phosphorylation of the H2A variant, H2AX, which has been used as a surrogate marker of DSBs. The ubiquitylation of histone H2B by RNF20 E3 ligase was recently found to be a DNA damage-induced histone modification. This modification is required for DSB repair and regulated by a distinctive pathway from that of histone H2AX phosphorylation. Moreover, the connection between H2B ubiquitylation and the chromatin remodeling activity of SNF2H has been elucidated. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of RNF20-mediated processes and the molecular link to H2AX-mediated processes during DSB repair. PMID:26184323

  11. Subdiffusion Supports Joining Of Correct Ends During Repair Of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girst, S.; Hable, V.; Drexler, G. A.; Greubel, C.; Siebenwirth, C.; Haum, M.; Friedl, A. A.; Dollinger, G.

    2013-08-01

    The mobility of damaged chromatin regions in the nucleus may affect the probability of mis-repair. In this work, live-cell observation and distance tracking of GFP-tagged DNA damage response protein MDC1 was used to study the random-walk behaviour of chromatin domains containing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Our measurements indicate a subdiffusion-type random walk process with similar time dependence for isolated and clustered DSBs that were induced by 20 MeV proton or 43 MeV carbon ion micro-irradiation. As compared to normal diffusion, subdiffusion enhances the probability that both ends of a DSB meet, thus promoting high efficiency DNA repair. It also limits their probability of long-range movements and thus lowers the probability of mis-rejoining and chromosome aberrations.

  12. Long noncoding RNA LINP1 regulates double strand DNA break repair in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youyou; He, Qun; Hu, Zhongyi; Feng, Yi; Fan, Lingling; Tang, Zhaoqing; Yuan, Jiao; Shan, Weiwei; Li, Chunsheng; Hu, Xiaowen; Tanyi, Janos L; Fan, Yi; Huang, Qihong; Montone, Kathleen; Dang, Chi V; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are transcripts that are larger than 200 nucleotides but do not appear to have protein-coding potential, play critical roles during tumorigenesis by functioning as scaffolds to regulate protein-protein, protein-DNA or protein-RNA interactions. Using a clinically guided genetic screening approach, we identified (lncRNA in Non-homologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway 1) as a lncRNA that is overexpressed in human triple-negative breast cancer. We found that LINP1 enhances double-strand DNA break repair by serving as a scaffold that links Ku80 and DNA-PKcs, thereby coordinating the NHEJ pathway. Importantly, blocking LINP1, which is regulated by the p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, increases sensitivity of tumor cell response to radiotherapy in breast cancer. PMID:27111890

  13. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3′ single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  14. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3' single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  15. A novel carbohydrate derived compound FCP5 causes DNA strand breaks and oxidative modifications of DNA bases in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Czubatka, Anna; Sarnik, Joanna; Lucent, Del; Blasiak, Janusz; Witczak, Zbigniew J; Poplawski, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    1,5-Anhydro-6-deoxy-methane-sulfamido-D-glucitol (FCP5) is a functionalized carbohydrate containing functional groups that render it potentially therapeutically useful. According to our concept of 'functional carb-pharmacophores' (FCPs) incorporation of the methanesulfonamido pharmacophore to 1,5 glucitol could create a therapeutically useful compound. Our previous studies revealed that FCP5 was cytotoxic to cancer cells. Therefore, in this work we assessed the cytotoxic mechanisms of FCP5 in four cancer cell lines - HeLa, LoVo, A549 and MCF-7, with particular focus on DNA damage and repair. A broad spectrum of methods, including comet assay with modifications, DNA repair enzyme assay, plasmid relaxation assay, and DNA fragmentation assay, were used. We also checked the potential for FCP5 to induce apoptosis. The results show that FCP5 can induce DNA strand breaks as well as oxidative modifications of DNA bases. DNA lesions induced by FCP5 were not entirely repaired in HeLa cells and DNA repair kinetics differs from other cell lines. Results from molecular docking and plasmid relaxation assay suggest that FCP5 binds to the major groove of DNA with a preference for adenosine-thymine base pair sequences and directly induces DNA strand breaks. Thus, FCP5 may represent a novel lead for the design of new major groove-binding compounds. The results also confirmed the validity of functional carb-pharmacophores as a new source of innovative drugs. PMID:25557509

  16. DNA double strand breaks in rat epidermis following irradiation with electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, K.

    1986-05-01

    Although radiation induced single strand breaks in rat epidermis are repaired fairly quickly (t-1/2 = 21 minutes), the fate of DNA double strand breaks in the same cells is unclear. Here we have attempted to measure dsb's in rat epidermis by neutral elution. The DNA of 28 day old CD rats was prelabeled with 6 I.P. injections at 2.0 uCi/g body weight of /sup 3/H-TdR. The dorsal skin was irradiated with a 0.8 MeV electron beam. The epidermis was removed by trypsinization at 4/sup 0/C and a single cell suspension was made. The cells were layered onto a polycarbonate filter, lysed, and eluted at pH 9.6. Doses of at least 6000 rads were needed to detect dsb's in vivo. Dsb's were still detectable in the epidermis 3 hours after irradiation. The amount of dsb's had returned to non-irradiated levels 8 hours after irradiation. 77 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Real-time analysis of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Wade M.; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Haber, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to induce synchronously a single site-specific double-strand break (DSB) in a budding yeast chromosome has made it possible to monitor the kinetics and genetic requirements of many molecular steps during DSB repair. Special attention has been paid to the switching of mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a process initiated by the HO endonuclease by cleaving the MAT locus. A DSB in MATa is repaired by homologous recombination—specifically, by gene conversion—using a heterochromatic donor, HMLα. Repair results in the replacement of the a-specific sequences (Ya) by Yα and switching from MATa to MATα. We report that MAT switching requires the DNA replication factor Dpb11, although it does not require the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or the Mcm and Cdc45 helicase components. Using Southern blot, PCR, and ChIP analysis of samples collected every 10 min, we extend previous studies of this process to identify the times for the loading of Rad51 recombinase protein onto the DSB ends at MAT, the subsequent strand invasion by the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament into the donor sequences, the initiation of new DNA synthesis, and the removal of the nonhomologous Y sequences. In addition we report evidence for the transient displacement of well-positioned nucleosomes in the HML donor locus during strand invasion. PMID:21292986

  18. Real-time analysis of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Wade M; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Haber, James E

    2011-02-22

    The ability to induce synchronously a single site-specific double-strand break (DSB) in a budding yeast chromosome has made it possible to monitor the kinetics and genetic requirements of many molecular steps during DSB repair. Special attention has been paid to the switching of mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a process initiated by the HO endonuclease by cleaving the MAT locus. A DSB in MATa is repaired by homologous recombination--specifically, by gene conversion--using a heterochromatic donor, HMLα. Repair results in the replacement of the a-specific sequences (Ya) by Yα and switching from MATa to MATα. We report that MAT switching requires the DNA replication factor Dpb11, although it does not require the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or the Mcm and Cdc45 helicase components. Using Southern blot, PCR, and ChIP analysis of samples collected every 10 min, we extend previous studies of this process to identify the times for the loading of Rad51 recombinase protein onto the DSB ends at MAT, the subsequent strand invasion by the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament into the donor sequences, the initiation of new DNA synthesis, and the removal of the nonhomologous Y sequences. In addition we report evidence for the transient displacement of well-positioned nucleosomes in the HML donor locus during strand invasion.

  19. DNA strand breaks in human nasal respiratory epithelium are induced upon exposure to urban pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon-Garciduenas, L.; Osnaya-Brizuela, N.; Ramirez-Martinez, L.

    1996-02-01

    All organisms have the ability to respond and adapt to a myriad of environmental insults. The human respiratory epithelium, when exposed to oxidant gases in photochemical smog, is at risk of DNA damage and requires efficient cellular adaptative responses to resist the environmentally induced cell damage. Ozone and its reaction products induce in vitro and in vivo DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in respiratory epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. To determine if exposure to a polluted atmosphere with ozone as the main criteria pollutant of 19 children and 13 adult males who lived in a low-polluted Pacific port, 69 males and 16 children who were permanent residents of Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), and 22 young males newly arrived to SWMMC and followed for 12 weeks. Respiratory symptoms, nasal cytology and histopathology, cell viabilities, and single-cell gel electrophoresis were investigated. Atmospheric pollutant data were obtained from a fixed-site monitoring station. SWMMC volunteers spent >7 hr/day outdoors and all had upper respiratory symptoms. A significant difference in the numbers of DNA-damaged nasal cells was observed between control and chronically exposed subjects, both in children (p<0.00001) and in adults (p>0.01). SSBs in newly arrived subjects quickly increased upon arrival to the city, from 39.8 {+-}8.34% in the first week to 67.29 {+-}2.35 by week 2. Thereafter, the number of cells with SSBs remained stable in spite of the continuous increase in cumulative ozone, suggesting a threshold for cumulative DNA nasal damage. Exposure to a polluted urban atmosphere induces SSBs in human nasal respiratory epithelium, and nasal SSBs could serve as a biomarker of ozone exposure. Further, because DNA strand breaks are a threat to cell viability and genome integrity and appear to be a critical lesion responsible for p53 induction, nasal SSBs should be evaluated in ozone-exposed individuals. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Fine resolution mapping of double-strand break sites for human ribosomal DNA units.

    PubMed

    Pope, Bernard J; Mahmood, Khalid; Jung, Chol-Hee; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    DNA breakage arises during a variety of biological processes, including transcription, replication and genome rearrangements. In the context of disease, extensive fragmentation of DNA has been described in cancer cells and during early stages of neurodegeneration (Stephens et al., 2011 Stephens et al. (2011) [5]; Blondet et al., 2001 Blondet et al. (2001) [1]). Stults et al. (2009) Stults et al. (2009) [6] reported that human rDNA gene clusters are hotspots for recombination and that rDNA restructuring is among the most common chromosomal alterations in adult solid tumours. As such, analysis of rDNA regions is likely to have significant prognostic and predictive value, clinically. Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016) Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016) [7], [9] have made major advances in this direction, reporting that sites of human genome double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur frequently at sites in rDNA that are tightly linked with active transcription - the authors used a RAFT (rapid amplification of forum termini) protocol that selects for blunt-ended sites. They reported the relative frequency of these rDNA DSBs within defined co-ordinate 'windows' of varying size and made these data (as well as the relevant 'raw' sequencing information) available to the public (Tchurikov et al., 2015b). Assay designs targeting rDNA DSB hotspots will benefit greatly from the publication of break sites at greater resolution. Here, we re-analyse public RAFT data and make available rDNA DSB co-ordinates to the single-nucleotide level. PMID:27656414

  1. QUANTITATION OF INTRACELLULAR NAD(P)H IN LIVING CELLS CAN MONITOR AN IMBALANCE OF DNA SINGLE STRAND BREAK REPAIR IN REAL TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H in living cells can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in real time.

    ABSTRACT

    DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or du...

  2. Visualization of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair at the Single-Molecule Level

    SciTech Connect

    Dynan, William S.; Li, Shuyi; Mernaugh, Raymond; Wragg, Stephanie; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2003-03-27

    Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is universal. The signature injury from ionizing radiation exposure is induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The first line of defense against DSBs is direct ligation of broken DNA ends via the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Because even a relatively high environmental exposure induces only a few DSBs per cell, our current understanding of the response to this exposure is limited by the ability to measure DSB repair events reliably in situ at a single-molecule level. To address this need, we have taken advantage of biological amplification, measuring relocalization of proteins and detection of protein phosphorylation as a surrogate for detection of broken ends themselves. We describe the use of specific antibodies to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of repair of very small numbers of DSBs in human cells by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway.

  3. Inactivation, DNA double strand break induction and their rejoining in bacterial cells irradiated with heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M.; Zimmermann, H.; Schmitz, C.

    1994-01-01

    Besides inactivation one of the major interests in our experiments is to study the primary damage in the DNA double strand breaks (DSB) after heavy ion irradiation. These damages lead not only to cell death but also under repair activities to mutations. In further experiments we have investigated the inactivation with two different strains of Deinococcus radiodurans (R1, Rec 30) and the induction of DSB as well as the rejoining of DSB in stationary cells of E. coli (strain B/r) irradiated with radiations of different quality. In the latter case irradiations were done so that the cell survival was roughly at the same level. We measured the DSB using the pulse field gelelectrophoresis which allows to separate between intact (circular) and damaged (linear) DNA. The irradiated cells were transferred to NB medium and incubated for different times to allow rejoining.

  4. The Transcriptional Response to DNA-Double-Strand Breaks in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Whitaker, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens is unique among plants in supporting the generation of mutant alleles by facile homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting (GT). Reasoning that targeted transgene integration occurs through the capture of transforming DNA by the homology-dependent pathway for DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair, we analysed the genome-wide transcriptomic response to bleomycin-induced DNA damage and generated mutants in candidate DNA repair genes. Massively parallel (Illumina) cDNA sequencing identified potential participants in gene targeting. Transcripts encoding DNA repair proteins active in multiple repair pathways were significantly up-regulated. These included Rad51, CtIP, DNA ligase 1, Replication protein A and ATR in homology-dependent repair, Xrcc4, DNA ligase 4, Ku70 and Ku80 in non-homologous end-joining and Rad1, Tebichi/polymerase theta, PARP in microhomology-mediated end-joining. Differentially regulated cell-cycle components included up-regulated Rad9 and Hus1 DNA-damage-related checkpoint proteins and down-regulated D-type cyclins and B-type CDKs, commensurate with the imposition of a checkpoint at G2 of the cell cycle characteristic of homology-dependent DNA-DSB repair. Candidate genes, including ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling helicases associated with repair and recombination, were knocked out and analysed for growth defects, hypersensitivity to DNA damage and reduced GT efficiency. Targeted knockout of PpCtIP, a cell-cycle activated mediator of homology-dependent DSB resection, resulted in bleomycin-hypersensitivity and greatly reduced GT efficiency. PMID:27537368

  5. The Transcriptional Response to DNA-Double-Strand Breaks in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Whitaker, John W; Cuming, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    The model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens is unique among plants in supporting the generation of mutant alleles by facile homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting (GT). Reasoning that targeted transgene integration occurs through the capture of transforming DNA by the homology-dependent pathway for DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair, we analysed the genome-wide transcriptomic response to bleomycin-induced DNA damage and generated mutants in candidate DNA repair genes. Massively parallel (Illumina) cDNA sequencing identified potential participants in gene targeting. Transcripts encoding DNA repair proteins active in multiple repair pathways were significantly up-regulated. These included Rad51, CtIP, DNA ligase 1, Replication protein A and ATR in homology-dependent repair, Xrcc4, DNA ligase 4, Ku70 and Ku80 in non-homologous end-joining and Rad1, Tebichi/polymerase theta, PARP in microhomology-mediated end-joining. Differentially regulated cell-cycle components included up-regulated Rad9 and Hus1 DNA-damage-related checkpoint proteins and down-regulated D-type cyclins and B-type CDKs, commensurate with the imposition of a checkpoint at G2 of the cell cycle characteristic of homology-dependent DNA-DSB repair. Candidate genes, including ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling helicases associated with repair and recombination, were knocked out and analysed for growth defects, hypersensitivity to DNA damage and reduced GT efficiency. Targeted knockout of PpCtIP, a cell-cycle activated mediator of homology-dependent DSB resection, resulted in bleomycin-hypersensitivity and greatly reduced GT efficiency. PMID:27537368

  6. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in E. coli and constitute the major pathway of error free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalyzed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ, and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. PMID:21219454

  7. Validation of freezing tissues and cells for analysis of DNA strand break levels by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Petra; Pedersen, Lourdes M; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Saber, Anne T; Hougaard, Karin S; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2013-11-01

    The comet analysis of DNA strand break levels in tissues and cells has become a common method of screening for genotoxicity. The large majority of published studies have used fresh tissues and cells processed immediately after collection. However, we have used frozen tissues and cells for more than 10 years, and we believe that freezing samples improve efficiency of the method. We compared DNA strand break levels measured in fresh and frozen bronchoalveolar cells, and lung and liver tissues from mice exposed to the known mutagen methyl methanesulphonate (0, 25, 75, 112.5mg/kg). We used a high-throughput comet protocol with fully automated scoring of DNA strand break levels. The overall results from fresh and frozen samples were in agreement [R (2) = 0.93 for %DNA in tail (%TDNA) and R (2) = 0.78 for tail length (TL)]. A slightly increased %TDNA was observed in lung and liver tissue from vehicle controls; and TL was slightly reduced in bronchoalveolar lavage cells from the high-dose group. In our comet protocol, a small block of tissue designated for comet analysis is frozen immediately at tissue collection and kept deep frozen until rapidly homogenised and embedded in agarose. To demonstrate the feasibility of long-term freezing of samples, we analysed the day-to-day variation of our internal historical negative and positive comet assay controls collected over a 10-year period (1128 observations, 11 batches of frozen untreated and H2O2-treated A549 lung epithelial cells). The H2O2 treatment explained most of the variation 57-77% and the day-to-day variation was only 2-12%. The presented protocol allows analysis of samples collected over longer time span, at different locations, with reduced variation by reducing number of electrophoreses and is suitable for both toxicological and epidemiological studies. The use of frozen tissues; however, requires great care during preparation before analysis, with handling as a major risk factor.

  8. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  9. Controlled DNA double-strand break induction in mice reveals post-damage transcriptome stability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongkyu; Sturgill, David; Tran, Andy D.; Sinclair, David A.; Oberdoerffer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their repair can cause extensive epigenetic changes. As a result, DSBs have been proposed to promote transcriptional and, ultimately, physiological dysfunction via both cell-intrinsic and cell-non-autonomous pathways. Studying the consequences of DSBs in higher organisms has, however, been hindered by a scarcity of tools for controlled DSB induction. Here, we describe a mouse model that allows for both tissue-specific and temporally controlled DSB formation at ∼140 defined genomic loci. Using this model, we show that DSBs promote a DNA damage signaling-dependent decrease in gene expression in primary cells specifically at break-bearing genes, which is reversed upon DSB repair. Importantly, we demonstrate that restoration of gene expression can occur independently of cell cycle progression, underlining its relevance for normal tissue maintenance. Consistent with this, we observe no evidence for persistent transcriptional repression in response to a multi-day course of continuous DSB formation and repair in mouse lymphocytes in vivo. Together, our findings reveal an unexpected capacity of primary cells to maintain transcriptome integrity in response to DSBs, pointing to a limited role for DNA damage as a mediator of cell-autonomous epigenetic dysfunction. PMID:26687720

  10. Asf1 facilitates dephosphorylation of Rad53 after DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Waterman, David P; Aguilar, Fiona; Katsnelson, Lizabeth; Eapen, Vinay V; Memisoglu, Gonen; Haber, James E

    2016-05-15

    To allow for sufficient time to repair DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint. In budding yeast, Rad53 (mammalian Chk2) phosphorylation parallels the persistence of the unrepaired DSB and is extinguished when repair is complete in a process termed recovery or when the cells adapt to the DNA damage checkpoint. A strain containing a slowly repaired DSB does not require the histone chaperone Asf1 to resume cell cycle progression after DSB repair. When a second, rapidly repairable DSB is added to this strain, Asf1 becomes required for recovery. Recovery from two repairable DSBs also depends on the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 and the cullin subunit Rtt101, both of which modify histone H3 that is associated with Asf1. We show that dissociation of histone H3 from Asf1 is required for efficient recovery and that Asf1 is required for complete dephosphorylation of Rad53 when the upstream DNA damage checkpoint signaling is turned off. Our data suggest that the requirements for recovery from the DNA damage checkpoint become more stringent with increased levels of damage and that Asf1 plays a histone chaperone-independent role in facilitating complete Rad53 dephosphorylation following repair.

  11. Asf1 facilitates dephosphorylation of Rad53 after DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Waterman, David P; Aguilar, Fiona; Katsnelson, Lizabeth; Eapen, Vinay V; Memisoglu, Gonen; Haber, James E

    2016-05-15

    To allow for sufficient time to repair DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint. In budding yeast, Rad53 (mammalian Chk2) phosphorylation parallels the persistence of the unrepaired DSB and is extinguished when repair is complete in a process termed recovery or when the cells adapt to the DNA damage checkpoint. A strain containing a slowly repaired DSB does not require the histone chaperone Asf1 to resume cell cycle progression after DSB repair. When a second, rapidly repairable DSB is added to this strain, Asf1 becomes required for recovery. Recovery from two repairable DSBs also depends on the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 and the cullin subunit Rtt101, both of which modify histone H3 that is associated with Asf1. We show that dissociation of histone H3 from Asf1 is required for efficient recovery and that Asf1 is required for complete dephosphorylation of Rad53 when the upstream DNA damage checkpoint signaling is turned off. Our data suggest that the requirements for recovery from the DNA damage checkpoint become more stringent with increased levels of damage and that Asf1 plays a histone chaperone-independent role in facilitating complete Rad53 dephosphorylation following repair. PMID:27222517

  12. Repairing DNA double-strand breaks by the prokaryotic non-homologous end-joining pathway.

    PubMed

    Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2009-06-01

    The NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) pathway is one of the major mechanisms for repairing DSBs (double-strand breaks) that occur in genomic DNA. In common with eukaryotic organisms, many prokaryotes possess a conserved NHEJ apparatus that is essential for the repair of DSBs arising in the stationary phase of the cell cycle. Although the bacterial NHEJ complex is much more minimal than its eukaryotic counterpart, both pathways share a number of common mechanistic features. The relative simplicity of the prokaryotic NHEJ complex makes it a tractable model system for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DSB repair. The present review describes recent advances in our understanding of prokaryotic end-joining, focusing primarily on biochemical, structural and cellular aspects of the mycobacterial NHEJ repair pathway.

  13. Visualization of complex DNA double-strand breaks in a tumor treated with carbon ion radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Niimi, Atsuko; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Murata, Kazutoshi; Matsumura, Akihiko; Noda, Shin-Ei; Kobayashi, Daijiro; Iwanaga, Mototaro; Tsuchida, Keisuke; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Shibata, Atsushi; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy shows great potential as a cure for X-ray-resistant tumors. Basic research suggests that the strong cell-killing effect induced by carbon ions is based on their ability to cause complex DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, evidence supporting the formation of complex DSBs in actual patients is lacking. Here, we used advanced high-resolution microscopy with deconvolution to show that complex DSBs are formed in a human tumor clinically treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, but not in a tumor treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Furthermore, analysis using a physics model suggested that the complexity of radiotherapy-induced DSBs is related to linear energy transfer, which is much higher for carbon ion beams than for X-rays. Visualization of complex DSBs in clinical specimens will help us to understand the anti-tumor effects of carbon ion radiotherapy. PMID:26925533

  14. Radiation-induced heat-labile sites that convert into DNA double-strand breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The yield of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in SV40 DNA irradiated in aqueous solution was found to increase by more than a factor of two as a result of postirradiation incubation of the DNA at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0 for 24 h. This is in agreement with data from studies performed at 37 degrees C that were published previously. Importantly, similar results were also obtained from irradiation of mammalian DNA in agarose plugs. These results suggest that heat-labile sites within locally multiply damaged sites are produced by radiation and are subsequently transformed into DSBs. Since incubation at 50 degrees C is typically employed for lysis of cells in commonly used pulsed-field gel assays for detection of DSBs in mammalian cells, the possibility that heat-labile sites are present in irradiated cells was also studied. An increase in the apparent number of DSBs as a function of lysis time at 50 degrees C was found with kinetics that was similar to that for irradiated DNA, although the magnitude of the increase was smaller. This suggests that heat-labile sites are also formed in the cell. If this is the case, a proportion of DSBs measured by the pulsed-field gel assays may occur during the lysis step and may not be present in the cell as breaks but as heat-labile sites. It is suggested that such sites consist mainly of heat-labile sugar lesions within locally multiply damaged sites. Comparing rejoining of DSBs measured with short and long lysis procedure indicates that the heat-labile sites are repaired with fast kinetics in comparison with repair of the bulk of DSBs.

  15. Molecular recombination and the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, M A; Moore, P D

    1979-01-01

    Molecular recombination and the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) have been examined in the G-0 and S phase of the cell cycle using a temperature-sensitive CHO cell line to test i) if there are cell cycle restrictions on the repair of DSB's' ii) the extent to which molecular recombination can be induced between either sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes and iii) whether repair of DSB's involves recombination (3). Mitomycin C (1-2 micrograms/ml) or ionizing radiation (50 krad) followed by incubation resulted in molecular recombination (hybrid DNA) in S phase cells. Approximately 0.03 to 0.10% of the molecules (number average molecular weight: 5.6 x 10(6) Daltons after shearing) had hybrid regions for more than 75% of their length. However, no recombination was detected in G-0 cells. Since the repair of DSB was observed in both stages with more than 50% of the breaks repaired in 5 hours, it appears that DSB repair in G-0 cells does not involve recombination between homologous chromosomes. The possibility is not excluded that repair in G-0 cells involves only small regions (less than 4 x 10(6) Daltons). PMID:493136

  16. Cohesin Protects Genes against γH2AX Induced by DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Pierre; Aymard, Francois; Iacovoni, Jason S.; Briois, Sébastien; Canitrot, Yvan; Bugler, Beatrix; Massip, Laurent; Losada, Ana; Legube, Gaëlle

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin undergoes major remodeling around DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) to promote repair and DNA damage response (DDR) activation. We recently reported a high-resolution map of γH2AX around multiple breaks on the human genome, using a new cell-based DSB inducible system. In an attempt to further characterize the chromatin landscape induced around DSBs, we now report the profile of SMC3, a subunit of the cohesin complex, previously characterized as required for repair by homologous recombination. We found that recruitment of cohesin is moderate and restricted to the immediate vicinity of DSBs in human cells. In addition, we show that cohesin controls γH2AX distribution within domains. Indeed, as we reported previously for transcription, cohesin binding antagonizes γH2AX spreading. Remarkably, depletion of cohesin leads to an increase of γH2AX at cohesin-bound genes, associated with a decrease in their expression level after DSB induction. We propose that, in agreement with their function in chromosome architecture, cohesin could also help to isolate active genes from some chromatin remodelling and modifications such as the ones that occur when a DSB is detected on the genome. PMID:22275873

  17. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant chronic myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Lisa A.; Robert, Carine; Rapoport, Aaron P.; Gojo, Ivana; Baer, Maria R.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Rassool, Feyruz V.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to imatinib (IM) and other BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI)s is an increasing problem in leukemias caused by expression of BCR-ABL1. Since chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 utilize an alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway (ALT NHEJ) to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s, we asked whether this repair pathway is a novel therapeutic target in TKI-resistant disease. Notably, the steady state levels of two ALT NHEJ proteins, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and DNA ligase IIIα were increased in the BCR-ABL1-positive CML cell line K562 and, to a greater extent, in its imatinib resistant (IMR) derivative. Incubation of these cell lines with a combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors inhibited ALT NHEJ and selectively decreased survival with the effect being greater in the IMR derivative. Similar results were obtained with TKI-resistant derivatives of two hematopoietic cell lines that had been engineered to stably express BCR-ABL1. Together our results show that the sensitivity of cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 to the combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors correlates with the steady state levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα, and ALT NHEJ activity. Importantly, analysis of clinical samples from CML patients confirmed that the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα correlated with sensitivity to the DNA repair inhibitor combination. Thus, the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα serve as biomarkers to identify a subgroup of CML patients who may be candidates for therapies that target the ALT NHEJ pathway when treatment with TKIs has failed. PMID:22641215

  18. Accumulation of Ku70 at DNA double-strand breaks in living epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-15

    Ku70 and Ku80 play an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., nonhomologous DNA-end-joining (NHEJ). No accumulation mechanisms of Ku70 at DSBs have been clarified in detail, although the accumulation mechanism of Ku70 at DSBs plays key roles in regulating the NHEJ activity. Here, we show the essential domains for the accumulation and function of Ku70 at DSBs in living lung epithelial cells. Our results showed that EGFP-Ku70 accumulation at DSBs began immediately after irradiation. Our findings demonstrate that three domains of Ku70, i.e., the {alpha}/{beta}, DNA-binding, and Ku80-binding domains, but not the SAP domain, are necessary for the accumulation at or recognition of DSBs in the early stage after irradiation. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that the leucine at amino acid 385 of Ku70 in the Ku80-binding domain, but not the three target amino acids for acetylation in the DNA-binding domain, is involved in the localization and accumulation of Ku70 at DSBs. Furthermore, accumulations of XRCC4 and XLF, but not that of Artemis, at DSBs are dependent on the presence of Ku70. These findings suggest that Artemis can work in not only the Ku-dependent repair process, but also the Ku-independent process at DSBs in living epithelial cells.

  19. Nanoneedle insertion into the cell nucleus does not induce double-strand breaks in chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seunghwan; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Naka, Ryohei; Silberberg, Yaron R; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2013-09-01

    An atomic force microscope probe can be formed into an ultra-sharp cylindrical shape (a nanoneedle) using micro-fabrication techniques such as focused ion beam etching. This nanoneedle can be effectively inserted through the plasma membrane of a living cell to not only access the cytosol, but also to penetrate through the nuclear membrane. This technique shows great potential as a tool for performing intranuclear measurements and manipulations. Repeated insertions of a nanoneedle into a live cell were previously shown not to affect cell viability. However, the effect of nanoneedle insertion on the nucleus and nuclear components is still unknown. DNA is the most crucial component of the nucleus for proper cell function and may be physically damaged by a nanoneedle. To investigate the integrity of DNA following nanoneedle insertion, the occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) was assessed. The results showed that there was no chromosomal DNA damage due to nanoneedle insertion into the nucleus, as indicated by the expression level of γ-H2AX, a molecular marker of DSBs.

  20. The proteasomal de-ubiquitinating enzyme POH1 promotes the double-strand DNA break response

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Laura R; Densham, Ruth M; Jia, Junying; Garvin, Alexander J; Stone, Helen R; Shah, Vandna; Weekes, Daniel; Festy, Frederic; Beesley, James; Morris, Joanna R

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of Ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates generated by the complex network of proteins that promote the mammalian DNA double-strand break (DSB) response is not fully understood. We show here that the Ub protease POH1/rpn11/PSMD14 resident in the 19S proteasome regulatory particle is required for processing poly-Ub formed in the DSB response. Proteasome activity is required to restrict tudor domain-dependent 53BP1 accumulation at sites of DNA damage. This occurs both through antagonism of RNF8/RNF168-mediated lysine 63-linked poly-Ub and through the promotion of JMJD2A retention on chromatin. Consistent with this role POH1 acts in opposition to RNF8/RNF168 to modulate end-joining DNA repair. Additionally, POH1 acts independently of 53BP1 in homologous recombination repair to promote RAD51 loading. Accordingly, POH1-deficient cells are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. These data demonstrate that proteasomal POH1 is a key de-ubiquitinating enzyme that regulates ubiquitin conjugates generated in response to damage and that several aspects of the DSB response are regulated by the proteasome. PMID:22909820

  1. Cdc14A and Cdc14B Redundantly Regulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Ha, Kyungsoo; Lu, Guojun; Fang, Xiao; Cheng, Ranran; Zuo, Qiuhong

    2015-01-01

    Cdc14 is a phosphatase that controls mitotic exit and cytokinesis in budding yeast. In mammals, the two Cdc14 homologues, Cdc14A and Cdc14B, have been proposed to regulate DNA damage repair, whereas the mitotic exit and cytokinesis rely on another phosphatase, PP2A-B55α. It is unclear if the two Cdc14s work redundantly in DNA repair and which repair pathways they participate in. More importantly, their target(s) in DNA repair remains elusive. Here we report that Cdc14B knockout (Cdc14B−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) showed defects in repairing ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which occurred only at late passages when Cdc14A levels were low. This repair defect could occur at early passages if Cdc14A levels were also compromised. These results indicate redundancy between Cdc14B and Cdc14A in DSB repair. Further, we found that Cdc14B deficiency impaired both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), the two major DSB repair pathways. We also provide evidence that Cdh1 is a downstream target of Cdc14B in DSB repair. PMID:26283732

  2. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Tanner, Judith; Butz, Tilman

    2007-07-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone γH2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of γH2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as "biological track detectors" for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of γH2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si 3N 4 window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern.

  3. Detection of DNA Strand Breaks in Apoptotic Cells by Flow- and Image-Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Zhao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Extensive DNA fragmentation that generates a multitude of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a hallmark of apoptosis. A widely used approach to identify apoptotic cells relies on labeling DSBs in situ with fluorochromes. Flow or image cytometry is then used to detect and quantify apoptotic cells labeled this way. We developed several variants of the methodology that is based on the use of exogenous terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) to label 3′-OH ends of the DSBs with fluorochromes, defined as the TUNEL assay. This chapter describes the variant based on DSBs labeling using 5-Bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-5′-triphosphate (BrdUTP) as a TdT substrate and the incorporated BrdU is subsequently detected immunocytochemically with anti-BrdU antibody. We also describe modifications of the protocol that allow using other than BrdUTP deoxyribonucleotides to label DSBs. Concurrent differential staining of cellular DNA and multiparameter analysis of cells by flow- or image cytometry enables one to correlate the induction of apoptosis with the cell cycle phase. Examples of the detection of apoptotic cells in cultures of human leukemic cell lines treated with TNF-α and DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor topote-can are presented. The protocol can be applied to the cells growing in vitro, treated ex vivo with cytotoxic drugs as well as to clinical samples. PMID:21057923

  4. Triplex structures induce DNA double strand breaks via replication fork collapse in NER deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Adaku, Nneoma; Peart, Natoya; Rogers, Faye A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural alterations in DNA can serve as natural impediments to replication fork stability and progression, resulting in DNA damage and genomic instability. Naturally occurring polypurine mirror repeat sequences in the human genome can create endogenous triplex structures evoking a robust DNA damage response. Failures to recognize or adequately process these genomic lesions can result in loss of genomic integrity. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins have been found to play a prominent role in the recognition and repair of triplex structures. We demonstrate using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that chromosomal triplexes perturb DNA replication fork progression, eventually resulting in fork collapse and the induction of double strand breaks (DSBs). We find that cells deficient in the NER damage recognition proteins, XPA and XPC, accumulate more DSBs in response to chromosomal triplex formation than NER-proficient cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that XPC-deficient cells are particularly prone to replication-associated DSBs in the presence of triplexes. In the absence of XPA or XPC, deleterious consequences of triplex-induced genomic instability may be averted by activating apoptosis via dual phosphorylation of the H2AX protein. Our results reveal that damage recognition by XPC and XPA is critical to maintaining replication fork integrity and preventing replication fork collapse in the presence of triplex structures. PMID:27298253

  5. Inhalation of ozone induces DNA strand breaks and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Jette; Dybdahl, Marianne; Vogel, Ulla; Hansen, Max; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2002-09-26

    Ozone (O3) is a well-known oxidant pollutant present in photochemical smog. Although ozone is suspected to be a respiratory carcinogen it is not regulated as a carcinogen in most countries. The genotoxic and inflammatory effects of ozone were investigated in female mice exposed to ozone for 90 min. The tail moment in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from BALB/c mice was determined by the comet assay as a measure of DNA strand breaks. Within the first 200 min after exposure, the BAL cells from the mice exposed to 1 or 2 ppm ozone had 1.6- and 2.6-fold greater tail moments than unexposed mice. After 200 min there was no effect. It could be ruled out that the effect during the first 200 min was due to major infiltration of lymphocytes or neutrophils. Unexpectedly, ozone had no effect on the content of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in nuclear DNA or on oxidised amino acids in the lung tissue. The mRNA level of the repair enzyme ERCC1 was not increased in the lung tissue. Inflammation was measured by the cytokine mRNA level in lung homogenates. An up to 150-fold induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA was detected in the animals exposed to 2 ppm ozone compared to the air-exposed control mice. Also at 1 ppm ozone, the IL-6 mRNA was induced. The large induction of IL-6 mRNA in the lung took place after DNA strand breaks were induced in BAL. This does not support the notion that inflammatory reactions are the cause of DNA damage. To determine whether these exposures were mutagenic, Muta Mice were exposed to 2 ppm ozone, 90 min per day for 5 days. No treatment-related mutations could be detected in the cII transgene. These results indicate that a short episode of ozone exposure at five times the threshold limit value (TLV) in US induces lung inflammatory mediators and DNA damage in the cells in the lumen of the lung. This was not reflected by an induction of mutations in the lung of Muta Mice. PMID:12297145

  6. Inhalation of ozone induces DNA strand breaks and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Jette; Dybdahl, Marianne; Vogel, Ulla; Hansen, Max; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2002-09-26

    Ozone (O3) is a well-known oxidant pollutant present in photochemical smog. Although ozone is suspected to be a respiratory carcinogen it is not regulated as a carcinogen in most countries. The genotoxic and inflammatory effects of ozone were investigated in female mice exposed to ozone for 90 min. The tail moment in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from BALB/c mice was determined by the comet assay as a measure of DNA strand breaks. Within the first 200 min after exposure, the BAL cells from the mice exposed to 1 or 2 ppm ozone had 1.6- and 2.6-fold greater tail moments than unexposed mice. After 200 min there was no effect. It could be ruled out that the effect during the first 200 min was due to major infiltration of lymphocytes or neutrophils. Unexpectedly, ozone had no effect on the content of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in nuclear DNA or on oxidised amino acids in the lung tissue. The mRNA level of the repair enzyme ERCC1 was not increased in the lung tissue. Inflammation was measured by the cytokine mRNA level in lung homogenates. An up to 150-fold induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA was detected in the animals exposed to 2 ppm ozone compared to the air-exposed control mice. Also at 1 ppm ozone, the IL-6 mRNA was induced. The large induction of IL-6 mRNA in the lung took place after DNA strand breaks were induced in BAL. This does not support the notion that inflammatory reactions are the cause of DNA damage. To determine whether these exposures were mutagenic, Muta Mice were exposed to 2 ppm ozone, 90 min per day for 5 days. No treatment-related mutations could be detected in the cII transgene. These results indicate that a short episode of ozone exposure at five times the threshold limit value (TLV) in US induces lung inflammatory mediators and DNA damage in the cells in the lumen of the lung. This was not reflected by an induction of mutations in the lung of Muta Mice.

  7. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent Protein Kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Ronald A.; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao; Berber, Elisabeth; Boxer, Lisa D.; Kusumoto, Rika; Guan, Shenheng; Shi, Xiaobing; Gozani, Or; Burlingame, Alma L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Chua, Katrin F.

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor with chromatin impacts on the efficiency of repair, and establish a link between chromatin regulation, DNA repair, and a mammalian Sir2 factor. PMID:20157594

  8. Cisplatin enhances the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks by hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Sanche, Léon; Hunting, Darel J

    2013-03-01

    The synergistic interaction of cisplatin with ionizing radiation is the clinical rationale for the treatment of several cancers including head and neck, cervical and lung cancer. The underlying molecular mechanism of the synergy has not yet been identified, although both DNA damage and repair processes are likely involved. Here, we investigate the indirect effect of γ rays on strand break formation in a supercoiled plasmid DNA (pGEM-3Zf-) covalently modified by cisplatin. The yields of single- and double-strand breaks were determined by irradiation of DNA and cisplatin/DNA samples with (60)Co γ rays under four different scavenging conditions to examine the involvement of hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals in inducing the DNA damage. At 5 mM tris in an N2 atmosphere, the presence of an average of two cisplatins per plasmid increased the yields of single- and double-strand breaks by factors of 1.9 and 2.2, respectively, relative to the irradiated unmodified DNA samples. Given that each plasmid of 3,200 base pairs contained an average of two cisplatins, this represents an increase in radiosensitivity of 3,200-fold on a per base pair basis. When hydrated electrons were scavenged by saturating the samples with N2O, these enhancement factors decreased to 1.5 and 1.2, respectively, for single- and double-strand breaks. When hydroxyl radicals were scavenged using 200 mM tris, the respective enhancement factors were 1.2 and 1.6 for single- and double-strand breaks, respectively. Furthermore, no enhancement in DNA damage by cisplatin was observed after scavenging both hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons. These findings show that hydrated electrons can induce both single- and double-strand breaks in the platinated DNA, but not in unmodified DNA. In addition, cisplatin modification is clearly an extremely efficient means of increasing the formation of both single- and double-strand breaks by the hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals created by ionizing

  9. O-hydroxylamine-coupled alkaline gel electrophoresis assay for the detection and measurement of DNA single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Luke, April M; Nakamura, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect and measure DNA single-strand breaks has been the aim of numerous assays developed to assess genotoxicity. These methods often rely on alkaline conditions to denature DNA. However, alkaline treatment of DNA also introduces artifactual SSBs through the cleavage of alkali-labile sites resulting in confounded data. Here, we describe a modified alkaline gel electrophoresis assay coupled with a neutral O-hydroxylamine to obtain the measurement of true SSB formation.

  10. Gastric cancer associated variant of DNA polymerase beta (Leu22Pro) promotes DNA replication associated double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rozacky, Jenna; Nemec, Antoni A; Sweasy, Joann B; Kidane, Dawit

    2015-09-15

    DNA polymerase beta (Pol β) is a key enzyme for the protection against oxidative DNA lesions via its role in base excision repair (BER). Approximately 1/3 of tumors studied to date express Pol β variant proteins, and several tumors overexpress Pol β. Pol β possesses DNA polymerase and dRP lyase activities, both of which are known to be important for efficient BER. The dRP lyase activity resides within the 8kDa amino terminal domain of Pol β, is responsible for removal of the 5' phosphate group (5'-dRP). The DNA polymerase subsequently fills the gaps. Previously, we demonstrated that the human gastric cancer-associated variant of Pol β (Leu22Pro (L22P)) lacks dRP lyase function in vitro. Here, we report that L22P-expressing cells harbor significantly increased replication associated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and defective maintenance of the nascent DNA strand (NDS) during replication stress. Moreover, L22P-expressing cells are sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors, which suggests trapped PARP1 binds to the 5'-dRP group and blocks replications forks, resulting in fork collapse and DSBs. Our data suggest that the normal function of the dRP lyase is critical to maintain replication fork integrity and prevent replication fork collapse to DSBs and cellular transformation. PMID:26090616

  11. Sensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes of pilots and astronauts to gamma-radiation: induction of double-stranded DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Vorobyova, N Yu; Osipova, A N; Pelevina, I I

    2007-10-01

    The levels of DNA breaks before and after in vitro irradiation (1 Gy) of lymphocytes from 17 donors, 41 pilots, and 8 astronauts were studied by comet assay. Seventeen donors. 41 pilots, and 8 astronauts were examined. The flights augmented individual differences in the levels of DNA breaks in blood lymphocytes and in the severity of injuries inflicted by radiation exposure to lymphocyte DNA. Dispersions in the distribution of the initial levels of DNA breaks in pilots and astronauts differed significantly from the control according to Fisher's F test. The dispersion of distribution of the levels of double-stranded DNA breaks after in vitro irradiation in the group of pilots also differed significantly from the control distribution. These results necessitate evaluation of individual sensitivity to the mission conditions during medical selection.

  12. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code: NASIC.

    PubMed

    Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Yan, Congchong; Xie, Wenzhang; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Tung, Chuanjong

    2015-09-01

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway.

  13. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation. PMID:25820262

  14. Immunofluorescent Detection of DNA Double Strand Breaks induced by High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Desai, Nirav

    2004-01-01

    Within cell nuclei, traversing charged heavy ion particles lead to the accumulation of proteins related to DNA lesions and repair along the ion trajectories. Irradiation using a standard geometric setup with the beam path perpendicular to the cell monolayer generates discrete foci of several proteins known to localize at sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). One such molecule is the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which gets rapidly phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation. Here we present data obtained with a modified irradiation geometry characterized by a beam path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells. This new irradiation geometry leads to the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in the x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the particle trajectories. Qualitative analysis of these distributions presented insights into the DNA repair kinetics along the primary track structure and visualization of possible chromatin movement. We also present evidence of colocalization of gamma-H2AX with several other proteins in responses to ionizing radiation exposure. Analysis of gamma-H2AX has the potential to provide useful information on human cell responses to high LET radiation after exposure to space-like radiation.

  15. RNF4 regulates DNA double-strand break repair in a cell cycle-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Li, Xu; Stark, Jeremy M.; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Ann, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both RNF4 and KAP1 play critical roles in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the functional interplay of RNF4 and KAP1 in regulating DNA damage response remains unclear. We have previously demonstrated the recruitment and degradation of KAP1 by RNF4 require the phosphorylation of Ser824 (pS824) and SUMOylation of KAP1. In this report, we show the retention of DSB-induced pS824-KAP1 foci and RNF4 abundance are inversely correlated as cell cycle progresses. Following irradiation, pS824-KAP1 foci predominantly appear in the cyclin A (-) cells, whereas RNF4 level is suppressed in the G0-/G1-phases and then accumulates during S-/G2-phases. Notably, 53BP1 foci, but not BRCA1 foci, co-exist with pS824-KAP1 foci. Depletion of KAP1 yields opposite effect on the dynamics of 53BP1 and BRCA1 loading, favoring homologous recombination repair. In addition, we identify p97 is present in the RNF4-KAP1 interacting complex and the inhibition of p97 renders MCF7 breast cancer cells relatively more sensitive to DNA damage. Collectively, these findings suggest that combined effect of dynamic recruitment of RNF4 to KAP1 regulates the relative occupancy of 53BP1 and BRCA1 at DSB sites to direct DSB repair in a cell cycle-dependent manner. PMID:26766492

  16. Structural Basis of Detection and Signaling of DNA Single-Strand Breaks by Human PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Eustermann, Sebastian; Wu, Wing-Fung; Langelier, Marie-France; Yang, Ji-Chun; Easton, Laura E; Riccio, Amanda A; Pascal, John M; Neuhaus, David

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) is a key eukaryotic stress sensor that responds in seconds to DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), the most frequent genomic damage. A burst of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis initiates DNA damage response, whereas PARP-1 inhibition kills BRCA-deficient tumor cells selectively, providing the first anti-cancer therapy based on synthetic lethality. However, the mechanism underlying PARP-1's function remained obscure; inherent dynamics of SSBs and PARP-1's multi-domain architecture hindered structural studies. Here we reveal the structural basis of SSB detection and how multi-domain folding underlies the allosteric switch that determines PARP-1's signaling response. Two flexibly linked N-terminal zinc fingers recognize the extreme deformability of SSBs and drive co-operative, stepwise self-assembly of remaining PARP-1 domains to control the activity of the C-terminal catalytic domain. Automodification in cis explains the subsequent release of monomeric PARP-1 from DNA, allowing repair and replication to proceed. Our results provide a molecular framework for understanding PARP inhibitor action and, more generally, allosteric control of dynamic, multi-domain proteins. PMID:26626479

  17. Mechanisms and Consequences of Double-Strand DNA Break Formation in Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Cannan, Wendy J; Pederson, David S

    2016-01-01

    All organisms suffer double-strand breaks (DSBs) in their DNA as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. DSBs can also form when replication forks encounter DNA lesions or repair intermediates. The processing and repair of DSBs can lead to mutations, loss of heterozygosity, and chromosome rearrangements that result in cell death or cancer. The most common pathway used to repair DSBs in metazoans (non-homologous DNA end joining) is more commonly mutagenic than the alternative pathway (homologous recombination mediated repair). Thus, factors that influence the choice of pathways used DSB repair can affect an individual's mutation burden and risk of cancer. This review describes radiological, chemical, and biological mechanisms that generate DSBs, and discusses the impact of such variables as DSB etiology, cell type, cell cycle, and chromatin structure on the yield, distribution, and processing of DSBs. The final section focuses on nucleosome-specific mechanisms that influence DSB production, and the possible relationship between higher order chromosome coiling and chromosome shattering (chromothripsis). PMID:26040249

  18. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and {gamma}-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  19. High LET - induced H2AX phosphorylation at sites of DNA double strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, N.; Cucinotta, F.; Wu, H.

    Within cell nuclei, traversing charged heavy ion particles lead to the accumulation of proteins related to DNA lesions and repair along the ion trajectories. Irradiation using a standard geometric setup with the beam path perpendicular to the cell monolayer generates discrete foci of several proteins known to localize at sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). One such molecule is the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which gets rapidly phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation. Here we present data obtained with a modified irradiation geometry characterized by a beam path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells. This new irradiation geometry leads to the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in the x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the particle trajectories. Qualitative analysis of these distributions presented insights into the DNA repair kinetics along the primary track structure and visualization of possible chromatin movement. We also present evidence of colocalization of gamma-H2AX with several other proteins in responses to ionizing radiation exposure. Analysis of gamma-H2AX has the potential to provide useful information on human cell responses to high LET radiation after exposure to space-like radiation.

  20. DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Telomeres Play Important Roles in Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human-infecting microbial pathogens all face a serious problem of elimination by the host immune response. Antigenic variation is an effective immune evasion mechanism where the pathogen regularly switches its major surface antigen. In many cases, the major surface antigen is encoded by genes from the same gene family, and its expression is strictly monoallelic. Among pathogens that undergo antigenic variation, Trypanosoma brucei (a kinetoplastid), which causes human African trypanosomiasis, Plasmodium falciparum (an apicomplexan), which causes malaria, Pneumocystis jirovecii (a fungus), which causes pneumonia, and Borrelia burgdorferi (a bacterium), which causes Lyme disease, also express their major surface antigens from loci next to the telomere. Except for Plasmodium, DNA recombination-mediated gene conversion is a major pathway for surface antigen switching in these pathogens. In the last decade, more sophisticated molecular and genetic tools have been developed in T. brucei, and our knowledge of functions of DNA recombination in antigenic variation has been greatly advanced. VSG is the major surface antigen in T. brucei. In subtelomeric VSG expression sites (ESs), VSG genes invariably are flanked by a long stretch of upstream 70-bp repeats. Recent studies have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), particularly those in 70-bp repeats in the active ES, are a natural potent trigger for antigenic variation in T. brucei. In addition, telomere proteins can influence VSG switching by reducing the DSB amount at subtelomeric regions. These findings will be summarized and their implications will be discussed in this review. PMID:25576484

  1. Chromatin dynamics during repair of chromosomal DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manisha; Peterson, Craig L

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of a eukaryotic genome is often challenged by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Even a single, unrepaired DSB can be a lethal event, or such unrepaired damage can result in chromosomal instability and loss of genetic information. Furthermore, defects in the pathways that respond to and repair DSBs can lead to the onset of several human pathologic disorders with pleiotropic clinical features, including age-related diseases and cancer. For decades, studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved in recognizing, signaling and repairing DSBs within eukaryotic cells. The majority of biochemical and genetic studies have used simple, DNA substrates, whereas only recently efforts have been geared towards understanding how the repair machinery deals with DSBs within chromatin fibers, the nucleoprotein complex that packages DNA within the eukaryotic nucleus. The aim of this review is to discuss our recent understanding of the relationship between chromatin structure and the repair of DSBs by homologous recombination. In particular, we discuss recent studies implicating specialized roles for several, distinct ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in facilitating multiple steps within the homologous recombination process. PMID:20495614

  2. Fine-tuning the ubiquitin code at DNA double-strand breaks: deubiquitinating enzymes at work

    PubMed Central

    Citterio, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a reversible protein modification broadly implicated in cellular functions. Signaling processes mediated by ubiquitin (ub) are crucial for the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most dangerous types of DNA lesions. In particular, the DSB response critically relies on active ubiquitination by the RNF8 and RNF168 ub ligases at the chromatin, which is essential for proper DSB signaling and repair. How this pathway is fine-tuned and what the functional consequences are of its deregulation for genome integrity and tissue homeostasis are subject of intense investigation. One important regulatory mechanism is by reversal of substrate ubiquitination through the activity of specific deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), as supported by the implication of a growing number of DUBs in DNA damage response processes. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of how ub-mediated signaling at DSBs is controlled by DUBs, with main focus on DUBs targeting histone H2A and on their recent implication in stem cell biology and cancer. PMID:26442100

  3. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose faulty repair may alter the content and organization of cellular genomes. To counteract this threat, numerous signaling and repair proteins are recruited hierarchically to the chromatin areas surrounding DSBs to facilitate accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance. In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity, as well as cell and organismal fitness. PMID:27446204

  4. Deficiency in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in mouse early preimplantation embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, Masashi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Nagata, Masao; Aoki, Fugaku . E-mail: aokif@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are caused by various environmental stresses, such as ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging agents. When DSBs occur, cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms function to stop the cell cycle until all DSBs are repaired; the phosphorylation of H2AX plays an important role in this process. Mouse preimplantation-stage embryos are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, and X-irradiated mouse zygotes are arrested at the G2 phase of the first cell cycle. To investigate the mechanisms responding to DNA damage at G2 in mouse preimplantation embryos, we examined G2/M checkpoint and DNA repair mechanisms in these embryos. Most of the one- and two-cell embryos in which DSBs had been induced by {gamma}-irradiation underwent a delay in cleavage and ceased development before the blastocyst stage. In these embryos, phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) was not detected in the one- or two-cell stages by immunocytochemistry, although it was detected after the two-cell stage during preimplantation development. These results suggest that the G2/M checkpoint and DNA repair mechanisms have insufficient function in one- and two-cell embryos, causing hypersensitivity to {gamma}-irradiation. In addition, phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein and DNA protein kinase catalytic subunits, which phosphorylate H2AX, were detected in the embryos at one- and two-cell stages, as well as at other preimplantation stages, suggesting that the absence of {gamma}-H2AX in one- and two-cell embryos depends on some factor(s) other than these kinases.

  5. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113385

  7. Lack of dependence on p53 for DNA double strand break repair of episomal vectors in human lymphoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohli, M.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene has been shown to be involved in a variety of repair processes, and recent findings have suggested that p53 may be involved in DNA double strand break repair in irradiated cells. The role of p53 in DNA double strand break repair, however, has not been fully investigated. In this study, we have constructed a novel Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-based shuttle vector, designated as pZEBNA, to explore the influence of p53 on DNA strand break repair in human lymphoblasts, since EBV-based vectors do not inactivate the p53 pathway. We have compared plasmid survival of irradiated, restriction enzyme linearized, and calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIP)-treated pZEBNA with a Simian virus 40 (SV40)-based shuttle vector, pZ189, in TK6 (wild-type p53) and WTK1 (mutant p53) lymphoblasts and determined that p53 does not modulate DNA double strand break repair in these cell lines. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. EFFECTS OF FOUR TRIHALOMETHANES ON DNA STRAND BREAKS, RENAL HYALINE DROPLET FORMATION AND SERUM TESTOSTERONE IN MALE F-344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    All four possible trihalomethanes (THMs) containing bromine and chlorine, as well as perchloroethylene (PCE), were evaluated for their ability to produce DNA strand breaks, a2u-globulin rich renal deposits, and testosterone changes in male F-344 rats. Rats received daily equimola...

  9. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal

  10. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  11. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  12. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase lambda mutant is mildly sensitive to DNA double strand breaks but defective in integration of a transgene

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomoyuki; Angelis, Karel J.; Britt, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a critical type of damage, and can be induced by both endogenous sources (e.g., errors of oxidative metabolism, transposable elements, programmed meiotic breaks, or perturbation of the DNA replication fork) and exogenous sources (e.g., ionizing radiation or radiomimetic chemicals). Although higher plants, like mammals, are thought to preferentially repair DSBs via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), much remains unclear about plant DSB repair pathways. Our reverse genetic approach suggests that DNA polymerase λ is involved in DSB repair in Arabidopsis. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant (atpolλ-1) displayed sensitivity to both gamma-irradiation and treatment with radiomimetic reagents, but not to other DNA damaging treatments. The atpolλ-1 mutant showed a moderate sensitivity to DSBs, while Arabidopsis Ku70 and DNA ligase 4 mutants (atku70-3 and atlig4-2), both of which play critical roles in NHEJ, exhibited a hypersensitivity to these treatments. The atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant exhibited a higher sensitivity to DSBs than each single mutant, but the atku70/atpolλ-1 showed similar sensitivity to the atku70-3 mutant. We showed that transcription of the DNA ligase 1, DNA ligase 6, and Wee1 genes was quickly induced by BLM in several NHEJ deficient mutants in contrast to wild-type. Finally, the T-DNA transformation efficiency dropped in NHEJ deficient mutants and the lowest transformation efficiency was scored in the atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant. These results imply that AtPolλ is involved in both DSB repair and DNA damage response pathway. PMID:26074930

  13. The COP9 signalosome is vital for timely repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Michal; Galanty, Yaron; Kashani, Lior; Blank, Michael; Khosravi, Rami; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Star, Ayelet; Shochot, Lea; Thomas, Yann; Garrett, Lisa J.; Chamovitz, Daniel A.; Bodine, David M.; Kurz, Thimo; Huertas, Pablo; Ziv, Yael; Shiloh, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response is vigorously activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The chief mobilizer of the DSB response is the ATM protein kinase. We discovered that the COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a crucial player in the DSB response and an ATM target. CSN is a protein complex that regulates the activity of cullin ring ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complexes by removing the ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8, from their cullin scaffold. We find that the CSN is physically recruited to DSB sites in a neddylation-dependent manner, and is required for timely repair of DSBs, affecting the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways—nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair (HRR). The CSN is essential for the processivity of deep end-resection—the initial step in HRR. Cullin 4a (CUL4A) is recruited to DSB sites in a CSN- and neddylation-dependent manner, suggesting that CSN partners with CRL4 in this pathway. Furthermore, we found that ATM-mediated phosphorylation of CSN subunit 3 on S410 is critical for proper DSB repair, and that loss of this phosphorylation site alone is sufficient to cause a DDR deficiency phenotype in the mouse. This novel branch of the DSB response thus significantly affects genome stability. PMID:25855810

  14. Involvement of histone H1.2 in apoptosis induced by DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Akimitsu; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Hirota, Junko; Takao, Toshifumi; Fan, Yuhong; Matsuoka, Yosuke; Zhang, Lilin; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Fujii, Yoshitaka; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide

    2003-09-19

    It is poorly understood how apoptotic signals arising from DNA damage are transmitted to mitochondria, which release apoptogenic factors into the cytoplasm that activate downstream destruction programs. Here, we identify histone H1.2 as a cytochrome c-releasing factor that appears in the cytoplasm after exposure to X-ray irradiation. While all nuclear histone H1 forms are released into the cytoplasm in a p53-dependent manner after irradiation, only H1.2, but not other H1 forms, induced cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria in a Bak-dependent manner. Reducing H1.2 expression enhanced cellular resistance to apoptosis induced by X-ray irradiation or etoposide, but not that induced by other stimuli including TNF-alpha and UV irradiation. H1.2-deficient mice exhibited increased cellular resistance in thymocytes and the small intestine to X-ray-induced apoptosis. These results indicate that histone H1.2 plays an important role in transmitting apoptotic signals from the nucleus to the mitochondria following DNA double-strand breaks.

  15. The difference that linear energy transfer makes to precursors of DNA strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, J.R.; Aguilera, J.A.; Wu, C.C.L.; Ng, J.Y.Y.; Ward, J.F.

    1996-04-01

    Using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have measured the yields of DNA single- and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) for plasmid DNA irradiated in aerobic aqueous solution with either {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays or {sup 4}He ions with a mean LET of 94 or 150 keV {mu}m{sup {minus}1}. The presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in a decrease in the yields of both SSBs and DSBs, with a greater decrease being apparent for {gamma} irradiation than for {sup 4}He-ion irradiation. Irradiation by {sup 4}He ions in the presence of N-(2-thioethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) resulted in a decrease in the yield of SSBs and a slightly larger decrease in the yield of DSBs. Together with results obtained previously, these observations suggest a substantial contribution to the formation of SSBs and DSBs by {sup 4}He ions by species containing at leas two radicals and more than two radicals, respectively. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. DNA Double Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Atsushi; Moiani, Davide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Harding, Shane M.; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Maity, Ranjan; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Kertokalio, Aryandi; Romoli, Filippo; Ismail, Amani; Ismalaj, Ermal; Petricci, Elena; Matthew, J Neale; Bristow, Robert G; Masson, Jean-Yves; Wyman, Claire; Jeggo, Penny; Tainer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY MRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here we employed structure-based design with a focused chemical library to discover specific MRE11 endo- or exonuclease inhibitors. With these inhibitors we examined repair pathway choice at DSBs generated in G2 following radiation exposure. Whilst endo- or exonuclease inhibition impairs radiation-induced RPA chromatin binding, suggesting diminished resection, the inhibitors surprisingly direct different repair outcomes. Endonuclease inhibition promotes NHEJ in lieu of HR, whilst exonuclease inhibition confers a repair defect. Collectively, the results describe nuclease-specific MRE11 inhibitors, define distinct nuclease roles in DSB repair, and support a mechanism whereby MRE11 endonuclease initiates resection, thereby licensing HR followed by MRE11 exo and EXO1/BLM bidirectional resection towards and away from the DNA end, which commits to HR. PMID:24316220

  17. DNA double-strand breaks alter the spatial arrangement of homologous loci in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Katagiri, Yohei; Ando, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics and arrangement are involved in many biological processes in nuclei of eukaryotes including plants. Plants have to respond rapidly to various environmental stimuli to achieve growth and development because they cannot move. It is assumed that the alteration of chromatin dynamics and arrangement support the response to these stimuli; however, there is little information in plants. In this study, we investigated the chromatin dynamics and arrangement with DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana by live-cell imaging with the lacO/LacI-EGFP system and simulation analysis. It was revealed that homologous loci kept a constant distance in nuclei of A. thaliana roots in general growth. We also found that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce the approach of the homologous loci with γ-irradiation. Furthermore, AtRAD54, which performs an important role in the homologous recombination repair pathway, was involved in the pairing of homologous loci with γ-irradiation. These results suggest that homologous loci approach each other to repair DSBs, and AtRAD54 mediates these phenomena.

  18. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and affects PARP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guotai; Chapman, J Ross; Brandsma, Inger; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H N; Schouten, Philip C; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-05-28

    Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway. In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, the administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumour cells of patients with breast or ovarian cancers. Despite the benefit of this tailored therapy, drug resistance can occur by HR restoration. Genetic reversion of BRCA1-inactivating mutations can be the underlying mechanism of drug resistance, but this does not explain resistance in all cases. In particular, little is known about BRCA1-independent restoration of HR. Here we show that loss of REV7 (also known as MAD2L2) in mouse and human cell lines re-establishes CTIP-dependent end resection of DSBs in BRCA1-deficient cells, leading to HR restoration and PARP inhibitor resistance, which is reversed by ATM kinase inhibition. REV7 is recruited to DSBs in a manner dependent on the H2AX-MDC1-RNF8-RNF168-53BP1 chromatin pathway, and seems to block HR and promote end joining in addition to its regulatory role in DNA damage tolerance. Finally, we establish that REV7 blocks DSB resection to promote non-homologous end-joining during immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Our results reveal an unexpected crucial function of REV7 downstream of 53BP1 in coordinating pathological DSB repair pathway choices in BRCA1-deficient cells.

  19. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and impacts PARP inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guotai; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Schouten, Philip C.; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J.; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C.; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway1. In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumor cells of patients with breast or ovarian cancers2,3. Despite the benefit of this tailored therapy, drug resistance can occur by HR restoration4. Genetic reversion of BRCA1-inactivating mutations can be the underlying mechanism of drug resistance, but this does not explain resistance in all cases5. In particular, little is known about BRCA1-independent restoration of HR. Here, we show that loss of REV7 (also known as MAD2L2) re-establishes CtIP-dependent end resection of DSBs in BRCA1-deficient cells, leading to HR restoration and PARP inhibitor resistance, reversed by ATM kinase inhibition. REV7 is recruited to DSBs in a manner dependent on the H2AX-MDC1-RNF8-RNF168-53BP1 chromatin pathway, and appears to block HR and promote end joining in addition to its regulatory role in DNA damage tolerance6. Finally, we establish that REV7 blocks DSB resection to promote non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) during immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Our results reveal an unexpected critical function of REV7 downstream of 53BP1 in coordinating pathological DSB repair pathway choices in BRCA1-deficient cells. PMID:25799992

  20. DNA double-strand breaks alter the spatial arrangement of homologous loci in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Katagiri, Yohei; Ando, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics and arrangement are involved in many biological processes in nuclei of eukaryotes including plants. Plants have to respond rapidly to various environmental stimuli to achieve growth and development because they cannot move. It is assumed that the alteration of chromatin dynamics and arrangement support the response to these stimuli; however, there is little information in plants. In this study, we investigated the chromatin dynamics and arrangement with DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana by live-cell imaging with the lacO/LacI-EGFP system and simulation analysis. It was revealed that homologous loci kept a constant distance in nuclei of A. thaliana roots in general growth. We also found that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce the approach of the homologous loci with γ-irradiation. Furthermore, AtRAD54, which performs an important role in the homologous recombination repair pathway, was involved in the pairing of homologous loci with γ-irradiation. These results suggest that homologous loci approach each other to repair DSBs, and AtRAD54 mediates these phenomena. PMID:26046331

  1. DNA double-strand breaks induced along the trajectory of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, I. C.; Niu, H.; Chen, C. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Hsu, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-known that the DNA damage caused by charged particles considerably differs from damage due to electromagnetic radiation. In the case of irradiation by charged particles the DNA lesions are more complex and clustered. Such clustered damage is presumed difficult to be repaired, and is potentially lethal. In this study, we utilize a 90°-scattering system and related imaging techniques to investigate the accumulation of γ-H2AX along the trajectory of charged particles. By immunostaining the γ-H2AX protein, optical images of corresponding double strand breaks were observed using a high resolution confocal microscope. We demonstrate the difference in the accumulation of γ-H2AX from irradiation by 1 MeV protons and that of 150 keV X-rays. The acquired images were arranged and reconstructed into a 3D image using ImageJ software. We discovered that the γ-H2AX foci, following irradiation by protons, have a tendency to extend in the beam direction, while those from X-ray irradiation tend to be smaller and more randomly distributed. These results can be explained by the physical model of energy deposition.

  2. Preventing Damage Limitation: Targeting DNA-PKcs and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathways for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dungl, Daniela A.; Maginn, Elaina N.; Stronach, Euan A.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the cornerstone of ovarian cancer treatment, and its efficacy is dependent on the generation of DNA damage, with subsequent induction of apoptosis. Inappropriate or aberrant activation of the DNA damage response network is associated with resistance to platinum, and defects in DNA repair pathways play critical roles in determining patient response to chemotherapy. In ovarian cancer, tumor cell defects in homologous recombination – a repair pathway activated in response to double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) – are most commonly associated with platinum-sensitive disease. However, despite initial sensitivity, the emergence of resistance is frequent. Here, we review strategies for directly interfering with DNA repair pathways, with particular focus on direct inhibition of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), another DSB repair pathway. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is a core component of NHEJ and it has shown considerable promise as a chemosensitization target in numerous cancer types, including ovarian cancer where it functions to promote platinum-induced survival signaling, via AKT activation. The development of pharmacological inhibitors of DNA-PKcs is on-going, and clinic-ready agents offer real hope to patients with chemoresistant disease. PMID:26579492

  3. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  4. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M

    2015-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures.

  5. A modified and automated version of the 'Fluorimetric Detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding' method to quantify formation and repair of DNA strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Villanueva, María; Pfeiffer, Ragen; Sindlinger, Thilo; Leake, Alan; Müller, Marcus; Kirkwood, Thomas BL; Bürkle, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Background Formation and repair of DNA single-strand breaks are important parameters in the assessment of DNA damage and repair occurring in live cells. The 'Fluorimetric Detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU)' method [Birnboim HC, Jevcak JJ. Cancer Res (1981) 41:1889–1892] is a sensitive procedure to quantify DNA strand breaks, yet it is very tedious to perform. Results In order (i) to render the FADU assay more convenient and robust, (ii) to increase throughput, and (iii) to reduce the number of cells needed, we have established a modified assay version that is largely automated and is based on the use of a liquid handling device. The assay is operated in a 96-well format, thus greatly increasing throughput. The number of cells required has been reduced to less than 10,000 per data point. The threshold for detection of X-ray-induced DNA strand breaks is 0.13 Gy. The total assay time required for a typical experiment to assess DNA strand break repair is 4–5 hours. Conclusion We have established a robust and convenient method measuring of formation and repair of DNA single-strand breaks in live cells. While the sensitivity of our method is comparable to current assays, throughput is massively increased while operator time is decreased. PMID:19389244

  6. Non-random distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in mammalian cells is dependent on the spatial distribution of energy deposition from the ionizing radiation. For high LET particle radiations the primary ionization sites occur in a correlated manner along the track of the particles, while for X-rays these sites are much more randomly distributed throughout the volume of the cell. It can therefore be expected that the distribution of dsbs linearly along the DNA molecule also varies with the type of radiation and the ionization density. Using pulsed-field gel and conventional gel techniques, we measured the size distribution of DNA molecules from irradiated human fibroblasts in the total range of 0.1 kbp-10 Mbp for X-rays and high LET particles (N ions, 97 keV/microns and Fe ions, 150 keV/microns). On a mega base pair scale we applied conventional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques such as measurement of the fraction of DNA released from the well (FAR) and measurement of breakage within a specific NotI restriction fragment (hybridization assay). The induction rate for widely spaced breaks was found to decrease with LET. However, when the entire distribution of radiation-induced fragments was analysed, we detected an excess of fragments with sizes below about 200 kbp for the particles compared with X-irradiation. X-rays are thus more effective than high LET radiations in producing large DNA fragments but less effective in the production of smaller fragments. We determined the total induction rate of dsbs for the three radiations based on a quantitative analysis of all the measured radiation-induced fragments and found that the high LET particles were more efficient than X-rays at inducing dsbs, indicating an increasing total efficiency with LET. Conventional assays that are based only on the measurement of large fragments are therefore misleading when determining total dsb induction rates of high LET particles. The possible biological significance of this non

  7. Gamma-irradiated quiescent cells repair directly induced double-strand breaks but accumulate persistent double-strand breaks during subsequent DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Yusuke; Atsumi, Yuko; Shinohara, Akira; Murakami, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Ken-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    H2AX is expressed at very low levels in quiescent normal cells in vivo and in vitro. Such cells repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by γ-irradiation through a transient stabilization of H2AX. However, the resultant cells accumulate small numbers of irreparable (or persistent) DSBs via an unknown mechanism. We found that quiescent cells that had repaired DSBs directly induced by γ-rays were prone to accumulate DSBs during the subsequent DNA replication. Unlike directly induced DSBs, secondary DSBs were not efficiently repaired, although Rad51 and 53BP1 were recruited to these sites. H2AX was dramatically stabilized in response to DSBs directly caused by γ-rays, enabling γH2AX foci formation and DSB repair, whereas H2AX was barely stabilized in response to secondary DSBs, in which γH2AX foci were small and DSBs were not efficiently repaired. Our results show a pathway that leads to the persistent DSB formation after γ-irradiation. PMID:27251002

  8. Gamma-irradiated quiescent cells repair directly induced double-strand breaks but accumulate persistent double-strand breaks during subsequent DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Yusuke; Atsumi, Yuko; Shinohara, Akira; Murakami, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Ken-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    H2AX is expressed at very low levels in quiescent normal cells in vivo and in vitro. Such cells repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by γ-irradiation through a transient stabilization of H2AX. However, the resultant cells accumulate small numbers of irreparable (or persistent) DSBs via an unknown mechanism. We found that quiescent cells that had repaired DSBs directly induced by γ-rays were prone to accumulate DSBs during the subsequent DNA replication. Unlike directly induced DSBs, secondary DSBs were not efficiently repaired, although Rad51 and 53BP1 were recruited to these sites. H2AX was dramatically stabilized in response to DSBs directly caused by γ-rays, enabling γH2AX foci formation and DSB repair, whereas H2AX was barely stabilized in response to secondary DSBs, in which γH2AX foci were small and DSBs were not efficiently repaired. Our results show a pathway that leads to the persistent DSB formation after γ-irradiation.

  9. Enrichment of Cdk1-cyclins at DNA double-strand breaks stimulates Fun30 phosphorylation and DNA end resection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuefeng; Niu, Hengyao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Jingjing; Zhu, Shuangyi; Zhou, Jianjie; Papusha, Alma; Cui, Dandan; Pan, Xuewen; Kwon, Youngho; Sung, Patrick; Ira, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most cytotoxic types of DNA lesion challenging genome integrity. The activity of cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 is essential for DSB repair by homologous recombination and for DNA damage signaling. Here we identify the Fun30 chromatin remodeler as a new target of Cdk1. Fun30 is phosphorylated by Cdk1 on Serine 28 to stimulate its functions in DNA damage response including resection of DSB ends. Importantly, Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation of Fun30-S28 increases upon DNA damage and requires the recruitment of Fun30 to DSBs, suggesting that phosphorylation increases in situ at the DNA damage. Consistently, we find that Cdk1 and multiple cyclins become highly enriched at DSBs and that the recruitment of Cdk1 and cyclins Clb2 and Clb5 ensures optimal Fun30 phosphorylation and checkpoint activation. We propose that the enrichment of Cdk1-cyclin complexes at DSBs serves as a mechanism for enhanced targeting and modulating of the activity of DNA damage response proteins. PMID:26801641

  10. DNA single strand breaks in peripheral lymphocytes associated with urinary thiodiglycolic acid levels in polyvinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu-Chen; Yang, Huei-Ting; Ma, Yee-Chung; Huang, Ming-Feng; Chang, Wushou P; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2004-07-11

    The association between vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure and DNA damage has been established. However, the relationship between individual exposure and DNA single strand breaks was limited. Since environmental monitoring may not reflect the actual exposure, a useful marker of exposure is needed to assess the individual exposure. In our previous study, we have found a high correlation between air VCM level and urinary thiodiglycolic acid (TdGA) at the commencement of the next shift. Here, we further used comet assay to evaluate the relationship between urinary TdGA levels and DNA single strand breaks in polyvinyl chloride monomer (PVC) workers. Urinary TdGA levels (n=26) at the commencement of the following shift were analyzed. Ten of the 26 workers also had personal air sampling for air VCM exposure. Questionnaires were administered to obtain epidemiological information including detailed history of occupation and lifestyles. Workers experiencing air VCM level greater than 5 ppm had higher tail moment and tail intensity (%) than those experiencing VCM exposure between 1 and 5, or <1 ppm, respectively (P < 0.05). The results also revealed that level of DNA single strand breaks, including tail moment and tail intensity, were increased with urinary TdGA level. The dose-response relationship of urinary TdGA level and DNA single strand breaks was particularly significant among the workers with 4 mg/g Cr of urinary TdGA level, which is equivalent to 5 ppm air VCM level. We concluded that air VCM exposure greater than 5 ppm could induce DNA damage. Further sensitive assay should be developed for the diction of DNA damage when air VCM exposure below 5 ppm.

  11. The tight linkage between DNA replication and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    George, James W.; Stohr, Bradley A.; Tomso, Daniel J.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) repair and DNA replication are tightly linked in the life cycle of bacteriophage T4. Indeed, the major mode of phage DNA replication depends on recombination proteins and can be stimulated by DSBs. DSB-stimulated DNA replication is dramatically demonstrated when T4 infects cells carrying two plasmids that share homology. A DSB on one plasmid triggered extensive replication of the second plasmid, providing a useful model for T4 recombination-dependent replication (RDR). This system also provides a view of DSB repair in T4-infected cells and revealed that the DSB repair products had been replicated in their entirety by the T4 replication machinery. We analyzed the detailed structure of these products, which do not fit the simple predictions of any of three models for DSB repair. We also present evidence that the T4 RDR system functions to restart stalled or inactivated replication forks. First, we review experiments involving antitumor drug-stabilized topoisomerase cleavage complexes. The results suggest that forks blocked at cleavage complexes are resolved by recombinational repair, likely involving RDR. Second, we show here that the presence of a T4 replication origin on one plasmid substantially stimulated recombination events between it and a homologous second plasmid that did not contain a T4 origin. Furthermore, replication of the second plasmid was increased when the first plasmid contained the T4 origin. Our interpretation is that origin-initiated forks become inactivated at some frequency during replication of the first plasmid and are then restarted via RDR on the second plasmid. PMID:11459966

  12. BRUCE regulates DNA double-strand break response by promoting USP8 deubiquitination of BRIT1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Ren, Jinyu; Pandita, Raj K.; Lu, Jing; Li, Kaiyi; Pandita, Tej K.; Du, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is crucial for genomic integrity. BRIT1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene C terminus-repeat inhibitor of human telomerase repeat transcriptase expression), a tumor suppressor and early DDR factor, is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by phosphorylated H2A histone family, member X (γ-H2AX), where it promotes chromatin relaxation by recruiting the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI–SNF) chromatin remodeler to facilitate DDR. However, regulation of BRIT1 recruitment is not fully understood. The baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Here, we report a non-IAP function of BRUCE in the regulation of the BRIT1–SWI–SNF DSB-response pathway and genomic stability. We demonstrate that BRIT1 is K63 ubiquitinated in unstimulated cells and that deubiquitination of BRIT1 is a prerequisite for its recruitment to DSB sites by γ-H2AX. We show mechanistically that BRUCE acts as a scaffold, bridging the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) and BRIT1 in a complex to coordinate USP8-catalyzed deubiquitination of BRIT1. Loss of BRUCE or USP8 impairs BRIT1 deubiquitination, BRIT1 binding with γ-H2AX, the formation of BRIT1 DNA damage foci, and chromatin relaxation. Moreover, BRUCE-depleted cells display reduced homologous recombination repair, and BRUCE-mutant mice exhibit repair defects and genomic instability. These findings identify BRUCE and USP8 as two hitherto uncharacterized critical DDR regulators and uncover a deubiquitination regulation of BRIT1 assembly at damaged chromatin for efficient DDR and genomic stability. PMID:25733871

  13. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced human ovarian aging: double strand DNA breaks and microvascular compromise.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Reza; Heytens, Elke; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Oktay, Kutluk

    2011-08-01

    The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced acceleration of ovarian aging is not fully understood. We used doxorubicin, a widely used cancer chemotherapeutic, in a variety of in vivo xenograft, and in vitro models to investigate the impact of chemotherapy-induced aging on the human ovary. Doxorubicin caused massive double-strand-DNA-breaks in primordial follicles, oocytes, and granulosa cells in a dose dependent fashion as revealed by accumulating γH2AX foci. This damage was associated with apoptotic oocyte death and resulted in the activation of ATM. It appeared that the repair response enabled a minor proportion of oocytes (34.7%) and granulosa cells (12.1%) to survive while the majority succumbed to apoptotic death. Paradoxically, inhibition of ATM by KU-55933 resulted in improved survival, probably via prevention of downstream activation of TAp63α. Furthermore, doxorubicin caused vascular and stromal damage in the human ovary, which might impair ovarian function both pre- and post-menopausally. Chemotherapy-induced premature ovarian aging appears to result from a complex process involving both the germ- and non-germ cell components of the ovary. These effects may have clinical implications in aging both for premenopausal and postmenopausal cancer survivors. PMID:21869459

  14. Strand breaks without DNA rearrangement in V(D)J recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, E.A.; Liu, V.F.; Weaver, D.T. )

    1991-06-01

    Somatic gene rearrangement of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes (V(D)J recombination) is mediated by pairs of specific DNA sequence motifs termed signal sequences. In experiments described here, retroviral vectors containing V(D)J rearrangement cassettes in which the signal sequences had been altered were introduced into wild-type and scid (severe combined immune deficiency) pre-B cells and used to define intermediates in the V(D)J recombination pathway. The scid mutation has previously been shown to deleteriously affect the V(d)J recombination process. Cassettes containing a point mutation in one of the two cassettes with the characteristic scid deletional phenotype. Using these mutated templates, the authors identified junctional modifications at the wild-type signal sequences that had arisen from strand breaks which were not associated with overall V(D)J rearrangements. Neither cell type was able to rearrange constructs which contained only a single, nonmutated, signal sequence. Analysis of these signal sequence mutations has provided insights into intermediates in the V(D)J rearrangement pathway in wild-type and scid pre-B cells.

  15. PML nuclear body disruption impairs DNA double-strand break sensing and repair in APL

    PubMed Central

    di Masi, A; Cilli, D; Berardinelli, F; Talarico, A; Pallavicini, I; Pennisi, R; Leone, S; Antoccia, A; Noguera, N I; Lo-Coco, F; Ascenzi, P; Minucci, S; Nervi, C

    2016-01-01

    Proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair localize within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), whose disruption is at the root of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) pathogenesis. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment induces PML-RARα degradation, restores PML-NB functions, and causes terminal cell differentiation of APL blasts. However, the precise role of the APL-associated PML-RARα oncoprotein and PML-NB integrity in the DSB response in APL leukemogenesis and tumor suppression is still lacking. Primary leukemia blasts isolated from APL patients showed high phosphorylation levels of H2AX (γ-H2AX), an initial DSBs sensor. By addressing the consequences of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSB response in primary APL blasts and RA-responsive and -resistant myeloid cell lines carrying endogenous or ectopically expressed PML-RARα, before and after treatment with RA, we found that the disruption of PML-NBs is associated with delayed DSB response, as revealed by the impaired kinetic of disappearance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci and activation of ATM and of its substrates H2AX, NBN, and CHK2. The disruption of PML-NB integrity by PML-RARα also affects the IR-induced DSB response in a preleukemic mouse model of APL in vivo. We propose the oncoprotein-dependent PML-NB disruption and DDR impairment as relevant early events in APL tumorigenesis. PMID:27468685

  16. Using carbon nanotubes to induce micronuclei and double strand breaks of the DNA in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cveticanin, Jelena; Joksic, Gordana; Leskovac, Andreja; Petrovic, Sandra; Valenta Sobot, Ana; Neskovic, Olivera

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique one-dimensional macromolecules with promising applications in biology and medicine. Since their toxicity is still under debate, here we present a study investigating the genotoxic properties of purified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and amide functionalized purified SWCNTs on cultured human lymphocytes employing cytokinesis block micronucleus assay and enumeration of γH2AX foci as a measure of double strand breaks (DSBs) of the DNA in normal human fibroblasts. SWCNTs induce micronuclei (MN) formation in lymphocytes and decrease the proliferation potential (CBPI) of cells. In a fibroblast cell line the same dose of SWCNTs induces γH2AX foci 2.7-fold higher than in a control. Amide functionalized purified SWCNTs behave differently: they do not disturb the cell proliferation potential of harvested lymphocytes, but induce micronuclei to a higher extent than SWCNTs. When applied on fibroblasts, amide functionalized SWCNTs also induce γH2AX foci, 3.18-fold higher than the control. The cellular effects of MWCNTs display the broad spectrum of clastogenic properties seen as the highest incidence of induced lymphocyte micronuclei and anaphase bridges among nuclei in binucleated cells. Surprisingly, the incidence of induced γH2AX foci was not as high as was expected by the micronucleus test, which indicates that MWCNTs act as clastogen and aneugen agents simultaneously. Biological endpoints investigated in this study indicate a close relationship between the electrochemical properties of carbon nanotubes and observed genotoxicity.

  17. DNA double strand break repair pathway choice: a chromatin based decision?

    PubMed

    Clouaire, T; Legube, G

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly toxic lesions that can be rapidly repaired by 2 main pathways, namely Homologous Recombination (HR) and Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). The choice between these pathways is a critical, yet not completely understood, aspect of DSB repair. We recently found that distinct DSBs induced across the genome are not repaired by the same pathway. Indeed, DSBs induced in active genes, naturally enriched in the trimethyl form of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36me3), are channeled to repair by HR, in a manner depending on SETD2, the major H3K36 trimethyltransferase. Here, we propose that these findings may be generalized to other types of histone modifications and repair machineries thus defining a "DSB repair choice histone code". This "decision making" function of preexisting chromatin structure in DSB repair could connect the repair pathway used to the type and function of the damaged region, not only contributing to genome stability but also to its diversity. PMID:25675367

  18. PML nuclear body disruption impairs DNA double-strand break sensing and repair in APL.

    PubMed

    di Masi, A; Cilli, D; Berardinelli, F; Talarico, A; Pallavicini, I; Pennisi, R; Leone, S; Antoccia, A; Noguera, N I; Lo-Coco, F; Ascenzi, P; Minucci, S; Nervi, C

    2016-01-01

    Proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair localize within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), whose disruption is at the root of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) pathogenesis. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment induces PML-RARα degradation, restores PML-NB functions, and causes terminal cell differentiation of APL blasts. However, the precise role of the APL-associated PML-RARα oncoprotein and PML-NB integrity in the DSB response in APL leukemogenesis and tumor suppression is still lacking. Primary leukemia blasts isolated from APL patients showed high phosphorylation levels of H2AX (γ-H2AX), an initial DSBs sensor. By addressing the consequences of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSB response in primary APL blasts and RA-responsive and -resistant myeloid cell lines carrying endogenous or ectopically expressed PML-RARα, before and after treatment with RA, we found that the disruption of PML-NBs is associated with delayed DSB response, as revealed by the impaired kinetic of disappearance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci and activation of ATM and of its substrates H2AX, NBN, and CHK2. The disruption of PML-NB integrity by PML-RARα also affects the IR-induced DSB response in a preleukemic mouse model of APL in vivo. We propose the oncoprotein-dependent PML-NB disruption and DDR impairment as relevant early events in APL tumorigenesis. PMID:27468685

  19. Protective role of 3-nitrotyrosine against gamma radiation-induced DNA strand breaks: A comparison study with tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Qun; Ni, Mei-Nan; Kong, Fu-Quan; Sui, Li; Hu, Jia; Xu, Dian-Dou; Li, Yan-Mei

    2008-10-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine(3-NY) has been reported as a potential source of reactive oxygen species (ROSs). In this work, plasmid pBR322 DNA was irradiated by gamma rays in aqueous solution in presence and absence of 3-NY, DNA strand breaks were analyzed by neutral electrophoresis followed by quantification with image analysis software. It was found that the presence of 3-NY could effectively reduce radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. A side-by-side comparison was performed between 3-NY and tyrosine, the results showed that the protective role 3-NY was comparable with tyrosine, which might imply that protein tyrosine nitration might not significantly decrease its ability as a free radical scavenger.

  20. DNA double-strand break repair: a theoretical framework and its application.

    PubMed

    Murray, Philip J; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A; Chapman, S Jon

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed as a result of genotoxic insults, such as exogenous ionizing radiation, and are among the most serious types of DNA damage. One of the earliest molecular responses following DSB formation is the phosphorylation of the histone H2AX, giving rise to γH2AX. Many copies of γH2AX are generated at DSBs and can be detected in vitro as foci using well-established immuno-histochemical methods. It has previously been shown that anti-γH2AX antibodies, modified by the addition of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT and a fluorescent or radionuclide label, can be used to visualize and quantify DSBs in vivo. Moreover, when labelled with a high amount of the short-range, Auger electron-emitting radioisotope, (111)In, the amount of DNA damage within a cell can be increased, leading to cell death. In this report, we develop a mathematical model that describes how molecular processes at individual sites of DNA damage give rise to quantifiable foci. Equations that describe stochastic mean behaviours at individual DSB sites are derived and parametrized using population-scale, time-series measurements from two different cancer cell lines. The model is used to examine two case studies in which the introduction of an antibody (anti-γH2AX-TAT) that targets a key component in the DSB repair pathway influences system behaviour. We investigate: (i) how the interaction between anti-γH2AX-TAT and γH2AX effects the kinetics of H2AX phosphorylation and DSB repair and (ii) model behaviour when the anti-γH2AX antibody is labelled with Auger electron-emitting (111)In and can thus instigate additional DNA damage. This work supports the conclusion that DSB kinetics are largely unaffected by the introduction of the anti-γH2AX antibody, a result that has been validated experimentally, and hence the hypothesis that the use of anti-γH2AX antibody to quantify DSBs does not violate the image tracer principle. Moreover, it provides a novel model of DNA damage

  1. DNA double-strand break repair: a theoretical framework and its application

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.; Chapman, S. Jon

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed as a result of genotoxic insults, such as exogenous ionizing radiation, and are among the most serious types of DNA damage. One of the earliest molecular responses following DSB formation is the phosphorylation of the histone H2AX, giving rise to γH2AX. Many copies of γH2AX are generated at DSBs and can be detected in vitro as foci using well-established immuno-histochemical methods. It has previously been shown that anti-γH2AX antibodies, modified by the addition of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT and a fluorescent or radionuclide label, can be used to visualize and quantify DSBs in vivo. Moreover, when labelled with a high amount of the short-range, Auger electron-emitting radioisotope, 111In, the amount of DNA damage within a cell can be increased, leading to cell death. In this report, we develop a mathematical model that describes how molecular processes at individual sites of DNA damage give rise to quantifiable foci. Equations that describe stochastic mean behaviours at individual DSB sites are derived and parametrized using population-scale, time-series measurements from two different cancer cell lines. The model is used to examine two case studies in which the introduction of an antibody (anti-γH2AX-TAT) that targets a key component in the DSB repair pathway influences system behaviour. We investigate: (i) how the interaction between anti-γH2AX-TAT and γH2AX effects the kinetics of H2AX phosphorylation and DSB repair and (ii) model behaviour when the anti-γH2AX antibody is labelled with Auger electron-emitting 111In and can thus instigate additional DNA damage. This work supports the conclusion that DSB kinetics are largely unaffected by the introduction of the anti-γH2AX antibody, a result that has been validated experimentally, and hence the hypothesis that the use of anti-γH2AX antibody to quantify DSBs does not violate the image tracer principle. Moreover, it provides a novel model of DNA damage

  2. scid mutation in mice confers hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and a deficiency in DNA double-strand break repair

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermann, K.A.; Sun, J.R.; Giaccia, A.J.; Tosto, L.M.; Brown, J.M. )

    1991-02-15

    C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice carry the scid mutation and are severely deficient in both T cell- and B cell-mediated immunity, apparently as a result of defective V(D)J joining of the immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene elements. In the present studies, we have defined the tissue, cellular, and molecular basis of another characteristic of these mice: their hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Bone marrow stem cells, intestinal crypt cells, and epithelial skin cells from scid mice are 2- to 3-fold more sensitive when irradiated in situ than are congenic BALB/c or C.B-17 controls. Two independently isolated embryo fibroblastic scid mouse cell lines display similar hypersensitivities to gamma-rays. In addition, these cell lines are sensitive to cell killing by bleomycin, which also produces DNA strand breaks, but not by the DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C or UV irradiation. Measurement of the rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicates that these animals are defective in this repair system. This suggests that the gamma-ray sensitivity of the scid mouse fibroblasts could be the result of reduced repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Therefore, a common factor may participate in both the repair of DNA double-strand breaks as well as V(D)J rejoining during lymphocyte development. This murine autosomal recessive mutation should prove extremely useful in fundamental studies of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair.

  3. Non-redundant Functions of ATM and DNA-PKcs in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Pierre; Choudjaye, Jonathan; Clouaire, Thomas; Bugler, Béatrix; Daburon, Virginie; Aguirrebengoa, Marion; Mangeat, Thomas; Iacovoni, Jason S.; Álvarez-Quilón, Alejandro; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Legube, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicit the so-called DNA damage response (DDR), largely relying on ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), two members of the PI3K-like kinase family, whose respective functions during the sequential steps of the DDR remains controversial. Using the DIvA system (DSB inducible via AsiSI) combined with high-resolution mapping and advanced microscopy, we uncovered that both ATM and DNA-PKcs spread in cis on a confined region surrounding DSBs, independently of the pathway used for repair. However, once recruited, these kinases exhibit non-overlapping functions on end joining and γH2AX domain establishment. More specifically, we found that ATM is required to ensure the association of multiple DSBs within “repair foci.” Our results suggest that ATM acts not only on chromatin marks but also on higher-order chromatin organization to ensure repair accuracy and survival. PMID:26586426

  4. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Michael; Simon, Matthew; Tombline, Gregory; May, Alfred; Morello, Timothy D; Hubbard, Basil P; Bredbenner, Katie; Park, Rosa; Sinclair, David A; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  5. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Michael; Simon, Matthew; Tombline, Gregory; May, Alfred; Morello, Timothy D; Hubbard, Basil P; Bredbenner, Katie; Park, Rosa; Sinclair, David A; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance. PMID:27568560

  6. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Dantuma, Nico P.; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process. PMID:27148355

  7. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process. PMID:27148355

  8. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  9. Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for (60)Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with (60)Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage. PMID:26675481

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for 60Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with 60Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for (60)Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with (60)Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage.

  13. Preferential Repair of DNA Double-strand Break at the Active Gene in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K.; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3′ end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells. PMID:22910905

  14. The Contribution of Alu Elements to Mutagenic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Streva, Vincent A.; DeFreece, Cecily B.; Hedges, Dale J.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2015-01-01

    Alu elements make up the largest family of human mobile elements, numbering 1.1 million copies and comprising 11% of the human genome. As a consequence of evolution and genetic drift, Alu elements of various sequence divergence exist throughout the human genome. Alu/Alu recombination has been shown to cause approximately 0.5% of new human genetic diseases and contribute to extensive genomic structural variation. To begin understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to these rearrangements in mammalian cells, we constructed Alu/Alu recombination reporter cell lines containing Alu elements ranging in sequence divergence from 0%-30% that allow detection of both Alu/Alu recombination and large non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) deletions that range from 1.0 to 1.9 kb in size. Introduction of as little as 0.7% sequence divergence between Alu elements resulted in a significant reduction in recombination, which indicates even small degrees of sequence divergence reduce the efficiency of homology-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Further reduction in recombination was observed in a sequence divergence-dependent manner for diverged Alu/Alu recombination constructs with up to 10% sequence divergence. With greater levels of sequence divergence (15%-30%), we observed a significant increase in DSB repair due to a shift from Alu/Alu recombination to variable-length NHEJ which removes sequence between the two Alu elements. This increase in NHEJ deletions depends on the presence of Alu sequence homeology (similar but not identical sequences). Analysis of recombination products revealed that Alu/Alu recombination junctions occur more frequently in the first 100 bp of the Alu element within our reporter assay, just as they do in genomic Alu/Alu recombination events. This is the first extensive study characterizing the influence of Alu element sequence divergence on DNA repair, which will inform predictions regarding the effect of Alu element sequence divergence on both

  15. BRG1 promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by facilitating the replacement of RPA with RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wenjing; Wang, Ruoxi; Chen, Hongyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Ting; Boldogh, Istvan; Ba, Xueqing; Han, Liping; Zeng, Xianlu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a type of lethal DNA damage. The repair of DSBs requires tight coordination between the factors modulating chromatin structure and the DNA repair machinery. BRG1, the ATPase subunit of the chromatin remodelling complex Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF), is often linked to tumorigenesis and genome instability, and its role in DSB repair remains largely unclear. In the present study, we show that BRG1 is recruited to DSB sites and enhances DSB repair. Using DR-GFP and EJ5-GFP reporter systems, we demonstrate that BRG1 facilitates homologous recombination repair rather than nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. Moreover, the BRG1–RAD52 complex mediates the replacement of RPA with RAD51 on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to initiate DNA strand invasion. Loss of BRG1 results in a failure of RAD51 loading onto ssDNA, abnormal homologous recombination repair and enhanced DSB-induced lethality. Our present study provides a mechanistic insight into how BRG1, which is known to be involved in chromatin remodelling, plays a substantial role in the homologous recombination repair pathway in mammalian cells. PMID:25395584

  16. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodeling complexes in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin and is therefore relatively inaccessible to DNA repair enzymes. In order to perform efficient DNA repair, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are required to alter the chromatin structure near the site of damage to facilitate processing and allow access to repair enzymes. Two of the best-studied remodeling complexes involved in repair are RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and INO80 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are both conserved in higher eukaryotes. RSC is very rapidly recruited to breaks and mobilizes nucleosomes to promote phosphorylation of H2A S129 and resection. INO80 enrichment at a break occurs later and is dependent on phospho-S129 H2A. INO80 activity at the break site also facilitates resection. Consequently, both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining are defective in rsc mutants, while subsets of these repair pathways are affected in ino80 mutants.

  17. Double-strand-break repair recombination in Escherichia coli: physical evidence for a DNA replication mechanism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Mohammad R.; Szigety, Susan K.; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    DNA double-strand-break repair (DSBR) is, in many organisms, accomplished by homologous recombination. In Escherichia coli DSBR was thought to result from breakage and reunion of parental DNA molecules, assisted by known endonucleases, the Holliday junction resolvases. Under special circumstances, for example, SOS induction, recombination forks were proposed to initiate replication. We provide physical evidence that this is a major alternative mechanism in which replication copies information from one chromosome to another generating recombinant chromosomes in normal cells in vivo. This alternative mechanism can occur independently of known Holliday junction cleaving proteins, requires DNA polymerase III, and produces recombined DNA molecules that carry newly replicated DNA. The replicational mechanism underlies about half the recombination of linear DNA in E. coli; the other half occurs by breakage and reunion, which we show requires resolvases, and is replication-independent. The data also indicate that accumulation of recombination intermediates promotes replication dramatically. PMID:10557215

  18. Probability of double-strand breaks in genome-sized DNA by {gamma}-ray decreases markedly as the DNA concentration increases

    SciTech Connect

    Shimobayashi, Shunsuke F.; Iwaki, Takafumi; Mori, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-05-07

    By use of the single-molecule observation, we count the number of DNA double-strand breaks caused by {gamma}-ray irradiation with genome-sized DNA molecules (166 kbp). We find that P{sub 1}, the number of double-strand breaks (DSBs) per base pair per unit Gy, is nearly inversely proportional to the DNA concentration above a certain threshold DNA concentration. The inverse relationship implies that the total number of DSBs remains essentially constant. We give a theoretical interpretation of our experimental results in terms of attack of reactive species upon DNA molecules, indicating the significance of the characteristics of genome-sized giant DNA as semiflexible polymers for the efficiency of DSBs.

  19. Determination of human DNA polymerase utilization for the repair of a model ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand break lesion in a defined vector substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, T. A.; Russell, P. S.; Kohli, M.; Dar, M. E.; Neumann, R. D.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase and DNA ligase utilization for the repair of a major class of ionizing radiation-induced DNA lesion [DNA single-strand breaks containing 3'-phosphoglycolate (3'-PG)] was examined using a novel, chemically defined vector substrate containing a single, site-specific 3'-PG single-strand break lesion. In addition, the major human AP endonuclease, HAP1 (also known as APE1, APEX, Ref-1), was tested to determine if it was involved in initiating repair of 3'-PG-containing single-strand break lesions. DNA polymerase beta was found to be the primary polymerase responsible for nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following excision of the 3'-PG blocking group. However, DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon was also capable of nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following 3'-PG excision. In addition, repair reactions catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta were found to be most effective in the presence of DNA ligase III, while those catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon appeared to be more effective in the presence of DNA ligase I. Also, it was demonstrated that the repair initiating 3'-PG excision reaction was not dependent upon HAP1 activity, as judged by inhibition of HAP1 with neutralizing HAP1-specific polyclonal antibody.

  20. A novel human AP endonuclease with conserved zinc-finger-like motifs involved in DNA strand break responses

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Kuzuoka, Hiroyuki; Sasao, Shigeru; Hong, Zehui; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Yasui, Akira

    2007-01-01

    DNA damage causes genome instability and cell death, but many of the cellular responses to DNA damage still remain elusive. We here report a human protein, PALF (PNK and APTX-like FHA protein), with an FHA (forkhead-associated) domain and novel zinc-finger-like CYR (cysteine–tyrosine–arginine) motifs that are involved in responses to DNA damage. We found that the CYR motif is widely distributed among DNA repair proteins of higher eukaryotes, and that PALF, as well as a Drosophila protein with tandem CYR motifs, has endo- and exonuclease activities against abasic site and other types of base damage. PALF accumulates rapidly at single-strand breaks in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-dependent manner in human cells. Indeed, PALF interacts directly with PARP1 and is required for its activation and for cellular resistance to methyl-methane sulfonate. PALF also interacts directly with KU86, LIGASEIV and phosphorylated XRCC4 proteins and possesses endo/exonuclease activity at protruding DNA ends. Various treatments that produce double-strand breaks induce formation of PALF foci, which fully coincide with γH2AX foci. Thus, PALF and the CYR motif may play important roles in DNA repair of higher eukaryotes. PMID:17396150

  1. Connecting by breaking and repairing: mechanisms of DNA strand exchange in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Sansam, Christopher L; Pezza, Roberto J

    2015-07-01

    During prophase of meiosis I, homologous chromosomes interact and undergo recombination. Successful completion of these processes is required in order for the homologous chromosomes to mount the meiotic spindle as a pair. The organization of the chromosomes into pairs ensures orderly segregation to opposite poles of the dividing cell, such that each gamete receives one copy of each chromosome. Chiasmata, the cytological manifestation of crossover products of recombination, physically connect the homologs in pairs, providing a linkage that facilitates their segregation. Consequently, mutations that reduce the level of recombination are invariably associated with increased errors in meiotic chromosome segregation. In this review, we focus on recent biochemical and genetic advances in elucidating the mechanisms of meiotic DNA strand exchange catalyzed by the Dmc1 protein. We also discuss the mode by which two recombination mediators, Hop2 and Mnd1, facilitate rate-limiting steps of DNA strand exchange catalyzed by Dmc1.

  2. Role for the Mammalian Swi5-Sfr1 Complex in DNA Strand Break Repair through Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Yufuko; Jasin, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In fission yeast, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays an important role in homologous recombination (HR), a pathway crucial for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we identify and characterize mammalian Swi5 and Sfr1 homologues. Mouse Swi5 and Sfr1 are nuclear proteins that form a complex in vivo and in vitro. Swi5 interacts in vitro with Rad51, the DNA strand-exchange protein which functions during HR. By generating Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− embryonic stem cell lines, we found that both proteins are mutually interdependent for their stability. Importantly, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays a role in HR when Rad51 function is perturbed in vivo by expression of a BRC peptide from BRCA2. Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− cells are selectively sensitive to agents that cause DNA strand breaks, in particular ionizing radiation, camptothecin, and the Parp inhibitor olaparib. Consistent with a role in HR, sister chromatid exchange induced by Parp inhibition is attenuated in Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− cells, and chromosome aberrations are increased. Thus, Swi5-Sfr1 is a newly identified complex required for genomic integrity in mammalian cells with a specific role in the repair of DNA strand breaks. PMID:20976249

  3. Double-stranded DNA breaks hidden in the neutral Comet assay suggest a role of the sperm nuclear matrix in DNA integrity maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; Gawecka, J E; Benet, J; Ward, W S

    2014-04-01

    We used a mouse model in which sperm DNA damage was induced to understand the relationship of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks to sperm chromatin structure and to the Comet assay. Sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF) produces dsDNA breaks located on the matrix attachment regions, between protamine toroids. In this model, epididymal sperm induced to undergo SCF can religate dsDNA breaks while vas deferens sperm cannot. Here, we demonstrated that the conventional neutral Comet assay underestimates the epididymal SCF breaks because the broken DNA ends remain attached to the nuclear matrix, causing the DNA to remain associated with the dispersion halo, and the Comet tails to be weak. Therefore, we term these hidden dsDNA breaks. When the Comet assay was modified to include an additional incubation with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dithiothreitol (DTT) after the conventional lysis, thereby solubilizing the nuclear matrix, the broken DNA was released from the matrix, which resulted in a reduction of the sperm head halo and an increase in the Comet tail length, exposing the hidden dsDNA breaks. Conversely, SCF-induced vas deferens sperm had small halos and long tails with the conventional neutral Comet assay, suggesting that the broken DNA ends were not tethered to the nuclear matrix. These results suggest that the attachment to the nuclear matrix is crucial for the religation of SCF-induced DNA breaks in sperm. Our data suggest that the neutral Comet assay identifies only dsDNA breaks that are released from the nuclear matrix and that the addition of an SDS treatment can reveal these hidden dsDNA breaks.

  4. Double-stranded DNA breaks hidden in the neutral Comet assay suggest a role of the sperm nuclear matrix in DNA integrity maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; Gawecka, J E; Benet, J; Ward, W S

    2014-04-01

    We used a mouse model in which sperm DNA damage was induced to understand the relationship of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks to sperm chromatin structure and to the Comet assay. Sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF) produces dsDNA breaks located on the matrix attachment regions, between protamine toroids. In this model, epididymal sperm induced to undergo SCF can religate dsDNA breaks while vas deferens sperm cannot. Here, we demonstrated that the conventional neutral Comet assay underestimates the epididymal SCF breaks because the broken DNA ends remain attached to the nuclear matrix, causing the DNA to remain associated with the dispersion halo, and the Comet tails to be weak. Therefore, we term these hidden dsDNA breaks. When the Comet assay was modified to include an additional incubation with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dithiothreitol (DTT) after the conventional lysis, thereby solubilizing the nuclear matrix, the broken DNA was released from the matrix, which resulted in a reduction of the sperm head halo and an increase in the Comet tail length, exposing the hidden dsDNA breaks. Conversely, SCF-induced vas deferens sperm had small halos and long tails with the conventional neutral Comet assay, suggesting that the broken DNA ends were not tethered to the nuclear matrix. These results suggest that the attachment to the nuclear matrix is crucial for the religation of SCF-induced DNA breaks in sperm. Our data suggest that the neutral Comet assay identifies only dsDNA breaks that are released from the nuclear matrix and that the addition of an SDS treatment can reveal these hidden dsDNA breaks. PMID:24282283

  5. Coordinateendonucleolytic 5' and 3' trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Povirk, Lawrence; Yannone, Steven M.; Khan, Imran S.; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; F., Lawrence

    2008-02-18

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis slowly trims 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5' {yields} 3' exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5'-phosphate but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3' overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent, and did not require a 5'-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3'-phosphoglycolate or 3'-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2-4 nucleotides from the 3'-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nucleotides from the 5'-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5'-terminal strand, resulting in short 3' overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites.

  6. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  7. The Fun30 ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeler promotes resection of DNA double-strand break ends

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuefeng; Cui, Dandan; Papusha, Alma; Zhang, Xiaotian; Chu, Chia-Dwo; Tang, Jiangwu; Chen, Kaifu; Pan, Xuewen; Ira, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) are resected by 5′-nucleases to form 3′ single-strand DNA (ssDNA) substrates for binding by homologous recombination and DNA damage checkpoint proteins. Two redundant pathways of extensive resection were described both in cells 1-3 and in vitro 4-6, one relying on Exo1 exonuclease and the other on Sgs1 helicase and Dna2 nuclease. However, it remains unknown how resection proceeds within the context of chromatin where histones and histone-bound proteins represent barriers for resection enzymes. Here, we have identified the yeast nucleosome remodeling enzyme Fun30 as novel factor promoting DSB end resection. Fun30 is the major nucleosome remodeler promoting extensive Exo1- and Sgs1-dependent resection of DSBs while the RSC and INO80 chromatin remodeling complexes play redundant roles with Fun30 in resection adjacent to DSB ends. ATPase and helicase domains of Fun30, which are needed for nucleosome remodeling 7, are also required for resection. Fun30 is robustly recruited to DNA breaks and spreads around the DSB coincident with resection. Fun30 becomes less important for resection in the absence of the histone-bound Rad9 checkpoint adaptor protein known to block 5′ strand processing 8 and in the absence of either histone H3 K79 methylation or γ-H2A, which mediate recruitment of the Rad9 9, 10. Together these data suggest that Fun30 helps to overcome the inhibitory effect of Rad9 on DNA resection. PMID:22960743

  8. Assays for DNA double-strand break repair by microhomology-based end-joining repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Mermod, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions. The main pathways responsible for repairing these breaks in eukaryotic cells are homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, a third group of still poorly characterized DSB repair pathways, collectively termed microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), relies on short homologies for the end-joining process. Here, we constructed GFP reporter assays to characterize and distinguish MMEJ variant pathways, namely the simple MMEJ and the DNA synthesis-dependent (SD)-MMEJ mechanisms. Transfection of these assay vectors in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and characterization of the repaired DNA sequences indicated that while simple MMEJ is able to mediate relatively efficient DSB repair if longer microhomologies are present, the majority of DSBs were repaired using the highly error-prone SD-MMEJ pathway. To validate the involvement of DNA synthesis in the repair process, siRNA knock-down of different genes proposed to play a role in MMEJ were performed, revealing that the knock-down of DNA polymerase θ inhibited DNA end resection and repair through simple MMEJ, thus favoring the other repair pathway. Overall, we conclude that this approach provides a convenient assay to study MMEJ-related DNA repair pathways.

  9. Chemotherapeutic Compounds Targeting the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathways: The Good, the Bad, and the Promising

    PubMed Central

    Jekimovs, Christian; Bolderson, Emma; Suraweera, Amila; Adams, Mark; O’Byrne, Kenneth J.; Richard, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a critical cellular mechanism that exists to ensure genomic stability. DNA DSBs are the most deleterious type of insult to a cell’s genetic material and can lead to genomic instability, apoptosis, or senescence. Incorrectly repaired DNA DSBs have the potential to produce chromosomal translocations and genomic instability, potentially leading to cancer. The prevalence of DNA DSBs in cancer due to unregulated growth and errors in repair opens up a potential therapeutic window in the treatment of cancers. The cellular response to DNA DSBs is comprised of two pathways to ensure DNA breaks are repaired: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Identifying chemotherapeutic compounds targeting proteins involved in these DNA repair pathways has shown promise as a cancer therapy for patients, either as a monotherapy or in combination with genotoxic drugs. From the beginning, there have been a number of chemotherapeutic compounds that have yielded successful responses in the clinic, a number that have failed (CGK-733 and iniparib), and a number of promising targets for future studies identified. This review looks in detail at how the cell responds to these DNA DSBs and investigates the chemotherapeutic avenues that have been and are currently being explored to target this repair process. PMID:24795863

  10. Products of ozonized arachidonic acid potentiate the formation of DNA single strand breaks in cultured human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kozumbo, W.J.; Hanley, N.M.; Agarwal, S.

    1996-12-31

    In this study we examined the potential for environmental levels of ozone (O{sub 3}) to degrade arachidonic acid (AA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid abundantly present in the lung, into products that can produce DNA single strand breaks (ssb) in cultured human lung cells. Human lung fibroblasts were incubated with 60 {mu}M AA that had been previously exposed to an degraded by 0.4 ppm O{sub 3} (1 hr). Incubation of the cells with O{sub 3}-exposed AA (but not with vehicle alone) for 1 hr at 4{degrees}C and 37{degrees}C produced 555 and 245 rad-equivalents of DNA ssb, respectively, as determined by the DNA alkaline elution technique. These breaks were completely eliminated when the ozonized AA solution was incubated with catalase prior to cell treatment, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was solely responsible for damaging DNA. Superoxide dismutase, bovine serum albumin, or heat-inactivated catalase showed little, if any, inhibitory activity. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content for only about 40% of the observed breaks. Potentiation of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA ssb persisted after removal of the carbonyl substances by chromatographic procedures, suggesting that the non-carbonyl component of ozonized AA was the responsible component for inducing augmentation of the observed increases in DNA ssb. Ozonized AA also induced DNA ssb in cultures of the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Again, these breaks were shown to exceed levels that could be attributed to the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone. These results indicate that products of ozonized AA can interact to potentiate DNA ssb in human lung cells. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Significant Correlation of Species Longevity with DNA Double Strand Break-Recognition but not with Telomere Length

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzini, Antonello; Johnson, F. Brad; Oliver, Anthony; Tresini, Maria; Smith, Jasmine S.; Hdeib, Mona; Sell, Christian; Cristofalo, Vincent J.; Stamato, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The identification of the cellular mechanisms responsible for the wide differences in species lifespan remains one of the major unsolved problems of the biology of aging. We measured the capacity of nuclear protein to recognize DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and telomere length of skin fibroblasts derived from mammalian species that exhibit wide differences in longevity. Our results indicate DNA DSB recognition increases exponentially with longevity. Further, an analysis of the level of Ku80 protein in human, cow, and mouse suggests that Ku levels vary dramatically between species and these levels are strongly correlated with longevity. In contrast mean telomere length appears to decrease with increasing longevity of the species, although not significantly. These findings suggest that an enhanced ability to bind to DNA-ends may be important for longevity. A number of possible roles for increased levels of Ku and DNA-PKcs are discussed. PMID:19896964

  12. Controlled induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the mouse liver induces features of tissue ageing

    PubMed Central

    White, Ryan R.; Milholland, Brandon; de Bruin, Alain; Curran, Samuel; Laberge, Remi-Martin; van Steeg, Harry; Campisi, Judith; Maslov, Alexander Y.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been implicated in ageing, but direct evidence for a causal relationship is lacking, owing to the difficulty of inducing defined DNA lesions in cells and tissues without simultaneously damaging other biomolecules and cellular structures. Here we directly test whether highly toxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) alone can drive an ageing phenotype using an adenovirus-based system based on tetracycline-controlled expression of the SacI restriction enzyme. We deliver the adenovirus to mice and compare molecular and cellular end points in the liver with normally aged animals. Treated, 3-month-old mice display many, but not all signs of normal liver ageing as early as 1 month after treatment, including ageing pathologies, markers of senescence, fused mitochondria and alterations in gene expression profiles. These results, showing that DSBs alone can cause distinct ageing phenotypes in mouse liver, provide new insights in the role of DNA damage as a driver of tissue ageing. PMID:25858675

  13. Controlled induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the mouse liver induces features of tissue ageing.

    PubMed

    White, Ryan R; Milholland, Brandon; de Bruin, Alain; Curran, Samuel; Laberge, Remi-Martin; van Steeg, Harry; Campisi, Judith; Maslov, Alexander Y; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been implicated in ageing, but direct evidence for a causal relationship is lacking, owing to the difficulty of inducing defined DNA lesions in cells and tissues without simultaneously damaging other biomolecules and cellular structures. Here we directly test whether highly toxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) alone can drive an ageing phenotype using an adenovirus-based system based on tetracycline-controlled expression of the SacI restriction enzyme. We deliver the adenovirus to mice and compare molecular and cellular end points in the liver with normally aged animals. Treated, 3-month-old mice display many, but not all signs of normal liver ageing as early as 1 month after treatment, including ageing pathologies, markers of senescence, fused mitochondria and alterations in gene expression profiles. These results, showing that DSBs alone can cause distinct ageing phenotypes in mouse liver, provide new insights in the role of DNA damage as a driver of tissue ageing. PMID:25858675

  14. Contrasting effects of Krüppel-like factor 4 on X-ray-induced double-strand and single-strand DNA breaks in mouse astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Cui, Fengmei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Liyuan; Chen, Qiu; Tian, Ye

    2014-04-01

    Astrocytes, the most common cell type in the brain, play a principal role in the repair of damaged brain tissues during external radiotherapy of brain tumours. As a downstream gene of p53, the effects of Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in response to X-ray-induced DNA damage in astrocytes are unclear. In the present study, KLF4 expression was upregulated after the exposure of astrocytes isolated from the murine brain. Inhibition of KLF4 expression using lentiviral transduction produced less double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) determined by a neutral comet assay and flow cytometric analysis of phosphorylated histone family 2A variant and more single-strand DNA breaks (SSB) determined by a basic comet assay when the astrocytes were exposed to 4 Gy of X-ray radiation. These data suggest that radiation exposure of the tissues around brain tumour during radiation therapy causes KLF4 overexpression in astrocytes, which induces more DSB and reduces SSB. This causes the adverse effects of radiation therapy in the treatment of brain tumours.

  15. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 Inhibits Ubiquitin Signaling at DNA Double-strand Breaks*

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ismail Hassan; McDonald, Darin; Strickfaden, Hilmar; Xu, Zhizhong; Hendzel, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1)-mediated histone ubiquitylation plays an important role in aberrant gene silencing in human cancers and is a potential target for cancer therapy. Here we show that 2-pyridine-3-yl-methylene-indan-1,3-dione (PRT4165) is a potent inhibitor of PRC1-mediated H2A ubiquitylation in vivo and in vitro. The drug also inhibits the accumulation of all detectable ubiquitin at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the retention of several DNA damage response proteins in foci that form around DSBs, and the repair of the DSBs. In vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity assays revealed that PRT4165 inhibits both RNF2 and RING 1A, which are partially redundant paralogues that together account for the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity found in PRC1 complexes, but not RNF8 nor RNF168. Because ubiquitylation is completely inhibited despite the efficient recruitment of RNF8 to DSBs, our results suggest that PRC1-mediated monoubiquitylation is required for subsequent RNF8- and/or RNF168-mediated polyubiquitylation. Our results demonstrate the unique feature of PRT4165 as a novel chromatin-remodeling compound and provide a new tool for the inhibition of ubiquitylation signaling at DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:23902761

  16. I-SceI-mediated double-strand DNA breaks stimulate efficient gene targeting in the industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Jean Paul; Arentshorst, Mark; Nikolaev, Igor; Barends, Sharief; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-12-01

    Targeted integration of expression cassettes for enzyme production in industrial microorganisms is desirable especially when enzyme variants are screened for improved enzymatic properties. However, currently used methods for targeted integration are inefficient and result in low transformation frequencies. In this study, we expressed the Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-SceI meganuclease to generate double-strand breaks at a defined locus in the Trichoderma reesei genome. We showed that the double-strand DNA breaks mediated by I-SceI can be efficiently repaired when an exogenous DNA cassette flanked by regions homologous to the I-SceI landing locus was added during transformation. Transformation efficiencies increased approximately sixfold compared to control transformation. Analysis of the transformants obtained via I-SceI-mediated gene targeting showed that about two thirds of the transformants resulted from a homologous recombination event at the predetermined locus. Counter selection of the transformants for the loss of the pyrG marker upon integration of the DNA cassette showed that almost all of the clones contained the cassette at the predetermined locus. Analysis of independently obtained transformants using targeted integration of a glucoamylase expression cassette demonstrated that glucoamylase production among the transformants was high and showing limited variation. In conclusion, the gene targeting system developed in this study significantly increases transformation efficiency as well as homologous recombination efficiency and omits the use of Δku70 strains. It is also suitable for high-throughput screening of enzyme variants or gene libraries in T. reesei.

  17. Adaptive response in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells exposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields: Gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and repair.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongxin; He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether radiofrequency field (RF) preexposure induced adaptive responses (AR) in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and the mechanisms underlying the observed findings. Cells were preexposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 120 μW/cm(2) power intensity for 4 h/d for 5 d. Some cells were subjected to 1.5 Gy γ-radiation (GR) 4 h following the last RF exposure. The intensity of strand breaks in the DNA was assessed immediately at 4 h. Subsequently, some BMSC were examined at 30, 60, 90, or 120 min utilizing the alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX foci technique. Data showed no significant differences in number and intensity of strand breaks in DNA between RF-exposed and control cells. A significant increase in number and intensity of DNA strand breaks was noted in cells exposed to GR exposure alone. RF followed by GR exposure significantly decreased number of strand breaks and resulted in faster kinetics of repair of DNA strand breaks compared to GR alone. Thus, data suggest that RF preexposure protected cells from damage induced by GR. Evidence indicates that in RF-mediated AR more rapid repair kinetics occurs under conditions of GR-induced damage, which may be attributed to diminished DNA strand breakage.

  18. Adaptive response in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells exposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields: Gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and repair.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongxin; He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether radiofrequency field (RF) preexposure induced adaptive responses (AR) in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and the mechanisms underlying the observed findings. Cells were preexposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 120 μW/cm(2) power intensity for 4 h/d for 5 d. Some cells were subjected to 1.5 Gy γ-radiation (GR) 4 h following the last RF exposure. The intensity of strand breaks in the DNA was assessed immediately at 4 h. Subsequently, some BMSC were examined at 30, 60, 90, or 120 min utilizing the alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX foci technique. Data showed no significant differences in number and intensity of strand breaks in DNA between RF-exposed and control cells. A significant increase in number and intensity of DNA strand breaks was noted in cells exposed to GR exposure alone. RF followed by GR exposure significantly decreased number of strand breaks and resulted in faster kinetics of repair of DNA strand breaks compared to GR alone. Thus, data suggest that RF preexposure protected cells from damage induced by GR. Evidence indicates that in RF-mediated AR more rapid repair kinetics occurs under conditions of GR-induced damage, which may be attributed to diminished DNA strand breakage. PMID:27267824

  19. Changes in the expression of DNA double strand break repair genes in primordial follicles from immature and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Keralapura Basavaraju, Rajani; Rao, Addicam Jagannadha

    2015-03-01

    Oocytes present at birth undergo a progressive process of apoptosis in humans and other mammals as they age. Accepted opinion is that no fresh oocytes are produced other than those present at the time of birth. Studies have shown that DNA repair genes in oocytes of mice and women decline with age, and lack of these genes show higher DNA breaks and increased oocyte death rates. In contrast to the ethical problems associated with monitoring the changes in DNA double-strand breaks in oocytes from young and old humans, it is relatively easy to carry out such a study using a rodent model. In this study, the mRNA levels of DNA repair genes are compared with protein products of some of the genes in the primordial follicles isolated from immature (18-20 days) and aged (400-450 days) female rats. Results revealed a significant decline in mRNA levels of BRAC1 (P < 0.01), RAD51 (P < 0.05), ERCC2 (P < 0.05), and H2AX (P < 0.01) of DNA repair genes and phospho-protein levels of BRAC1 (P < 0.01) and H2AX (P < 0.05) in primordial follicles of aged rats. Impaired DNA repair is confirmed as a mechanism of oocyte ageing.

  20. C-terminal region of bacterial Ku controls DNA bridging, DNA threading and recruitment of DNA ligase D for double strand breaks repair

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Stephen; Baconnais, Sonia; Roblin, Pierre; Nicolas, Pierre; Drevet, Pascal; Simonson, Héloïse; Piétrement, Olivier; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Le Cam, Eric; Noirot, Philippe; Lecointe, François

    2016-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining is a ligation process repairing DNA double strand breaks in eukaryotes and many prokaryotes. The ring structured eukaryotic Ku binds DNA ends and recruits other factors which can access DNA ends through the threading of Ku inward the DNA, making this protein a key ingredient for the scaffolding of the NHEJ machinery. However, this threading ability seems unevenly conserved among bacterial Ku. As bacterial Ku differ mainly by their C-terminus, we evaluate the role of this region in the loading and the threading abilities of Bacillus subtilis Ku and the stimulation of the DNA ligase LigD. We identify two distinct sub-regions: a ubiquitous minimal C-terminal region and a frequent basic C-terminal extension. We show that truncation of one or both of these sub-regions in Bacillus subtilis Ku impairs the stimulation of the LigD end joining activity in vitro. We further demonstrate that the minimal C-terminus is required for the Ku-LigD interaction, whereas the basic extension controls the threading and DNA bridging abilities of Ku. We propose that the Ku basic C-terminal extension increases the concentration of Ku near DNA ends, favoring the recruitment of LigD at the break, thanks to the minimal C-terminal sub-region. PMID:26961308

  1. Effects of DNA double-strand and single-strand breaks on intrachromosomal recombination events in cell-cycle-arrested yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Galli, A; Schiestl, R H

    1998-01-01

    Intrachromosomal recombination between repeated elements can result in deletion (DEL recombination) events. We investigated the inducibility of such intrachromosomal recombination events at different stages of the cell cycle and the nature of the primary DNA lesions capable of initiating these events. Two genetic systems were constructed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that select for DEL recombination events between duplicated alleles of CDC28 and TUB2. We determined effects of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-strand breaks (SSBs) between the duplicated alleles on DEL recombination when induced in dividing cells or cells arrested in G1 or G2. Site-specific DSBs and SSBs were produced by overexpression of the I-Sce I endonuclease and the gene II protein (gIIp), respectively. I-Sce I-induced DSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequencies in both dividing and cell-cycle-arrested cells, indicating that G1- and G2-arrested cells are capable of completing DSB repair. In contrast, gIIp-induced SSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequency only in dividing cells. To further examine these phenomena we used both gamma-irradiation, inducing DSBs as its most relevant lesion, and UV, inducing other forms of DNA damage. UV irradiation did not increase DEL recombination frequencies in G1 or G2, whereas gamma-rays increased DEL recombination frequencies in both phases. Both forms of radiation, however, induced DEL recombination in dividing cells. The results suggest that DSBs but not SSBs induce DEL recombination, probably via the single-strand annealing pathway. Further, DSBs in dividing cells may result from the replication of a UV or SSB-damaged template. Alternatively, UV induced events may occur by replication slippage after DNA polymerase pausing in front of the damage. PMID:9649517

  2. Mechanisms of a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy involving atmospheric pressure plasma-mediated apoptosis and DNA strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed for a variety of biomedical applications due to its chemically reactive components. Recently, the plasma has emerged as a promising novel cancer therapy based on its ability to selectively ablate cancer cells while leaving normal cells essentially unaffected. The therapeutic effect of plasma is attributed to intracellular generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway via severe DNA strand break formation. However, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for appropriate activation of these physiological events and which pathway is more crucial for plasma-mediated cytotoxicity have not been clarified. Understanding the molecular link between ROS/RNS-mediated apoptosis and DNA damage-involved chromosome instability is critical for the development of more efficacious therapeutic strategies for selective killing of diverse cancer cells.

  3. Role of the silkworm argonaute2 homolog gene in double-strand break repair of extrachromosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsukioka, Haruna; Takahashi, Masateru; Mon, Hiroaki; Okano, Kazuhiro; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru; Lee, Jae Man; Kawaguchi, Yutaka; Koga, Katsumi; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2006-01-01

    The argonaute protein family provides central components for RNA interference (RNAi) and related phenomena in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we isolated, from a Bombyx mori cell, a cDNA clone named BmAGO2, which is homologous to Drosophila ARGONAUTE2, the gene encoding a repressive factor for the recombination repair of extrachromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). RNAi-mediated silencing of the BmAGO2 sequence markedly increased homologous recombination (HR) repair of DSBs in episomal DNA, but had no effect on that in chromosomes. Moreover, we found that RNAi for BmAGO2 enhanced the integration of linearized DNA into a silkworm chromosome via HR. These results suggested that BmAgo2 protein plays an indispensable role in the repression of extrachromosomal DSB repair.

  4. 5-Fluorouracil sensitizes colorectal tumor cells towards double stranded DNA breaks by interfering with homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Upadhyayula Sai; Dyczkowski, Jerzy; Beißbarth, Tim; Gaedcke, Jochen; Mansour, Wael Y.; Borgmann, Kerstin; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the rectum are treated by neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. This involves a combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and double stranded DNA-break (DSB)-inducing radiotherapy. Here we explored how 5-FU cooperates with DSB-induction to achieve sustainable DNA damage in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. After DSB induction by neocarzinostatin, phosphorylated histone 2AX (γ-H2AX) rapidly accumulated but then largely vanished within a few hours. In contrast, when CRC cells were pre-treated with 5-FU, gammaH2AX remained for at least 24 hours. GFP-reporter assays revealed that 5-FU decreases the efficiency of homologous recombination (HR) repair. However, 5-FU did not prevent the initial steps of HR repair, such as the accumulation of RPA and Rad51 at nuclear foci. Thus, we propose that 5-FU interferes with the continuation of HR repair, e. g. the synthesis of new DNA strands. Two key mediators of HR, Rad51 and BRCA2, were found upregulated in CRC biopsies as compared to normal mucosa. Inhibition of HR by targeting Rad51 enhanced DNA damage upon DSB-inducing treatment, outlining an alternative way of enhancing therapeutic efficacy. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that interfering with HR represents a key mechanism to enhance the efficacy when treating CRC with DNA-damaging therapy. PMID:25909291

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor facilitates DNA strand breaks and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine formation by the aldo-keto reductase product benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Heum; Mangal, Dipti; Frey, Alexander J; Harvey, Ronald G; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2009-10-23

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) o-quinones produced by aldo-keto reductases are ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) (Burczynski, M. E., and Penning, T. M. (2000) Cancer Res. 60, 908-915). They induce oxidative DNA lesions (reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA strand breaks and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo) formation) in human lung cells. We tested whether the AhR enhances PAH o-quinone-mediated oxidative DNA damage by translocating these ligands to the nucleus. Using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay to detect DNA strand breaks in murine hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and its AhR- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-deficient variants, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione (B[a]P-7,8-dione) produced fewer DNA strand breaks in AhR-deficient cells compared with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-deficient and wild type Hepa1c1c7 cells. Decreased DNA strand breaks were also observed in human bronchoalveolar H358 cells in which the AhR was silenced by siRNA. The antioxidant alpha-tocopherol and the iron chelator/antioxidant desferal decreased the formation of B[a]P-7,8-dione-mediated DNA strand breaks indicating that they were reactive oxygen species-dependent. By coupling the comet assay to 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (hOGG1), which excises 8-oxo-Gua, strand breaks dependent upon this lesion were measured. hOGG1 treatment produced more DNA single strand breaks in B[a]P-7,8-dione-treated Hepa cells and H358 cells than in its absence. The levels of hOGG1-dependent DNA strand breaks mediated by B[a]P-7,8-dione were lower in AhR-deficient Hepa and AhR knockdown H358 cells. The AhR antagonist alpha-naphthoflavone also attenuated B[a]P-7,8-dione-mediated DNA strand breaks. The decrease in 8-oxo-dGuo levels in AhR-deficient Hepa cells and AhR knockdown H358 cells was validated by immunoaffinity capture stable isotope dilution ([(15)N(5)]8-oxo-dGuo) liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/multiple reaction

  6. Gateway to genetic exchange? DNA double-strand breaks in the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga submitted to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Hespeels, B; Knapen, M; Hanot-Mambres, D; Heuskin, A-C; Pineux, F; LUCAS, S; Koszul, R; Van Doninck, K

    2014-07-01

    The bdelloid rotifer lineage Adineta vaga inhabits temporary habitats subjected to frequent episodes of drought. The recently published draft sequence of the genome of A. vaga revealed a peculiar genomic structure incompatible with meiosis and suggesting that DNA damage induced by desiccation may have reshaped the genomic structure of these organisms. However, the causative link between DNA damage and desiccation has never been proven to date in rotifers. To test for the hypothesis that desiccation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), we developed a protocol allowing a high survival rate of desiccated A. vaga. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to monitor genomic integrity, we followed the occurrence of DSBs in dried bdelloids and observed an accumulation of these breaks with time spent in dehydrated state. These DSBs are gradually repaired upon rehydration. Even when the genome was entirely shattered into small DNA fragments by proton radiation, A. vaga individuals were able to efficiently recover from desiccation and repair a large amount of DSBs. Interestingly, when investigating the influence of UV-A and UV-B exposure on the genomic integrity of desiccated bdelloids, we observed that these natural radiations also caused important DNA DSBs, suggesting that the genome is not protected during the desiccated stage but that the repair mechanisms are extremely efficient in these intriguing organisms.

  7. Radioprotective action of WR-1065 on radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.; VanAnkeren, S.C.; Milas, L.; Meyn, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the radioprotective effect of WR-1065 on cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. The effects of the drug on the induction and rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were measured using alkaline (pH 12.1) and neutral (pH 7.0) elution, respectively. Molecular protection factors (PFs) calculated from these data allowed us to determine whether the degree of modification of strand breakage accurately predicted the PFs measured using the biological end point of cell survival. The drug did protect against the induction of both SSBs and DSBs, although to an extent that did not appear to fully account for the degree of radioprotection in terms of cell killing measured under identical conditions. It is therefore unlikely that radioprotection by WR-1065 occurs simply as a consequence of a general lowering of all types of gamma-ray-induced DNA lesions, and it is possible that the drug could differentially protect against the induction of subsets of these DNA lesions. The rate of SSB rejoining was retarded following preirradiation treatment of cells with WR-1065, but there was no effect on DSB rejoining. Postirradiation treatment with WR-1065 also appeared to retard SSB rejoining but without an accompanying effect on either DSB rejoining or cell survival; however, this effect was largely reversed by the addition of catalase and was, therefore, probably a result of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ generated by autoxidation of the drug. Based on these observations, it would appear that the molecular actions of aminothiol radioprotective compounds that lead to reduced cell killing are much more complex than previously thought.

  8. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Yasunori Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  9. Depletion of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 activity enhances etoposide-mediated double-strand break formation and cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Dutta, Arijit; Mallisetty, Apurva; Mathew, Jeena; Minas, Tsion; Kraus, Christina; Dhopeshwarkar, Priyanka; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Mitra, Sankar; Üren, Aykut; Adhikari, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    DNA topoisomerase 2 (Top2) poisons, including common anticancer drugs etoposide and doxorubicin kill cancer cells by stabilizing covalent Top2-tyrosyl-DNA 5'-phosphodiester adducts and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Proteolytic degradation of the covalently attached Top2 leaves a 5'-tyrosylated blocked termini which is removed by tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2), prior to DSB repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Thus, TDP2 confers resistance of tumor cells to Top2-poisons by repairing such covalent DNA-protein adducts, and its pharmacological inhibition could enhance the efficacy of Top2-poisons. We discovered NSC111041, a selective inhibitor of TDP2, by optimizing a high throughput screening (HTS) assay for TDP2's 5'-tyrosyl phosphodiesterase activity and subsequent validation studies. We found that NSC111041 inhibits TDP2's binding to DNA without getting intercalated into DNA and enhanced etoposide's cytotoxicity synergistically in TDP2-expressing cells but not in TDP2 depleted cells. Furthermore, NSC111041 enhanced formation of etoposide-induced γ-H2AX foci presumably by affecting DSB repair. Immuno-histochemical analysis showed higher TDP2 expression in a sub-set of different type of tumor tissues. These findings underscore the feasibility of clinical use of suitable TDP2 inhibitors in adjuvant therapy with Top2-poisons for a sub-set of cancer patients with high TDP2 expression. PMID:27235629

  10. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis. PMID:26822533

  11. Parole terms for a killer: directing caspase3/CAD induced DNA strand breaks to coordinate changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brian D; Megeney, Lynn A

    2010-08-01

    In a series of discoveries over the preceding decade, a number of laboratories have unequivocally established that apoptotic proteins and pathways are well conserved cell fate determinants, which act independent of a cell death response. Within this context, the role for apoptotic proteins in the induction of cell differentiation has been widely documented. Despite these discoveries, little information has been forthcoming regarding a conserved mechanism by which apoptotic proteins achieve this non-death outcome. In the following discussion, we will explore the premise that the penultimate step in apoptosis, genome wide DNA damage/strand breaks act as a conserved genomic reprogramming event necessary for cell differentiation (Larsen et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010; 107:4230-5). Moreover, we hypothesis that directed DNA damage, as mediated by known apoptotic proteins, may participate in numerous forms of regulated gene expression.

  12. TiO2 nanoparticles induce DNA double strand breaks and cell cycle arrest in human alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Kansara, Krupa; Patel, Pal; Shah, Darshini; Shukla, Ritesh K; Singh, Sanjay; Kumar, Ashutosh; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-03-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) have the second highest global annual production (∼3000 tons) among the metal-containing NPs. These NPs are used as photocatalysts for bacterial disinfection, and in various other consumer products including sunscreen, food packaging, therapeutics, biosensors, surface cleaning agents, and others. Humans are exposed to these NPs during synthesis (laboratory), manufacture (industry), and use (consumer products, devices, medicines, etc.), as well as through environmental exposures (disposal). Hence, there is great concern regarding the health effects caused by exposure to NPs and, in particular, to TiO2 NPs. In the present study, the genotoxic potential of TiO2 NPs in A549 cells was examined, focusing on their potential to induce ROS, different types of DNA damage, and cell cycle arrest. We show that TiO2 NPs can induce DNA damage and a corresponding increase in micronucleus frequency, as evident from the comet and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assays. We demonstrate that DNA damage may be attributed to increased oxidative stress and ROS generation. Furthermore, genomic and proteomic analyses showed increased expression of ATM, P53, and CdC-2 and decreased expression of ATR, H2AX, and Cyclin B1 in A549 cells, suggesting induction of DNA double strand breaks. The occurrence of double strand breaks was correlated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Overall, the results indicate the potential for genotoxicity following exposure to these TiO2 NPs, suggesting that use should be carefully monitored.

  13. Melatonin sensitizes human breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Carolina; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Gómez-Arozamena, José; Cos, Samuel

    2015-03-01

    Radiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy are nowadays considered a standard treatment option after surgery in breast cancer. Melatonin exerts oncostatic actions on human breast cancer cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of a combination of radiotherapy and melatonin on human breast cancer cells. Melatonin (1 mm, 10 μm and 1 nm) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Radiation alone inhibited the MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of breast cancer cells with melatonin 1 wk before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease of MCF-7 cell proliferation compared with radiation alone. Melatonin pretreatment before radiation also decreased G2 -M phase arrest compared with irradiation alone, with a higher percentage of cells in the G0 -G1 phase and a lower percentage of cells in S phase. Radiation alone diminished RAD51 and DNA-protein kinase (PKcs) mRNA expression, two main proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. Treatment with melatonin for 7 days before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease in RAD51 and DNA-PKcs mRNA expression compared with radiation alone. Our findings suggest that melatonin pretreatment before radiation sensitizes breast cancer cells to the ionizing effects of radiation by decreasing cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest and downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. These findings may have implications for designing clinical trials using melatonin and radiotherapy. PMID:25623566

  14. Ku counteracts mobilization of PARP1 and MRN in chromatin damaged with DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiao; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Gomez, Dennis; Bombarde, Oriane; Couderc, Bettina; Ren, Guo-Sheng; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the main pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair is classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ). An alternative or back-up NHEJ (B-NHEJ) pathway has emerged which operates preferentially under C-NHEJ defective conditions. Although B-NHEJ appears particularly relevant to genomic instability associated with cancer, its components and regulation are still largely unknown. To get insights into this pathway, we have knocked-down Ku, the main contributor to C-NHEJ. Thus, models of human cell lines have been engineered in which the expression of Ku70/80 heterodimer can be significantly lowered by the conditional induction of a shRNA against Ku70. On Ku reduction in cells, resulting NHEJ competent protein extracts showed a shift from C- to B-NHEJ that could be reversed by addition of purified Ku protein. Using a cellular fractionation protocol after treatment with a strong DSBs inducer followed by western blotting or immunostaining, we established that, among C-NHEJ factors, Ku is the main counteracting factor against mobilization of PARP1 and the MRN complex to damaged chromatin. In addition, Ku limits PAR synthesis and single-stranded DNA production in response to DSBs. These data support the involvement of PARP1 and the MRN proteins in the B-NHEJ route for the repair of DNA DSBs. PMID:21880593

  15. High-resolution profiling of γH2AX around DNA double strand breaks in the mammalian genome

    PubMed Central

    Iacovoni, Jason S; Caron, Pierre; Lassadi, Imen; Nicolas, Estelle; Massip, Laurent; Trouche, Didier; Legube, Gaëlle

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin acts as a key regulator of DNA-related processes such as DNA damage repair. Although ChIP-chip is a powerful technique to provide high-resolution maps of protein–genome interactions, its use to study DNA double strand break (DSB) repair has been hindered by the limitations of the available damage induction methods. We have developed a human cell line that permits induction of multiple DSBs randomly distributed and unambiguously positioned within the genome. Using this system, we have generated the first genome-wide mapping of γH2AX around DSBs. We found that all DSBs trigger large γH2AX domains, which spread out from the DSB in a bidirectional, discontinuous and not necessarily symmetrical manner. The distribution of γH2AX within domains is influenced by gene transcription, as parallel mappings of RNA Polymerase II and strand-specific expression showed that γH2AX does not propagate on active genes. In addition, we showed that transcription is accurately maintained within γH2AX domains, indicating that mechanisms may exist to protect gene transcription from γH2AX spreading and from the chromatin rearrangements induced by DSBs. PMID:20360682

  16. In Vivo Alkaline Comet Assay and Enzyme-modified Alkaline Comet Assay for Measuring DNA Strand Breaks and Oxidative DNA Damage in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Bishop, Michelle E; Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E; Davis, Kelly J; Manjanatha, Mugimane G

    2016-05-04

    Unrepaired DNA damage can lead to genetic instability, which in turn may enhance cancer development. Therefore, identifying potential DNA damaging agents is important for protecting public health. The in vivo alkaline comet assay, which detects DNA damage as strand breaks, is especially relevant for assessing the genotoxic hazards of xenobiotics, as its responses reflect the in vivo absorption, tissue distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of chemicals, as well as DNA repair process. Compared to other in vivo DNA damage assays, the assay is rapid, sensitive, visual and inexpensive, and, by converting oxidative DNA damage into strand breaks using specific repair enzymes, the assay can measure oxidative DNA damage in an efficient and relatively artifact-free manner. Measurement of DNA damage with the comet assay can be performed using both acute and subchronic toxicology study designs, and by integrating the comet assay with other toxicological assessments, the assay addresses animal welfare requirements by making maximum use of animal resources. Another major advantage of the assays is that they only require a small amount of cells, and the cells do not have to be derived from proliferating cell populations. The assays also can be performed with a variety of human samples obtained from clinically or occupationally exposed individuals.

  17. Cohesin phosphorylation and mobility of SMC1 at ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bauerschmidt, Christina; Helleday, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Cohesin, a hetero-tetrameric complex of SMC1, SMC3, Rad21 and Scc3, associates with chromatin after mitosis and holds sister chromatids together following DNA replication. Following DNA damage, cohesin accumulates at and promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In addition, phosphorylation of the SMC1/3 subunits contributes to DNA damage-induced cell cycle checkpoint regulation. The aim of this study was to determine the regulation and consequences of SMC1/3 phosphorylation as part of the cohesin complex. We show here that the ATM-dependent phosphorylation of SMC1 and SMC3 is mediated by H2AX, 53BP1 and MDC1. Depletion of RAD21 abolishes these phosphorylations, indicating that only the fully assembled complex is phosphorylated. Comparison of wild type SMC1 and SMC1S966A in fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching experiments shows that phosphorylation of SMC1 is required for an increased mobility after DNA damage in G2-phase cells, suggesting that ATM-dependent phosphorylation facilitates mobilization of the cohesin complex after DNA damage.

  18. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese.

  19. hnRNP-U is a specific DNA-dependent protein kinase substrate phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Fredrik M.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2009-03-27

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are orchestrated by the large phosphoinositol-3-kinase related kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. We have developed a cell-free system to dissect the biochemical mechanisms of these kinases. Using this system, we identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U), also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), as a specific substrate for DNA-PK. We show that hnRNP-U is phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK in vitro and in cells in response to DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of hnRNP-U suggests novel functions for DNA-PK in the response to DNA damage.

  20. Fluorometric determination of DNA in agarose gels: usefulness for measurement of double-strand breaks in nonlabeled cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J K; Birnboim, H C

    1993-09-01

    Quantitative measurement of DNA in agarose gels, particularly as needed for measurement of double-strand breaks induced by agents such as radiation, usually involves the use of radioactively labeled DNA. Thus its usefulness is usually limited to growing cells which incorporate radiolabeled thymidine into DNA. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a fluorometric technique for quantitative estimation of DNA in the presence of large amounts of agarose. Gel slices are solubilized with concentrated sodium perchlorate and DNA is selectively precipitated with cadmium chloride. The amount of DNA can then be estimated with 3,5-diaminobenzoic acid. Determination of DNA is linear in the range 10 ng to 1 microgram or more. We describe the application of this technique to the measurement of 60Co gamma-ray-induced double-strand breaks by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our results are essentially identical to those obtained using radiolabeled DNA.

  1. Superresolution light microscopy shows nanostructure of carbon ion radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair foci.

    PubMed

    Lopez Perez, Ramon; Best, Gerrit; Nicolay, Nils H; Greubel, Christoph; Rossberger, Sabrina; Reindl, Judith; Dollinger, Günther; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Cremer, Christoph; Huber, Peter E

    2016-08-01

    Carbon ion radiation is a promising new form of radiotherapy for cancer, but the central question about the biologic effects of charged particle radiation is yet incompletely understood. Key to this question is the understanding of the interaction of ions with DNA in the cell's nucleus. Induction and repair of DNA lesions including double-strand breaks (DSBs) are decisive for the cell. Several DSB repair markers have been used to investigate these processes microscopically, but the limited resolution of conventional microscopy is insufficient to provide structural insights. We have applied superresolution microscopy to overcome these limitations and analyze the fine structure of DSB repair foci. We found that the conventionally detected foci of the widely used DSB marker γH2AX (Ø 700-1000 nm) were composed of elongated subfoci with a size of ∼100 nm consisting of even smaller subfocus elements (Ø 40-60 nm). The structural organization of the subfoci suggests that they could represent the local chromatin structure of elementary DSB repair units at the DSB damage sites. Subfocus clusters may indicate induction of densely spaced DSBs, which are thought to be associated with the high biologic effectiveness of carbon ions. Superresolution microscopy might emerge as a powerful tool to improve our knowledge of interactions of ionizing radiation with cells.-Lopez Perez, R., Best, G., Nicolay, N. H., Greubel, C., Rossberger, S., Reindl, J., Dollinger, G., Weber, K.-J., Cremer, C., Huber, P. E. Superresolution light microscopy shows nanostructure of carbon ion radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair foci. PMID:27166088

  2. An inverse switch in DNA base excision and strand break repair contributes to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Mirta M L; Zub, Kamila Anna; Aas, Per Arne; Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Demirovic, Aida; Sarno, Antonio; Tian, Erming; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in checkpoint and DNA repair pathways may provide adaptive mechanisms contributing to acquired drug resistance. Here, we investigated the levels of proteins mediating DNA damage signaling and -repair in RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells and its Melphalan-resistant derivative 8226-LR5. We observed markedly reduced steady-state levels of DNA glycosylases UNG2, NEIL1 and MPG in the resistant cells and cross-resistance to agents inducing their respective DNA base lesions. Conversely, repair of alkali-labile sites was apparently enhanced in the resistant cells, as substantiated by alkaline comet assay, autoribosylation of PARP-1, and increased sensitivity to PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AN or KU58684. Reduced base-excision and enhanced single-strand break repair would both contribute to the observed reduction in genomic alkali-labile sites, which could jeopardize productive processing of the more cytotoxic Melphalan-induced interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs). Furthermore, we found a marked upregulation of proteins in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of double-strand break (DSB) repair, likely contributing to the observed increase in DSB repair kinetics in the resistant cells. Finally, we observed apparent upregulation of ATR-signaling and downregulation of ATM-signaling in the resistant cells. This was accompanied by markedly increased sensitivity towards Melphalan in the presence of ATR-, DNA-PK, or CHK1/2 inhibitors whereas no sensitizing effect was observed subsequent to ATM inhibition, suggesting that replication blocking lesions are primary triggers of the DNA damage response in the Melphalan resistant cells. In conclusion, Melphalan resistance is apparently contributed by modulation of the DNA damage response at multiple levels, including downregulation of specific repair pathways to avoid repair intermediates that could impair efficient processing of cytotoxic ICLs and ICL-induced DSBs. This study has revealed several novel candidate biomarkers

  3. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways. PMID:23088767

  4. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways.

  5. CK2 phosphorylation of XRCC1 facilitates dissociation from DNA and single-strand break formation during base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Ström, Cecilia E; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Finch, David; Parsons, Jason L; Lagerqvist, Anne; Johansson, Fredrik; Schultz, Niklas; Erixon, Klaus; Dianov, Grigory L; Helleday, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    CK2 phosphorylates the scaffold protein XRCC1, which is required for efficient DNA single-strand break (SSB) repair. Here, we express an XRCC1 protein (XRCC1(ckm)) that cannot be phosphorylated by CK2 in XRCC1 mutated EM9 cells and show that the role of this post-translational modification gives distinct phenotypes in SSB repair and base excision repair (BER). Interestingly, we find that fewer SSBs are formed during BER after treatment with the alkylating agent dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in EM9 cells expressing XRCC1(ckm) (CKM cells) or following inhibition with the CK2 inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT). We also show that XRCC1(ckm) protein has a higher affinity for DNA than wild type XRCC1 protein and resides in an immobile fraction on DNA, in particular after damage. We propose a model whereby the increased affinity for DNA sequesters XRCC1(ckm) and the repair enzymes associated with it, at the repair site, which retards kinetics of BER. In conclusion, our results indicate that phosphorylation of XRCC1 by CK2 facilitates the BER incision step, likely by promoting dissociation from DNA.

  6. SETD2 is required for DNA double-strand break repair and activation of the p53-mediated checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sílvia; Vítor, Alexandra C; Sridhara, Sreerama C; Martins, Filipa B; Raposo, Ana C; Desterro, Joana MP; Ferreira, João; de Almeida, Sérgio F

    2014-01-01

    Histone modifications establish the chromatin states that coordinate the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that SETD2, the enzyme that trimethylates histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36me3), is required for ATM activation upon DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Moreover, we find that SETD2 is necessary for homologous recombination repair of DSBs by promoting the formation of RAD51 presynaptic filaments. In agreement, SETD2-mutant clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells displayed impaired DNA damage signaling. However, despite the persistence of DNA lesions, SETD2-deficient cells failed to activate p53, a master guardian of the genome rarely mutated in ccRCC and showed decreased cell survival after DNA damage. We propose that this novel SETD2-dependent role provides a chromatin bookmarking instrument that facilitates signaling and repair of DSBs. In ccRCC, loss of SETD2 may afford an alternative mechanism for the inactivation of the p53-mediated checkpoint without the need for additional genetic mutations in TP53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02482.001 PMID:24843002

  7. Clioquinol induces DNA double-strand breaks, activation of ATM, and subsequent activation of p53 signaling.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Masato; Iwata, Kazumi; Ibi, Masakazu; Matsuno, Kuniharu; Matsumoto, Misaki; Yabe-Nishimura, Chihiro

    2012-09-01

    Clioquinol, a Cu²⁺/Zn²⁺/Fe²⁺ chelator/ionophor, was used extensively in the mid 1900s as an amebicide for treating indigestion and diarrhea. It was eventually withdrawn from the market because of a link to subacute myelo-optic neuropathy (SMON) in Japan. The pathogenesis of SMON, however, is not fully understood. To clarify the molecular mechanisms of clioquinol-induced neurotoxicity, a global analysis using DNA chips was carried out on human neuroblastoma cells. The global analysis and quantitative PCR demonstrated that mRNA levels of p21(Cip1), an inhibitor of cyclins D and E, and of GADD45α, a growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein, were significantly increased by clioquinol treatment in SH-SY5Y and IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. Activation of p53 by clioquinol was suggested, since clioquinol induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 to enhance its stabilization. The phosphorylation of p53 was inhibited by KU-55933, an inhibitor of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM), but not by NU7026, an inhibitor of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Clioquinol in fact induced phosphorylation of ATM and histone H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These results suggest that clioquinol-induced neurotoxicity is mediated by DSBs and subsequent activation of ATM/p53 signaling. PMID:22627294

  8. Post-irradiation chemical processing of DNA damage generates double-strand breaks in cells already engaged in repair

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wang, Minli; Staudt, Christian; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered-damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar–phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that these DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) apparatus. This assumption is questioned by the observation that after irradiation of naked DNA, a fraction of DSBs forms minutes to hours after exposure as a result of temperature dependent, chemical processing of labile sugar lesions. Excess DSBs also form when IR-exposed cells are processed at 50°C, but have been hitherto considered method-related artifact. Thus, it remains unknown whether DSBs actually develop in cells after IR exposure from chemically labile damage. Here, we show that irradiation of ‘naked’ or chromatin-organized mammalian DNA produces lesions, which evolve to DSBs and add to those promptly induced, after 8–24 h in vitro incubation at 37°C or 50°C. The conversion is more efficient in chromatin-associated DNA, completed within 1 h in cells and delayed in a reducing environment. We conclude that IR generates sugar lesions within clustered-damage sites contributing to DSB formation only after chemical processing, which occurs efficiently at 37°C. This subset of delayed DSBs may challenge DDR, may affect the perceived repair kinetics and requires further characterization. PMID:21745815

  9. GC-Rich Extracellular DNA Induces Oxidative Stress, Double-Strand DNA Breaks, and DNA Damage Response in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kostyuk, Svetlana; Smirnova, Tatiana; Kameneva, Larisa; Porokhovnik, Lev; Speranskij, Anatolij; Ershova, Elizaveta; Stukalov, Sergey; Izevskaya, Vera; Veiko, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cell free DNA (cfDNA) circulates throughout the bloodstream of both healthy people and patients with various diseases. CfDNA is substantially enriched in its GC-content as compared with human genomic DNA. Principal Findings. Exposure of haMSCs to GC-DNA induces short-term oxidative stress (determined with H2DCFH-DA) and results in both single- and double-strand DNA breaks (comet assay and γH2AX, foci). As a result in the cells significantly increases the expression of repair genes (BRCA1 (RT-PCR), PCNA (FACS)) and antiapoptotic genes (BCL2 (RT-PCR and FACS), BCL2A1, BCL2L1, BIRC3, and BIRC2 (RT-PCR)). Under the action of GC-DNA the potential of mitochondria was increased. Here we show that GC-rich extracellular DNA stimulates adipocyte differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs). Exposure to GC-DNA leads to an increase in the level of RNAPPARG2 and LPL (RT-PCR), in the level of fatty acid binding protein FABP4 (FACS analysis) and in the level of fat (Oil Red O). Conclusions. GC-rich fragments in the pool of cfDNA can potentially induce oxidative stress and DNA damage response and affect the direction of mesenchymal stem cells differentiation in human adipose—derived mesenchymal stem cells. Such a response may be one of the causes of obesity or osteoporosis. PMID:26273425

  10. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tóth, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  11. Application of laser-accelerated protons to the demonstration of DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-05-01

    We report the demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human cancer cells. In vitro (living) A549 cells are irradiated with quasimonoenergetic proton bunches of 0.8-2.4 MeV with a single bunch duration of 15 ns. Irradiation with the proton dose of 20 Gy results in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks generated in the cancer cells. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. Unique high-current and short-bunch features make laser-driven proton bunches an excitation source for time-resolved determination of radical yields.

  12. Application of laser-accelerated protons to the demonstration of DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Bolton, P. R.

    2009-05-04

    We report the demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human cancer cells. In vitro (living) A549 cells are irradiated with quasimonoenergetic proton bunches of 0.8-2.4 MeV with a single bunch duration of 15 ns. Irradiation with the proton dose of 20 Gy results in a distinct formation of {gamma}-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks generated in the cancer cells. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. Unique high-current and short-bunch features make laser-driven proton bunches an excitation source for time-resolved determination of radical yields.

  13. Impact of Charged Particle Exposure on Homologous DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Blood-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rall, Melanie; Kraft, Daniela; Volcic, Meta; Cucu, Aljona; Nasonova, Elena; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Bönig, Halvard; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Fournier, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) which, unless faithfully repaired, can generate chromosomal rearrangements in hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPC), potentially priming the cells towards a leukemic phenotype. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-based reporter system, we recently identified differences in the removal of enzyme-mediated DSB in human HSPC versus mature peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), particularly regarding homologous DSB repair (HR). Assessment of chromosomal breaks via premature chromosome condensation or γH2AX foci indicated similar efficiency and kinetics of radiation-induced DSB formation and rejoining in PBL and HSPC. Prolonged persistence of chromosomal breaks was observed for higher LET charged particles which are known to induce more complex DNA damage compared to X-rays. Consistent with HR deficiency in HSPC observed in our previous study, we noticed here pronounced focal accumulation of 53BP1 after X-ray and carbon ion exposure (intermediate LET) in HSPC versus PBL. For higher LET, 53BP1 foci kinetics was similarly delayed in PBL and HSPC suggesting similar failure to repair complex DNA damage. Data obtained with plasmid reporter systems revealed a dose- and LET-dependent HR increase after X-ray, carbon ion and higher LET exposure, particularly in HR-proficient immortalized and primary lymphocytes, confirming preferential use of conservative HR in PBL for intermediate LET damage repair. HR measured adjacent to the leukemia-associated MLL breakpoint cluster sequence in reporter lines revealed dose dependency of potentially leukemogenic rearrangements underscoring the risk of leukemia-induction by radiation treatment. PMID:26618143

  14. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair as Determinant of Cellular Radiosensitivity to Killing and Target in Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mladenov, Emil; Magin, Simon; Soni, Aashish; Iliakis, George

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an important role in the management of a wide range of cancers. Besides innovations in the physical application of radiation dose, radiation therapy is likely to benefit from novel approaches exploiting differences in radiation response between normal and tumor cells. While ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA lesions, including base damages and single-strand breaks, the DNA double-strand break (DSB) is widely considered as the lesion responsible not only for the aimed cell killing of tumor cells, but also for the general genomic instability that leads to the development of secondary cancers among normal cells. Homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), and alternative NHEJ, operating as a backup, are the major pathways utilized by cells for the processing of DSBs. Therefore, their function represents a major mechanism of radiation resistance in tumor cells. HRR is also required to overcome replication stress – a potent contributor to genomic instability that fuels cancer development. HRR and alternative NHEJ show strong cell-cycle dependency and are likely to benefit from radiation therapy mediated redistribution of tumor cells throughout the cell-cycle. Moreover, the synthetic lethality phenotype documented between HRR deficiency and PARP inhibition has opened new avenues for targeted therapies. These observations make HRR a particularly intriguing target for treatments aiming to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy. Here, we briefly describe the major pathways of DSB repair and review their possible contribution to cancer cell radioresistance. Finally, we discuss promising alternatives for targeting DSB repair to improve radiation therapy and cancer treatment. PMID:23675572

  15. The repair of environmentally relevant DNA double strand breaks caused by high linear energy transfer irradiation--no simple task.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shaun; Stanley, Fintan K T; Goodarzi, Aaron A

    2014-05-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) ionising radiation (IR) such as radon-derived alpha particles and high mass, high energy (HZE) particles of cosmic radiation are the predominant forms of IR to which humanity is exposed throughout life. High-LET forms of IR are established carcinogens relevant to human cancer, and their potent mutagenicity is believed, in part, to be due to a greater incidence of clustered DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and associated lesions, as ionization events occur within a more confined genomic space. The repair of such DNA damage is now well-documented to occur with slower kinetics relative to that induced by low-LET IR, and to be more reliant upon homology-directed repair pathways. Underlying these phenomena is the relative inability of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) to adequately resolve high-LET IR-induced DSBs. Current findings suggest that the functionality of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), comprised of the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer and the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), is particularly perturbed by high-LET IR-induced clustered DSBs, rendering DNA-PK dependent NHEJ less relevant to resolving these lesions. By contrast, the NHEJ-associated DNA processing endonuclease Artemis shows a greater relevance to high-LET IR-induced DSB repair. Here, we will review the cellular response to high-LET irradiation, the implications of the chronic, low-dose modality of this exposure and molecular pathways that respond to high-LET irradiation induced DSBs, with particular emphasis on NHEJ factors. PMID:24565812

  16. RuvABC-dependent double-strand breaks in dnaBts mutants require recA.

    PubMed

    Seigneur, M; Ehrlich, S D; Michel, B

    2000-11-01

    Replication fork arrest can cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These DSBs are caused by the action of the Holliday junction resolvase RuvABC, indicating that they are made by resolution of Holliday junctions formed at blocked forks. In this work, we study the homologous recombination functions required for RuvABC-mediated breakage in cells deficient for the accessory replicative helicase Rep or deficient for the main Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB. We show that, in the rep mutant, RuvABC-mediated breakage occurs in the absence of the homologous recombination protein RecA. In contrast, in dnaBts mutants, most of the RuvABC-mediated breakage depends on the presence of RecA, which suggests that RecA participates in the formation of Holliday junctions at forks blocked by the inactivation of DnaB. This action of RecA does not involve the induction of the SOS response and does not require any of the recombination proteins essential for the presynaptic step of homologous recombination, RecBCD, RecF or RecO. Consequently, our observations suggest a new function for RecA at blocked replication forks, and we propose that RecA acts by promoting homologous recombination without the assistance of known presynaptic proteins. PMID:11069680

  17. Role for Artemis nuclease in the repair of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks by alternative end joining.

    PubMed

    Moscariello, Mario; Wieloch, Radi; Kurosawa, Aya; Li, Fanghua; Adachi, Noritaka; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-07-01

    Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs generates DNA double-strand breaks that are processed either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or by canonical, DNA-PKcs-dependent non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ). Chemical or genetic inactivation of factors involved in C-NHEJ or HRR, but also their local failure in repair proficient cells, promotes an alternative, error-prone end-joining pathway that serves as backup (A-EJ). There is evidence for the involvement of Artemis endonuclease, a protein deficient in a human radiosensitivity syndrome associated with severe immunodeficiency (RS-SCID), in the processing of subsets of DSBs by HRR or C-NHEJ. It is thought that within HRR or C-NHEJ Artemis processes DNA termini at complex DSBs. Whether Artemis has a role in A-EJ remains unknown. Here, we analyze using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and specialized reporter assays, DSB repair in wild-type pre-B NALM-6 lymphocytes, as well as in their Artemis(-/-), DNA ligase 4(-/-) (LIG4(-/-)), and LIG4(-/-)/Artemis(-/-) double mutant counterparts, under conditions allowing evaluation of A-EJ. Our results substantiate the suggested roles of Artemis in C-NHEJ and HRR, but also demonstrate a role for the protein in A-EJ that is confirmed in Artemis deficient normal human fibroblasts. We conclude that Artemis is a nuclease participating in DSB repair by all major repair pathways.

  18. RRP6/EXOSC10 is required for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Marin-Vicente, Consuelo; Domingo-Prim, Judit; Eberle, Andrea B; Visa, Neus

    2015-03-15

    The exosome acts on different RNA substrates and plays important roles in RNA metabolism. The fact that short non-coding RNAs are involved in the DNA damage response led us to investigate whether the exosome factor RRP6 of Drosophila melanogaster and its human ortholog EXOSC10 play a role in DNA repair. Here, we show that RRP6 and EXOSC10 are recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in S2 cells and HeLa cells, respectively. Depletion of RRP6/EXOSC10 does not interfere with the phosphorylation of the histone variant H2Av (Drosophila) or H2AX (humans), but impairs the recruitment of the homologous recombination factor RAD51 to the damaged sites, without affecting RAD51 levels. The recruitment of RAD51 to DSBs in S2 cells is also inhibited by overexpression of RRP6-Y361A-V5, a catalytically inactive RRP6 mutant. Furthermore, cells depleted of RRP6 or EXOSC10 are more sensitive to radiation, which is consistent with RRP6/EXOSC10 playing a role in DNA repair. RRP6/EXOSC10 can be co-immunoprecipitated with RAD51, which links RRP6/EXOSC10 to the homologous recombination pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that the ribonucleolytic activity of RRP6/EXOSC10 is required for the recruitment of RAD51 to DSBs.

  19. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks in primary gingival fibroblasts by exposure to dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Urcan, Ebru; Scherthan, Harry; Styllou, Marianthi; Haertel, Uschi; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2010-03-01

    Dental resin composites and their reactive monomers/co-monomers have been shown to elicit cytotoxic responses in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF), and their metabolic radical intermediates have the potential to attack the DNA backbone, which may induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In this study we have tested the cytotoxicity and induction of DSBs by the most common composite resin monomers/co-monomers: BisGMA, HEMA, TEGDMA, and UDMA in gingival fibroblasts using the sensitive gamma-H2AX DNA repair focus assay. Our results show increasing monomer cytotoxicities in the order of BisGMA>UDMA>TEGDMA>HEMA, an order that was also observed for their capacity to induce DSBs. BisGMA at the EC50 concentration of 0.09 mm evoked the highest rate of gamma-H2AX foci-formation that was 11-fold higher DNA DSBs as compared to the negative controls that ranged between 0.25 and 0.5gamma-H2AX foci/HGF cell. Our results for the first time show that exposure to dental resin monomers can induce DSBs in primary human oral cavity cells, which underscores their genotoxic capacity.

  20. Opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and deubiquitinating enzymes in ubiquitination-dependent DNA double-strand break response signaling and DNA-repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligases ring finger protein (RNF) 8 and RNF168 transduce the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response (DDR) signal by ubiquitinating DSB sites. The depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 suppresses the accumulation of DNA-repair regulating factors such as 53BP1 and RAP80 at DSB sites, suggesting roles for RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination in DSB repair. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent DDR-signaling and DNA-repair pathways. The choice of DNA-repair pathway when RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling is negatively regulated by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) is reviewed to clarify how the opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and DUBs regulate ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling and the choice of DNA-repair pathway. PMID:26983989

  1. Myricetin induces apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum stress and DNA double-strand breaks in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    XU, YE; XIE, QI; WU, SHAOHUA; YI, DAN; YU, YANG; LIU, SHIBING; LI, SONGYAN; LI, ZHIXIN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying myricetin-induced cancer cell apoptosis remain to be elucidated. Certain previous studies have shown that myricetin induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway. Apoptosis, however, can also be induced by other classical pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to assess whether these two apoptotic pathways are involved in myricetin-induced cell death in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. The results revealed that treatment with myricetin inhibited viability of SKOV3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Myricetin induced nuclear chromatin condensation and fragmentation, and also upregulated the protein levels of active caspase 3 in a time-dependent manner. In addition, myricetin upregulated ER stress-associated proteins, glucose-regulated protein-78 and C/EBP homologous protein in SKOV3 cells. Phosphorylation of H2AX, a marker of DNA DSBs, was revealed to be upregulated in myricetin-treated cells. The data indicated that myricetin induces DNA DSBs and ER stress, which leads to apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. PMID:26782830

  2. Epigenetic Modifications and Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Oral Lichen Planus Lesions Presenting Poor Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dillenburg, Caroline S.; Martins, Marco A.T.; Almeida, Luciana O.; Meurer, Luise; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Martins, Manoela D.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetics refers to changes in cell characteristics that occur independently of modifications to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence. Alterations mediated by epigenetic mechanisms are important factors in cancer progression. Although an exciting prospect, the identification of early epigenetic markers associated with clinical outcome in premalignant and malignant disorders remains elusive. We examined alterations in chromatin acetylation in oral lichen planus (OLP) with distinct clinical behavior and compared the alterations to the levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We analyzed 42 OLP patients, who had different responses to therapy, for acetyl-histone H3 at lys9 (H3K9ac), which is associated with enhanced transcription and nuclear decondensation, and the presence of DSBs, as determined by accumulation of phosphorylated γH2AX foci. Patients with high levels of H3K9ac acetylation failed to respond to therapy or experienced disease recurrence shortly after therapy. Similar to H3K9ac, patients who responded poorly to therapy had increased accumulation of DNA DSB, indicating genomic instability. These findings suggest that histone modifications occur in OLP, and H3K9ac and γH2AX histones may serve as epigenetic markers for OLP recurrence. PMID:26222871

  3. Dynamic formation of RecA filaments at DNA double strand break repair centers in live cells.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Graumann, Peter L

    2005-08-01

    We show that RecN protein is recruited to a defined DNA double strand break (DSB) in Bacillus subtilis cells at an early time point during repair. Because RecO and RecF are successively recruited to DSBs, it is now clear that dynamic DSB repair centers (RCs) exist in prokaryotes. RecA protein was also recruited to RCs and formed highly dynamic filamentous structures, which we term threads, across the nucleoids. Formation of RecA threads commenced approximately 30 min after the induction of DSBs, after RecN recruitment to RCs, and disassembled after 2 h. Time-lapse microscopy showed that the threads rapidly changed in length, shape, and orientation within minutes and can extend at 1.02 microm/min. The formation of RecA threads was abolished in recJ addAB mutant cells but not in each of the single mutants, suggesting that RecA filaments can be initiated via two pathways. Contrary to proteins forming RCs, DNA polymerase I did not form foci but was present throughout the nucleoids (even after induction of DSBs or after UV irradiation), suggesting that it continuously scans the chromosome for DNA lesions. PMID:16061691

  4. Metallothionein mRNA induction is correlated with the decrease of DNA strand breaks in cadmium exposed zebra mussels.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Châtel, Amélie; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2014-05-15

    We have previously shown that cadmium (Cd) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced early DNA damages in zebra mussels, and that the level of DNA strand breaks (SB) returned to a basal level after 3 days of exposure to Cd. The aim of the present study was to go further in the mechanisms of Cd and BaP detoxification. For that purpose, expression of genes encoding for metallothionein (MT), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), P-gp, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) proteins have been measured using RT-qPCR. Data reported here show that Cd is a strong inducer of MT and HSP70 genes, and that BaP is a strong inducer of P-gp and AHR genes. Exposure to Cd and BaP resulted in moderate changes in antioxidant enzymes mRNA. Since the increase of MT mRNA occurred when the DNA SB level returned to its basal level, we can suggest that MT is implicated in cadmium detoxification.

  5. Rad54B targeting to DNA double-strand break repair sites requires complex formation with S100A11.

    PubMed

    Murzik, Ulrike; Hemmerich, Peter; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Ulbricht, Tobias; Bussen, Wendy; Hentschel, Julia; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Melle, Christian

    2008-07-01

    S100A11 is involved in a variety of intracellular activities such as growth regulation and differentiation. To gain more insight into the physiological role of endogenously expressed S100A11, we used a proteomic approach to detect and identify interacting proteins in vivo. Hereby, we were able to detect a specific interaction between S100A11 and Rad54B, which could be confirmed under in vivo conditions. Rad54B, a DNA-dependent ATPase, is described to be involved in recombinational repair of DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Treatment with bleomycin, which induces DSBs, revealed an increase in the degree of colocalization between S100A11 and Rad54B. Furthermore, S100A11/Rad54B foci are spatially associated with sites of DNA DSB repair. Furthermore, while the expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) was increased in parallel with DNA damage, its protein level was drastically down-regulated in damaged cells after S100A11 knockdown. Down-regulation of S100A11 by RNA interference also abolished Rad54B targeting to DSBs. Additionally, S100A11 down-regulated HaCaT cells showed a restricted proliferation capacity and an increase of the apoptotic cell fraction. These observations suggest that S100A11 targets Rad54B to sites of DNA DSB repair sites and identify a novel function for S100A11 in p21-based regulation of cell cycle. PMID:18463164

  6. Rad54B Targeting to DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Sites Requires Complex Formation with S100A11

    PubMed Central

    Murzik, Ulrike; Hemmerich, Peter; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Ulbricht, Tobias; Bussen, Wendy; Hentschel, Julia; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2008-01-01

    S100A11 is involved in a variety of intracellular activities such as growth regulation and differentiation. To gain more insight into the physiological role of endogenously expressed S100A11, we used a proteomic approach to detect and identify interacting proteins in vivo. Hereby, we were able to detect a specific interaction between S100A11 and Rad54B, which could be confirmed under in vivo conditions. Rad54B, a DNA-dependent ATPase, is described to be involved in recombinational repair of DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Treatment with bleomycin, which induces DSBs, revealed an increase in the degree of colocalization between S100A11 and Rad54B. Furthermore, S100A11/Rad54B foci are spatially associated with sites of DNA DSB repair. Furthermore, while the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 was increased in parallel with DNA damage, its protein level was drastically down-regulated in damaged cells after S100A11 knockdown. Down-regulation of S100A11 by RNA interference also abolished Rad54B targeting to DSBs. Additionally, S100A11 down-regulated HaCaT cells showed a restricted proliferation capacity and an increase of the apoptotic cell fraction. These observations suggest that S100A11 targets Rad54B to sites of DNA DSB repair sites and identify a novel function for S100A11 in p21-based regulation of cell cycle. PMID:18463164

  7. Nonhomologous end joining of complex DNA double-strand breaks with proximal thymine glycol and interplay with base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Almohaini, Mohammed; Chalasani, Sri Lakshmi; Bafail, Duaa; Akopiants, Konstantin; Zhou, Tong; Yannone, Steven M; Ramsden, Dale A; Hartman, Matthew C T; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2016-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation are often accompanied by ancillary oxidative base damage that may prevent or delay their repair. In order to better define the features that make some DSBs repair-resistant, XLF-dependent nonhomologous end joining of blunt-ended DSB substrates having the oxidatively modified nonplanar base thymine glycol at the first (Tg1), second (Tg2), third (Tg3) or fifth (Tg5) positions from one 3' terminus, was examined in human whole-cell extracts. Tg at the third position had little effect on end-joining even when present on both ends of the break. However, Tg as the terminal or penultimate base was a major barrier to end joining (>10-fold reduction in ligated products) and an absolute barrier when present at both ends. Dideoxy trapping of base excision repair intermediates indicated that Tg was excised from Tg1, Tg2 and Tg3 largely if not exclusively after DSB ligation. However, Tg was rapidly excised from the Tg5 substrate, resulting in a reduced level of DSB ligation, as well as slow concomitant resection of the opposite strand. Ligase reactions containing only purified Ku, XRCC4, ligase IV and XLF showed that ligation of Tg3 and Tg5 was efficient and only partially XLF-dependent, whereas ligation of Tg1 and Tg2 was inefficient and only detectable in the presence of XLF. Overall, the results suggest that promoting ligation of DSBs with proximal base damage may be an important function of XLF, but that Tg can still be a major impediment to repair, being relatively resistant to both trimming and ligation. Moreover, it appears that base excision repair of Tg can sometimes interfere with repair of DSBs that would otherwise be readily rejoined. PMID:27049455

  8. DNA replication and the repair of DNA strand breaks in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. Terminal report, August 1, 1978-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, E.N.; Evans, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclei isolated from Physarum are able to replicate approximately 15% of the total genome in a manner which is qualitatively similar to the DNA replication process occurring in the intact organism. Such nuclei, however, are defective in the joining of Okazaki intermediates in vitro. Two DNA polymerase species, isolated from nuclei or intact plasmodia of this organism, can be separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Total DNA polymerase activity is low in nuclei isolated during mitosis. A heat-stable glycoprotein material present in aqueous nuclear extracts stimulates DNA synthesis in well-washed nuclei. A sub-nuclear preparation active in DNA synthesis in vitro has been obtained from isolated nuclei of Physarum. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks are rejoined in intact plasmodia and isolated nuclei of Physarum in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This phenomenon does not appear to be due to an intrinsic difference in nuclear DNA endonuclease activity at different times of the mitotic cycle. DNA strand breaks and repair induced by the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide is similar in several respects to that resulting from exposure of the organism to ionizing radiation. Temperature sensitive strains of Physarum have been constructed and preliminary genetical and biochemical characterizations have been carried out. Two of the strains appear to be conditionally defective in DNA metabolism. An isogenic ploidal series of amoebae has been prepared and characterized as to uv and ionizing radiation sensitivity (in terms of cell survival). There is a direct relationship between ploidy and resistance to uv whereas ploidal change does not appear to affect the response to ionizing radiation.

  9. Trifluridine Induces p53-Dependent Sustained G2 Phase Arrest with Its Massive Misincorporation into DNA and Few DNA Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Iimori, Makoto; Niimi, Shinichiro; Tsukihara, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Sugiko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Kiniwa, Mamoru; Ando, Koji; Tokunaga, Eriko; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Kitao, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Trifluridine (FTD) is a key component of the novel oral antitumor drug TAS-102, which consists of FTD and a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor. Like 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FdUrd), a deoxynucleoside form of 5-fluorouracil metabolite, FTD is sequentially phosphorylated and not only inhibits thymidylate synthase activity, but is also incorporated into DNA. Although TAS-102 was effective for the treatment of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer in clinical trials, the mechanism of FTD-induced cytotoxicity is not completely understood. Here, we show that FTD as well as FdUrd induce transient phosphorylation of Chk1 at Ser345, and that this is followed by accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins in p53-proficient human cancer cell lines. In particular, FTD induced p53-dependent sustained arrest at G2 phase, which was associated with a proteasome-dependent decrease in the Cyclin B1 protein level and the suppression of CCNB1 and CDK1 gene expression. In addition, a p53-dependent increase in p21 protein was associated with an FTD-induced decrease in Cyclin B1 protein. Although numerous ssDNA and dsDNA breaks were induced by FdUrd, few DNA strand breaks were detected in FTD-treated HCT-116 cells despite massive FTD misincorporation into genomic DNA, suggesting that the antiproliferative effect of FTD is not due to the induction of DNA strand breaks. These distinctive effects of FTD provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying its antitumor effect and may explain the clinical efficacy of TAS-102.

  10. On the importance of DNA strand breaks as the first event to initiate sister chromatid exchange (SCE): experiments with restriction endonuclease BglI.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T; Piñero, J; Cortés, F

    1996-11-01

    The exact molecular mechanism of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is still unknown, despite the many reports dealing with this cytogenetic end point published in the last 40 years. One point to be investigated is the nature of the original lesion(s) in DNA leading to the production of SCE. Whereas, for chromosomal aberrations, the importance of DNA double-strand breaks has been well established, there is still controversy about the relative importance of strand breaks and base modifications for triggering the process of SCE formation. In the present paper, we have taken advantage of the ability of the restriction endonuclease BglI to induce SCE and have exploited the fact that preincubation with 2,3-butanedione results in the loss of BgiI ability to cut DNA, while it is still able to recognize its sequence in DNA and bind to it, to see whether this alone is enough to initiate SCE formation, or if a physical DNA double-strand break is required. Our results seem to support the necessity of DNA breaks for SCE production.

  11. Double Strand Breaks Can Initiate Gene Silencing and SIRT1-Dependent Onset of DNA Methylation in an Exogenous Promoter CpG Island

    PubMed Central

    O'Hagan, Heather M.; Mohammad, Helai P.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic exposure to inducers of DNA base oxidation and single and double strand breaks contribute to tumorigenesis. In addition to the genetic changes caused by this DNA damage, such tumors often contain epigenetically silenced genes with aberrant promoter region CpG island DNA hypermethylation. We herein explore the relationships between such DNA damage and epigenetic gene silencing using an experimental model in which we induce a defined double strand break in an exogenous promoter construct of the E-cadherin CpG island, which is frequently aberrantly DNA hypermethylated in epithelial cancers. Following the onset of repair of the break, we observe recruitment to the site of damage of key proteins involved in establishing and maintaining transcriptional repression, namely SIRT1, EZH2, DNMT1, and DNMT3B, and the appearance of the silencing histone modifications, hypoacetyl H4K16, H3K9me2 and me3, and H3K27me3. Although in most cells selected after the break, DNA repair occurs faithfully with preservation of activity of the promoter, a small percentage of the plated cells demonstrate induction of heritable silencing. The chromatin around the break site in such a silent clone is enriched for most of the above silent chromatin proteins and histone marks, and the region harbors the appearance of increasing DNA methylation in the CpG island of the promoter. During the acute break, SIRT1 appears to be required for the transient recruitment of DNMT3B and subsequent methylation of the promoter in the silent clones. Taken together, our data suggest that normal repair of a DNA break can occasionally cause heritable silencing of a CpG island–containing promoter by recruitment of proteins involved in silencing. Furthermore, with contribution of the stress-related protein SIRT1, the break can lead to the onset of aberrant CpG island DNA methylation, which is frequently associated with tight gene silencing in cancer. PMID:18704159

  12. Analysis of restriction enzyme-induced DNA double-strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: implications for chromosome damage.

    PubMed

    Ager, D D; Phillips, J W; Columna, E A; Winegar, R A; Morgan, W F

    1991-11-01

    Restriction enzymes can be electroporated into mammalian cells, and the induced DNA double-strand breaks can lead to aberrations in metaphase chromosomes. Chinese hamster ovary cells were electroporated with PstI, which generates 3' cohesive-end breaks, PvuII, which generates blunt-end breaks, or XbaI, which generates 5' cohesive-end breaks. Although all three restriction enzymes induced similar numbers of aberrant metaphase cells, PvuII was dramatically more effective at inducing both exchange-type and deletion-type chromosome aberrations. Our cytogenetic studies also indicated that enzymes are active within cells for only a short time. We used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to investigate (i) how long it takes for enzymes to cleave DNA after electroporation into cells, (ii) how long enzymes are active in the cells, and (iii) how the DNA double-strand breaks induced are related to the aberrations observed in metaphase chromosomes. At the same concentrations used in the cytogenetic studies, all enzymes were active within 10 min of electroporation. PstI and PvuII showed a distinct peak in break formation at 20 min, whereas XbaI showed a gradual increase in break frequency over time. Another increase in the number of breaks observed with all three enzymes at 2 and 3 h after electroporation was probably due to nonspecific DNA degradation in a subpopulation of enzyme-damaged cells that lysed after enzyme exposure. Break frequency and chromosome aberration frequency were inversely related: The blunt-end cutter PvuII gave rise to the most aberrations but the fewest breaks, suggesting that it is the type of break rather than the break frequency that is important for chromosome aberration formation.

  13. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  14. Quiescent human peripheral blood lymphocytes do not contain a sizable amount of preexistent DNA single-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.; Mullaart, E.; van der Schans, G.P.; Vijg, J.

    1989-02-01

    Sedimentation of nucleoids through neutral sucrose density gradients has shown that nucleoids isolated from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) sediment faster than nucleoids derived from quiescent lymphocytes, which was attributed to rejoining of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) present in the resting cells. We isolated PBL from donors and determined the amount of SSB in nonradiolabeled, untreated resting and PHA-stimulated cells by applying the alkaline filter elution technique. Calibration was based on dose-dependent induction of SSB by /sup 60/Co-gamma-radiation. Quiescent cells did not contain a sizable amount of SSB. Mitogen-stimulated cells showed equally low amounts of SSB per cell. The present study indicates that the interpretation of the results obtained with the nucleoid sedimentation technique concerning the supposed rejoining of SSB in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes is incorrect. Other, equally sensitive, techniques such as alkaline filter elution appear to be preferable for studies on DNA damage and repair.

  15. Pre-Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Stimulates DNA Double Strand Break End Resection, Promoting the Use of Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The choice of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway is determined at the stage of DSB end resection. Resection was proposed to control the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here, we examined the regulation of DSB repair pathway choice at two-ended DSBs following ionizing radiation (IR) in G2 phase of the cell cycle. We found that cells pre-exposed to low-dose IR preferred to undergo HR following challenge IR in G2, whereas NHEJ repair kinetics in G1 were not affected by pre-IR treatment. Consistent with the increase in HR usage, the challenge IR induced Replication protein A (RPA) foci formation and RPA phosphorylation, a marker of resection, were enhanced by pre-IR. However, neither major DNA damage signals nor the status of core NHEJ proteins, which influence the choice of repair pathway, was significantly altered in pre-IR treated cells. Moreover, the increase in usage of HR due to pre-IR exposure was prevented by treatment with ATM inhibitor during the incubation period between pre-IR and challenge IR. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that the ATM-dependent damage response after pre-IR changes the cellular environment, possibly by regulating gene expression or post-transcriptional modifications in a manner that promotes resection. PMID:25826455

  16. Bevacizumab radiosensitizes non-small cell lung cancer xenografts by inhibiting DNA double-strand break repair in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Xue, Jianxin; Zhou, Lin; Lan, Jie; He, Jiazhuo; Na, Feifei; Yang, Lifei; Deng, Lei; Lu, You

    2015-08-28

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of biweekly bevacizumab administration on a tumor microenvironment and to investigate the mechanisms of radiosensitization that were induced by it. Briefly, bevacizumab was administered intravenously to Balb/c nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1975 xenografts; in addition, bevacizumab was added to NSCLC or endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro, followed by irradiation (IR). The anti-tumor efficacy, anti-angiogenic efficacy and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated. The activation of signaling pathways was determined using immunoprecipitation (IP) and WB analyses. Finally, biweekly bevacizumab administration inhibited the growth of H1975 xenografts and induced vascular normalization periodically. Bevacizumab more significantly increased cellular DSB and EC apoptosis when administered 1 h prior to 12 Gy/1f IR than when administered 5 days prior to IR, thereby inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. In vitro, bevacizumab more effectively increased DSBs and apoptosis prior to IR and inhibited the clonogenic survival of ECs but not NSCLC cells. Using IP and WB analyses, we confirmed that bevacizumab can directly inhibit the phosphorylation of components of the VEGR2/PI3K/Akt/DNA-PKcs signaling pathway that are induced by IR in ECs. In conclusion, bevacizumab radiosensitizes NSCLC xenografts mainly by inhibiting DSB repair in ECs rather than by inducing vascular normalization.

  17. p53 binding protein 1 foci as a biomarker of DNA double strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. K. M.; Wong, M. Y. P.; Lam, R. K. K.; Ho, J. P. Y.; Chiu, S. K.; Yu, K. N.

    2011-12-01

    Foci of p53 binding protein 1 (53 BP1) have been used as a biomarker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells induced by ionizing radiations. 53 BP1 was shown to relocalize into foci shortly after irradiation, with the number of foci closely paralleling the number of DNA DSBs. However, consensus on criteria in terms of the numbers of 53 BP1 foci to define cells damaged by direct irradiation or by bystander signals has not been reached, which is partly due to the presence of 53 BP1 also in normal cells. The objective of the present work was to study the changes in the distribution of cells with different numbers of 53 BP1 foci in a cell population after low-dose ionizing irradiation (<0.1 Gy) provided by alpha particles, with a view to propose feasible criteria for defining cells damaged by direct irradiation or by bystander signals. It was proposed that the change in the percentage of cells with 1-3 foci should be used for such purposes. The underlying reasons were discussed.

  18. DNA double strand break end-processing and RecA induce RecN expression levels in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Paula P; Gándara, Carolina; Alonso, Juan C

    2014-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis cells respond to double strand breaks (DSBs) with an ordered recruitment of repair proteins to the site lesion, being RecN one of the first responders. In B. subtilis, one of the responses to DSBs is to increase RecN expression rather than modifying its turnover rate. End-processing activities and the RecA protein itself contribute to increase RecN levels after DNA DSBs. RecO is required for RecA filament formation and full SOS induction, but its absence did not significantly affect RecN expression. Neither the absence of LexA nor the phosphorylation state of RecA or SsbA significantly affect RecN expression levels. These findings identify two major mechanisms (SOS and DSB response) used to respond to DSBs, with LexA required for one of them (SOS response). The DSB response, which requires end-processing and RecA or short RecO-independent RecA filaments, highlights the importance of guarding genome stability by modulating the DNA damage responses. PMID:24373815

  19. Thrombospondin-1 might be a therapeutic target to suppress RB cells by regulating the DNA double-strand breaks repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhang; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) arises from the retina, and its growth usually occurs under the retina and toward the vitreous. Ideal therapy should aim to inhibit the tumor and protect neural cells, increasing the patient's life span and quality of life. Previous studies have demonstrated that Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is associated with neurogenesis, neovascularization and tumorigenesis. However, at present, the bioactivity of TSP-1 in retinoblastoma has not been defined. Herein, we demonstrated that TSP-1 was silenced in RB cell lines and clinical tumor samples. HDAC inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), could notably transcriptionally up-regulate TSP-1 in RB cells, WERI-Rb1 cells and Y79 cells. Moreover, we found human recombinant TSP-1 (hTSP-1) could significantly inhibit the cell viability of RB cells both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, hTSP-1 could significantly induce the expression of γ-H2AX, a well-characterized in situ marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in RB cells. The DNA NHEJ pathway in WERI-Rb1 cells could be significantly inhibited by hTSP-1. A mutation in Rb1 might be involved in the hTSP-1-medicated γ-H2AX increasing in WERI-Rb1 cells. Furthermore, hTSP-1 could inhibit RB cells while promoting retinal neurocyte survival in the neuronal and retinoblastoma cell co-culture system. As such, TSP-1 may become a therapeutic target for treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:26756218

  20. Thrombospondin-1 might be a therapeutic target to suppress RB cells by regulating the DNA double-strand breaks repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Yu, Na; Zhang, Zhang; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) arises from the retina, and its growth usually occurs under the retina and toward the vitreous. Ideal therapy should aim to inhibit the tumor and protect neural cells, increasing the patient's life span and quality of life. Previous studies have demonstrated that Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is associated with neurogenesis, neovascularization and tumorigenesis. However, at present, the bioactivity of TSP-1 in retinoblastoma has not been defined. Herein, we demonstrated that TSP-1 was silenced in RB cell lines and clinical tumor samples. HDAC inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), could notably transcriptionally up-regulate TSP-1 in RB cells, WERI-Rb1 cells and Y79 cells. Moreover, we found human recombinant TSP-1 (hTSP-1) could significantly inhibit the cell viability of RB cells both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, hTSP-1 could significantly induce the expression of γ-H2AX, a well-characterized in situ marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in RB cells. The DNA NHEJ pathway in WERI-Rb1 cells could be significantly inhibited by hTSP-1. A mutation in Rb1 might be involved in the hTSP-1-medicated γ-H2AX increasing in WERI-Rb1 cells. Furthermore, hTSP-1 could inhibit RB cells while promoting retinal neurocyte survival in the neuronal and retinoblastoma cell co-culture system. As such, TSP-1 may become a therapeutic target for treatment of retinoblastoma.

  1. Repair rates of DNA double-strand breaks under different doses of proton and γ-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Fu, Qibin; Quan, Yi; Wang, Weikang; Mei, Tao; Li, Jia; Yang, Gen; Ren, Xiaotang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang

    2012-04-01

    It is known that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which can be induced by a variety of treatments including ionizing radiation (IR), can cause most deleterious consequences among all kinds of DNA lesions. However, it is still under debate about whether DSBs repair is equally efficient after low and high-LET radiation, especially the basic biological responses after exposure to high-LET particles. In present study, synchronous fibroblast normal Human lung fibroblast (NHLF) cells were irradiated with graded doses of proton and γ-ray. Then γ-H2AX foci assay was used to monitor DSBs induction and repair at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 18 h post irradiation. The results showed that the γ-ray irradiation could produce more γ-H2AX foci than proton irradiation at the same dose. However, compared to low LET radiation with γ-ray, the results also showed a much slower DSBs repair rate after high LET radiation with protons, suggesting that the cellular ability to eliminate DSBs after low and high-LET ionizing radiation is quite different.

  2. Inhibitory effects of trientine, a copper-chelating agent, on induction of DNA strand breaks in kidney cells of Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masanobu; Miyane, Kazuhiro; Senou, Misato; Endoh, Daiji; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Nagahata, Hajime; Nakayama, Kenji; Kon, Yasuhiro; Okui, Toyo

    2005-10-01

    The effects of treatment with trientine, a specific copper-chelating agent, on the accumulation of copper and induction of DNA strand breaks were investigated in Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an animal model for human Wilson's disease. Copper accumulated in the kidneys of LEC rats in an age-dependent manner from 12 to 18 weeks of age. When LEC rats were treated with trientine from 10 weeks of age, renal copper contents did not increase and were maintained at the same levels as those in 4-week-old LEC rats. Estimation of the amounts of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) by comet assay showed that SSBs of DNA were induced in a substantial population of LEC rat renal cortex cells around 12 weeks of age and that the amounts of SSBs increased in an age-dependent manner from 12 to 18 weeks of age. When LEC rats were treated with trientine from 10 weeks of age, the observed number of cells with DNA damage decreased, suggesting that induction of SSBs of DNA was inhibited and/or SSBs were repaired during the period of treatment with trientine. The results show that SSBs of DNA in LEC rat kidney cells are induced prior to occurrence of clinical signs of hepatic injury and that treatment of LEC rats with trientine decreases the number of DNA strand breaks.

  3. Cyclin D1 silencing suppresses tumorigenicity, impairs DNA double strand break repair and thus radiosensitizes androgen-independent prostate cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiaoming; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Pompili, Simona; Festuccia, Claudio; Colapietro, Alessandro; Gaudio, Eugenio; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Pestell, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hormone-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) have higher biochemical failure rates following radiation therapy (RT). Cyclin D1 deregulated expression in PCa is associated with a more aggressive disease: however its role in radioresistance has not been determined. Cyclin D1 levels in the androgen-independent PC3 and 22Rv1 PCa cells were stably inhibited by infecting with cyclin D1-shRNA. Tumorigenicity and radiosensitivity were investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental assays. Cyclin D1 silencing interfered with PCa oncogenic phenotype by inducing growth arrest in the G1 phase of cell cycle and reducing soft agar colony formation, migration, invasion in vitro and tumor formation and neo-angiogenesis in vivo. Depletion of cyclin D1 significantly radiosensitizes PCa cells by increasing the RT-induced DNA damages by affecting the NHEJ and HR pathways responsible of the DNA double-strand break repair. Following treatment of cells with RT the abundance of a biomarker of DNA damage, γ-H2AX, was dramatically increased in sh-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. Concordant with these observations DNA-PKcs-activation and RAD51-accumulation, part of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery, were reduced in shRNA-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. We further demonstrate the physical interaction between CCND1 with activated-ATM, -DNA-PKcs and RAD51 is enhanced by RT. Finally, siRNA-mediated silencing experiments indicated DNA-PKcs and RAD51 are downstream targets of CCND1-mediated PCa cells radioresistance. In summary, these observations suggest that CCND1 is a key mediator of PCa radioresistance and could represent a potential target for radioresistant hormone-resistant PCa. PMID:26689991

  4. Antitumour benzothiazoles. Part 32: DNA adducts and double strand breaks correlate with activity; synthesis of 5F203 hydrogels for local delivery.

    PubMed

    Stone, Erica L; Citossi, Francesca; Singh, Rajinder; Kaur, Balvinder; Gaskell, Margaret; Farmer, Peter B; Monks, Anne; Hose, Curtis; Stevens, Malcolm F G; Leong, Chee-Onn; Stocks, Michael; Kellam, Barrie; Marlow, Maria; Bradshaw, Tracey D

    2015-11-01

    Potent, selective antitumour AhR ligands 5F 203 and GW 610 are bioactivated by CYPs 1A1 and 2W1. Herein we reason that DNA adducts' generation resulting in lethal DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) underlies benzothiazoles' activity. Treatment of sensitive carcinoma cell lines with GW 610 generated co-eluting DNA adducts (R(2)>0.7). Time-dependent appearance of γ-H2AX foci revealed subsequent DNA double strand breaks. Propensity for systemic toxicity of benzothiazoles steered development of prodrugs' hydrogels for localised delivery. Clinical applications of targeted therapies include prevention or treatment of recurrent disease after surgical resection of solid tumours. In vitro evaluation of 5F 203 prodrugs' activity demonstrated nanomolar potency against MCF-7 breast and IGROV-1 ovarian carcinoma cell lines.

  5. Chromosome thripsis by DNA double strand break clusters causes enhanced cell lethality, chromosomal translocations and 53BP1-recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Schipler, Agnes; Mladenova, Veronika; Soni, Aashish; Nikolov, Vladimir; Saha, Janapriya; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are hallmark of cancer and of radiation-induced cell killing, reflecting joining of incongruent DNA-ends that alter the genome. Translocation-formation requires DNA end-joining mechanisms and incompletely characterized, permissive chromatin conditions. We show that chromatin destabilization by clusters of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs) generated by the I-SceI meganuclease at multiple, appropriately engineered genomic sites, compromises c-NHEJ and markedly increases cell killing and translocation-formation compared to single-DSBs. Translocation-formation from DSB-clusters utilizes Parp1 activity, implicating alt-EJ in their formation. Immunofluorescence experiments show that single-DSBs and DSB-clusters uniformly provoke the formation of single γ-H2AX foci, suggesting similar activation of early DNA damage response (DDR). Live-cell imaging also shows similar single-focus recruitment of the early-response protein MDC1, to single-DSBs and DSB-clusters. Notably, the late DDR protein, 53BP1 shows in live-cell imaging strikingly stronger recruitment to DSB-clusters as compared to single-DSBs. This is the first report that chromatin thripsis, in the form of engineered DSB-clusters, compromises first-line DSB-repair pathways, allowing alt-EJ to function as rescuing-backup. DSB-cluster-formation is indirectly linked to the increased biological effectiveness of high ionization-density radiations, such as the alpha-particles emitted by radon gas or the heavy-ions utilized in cancer therapy. Our observations provide the first direct mechanistic explanation for this long-known effect. PMID:27257076

  6. DNA double-strand breaks relieve USF-mediated repression of Dβ2 germline transcription in developing thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer L.; McMillan, Ruth E.; Skaar, David A.; Bradshaw, Justin M.; Jirtle, Randy L.; Sikes, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of germline promoters is central to V(D)J recombinational accessibility, driving chromatin remodeling, nucleosome repositioning and transcriptional readthrough of associated DNA. We have previously shown that of the 2 Tcrb D segments, Dβ1 is flanked by an upstream promoter that directs its transcription and recombinational accessibility. In contrast, transcription within the DJβ2 segment cluster is initially restricted to the J segments and only redirected upstream of Dβ2 after D-to-J joining. The repression of upstream promoter activity prior to Tcrb assembly correlates with evidence that suggests DJβ2 recombination is less efficient than that of DJβ1. Since inefficient DJβ2 assembly offers the potential for V-to-DJβ2 recombination to rescue frameshifted V-to-DJβ1 joints, we wished to determine how Dβ2 promoter activity is modulated upon Tcrb recombination. Here, we show that repression of the otherwise transcriptionally primed 5'Dβ2 promoter (5'PDβ2) requires binding of USF-1 to a non-canonical E-box within the Dβ2 12-RSS spacer prior to Tcrb recombination. USF binding is lost from both rearranged and germline Dβ2 sites in DNA-PKcs-competent thymocytes. Finally, genotoxic double-stranded DNA breaks lead to rapid loss of USF binding and gain of 5'PDβ2 activity in a DNA-PKcs-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest a mechanism by which V(D)J recombination may feedback to regulate local Dβ2 recombinational accessibility during thymocyte development. PMID:22287717

  7. Chromosome thripsis by DNA double strand break clusters causes enhanced cell lethality, chromosomal translocations and 53BP1-recruitment.

    PubMed

    Schipler, Agnes; Mladenova, Veronika; Soni, Aashish; Nikolov, Vladimir; Saha, Janapriya; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-09-19

    Chromosome translocations are hallmark of cancer and of radiation-induced cell killing, reflecting joining of incongruent DNA-ends that alter the genome. Translocation-formation requires DNA end-joining mechanisms and incompletely characterized, permissive chromatin conditions. We show that chromatin destabilization by clusters of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs) generated by the I-SceI meganuclease at multiple, appropriately engineered genomic sites, compromises c-NHEJ and markedly increases cell killing and translocation-formation compared to single-DSBs. Translocation-formation from DSB-clusters utilizes Parp1 activity, implicating alt-EJ in their formation. Immunofluorescence experiments show that single-DSBs and DSB-clusters uniformly provoke the formation of single γ-H2AX foci, suggesting similar activation of early DNA damage response (DDR). Live-cell imaging also shows similar single-focus recruitment of the early-response protein MDC1, to single-DSBs and DSB-clusters. Notably, the late DDR protein, 53BP1 shows in live-cell imaging strikingly stronger recruitment to DSB-clusters as compared to single-DSBs. This is the first report that chromatin thripsis, in the form of engineered DSB-clusters, compromises first-line DSB-repair pathways, allowing alt-EJ to function as rescuing-backup. DSB-cluster-formation is indirectly linked to the increased biological effectiveness of high ionization-density radiations, such as the alpha-particles emitted by radon gas or the heavy-ions utilized in cancer therapy. Our observations provide the first direct mechanistic explanation for this long-known effect. PMID:27257076

  8. Mammalian cells are not killed by DNA single-strand breaks caused by hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.F.; Blakely, W.F.; Joner, E.I.

    1985-09-01

    Cell killing by ionizing radiation has been shown to be caused by hydroxyl free radicals formed by water radiolysis. The authors have previously suggested that the killing is not caused by individual OH free radicals but by the interaction of volumes of high radical density with DNA to cause locally multiple damaged sites (LMDS). Here they test this hypothesis using hydrogen dioxide as an alternate source of OH radicals. The route to OH production from H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is expected to cause singly damaged sites rather than LMDS. Chinese hamster V79-171 cells were treated with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at varying concentrations for varying times at 0/sup 0/C. The yield of DNA damage produced increases with increasing concentration of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and with time of exposure. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is efficient in producing single-strand breaks; treatment with 50 ..mu..M for 30 min produces damage equivalent to that formed by 10 Gy of ..cap alpha.. irradiation. In the presence of a hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the yield of damage decreases with increasing DMSO concentration consistent with the scavenging of hydroxyl radicals. In contrast to DNA damage production, cell killing by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ treatment at 0/sup 0/C is inefficient. The conclusion drawn is that individual DNA damage sites are ineffectual in killing cells. Mechanisms are suggested for killing at 0/sup 0/C at high concentrations and for the efficient cell killing by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C at much lower concentrations.

  9. Induction of Strand Breaks in DNA films by Low Energy Electrons and Soft X-ray under Nitrous Oxide Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Five-monolayer (5ML) plasmid DNA films deposited on glass and tantalum substrates were exposed to Al Kα X-rays of 1.5 keV under gaseous nitrous oxide (N2O) at atmospheric pressure and temperature. Whereas the damage yields for DNA deposited on glass are due to soft X-rays, those arising from DNA on tantalum are due to both the interaction of low energy photoelectrons from the metal and X-rays. Then, the differences in the yields of damage on glass and tantalum substrates, essentially arises from interaction of essentially low-energy electrons (LEEs) with DNA molecules and the surrounding atmosphere. The G-values (i.e., the number of moles of product per Joule of energy absorbed) for DNA strand breaks induced by LEEs (GLEE) and the lower limit of G-values for soft X-ray photons (GXL) were calculated and the results compared to those from previous studies under atmospheric conditions and other ambient gases, such as N2 and O2. Under N2O, the G-values for loss of supercoiled DNA are 103±15 nmol/J for X-rays, and 737±110 nmol/J for LEEs. Compared to corresponding values in an O2 atmosphere, the effectiveness of X-rays to damage DNA in N2O is less, but the G value for LEEs in N2O is more than twice the corresponding value for an oxygenated environment. This result indicates a higher effectiveness for LEEs relative to N2 and O2 environments in causing SSB and DSB in an N2O environment. Thus, the previously observed radiosensitization of cells by N2O may not be only due to OH• radicals but also to the reaction of LEE with N2O molecules near DNA. The previous experiments with N2 and O2 and the present one demonstrate the possibility to investigate damage induced by LEEs to biomolecules under various type of surrounding atmospheres. PMID:24976692

  10. DNA-PK triggers histone ubiquitination and signaling in response to DNA double-strand breaks produced during the repair of transcription-blocking topoisomerase I lesions.

    PubMed

    Cristini, Agnese; Park, Joon-Hyung; Capranico, Giovanni; Legube, Gaëlle; Favre, Gilles; Sordet, Olivier

    2016-02-18

    Although defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to neurodegenerative diseases, the processes underlying their production and signaling in non-replicating cells are largely unknown. Stabilized topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1cc) by natural compounds or common DNA alterations are transcription-blocking lesions whose repair depends primarily on Top1 proteolysis and excision by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 (TDP1). We previously reported that stabilized Top1cc produce transcription-dependent DSBs that activate ATM in neurons. Here, we use camptothecin (CPT)-treated serum-starved quiescent cells to induce transcription-blocking Top1cc and show that those DSBs are generated during Top1cc repair from Top1 peptide-linked DNA single-strand breaks generated after Top1 proteolysis and before excision by TDP1. Following DSB induction, ATM activates DNA-PK whose inhibition suppresses H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and the later assembly of activated ATM into nuclear foci. Inhibition of DNA-PK also reduces Top1 ubiquitination and proteolysis as well as resumption of RNA synthesis suggesting that DSB signaling further enhances Top1cc repair. Finally, we show that co-transcriptional DSBs kill quiescent cells. Together, these new findings reveal that DSB production and signaling by transcription-blocking Top1 lesions impact on non-replicating cell fate and provide insights on the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCAN1 and AT syndromes, which are caused by TDP1 and ATM deficiency, respectively.

  11. Inhibitory effects of trientine, a copper-chelating agent, on induction of DNA strand breaks in hepatic cells of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masanobu; Miyane, Kazuhiro; Hirooka, Takeshi; Endoh, Daiji; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Nagahata, Hajime; Nakayama, Kenji; Kon, Yashuhiro; Okui, Toyo

    2004-11-01

    Effects of treatment with trientine, a specific copper-chelating agent, on accumulation of copper and induction of DNA strand breaks were investigated in Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an animal model for human Wilson's disease. Copper accumulated in the livers of LEC rats in an age-dependent manner from 4 to 13 weeks of age. When LEC rats were treated with trientine from 10 weeks of age, hepatic copper contents did not increase and were maintained at the same levels as those in 10-week-old LEC rats. When the amounts of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) were estimated by a comet assay, SSBs of DNA were induced in a substantial population of LEC rat hepatic cells around 8 weeks of age and the amounts of SSBs increased in an age-dependent manner from 8 to 15 weeks of age. When LEC rats were treated with trientine from 10 weeks of age, the observed number of cells with DNA damage decreased dramatically, suggesting that induction of SSBs of DNA was inhibited and/or SSBs were repaired during the period of treatment with trientine. The results show that treatment of LEC rats with trientine decreases the number of DNA strand breaks observed, although copper contents remain high in the liver.

  12. Rad52 promotes second-end DNA capture in double-stranded break repair to form complement-stabilized joint molecules.

    PubMed

    Nimonkar, Amitabh V; Sica, R Alejandro; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2009-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 performs multiple functions during the recombinational repair of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks (DSBs). It mediates assembly of Rad51 onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is complexed with replication protein A (RPA); the resulting nucleoprotein filament pairs with homologous dsDNA to form joint molecules. Rad52 also catalyzes the annealing of complementary strands of ssDNA, even when they are complexed with RPA. Both Rad51 and Rad52 can be envisioned to promote "second-end capture," a step that pairs the ssDNA generated by processing of the second end of a DSB to the joint molecule formed by invasion of the target dsDNA by the first processed end. Here, we show that Rad52 promotes annealing of complementary ssDNA that is complexed with RPA to the displaced strand of a joint molecule, to form a complement-stabilized joint molecule. RecO, a prokaryotic homolog of Rad52, cannot form complement-stabilized joint molecules with RPA-ssDNA complexes, nor can Rad52 promote second-end capture when the ssDNA is bound with either human RPA or the prokaryotic ssDNA-binding protein, SSB, indicating a species-specific process. We conclude that Rad52 participates in second-end capture by annealing a resected DNA break, complexed with RPA, to the joint molecule product of single-end invasion event. These studies support a role for Rad52-promoted annealing in the formation of Holliday junctions in DSB repair. PMID:19204284

  13. Spatial distribution and yield of DNA double-strand breaks induced by 3-7 MeV helium ions in human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, Bjorn; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Holley, William R.; Lobrich, Markus; Zeitlin, Cary; Chatterjee, Aloke; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated helium ions with mean energies at the target location of 3-7 MeV were used to simulate alpha-particle radiation from radon daughters. The experimental setup and calibration procedure allowed determination of the helium-ion energy distribution and dose in the nuclei of irradiated cells. Using this system, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks and their spatial distributions along DNA were studied in irradiated human fibroblasts. It was found that the apparent number of double-strand breaks as measured by a standard pulsed-field gel assay (FAR assay) decreased with increasing LET in the range 67-120 keV/microm (corresponding to the energy of 7-3 MeV). On the other hand, the generation of small and intermediate-size DNA fragments (0.1-100 kbp) increased with LET, indicating an increased intratrack long-range clustering of breaks. The fragment size distribution was measured in several size classes down to the smallest class of 0.1-2 kbp. When the clustering was taken into account, the actual number of DNA double-strand breaks (separated by at least 0.1 kbp) could be calculated and was found to be in the range 0.010-0.012 breaks/Mbp Gy(-1). This is two- to threefold higher than the apparent yield obtained by the FAR assay. The measured yield of double-strand breaks as a function of LET is compared with theoretical Monte Carlo calculations that simulate the track structure of energy depositions from helium ions as they interact with the 30-nm chromatin fiber. When the calculation is performed to include fragments larger than 0.1 kbp (to correspond to the experimental measurements), there is good agreement between experiment and theory.

  14. The formation of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human blood lymphocytes exposed to 365-nm UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Smetanina, Nadezhda M; Pustovalova, Margarita V; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    The potency of UVA radiation, representing 90% of solar UV light reaching the earth's surface, to induce human skin cancer is the subject of continuing controversy. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species in DNA damage produced by the exposure of human cells to UVA radiation. This knowledge is important for better understanding of UV-induced carcinogenesis. We measured DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo to various doses of 365-nm UV photons compared to X-rays and hydrogen peroxide using the comet assay. We demonstrated that the UVA-induced DNA damage increased in a linear dose-dependent manner. The rate of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure to 1J/cm(2) was similar to the rate induced by exposure to 1 Gy of X-rays or 25 μM hydrogen peroxide. The presence of either the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide or the singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide resulted in a significant reduction in the UVA-induced DNA damage, suggesting a role for these reactive oxygen species in mediating UVA-induced DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. We also showed that chromatin relaxation due to hypertonic conditions resulted in increased damage in both untreated and UVA-treated cells. The effect was the most significant in the presence of 0.5M Na(+), implying a role for histone H1. Our data suggest that the majority of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure of human lymphocytes to UVA are produced by reactive oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen) and that the state of chromatin may substantially contribute to the outcome of such exposures.

  15. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  16. Temporal and Spatial Uncoupling of DNA Double Strand Break Repair Pathways within Mammalian Heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Tsouroula, Katerina; Furst, Audrey; Rogier, Melanie; Heyer, Vincent; Maglott-Roth, Anne; Ferrand, Alexia; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-07-21

    Repetitive DNA is packaged into heterochromatin to maintain its integrity. We use CRISPR/Cas9 to induce DSBs in different mammalian heterochromatin structures. We demonstrate that in pericentric heterochromatin, DSBs are positionally stable in G1 and recruit NHEJ factors. In S/G2, DSBs are resected and relocate to the periphery of heterochromatin, where they are retained by RAD51. This is independent of chromatin relaxation but requires end resection and RAD51 exclusion from the core. DSBs that fail to relocate are engaged by NHEJ or SSA proteins. We propose that the spatial disconnection between end resection and RAD51 binding prevents the activation of mutagenic pathways and illegitimate recombination. Interestingly, in centromeric heterochromatin, DSBs recruit both NHEJ and HR proteins throughout the cell cycle. Our results highlight striking differences in the recruitment of DNA repair factors between pericentric and centromeric heterochromatin and suggest a model in which the commitment to specific DNA repair pathways regulates DSB position.

  17. MeHg Developing Exposure Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Elicits Cell Cycle Arrest in Spinal Cord Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fabiana F.; Ammar, Dib; Bourckhardt, Gilian F.; Kobus-Bianchini, Karoline; Müller, Yara M. R.; Nazari, Evelise M.

    2015-01-01

    The neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury (MeHg) is well documented; however, the developmental neurotoxicity in spinal cord is still not fully understood. Here we investigated whether MeHg affects the spinal cord layers development. Chicken embryos at E3 were treated in ovo with 0.1 μg MeHg/50 μL saline solution and analyzed at E10. Thus, we performed immunostaining using anti-γ-H2A.X to recognize DNA double-strand breaks and antiphosphohistone H3, anti-p21, and anti-cyclin E to identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins. Also, to identify neuronal cells, we used anti-NeuN and anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies. After the MeHg treatment, we observed the increase on γ-H2A.X in response to DNA damage. MeHg caused a decrease in the proliferating cells and in the thickness of spinal cord layers. Moreover, we verified that MeHg induced an increase in the number of p21-positive cells but did not change the cyclin E-positive cells. A significantly high number of TUNEL-positive cells indicating DNA fragmentation were observed in MeHg-treated embryos. Regarding the neuronal differentiation, MeHg induced a decrease in NeuN expression and did not change the expression of βIII-tubulin. These results showed that in ovo MeHg exposure alters spinal cord development by disturbing the cell proliferation and death, also interfering in early neuronal differentiation. PMID:26793240

  18. Prevention of DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by Radioiodide-131I in FRTL-5 Thyroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okunyan, Armen; Rivina, Yelena; Cannon, Sophie; Hogen, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Radioiodine-131 released from nuclear reactor accidents has dramatically increased the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer in exposed individuals. The deposition of ionizing radiation in cells results in double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) at fragile sites, and this early event can generate oncogenic rearrangements that eventually cause cancer. The aims of this study were to develop a method to show DNA DSBs induced by 131I in thyroid cells; to test monovalent anions that are transported by the sodium/iodide symporter to determine whether they prevent 131I-induced DSB; and to test other radioprotective agents for their effect on irradiated thyroid cells. Rat FRTL-5 thyroid cells were incubated with 131I. DSBs were measured by nuclear immunofluorescence using antibodies to p53-binding protein 1 or γH2AX. Incubation with 1–10 μCi 131I per milliliter for 90 min resulted in a dose-related increase of DSBs; the number of DSBs increased from a baseline of 4–15% before radiation to 65–90% after radiation. GH3 or CHO cells that do not transport iodide did not develop DSBs when incubated with 131I. Incubation with 20–100 μm iodide or thiocyanate markedly attenuated DSBs. Perchlorate was about 6 times more potent than iodide or thiocyanate. The effects of the anions were much greater when each was added 30–120 min before the 131I. Two natural organic compounds recently shown to provide radiation protection partially prevented DSBs caused by 131I and had an additive effect with perchlorate. In conclusion, we developed a thyroid cell model to quantify the mitogenic effect of 131I. 131I causes DNA DSBs in FRTL-5 cells and had no effect on cells that do not transport iodide. Perchlorate, iodide, and thiocyanate protect against DSBs induced by 131I. PMID:21190956

  19. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells. PMID:27310875

  20. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells.

  1. Translesion DNA synthesis-assisted non-homologous end-joining of complex double-strand breaks prevents loss of DNA sequences in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Covo, Shay; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Jeggo, Penny A.; Livneh, Zvi

    2009-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSB) are severe DNA lesions, and if not properly repaired, may lead to cell death or cancer. While there is considerable data on the repair of simple DSB (sDSB) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), little is known about the repair of complex DSBs (cDSB), namely breaks with a nearby modification, which precludes ligation without prior processing. To study the mechanism of cDSB repair we developed a plasmid-based shuttle assay for the repair of a defined site-specific cDSB in cultured mammalian cells. Using this assay we found that repair efficiency and accuracy of a cDSB with an abasic site in a 5′ overhang was reduced compared with a sDSB. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) across the abasic site located at the break prevented loss of DNA sequences, but was highly mutagenic also at the template base next to the abasic site. Similar to sDSB repair, cDSB repair was totally dependent on XrccIV, and altered in the absence of Ku80. In contrast, Artemis appears to be specifically involved in cDSB repair. These results may indicate that mammalian cells have a damage control strategy, whereby severe deletions are prevented at the expense of the less deleterious point mutations during NHEJ. PMID:19762482

  2. A moonlighting metabolic protein influences repair at DNA double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Machorro, Ana Lilia; Aris, John P.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Catalytically active proteins with divergent dual functions are often described as ‘moonlighting’. In this work we characterize a new, chromatin-based function of Lys20, a moonlighting protein that is well known for its role in metabolism. Lys20 was initially described as homocitrate synthase (HCS), the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway in yeast. Its nuclear localization led to the discovery of a key role for Lys20 in DNA damage repair through its interaction with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase Esa1. Overexpression of Lys20 promotes suppression of DNA damage sensitivity of esa1 mutants. In this work, by taking advantage of LYS20 mutants that are active in repair but not in lysine biosynthesis, the mechanism of suppression of esa1 was characterized. First we analyzed the chromatin landscape of esa1 cells, finding impaired histone acetylation and eviction. Lys20 was recruited to sites of DNA damage, and its overexpression promoted enhanced recruitment of the INO80 remodeling complex to restore normal histone eviction at the damage sites. This study improves understanding of the evolutionary, structural and biological relevance of independent activities in a moonlighting protein and links metabolism to DNA damage repair. PMID:25628362

  3. Mouse HORMAD1 is a meiosis i checkpoint protein that modulates DNA double- strand break repair during female meiosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hyun; McGuire, Megan M; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2013-08-01

    Oocytes in embryonic ovaries enter meiosis I and arrest in the diplonema stage. Perturbations in meiosis I, such as abnormal double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair, adversely affect oocyte survival. We previously discovered that HORMAD1 is a critical component of the synaptonemal complex but not essential for oocyte survival. No significant differences were observed in the number of primordial, primary, secondary, and developing follicles between wild-type and Hormad1(−/−)newborn, 8-day, and 80-day ovaries. Meiosis I progression in Hormad1(−/−) embryonic ovaries was normal through the zygotene stage and in oocytes arrested in diplonema; however, we did not visualize oocytes with completely synapsed chromosomes. We investigated effects of HORMAD1 deficiency on the kinetics of DNA DSB formation and repair in the mouse ovary. We irradiated Embryonic Day 16.5 wild-type and Hormad1(−/−) ovaries and monitored DSB repair using gammaH2AX, RAD51, and DMC1 immunofluorescence. Our results showed a significant drop in unrepaired DSBs in the irradiated Hormad1(−/−) zygotene oocytes as compared to the wild-type oocytes. Moreover, Hormad1 deficiency rescued Dmc1(−/−) oocytes. These results indicate that Hormad1 deficiency promotes DMC1-independent DSB repairs, which in turn helps asynaptic Hormad1(−/−) oocytes resist perinatal loss. PMID:23759310

  4. Transcription-associated processes cause DNA double-strand breaks and translocations in neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Schwer, Bjoern; Wei, Pei-Chi; Chang, Amelia N; Kao, Jennifer; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M; Alt, Frederick W

    2016-02-23

    High-throughput, genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS) studies of activated B cells have revealed that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) capable of translocating to defined bait DSBs are enriched around the transcription start sites (TSSs) of active genes. We used the HTGTS approach to investigate whether a similar phenomenon occurs in primary neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). We report that breakpoint junctions indeed are enriched around TSSs that were determined to be active by global run-on sequencing analyses of NSPCs. Comparative analyses of transcription profiles in NSPCs and B cells revealed that the great majority of TSS-proximal junctions occurred in genes commonly expressed in both cell types, possibly because this common set has higher transcription levels on average than genes transcribed in only one or the other cell type. In the latter context, among all actively transcribed genes containing translocation junctions in NSPCs, those with junctions located within 2 kb of the TSS show a significantly higher transcription rate on average than genes with junctions in the gene body located at distances greater than 2 kb from the TSS. Finally, analysis of repair junction signatures of TSS-associated translocations in wild-type versus classical nonhomologous end-joining (C-NHEJ)-deficient NSPCs reveals that both C-NHEJ and alternative end-joining pathways can generate translocations by joining TSS-proximal DSBs to DSBs on other chromosomes. Our studies show that the generation of transcription-associated DSBs is conserved across divergent cell types.

  5. Induction and disappearance of DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts treated with methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.T.I.; Mullaart, E.; Vijg, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and fibroblasts exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were investigated by using the alkaline filter elution assay. In the two cell types, identical amounts of SSB were induced during a 45-minute treatment with a given dose of MMS. In quiescent PBL only 9{plus minus}4% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the induced SSB had disappeared at 1 hour after exposure, whereas in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBL, 23 {plus minus} 12% disappeared within the same repair period. The accumulation of SSB in PBL, but not in fibroblasts, during MMS exposure in the presence of the excision-repair inhibitor 1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine indicated the utilization of different repair pathways in these two cell types. The generally lower rate of disappearance of MMS-induced SSB in PBL as compared to fibroblasts correlated with an increased loss of cell viability, measured by determining the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine.

  6. MEIOTIC F-BOX Is Essential for Male Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Yu, Junping; Zong, Jie; Lu, Pingli

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large superfamily in plants and play important roles in controlling many biological processes, but the roles of F-box proteins in male meiosis in plants remain unclear. Here, we identify the rice (Oryza sativa) F-box gene MEIOTIC F-BOX (MOF), which is essential for male meiotic progression. MOF belongs to the FBX subfamily and is predominantly active during leptotene to pachytene of prophase I. mof meiocytes display disrupted telomere bouquet formation, impaired pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and arrested meiocytes at late prophase I, followed by apoptosis. Although normal, programmed double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) form in mof mutants, foci of the phosphorylated histone variant γH2AX, a marker for DSBs, persist in the mutant, indicating that many of the DSBs remained unrepaired. The recruitment of Completion of meiosis I (COM1) and Radiation sensitive51C (RAD51C) to DSBs is severely compromised in mutant meiocytes, indicating that MOF is crucial for DSB end-processing and repair. Further analyses showed that MOF could physically interact with the rice SKP1-like Protein1 (OSK1), indicating that MOF functions as a component of the SCF E3 ligase to regulate meiotic progression in rice. Thus, this study reveals the essential role of an F-box protein in plant meiosis and provides helpful information for elucidating the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in plant meiotic progression. PMID:27436711

  7. A histone H3K36 chromatin switch coordinates DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Lakxmi; Gal, Csenge; Sarkar, Sovan; Blaikley, Elizabeth J.; Walker, Carol; Hulme, Lydia; Bernhard, Eric; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg; Allshire, Robin; Whitehall, Simon; Humphrey, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is a highly regulated process performed predominantly by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways. How these pathways are coordinated in the context of chromatin is unclear. Here we uncover a role for histone H3K36 modification in regulating DSB repair pathway choice in fission yeast. We find Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation reduces chromatin accessibility, reduces resection and promotes NHEJ, while antagonistic Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation increases chromatin accessibility, increases resection and promotes HR. Accordingly, loss of Set2 increases H3K36Ac, chromatin accessibility and resection, while Gcn5 loss results in the opposite phenotypes following DSB induction. Further, H3K36 modification is cell cycle regulated with Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation peaking in G1 when NHEJ occurs, while Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation peaks in S/G2 when HR prevails. These findings support an H3K36 chromatin switch in regulating DSB repair pathway choice. PMID:24909977

  8. A histone H3K36 chromatin switch coordinates DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Deegan, Rachel S; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Gal, Csenge; Sarkar, Sovan; Blaikley, Elizabeth J; Walker, Carol; Hulme, Lydia; Bernhard, Eric; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg; Allshire, Robin; Whitehall, Simon; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2014-06-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is a highly regulated process performed predominantly by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways. How these pathways are coordinated in the context of chromatin is unclear. Here we uncover a role for histone H3K36 modification in regulating DSB repair pathway choice in fission yeast. We find Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation reduces chromatin accessibility, reduces resection and promotes NHEJ, while antagonistic Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation increases chromatin accessibility, increases resection and promotes HR. Accordingly, loss of Set2 increases H3K36Ac, chromatin accessibility and resection, while Gcn5 loss results in the opposite phenotypes following DSB induction. Further, H3K36 modification is cell cycle regulated with Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation peaking in G1 when NHEJ occurs, while Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation peaks in S/G2 when HR prevails. These findings support an H3K36 chromatin switch in regulating DSB repair pathway choice.

  9. MEI4 – a central player in the regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajeev; Ghyselinck, Norbert; Ishiguro, Kei-ichiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kouznetsova, Anna; Höög, Christer; Strong, Edward; Schimenti, John; Daniel, Katrin; Toth, Attila; de Massy, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the beginning of meiotic prophase marks the initiation of meiotic recombination. Meiotic DSB formation is catalyzed by SPO11 and their repair takes place on meiotic chromosome axes. The evolutionarily conserved MEI4 protein is required for meiotic DSB formation and is localized on chromosome axes. Here, we show that HORMAD1, one of the meiotic chromosome axis components, is required for MEI4 localization. Importantly, the quantitative correlation between the level of axis-associated MEI4 and DSB formation suggests that axis-associated MEI4 could be a limiting factor for DSB formation. We also show that MEI1, REC8 and RAD21L are important for proper MEI4 localization. These findings on MEI4 dynamics during meiotic prophase suggest that the association of MEI4 to chromosome axes is required for DSB formation, and that the loss of this association upon DSB repair could contribute to turning off meiotic DSB formation. PMID:25795304

  10. MEIOTIC F-BOX Is Essential for Male Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Rice.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Wang, Chong; Higgins, James D; Yu, Junping; Zong, Jie; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2016-08-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large superfamily in plants and play important roles in controlling many biological processes, but the roles of F-box proteins in male meiosis in plants remain unclear. Here, we identify the rice (Oryza sativa) F-box gene MEIOTIC F-BOX (MOF), which is essential for male meiotic progression. MOF belongs to the FBX subfamily and is predominantly active during leptotene to pachytene of prophase I. mof meiocytes display disrupted telomere bouquet formation, impaired pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and arrested meiocytes at late prophase I, followed by apoptosis. Although normal, programmed double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) form in mof mutants, foci of the phosphorylated histone variant γH2AX, a marker for DSBs, persist in the mutant, indicating that many of the DSBs remained unrepaired. The recruitment of Completion of meiosis I (COM1) and Radiation sensitive51C (RAD51C) to DSBs is severely compromised in mutant meiocytes, indicating that MOF is crucial for DSB end-processing and repair. Further analyses showed that MOF could physically interact with the rice SKP1-like Protein1 (OSK1), indicating that MOF functions as a component of the SCF E3 ligase to regulate meiotic progression in rice. Thus, this study reveals the essential role of an F-box protein in plant meiosis and provides helpful information for elucidating the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in plant meiotic progression. PMID:27436711

  11. A histone H3K36 chromatin switch coordinates DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Deegan, Rachel S; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Gal, Csenge; Sarkar, Sovan; Blaikley, Elizabeth J; Walker, Carol; Hulme, Lydia; Bernhard, Eric; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg; Allshire, Robin; Whitehall, Simon; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is a highly regulated process performed predominantly by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways. How these pathways are coordinated in the context of chromatin is unclear. Here we uncover a role for histone H3K36 modification in regulating DSB repair pathway choice in fission yeast. We find Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation reduces chromatin accessibility, reduces resection and promotes NHEJ, while antagonistic Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation increases chromatin accessibility, increases resection and promotes HR. Accordingly, loss of Set2 increases H3K36Ac, chromatin accessibility and resection, while Gcn5 loss results in the opposite phenotypes following DSB induction. Further, H3K36 modification is cell cycle regulated with Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation peaking in G1 when NHEJ occurs, while Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation peaks in S/G2 when HR prevails. These findings support an H3K36 chromatin switch in regulating DSB repair pathway choice. PMID:24909977

  12. Age-dependent change of HMGB1 and DNA double-strand break accumulation in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Enokido, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Ayaka; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2008-11-07

    HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved non-histone chromatin-associated protein with key roles in maintenance of nuclear homeostasis; however, the function of HMGB1 in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, we found that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 protein level in the nucleus associates with DNA double-strand break (DDSB)-mediated neuronal damage in Huntington's disease [M.L. Qi, K. Tagawa, Y. Enokido, N. Yoshimura, Y. Wada, K. Watase, S. Ishiura, I. Kanazawa, J. Botas, M. Saitoe, E.E. Wanker, H. Okazawa, Proteome analysis of soluble nuclear proteins reveals that HMGB1/2 suppress genotoxic stress in polyglutamine diseases, Nat. Cell Biol. 9 (2007) 402-414]. In this study, we analyze the region- and cell type-specific changes of HMGB1 and DDSB accumulation during the aging of mouse brain. HMGB1 is localized in the nuclei of neurons and astrocytes, and the protein level changes in various brain regions age-dependently. HMGB1 reduces in neurons, whereas it increases in astrocytes during aging. In contrast, DDSB remarkably accumulates in neurons, but it does not change significantly in astrocytes during aging. These results indicate that HMGB1 expression during aging is differentially regulated between neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 might be causative for DDSB in neurons of the aged brain.

  13. Nicotine, cotinine, and b-nicotyrine inhibit NNK-induced DNA-strand break in the hepatic cell line HepaRG.

    PubMed

    Ordonez; Sierra, Ana Belen; Camacho, Oscar M; Baxter, Andrew; Banerjee, Anisha; Waters, David; Minet, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Recent in vitro work using purified enzymes demonstrated that nicotine and/or a nicotine metabolite could inhibit CYPs (CYP2A6, 2A13, 2E1) involved in the metabolism of the genotoxic tobacco nitrosamine NNK. This observation raises the possibility of nicotine interaction with the mechanism of NNK bioactivation. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine or a nicotine metabolite such as cotinine might contribute to the inhibition of NNK-induced DNA strand breaks by interfering with CYP enzymes. The effect of nicotine and cotinine on DNA strand breaks was evaluated using the COMET assay in CYP competent HepaRG cells incubated with bioactive CYP-dependent NNK and CYP-independent NNKOAc (4-(acetoxymethylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone). We report a dose-dependent reduction in DNA damage in hepatic-derived cell lines in the presence of nicotine and cotinine. Those results are discussed in the context of the in vitro model selected. PMID:25221795

  14. Nicotine, cotinine, and β-nicotyrine inhibit NNK-induced DNA-strand break in the hepatic cell line HepaRG.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Patricia; Sierra, Ana Belen; Camacho, Oscar M; Baxter, Andrew; Banerjee, Anisha; Waters, David; Minet, Emmanuel

    2014-07-15

    Recent in vitro work using purified enzymes demonstrated that nicotine and/or a nicotine metabolite could inhibit CYPs (CYP2A6, 2A13, 2E1) involved in the metabolism of the genotoxic tobacco nitrosamine NNK. This observation raises the possibility of nicotine interaction with the mechanism of NNK bioactivation. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine or a nicotine metabolite such as cotinine might contribute to the inhibition of NNK-induced DNA strand breaks by interfering with CYP enzymes. The effect of nicotine and cotinine on DNA strand breaks was evaluated using the COMET assay in CYP competent HepaRG cells incubated with bioactive CYP-dependent NNK and CYP-independent NNKOAc (4-(acetoxymethylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone). We report a dose-dependent reduction in DNA damage in hepatic-derived cell lines in the presence of nicotine and cotinine. Those results are discussed in the context of the in vitro model selected. PMID:25075717

  15. Protective effect of ascorbic acid against double-strand breaks in giant DNA: Marked differences among the damage induced by photo-irradiation, gamma-rays and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yue; Ogawa, Naoki; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Mori, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    The protective effect of ascorbic acid against double-strand breaks in DNA was evaluated by single-molecule observation of giant DNA (T4 DNA; 166 kbp) through fluorescence microscopy. Samples were exposed to three different forms of radiation: visible light, γ-ray and ultrasound. With regard to irradiation with visible light, 1 mM AA reduced the damage down to ca. 30%. Same concentration of AA decreased the damage done by γ-ray to ca. 70%. However, AA had almost no protective effect against the damage caused by ultrasound. This significant difference is discussed in relation to the physico-chemical mechanism of double-strand breaks depending on the radiation source.

  16. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Genes and Oxidative Damage in Brain Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Lynda; Duchnowska, Renata; Reed, L. Tiffany; Palmieri, Diane; Qian, Yongzhen; Badve, Sunil; Sledge, George; Gril, Brunilde; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Fu, Haiqing; Flores, Natasha M.; Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Biernat, Wojciech; Szutowicz-Zielińska, Ewa; Mandat, Tomasz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Och, Waldemar; Czartoryska-Arlukowicz, Bogumiła; Jassem, Jacek; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the brain, colonizing a neuro-inflammatory microenvironment. The molecular pathways facilitating this colonization remain poorly understood. Methods Expression profiling of 23 matched sets of human resected brain metastases and primary breast tumors by two-sided paired t test was performed to identify brain metastasis–specific genes. The implicated DNA repair genes BARD1 and RAD51 were modulated in human (MDA-MB-231-BR) and murine (4T1-BR) brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines by lentiviral transduction of cDNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) coding sequences. Their functional contribution to brain metastasis development was evaluated in mouse xenograft models (n = 10 mice per group). Results Human brain metastases overexpressed BARD1 and RAD51 compared with either matched primary tumors (1.74-fold, P < .001; 1.46-fold, P < .001, respectively) or unlinked systemic metastases (1.49-fold, P = .01; 1.44-fold, P = .008, respectively). Overexpression of either gene in MDA-MB-231-BR cells increased brain metastases by threefold to fourfold after intracardiac injections, but not lung metastases upon tail-vein injections. In 4T1-BR cells, shRNA-mediated RAD51 knockdown reduced brain metastases by 2.5-fold without affecting lung metastasis development. In vitro, BARD1- and RAD51-overexpressing cells showed reduced genomic instability but only exhibited growth and colonization phenotypes upon DNA damage induction. Reactive oxygen species were present in tumor cells and elevated in the metastatic neuro-inflammatory microenvironment and could provide an endogenous source of genotoxic stress. Tempol, a brain-permeable oxygen radical scavenger suppressed brain metastasis promotion induced by BARD1 and RAD51 overexpression. Conclusions BARD1 and RAD51 are frequently overexpressed in brain metastases from breast cancer and may constitute a mechanism to overcome reactive oxygen species–mediated genotoxic stress in the metastatic

  17. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S R; Kurimasa, A; Oshimura, M; Dynan, W S; Bradbury, E M; Chen, D J

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an approximately 350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway.

  18. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.R. |; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Dynan, W.S.; Bradbury, E.M. |; Chen, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an {approx}350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Induction of DNA-strand breaks after X- irradiation in murine bone cells of various differentiation capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Kirchner, S.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Horneck, G.

    Bone loss resulting from long-duration space flight is a well known medical risk for space travellers, as a weakened skeleton is more susceptible to bone fractures. In addition to weightlessness the astronaut is also exposed to cosmic ionizing radiation. In order to elucidate changes in bone cell metabolism by ionizing radiation, a ground-based bone cell model has been developed. This model consists of a bunch of immortalized murine osteocyte, osteoblast and pre-osteoblast cell lines representing discrete stages of differentiation: The osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 (obtained from L. Bonewald, Kansas City, USA), the osteoblast cell line OCT-1 (obtained from D. Chen, San Antonio, USA), and the subclones 4 and 24 of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 (obtained from ATCC, Manassas, Virginia, USA). Regarding their growth properties, MLO-Y4 cells show the highest growth velocity with a doubling time of 15.8 h. The osteoblast cell line OCT-1 has a doubling time of 27.3 h. The respective values for MC3T3-E1 subclone 24 and S4 are 90.5 h and 51.6 h. To investigate the stage of differentiation, the expression of alkaline phosphatase, of osteocalcin and of E11 was examined. Survival after X-ray exposure was determined using the colony forming ability test. The resulting dose-effect relationships revealed significant differences. The parameter D0 of the survival curves ranges between 1.8 Gy for OCT-1, 1.9 Gy for MLO-Y4, 2.0 Gy for subclone 24 and 2,3 Gy for subclone 4. The quantitative acquisition of DNA-strand breaks was performed by Fluorescent Analysis of DNA-Unwinding (FADU). The results can be correlated with the corresponding survival curve. In conclusion, the cell lines with higher differentiation levels are less sensitive to radiation when compared to the lower differentiated osteoblast cell lines.

  20. Protective effect of chitosan oligosaccharide lactate against DNA double-strand breaks induced by a model methacrylate dental adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanska, Joanna; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Synowiec, Ewelina; Czarny, Piotr; Rekas, Marek; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jacek Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Monomers of methacrylates used in restorative dentistry have been recently reported to induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) in vitro. Because such monomers may penetrate the pulp and oral cavity due to the incompleteness of polymerization and polymer degradation, they may induce a similar effect in vivo. DSBs are the most serious type of DNA damage and if misrepaired or not repaired may lead to mutation, cancer transformation and cell death. Therefore, the protection against DSBs induced by methacrylate monomers released from dental restorations is imperative. Material/Methods We examined the protective action of chitosan oligosaccharide lactate (ChOL) against cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by monomers of the model adhesive consisting of 55% bisphenol A-diglycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA) and 45% 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). We evaluated the extent of DSBs by the neutral comet assay and the phosphorylation of the H2AX histone test. Results ChOL increased the viability of HGFs exposed to Bis-GMA/HEMA as assessed by flow cytometry. ChOL decreased the extent of DSBs induced by Bis-GMA/HEMA as evaluated by neutral comet assay and phosphorylation of the H2AX histone. ChOL did not change mechanical properties of the model adhesive, as checked by the shear bond test. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a better sealing of the dentinal microtubules in the presence of ChOL, which may protect pulp cells against the harmful action of the monomers. Conclusions ChOL can be considered as an additive to methacrylate-based dental materials to prevent DSBs induction, but further studies are needed on its formulation with the methacrylates. PMID:21804456

  1. Identification of defective illegitimate recombinational repair of oxidatively-induced DNA double-strand breaks in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, M. E.; Winters, T. A.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal-recessive lethal human disease. Homozygotes suffer from a number of neurological disorders, as well as very high cancer incidence. Heterozygotes may also have a higher than normal risk of cancer, particularly for the breast. The gene responsible for the disease (ATM) has been cloned, but its role in mechanisms of the disease remain unknown. Cellular A-T phenotypes, such as radiosensitivity and genomic instability, suggest that a deficiency in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may be the primary defect; however, overall levels of DSB rejoining appear normal. We used the shuttle vector, pZ189, containing an oxidatively-induced DSB, to compare the integrity of DSB rejoining in one normal and two A-T fibroblast cells lines. Mutation frequencies were two-fold higher in A-T cells, and the mutational spectrum was different. The majority of the mutations found in all three cell lines were deletions (44-63%). The DNA sequence analysis indicated that 17 of the 17 plasmids with deletion mutations in normal cells occurred between short direct-repeat sequences (removing one of the repeats plus the intervening sequences), implicating illegitimate recombination in DSB rejoining. The combined data from both A-T cell lines showed that 21 of 24 deletions did not involve direct-repeats sequences, implicating a defect in the illegitimate recombination pathway. These findings suggest that the A-T gene product may either directly participate in illegitimate recombination or modulate the pathway. Regardless, this defect is likely to be important to a mechanistic understanding of this lethal disease.

  2. Crystal Structure of E. coli RecE Protein Reveals a Toroidal Tetramer for Processing Double-Stranded DNA Breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjin; Xing, Xu; Herr, Andrew B.; Bell, Charles E.

    2009-07-21

    Escherichia coli RecE protein is part of the classical RecET recombination system that has recently been used in powerful new methods for genetic engineering. RecE binds to free double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ends and processively digests the 5{prime}-ended strand to form 5{prime}-mononucleotides and a 3{prime}-overhang that is a substrate for single strand annealing promoted by RecT. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal nuclease domain of RecE at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. RecE forms a toroidal tetramer with a central tapered channel that is wide enough to bind dsDNA at one end, but is partially plugged at the other end by the C-terminal segment of the protein. Four narrow tunnels, one within each subunit of the tetramer, lead from the central channel to the four active sites, which lie about 15 {angstrom} from the channel. The structure, combined with mutational studies, suggests a mechanism in which dsDNA enters through the open end of the central channel, the 5{prime}-ended strand passes through a tunnel to access one of the four active sites, and the 3{prime}-ended strand passes through the plugged end of the channel at the back of the tetramer.

  3. Pulmonary exposure to carbon black by inhalation or instillation in pregnant mice: Effects on liver DNA strand breaks in dams and offspring

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Petra; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Boisen, Anne Mette Z.; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Møller, Peter; Brunborg, Gunnar; Gutzkow, Kristine Bjerve; Andersen, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Effects of maternal pulmonary exposure to carbon black (Printex 90) on gestation, lactation and DNA strand breaks were evaluated. Time-mated C57BL/6BomTac mice were exposed by inhalation to 42 mg/m3 Printex 90 for 1 h/day on gestation days (GD) 8-18, or by four intratracheal instillations on GD 7, 10, 15 and 18, with total doses of 11, 54 and 268 (μg/animal. Dams were monitored until weaning and some offspring until adolescence. Inflammation was assessed in maternal bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 3-5 days after exposure, and at weaning. Levels of DNA strand breaks were assessed in maternal BAL cells and liver, and in offspring liver. Persistent lung inflammation was observed in exposed mothers. Inhalation exposure induced more DNA strand breaks in the liver of mothers and their offspring, whereas intratracheal instillation did not. Neither inhalation nor instillation affected gestation and lactation. Maternal inhalation exposure to Printex 90-induced liver DNA damage in the mothers and the in utero exposed offspring. PMID:21649560

  4. Serines 440 and 467 in the Werner syndrome protein are phosphorylated by DNA-PK and affects its dynamics in response to DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Ghosh, Deblina; Karmakar, Parimal; May, Alfred; Ramsden, Dale; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-01-01

    WRN protein, defective in Werner syndrome (WS), a human segmental progeria, is a target of serine/threonine kinases involved in sensing DNA damage. DNA-PK phosphorylates WRN in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the main phosphorylation sites and functional importance of the phosphorylation of WRN has remained unclear. Here, we identify Ser-440 and -467 in WRN as major phosphorylation sites mediated by DNA-PK.In vitro, DNA-PK fails to phosphorylate a GST-WRN fragment with S440A and/or S467A substitution. In addition, full length WRN with the mutation expressed in 293T cells was not phosphorylated in response to DSBs produced by bleomycin. Accumulation of the mutant WRN at the site of laser-induced DSBs occurred with the same kinetics as wild type WRN in live HeLa cells. While the wild type WRN relocalized to the nucleoli after 24 hours recovery from etoposide-induced DSBs, the mutant WRN remained mostly in the nucleoplasm. Consistent with this, WS cells expressing the mutants exhibited less DNA repair efficiency and more sensitivity to etoposide, compared to those expressing wild type. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation of Ser-440 and -467 in WRN are important for relocalization of WRN to nucleoli, and that it is required for efficient DSB repair.

  5. DNA Ligase IV and Artemis Act Cooperatively to Suppress Homologous Recombination in Human Cells: Implications for DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR. PMID:23967291

  6. Hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks and genomic contacts of human rDNA units are involved in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Fedoseeva, Daria M; Sosin, Dmitri V; Snezhkina, Anastasia V; Melnikova, Nataliya V; Kudryavtseva, Anna V; Kravatsky, Yuri V; Kretova, Olga V

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are involved in many cellular mechanisms, including replication, transcription, and genome rearrangements. The recent observation that hot spots of DSBs in human chromosomes delimit DNA domains that possess coordinately expressed genes suggests a strong relationship between the organization of transcription patterns and hot spots of DSBs. In this study, we performed mapping of hot spots of DSBs in a human 43-kb ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeated unit. We observed that rDNA units corresponded to the most fragile sites in human chromosomes and that these units possessed at least nine specific regions containing clusters of extremely frequently occurring DSBs, which were located exclusively in non-coding intergenic spacer (IGS) regions. The hot spots of DSBs corresponded to only a specific subset of DNase-hypersensitive sites, and coincided with CTCF, PARP1, and HNRNPA2B1 binding sites, and H3K4me3 marks. Our rDNA-4C data indicate that the regions of IGS containing the hot spots of DSBs often form contacts with specific regions in different chromosomes, including the pericentromeric regions, as well as regions that are characterized by H3K27ac and H3K4me3 marks, CTCF binding sites, ChIA-PET and RIP signals, and high levels of DSBs. The data suggest a strong link between chromosome breakage and several different mechanisms of epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  7. Hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks and genomic contacts of human rDNA units are involved in epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A.; Fedoseeva, Daria M.; Sosin, Dmitri V.; Snezhkina, Anastasia V.; Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Kravatsky, Yuri V.; Kretova, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are involved in many cellular mechanisms, including replication, transcription, and genome rearrangements. The recent observation that hot spots of DSBs in human chromosomes delimit DNA domains that possess coordinately expressed genes suggests a strong relationship between the organization of transcription patterns and hot spots of DSBs. In this study, we performed mapping of hot spots of DSBs in a human 43-kb ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeated unit. We observed that rDNA units corresponded to the most fragile sites in human chromosomes and that these units possessed at least nine specific regions containing clusters of extremely frequently occurring DSBs, which were located exclusively in non-coding intergenic spacer (IGS) regions. The hot spots of DSBs corresponded to only a specific subset of DNase-hypersensitive sites, and coincided with CTCF, PARP1, and HNRNPA2B1 binding sites, and H3K4me3 marks. Our rDNA-4C data indicate that the regions of IGS containing the hot spots of DSBs often form contacts with specific regions in different chromosomes, including the pericentromeric regions, as well as regions that are characterized by H3K27ac and H3K4me3 marks, CTCF binding sites, ChIA-PET and RIP signals, and high levels of DSBs. The data suggest a strong link between chromosome breakage and several different mechanisms of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:25280477

  8. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Brandi L.; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long complementary DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  9. Induction of DNA-strand breaks after X-irradiation in murine bone cells of various differentiation capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine E.; Kirchner, Simone; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    survival curve of MLO-Y4 shows a broad shoulder, suggesting a high repair capacity or a high DNA damage or misrepair tolerance. The quantitative acquisition of DNA-strand breaks was performed by fluorescent analysis of DNA unwinding and revealed a high level of DNA damage immediately after X-irradiation, which increases dose dependently. In conclusion, the cell line with the highest differentiation level (MLO-Y4) displays lower radiation sensitivity, regarding the shoulder width of the dose-effect curve, compared to the less differentiated osteoblast cell lines.

  10. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 and DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Have Equivalent Roles in Double Strand Break Repair Following Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jody; Smith, Graeme; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are predominantly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), involving DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), well characterized for its role in single strand break repair, may also facilitate DSB repair. We investigated the activation of these enzymes by differing DNA ends and their interaction in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: The effect of PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors (KU-0058684 and NU7441) on repair of IR-induced DSBs was investigated in DNA-PK and PARP-1 proficient and deficient cells by measuring gammaH2AX foci and neutral comets. Complementary in vitro enzyme kinetics assays demonstrated the affinities of DNA-PK and PARP-1 for DSBs with varying DNA termini. Results: DNA-PK and PARP-1 both promoted the fast phase of resolution of IR-induced DSBs in cells. Inactivation of both enzymes was not additive, suggesting that PARP-1 and DNA-PK cooperate within the same pathway to promote DSB repair. The affinities of the two enzymes for oligonucleotides with blunt, 3' GGG or 5' GGG overhanging termini were similar and overlapping (K{sub dapp} = 2.6-6.4nM for DNA-PK; 1.7-4.5nM for PARP-1). DNA-PK showed a slightly greater affinity for overhanging DNA and was significantly more efficient when activated by a 5' GGG overhang. PARP-1 had a preference for blunt-ended DNA and required a separate factor for efficient stimulation by a 5' GGG overhang. Conclusion: DNA-PK and PARP-1 are both required in a pathway facilitating the fast phase of DNA DSB repair.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Ts65Dn Mice Are Deficient in the Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Chang, Jianhui; Shao, Lijian; Feng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Chow, Marie; Du, Wei; Meng, Aimin; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra partial or whole copy of chromosome 21. In addition to musculoskeletal and neurodevelopmental abnormalities, children with DS exhibit various hematologic disorders and have an increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute megakaryocytic leukemia. Using the Ts65Dn mouse model, we investigated bone marrow defects caused by trisomy for 132 orthologs of the genes on human chromosome 21. The results showed that, although the total bone marrow cellularity as well as the frequency of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) was comparable between Ts65Dn mice and their age-matched euploid wild-type (WT) control littermates, human chromosome 21 trisomy led to a significant reduction in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and clonogenic function in Ts65Dn mice. We also found that spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were significantly increased in HSCs from the Ts65Dn mice, which was correlated with the significant reduction in HSC clonogenic activity compared to those from WT controls. Moreover, analysis of the repair kinetics of radiation-induced DSBs revealed that HSCs from Ts65Dn mice were less proficient in DSB repair than the cells from WT controls. This deficiency was associated with a higher sensitivity of Ts65Dn HSCs to radiation-induced suppression of HSC clonogenic activity than that of euploid HSCs. These findings suggest that an additional copy of genes on human chromosome 21 may selectively impair the ability of HSCs to repair DSBs, which may contribute to DS-associated hematological abnormalities and malignancies. PMID:27243896

  12. Single- and double-strand breaks induced in plasmid DNA irradiated by ultra-soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayard, B.; Touati, A.; Sage, E.; Abel, F.; Champion, C.; Chetoui, A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular consequences of a carbon K photo-ionization located on DNA, dry pBS plasmid samples were irradiated with ultra-soft X-rays at energies below and above the carbon K-threshold (E_K=278 eV). Single- and double-strand breaks (ssb and dsb) were quantified after resolution of the three plasmid forms (supercoiled, relaxed circular, linear) by gel electrophoresis. A factor of 1.2 was found between the doses required at 250 eV and 380 eV to induce the same number of dsb per plasmid. Dans le but d'étudier les conséquences à l'échelle moléculaire d'une photo- ionisation en couche K du carbone de l'ADN, des dépots de plasmides ont été irradiés à sec par des X ultra-mous d'énergies situées de part et d'autre du seuil d'ionisation en couche interne du carbone (E_K=278 eV). Les taux de cassures simple- et double-brin (ssb et dsb) ont été quantifiées après résolution des trois formes de plasmide (surenroulé, circulaire relaché, linéaire) par électrophorèse. Un facteur de 1.2 a été mesuré entre les doses nécessaires à 250 eV et 380 eV pour produire le même nombre de dsb par plasmide.

  13. Transcription-associated processes cause DNA double-strand breaks and translocations in neural stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Bjoern; Wei, Pei-Chi; Chang, Amelia N.; Kao, Jennifer; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput, genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS) studies of activated B cells have revealed that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) capable of translocating to defined bait DSBs are enriched around the transcription start sites (TSSs) of active genes. We used the HTGTS approach to investigate whether a similar phenomenon occurs in primary neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). We report that breakpoint junctions indeed are enriched around TSSs that were determined to be active by global run-on sequencing analyses of NSPCs. Comparative analyses of transcription profiles in NSPCs and B cells revealed that the great majority of TSS-proximal junctions occurred in genes commonly expressed in both cell types, possibly because this common set has higher transcription levels on average than genes transcribed in only one or the other cell type. In the latter context, among all actively transcribed genes containing translocation junctions in NSPCs, those with junctions located within 2 kb of the TSS show a significantly higher transcription rate on average than genes with junctions in the gene body located at distances greater than 2 kb from the TSS. Finally, analysis of repair junction signatures of TSS-associated translocations in wild-type versus classical nonhomologous end-joining (C-NHEJ)–deficient NSPCs reveals that both C-NHEJ and alternative end-joining pathways can generate translocations by joining TSS-proximal DSBs to DSBs on other chromosomes. Our studies show that the generation of transcription-associated DSBs is conserved across divergent cell types. PMID:26873106

  14. Effects of chemopreventive natural products on non-homologous end-joining DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Charles, Catherine; Nachtergael, Amandine; Ouedraogo, Moustapha; Belayew, Alexandra; Duez, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) may result from endogenous (e.g., reactive oxygen species, variable (diversity) joining, meiotic exchanges, collapsed replication forks, nucleases) or exogenous (e.g., ionizing radiation, chemotherapeutic agents, radiomimetic compounds) events. DSBs disrupt the integrity of DNA and failed or improper DSBs repair may lead to genomic instability and, eventually, mutations, cancer, or cell death. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway used by higher eukaryotic cells to repair these lesions. Given the complexity of NHEJ and the number of proteins and cofactors involved, secondary metabolites from medicinal or food plants might interfere with the process, activating or inhibiting repair. Twelve natural products, arbutin, curcumin, indole-3-carbinol, and nine flavonoids (apigenin, baicalein, chalcone, epicatechin, genistein, myricetin, naringenin, quercetin, sakuranetin) were chosen for their postulated roles in cancer chemoprevention and/or treatment. The effects of these compounds on NHEJ were investigated with an in vitro protocol based on plasmid substrates. Plasmids were linearized by a restriction enzyme, generating cohesive ends, or by a combination of enzymes, generating incompatible ends; plasmids were then incubated with a nuclear extract prepared from normal human small-intestinal cells (FHS 74 Int), either treated with these natural products or untreated (controls). The NHEJ repair complex from nuclear extracts ligates linearized plasmids, resulting in plasmid oligomers that can be separated and quantified by on-chip microelectrophoresis. Some compounds (chalcone, epicatechin, myricetin, sakuranetin and arbutin) clearly activated NHEJ, whereas others (apigenin, baicalein and curcumin) significantly reduced the repair rate of both types of plasmid substrates. Although this in vitro protocol is only partly representative of the in vivo situation, the natural products appear to interfere with NHEJ repair and warrant

  15. Heavy ion induced double strand breaks in bacteria and bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micke, U.; Schäfer, M.; Anton, A.; Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.

    DNA damage induced by heavy ions in bacterial cells and bacteriophages such as Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Bacteriophage Tl were investigated by analyzing the double strand breaks in the chromosomal DNA. This kind of lesion is considered as one of the main reasons for lethal events. To analyze double strand breaks in long molecules of DNA - up to some Mbp in length - the technique of pulse field agarose gel electrophoresis has been used. This allows the detection of one double strand break per genome. Cell lysis and DNA isolation were performed in small agarose blocks directly. This procedure secured minimum DNA destruction by shearing forces. After running a gel, the DNA was stained with ethidium bromide. The light intensity of ethidium bromide fluorescence for both the outcoming (running) DNA and the remaining intact DNA were measured by scanning. The mean number of double strand breaks was calculated by determining the quotient of these intensities. Strand break induction after heavy ion and X-ray irradiation was compared.

  16. Double-strand break-induced targeted mutagenesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Lyznik, L Alexander; Djukanovic, Vesna; Yang, Meizhu; Jones, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Double-strand breaks are very potent inducers of DNA recombination. There is no recombination between DNA molecules unless one or two DNA strands are broken. It has become feasible to introduce double-strand breaks at specific chromosomal loci by using dedicated, redesigned endonucleases with altered DNA-binding specificities. Such breaks are mainly repaired by error-prone nonhomologous recombination pathways in somatic cells, thus frequently producing mutations at the preselected chromosomal sites. Although the art and science of reengineering protein properties have been advancing quickly, an empirical validation of new endonucleases in a particular experimental environment is essential for successful targeted mutagenesis experiments. This chapter presents methods that were developed for a comprehensive evaluation of the DNA-binding and DNA-cutting activities of homing endonucleases in maize cells; however, they can be adopted for similar evaluation studies of other endonucleases and other plant species that are amenable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PMID:22351025

  17. Damage to cellular DNA from particulate radiations, the efficacy of its processing and the radiosensitivity of mammalian cells. Emphasis on DNA double strand breaks and chromatin breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lett, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    For several years, it has been evident that cellular radiation biology is in a necessary period of consolidation and transition (Lett 1987, 1990; Lett et al. 1986, 1987). Both changes are moving apace, and have been stimulated by studies with heavy charged particles. From the standpoint of radiation chemistry, there is now a consensus of opinion that the DNA hydration shell must be distinguished from bulk water in the cell nucleus and treated as an integral part of DNA (chromatin) (Lett 1987). Concomitantly, sentiment is strengthening for the abandonment of the classical notions of "direct" and "indirect" action (Fielden and O'Neill 1991; O'Neill 1991; O'Neill et al. 1991; Schulte-Frohlinde and Bothe 1991 and references therein). A layer of water molecules outside, or in the outer edge of, the DNA (chromatin) hydration shell influences cellular radiosensitivity in ways not fully understood. Charge and energy transfer processes facilitated by, or involving, DNA hydration must be considered in rigorous theories of radiation action on cells. The induction and processing of double stand breaks (DSBs) in DNA (chromatin) seem to be the predominant determinants of the radiotoxicity of normally radioresistant mammalian cells, the survival curves of which reflect the patterns of damage induced and the damage present after processing ceases, and can be modelled in formal terms by the use of reaction (enzyme) kinetics. Incongruities such as sublethal damage are neither scientifically sound nor relevant to cellular radiation biology (Calkins 1991; Lett 1990; Lett et al. 1987a). Increases in linear energy transfer (LET infinity) up to 100-200 keV micron-1 cause increases in the extents of neighboring chemical and physical damage in DNA denoted by the general term DSB. Those changes are accompanied by decreasing abilities of cells normally radioresistant to sparsely ionizing radiations to process DSBs in DNA and chromatin and to recover from radiation exposure, so they make

  18. Artesunate induces oxidative DNA damage, sustained DNA double-strand breaks, and the ATM/ATR damage response in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Berdelle, Nicole; Nikolova, Teodora; Quiros, Steve; Efferth, Thomas; Kaina, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Artesunate, the active agent from Artemisia annua L. used in the traditional Chinese medicine, is being applied as a first-line drug for malaria treatment, and trials are ongoing that include this drug in cancer therapy. Despite increasing interest in its therapeutic application, the mode of cell killing provoked by artesunate in human cells is unknown. Here, we show that artesunate is a powerful inducer of oxidative DNA damage, giving rise to formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase-sensitive sites and the formation of 8-oxoguanine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in LN-229 human glioblastoma cells dose dependently and was paralleled by cell death executed by apoptosis and necrosis, which could be attenuated by radical scavengers such as N-acetyl cysteine. Oxidative DNA damage resulted in DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as determined by γH2AX foci that colocalized with 53BP1. Upon chronic treatment with artesunate, the level of DSB continuously increased over the treatment period up to a steady-state level, which is in contrast to ionizing radiation that induced a burst of DSB followed by a decline due to their repair. Knockdown of Rad51 by short interfering RNA and inactivation of DNA-PK strongly sensitized glioma cells to artesunate. These data indicate that both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining are involved in the repair of artesunate-induced DSB. Artesunate provoked a DNA damage response (DDR) with phosphorylation of ATM, ATR, Chk1, and Chk2. Overall, these data revealed that artesunate induces oxidative DNA lesions and DSB that continuously increase during the treatment period and accumulate until they trigger DDR and finally tumor cell death. PMID:21998290

  19. Histone chaperone Anp32e removes H2A.Z from DNA double-strand breaks and promotes nucleosome reorganization and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Price, Brendan D

    2015-06-16

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires open, flexible chromatin domains. The NuA4-Tip60 complex creates these flexible chromatin structures by exchanging histone H2A.Z onto nucleosomes and promoting acetylation of histone H4. Here, we demonstrate that the accumulation of H2A.Z on nucleosomes at DSBs is transient, and that rapid eviction of H2A.Z is required for DSB repair. Anp32e, an H2A.Z chaperone that interacts with the C-terminal docking domain of H2A.Z, is rapidly recruited to DSBs. Anp32e functions to remove H2A.Z from nucleosomes, so that H2A.Z levels return to basal within 10 min of DNA damage. Further, H2A.Z removal by Anp32e disrupts inhibitory interactions between the histone H4 tail and the nucleosome surface, facilitating increased acetylation of histone H4 following DNA damage. When H2A.Z removal by Anp32e is blocked, nucleosomes at DSBs retain elevated levels of H2A.Z, and assume a more stable, hypoacetylated conformation. Further, loss of Anp32e leads to increased CtIP-dependent end resection, accumulation of single-stranded DNA, and an increase in repair by the alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway. Exchange of H2A.Z onto the chromatin and subsequent rapid removal by Anp32e are therefore critical for creating open, acetylated nucleosome structures and for controlling end resection by CtIP. Dynamic modulation of H2A.Z exchange and removal by Anp32e reveals the importance of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome dynamics in processing the damaged chromatin template during DSB repair.

  20. Role of the yeast DNA repair protein Nej1 in end processing during the repair of DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Trujillo, Kelly M.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Osley, Mary Ann; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s often require end processing prior to joining during their repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although the yeast proteins, Pol4, a Pol X family DNA polymerase, and Rad27, a nuclease, participate in the end processing reactions of NHEJ, the mechanisms underlying the recruitment of these factors to DSBs are not known. Here we demonstrate that Nej1, a NHEJ factor that interacts with and modulates the activity of the NHEJ DNA ligase complex (Dnl4/Lif1), physically and functionally interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27. Notably, Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1, which also interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27, independently recruit the end processing factors to in vivo DSBs via mechanisms that are additive rather than redundant. As was observed with Dnl4/Lif1, the activities of both Pol4 and Rad27 were enhanced by the interaction with Nej1. Furthermore, Nej1 increased the joining of incompatible DNA ends in reconstituted reactions containing Pol4, Rad27 and Dnl4/Lif1, indicating that the stimulatory activities of Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1 are also additive. Together our results reveal novel roles for Nej1 in the recruitment of Pol4 and Rad27 to in vivo DSBs and the coordination of the end processing and ligation reactions of NHEJ. PMID:25942368

  1. DNA double strand break repair inhibition as a cause of heat radiosensitization: re-evaluation considering backup pathways of NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Iliakis, George; Wu, Wenqi; Wang, Minli

    2008-02-01

    Heat shock is one of the most effective radiosensitizers known. As a result, combination of heat with ionizing radiation (IR) is considered a promising strategy in the management of human cancer. The mechanism of heat radiosensitization has been the subject of extensive work but a unifying mechanistic model is presently lacking. To understand the cause of excessive death in irradiated cells after heat exposure, it is necessary to characterize the lesion(s) underlying the effect and to determine which of the pathways processing this lesion are affected by heat. Since DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are the main cause for IR-induced cell death, inhibition of DSB processing has long been considered a major candidate for heat radiosensitization. However, effective radiosensitization of mutants with defects in homologous recombination repair (HRR), or in DNA-PK dependent non-homologous end joining (D-NHEJ), the two primary pathways of DSB repair, has led to the formulation of models excluding DSBs as a cause for this phenomenon and attributing heat radiosensitization to inhibition of base damage processing. Since direct evidence for a major role of base damage in heat radiosensitization, or in IR-induced killing for that matter, is scarce and new insights in DSB repair allow alternative interpretations of existing data with repair mutants, we attempt here a re-evaluation of the role of DSBs and their repair in heat radiosensitization. First, we reanalyse data obtained with various DSB repair mutants on first principles and in the light of the recent recognition that alternative pathways of NHEJ, operating as backup (B-NHEJ), substantially contribute to DSB repair and thus probably also to heat radiosensitization. Second, we review aspects of combined action of heat and radiation, such as modulation in the cell-cycle-dependent variation in radiosensitivity to killing, as well as heat radiosensitization as a function of LET, and examine whether the observed effects are

  2. DNA strand breaks and crosslinks induced by transient anions in the range 2-20 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xinglan; Zheng, Yi; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-01

    The energy dependence of the yields of single and double strand breaks (SSB and DSB) and crosslinks induced by electron impact on plasmid DNA films is measured in the 2-20 eV range. The yield functions exhibit two strong maxima, which are interpreted to result from the formation of core-excited resonances (i.e., transient anions) of the bases, and their decay into the autoionization channel, resulting in π → π* electronic transitions of the bases followed by electron transfer to the C-O σ* bond in the phosphate group. Occupancy of the σ* orbital ruptures the C-O bond of the backbone via dissociative electron attachment, producing a SSB. From a comparison of our results with those of other works, including theoretical calculations and electron-energy-loss spectra of the bases, the 4.6 eV peak in the SSB yield function is attributed to the resonance decay into the lowest electronically excited states of the bases; in particular, those resulting from the transitions 13A' (π2 → π3*) and 13A″ (n2 → π3*) of thymine and 13A' (π → π*) of cytosine. The strongest peak at 9.6 eV in the SSB yield function is also associated with electron captured by excited states of the bases, resulting mostly from a multitude of higher-energy π → π* transitions. The DSB yield function exhibits strong maxima at 6.1 and 9.6 eV. The peak at 9.6 eV is probably related to the same resonance manifold as that leading to SSB, but the other at 6.1 eV may be more restricted to decay into the electronic state 13A' (π → π*) of cytosine via autoionization. The yield function of crosslinks is dominated by a broad peak extending over the 3.6-11.6 eV range with a sharper one at 17.6 eV. The different line shape of the latter function, compared to that of SSB and DSB, appears to be due to the formation of reactive radical sites in the initial supercoiled configuration of the plasmid, which react with the circular form (i.e., DNA with a SSB) to produce a crosslink.

  3. DNA strand breaks and crosslinks induced by transient anions in the range 2-20 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xinglan; Zheng, Yi; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-21

    The energy dependence of the yields of single and double strand breaks (SSB and DSB) and crosslinks induced by electron impact on plasmid DNA films is measured in the 2-20 eV range. The yield functions exhibit two strong maxima, which are interpreted to result from the formation of core-excited resonances (i.e., transient anions) of the bases, and their decay into the autoionization channel, resulting in π → π{sup *} electronic transitions of the bases followed by electron transfer to the C–O σ{sup *} bond in the phosphate group. Occupancy of the σ{sup *} orbital ruptures the C–O bond of the backbone via dissociative electron attachment, producing a SSB. From a comparison of our results with those of other works, including theoretical calculations and electron-energy-loss spectra of the bases, the 4.6 eV peak in the SSB yield function is attributed to the resonance decay into the lowest electronically excited states of the bases; in particular, those resulting from the transitions 1{sup 3}A{sup ′} (π{sub 2} → π{sub 3}{sup *}) and 1{sup 3}A{sup ″} (n{sub 2} → π{sub 3}{sup *}) of thymine and 1{sup 3}A{sup ′} (π → π{sup *}) of cytosine. The strongest peak at 9.6 eV in the SSB yield function is also associated with electron captured by excited states of the bases, resulting mostly from a multitude of higher-energy π → π{sup *} transitions. The DSB yield function exhibits strong maxima at 6.1 and 9.6 eV. The peak at 9.6 eV is probably related to the same resonance manifold as that leading to SSB, but the other at 6.1 eV may be more restricted to decay into the electronic state 1{sup 3}A{sup ′} (π → π{sup *}) of cytosine via autoionization. The yield function of crosslinks is dominated by a broad peak extending over the 3.6-11.6 eV range with a sharper one at 17.6 eV. The different line shape of the latter function, compared to that of SSB and DSB, appears to be due to the formation of reactive radical sites in the initial supercoiled

  4. The deinococcal DdrB protein is involved in an early step of DNA double strand break repair and in plasmid transformation through its single-strand annealing activity

    PubMed Central

    de la Tour, Claire Bouthier; Boisnard, Stéphanie; Norais, Cédric; Toueille, Magali; Bentchikou, Esma; Vannier, Françoise; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne; Servant, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans bacterium exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. Here, we investigated the in vivo role of DdrB, a radiation-induced Deinococcus specific protein that was previously shown to exhibit some in vitro properties akin to those of SSB protein from E. coli but also to promote annealing of single stranded DNA. First we report that the deletion of the C-terminal motif of the DdrB protein, which is similar to the SSB C-terminal motif involved in recruitment to DNA of repair proteins, did neither affect cell radioresistance nor DNA binding properties of purified DdrB protein. We show that, in spite of their different quaternary structure, DdrB and SSB occlude the same amount of ssDNA in vitro. We also showed that DdrB is recruited early and transiently after irradiation into the nucleoid to form discrete foci. Absence of DdrB increased the lag phase of the extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing (ESDSA) process, affecting neither the rate of DNA synthesis nor the efficiency of fragment reassembly, as indicated by monitoring DNA synthesis and genome reconstitution in cells exposed to a sub-lethal ionizing radiation dose. Moreover, cells devoid of DdrB were affected in the establishment of plasmid DNA during natural transformation, a process that requires pairing of internalized plasmid single stranded DNA fragments, whereas they were proficient in transformation by a chromosomal DNA marker that integrates into the host chromosome through homologous recombination. Our data are consistent with a model in which DdrB participates in an early step of DNA double strand break repair in cells exposed to very high radiation doses. DdrB might facilitate the accurate assembly of the myriad of small fragments generated by extreme radiation exposure through a single strand annealing (SSA) process to generate suitable substrates for subsequent ESDSA-promoted genome reconstitution. PMID:21968057

  5. DNA strand break dependence on Tris and arginine scavenger concentrations under ultra-soft X-ray irradiation: the contribution of secondary arginine radicals.

    PubMed

    Souici, Mounir; Khalil, Talat Tariq; Boulanouar, Omar; Belafrites, Abdelfettah; Mavon, Christophe; Fromm, Michel

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used a bench-top cold-cathode ultra-soft X-ray (USX) generator to expose aqueous DNA plasmid solutions to low-LET radiation under various scavenging conditions. Single- and double-strand breaks were assessed using classic gel electrophoresis quantification of linear, circular and supercoiled plasmid DNA topologies. With their very low penetration range in water, USX can only interact with matter up to short distances, of the order of 50 μm. We validated a stirring procedure which makes it possible to expose 100 µL of aqueous samples (2 mm thick). The scavenging of OH radicals by Tris buffer was studied at ambient temperature under aerobic conditions and compared to data gathered in the literature. A very good agreement was found with the rare data dealing with DNA plasmid exposed to Al Kα photons at low temperature (T ≤ 277 K), which therefore validated the experimental procedure. The yields for DNA single-strand breaks determined during this study enabled the ratio of indirect to direct effects to be determined at 96.2%, in good agreement with the value of 97.7% stemming from a study based on γ-ray irradiation of frozen solutions of plasmid DNA. Then, arginine was used both to create a "biological-like" chemical environment around the DNA plasmids and as an OH radical scavenger, in vitro. Although arginine has a greater scavenging (protecting) power than Tris, surprisingly, it led to higher rates of strand breakage. Based on the specific binding modes of arginine to DNA, we suggest that the side effects observed are due to the presence of arginine near to, but also inside, the DNA double helix. PMID:26994994

  6. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Ian; Gencheva, Marieta; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Piktel, Debbie; Vos, Jeffrey A.; Howell, David; Gibson, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs), the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16) at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR) transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation. PMID:26880992

  7. Sequence conservation of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA double-strand break repair gene in human and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.J.; Troelstra, C.; Kanaar, R.

    1996-09-01

    The rad21 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. The isolation of mouse and human putative homologs of rad21 is reported here. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence of Rad21 with the mammalian proteins showed that the similarity was distributed across the length of the proteins, with more highly conserved regions at both termini. The mHR21{sup sp} (mouse homolog of Rad21, S. pombe) and hHR21{sup sp} (human homolog of Rad21, S. pombe) predicted proteins were 96% identical, whereas the human and S. pombe proteins were 25% identical and 47% similar. RNA blot analysis showed that mHR21{sup sp} mRNA was abundant in all adult mouse tissues examined, with highest expression in testis and thymus. In addition to a 3.1-kb constitutive mRNA transcript, a 2.2-kb transcript was present at a high level in postmeiotic spermatids, while expression of the 3.1-kb mRNA in testis was confined to the meiotic compartment. hHR21{sup sp} mRNA was cell-cycle regulated in human cells, increasing in late S phase to a peak in G2 phase. The level of hHR21{sup sp} transcripts was not altered by exposure of normal diploid fibroblasts to 10 Gy ionizing radiation. In situ hybridization showed that mHR21{sup sp} resided on chromosome 15D3, whereas hHR21{sup sp} localized to the syntenic 8q24 region. Elevated expression of mHR21{sup sp} in testis and thymus supports a possible role for the rad21 mammalian homologs in V(D)J and meiotic recombination, respectively. Cell cycle regulation of rad21, retained from S. pombe to human, is consistent with a conservation of function between S. pombe and human rad21 genes. 62 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Rapid MCNP simulation of DNA double strand break (DSB) relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for photons, neutrons, and light ions.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert D; Streitmatter, Seth W; Argento, David C; Kirkby, Charles; Goorley, John T; Moffitt, Greg; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Sandison, George A

    2015-11-01

    To account for particle interactions in the extracellular (physical) environment, information from the cell-level Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) for DNA double strand break (DSB) induction has been integrated into the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) radiation transport code system. The effort to integrate these models is motivated by the need for a computationally efficient model to accurately predict particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in cell cultures and in vivo. To illustrate the approach and highlight the impact of the larger scale physical environment (e.g. establishing charged particle equilibrium), we examined the RBE for DSB induction (RBEDSB) of x-rays, (137)Cs γ-rays, neutrons and light ions relative to γ-rays from (60)Co in monolayer cell cultures at various depths in water. Under normoxic conditions, we found that (137)Cs γ-rays are about 1.7% more effective at creating DSB than γ-rays from (60)Co (RBEDSB  =  1.017) whereas 60-250 kV x-rays are 1.1 to 1.25 times more efficient at creating DSB than (60)Co. Under anoxic conditions, kV x-rays may have an RBEDSB up to 1.51 times as large as (60)Co γ-rays. Fission neutrons passing through monolayer cell cultures have an RBEDSB that ranges from 2.6 to 3.0 in normoxic cells, but may be as large as 9.93 for anoxic cells. For proton pencil beams, Monte Carlo simulations suggest an RBEDSB of about 1.2 at the tip of the Bragg peak and up to 1.6 a few mm beyond the Bragg peak. Bragg peak RBEDSB increases with decreasing oxygen concentration, which may create opportunities to apply proton dose painting to help address tumor hypoxia. Modeling of the particle RBE for DSB induction across multiple physical and biological scales has the potential to aid in the interpretation of laboratory experiments and provide useful information to advance the safety and effectiveness of hadron therapy in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Rapid MCNP simulation of DNA double strand break (DSB) relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for photons, neutrons, and light ions.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert D; Streitmatter, Seth W; Argento, David C; Kirkby, Charles; Goorley, John T; Moffitt, Greg; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Sandison, George A

    2015-11-01

    To account for particle interactions in the extracellular (physical) environment, information from the cell-level Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) for DNA double strand break (DSB) induction has been integrated into the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) radiation transport code system. The effort to integrate these models is motivated by the need for a computationally efficient model to accurately predict particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in cell cultures and in vivo. To illustrate the approach and highlight the impact of the larger scale physical environment (e.g. establishing charged particle equilibrium), we examined the RBE for DSB induction (RBEDSB) of x-rays, (137)Cs γ-rays, neutrons and light ions relative to γ-rays from (60)Co in monolayer cell cultures at various depths in water. Under normoxic conditions, we found that (137)Cs γ-rays are about 1.7% more effective at creating DSB than γ-rays from (60)Co (RBEDSB  =  1.017) whereas 60-250 kV x-rays are 1.1 to 1.25 times more efficient at creating DSB than (60)Co. Under anoxic conditions, kV x-rays may have an RBEDSB up to 1.51 times as large as (60)Co γ-rays. Fission neutrons passing through monolayer cell cultures have an RBEDSB that ranges from 2.6 to 3.0 in normoxic cells, but may be as large as 9.93 for anoxic cells. For proton pencil beams, Monte Carlo simulations suggest an RBEDSB of about 1.2 at the tip of the Bragg peak and up to 1.6 a few mm beyond the Bragg peak. Bragg peak RBEDSB increases with decreasing oxygen concentration, which may create opportunities to apply proton dose painting to help address tumor hypoxia. Modeling of the particle RBE for DSB induction across multiple physical and biological scales has the potential to aid in the interpretation of laboratory experiments and provide useful information to advance the safety and effectiveness of hadron therapy in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26449929

  10. Rapid MCNP simulation of DNA double strand break (DSB) relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for photons, neutrons, and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert D.; Streitmatter, Seth W.; Argento, David C.; Kirkby, Charles; Goorley, John T.; Moffitt, Greg; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Sandison, George A.

    2015-11-01

    To account for particle interactions in the extracellular (physical) environment, information from the cell-level Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) for DNA double strand break (DSB) induction has been integrated into the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) radiation transport code system. The effort to integrate these models is motivated by the need for a computationally efficient model to accurately predict particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in cell cultures and in vivo. To illustrate the approach and highlight the impact of the larger scale physical environment (e.g. establishing charged particle equilibrium), we examined the RBE for DSB induction (RBEDSB) of x-rays, 137Cs γ-rays, neutrons and light ions relative to γ-rays from 60Co in monolayer cell cultures at various depths in water. Under normoxic conditions, we found that 137Cs γ-rays are about 1.7% more effective at creating DSB than γ-rays from 60Co (RBEDSB  =  1.017) whereas 60-250 kV x-rays are 1.1 to 1.25 times more efficient at creating DSB than 60Co. Under anoxic conditions, kV x-rays may have an RBEDSB up to 1.51 times as large as 60Co γ-rays. Fission neutrons passing through monolayer cell cultures have an RBEDSB that ranges from 2.6 to 3.0 in normoxic cells, but may be as large as 9.93 for anoxic cells. For proton pencil beams, Monte Carlo simulations suggest an RBEDSB of about 1.2 at the tip of the Bragg peak and up to 1.6 a few mm beyond the Bragg peak. Bragg peak RBEDSB increases with decreasing oxygen concentration, which may create opportunities to apply proton dose painting to help address tumor hypoxia. Modeling of the particle RBE for DSB induction across multiple physical and biological scales has the potential to aid in the interpretation of laboratory experiments and provide useful information to advance the safety and effectiveness of hadron therapy in the treatment of cancer.

  11. DNA single- and double-strand breaks by alkaline- and immuno-comet assay in lymphocytes of workers exposed to styrene.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Maria Enrica; Doria, Denise; Carrieri, Mariella; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Quintavalle, Sonia; De Rosa, Edoardo

    2009-02-25

    Occupational exposure to styrene was studied in 34 workers employed in the production of fiberglass-reinforced plastic sheets and compared to 29 unexposed healthy controls. We evaluated genotoxic effects induced by occupational styrene exposure in lymphocytes by alkaline version of the comet assay to detect single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA oxidation products (formamido pyrimidine glycosilase (Fpg)- and endonuclease (Endo III)-sensitive sites) and DNA repair kinetics studies, as well as the neutral version of comet assay for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). An innovative aspect of this study was the use of immuno-comet assay, a new technique that recognizes DSBs with specific antibody by DAPI/FITC method. The battery of parameters included markers of external and internal exposure. Exposed workers showed significant high levels of SSBs (p<0.0001) and DSBs (p<0.0001) in neutral- and immuno-comet assay. A drastic decrease in DNA repair activity as compared to controls was observed (180 min vs. 35 min). Styrene workplace concentration significantly correlated with alkaline comet parameters (TM, p=0.013; TI, p=0.008), in negative with TL (p=0.022), and with DNA-base oxidation (TM Endo III, p=0.048 and TI Endo III, p=0.028). There was a significant negative correlation between urinary metabolites (MA+PGA) and TM Endo III (p=0.032) and TI Endo III (p=0.017).

  12. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks produced in histone-depleted tumor cell nuclei measured using the neutral comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, P.L.; Banath, J.P.

    1995-05-01

    Removal of histones and other nuclear proteins greatly enhances the sensitivity of mammalian cells to DNA damage by ionizing radiation. We examined the possibility that the ease of dissociation of histones, or the association of other nuclear proteins with DNA, may differ between radioresistant and sensitive human tumor cells. Cells embedded in agarose were exposed to increasing salt concentrations prior to irradiation and examination using a microscopic gel electrophoresis method, the neutral comet assay. Induction of double-strand breaks increased by a factor of about 20 when cells of four human tumor cell line HT144 melanoma, HT29 adenocarcinoma, DU145 prostate carcinoma and U87 glioma, were exposed to 2 M NaCl; however, no correlation with radiosensitivity was apparent. While a significant number of histone and non-histone proteins are present after extraction with 1.2 M NaCL, these proteins apparently have only a minor influence on radiosensitivity. However, if they are allowed to remain with DNA during electrophoresis, about 15 times more strand breaks are required to produce a similar amount of DNA migration in both DU145 and HT144 cells. These results suggest that the association between proteins and DNA within the nucleus, as probed by extraction with sodium chloride, does not help to explain differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity among cells of these diverse tumor cell lines. 33 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Analysis of DNA strand breaks induced in rodent liver in vivo, hepatocytes in primary culture, and a human cell line by chlorinated acetic acids and chlorinated acetaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B. ); DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1992-01-01

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice treated in vivo, in rodent hepatocytes in primary culture, and in CCRF-CEM cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, following treatment with tri-(TCA), di-(CA), and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and their corresponding aldehydes, tri-(chloralhydrate, CH), di(DCAA) and mono-(CAA) chloroacetaldehyde. None of the chloracetic acids induced DNA SB in the livers of rats at 4 hr following a single administration of 1-10 mmole/kg. TCA (10 mmole/kg) and DCA (5 and 10 mmole/kg) did produce a small amount of strand breakage in mice (7% at 4hr) but not at 1 hr. N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA), an established alkylating agent and a rodent hepatocarcinogen, produced DNA SB in the livers of both species. TCA, DCA, and MCA also failed to induce DNA strand breaks in splenocytes and epithelial cells derived from the stomach and duodenum of mice treated in vivo. None of the three chloroacetaldehydes induced DNA SB in either mouse or rat liver. These studies provide further evidence that the chloroacetic acids lack genotoxic activity not only in rodent liver, a tissue in that they induce tumors, but in a variety of other rodent tissues and cultured cell types. Two of the chloroacetaldehydes, DCAA and CAA, are direct acting DNA damaging agents in CCRF-CEM cells, but not in liver or splenocytes in vivo or in cultured hepatocytes. CH showed no activity in any system investigated. 58 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukhanova, Maria V.; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  15. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Curmi, Patrick A; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I

    2016-04-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages.

  16. Hypersensitivity of Cockayne's syndrome cells to camptothecin is associated with the generation of abnormally high levels of double strand breaks in nascent DNA.

    PubMed

    Squires, S; Ryan, A J; Strutt, H L; Johnson, R T

    1993-05-01

    We report that fibroblasts from individuals with Cockayne's Syndrome (CS), an autosomal recessive disease exhibiting hypersensitivity to UV, are also hypersensitive to the killing action of camptothecin (CPT). In normal and CS cell lines the level of the protein-linked single strand DNA breaks (SSBs) induced by equal doses of CPT is similar, and these DNA breaks disappear within minutes of the removal of CPT. Thus, the toxicity of CPT does not correlate with the primary DNA lesions induced by the drug, and the hypersensitivity of CS cells cannot be explained by excessive topoisomerase I activity or by a defect in the enzyme ligation step. We have reported that CPT toxicity in normal cells is closely associated with the generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), predominantly at sites of DNA replication. The hypersensitivity of CS cells to CPT correlates closely with the much higher level of DSBs in nascent DNA than in normal cells. These DSBs are long-lived in all cells, but in CS many more (about 10-fold) remain 24 h after CPT removal and are presumably responsible for the higher frequency of chromosome aberrations in these cells. In CS as in normal cells aphidicolin prevents the generation of replication-related DSBs, suggesting that the movement of the DNA polymerase is necessary for the induction by CPT of the cytotoxic DSBs. Resistance to CPT and UV is restored to wild type in proliferating hybrids constructed between CS lines from two different complementation groups as is the abundance of replication-related DSBs. On the basis of this complementation we conclude that the UV and CPT sensitivities are distinct phenotypic traits arising from mutations in the CS A and B genes. PMID:7683249

  17. Influence of different iodinated contrast media on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks after in vitro X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Deinzer, Christoph K W; Danova, Daniela; Kleb, Beate; Klose, Klaus J; Heverhagen, Johannes T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to examine differences in DNA double-strand break induction in peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro X-ray irradiation between iodinated contrast agents. Four different iodinated X-ray contrast agents--three of them with two different iodine concentrations--and mannitol (negative control; concentration of 150 mg mannitol per ml blood) were pipetted into blood samples so that there was a concentration of 0, 7.5 or 15 mg of iodine per ml blood in the samples. Negative controls without contrast medium (0 mg of iodine per ml blood) were also processed for every irradiation dose. The tubes were exposed to 0, 20 or 500 mGy in vitro X-ray irradiation. After that, the lymphocytes were separated by using density-gradient centrifugation. Fluorescence microscopy was applied to determine the average number of γH2AX-foci per lymphocyte in the presence or absence of different contrast media or mannitol. Differences in the number of γH2AX-foci were statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's honestly significant difference test. Iodinated contrast agents led to a statistically significant increase in DNA double-strand breaks after in vitro irradiation. This effect increased statistically significant with rising radiation dose and appeared independent of the contrast agent used (iopromid, iodixanol, iomeprol, iopamidol). A statistically significant difference in DNA damage between the different tested contrast agents was not found. Therefore, the increase in DNA double-strand breaks depends solely on the amount of iodine applied. For evaluation of clinical consequences, our findings could be tested in further animal studies.

  18. Assessment of DNA double-strand breaks induced by intravascular iodinated contrast media following in vitro irradiation and in vivo, during paediatric cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gould, Richard; McFadden, Sonyia L; Horn, Simon; Prise, Kevin M; Doyle, Philip; Hughes, Ciara M

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric cardiac catheterizations may result in the administration of substantial amounts of iodinated contrast media and ionizing radiation. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of iodinated contrast media in combination with in vitro and in vivo X-ray radiation on lymphocyte DNA. Six concentrations of iodine (15, 17.5, 30, 35, 45, and 52.5 mg of iodine per mL blood) represented volumes of iodinated contrast media used in the clinical setting. Blood obtained from healthy volunteers was mixed with iodinated contrast media and exposed to radiation doses commonly used in paediatric cardiac catheterizations (0 mGy, 70 mGy, 140 mGy, 250 mGy and 450 mGy). Control samples contained no iodine. For in vivo experimentation, pre and post blood samples were collected from children undergoing cardiac catheterization, receiving iodine concentrations of up to 51 mg of iodine per mL blood and radiation doses of up to 400 mGy. Fluorescence microscopy was performed to assess γH2AX-foci induction, which corresponded to the number of DNA double-strand breaks. The presence of iodine in vitro resulted in significant increases of DNA double-strand breaks beyond that induced by radiation for ≥ 17.5 mg/mL iodine to blood. The in vivo effects of contrast media on children undergoing cardiac catheterization resulted in a 19% increase in DNA double-strand breaks in children receiving an average concentration of 19 mg/mL iodine to blood. A larger investigation is required to provide further information of the potential benefit of lowering the amount of iodinated contrast media received during X-ray radiation investigations.

  19. The telomeric protein TRF2 is critical for the protection of A549 cells from both telomere erosion and DNA double-strand breaks driven by salvicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Miao, Ze-Hong; Ding, Jian

    2008-03-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) has been increasingly recognized to be involved in DNA damage response and telomere maintenance. Our previous report found that salvicine (SAL), a novel topoisomerase II poison, elicited DNA double-strand breaks and telomere erosion in separate experimental systems. However, it remains to be clarified whether they share a common response to these two events and in particular whether TRF2 is involved in this process. In this study, we found that SAL concurrently induced DNA double-strand breaks, telomeric DNA damage, and telomere erosion in lung carcinoma A549 cells. It was unexpected to find that SAL led to disruption of TRF2, independently of either its transcription or proteasome-mediated degradation. By overexpressing the full-length trf2 gene and transfecting TRF2 small interfering RNAs, we showed that TRF2 protein protected both telomeric and genomic DNA from the SAL-elicited events. It is noteworthy that although both the Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and the ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) kinases responded to the SAL-induced DNA damages, only ATR was essential for the telomere erosion. The study also showed that the activated ATR augmented the SAL-triggered TRF2 disruption, whereas TRF2 reduction in turn enhanced ATR function. All of these findings suggest the emerging significance of TRF2 protecting both telomeric DNA and genomic DNA on the one hand and reveal the mutual modulation between ATR and TRF2 in sensing DNA damage signaling during cancer development on the other hand.

  20. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  1. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  2. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  3. Coordination and processing of DNA ends during double-strand break repair: the role of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex.

    PubMed

    Almond, Joshua R; Stohr, Bradley A; Panigrahi, Anil K; Albrecht, Dustin W; Nelson, Scott W; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-11-01

    The in vivo functions of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex (gp46/47) in double-strand-end processing, double-strand break repair, and recombination-dependent replication were investigated. The complex is essential for T4 growth, but we wanted to investigate the in vivo function during productive infections. We therefore generated a suppressed triple amber mutant in the Rad50 subunit to substantially reduce the level of complex and thereby reduce phage growth. Growth-limiting amounts of the complex caused a concordant decrease in phage genomic recombination-dependent replication. However, the efficiencies of double-strand break repair and of plasmid-based recombination-dependent replication remained relatively normal. Genetic analyses of linked markers indicated that double-strand ends were less protected from nuclease erosion in the depleted infection and also that end coordination during repair was compromised. We discuss models for why phage genomic recombination-dependent replication is more dependent on Mre11/Rad50 levels when compared to plasmid recombination-dependent replication. We also tested the importance of the conserved histidine residue in nuclease motif I of the T4 Mre11 protein. Substitution with multiple different amino acids (including serine) failed to support phage growth, completely blocked plasmid recombination-dependent replication, and led to the stabilization of double-strand ends. We also constructed and expressed an Mre11 mutant protein with the conserved histidine changed to serine. The mutant protein was found to be completely defective for nuclease activities, but retained the ability to bind the Rad50 subunit and double-stranded DNA. These results indicate that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is critical for phage growth and recombination-dependent replication during T4 infections.

  4. A major role of the RecFOR pathway in DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Bentchikou, Esma; Servant, Pascale; Coste, Geneviève; Sommer, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    In Deinococcus radiodurans, the extreme resistance to DNA-shattering treatments such as ionizing radiation or desiccation is correlated with its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of chromosomal fragments. The rapid reconstitution of an intact genome is thought to occur through an extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing process (ESDSA) followed by DNA recombination. Here, we investigated the role of key components of the RecF pathway in ESDSA in this organism naturally devoid of RecB and RecC proteins. We demonstrate that inactivation of RecJ exonuclease results in cell lethality, indicating that this protein plays a key role in genome maintenance. Cells devoid of RecF, RecO, or RecR proteins also display greatly impaired growth and an important lethal sectoring as bacteria devoid of RecA protein. Other aspects of the phenotype of recFOR knock-out mutants paralleled that of a DeltarecA mutant: DeltarecFOR mutants are extremely radiosensitive and show a slow assembly of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments, not accompanied by DNA synthesis, and reduced DNA degradation. Cells devoid of RecQ, the major helicase implicated in repair through the RecF pathway in E. coli, are resistant to gamma-irradiation and have a wild-type DNA repair capacity as also shown for cells devoid of the RecD helicase; in contrast, DeltauvrD mutants show a markedly decreased radioresistance, an increased latent period in the kinetics of DNA double-strand-break repair, and a slow rate of fragment assembly correlated with a slow rate of DNA synthesis. Combining RecQ or RecD deficiency with UvrD deficiency did not significantly accentuate the phenotype of DeltauvrD mutants. In conclusion, RecFOR proteins are essential for DNA double-strand-break repair through ESDSA whereas RecJ protein is essential for cell viability and UvrD helicase might be involved in the processing of double stranded DNA ends and/or in the DNA synthesis step of ESDSA. PMID:20090937

  5. DNA Methyltransferase 1-associated Protein (DMAP1) Is a Co-repressor That Stimulates DNA Methylation Globally and Locally at Sites of Double Strand Break Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun E.; Kim, Joo Hee; Taylor, Michael; Muller, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Correction of double strand DNA breaks proceeds in an error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR), which can result in gene silencing of half of the DNA molecules caused by action by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) (Cuozzo, C., Porcellini, A., Angrisano, T., Morano, A., Lee, B., Di Pardo, A., Messina, S., Iuliano, R., Fusco, A., Santillo, M. R., Muller, M. T., Chiariotti, L., Gottesman, M. E., and Avvedimento, E. V. (2007) PLoS Genet. 3, e110). To explore the mechanism that leads to HR-induced silencing, a genetic screen was carried out based on the silencing of a GFP reporter to identify potential partners. DMAP1, a DNMT1 interacting protein, was identified as a mediator of this process. DMAP1 is a potent activator of DNMT1 methylation in vitro, suggesting that DMAP1 is a co-repressor that supports the maintenance and de novo action of DNMT1. To examine critical roles for DMAP1 in vivo, lentiviral shRNA was used to conditionally reduce cellular DMAP1 levels. The shRNA transduced cells grew poorly and eventually ceased their growth. Analysis of the tumor suppressor gene p16 methylation status revealed a clear reduction in methylated CpGs in the shRNA cells, suggesting that reactivation of a tumor suppressor gene pathway caused the slow growth phenotype. Analysis of HR, using a fluorescence-based reporter, revealed that knocking down DMAP1 also caused hypomethylation of the DNA repair products following gene conversion. DMAP1 was selectively enriched in recombinant GFP chromatin based on chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. The picture that emerges is that DMAP1 activates DNMT1 preferentially at sites of HR repair. Because DMAP1 depleted cells display enhanced HR, we conclude that it has additional roles in genomic stability. PMID:20864525

  6. DNA methyltransferase 1-associated protein (DMAP1) is a co-repressor that stimulates DNA methylation globally and locally at sites of double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun E; Kim, Joo Hee; Taylor, Michael; Muller, Mark T

    2010-11-26

    Correction of double strand DNA breaks proceeds in an error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR), which can result in gene silencing of half of the DNA molecules caused by action by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) (Cuozzo, C., Porcellini, A., Angrisano, T., Morano, A., Lee, B., Di Pardo, A., Messina, S., Iuliano, R., Fusco, A., Santillo, M. R., Muller, M. T., Chiariotti, L., Gottesman, M. E., and Avvedimento, E. V. (2007) PLoS Genet. 3, e110). To explore the mechanism that leads to HR-induced silencing, a genetic screen was carried out based on the silencing of a GFP reporter to identify potential partners. DMAP1, a DNMT1 interacting protein, was identified as a mediator of this process. DMAP1 is a potent activator of DNMT1 methylation in vitro, suggesting that DMAP1 is a co-repressor that supports the maintenance and de novo action of DNMT1. To examine critical roles for DMAP1 in vivo, lentiviral shRNA was used to conditionally reduce cellular DMAP1 levels. The shRNA transduced cells grew poorly and eventually ceased their growth. Analysis of the tumor suppressor gene p16 methylation status revealed a clear reduction in methylated CpGs in the shRNA cells, suggesting that reactivation of a tumor suppressor gene pathway caused the slow growth phenotype. Analysis of HR, using a fluorescence-based reporter, revealed that knocking down DMAP1 also caused hypomethylation of the DNA repair products following gene conversion. DMAP1 was selectively enriched in recombinant GFP chromatin based on chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. The picture that emerges is that DMAP1 activates DNMT1 preferentially at sites of HR repair. Because DMAP1 depleted cells display enhanced HR, we conclude that it has additional roles in genomic stability. PMID:20864525

  7. UVA and visible light photons produce frank strand breaks in human P3 cell DNA as well as a new class of alkali-labile lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    Human P3 epithelioid cells were exposed to UVA (290--400 nm), as well as to blue and green photons in the 400--520 mm region of the spectrum, and the production of strand breaks in their DNA was measured by using elution. After exposure to blue photons the profiles were convex (downturning), shown to be due to the induction of a mixture of frank single-strand DNA breaks (SSB) plus rapidly developing alkali-labile sites (ALS). as well as latent breaks that develop during the first 6 h of the elution, termed slowly developing alkali-labile sites (SDALS). A significant proportion of the lesions produced by P3 cells by blue light photons are SDALS, whereas green light photons at 520 nm and UVA photons at 365 nm produce no SDALS and the elution profiles are exponential. This is also the case for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to 405 nm, evidence that a unique chromophore in P3 cells that absorbs strongly in the blue region leads to the formation of SDALS. The similarity in induction of SDALS at 460 and 405 nm is evidence that the chromophore is not a porphyrin, because these compounds have sharp absorption maxima in the lower 400 nm region. The chemical nature of these lesions as well as the cellular responses to them remain enigmatic.

  8. Metabolism, sister chromatid exchanges, and DNA single-strand breaks induced by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone and their modulation by vitamin A in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alaoui-Jamali, M A; Bélanger, P M; Rossignol, G; Castonguay, A

    1991-08-01

    The nicotine-derived N-nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1- butanone (NNK) is abundant in smokeless tobacco and tobacco smoke and is hepatocarcinogenic in F344 rats. We have investigated how vitamin A modulates sister chromatid exchanges and DNA single-strand breaks induced by NNK. In V79 cells, vitamin A at concentrations ranging from 34.9 to 139.6 microM inhibited sister chromatid exchange frequencies induced by 20 mM NNK activated by primary rat hepatocytes. Sister chromatid exchanges were inhibited by 24, 44, and 55% when cells were cotreated with 34.9, 69.8, and 139.6 microM vitamin A, respectively. DNA single-strand breaks induced by NNK in rat hepatocytes were also inhibited by vitamin A. After 9 h of elution, DNA single-strand breaks induced by 1, 5, and 10 mM NNK were inhibited by 13, 5, and 3.5% in the presence of 69.8 microM vitamin A, respectively. This protective effect by vitamin A was associated with a reduction of alpha-carbon hydroxylation, an activation pathway of NNK. This pathway was inhibited by 50% when cells were cotreated with 3.49 microM vitamin A. The reduction in the hepatic microsomal aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline hydroxylase, and N,N-dimethyl aniline N-demethylase in the presence of vitamin A (0.035 to 0.35 microM) suggests that vitamin A could reduce NNK genotoxicity by inhibiting the enzymes involved in the activation process. PMID:1855212

  9. Investigation of the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by methylenediphenyl-4-4'-diisocyanate in cultured human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Vock, E H; Vamvakas, S; Gahlmann, R; Lutz, W K

    1998-11-01

    The question was addressed whether methylenediphenyl-4,4'-diisocyanate (MDI), a bifunctional electrophile, can induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) by repair of interstrand DNA crosslinks or whether DSB are the result of cell death. Cultured human lung epithelial cells (A549) were treated with MDI, methylene-4,4'-dianiline (MDA; a potential hydrolysis product of MDI), the nitrogen mustard melphalan, and the detergent Triton X-100. All chemicals were dissolved in ethylene glycol dimethyl ether which was added to a cell monolayer covered with phosphate-buffered saline. After 2 h, the treatment solution was exchanged against medium, and 8, 24, and 72 h after treatment initiation, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. At the same time, the viability was determined with the MTT test (intracellular reduction of the tetrazolium dye MTT). At the 8-h time point, 1 and 10 microM melphalan induced DSB without concomitant effect on cell viability. With all other chemicals, the dose-response curves for DNA fragmentation and viability were mirror images. Approximate 50% lethal concentrations were 200, 3000, and 100 microM for MDI, MDA, and Triton X-100, respectively. For these chemicals, the observed DSB were the consequence of extragenomic damage in the course of cell death rather than of an interaction with DNA. The mechanistic difference of melphalan was supported by analysis of nuclear morphology. Apoptotic bodies were observed only after melphalan treatment, whereas MDI and Triton X-100 produced only irregular clumping of chromatin (72-h time point). DNA fragment length analysis showed a time-independent pattern, with sizes between 1 and 4 Mbp for melphalan, while MDI, and Triton X-100 induced smaller DNA fragments in a time-dependent manner. It is concluded that DSB observed in cells treated with MDI are unlikely the result of DNA crosslink formation.

  10. Drosophila mus301/spindle-C Encodes a Helicase With an Essential Role in Double-Strand DNA Break Repair and Meiotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Ruth; St Johnston, Daniel; González-Reyes, Acaimo

    2006-01-01

    mus301 was identified independently in two genetic screens, one for mutants hypersensitive to chemical mutagens and another for maternal mutants with eggshell defects. mus301 is required for the proper specification of the oocyte and for progression through meiosis in the Drosophila ovary. We have cloned mus301 and show that it is a member of the Mus308 subfamily of ATP-dependent helicases and the closest homolog of human and mouse HEL308. Functional analyses demonstrate that Mus301 is involved in chromosome segregation in meiosis and in the repair of double-strand-DNA breaks in both meiotic and mitotic cells. Most of the oogenesis defects of mus301 mutants are suppressed by mutants in the checkpoint kinase Mei41 and in MeiW68, the Spo11 homolog that is thought to generate the dsDNA breaks that initiate recombination, indicating that these phenotypes are caused by activation of the DNA damage checkpoint in response to unrepaired Mei-W68-induced dsDNA breaks. However, neither mei-W68 nor mei-41 rescue the defects in oocyte specification of mus301 mutants, suggesting that this helicase has another function in oocyte selection that is independent from its role in meiotic recombination. PMID:16888338

  11. Investigation of the DNA damage response to SFOM-0046, a new small-molecule drug inducing DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Pauty, Joris; Côté, Marie-France; Rodrigue, Amélie; Velic, Denis; Masson, Jean-Yves; Fortin, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    2-Ethylphenyl 4-(3-ethylureido)benzenesulfonate (SFOM-0046) is a novel anticancer agent that arrests cell cycle in S-phase and causes DNA replication stress leading to the phosphorylation of H2AX into γ-H2AX. First, using the M21, HT29, HT-1080 and HeLa cell lines, we confirmed that S-phase cell cycle arrest and γ-H2AX foci induction by SFOM-0046 is a general mechanism occurring in diverse cancer cell lines. In addition to γ-H2AX, SFOM-0046 activates preferentially ATR-Chk1 in M21 and HT29 cells while both ATR-Chk1 and ATM-Chk2 pathways are activated in HCT116 cells. Co-localization of SFOM-0046-induced 53BP1 foci with γ-H2AX foci validates that the DNA damage generated corresponds to double-strand-breaks (DSBs). Consistent with an S-phase arrest, SFOM-0046 treatment induces RAD51 foci formation but not DNA-PKcs foci, confirming that homologous recombination is the major DSB repair pathway targeted by the drug. Furthermore, using isogenic HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116 p53−/− cells, we showed that p53 plays a key role in the survival mechanism to SFOM-0046. Finally, SFOM-0046 exhibits a dose-dependent antitumor activity on human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 tumours grafted onto chick chorioallantoic membranes without showing embryo toxicity even at high doses. Altogether, our results highlight SFOM-0046 as a very promising drug that induces a replication stress response. PMID:27001483

  12. Protein kinase CK2 is required for the recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA double-strand break induced by radiomimetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Barbara; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2014-04-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling pathway responds rapidly to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and it is characterized by recruitment of sensor, mediator, transducer and repair proteins to sites of DNA damage. Data suggest that CK2 is implicated in the early cellular response to DSBs. We demonstrate that CK2 binds constitutively the adaptor protein 53BP1 through the tandem Tudor domains and that the interaction is disrupted upon induction of DNA damage. Down-regulation of CK2 results in significant reduction of (i) 53BP1 foci formation, (ii) binding to dimethylated histone H4 and (iii) ATM autophosphorylation. Our data suggest that CK2 is required for 53BP1 accumulation at sites of DSBs which is a prerequisite for efficient activation of the ATM-mediated signaling pathway.

  13. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-01

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  14. Production of strand breaks in DNA in the presence of the hydroxylamine of SR-2508 (1-(N-(2-hydroxyethyl)acetamido)-2-nitroimidazole) at neutral pH

    SciTech Connect

    Laderoute, K.R.; Eryavec, E.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

    1986-07-01

    The protonated hydroxylamine of SR 2508 has been prepared by radiochemical reduction and then lyophilized, isolated as the hydrochloride salt, and characterized by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Single strand breaks are produced in the plasmid pBR322 when aliquots of a neutralized solution of the hydroxylamine (10-20 mM) are added to air-equilibrated solutions of the plasmid immediately after adjusting the pH. No breaks are observed, if times greater than five min elapse before adding the neutralized hydroxylamine to DNA, or if oxygen is excluded from the reaction mixture. These results suggest that single strand breaks occur because of the existence of a short-lived reactive species, which is produced after pH adjustment. Observations that oxygen is consumed during the pH jump, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced and catalase, desferal and radical scavengers inhibit the reaction are consistent with the hydroxyl radical as the active agent.

  15. Effective cross sections for production of single-strand breaks in plasmid DNA by 0.1 to 4.7 eV electrons.

    PubMed

    Panajotovic, Radmila; Martin, Frédéric; Cloutier, Pierre; Hunting, Darel; Sanche, Léon

    2006-04-01

    We determined effective cross sections for production of single-strand breaks (SSBs) in plasmid DNA [pGEM 3Zf(-)] by electrons of 10 eV and energies between 0.1 and 4.7 eV. After purification and lyophilization on a chemically clean tantalum foil, dry plasmid DNA samples were transferred into a high-vacuum chamber and bombarded by a monoenergetic electron beam. The amount of the circular relaxed DNA in the samples was separated from undamaged molecules and quantified using agarose gel electrophoresis. The effective cross sections were derived from the slope of the yield as a function of exposure and had values in the range of 10(-15)- 10(-14) cm2, giving an effective cross section of the order of 10(-18) cm2 per nucleotide. Their strong variation with incident electron energy and the resonant enhancement at 1 eV suggest that considerable damage is inflicted by very low-energy electrons to DNA, and it indicates the important role of pi* shape resonances in the bond-breaking process. Furthermore, the fact that the energy threshold for SSB production is practically zero implies that the sensitivity of DNA to electron impact is universal and is not limited to any particular energy range.

  16. Protein phosphatases pph3, ptc2, and ptc3 play redundant roles in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ae; Hicks, Wade M; Li, Jin; Tay, Sue Yen; Haber, James E

    2011-02-01

    In response to a DNA double-strand break (DSB), cells undergo a transient cell cycle arrest prior to mitosis until the break is repaired. In budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the DNA damage checkpoint is regulated by a signaling cascade of protein kinases, including Mec1 and Rad53. When DSB repair is complete, cells resume cell cycle progression (a process called "recovery") by turning off the checkpoint. Recovery involves two members of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family, Ptc2 and Ptc3, as well as the protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) enzyme, Pph3. Here, we demonstrate a new function of these three phosphatases in DSB repair. Cells lacking all three phosphatases Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 exhibit synergistic sensitivities to the DNA-damaging agents camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate, as well as hydroxyurea but not to UV light. Moreover, the simultaneous absence of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 results in defects in completing DSB repair, whereas neither single nor double deletion of the phosphatases causes a repair defect. Specifically, cells lacking all three phosphatases are defective in the repair-mediated DNA synthesis. Interestingly, the repair defect caused by the triple deletion of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 is most prominent when a DSB is slowly repaired and the DNA damage checkpoint is fully activated.

  17. PARG dysfunction enhances DNA double strand break formation in S-phase after alkylation DNA damage and augments different cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, H; Poetsch, A R; Gunji, A; Maeda, D; Fujimori, H; Fujihara, H; Yoshida, T; Ogino, H; Masutani, M

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the primary enzyme responsible for the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose). PARG dysfunction sensitizes cells to alkylating agents and induces cell death; however, the details of this effect have not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which PARG deficiency leads to cell death in different cell types using methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), an alkylating agent, and Parg−/− mouse ES cells and human cancer cell lines. Parg−/− mouse ES cells showed increased levels of γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose), p53 network activation, and S-phase arrest. Early apoptosis was enhanced in Parg−/− mouse ES cells. Parg−/− ES cells predominantly underwent caspase-dependent apoptosis. PARG was then knocked down in a p53-defective cell line, MIAPaCa2 cells, a human pancreatic cancer cell line. MIAPaCa2 cells were sensitized to MMS by PARG knockdown. Enhanced necrotic cell death was induced in MIAPaCa2 cells after augmenting γ-H2AX levels and S-phase arrest. Taken together, these data suggest that DSB repair defect causing S-phase arrest, but p53 status was not important for sensitization to alkylation DNA damage by PARG dysfunction, whereas the cell death pathway is dependent on the cell type. This study demonstrates that functional inhibition of PARG may be useful for sensitizing at least particular cancer cells to alkylating agents. PMID:23744356

  18. Localization of specific sequences and DNA single-strand breaks in individual UV-A-irradiated human lymphocytes by COMET FISH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Claudia; Rapp, Alexander; Dittmar, Heike; Monajembashi, Shamci; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1999-01-01

    The COMET assay, a single cell electrophoresis technique which allows to separate electrophoretically fractionated DNA according to size has been combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) which allows to localize specific genes or gene regions. This combination (COMET FISH) allows the detection of DNA single strand breaks in specific regions of the genome of human lymphocytes at the single cell level. Various types of DNA probes, e.g. centromere-, (alpha) - satellite-, telomere-, whole chromosome-, single copy- and region specific DNA probes have been used to investigate whether the UV-A induced DNA single strand breaks are distributed randomly all over the human genome or induced at specific sites ('hot spots'). In the investigated human peripheral blood lymphocytes all but one centromere reveal low sensitivity for UV-A irradiation (500 kJ/m2), while telomeres are randomly distributed over COMET heads and tails. The human chromosome 1 is fractionated by irradiation, but remains in the COMET head, indicating an only moderate degree of fractionation. Among three tested single copy probes, c- myc, p53 and p58, the p53 gene located on chromosome 17p13.1 and the p58 gene (1p36) appear to be located in UV-A stable regions of the human genome in 95% of 65 investigated lymphocytes. In contrast, the c-myc proto-oncogene (8q24) is found in the COMET tail in 90% of the 27 investigated lymphocytes and thus appears to be more sensitive to UV-A irradiation.

  19. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Baker, Richard E; Linehan, Erin K; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-08-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID.

  20. DNA polymerases δ and λ cooperate in repairing double-strand breaks by microhomology-mediated end-joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Damon; Fu, Becky Xu Hua; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-12-15

    Maintenance of genome stability is carried out by a suite of DNA repair pathways that ensure the repair of damaged DNA and faithful replication of the genome. Of particular importance are the repair pathways, which respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and how the efficiency of repair is influenced by sequence homology. In this study, we developed a genetic assay in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to analyze DSBs requiring microhomologies for repair, known as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ). MMEJ repair efficiency increased concomitant with microhomology length and decreased upon introduction of mismatches. The central proteins in homologous recombination (HR), Rad52 and Rad51, suppressed MMEJ in this system, suggesting a competition between HR and MMEJ for the repair of a DSB. Importantly, we found that DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) is critical for MMEJ, independent of microhomology length and base-pairing continuity. MMEJ recombinants showed evidence that Pol δ proofreading function is active during MMEJ-mediated DSB repair. Furthermore, mutations in Pol δ and DNA polymerase 4 (Pol λ), the DNA polymerase previously implicated in MMEJ, cause a synergistic decrease in MMEJ repair. Pol λ showed faster kinetics associating with MMEJ substrates following DSB induction than Pol δ. The association of Pol δ depended on RAD1, which encodes the flap endonuclease needed to cleave MMEJ intermediates before DNA synthesis. Moreover, Pol δ recruitment was diminished in cells lacking Pol λ. These data suggest cooperative involvement of both polymerases in MMEJ. PMID:26607450

  1. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V.; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D.; Panyutin, Igor G.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC. PMID:26729112

  2. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2016-01-02

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC.

  3. Bcl2 inhibits recruitment of Mre11 complex to DNA double-strand breaks in response to high-linear energy transfer radiation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Maohua; Park, Dongkyoo; You, Shuo; Li, Rui; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Wang, Ya; Doetsch, Paul W.; Deng, Xingming

    2015-01-01

    High-linear energy transfer ionizing radiation, derived from high charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) particles, induces clustered/complex DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that include small DNA fragments, which are not repaired by the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway plays a major role in repairing DSBs induced by HZE particles. The Mre11 complex (Mre11/Rad50/NBS1)-mediated resection of DSB ends is a required step in preparing for DSB repair via the HR DNA repair pathway. Here we found that expression of Bcl2 results in decreased HR activity and retards the repair of DSBs induced by HZE particles (i.e. 56iron and 28silicon) by inhibiting Mre11 complex activity. Exposure of cells to 56iron or 28silicon promotes Bcl2 to interact with Mre11 via the BH1 and BH4 domains. Purified Bcl2 protein directly suppresses Mre11 complex-mediated DNA resection in vitro. Expression of Bcl2 reduces the ability of Mre11 to bind DNA following exposure of cells to HZE particles. Our findings suggest that, after cellular exposure to HZE particles, Bcl2 may inhibit Mre11 complex-mediated DNA resection leading to suppression of the HR-mediated DSB repair in surviving cells, which may potentially contribute to tumor development. PMID:25567982

  4. DNA double strand break repair defect and sensitivity to poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibition in human papillomavirus 16-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Alice N.; Cooper, Tiffiny S.; Rodriguez, Marcela; Trummell, Hoa Q.; Bonner, James A.; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Yang, Eddy S.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus-positive (HPV+) head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) have increased response to radio- and chemotherapy and improved overall survival, possibly due to an impaired DNA damage response. Here, we investigated the correlation between HPV status and repair of DNA damage in HNSCC cell lines. We also assessed in vitro and in vivo sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor veliparib (ABT-888) in HNSCC cell lines and an HPV+ patient xenograft. Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) was significantly delayed in HPV+ compared to HPV− HNSCCs, resulting in persistence of γH2AX foci. Although DNA repair activators 53BP1 and BRCA1 were functional in all HNSCCs, HPV+ cells showed downstream defects in both non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair. Specifically, HPV+ cells were deficient in protein recruitment and protein expression of DNA-Pk and BRCA2, key factors for non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination respectively. Importantly, the apparent DNA repair defect in HPV+ HNSCCs was associated with increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor veliparib, resulting in decreased cell survival in vitro and a 10–14 day tumor growth delay in vivo. These results support the testing of PARP inhibition in combination with DNA damaging agents as a novel therapeutic strategy for HPV+ HNSCC. PMID:26336991

  5. Isolation of mammalian cell mutants that are X-ray sensitive, impaired in DNA double-strand break repair and defective for V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Lee, S E; Pulaski, C R; He, D M; Benjamin, D M; Voss, M; Um, J; Hendrickson, E A

    1995-05-01

    The Chinese hamster lung V79-4 cell line was infected with a Moloney murine leukemia retrovirus and the infected cells were subsequently screened for mutants that were sensitive to X-rays using a toothpicking/96-well replica plating technique. Four independent mutants that were sensitive to X-irradiation (sxi-1 to sxi-4) were isolated from 9000 retrovirally infected colonies. A pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay demonstrated that all of the sxi mutants were impaired in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, thus providing a molecular explanation for the observed X-ray sensitivity. Interestingly, additional PFGE experiments demonstrated that for any given X-ray dose all of the mutants incurred more DNA DSBs than the parental V79-4 cell line indicating there may be some inherent fragility to sxi chromosomes. Cross-sensitivity to other DNA-damaging agents including bleomycin, mitomycin C and methyl methanesulfonate indicated that sxi-2, sxi-3 and sxi-4 appear to be specifically hypersensitive to genotoxic agents that cause DNA DSBs, whereas sxi-1 appeared to be hypersensitive to multiple types of DNA lesions. Lastly, in preliminary experiments all of the sxi mutants demonstrated an inability to carry out V(D)J recombination, a somatic DNA rearrangement process required for the assembly of lymphoid antigen receptor genes. Thus, the sxi cell lines have interesting phenotypes which should make them valuable tools for unraveling the mechanism(s) of DNA DSB repair and recombination in mammalian cells. PMID:7537861

  6. SWI/SNF recruitment to a DNA double-strand break by the NuA4 and Gcn5 histone acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Gwendolyn; Peterson, Craig L

    2015-06-01

    The DNA damage response to double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for cellular viability. Recent work has shown that a host of chromatin regulators are recruited to a DSB, and that they are important for the DNA damage response. However, the functional relationships between different chromatin regulators at DSBs remain unclear. Here we describe a conserved functional interaction among the chromatin remodeling enzyme, SWI/SNF, the NuA4 and Gcn5 histone acetyltransferases, and phosphorylation of histone H2A.X (γH2AX). Specifically, we find that the NuA4 and Gcn5 enzymes are both required for the robust recruitment of SWI/SNF to a DSB, which in turn promotes the phosphorylation of H2A.X.

  7. Efficient Rejoining of DNA Double-Strand Breaks despite Increased Cell-Killing Effectiveness following Spread-Out Bragg Peak Carbon-Ion Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Averbeck, Nicole B.; Topsch, Jana; Scholz, Michael; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Durante, Marco; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy of solid tumors with charged particles holds several advantages in comparison to photon therapy; among them conformal dose distribution in the tumor, improved sparing of tumor-surrounding healthy tissue, and an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the tumor target volume in the case of ions heavier than protons. A crucial factor of the biological effects is DNA damage, of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious. The reparability of these lesions determines the cell survival after irradiation and thus the RBE. Interestingly, using phosphorylated H2AX as a DSB marker, our data in human fibroblasts revealed that after therapy-relevant spread-out Bragg peak irradiation with carbon ions DSBs are very efficiently rejoined, despite an increased RBE for cell survival. This suggests that misrepair plays an important role in the increased RBE of heavy-ion radiation. Possible sources of erroneous repair will be discussed. PMID:26904506

  8. Detecting DNA Double-Stranded Breaks in Mammalian Genomes by Linear Amplification-mediated High-Throughput Genome-wide Translocation Sequencing (LAM-HTGTS)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiazhi; Meyers, Robin M.; Dong, Junchao; Panchakshari, Rohit A.; Alt, Frederick W.; Frock, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Unbiased, high-throughput assays to detect and quantify DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) genome-wide in mammalian cells will facilitate basic studies of mechanisms that generate and repair endogenous DSBs. They will also enable more applied studies, such as evaluating on- and off-target activities of engineered nucleases. Here we describe a linear amplification-mediated high-throughput genome-wide sequencing (LAM-HTGTS) method for detecting genome-wide “prey” DSBs via their translocation in cultured mammalian cells to a fixed “bait” DSB. Bait-prey junctions are cloned directly from isolated genomic DNA using LAM-PCR and unidirectionally ligated to bridge adapters; subsequent PCR steps amplify the single-stranded DNA junction library in preparation for Illumina paired-end Miseq sequencing. A custom bioinformatic pipeline identifies prey sequences that contribute to junctions and maps them across the genome. LAM-HTGTS differs from related approaches because it detects a wide range of broken end structures with nucleotide level resolution. Familiarity with nucleic acid methods and next-generation sequencing analysis are necessary for library generation and data interpretation. LAM-HTGTS assays are sensitive, reproducible, relatively inexpensive, scalable, and straightforward to implement with a turnaround time of less than one week. PMID:27031497

  9. Ghrelin Prevents Cisplatin-Induced Testicular Damage by Facilitating Repair of DNA Double Strand Breaks Through Activation of p53 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jose M; Chen, Ji-an; Guillory, Bobby; Donehower, Lawrence A; Smith, Roy G; Lamb, Dolores J

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin administration induces DNA damage resulting in germ cell apoptosis and subsequent testicular atrophy. Although 50 percent of male cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy develop long-term secondary infertility, medical treatment to prevent spermatogenic failure after chemotherapy is not available. Under normal conditions, testicular p53 promotes cell cycle arrest, which allows time for DNA repair and reshuffling during meiosis. However, its role in the setting of cisplatin-induced infertility has not been studied. Ghrelin administration ameliorates the spermatogenic failure that follows cisplatin administration in mice, but the mechanisms mediating these effects have not been well established. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mechanisms of ghrelin and p53 action in the testis after cisplatin-induced testicular damage. Here we show that cisplatin induces germ cell damage through inhibition of p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms involving gamma-H2AX and ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein kinase. As a result, testicular weight and sperm count and motility were decreased with an associated increase in sperm DNA damage. Ghrelin administration prevented these sequelae by restoring the normal expression of gamma-H2AX, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and p53, which in turn allows repair of DNA double stranded breaks. In conclusion, these findings indicate that ghrelin has the potential to prevent or diminish infertility caused by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic agents by restoring p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:26019260

  10. Do DNA double-strand breaks induced by Alu I lead to development of novel aberrations in the second and third post-treatment mitoses?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, A.; Bonk, K.; Mueller, M.U.; Streffer, C.; Obe, G.

    1996-02-01

    Several authors have reported that ionizing radiation can give rise to novel aberrations several mitotic divisions after the exposure. At our institute this phenomenon has been observed in mouse preimplantation embryos. This cell system is uniquely well suited for such investigations because the first three cell divisions show a high degree of synchrony. Thus the expression of chromosomal aberrations at the first, second and third mitosis after irradiation can be scored unambiguously. To investigate whether DNA double-strand breaks may be the lesions responsible for the delayed expression of chromosomal aberrations, we have studied the frequencies of aberrations in the first, second and third mitosis after treatment of one-cell mouse embryos with the restriction enzyme Alu I. Embryos were permeabilized with Streptolysin-O. The results indicate that the induction of double-strand breaks does not lead to novel aberrations in the third post-treatment mitosis. Several embryos scored at the second mitosis showed very high numbers of aberrations, indicating that Alu I may remain active in the cells for a period of one cell cycle. After treatment with Streptolysin-O alone, enhanced aberration frequencies were observed in the third post-treatment mitosis, suggesting that membrane damage has a delayed effect on the cellular integrity. 44 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Gamma irradiation induces DNA double-strand breaks in fibroblasts: a model study for the development of biodosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttayarat, P.; Tangtong, T.; Sukapirom, K.; Boonsirichai, K.

    2015-05-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) of DNAs induced by ionizing radiation can pose detrimental damages on organisms which include genetic instability and cell death. It is necessary to be able to assess health risks associated with irradiation from both accidental and therapeutic exposures in a timely manner for proper medical treatments. This present study showed the first attempt to develop a biodosimetric measure in Thailand based on the quantification of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) formed at DSB sites with an aim to establish a dose response curve using a two-dimensional (2D) cell culture model. Human dermal fibroblasts were grown into monolayers before irradiated by gamma rays from a Co-60 source in a custom-made lead chamber at doses 0, 0.2, 1, 2 and 4 Gy and a dose rate of 0.21 Gy/min. After 30 min post exposure, γ-H2AX proteins were immunofluorescently labelled for evaluation by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The accumulation of phosphorylated γ-H2AX proteins at DSBs appeared as nuclear foci with the most prominent intensity at 4 Gy. Linear regression analysis of flow cytometric data showed a linear response (R2 = 0.9862) of foci intensity in proportion to irradiation dose. In addition, the fraction of cell viability was shown to decrease at higher doses. This technique can be further developed as a quick assessment tool to identify individuals subjected to accidental radiation in parallel to other established biodosimetric measures.

  12. Common and unique genetic interactions of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases PARP1 and PARP2 with DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajib; Roy, Sanchita; Kamyab, Johan; Dantzer, Francoise; Franco, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    In mammalian cells, chromatin poly(ADP-ribos)ylation (PARylation) at sites of DNA Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs) is mediated by two highly related enzymes, PARP1 and PARP2. However, enzyme-specific genetic interactions with other DSB repair factors remain largely undefined. In this context, it was previously shown that mice lacking PARP1 and H2AX, a histone variant that promotes DSB repair throughout the cell cycle, or the core nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) factor Ku80 are not viable, while mice lacking PARP1 and the noncore NHEJ factor DNA-PKcs are severely growth retarded and markedly lymphoma-prone. Here, we have examined the requirement for PARP2 in these backgrounds. We find that, like PARP1, PARP2 is essential for viability in mice lacking H2AX. Moreover, treatment of H2AX-deficient primary fibroblasts or B lymphocytes with PARP inhibitors leads to activation of the G2/M checkpoint and accumulation of chromatid-type breaks in a lineage- and gene-dose dependent manner. In marked contrast to PARP1, loss of PARP2 does not result in additional phenotypes in growth, development or tumorigenesis in mice lacking either Ku80 or DNA-PKcs. Altogether these findings highlight specific nonoverlapping functions of PARP1 and PARP2 at H2AX-deficient chromatin during replicative phases of the cell cycle and uncover a unique requirement for PARP1 in NHEJ-deficient cells. PMID:27373144

  13. DNA Double-Strand Breaks by Cr(VI) Are Targeted to Euchromatin and Cause ATR-Dependent Phosphorylation of Histone H2AX and Its Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    DeLoughery, Zachary; Luczak, Michal W.; Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a human respiratory carcinogen that undergoes intracellular activation in vivo primarily via reduction with ascorbate. Replication of Cr-adducted DNA triggers mismatch repair that generates toxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as secondary lesions. Here, we examined the intranuclear distribution of chromate-induced breaks and a central DSB signaling branch targeting histone H2AX. Using ascorbate-restored cells (H460 human lung epithelial cells, normal human lung and normal mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs)), we found that Cr(VI) produced a typical DSB-associated spectrum of H2AX modifications, including its Ser139-phosphorylated (known as γH2AX) and mono- and diubiquitinated forms. However, whereas canonical DSB signaling relies on ATM, the formation of γH2AX and its ubiquitinated products by Cr(VI) was dependent on ATR kinase. Based on the established mode of ATR activation, this suggests that Cr-induced DSB are not blunt-ended and likely contain single-stranded tails. Confocal imaging with markers of active and inactive chromatin revealed a selective formation of Cr-induced DSB in euchromatin of mouse and human cells. In contrast to DSB, Cr-DNA adducts were produced in both types of chromatin. The euchromatin targeting of Cr-induced DSB makes these lesions particularly dangerous by increasing the probability of deleting active tumor suppressors and producing oncogenic translocations. Accumulation of transcription-inhibiting ubiquitinated forms of γH2AX in euchromatin is expected to contribute to the ability of Cr(VI) to suppress upregulation of inducible genes. PMID:25288669

  14. Modification of radiation-induced DNA double strand break repair pathways by chemicals extracted from Podophyllum hexandrum: an in vitro study in human blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nitya N; Shukla, Sandeep K; Yashavarddhan, M H; Devi, Memita; Tripathi, Rajendra P; Gupta, Manju L

    2014-06-01

    Radiation exposure is a serious threat to biomolecules, particularly DNA, proteins and lipids. Various exogenous substances have been reported to protect these biomolecules. In this study we explored the effect of pre-treatment with G-002M, a mixture of three active derivatives isolated from the rhizomes of Podophyllum hexandrum, on DNA damage response in irradiated human blood leukocytes. Blood was collected from healthy male volunteers, preincubated with G-002M and then irradiated with various doses of radiation. Samples were analyzed using flow cytometry to quantify DNA double strand break (DSB) biomarkers including γ-H2AX, P53BP1 and levels of ligase IV. Blood samples were irradiated in vitro and processed to determine time and dose-dependent kinetics. Semiquantitative RT-PCR was performed at various time points to measure gene expression of DNA-PKcs, Ku80, ATM, and 53BP1; each of these genes is involved in DNA repair signaling. Pre-treatment of blood with G-002M resulted in reduction of γ-H2AX and P53BP1 biomarkers levels and elevated ligase IV levels relative to non-G-002M-treated irradiated cells. These results confirm suppression in radiation-induced DNA DSBs. Samples pre-treated with G-002M and then irradiated also showed significant up-regulation of DNA-PKcs and Ku80 and downregulation of ATM and 53BP1 gene expressions, suggesting that G-002M plays a protective role against DNA damage. The protective effect of G-002M may be due to its ability to scavange radiation-induced free radicals or assist in DNA repair. Further studies are needed to decipher the role of G-002M on signaling molecules involved in radiation-induced DNA damage repair pathways.

  15. Effects of garlic on cellular doubling time and DNA strand breaks caused by UV light and BPL, enhanced with catechol and TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Baturay, N.Z.; Gayle, F.; Liu, S.; Kreidinger, C.

    1995-11-01

    3T3 cell cultures were exposed to UV light and Beta-Propiolactone. Neoplastic cell transformation (TF) was demonstrated after concurrent addition of catechol, or repeated addition of TPA. Addition of garlic to all fluences/concentrations of the carcinogen/cocarcinogen/promoter groups reduced the number of transformed foci/dish by at least 40%. Since the cell cycle is prolonged following exposure to carcinogens, it is likely the cell requires a longer time to repair this damage. The doubling time (DT) was extended from 12 to 36 hrs. when cells were exposed to BPL and from 12 o 28 hrs. when cells were exposed to 3.0J/M2/sec. If an anticarcinogenic compound is also added, it is reasonable to assume that the cell cycle may be further elongated. The cell cycle, denoted by DT was lengthened from 12 to 47 hrs and from 12 to 86 hrs for BPL and UVC, respectively. The extensions occurred in a dope dependent manner. The concentrations of the cocarcinogen and promoter remained constant throughout the experiment. When strand breaks were determined at the same dose sequences, by alkaline elution, more repair was seen with garlic where the lowest and middle doses of BPL were used and almost no decrease in % DNA eluted was seen with UVC exposed cells. With catechol, there was a two-fold decrease in % DNA eluted at the lowest and middle fluences. When TPA was added, all three fluences of UVC showed more than a threefold decrease in % DNA eluted. BPS with both TPA and catechol, again showed a reduction in strand breaks only low and middle doses. Both a direct-acting alkylating agent, BPL, and a physical carcinogen, UVC, were homogeneously affected, in terms of doubling time, but not when strand break repair was examined. A separate mechanism may be responsible for repair, and the mechanism associated with combinations of physical carcinogen enhancing agents combined with some non-carcinogens may be more profoundly affected by some natural products.

  16. Additive Effects of SbcCD and PolX Deficiencies in the In Vivo Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bentchikou, Esma; Servant, Pascale; Coste, Geneviève; Sommer, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Orthologs of proteins SbcD (Mre11) and SbcC (Rad50) exist in all kingdoms of life and are involved in a wide variety of DNA repair and maintenance functions, including homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining. Here, we have inactivated the sbcC and/or sbcD genes of Deinococcus radiodurans, a highly radioresistant bacterium able to mend hundreds of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Mutants devoid of the SbcC and/or SbcD proteins displayed reduced survival and presented a delay in kinetics of DSB repair and cell division following γ-irradiation. It has been recently reported that D. radiodurans DNA polymerase X (PolX) possesses a structure-modulated 3′-to-5′ exonuclease activity reminiscent of specific nuclease activities displayed by the SbcCD complex from Escherichia coli. We constructed a double mutant devoid of SbcCD and PolX proteins. The double-mutant ΔsbcCD ΔpolXDr (where Dr indicates D. radiodurans) bacteria are much more sensitive to γ-irradiation than the single mutants, suggesting that the deinococcal SbcCD and PolX proteins may play important complementary roles in processing damaged DNA ends. We propose that they are part of a backup repair system acting to rescue cells containing DNA lesions that are excessively numerous or difficult to repair. PMID:17483232

  17. P53 Binding Protein 1 (53bp1) Is an Early Participant in the Cellular Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Linda B.; Chehab, Nabil H.; Malikzay, Asra; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2000-01-01

    p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), a protein proposed to function as a transcriptional coactivator of the p53 tumor suppressor, has BRCT domains with high homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9p DNA damage checkpoint protein. To examine whether 53BP1 has a role in the cellular response to DNA damage, we probed its intracellular localization by immunofluorescence. In untreated primary cells and U2OS osteosarcoma cells, 53BP1 exhibited diffuse nuclear staining; whereas, within 5–15 min after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), 53BP1 localized at discreet nuclear foci. We propose that these foci represent sites of processing of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), because they were induced by IR and chemicals that cause DSBs, but not by ultraviolet light; their peak number approximated the number of DSBs induced by IR and decreased over time with kinetics that parallel the rate of DNA repair; and they colocalized with IR-induced Mre11/NBS and γ-H2AX foci, which have been previously shown to localize at sites of DSBs. Formation of 53BP1 foci after irradiation was not dependent on ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS1), or wild-type p53. Thus, the fast kinetics of 53BP1 focus formation after irradiation and the lack of dependency on ATM and NBS1 suggest that 53BP1 functions early in the cellular response to DNA DSBs. PMID:11134068

  18. Mechanism of action studies of lomaiviticin A and the monomeric lomaiviticin aglycon. Selective and potent activity toward DNA double-strand break repair-deficient cell lines.

    PubMed

    Colis, Laureen C; Hegan, Denise C; Kaneko, Miho; Glazer, Peter M; Herzon, Seth B

    2015-05-01

    (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) and the monomeric lomaiviticin aglycon [aka: (-)-MK7-206, (3)] are cytotoxic agents that induce double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA. Here we elucidate the cellular responses to these agents and identify synthetic lethal interactions with specific DNA repair factors. Toward this end, we first characterized the kinetics of DNA damage by 1 and 3 in human chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) cells. DSBs are rapidly induced by 3, reaching a maximum at 15 min post addition and are resolved within 4 h. By comparison, DSB production by 1 requires 2-4 h to achieve maximal values and >8 h to achieve resolution. As evidenced by an alkaline comet unwinding assay, 3 induces extensive DNA damage, suggesting that the observed DSBs arise from closely spaced single-strand breaks (SSBs). Both 1 and 3 induce ataxia telangiectasia mutated- (ATM-) and DNA-dependent protein kinase- (DNA-PK-) dependent production of phospho-SER139-histone H2AX (γH2AX) and generation of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) foci in K562 cells within 1 h of exposure, which is indicative of activation of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) repair. Both compounds also lead to ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related- (ATR-) dependent production of γH2AX at later time points (6 h post addition), which is indicative of replication stress. 3 is also shown to induce apoptosis. In accord with these data, 1 and 3 were found to be synthetic lethal with certain mutations in DNA DSB repair. 1 potently inhibits the growth of breast cancer type 2, early onset- (BRCA2-) deficient V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line derivative (VC8), and phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten- (PTEN-) deficient human glioblastoma (U251) cell lines, with LC50 values of 1.5 ± 0.5 and 2.0 ± 0.6 pM, respectively, and selectivities of >11.6 versus the isogenic cell lines transfected with and expressing functional BRCA2 and PTEN genes. 3 inhibits the growth of the same

  19. DNA double-strand breaks cooperate with loss of Ink4 and Arf tumor suppressors to generate glioblastomas with frequent Met amplification

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Cristel V.; Todorova, Pavlina K.; Gillam, Molly C.; Tomimatsu, Nozomi; del Alcazar, Carlos R Gil; Ilcheva, Mariya; Mukherjee, Bipasha; McEllin, Brian; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Hatanpaa, Kimmo; Story, Michael D.; Habib, Amyn A.; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Bachoo, Robert; Burma, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are highly radioresistant and lethal brain tumors. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a risk factor for the development of GBM. In this study, we systematically examined the contribution of IR-induced DSBs to GBM development using transgenic mouse models harboring brain-targeted deletions of key tumor suppressors frequently lost in GBM, namely Ink4a, Ink4b, Arf, and/or PTEN. Using low linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays to generate simple breaks or high LET Fe ions to generate complex breaks, we found that DSBs induce high-grade gliomas in these mice which, otherwise, do not develop gliomas spontaneously. Loss of Ink4a and Arf was sufficient to trigger IR-induced glioma development but additional loss of Ink4b significantly increased tumor incidence. We analyzed IR-induced tumors for copy number alterations (CNAs) to identify oncogenic changes that were generated and selected for as a consequence of stochastic DSB events. We found Met amplification to be the most significant oncogenic event in these radiation-induced gliomas. Importantly, Met activation resulted in expression of Sox2, a GBM cancer stem cell (CSC) marker, and was obligatory for tumor formation. In sum, these results indicate that radiation-induced DSBs cooperate with loss of Ink4 and Arf tumor suppressors to generate high-grade gliomas that are commonly driven by Met amplification and activation. PMID:24632607

  20. Joining of correct and incorrect DNA ends at double-strand breaks produced by high-linear energy transfer radiation in human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were measured within a 3.2-Mbp NotI fragment on chromosome 21 of cells of a normal human fibroblast cell line. Correct rejoining of DSBs was followed by measuring reconstitution of the original-size NotI fragment, and this was compared to total rejoining as measured by a conventional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis technique (FAR assay). After 80 Gy of particle irradiations with LETs in the range of 7-150 keV/microm, it was found that the repair kinetics was generally slower after irradiation with high-LET particles compared to X irradiation and that a larger proportion of the breaks remained unrepaired after 24 h. On the other hand, the misrejoining frequency as measured by the difference between correct and total rejoining after 24 h did not change with LET, but was approximately the same for all radiations at this dose, equal to 25-30% of the initial breaks. This result is discussed in relation to formation of chromosomal aberrations, deletion mutations and other biological end points.

  1. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression.

  2. Measurement of DNA Double-Strand Break Yield in Human Cancer Cells by High-Current, Short-Duration Bunches of Laser-Accelerated Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, Akifumi; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Maeda, Takuya; Sakaki, Hironao; Hori, Toshihiko; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Bolton, Paul R.; Kawanishi, Shunichi

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the radiobiological effects of high dose rates that are attributed to high current, short bunch beam generation with laser-dreven ion acceleration, we have developed an experimental setup that uses laser-accelerated protons. In-vitro human lung cancer cells: A549 pulmonary adenocarcinoma are irradiated with a laser-accelerated proton bunches with a duration of 2×10-8 s and flux of ˜1015 cm-2 s-1, amounting to single bunch absorbed dose at the 1 Gy level. The double-strand break (DSB) yield in cell DNA is analyzed for the laser-accelerated proton beam at an average LET of 41 keV/µm.

  3. Tracking the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break ends by ligation-mediated PCR: increased persistence of 3′-phosphoglycolate termini in SCAN1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Akopiants, Konstantin; Mohapatra, Susovan; Menon, Vijay; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; Povirk, Lawrence F.

    2014-01-01

    To track the processing of damaged DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends in vivo, a method was devised for quantitative measurement of 3′-phosphoglycolate (PG) termini on DSBs induced by the non-protein chromophore of neocarzinostatin (NCS-C) in the human Alu repeat. Following exposure of cells to NCS-C, DNA was isolated, and labile lesions were chemically stabilized. All 3′-phosphate and 3′-hydroxyl ends were enzymatically capped with dideoxy termini, whereas 3′-PG ends were rendered ligatable, linked to an anchor, and quantified by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction. Using this assay and variations thereof, 3′-PG and 3′-phosphate termini on 1-base 3′ overhangs of NCS-C-induced DSBs were readily detected in DNA from the treated lymphoblastoid cells, and both were largely eliminated from cellular DNA within 1 h. However, the 3′-PG termini were processed more slowly than 3′-phosphate termini, and were more persistent in tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1-mutant SCAN1 than in normal cells, suggesting a significant role for tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 in removing 3′-PG blocking groups for DSB repair. DSBs with 3′-hydroxyl termini, which are not directly induced by NCS-C, were formed rapidly in cells, and largely eliminated by further processing within 1 h, both in Alu repeats and in heterochromatic α-satellite DNA. Moreover, absence of DNA-PK in M059J cells appeared to accelerate resolution of 3′-PG ends. PMID:24371269

  4. Evaluation of DNA single and double strand breaks in women with cervical neoplasia based on alkaline and neutral comet assay techniques.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Hernández-Garza, Fernando; García-Pérez, Jorge O; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Aguado-Barrera, Miguel E; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M

    2012-01-01

    A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was performed in order to determine the relation of DNA single (ssb) and double (dsb) strand breaks in women with and without cervical neoplasia. Cervical epithelial cells of 30 women: 10 with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 without cervical lesions were evaluated using alkaline and neutral comet assays. A significant increase in global DNA damage (ssb + dsb) and dsb was observed in patients with HG-SIL (48.90 ± 12.87 and 23.50 ± 13.91), patients with LG-SIL (33.60 ± 14.96 and 11.20 ± 5.71), and controls (21.70 ± 11.87 and 5.30 ± 5.38; resp.). Pearson correlation coefficient reveled a strong relation between the levels ssb and dsb (r(2) = 0.99, P = 0.03, and r(2) = 0.94, P = 0.16, resp.) and progression of neoplasia. The increase of dsb damage in patients with HG-SIL was confirmed by DNA breakage detection-FISH (DBD-FISH) on neutral comets. Our results argue in favor of a real genomic instability in women with cervical neoplasia, which was strengthened by our finding of a higher proportion of DNA dsb. PMID:23093842

  5. Evaluation of DNA Single and Double Strand Breaks in Women with Cervical Neoplasia Based on Alkaline and Neutral Comet Assay Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Hernández-Garza, Fernando; García-Pérez, Jorge O.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Aguado-Barrera, Miguel E.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was performed in order to determine the relation of DNA single (ssb) and double (dsb) strand breaks in women with and without cervical neoplasia. Cervical epithelial cells of 30 women: 10 with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 without cervical lesions were evaluated using alkaline and neutral comet assays. A significant increase in global DNA damage (ssb + dsb) and dsb was observed in patients with HG-SIL (48.90 ± 12.87 and 23.50 ± 13.91), patients with LG-SIL (33.60 ± 14.96 and 11.20 ± 5.71), and controls (21.70 ± 11.87 and 5.30 ± 5.38; resp.). Pearson correlation coefficient reveled a strong relation between the levels ssb and dsb (r2 = 0.99, P = 0.03, and r2 = 0.94, P = 0.16, resp.) and progression of neoplasia. The increase of dsb damage in patients with HG-SIL was confirmed by DNA breakage detection-FISH (DBD-FISH) on neutral comets. Our results argue in favor of a real genomic instability in women with cervical neoplasia, which was strengthened by our finding of a higher proportion of DNA dsb. PMID:23093842

  6. Induction of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cellular Migration Through Bystander Effects in Cells Irradiated With the Slit-Type Microplanar Beam of the Spring-8 Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kashino, Genro Kondoh, Takeshi; Nariyama, Nobuteru; Umetani, Keiji; Ohigashi, Takuji; Shinohara, Kunio; Kurihara, Ai; Fukumoto, Manabu; Tanaka, Hiroki; Maruhashi, Akira; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Liu Yong; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Masami; Ono, Koji

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether glioma cells irradiated with a microplanar X-ray beam exert bystander effects. Methods and Materials: Microplanar beam irradiation of glioma cells in vitro was done using the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The amount of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) was measured by the fluorescence intensity of phosphorylated H2AX or the number of 53BP1 foci. The dose distribution in a cell population exposed to a single microplanar beam was determined by the amount of phosphorylated H2AX-positive cells. Bystander effects were determined by counting the number of 53BP1 foci in nonirradiated cells treated with conditioned medium from cultures of irradiated cells. Results: More DNA dsbs were detected in cells adjacent to an area irradiated by the single beam than in cells in distant, nonirradiated areas as a result of bystander effects caused by scattered X-rays and DNA dsbs. In support of this, more 53BP1 foci were observed in nonirradiated, conditioned medium-treated cells than in control cells (i.e., cells not treated with irradiation or conditioned medium). These results suggest that DNA dsbs were induced in nonirradiated cells by soluble factors in the culture medium. In addition, we observed cellular migration into areas irradiated with peak doses, suggesting that irradiated cells send signals that cause nonirradiated cells to migrate toward damaged cells. Conclusions: Bystander effects are produced by factors secreted as a result of slit-type microplanar X-ray beam irradiation.

  7. Collision of Trapped Topoisomerase 2 with Transcription and Replication: Generation and Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks with 5′ Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Tammaro, Margaret; Liao, Shuren

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 2 (Top2) is an essential enzyme responsible for manipulating DNA topology during replication, transcription, chromosome organization and chromosome segregation. It acts by nicking both strands of DNA and then passes another DNA molecule through the break. The 5′ end of each nick is covalently linked to the tyrosine in the active center of each of the two subunits of Top2 (Top2cc). In this configuration, the two sides of the nicked DNA are held together by the strong protein-protein interactions between the two subunits of Top2, allowing the nicks to be faithfully resealed in situ. Top2ccs are normally transient, but can be trapped by cancer drugs, such as etoposide, and subsequently processed into DSBs in cells. If not properly repaired, these DSBs would lead to genome instability and cell death. Here, I review the current understanding of the mechanisms by which DSBs are induced by etoposide, the unique features of such DSBs and how they are repaired. Implications for the improvement of cancer therapy will be discussed. PMID:27376333

  8. DNA double-strand break repair in parental chromatin of mouse zygotes, the first cell cycle as an origin of de novo mutation.

    PubMed

    Derijck, Alwin; van der Heijden, Godfried; Giele, Maud; Philippens, Marielle; de Boer, Peter

    2008-07-01

    In the human, the contribution of the sexes to the genetic load is dissimilar. Especially for point mutations, expanded simple tandem repeats and structural chromosome mutations, the contribution of the male germline is dominant. Far less is known about the male germ cell stage(s) that are most vulnerable to mutation contraction. For the understanding of de novo mutation induction in the germline, mechanistic insight of DNA repair in the zygote is mandatory. At the onset of embryonic development, the parental chromatin sets occupy one pronucleus (PN) each and DNA repair can be regarded as a maternal trait, depending on proteins and mRNAs provided by the oocyte. Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is executed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Differentiated somatic cells often resolve DSBs by NHEJ, whereas embryonic stem cells preferably use HR. We show NHEJ and HR to be both functional during the zygotic cell cycle. NHEJ is already active during replacement of sperm protamines by nucleosomes. The kinetics of G1 repair is influenced by DNA-PK(cs) hypomorphic activity. Both HR and NHEJ are operative in S-phase, HR being more active in the male PN. DNA-PK(cs) deficiency upregulates the HR activity. Both after sperm remodeling and at first mitosis, spontaneous levels of gammaH2AX foci (marker for DSBs) are high. All immunoflurescent indices of DNA damage and DNA repair point at greater spontaneous damage and induced repair activity in paternal chromatin in the zygote. PMID:18353795

  9. Nontoxic concentration of DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 radio-sensitizes lung tumor cells with little effect on double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Sunada, Shigeaki; Kanai, Hideki; Lee, Younghyun; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Liu, Cuihua; Fujimori, Akira; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2016-09-01

    High-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions have been increasingly employed as a useful alternative to conventional photon radiotherapy. As recent studies suggested that high LET radiation mainly affects the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, we further investigated this concept by evaluating the combined effect of an NHEJ inhibitor (NU7441) at a non-toxic concentration and carbon ions. NU7441-treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 and H1299 cells were irradiated with X-rays and carbon ions (290 MeV/n, 50 keV/μm). Cell survival was measured by clonogenic assay. DNA DSB repair, cell cycle distribution, DNA fragmentation and cellular senescence induction were studied using a flow cytometer. Senescence-associated protein p21 was detected by western blotting. In the present study, 0.3 μM of NU7441, nontoxic to both normal and tumor cells, caused a significant radio-sensitization in tumor cells exposed to X-rays and carbon ions. This concentration did not seem to cause inhibition of DNA DSB repair but induced a significant G2/M arrest, which was particularly emphasized in p53-null H1299 cells treated with NU7441 and carbon ions. In addition, the combined treatment induced more DNA fragmentation and a higher degree of senescence in H1299 cells than in A549 cells, indicating that DNA-PK inhibitor contributes to various modes of cell death in a p53-dependent manner. In summary, NSCLC cells irradiated with carbon ions were radio-sensitized by a low concentration of DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 through a strong G2/M cell cycle arrest. Our findings may contribute to further effective radiotherapy using heavy ions. PMID:27341700

  10. Repair of x-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks in specific Not I restriction fragments in human fibroblasts: joining of correct and incorrect ends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    An assay that allows measurement of absolute induction frequencies for DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in defined regions of the genome and that quantitates rejoining of correct DNA ends has been used to study repair of dsbs in normal human fibroblasts after x-irradiation. The approach involves hybridization of single-copy DNA probes to Not I restriction fragments separated according to size by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Induction of dsbs is quantitated from the decrease in the intensity of the hybridizing restriction fragment and an accumulation of a smear below the band. Rejoining of dsbs results in reconstitution of the intact restriction fragment only if correct DNA ends are joined. By comparing results from this technique with results from a conventional electrophoresis assay that detects all rejoining events, it is possible to quantitate the misrejoining frequency. Three Not I fragments on the long arm of chromosome 21 were investigated with regard to dsb induction, yielding an identical induction rate of 5.8 X 10(-3) break per megabase pair per Gy. Correct dsb rejoining was measured for two of these Not I fragments after initial doses of 80 and 160 Gy. The misrejoining frequency was about 25% for both fragments and was independent of dose. This result appears to be representative for the whole genome as shown by analysis of the entire Not I fragment distribution. The correct rejoining events primarily occurred within the first 2 h, while the misrejoining kinetics included a much slower component, with about half of the events occurring between 2 and 24 h. These misrejoining kinetics are similar to those previously reported for production of exchange aberrations in interphase chromosomes.

  11. Comet assay analysis of repair of DNA strand breaks in normal and deficient human cells exposed to radiations and chemicals. Evidence for a repair pathway specificity of DNA ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Nocentini, S.

    1995-11-01

    The induction and resealing of DNA strand breaks in a cell line with a proven defect in DNA ligase I, 46BR, and in two Bloom`s syndrome cell lines. YBL6 and GM 1492, were compared to those observed in normal human 1BR/3 fibroblasts after treatment with a variety of genotoxic agents whose lesions are processed by different repair pathways. This analysis was performed using the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. The three types of cells were found to have similar capabilities to recognize and incise ultraviolet photoproducts and also demonstrated similar amounts of DNA breaks immediately after {gamma} irradiation. During post-treatment incubation, 46BR cells showed a marked DNA re-ligation defect after ultraviolet radiation damage, GM 1492 cells demonstrated a highly reduced DNA joining ability after relatively high doses of ultraviolet radiation, and YBL6 cells were particularly affected in DNA re-ligation after damage by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide. The two Bloom`s syndrome cell lines and 46BR cells had a nearly normal ability to reseal breaks resulting from {gamma} irradiation or treatment with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase. These findings suggest that different DNA ligases may be involved in different DNA repair pathways in human cells. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Role of DNA damage and repair in the function of eukaryotic genes: radiation-induced single-strand breaks and their rejoining in chromosomal and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1980-04-01

    The production and rejoining of single-strand breaks (SSB) in chromosomal DNA and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were investigated after sublethal doses of ..gamma.. radiation to exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Hydrogen-3-labeled total nuclear DNA isolated from either control or irradiated cells was heat denatured and electrophoresed in agarose gels containing formaldehyde. Ribosomal DNA was identified by hybridization to (/sup 32/P)rRNA after transferring the DNA from the gels to nitrocellulose strips. It was found that (a) approximately 0.68 SSB is produced in each strand of rDNA exposed to 40 krad; (b) greater than 80% of SSB were rejoined within the first 20 min after irradiation in both chromosomal and rDNA; and (c) the rejoining process in both chromosomal and rDNA proceeded in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, RNA synthesis, or oxidative metabolism. While the majority of SSB induced by 40 krad is rejoined within 20 min after irradiation, the resumption of rRNA synthesis does not occur until 30 min thereafter; it is concluded that the restoration of the normal size of the rDNA template is probably necessary but not sufficient for the resumption of rRNA synthesis.

  13. Androgen receptor in Sertoli cells regulates DNA double-strand break repair and chromosomal synapsis of spermatocytes partially through intercellular EGF-EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Hao, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Shou-Long; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Yu-Qian; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2016-04-01

    Spermatogenesis does not progress beyond the pachytene stages of meiosis in Sertoli cell-specific AR knockout (SCARKO) mice. However, further evidence of meiotic arrest and underlying paracrine signals in SCARKO testes is still lacking. We utilized co-immunostaining of meiotic surface spreads to examine the key events during meiotic prophase I. SCARKO spermatocytes exhibited a failure in chromosomal synapsis observed by SCP1/SCP3 double-staining and CREST foci quantification. In addition, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were formed but were not repaired in the mutant spermatocytes, as revealed by γ-H2AX staining and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity examination. The later stages of DSB repair, such as the accumulation of the RAD51 strand exchange protein and the localization of mismatch repair protein MLH1, were correspondingly altered in SCARKO spermatocytes. Notably, the expression of factors that guide RAD51 loading onto sites of DSBs, including TEX15, BRCA1/2 and PALB2, was severely impaired when either AR was down-regulated or EGF was up-regulated. We observed that some ligands in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family were over-expressed in SCARKO Sertoli cells and that some receptors in the EGF receptor (EGFR) family were ectopically activated in the mutant spermatocytes. When EGF-EGFR signaling was repressed to approximately normal by the specific inhibitor AG1478 in the cultured SCARKO testis tissues, the arrested meiosis was partially rescued, and functional haploid cells were generated. Based on these data, we propose that AR in Sertoli cells regulates DSB repair and chromosomal synapsis of spermatocytes partially through proper intercellular EGF-EGFR signaling.

  14. Androgen receptor in Sertoli cells regulates DNA double-strand break repair and chromosomal synapsis of spermatocytes partially through intercellular EGF-EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Hao, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Shou-Long; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Yu-Qian; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2016-04-01

    Spermatogenesis does not progress beyond the pachytene stages of meiosis in Sertoli cell-specific AR knockout (SCARKO) mice. However, further evidence of meiotic arrest and underlying paracrine signals in SCARKO testes is still lacking. We utilized co-immunostaining of meiotic surface spreads to examine the key events during meiotic prophase I. SCARKO spermatocytes exhibited a failure in chromosomal synapsis observed by SCP1/SCP3 double-staining and CREST foci quantification. In addition, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were formed but were not repaired in the mutant spermatocytes, as revealed by γ-H2AX staining and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity examination. The later stages of DSB repair, such as the accumulation of the RAD51 strand exchange protein and the localization of mismatch repair protein MLH1, were correspondingly altered in SCARKO spermatocytes. Notably, the expression of factors that guide RAD51 loading onto sites of DSBs, including TEX15, BRCA1/2 and PALB2, was severely impaired when either AR was down-regulated or EGF was up-regulated. We observed that some ligands in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family were over-expressed in SCARKO Sertoli cells and that some receptors in the EGF receptor (EGFR) family were ectopically activated in the mutant spermatocytes. When EGF-EGFR signaling was repressed to approximately normal by the specific inhibitor AG1478 in the cultured SCARKO testis tissues, the arrested meiosis was partially rescued, and functional haploid cells were generated. Based on these data, we propose that AR in Sertoli cells regulates DSB repair and chromosomal synapsis of spermatocytes partially through proper intercellular EGF-EGFR signaling. PMID:26959739

  15. Analysis of micronuclei and DNA single-strand breaks in mouse splenocytes and peripheral lymphocytes after oral administration of tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram).

    PubMed

    Villani, P; Andreoli, C; Crebelli, R; Pacchierotti, F; Zijno, A; Carere, A

    1998-03-01

    The fungicide thiram (tetramethylthiuram disulfide, TMTD) was administered by repeated oral intubations to groups of male B6C3F1 mice at 100, 300 and 900 mg/kg body weight for 4 consecutive days, or at 300 mg/kg for 8 and 12 days. 24 hr after the last treatment animals were killed, and splenocyte cultures were set up for the analysis of micronuclei by the cytokinesis-block method. DNA single strand breaks (ssb) and alkali labile sites were also analysed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay in splenocytes and lymphocytes of animals receiving the 8- and 12-day treatments. Parallel experiments with human peripheral lymphocytes were carried out to assess the ability of thiram to induce micronuclei and DNA ssb and alkaline labile sites under in vitro conditions. No significant increase of micronucleated splenocytes was observed in treated animals, despite some evidence of treatment-related cellular toxicity. A borderline excess of DNA damage was suggested by the Comet assay on circulating lymphocytes, whereas negative results were obtained with splenocytes. In vitro, positive results with both genetic end points were obtained in assays with human lymphocytes in the dose ranges 0.5-24 microg/ml and 0.1-8 microg/ml for micronucleus and Comet assays, respectively. These results suggest that thiram, despite its established genotoxicity in vitro, is devoid of appreciable clastogenic and/or aneugenic activity in vivo after oral administration to mice at the maximum tolerated dose.

  16. Recruitment of the cohesin loading factor NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks depends on MDC1, RNF168 and HP1{gamma} in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Mitsutake, Norisato; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} NIPBL is recruited to DSBs. {yields} Localization of NIPBL to DSBs is regulated by MDC1 and RNF168. {yields} HP1{gamma} is required for NIPBL accumulation at DSBs. -- Abstract: The cohesin loading factor NIPBL is required for cohesin to associate with chromosomes and plays a role in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Although the NIPBL homolog Scc2 is recruited to an enzymatically generated DSB and promotes cohesin-dependent DSB repair in yeast, the mechanism of the recruitment remains poorly understood. Here we show that the human NIPBL is recruited to the sites of DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation as well as to the sites of DSBs induced by homing endonuclease, I-PpoI. The recruitment of NIPBL was impaired by RNAi-mediated knockdown of MDC1 or RNF168, both of which also accumulate at DSBs. We also show that the recruitment of NIPBL to the sites of DNA damage is mediated by its C-terminal region containing HEAT repeats and Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) interacting motif. Furthermore, NIPBL accumulation at damaged sites was also compromised by HP1{gamma} depletion. Taken together, our study reveals that human NIPBL is a novel protein recruited to DSB sites, and the recruitment is controlled by MDC1, RNF168 and HP1{gamma}.

  17. A fine-scale dissection of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery and its implications for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Srihari, Sriganesh; Cao, Kim-Anh Lê; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simpson, Peter T.; Ragan, Mark A.; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2014-01-01

    DNA-damage response machinery is crucial to maintain the genomic integrity of cells, by enabling effective repair of even highly lethal lesions such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Defects in specific genes acquired through mutations, copy-number alterations or epigenetic changes can alter the balance of these pathways, triggering cancerous potential in cells. Selective killing of cancer cells by sensitizing them to further DNA damage, especially by induction of DSBs, therefore requires careful modulation of DSB-repair pathways. Here, we review the latest knowledge on the two DSB-repair pathways, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining in human, describing in detail the functions of their components and the key mechanisms contributing to the repair. Such an in-depth characterization of these pathways enables a more mechanistic understanding of how cells respond to therapies, and suggests molecules and processes that can be explored as potential therapeutic targets. One such avenue that has shown immense promise is via the exploitation of synthetic lethal relationships, for which the BRCA1–PARP1 relationship is particularly notable. Here, we describe how this relationship functions and the manner in which cancer cells acquire therapy resistance by restoring their DSB repair potential. PMID:24792170

  18. Promotion of DNA strand breaks in cocultured mononuclear leukocytes by protein kinase C-dependent prooxidative interactions of benoxaprofen, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, G.; Beyers, A.D.; Anderson, R.; Nel, A.E.

    1988-06-01

    At concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml and greater the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug benoxaprofen caused dose-related activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Benoxaprofen-mediated activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence by PMNL was increased by UV radiation and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by the selective protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. To identify the molecular mechanism of the prooxidative activity of benoxaprofen, the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug on the activity of purified protein kinase C in a cell-free system were investigated. Benoxaprofen caused a dose-related activation of protein kinase C by interaction with the binding site for the physiological activator phosphatidylserine, but could not replace diacylglycerol. When autologous mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) were cocultured with PMNL and benoxaprofen in combination, but not individually, the frequency of DNA strand breaks in MNL was markedly increased. UV radiation significantly potentiated damage to DNA mediated by benoxaprofen and PMNL. Inclusion of superoxide dismutase, H-7, and, to a much lesser extent, catalase during exposure of MNL to benoxaprofen-activated PMNL prevented oxidant damage to DNA. These results clearly demonstrate that potentially carcinogenic prooxidative interactions, which are unlikely to be detected by conventional assays of mutagenicity, may occur between phagocytes, UV radiation, and certain pharmacological agents.

  19. New mechanism of γ-H2AX generation: Surfactant-induced actin disruption causes deoxyribonuclease I translocation to the nucleus and forms DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoxu; Yang, Gang; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We previously showed that nonionic surfactants, nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs), induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX, forming γ-H2AX. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of γ-H2AX generation by an NPEO with 15 ethylene oxide units (NPEO(15)). In MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, NPEO(15) treatment induced γ-H2AX in a dose-dependent manner. EDTA and ZnCl2, two inhibitors of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I), inhibited both the γ-H2AX and DNA double-strand breaks induced by NPEO(15). NPEO(15) disrupted filamentous actin and released free DNase I as detected by cell fractionation analysis. Based on immunofluorescence staining of DNase I and monitoring DNase I-GFP localization, DNase I was translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus of cells after treatment with NPEO(15). This translocation did not occur with the common DNA damage inducers ultraviolet B irradiation and hydrogen peroxide. Other surfactants, Tween 20, Triton X-100 and Nonidet P-40, also generated γ-H2AX. These results show that γ-H2AX induction by surfactants including NPEOs, occurs via a new mechanism involving release of free DNase I with actin disruption. This mechanism is distinct from the process of γ-H2AX generation caused by direct chemically induced DNA damage.

  20. New mechanism of γ-H2AX generation: Surfactant-induced actin disruption causes deoxyribonuclease I translocation to the nucleus and forms DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoxu; Yang, Gang; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We previously showed that nonionic surfactants, nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs), induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX, forming γ-H2AX. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of γ-H2AX generation by an NPEO with 15 ethylene oxide units (NPEO(15)). In MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, NPEO(15) treatment induced γ-H2AX in a dose-dependent manner. EDTA and ZnCl2, two inhibitors of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I), inhibited both the γ-H2AX and DNA double-strand breaks induced by NPEO(15). NPEO(15) disrupted filamentous actin and released free DNase I as detected by cell fractionation analysis. Based on immunofluorescence staining of DNase I and monitoring DNase I-GFP localization, DNase I was translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus of cells after treatment with NPEO(15). This translocation did not occur with the common DNA damage inducers ultraviolet B irradiation and hydrogen peroxide. Other surfactants, Tween 20, Triton X-100 and Nonidet P-40, also generated γ-H2AX. These results show that γ-H2AX induction by surfactants including NPEOs, occurs via a new mechanism involving release of free DNase I with actin disruption. This mechanism is distinct from the process of γ-H2AX generation caused by direct chemically induced DNA damage. PMID:26653977

  1. Depletion of Histone Demethylase Jarid1A Resulting in Histone Hyperacetylation and Radiation Sensitivity Does Not Affect DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Penterling, Corina; Drexler, Guido A.; Böhland, Claudia; Stamp, Ramona; Wilke, Christina; Braselmann, Herbert; Caldwell, Randolph B.; Reindl, Judith; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Siebenwirth, Christian; Mansour, Wael Y.; Borgmann, Kerstin; Dollinger, Günther; Unger, Kristian; Friedl, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Histone demethylases have recently gained interest as potential targets in cancer treatment and several histone demethylases have been implicated in the DNA damage response. We investigated the effects of siRNA-mediated depletion of histone demethylase Jarid1A (KDM5A, RBP2), which demethylates transcription activating tri- and dimethylated lysine 4 at histone H3 (H3K4me3/me2), on growth characteristics and cellular response to radiation in several cancer cell lines. In unirradiated cells Jarid1A depletion lead to histone hyperacetylation while not affecting cell growth. In irradiated cells, depletion of Jarid1A significantly increased cellular radiosensitivity. Unexpectedly, the hyperacetylation phenotype did not lead to disturbed accumulation of DNA damage response and repair factors 53BP1, BRCA1, or Rad51 at damage sites, nor did it influence resolution of radiation-induced foci or rejoining of reporter constructs. We conclude that the radiation sensitivity observed following depletion of Jarid1A is not caused by a deficiency in repair of DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:27253695

  2. Fine-Structure Mapping of Meiosis-Specific Double-Strand DNA Breaks at a Recombination Hotspot Associated with an Insertion of Telomeric Sequences Upstream of the His4 Locus in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Xu, F.; Petes, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). Using two approaches, we mapped the position of DSBs associated with a recombination hotspot created by insertion of telomeric sequences into the region upstream of HIS4. We found that the breaks have no obvious sequence specificity and localize to a region of ~50 bp adjacent to the telomeric insertion. By mapping the breaks and by studies of the exonuclease III sensitivity of the broken ends, we conclude that most of the broken DNA molecules have blunt ends with 3'-hydroxyl groups. PMID:8807286

  3. H2A.Z depletion impairs proliferation and viability but not DNA double-strand breaks repair in human immortalized and tumoral cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Taty-Taty, Gemael-Cedrick; Courilleau, Celine; Quaranta, Muriel; Carayon, Alexandre; Chailleux, Catherine; Aymard, François; Trouche, Didier; Canitrot, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian cells, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can be repaired by 2 main pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). To give access to DNA damage to the repair machinery the chromatin structure needs to be relaxed, and chromatin modifications play major roles in the control of these processes. Among the chromatin modifications, changes in nucleosome composition can influence DNA damage response as observed with the H2A.Z histone variant in yeast. In mammals, p400, an ATPase of the SWI/SNF family able to incorporate H2A.Z in chromatin, was found to be important for histone ubiquitination and BRCA1 recruitment around DSB or for HR in cooperation with Rad51. Recent data with 293T cells showed that mammalian H2A.Z is recruited to DSBs and is important to control DNA resection, therefore participating both in HR and NHEJ. Here we show that depletion of H2A.Z in the osteosarcoma U2OS cell line and in immortalized human fibroblasts does not change parameters of DNA DSB repair while affecting clonogenic ability and cell cycle distribution. In addition, no recruitment of H2A.Z around DSB can be detected in U2OS cells either after local laser irradiation or by chromatin immunoprecipitation. These data suggest that the role of H2A.Z in DSB repair is not ubiquitous in mammals. In addition, given that important cellular parameters, such as cell viability and cell cycle distribution, are more sensitive to H2A.Z depletion than DNA repair, our results underline the difficulty to investigate the role of versatile factors such as H2A.Z. PMID:24240188

  4. Homologous recombination in plant cells is enhanced by in vivo induction of double strand breaks into DNA by a site-specific endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Puchta, H; Dujon, B; Hohn, B

    1993-01-01

    Induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) is coupled to meiotic and mitotic recombination in yeast. We show that also in a higher eukaryote induction of DSBs is directly correlated with a strong enhancement of recombination frequencies. We cotransfected Nicotiana plumbaginifolia protoplasts with a plasmid carrying a synthetic I-SceI gene, coding for a highly sequence specific endonuclease, together with recombination substrates carrying an I-SceI-site adjacent to their homologous sequences. We measured efficiencies of extrachromosomal recombination, using a well established transient beta-glucuronidase (GUS) assay. GUS enzyme activities were strongly increased when a plasmid carrying the I-SceI gene in sense but not in antisense orientation with respect to the promoter was included in the transfections. The in vivo induced DSBs were detected in the recombination substrates by Southern blotting, demonstrating that the yeast enzyme is functional in plant cells. At high ratios of transfected I-SceI-genes to I-SceI-sites the majority of the I-SceI-sites in the recombination substrates are cleaved, indicating that the induction of the DSBs is the rate limiting step in the described recombination reaction. These results imply that in vivo induction of transient breaks at specific sites in the plant genome could allow foreign DNA to be targeted to these sites via homologous recombination. Images PMID:8255757

  5. The nucleotide mapping of DNA double-strand breaks at the CYS3 initiation site of meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    de Massy, B; Rocco, V; Nicolas, A

    1995-01-01

    Initiation of meiotic recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs by localized DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at several locations in the genome, corresponding to hot spots for meiotic gene conversion and crossing over. The meiotic DSBs occur in regions of chromatin that are hypersensitive to nucleases. To gain insight into the molecular mechanism involved in the formation of these DSBs, we have determined their positions at the nucleotide level at the CYS3 hot spot of gene conversion on chromosome I. We found four major new features of these DSBs: (i) sites of DSBs are multiple with varying intensities and spacing within the promoter region of the CYS3 gene; (ii) no consensus sequence can be found at these sites, indicating that the activity involved in DSB formation has little or no sequence specificity; (iii) the breaks are generated by blunt cleavages; and (iv) the 5' ends are modified in rad50S mutant strains, where the processing of these ends is known to be prevented. We present a model for the initiation of meiotic recombination taking into account the implications of these results. Images PMID:7556102

  6. Effect of vanillin on methylene blue plus light-induced single-strand breaks in plasmid pBR322 DNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S S; Ghosh, A; Devasagayam, T P; Chauhan, P S

    2000-09-20

    The ability of vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), a naturally occurring food flavouring agent, in inhibiting photosensitization-induced single-strand breaks (ssbs) in plasmid pBR322 DNA has been examined in an in vitro system, independent of DNA repair/replication processes. Photosensitization of DNA with methylene blue, visible light and oxygen, induced ssbs resulting in the production of open circular form (OC form) in a concentration-dependent manner. The yield of OC form induced by photosensitization was increased several-fold by deuteration of the buffer and was found to be inhibited by sodium azide, a scavenger of singlet oxygen (1O(2)). Vanillin, per se, did not induce but inhibited photosensitization-induced ssbs in plasmid DNA, at millimolar concentrations. The inhibitory effect of vanillin was both concentration- and time-dependent. On a molar basis, vanillin was, however, less effective than trolox, a water-soluble analogue of alpha-tocopherol. Photosensitization by methylene blue system generates singlet oxygen, as one of the major components of ROS. Therefore, interaction of singlet oxygen with vanillin was investigated. The rate constant of vanillin with 1O(2) was estimated to be 5.93x10(7)M(-1)s(-1) and that of sodium azide as 2. 7x10(8)M(-1)s(-1). The present investigations show that vanillin can protect against photosensitization-induced ssbs in the plasmid pBR322 DNA, and this effect may partly be due to its ability to scavenge 1O(2).

  7. Marked contribution of alternative end-joining to chromosome-translocation-formation by stochastically induced DNA double-strand-breaks in G2-phase human cells.

    PubMed

    Soni, Aashish; Siemann, Maria; Pantelias, Gabriel E; Iliakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces double strand breaks (DSBs) in cellular DNA, which if not repaired correctly can cause chromosome translocations leading to cell death or cancer. Incorrect joining of DNA ends generating chromosome translocations can be catalyzed either by the dominant DNA-PKcs-dependent, classical non-homologous end-joining (c-NHEJ), or by an alternative end-joining (alt-EJ) process, functioning as backup to abrogated c-NHEJ, or homologous recombination repair. Alt-EJ operates with slower kinetics as compared to c-NHEJ and generates larger alterations at the junctions; it is also considered crucial to chromosome translocation-formation. A recent report posits that this view only holds for rodent cells and that in human cells c-NHEJ is the main mechanism of chromosome translocation formation. Since this report uses designer nucleases that induce DSBs with unique characteristics in specific genomic locations and PCR to detect translocations, we revisit the issue using stochastically distributed DSBs induced in the human genome by IR during the G2-phase of the cell cycle. For visualization and analysis of chromosome translocations, which manifest as chromatid translocations in cells irradiated in G2, we employ classical cytogenetics. In wild-type cells, we observe a significant contribution of alt-EJ to translocation formation, as demonstrated by a yield-reduction after treatment with inhibitors of Parp, or of DNA ligases 1 and 3 (Lig1, Lig3). Notably, a nearly fourfold increase in translocation formation is seen in c-NHEJ mutants with defects in DNA ligase 4 (Lig4) that remain largely sensitive to inhibitors of Parp, and of Lig1/Lig3. We conclude that similar to rodent cells, chromosome translocation formation from randomly induced DSBs in human cells largely relies on alt-EJ. We discuss DSB localization in the genome, characteristics of the DSB and the cell cycle as potential causes of the divergent results generated with IR and designer nucleases

  8. Dual Targeting of Akt and mTORC1 Impairs Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Increases Radiation Sensitivity of Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Marina; Grottke, Astrid; Mueck, Katharina; Manes, Julia; Jücker, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin-complex 1 (mTORC1) induces activation of Akt. Because Akt activity mediates the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) and consequently the radioresistance of solid tumors, we investigated whether dual targeting of mTORC1 and Akt impairs DNA-DSB repair and induces radiosensitization. Combining mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin with ionizing radiation in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells (H661, H460, SK-MES-1, HTB-182, A549) and in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 resulted in radiosensitization of H661 and H460 cells (responders), whereas only a very slight effect was observed in A549 cells, and no effect was observed in SK-MES-1, HTB-182 or MDA-MB-231 cells (non-responders). In responder cells, rapamycin treatment did not activate Akt1 phosphorylation, whereas in non-responders, rapamycin mediated PI3K-dependent Akt activity. Molecular targeting of Akt by Akt inhibitor MK2206 or knockdown of Akt1 led to a rapamycin-induced radiosensitization of non-responder cells. Compared to the single targeting of Akt, the dual targeting of mTORC1 and Akt1 markedly enhanced the frequency of residual DNA-DSBs by inhibiting the non-homologous end joining repair pathway and increased radiation sensitivity. Together, lack of radiosensitization induced by rapamycin was associated with rapamycin-mediated Akt1 activation. Thus, dual targeting of mTORC1 and Akt1 inhibits repair of DNA-DSB leading to radiosensitization of solid tumor cells. PMID:27137757

  9. A new method for high-resolution imaging of Ku foci to decipher mechanisms of DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most toxic of all genomic insults, and pathways dealing with their signaling and repair are crucial to prevent cancer and for immune system development. Despite intense investigations, our knowledge of these pathways has been technically limited by our inability to detect the main repair factors at DSBs in cells. In this paper, we present an original method that involves a combination of ribonuclease- and detergent-based preextraction with high-resolution microscopy. This method allows direct visualization of previously hidden repair complexes, including the main DSB sensor Ku, at virtually any type of DSB, including those induced by anticancer agents. We demonstrate its broad range of applications by coupling it to laser microirradiation, super-resolution microscopy, and single-molecule counting to investigate the spatial organization and composition of repair factories. Furthermore, we use our method to monitor DNA repair and identify mechanisms of repair pathway choice, and we show its utility in defining cellular sensitivities and resistance mechanisms to anticancer agents. PMID:23897892

  10. Creation and repair of specific DNA double-strand breaks in vivo following infection with adenovirus vectors expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, A L; Munz, P L; Falck-Pedersen, E; Young, C S

    2000-01-01

    To study DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO endonuclease gene, or its recognition site, was cloned into the adenovirus E3 or E1 regions. Analysis of DNA from human A549 cells coinfected with the E3::HO gene and site viruses showed that HO endonuclease was active and that broken viral genomes were detectable 12 h postinfection, increasing with time up to approximately 30% of the available HO site genomes. Leftward fragments of approximately 30 kbp, which contain the packaging signal, but not rightward fragments of approximately 6 kbp, were incorporated into virions, suggesting that broken genomes were not held together tightly after cleavage. There was no evidence for DSB repair in E3::HO virus coinfections. In contrast, such evidence was obtained in E1::HO virus coinfections of nonpermissive cells, suggesting that adenovirus proteins expressed in the permissive E3::HO coinfection can inhibit mammalian DSB repair. To test the inhibitory role of E4 proteins, known to suppress genome concatemer formation late in infection (Weiden and Ginsberg, 1994), A549 cells were coinfected with E3::HO viruses lacking the E4 region. The results strongly suggest that the E4 protein(s) inhibits DSB repair.

  11. Non-canonical uracil processing in DNA gives rise to double-strand breaks and deletions: relevance to class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Kallenberger, Lia; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2016-01-01

    During class switch recombination (CSR), antigen-stimulated B-cells rearrange their immunoglobulin constant heavy chain (CH) loci to generate antibodies with different effector functions. CSR is initiated by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines in switch (S) regions, repetitive sequences flanking the CH loci, to uracils. Although U/G mispairs arising in this way are generally efficiently repaired to C/Gs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG)-initiated base excision repair (BER), uracil processing in S-regions of activated B-cells occasionally gives rise to double strand breaks (DSBs), which trigger CSR. Surprisingly, genetic experiments revealed that CSR is dependent not only on AID and UNG, but also on mismatch repair (MMR). To elucidate the role of MMR in CSR, we studied the processing of uracil-containing DNA substrates in extracts of MMR-proficient and –deficient human cells, as well as in a system reconstituted from recombinant BER and MMR proteins. Here, we show that the interplay of these repair systems gives rise to DSBs in vitro and to genomic deletions and mutations in vivo, particularly in an S-region sequence. Our findings further suggest that MMR affects pathway choice in DSB repair. Given its amenability to manipulation, our system represents a powerful tool for the molecular dissection of CSR. PMID:26743004

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors decrease NHEJ both by acetylation of repair factors and trapping of PARP1 at DNA double-strand breaks in chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Carine; Nagaria, Pratik K.; Pawar, Nisha; Adewuyi, Adeoluwa; Gojo, Ivana; Meyers, David J.; Cole, Philip A.; Rassool, Feyruz V.

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins, and modulate the acetylation of proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the main pathways for repairing DSBs. Decreased NHEJ activity has been reported with HDACi treatment. However, mechanisms through which these effects are regulated in the context of chromatin are unclear. We show that pan-HDACi, trichostatin A (TSA), causes differential acetylation of DNA repair factors Ku70/Ku80 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1), and impairs NHEJ. Repair effects are reversed by treatments with p300/CBP inhibitor C646, with significantly decreased acetylation of PARP1. In keeping with these findings, TSA treatment significantly increases PARP1 binding to DSBs in chromatin. Notably, AML patients treated with HDACi entinostat (MS275) in vivo also show increased formation of poly ADP-ribose (PAR) that co-localizes with DSBs. Further, we demonstrate that PARP1 bound to chromatin increases with duration of TSA exposure, resembling PARP “trapping”. Knockdown of PARP1 inhibits trapping and mitigates HDACi effects on NHEJ. Finally, combination of HDACi with potent PARP inhibitor talazoparib (BMN673) shows a dose-dependent increase in PARP “trapping”, which correlates with increased apoptosis. These results provide a mechanism through which HDACi inhibits deacetylation and increases binding of PARP1 to DSBs, leading to decreased NHEJ and cytotoxicity of leukemia cells. PMID:27064363

  13. The rate of X-ray-induced DNA double-strand break repair in the embryonic mouse brain is unaffected by exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Following in utero exposure to low dose radiation (10–200 mGy), we recently observed a linear induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and activation of apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. No significant induction of DSB or apoptosis was observed following exposure to magnetic fields (MF). In the present study, we exploited this in vivo system to examine whether exposure to MF before and after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays impacts upon DSB repair rates. Materials and methods: 53BP1 foci were quantified following combined exposure to radiation and MF in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. Embryos were exposed in utero to 50 Hz MF at 300 μT for 3 h before and up to 9 h after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays. Controls included embryos exposed to MF or X-rays alone plus sham exposures. Results: Exposure to MF before and after 100 mGy X-rays did not impact upon the rate of DSB repair in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment compared to repair rates following radiation exposure alone. Conclusions: We conclude that in this sensitive system MF do not exert any significant level of DNA damage and do not impede the repair of X-ray induced damage. PMID:25786477

  14. The RSF1 Histone-Remodelling Factor Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Recruiting Centromeric and Fanconi Anaemia Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Fabio; Lowndes, Noel F.

    2014-01-01

    ATM is a central regulator of the cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here we identify a biochemical interaction between ATM and RSF1 and we characterise the role of RSF1 in this response. The ATM–RSF1 interaction is dependent upon both DSBs and ATM kinase activity. Together with SNF2H/SMARCA5, RSF1 forms the RSF chromatin-remodelling complex. Although RSF1 is specific to the RSF complex, SNF2H/SMARCA5 is a catalytic subunit of several other chromatin-remodelling complexes. Although not required for checkpoint signalling, RSF1 is required for efficient repair of DSBs via both end-joining and homology-directed repair. Specifically, the ATM-dependent recruitment to sites of DSBs of the histone fold proteins CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, previously identified at centromeres, is RSF1-dependent. In turn these proteins recruit and regulate the mono-ubiquitination of the Fanconi Anaemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI. We propose that by depositing CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, the RSF complex either directly or indirectly contributes to the reorganisation of chromatin around DSBs that is required for efficient DNA repair. PMID:24800743

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibitors decrease NHEJ both by acetylation of repair factors and trapping of PARP1 at DNA double-strand breaks in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Robert, Carine; Nagaria, Pratik K; Pawar, Nisha; Adewuyi, Adeoluwa; Gojo, Ivana; Meyers, David J; Cole, Philip A; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2016-06-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins, and modulate the acetylation of proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the main pathways for repairing DSBs. Decreased NHEJ activity has been reported with HDACi treatment. However, mechanisms through which these effects are regulated in the context of chromatin are unclear. We show that pan-HDACi, trichostatin A (TSA), causes differential acetylation of DNA repair factors Ku70/Ku80 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1), and impairs NHEJ. Repair effects are reversed by treatments with p300/CBP inhibitor C646, with significantly decreased acetylation of PARP1. In keeping with these findings, TSA treatment significantly increases PARP1 binding to DSBs in chromatin. Notably, AML patients treated with HDACi entinostat (MS275) in vivo also show increased formation of poly ADP-ribose (PAR) that co-localizes with DSBs. Further, we demonstrate that PARP1 bound to chromatin increases with duration of TSA exposure, resembling PARP "trapping". Knockdown of PARP1 inhibits trapping and mitigates HDACi effects on NHEJ. Finally, combination of HDACi with potent PARP inhibitor talazoparib (BMN673) shows a dose-dependent increase in PARP "trapping", which correlates with increased apoptosis. These results provide a mechanism through which HDACi inhibits deacetylation and increases binding of PARP1 to DSBs, leading to decreased NHEJ and cytotoxicity of leukemia cells.

  16. Non-canonical uracil processing in DNA gives rise to double-strand breaks and deletions: relevance to class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Kallenberger, Lia; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2016-04-01

    During class switch recombination (CSR), antigen-stimulated B-cells rearrange their immunoglobulin constant heavy chain (CH) loci to generate antibodies with different effector functions. CSR is initiated by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines in switch (S) regions, repetitive sequences flanking the CH loci, to uracils. Although U/G mispairs arising in this way are generally efficiently repaired to C/Gs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG)-initiated base excision repair (BER), uracil processing in S-regions of activated B-cells occasionally gives rise to double strand breaks (DSBs), which trigger CSR. Surprisingly, genetic experiments revealed that CSR is dependent not only on AID and UNG, but also on mismatch repair (MMR). To elucidate the role of MMR in CSR, we studied the processing of uracil-containing DNA substrates in extracts of MMR-proficient and -deficient human cells, as well as in a system reconstituted from recombinant BER and MMR proteins. Here, we show that the interplay of these repair systems gives rise to DSBs in vitro and to genomic deletions and mutations in vivo, particularly in an S-region sequence. Our findings further suggest that MMR affects pathway choice in DSB repair. Given its amenability to manipulation, our system represents a powerful tool for the molecular dissection of CSR.

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitors decrease NHEJ both by acetylation of repair factors and trapping of PARP1 at DNA double-strand breaks in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Robert, Carine; Nagaria, Pratik K; Pawar, Nisha; Adewuyi, Adeoluwa; Gojo, Ivana; Meyers, David J; Cole, Philip A; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2016-06-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins, and modulate the acetylation of proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the main pathways for repairing DSBs. Decreased NHEJ activity has been reported with HDACi treatment. However, mechanisms through which these effects are regulated in the context of chromatin are unclear. We show that pan-HDACi, trichostatin A (TSA), causes differential acetylation of DNA repair factors Ku70/Ku80 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1), and impairs NHEJ. Repair effects are reversed by treatments with p300/CBP inhibitor C646, with significantly decreased acetylation of PARP1. In keeping with these findings, TSA treatment significantly increases PARP1 binding to DSBs in chromatin. Notably, AML patients treated with HDACi entinostat (MS275) in vivo also show increased formation of poly ADP-ribose (PAR) that co-localizes with DSBs. Further, we demonstrate that PARP1 bound to chromatin increases with duration of TSA exposure, resembling PARP "trapping". Knockdown of PARP1 inhibits trapping and mitigates HDACi effects on NHEJ. Finally, combination of HDACi with potent PARP inhibitor talazoparib (BMN673) shows a dose-dependent increase in PARP "trapping", which correlates with increased apoptosis. These results provide a mechanism through which HDACi inhibits deacetylation and increases binding of PARP1 to DSBs, leading to decreased NHEJ and cytotoxicity of leukemia cells. PMID:27064363

  18. The Transcriptional Histone Acetyltransferase Cofactor TRRAP Associates with the MRN Repair Complex and Plays a Role in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Flavie; Hardy, Sara; Nagy, Zita; Baldeyron, Céline; Murr, Rabih; Déry, Ugo; Masson, Jean-Yves; Papadopoulo, Dora; Herceg, Zdenko; Tora, Làszlò

    2006-01-01

    Transactivation-transformation domain-associated protein (TRRAP) is a component of several multiprotein histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes implicated in transcriptional regulation. TRRAP was shown to be required for the mitotic checkpoint and normal cell cycle progression. MRE11, RAD50, and NBS1 (product of the Nijmegan breakage syndrome gene) form the MRN complex that is involved in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By using double immunopurification, mass spectrometry, and gel filtration, we describe the stable association of TRRAP with the MRN complex. The TRRAP-MRN complex is not associated with any detectable HAT activity, while the isolated other TRRAP complexes, containing either GCN5 or TIP60, are. TRRAP-depleted extracts show a reduced nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity in vitro. Importantly, small interfering RNA knockdown of TRRAP in HeLa cells or TRRAP knockout in mouse embryonic stem cells inhibit the DSB end-joining efficiency and the precise nonhomologous end-joining process, further suggesting a functional involvement of TRRAP in the DSB repair processes. Thus, TRRAP may function as a molecular link between DSB signaling, repair, and chromatin remodeling. PMID:16382133

  19. Use of a ring chromosome and pulsed-field gels to study interhomolog recombination, double-strand DNA breaks and sister-chromatid exchange in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Game, J.C. ); Sitney, K.C.; Cook, V.E.; Mortimer, R.K. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors describe a system that uses pulsed-field gels for the physical detection of recombinant DNA molecules, double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) and sister-chromatid exchange in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system makes use of a circular variant of chromosome II (Chr. III). Meiotic recombination between this ring chromosome and a linear homolog produces new molecules of sizes distinguishable on gels from either parental molecule. They demonstrate that these recombinant molecules are not present either in strains with two linear Chr. III molecules or in rad50 mutants, which are defective in meiotic recombination. In conjunction with the molecular endpoints. They present data on the timing of commitment to meiotic recombination scored genetically. They have used x-rays to linearize circular Chr. III, both to develop a sensitive method for measuring frequency of DSB and as a means of detecting double-size circles originating in part from sister-chromatid exchange, which they find to be frequent during meiosis.

  20. Increased DNA double-strand break was associated with downregulation of repair and upregulation of apoptotic factors in rat hippocampus after alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; N'Gouemo, Prosper; Datta, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Binge drinking is known to cause damage in critical areas of the brain, including the hippocampus, which is important for relational memory and is reported to be sensitive to alcohol toxicity. However, the roles of DNA double-strand break (DSB) and its repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in alcohol-induced hippocampal injury remain to be elucidated. The purpose of this first study was to assess alcohol-induced DNA DSB and the mechanism by which alcohol affects DSB repair pathways in rat hippocampus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (8-10 weeks old) were put on a 4-day binge ethanol treatment regimen. Control animals were maintained under similar conditions but were given the vehicle without ethanol. All animals were humanely euthanized 24 h after the last dose of ethanol administration and the hippocampi were dissected for immunoblot and immunohistochemistry analysis. Ethanol exposure caused increased 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) staining as well as elevated γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in hippocampal cells. Immunoblot analysis showed decreased Mre11, Rad51, Rad50, and Ku86 as well as increased Bax and p21 in samples from ethanol-treated rats. Additionally, we also observed increased activated caspase3 staining in hippocampal cells 24 h after ethanol withdrawal. Taken together, our data demonstrated that ethanol concurrently induced DNA DSB, downregulated DSB repair pathway proteins, and increased apoptotic factors in hippocampal cells. We believe these findings will provide the impetus for further research on DNA DSB and its repair pathways in relation to alcohol toxicity in brain. PMID:27565756

  1. In vitro binding kinetics of DNA double strand break repair proteins Ku70/80 and DNA-PKcs quantified by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2012-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal types of DNA damage that occurs in eukaryotic cells. There are two distinct pathways of repairing DSBs, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In the NHEJ repairing pathway, DSB recognition and repair initiation is directed by the interaction of DNAbinding subunit Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-PK protein catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Mutations in these proteins result in repair stalling and eventual DNA misrepair that may lead to genomic instability. Studying the binding kinetics of these repair proteins is therefore important for understanding the conditions under which DSB repair stalls. Currently open questions are, what is the minimum DNA length that this complex needs to get a foothold onto a DSB and how tightly does DNA-PKcs bind onto the DNA-Ku70/80 complex. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS) techniques have the potential to give information about the binding kinetics of DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions at the single-molecule level. In this work, FCS/FCCS measurements were performed to explore the minimum DNA base-pair (bp) length that Ku70/80 needed as a foothold to bind effectively onto the tips of different lengths of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments that mimic DSBs. 25 bp, 33 bp and 50 bp of dsDNA were used for these experiments and binding was studied as a function of salt concentration in solution. It was found that the 25 bp binding was weak even at physiological salt concentrations while the dissociation constant (Kd) remained constant for 33 and 50 bp dsDNA strand lengths. These studies indicated that the minimum binding length for the Ku70/8 is in the vicinity of 25 bp. The specificity of binding of Ku70/80 was proven by competitive binding FCCS experiments between Cy5-labeled DNA, GFP-Ku70/80 and titrations of unlabeled Ku70/80. Finally, using FCCS it was possible to estimate

  2. Reparation in unicellular green algae during chronic exposure to the action of mutagenic factors. II. Restoration of single-stranded DNA breaks following exposure of Chlamydomonas reinchardii to gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeeva, S.A.; Ptitsina, S.N.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1986-12-01

    The restoration of single-stranded breaks in the DNA in different strains of unicellular green algae (chlamydomonads) during chronic exposure to the action of mutagenic factors following ..gamma..-irradiation was investigated. It was shown that the restoration of DNA breaks was most effective in the case of strain M ..gamma../sup mt/sup +//, which is resistant to radiation. Strains, that were sensitive to UV irradiation showed a similar order of DNA break restoration as the wild-type strain. Strain UVS-1 showed a higher level of restoration than the wild-type strain. The data indicated that chlamydomonads have different pathways of reparation, which lead to the restoration of breaks induced by ..gamma..-irradiation and UV-rays.

  3. Molecular dosimetry of DNA damage caused by alkylation. I. Single-strand breaks induced by ethylating agents in cultured mammalian cells in relation to survival.

    PubMed

    Abbondandolo, A; Dogliotti, E; Lohman, P H; Berends, F

    1982-02-22

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with ethylating agents. DNA lesions giving rise to single-strand breaks (ssb) or alkali-labile sites were measured by centrifugation in alkaline sucrose gradients after lysis in alkali. 4 agents with different tendencies to ethylate preferentially either at N or O atoms were compared, namely N-ethyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and diethyl sulphonate (DES). The compounds differed greatly in their potency to induce the lesions measured when compared on a molar basis, but comparison at equicytotoxic doses showed relatively small differences. Upon prolonged incubation of the DNA in alkali, the number of ssb increased considerably. DNA from untreated cells showed biphasic kinetics: slow ssb formation for about 10 h, then the rate increased and remained constant for up to 40 h. Treated cells showed an accelerated, dose-dependent linear generation of ssb for 10 h, followed by a short plateau; then ssb were formed again at a constant rate, somewhat higher than that in controls. Ssb formed in the initial phase are ascribed to phosphotriester hydrolysis, those after the plateau to unidentified causes. Zero intercepts appeared to be a measure of apurinic sites generated intracellularly. A 24-h repair period preceding lysis reduced the ENNG intercept, but not that of DES. Rapid degradation of DES during the 1-h treatment occurred, so most "apurinic-site lesions" were induced in the beginning of exposure and possibly were already repaired at the end. The types of lesion distinguished (reparable and non-reparable apurinic sites, phosphotriesters) appeared of little consequence for cell survival. PMID:7201070

  4. Role of Human DNA Glycosylase Nei-like 2 (NEIL2) and Single Strand Break Repair Protein Polynucleotide Kinase 3′-Phosphatase in Maintenance of Mitochondrial Genome*

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Santi M.; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Chatterjee, Arpita; Hegde, Pavana M.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Banerjee, Dibyendu; Boldogh, Istvan; Gao, Rui; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Sarkar, Partha S.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2012-01-01

    The repair of reactive oxygen species-induced base lesions and single strand breaks (SSBs) in the nuclear genome via the base excision (BER) and SSB repair (SSBR) pathways, respectively, is well characterize, and important for maintaining genomic integrity. However, the role of mitochondrial (mt) BER and SSBR proteins in mt genome maintenance is not completely clear. Here we show the presence of the oxidized base-specific DNA glycosylase Nei-like 2 (NEIL2) and the DNA end-processing enzyme polynucleotide kinase 3′-phosphatase (PNKP) in purified human mitochondrial extracts (MEs). Confocal microscopy revealed co-localization of PNKP and NEIL2 with the mitochondrion-specific protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (MT-CO2). Further, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed association of NEIL2 and PNKP with the mitochondrial genes MT-CO2 and MT-CO3 (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3); importantly, both enzymes also associated with the mitochondrion-specific DNA polymerase γ. In cell association of NEIL2 and PNKP with polymerase γ was further confirmed by proximity ligation assays. PNKP-depleted ME showed a significant decrease in both BER and SSBR activities, and PNKP was found to be the major 3′-phosphatase in human ME. Furthermore, individual depletion of NEIL2 and PNKP in human HEK293 cells caused increased levels of oxidized bases and SSBs in the mt genome, respectively. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the critical role of NEIL2 and PNKP in maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome. PMID:22130663

  5. Targeting Aberrant DNA double strand break repair in triple negative breast cancer with alpha particle emitter radiolabeled anti-EGFR antibody

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Hedayati, Mohammad; Hobbs, Robert F.; Shao, Chunbo; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Sgouros, George

    2013-01-01

    The higher potential efficacy of alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy lies in the 3 to 8-fold greater biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles relative to photon or beta-particle radiation. This greater RBE, however, also applies to normal tissue, thereby reducing the potential advantage of high RBE. Since alpha particles typically cause DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), targeting tumors that are defective in DSB repair effectively increases the RBE, yielding a secondary, RBE-based differentiation between tumor and normal tissue that is complementary to conventional, receptor-mediated tumor targeting. In some triple negative breast cancers (TNBC, ER−/PR−/HER-2−), germline mutation in BRCA-1, a key gene in homologous recombination (HR) DSB repair, predisposes patients to early onset of breast cancer. These patients have few treatment options once the cancer has metastasized. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of alpha particle emitter, 213Bi labeled anti-EGFR antibody, Cetuximab, in BRCA-1 defective TNBC. 213Bi-Cetuximab was found to be significantly more effective in the BRCA-1 mutated TNBC cell line HCC1937 than BRCA-1 competent TNBC cell MDA-MB-231. siRNA knockdown of BRCA-1 or DNA-PKcs, a key gene in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway, also sensitized TNBC cells to 213Bi-Cetuximab. Furthermore, the small molecule inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, NU7441, sensitized BRCA-1 competent TNBC cells to alpha particle radiation. Immunofluorescent staining of γH2AX foci and comet assay confirmed that enhanced RBE is caused by impaired DSB repair. These data offer a novel strategy for enhancing conventional receptor-mediated targeting with an additional, potentially synergistic radiobiological targeting that could be applied to TNBC. PMID:23873849

  6. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    PubMed

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'.

  7. Increased sensitivity of BRCA defective triple negative breast tumors to plumbagin through induction of DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB)

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rakesh Sathish; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Jose, Jedy; Somasundaram, Veena; Hemalatha, Sreelatha K.; Sengodan, Satheesh Kumar; Nadhan, Revathy; Anilkumar, Thapasimuthu V.; Srinivas, Priya

    2016-01-01

    We have earlier shown that Plumbagin (PB) can induce selective cytotoxicity to BRCA1 defective ovarian cancer cells; however, the effect of this molecule in BRCA1 mutated breast cancers has not been analyzed yet. Here, we report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by PB resulted in DNA DSB and activates downstream signaling by ATR/ATM kinases and subsequent apoptosis. PB reduces DNA- dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) expression and inhibits NHEJ (Non Homologous End Joining) activity in BRCA1 defective breast cancer cells. Also, PB induces apoptosis in two different BRCA1 conditional knock out murine models: MMTV-Cre; BRCA1Co/Co and WAP-Cre; BRCA1Co/Co, at 2 mg/kg body weight, but 32 mg/kg of carboplatin (CN) was needed to induce apoptosis in them. This is the first study where two different tissue specific promoter driven transgenic mice models with BRCA1 exon 11 deletions are used for preclinical drug testing. The apoptosis induced by PB in HR (Homologous Recombination) defective triple negative BRCA1 mutant cell lines and in mouse models occur by inducing ROS mediated DNA DSB. The toxicity profile as compared with CN in transgenic mice provides evidence for PB’s safer disposition as a therapeutic lead in breast cancer drug development. PMID:27220670