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Sample records for strandberg kaarel tammar

  1. The vomeronasal organ of the tammar wallaby

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Nanette Y; Fletcher, Terence P; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ is the primary olfactory organ that detects sexual pheromones in mammals. We investigated the anatomy of the vomeronasal organ of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), a small macropodid marsupial. Pheromones may be important for activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis of tammar males at the start of the breeding season because plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone concentration in males rise concurrently with pregnancy and the post-partum ovulation in females. The gross anatomy and the connection to the brain of the vomeronasal organ were examined by light and electron microscopy in adult male and female tammars. The vomeronasal organ was well developed in both sexes. The vomeronasal organ is a tubular organ connected at the rostral end via the nasopalatine duct (incisive duct) to the mouth and nasal cavity. At the rostral end the lumen of the vomeronasal organ was crescent shaped, changing to a narrow oval shape caudally. Glandular tissue associated with the vomeronasal organ increased towards the blind end of the organ. The tammar has the typical pattern of mammalian vomeronasal organs with electron-dense supporting cells and electron-lucent receptor cells. Microvilli were present on the surface of both epithelia while cilia were only found on the surface of the non-receptor epithelium. Some non-receptor epithelial cells appeared to secrete mucus into the vomeronasal organ lumen. The vomeronasal organ shows a high degree of structural conservation compared with eutherian mammals. The degree of vomeronasal organ development makes it likely that, as in other mammals, pheromones are important in the reproduction of the tammar. PMID:19172728

  2. Development of the penile urethra in the tammar wallaby.

    PubMed

    Leihy, M W; Shaw, G; Wilson, J D; Renfree, M B

    2011-01-01

    Hypospadias is increasingly common, and requires surgery to repair, but its aetiology is poorly understood. The marsupial tammar wallaby provides a unique opportunity to study hypospadias because penile differentiation occurs postnatally. Androgens are responsible for penile development in the tammar, but the majority of differentiation, in particular formation and closure of the urethral groove forming the penile urethra in males, occurs when there is no measurable sex difference in the concentrations of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone in either the gonads or the circulation [corrected]. Phalluses were examined morphologically from the sexually indifferent period (when androgens are high) to well after the time that the phallus becomes sexually dimorphic. We show that penile development and critical changes in the positioning of the urethra occur in the male phallus begin during an early window of time when androgens are high. Remodelling of the urethra in the male occurs between days 20-60. The critical period of time for the establishment urethral closure occurs during the earliest phases of penile development. This study suggests that there is an early window of time before day 60 when androgen imprinting must occur for normal penile development and closure of the urethral groove.

  3. Development of the penile urethra in the tammar wallaby.

    PubMed

    Leihy, M W; Shaw, G; Wilson, J D; Renfree, M B

    2011-01-01

    Hypospadias is increasingly common, and requires surgery to repair, but its aetiology is poorly understood. The marsupial tammar wallaby provides a unique opportunity to study hypospadias because penile differentiation occurs postnatally. Androgens are responsible for penile development in the tammar, but the majority of differentiation, in particular formation and closure of the urethral groove forming the penile urethra in males, occurs when there is no measurable sex difference in the concentrations of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone in either the gonads or the circulation [corrected]. Phalluses were examined morphologically from the sexually indifferent period (when androgens are high) to well after the time that the phallus becomes sexually dimorphic. We show that penile development and critical changes in the positioning of the urethra occur in the male phallus begin during an early window of time when androgens are high. Remodelling of the urethra in the male occurs between days 20-60. The critical period of time for the establishment urethral closure occurs during the earliest phases of penile development. This study suggests that there is an early window of time before day 60 when androgen imprinting must occur for normal penile development and closure of the urethral groove. PMID:22116535

  4. Urolithiasis in a captive group of Tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Liptovszky, Mátyás; Sós, Endre; Bende, Balázs; Perge, Edina; Molnár, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a well-known disease of the urogenital system in domestic animals, and it has also been described in captive and free-ranging wildlife. This article reports 15 cases of urolithiasis in a captive group of Tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) between 2004 and 2011. The analyzed stones were composed of pure calcium carbonate (n = 5), calcium carbonate with traces of calcium phosphate (n = 6), carbonate apatite (n = 2), and carbonate apatite mixed with calcium oxalate (n = 2). In 12 out of 15 cases uroliths were situated only in the renal pelvis; in two cases they were found in the renal pelvis and the ureter; while in one case in the ureter only. No common infectious agents were identified either by microbiological or histopathological methods. Although the exact cause remains unknown, the repetitive occurrence of calcium carbonate urolithiasis suggests husbandry-related causes. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on recurrent appearance of urolithiasis in a captive group of Tammar wallabies. PMID:25105843

  5. The extracellular matrix locally regulates asynchronous concurrent lactation in tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Wanyonyi, Stephen S; Lefevre, Christophe; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2013-08-01

    Asynchronous concurrent lactation (ACL) is an extreme lactation strategy in macropod marsupials including the tammar wallaby, that may hold the key to understanding local control of mammary epithelial cell function. Marsupials have a short gestation and a long lactation consisting of three phases; P2A, P2B and P3, representing early, mid and late lactation respectively and characterised by profound changes in milk composition. A lactating tammar is able to concurrently produce phase 2A and 3 milk from adjacent glands in order to feed a young newborn and an older sibling at heel. Physiological effectors of ACL remain unknown and in this study the extracellular matrix (ECM) is investigated for its role in switching mammary phenotypes between phases of tammar wallaby lactation. Using the level of expression of the genes for the phase specific markers tELP, tWAP, and tLLP-B representing phases 2A, 2B and 3 respectively we show for the first time that tammar wallaby mammary epithelial cells (WallMECs) extracted from P2B acquire P3 phenotype when cultured on P3 ECM. Similarly P2A cells acquire P2B phenotype when cultured on P2B ECM. We further demonstrate that changes in phase phenotype correlate with phase-specific changes in ECM composition. This study shows that progressive changes in ECM composition in individual mammary glands provide a local regulatory mechanism for milk protein gene expression thereby enabling the mammary glands to lactate independently. PMID:23665481

  6. Interactions of sperm and the reproductive ducts of the male tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii (Macropodidae: Marsupialia).

    PubMed

    Jones, R C; Clulow, J

    1994-01-01

    This review compares sperm production in the tammar wallaby and eutherian mammals, particularly the rat. The capacity of sperm to fertilize an ovum when they leave the testis and the changes they undergo in the epididymidis are considered. The structural differentiation and regulation of the extratesticular duct system is assessed and related to the reabsorption and secretion of water, inorganic ions and proteins, and the interaction of sperm and proteins synthesized and secreted by the epididymidis. Adaptations of the cauda epididymidis for storing spermatozoa are also considered. It is suggested that the tammar may be a good animal model to study the suppression of sperm motility and metabolism in the cauda epididymidis as it is possible to collect from them luminal samples of sperm which are initially immotile and then spontaneously activate during incubation in vitro.

  7. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, Veronica J.; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L.; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S.; Pask, Andrew J.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall; Waters, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis–brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  8. Uterine morphology during diapause and early pregnancy in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Laird, Melanie K; Hearn, Cyrma M; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-09-01

    In mammals, embryonic diapause, or suspension of embryonic development, occurs when embryos at the blastocyst stage are arrested in growth and metabolism. In the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), there are two separate uteri, only one of which becomes gravid with the single conceptus at a post-partum oestrus, so changes during pregnancy can be compared between the gravid and non-gravid uterus within the same individual. Maintenance of the viable blastocyst and inhibition of further conceptus growth during diapause in the tammar is completely dependent on the uterine environment. Although the specific endocrine and seasonal signals are well established, much less is known about the cellular changes required to create this environment. Here we present the first detailed study of uterine morphology during diapause and early pregnancy of the tammar wallaby. We combined transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy to describe the histological and ultrastructural changes to luminal and glandular epithelial cells. At entry into diapause after the post-partum oestrus and formation of the new conceptus, there was an increase in abundance of organelles associated with respiration in the endometrial cells of the newly gravid uterus, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, as well as an increase in secretory activity. Organelle changes and active secretion then ceased in these cells as they became quiescent and remained so for the duration of diapause. In contrast, cells of the non-gravid, post-partum, contralateral uterus underwent sloughing and remodelling during this time and some organelle changes in glandular epithelial cells continued throughout diapause, suggesting these cells are not completely quiescent during diapause, although no active secretion occurred. These findings demonstrate that diapause, like pregnancy, is under unilateral endocrine control in the tammar, and that preparation for and maintenance of diapause requires

  9. Identification and expression of a novel marsupial cathelicidin from the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)

    PubMed Central

    Carman, Rebecca L.; Old, Julie M.; Baker, Michelle; Jacques, Nicholas A.; Deane, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Cathelicidins are important components of the innate immune system and have been identified in skin and epithelia of a range of mammals. In this study molecular techniques, including RACE-PCR, were used to identify the full cDNA sequence of a cathelicidin gene, MaeuCath8, from the Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. This cathelicidin was not homologous to other such genes previously isolated from a tammar wallaby mammary gland EST library, however, it did contain 4 conserved cysteine residues which characterise the pre-propeptide and had 80% identity with a previously isolated bandicoot cathelicidin. Reverse transcriptase-PCR established the expression profile of MaeuCath8 in a range of tissues, including spleen, thymus, gastrointestinal tract, skin and liver, of the tammar wallaby from birth to adulthood. Expression of MaeuCath8 was observed in spleen and gastrointestinal tract of newborn animals and was observed in most tissues by 7 days post-partum. The results indicate that pouch young could synthesize their own antimicrobial peptides from an early age suggesting that this ability most likely plays a role in protecting the pouch young from infection prior to the development of immunocompetence. PMID:19046773

  10. Comparative analysis of caveolins in mouse and tammar wallaby: role in regulating mammary gland function.

    PubMed

    Kuruppath, Sanjana; Sharp, Julie A; Lefevre, Christophe; Murphy, Robyn M; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2014-11-15

    Recent studies using the mouse showed an inverse correlation between the Caveolin 1 gene expression and lactation, and this was regulated by prolactin. However, current study using mammary explants from pregnant mice showed that while insulin (I), cortisol (F) and prolactin (P) resulted in maximum induction of the β-casein gene, FP and IFP resulted in the downregulation of Caveolin 1. Additionally, IF, FP and IFP resulted in the downregulation of Caveolin 2. Immunohistochemistry confirmed localisation of Caveolin 1 specific to myoepithelial cells and adipocytes. Comparative studies with the tammar wallaby showed Caveolin 1 and 2 had 70-80% homology with the mouse proteins. However, in contrast to the mouse, Caveolin 1 and 2 genes showed a significantly increased level of expression in the mammary gland during lactation. The regulation of tammar Caveolin 1 and 2 gene expression was examined in mammary explants from pregnant tammars, and no significant difference was observed either in the absence or in the presence of IFP. PMID:25200498

  11. Transcriptomic analysis supports similar functional roles for the two thymuses of the tammar wallaby

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The thymus plays a critical role in the development and maturation of T-cells. Humans have a single thoracic thymus and presence of a second thymus is considered an anomaly. However, many vertebrates have multiple thymuses. The tammar wallaby has two thymuses: a thoracic thymus (typically found in all mammals) and a dominant cervical thymus. Researchers have known about the presence of the two wallaby thymuses since the 1800s, but no genome-wide research has been carried out into possible functional differences between the two thymic tissues. Here, we used pyrosequencing to compare the transcriptomes of a cervical and thoracic thymus from a single 178 day old tammar wallaby. Results We show that both the tammar thoracic and the cervical thymuses displayed gene expression profiles consistent with roles in T-cell development. Both thymuses expressed genes that mediate distinct phases of T-cells differentiation, including the initial commitment of blood stem cells to the T-lineage, the generation of T-cell receptor diversity and development of thymic epithelial cells. Crucial immune genes, such as chemokines were also present. Comparable patterns of expression of non-coding RNAs were seen. 67 genes differentially expressed between the two thymuses were detected, and the possible significance of these results are discussed. Conclusion This is the first study comparing the transcriptomes of two thymuses from a single individual. Our finding supports that both thymuses are functionally equivalent and drive T-cell development. These results are an important first step in the understanding of the genetic processes that govern marsupial immunity, and also allow us to begin to trace the evolution of the mammalian immune system. PMID:21854594

  12. Functional gene analysis suggests different acetogen populations in the bovine rumen and tammar wallaby forestomach.

    PubMed

    Gagen, Emma J; Denman, Stuart E; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Zadbuke, Someshwar; Al Jassim, Rafat; Morrison, Mark; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-12-01

    Reductive acetogenesis via the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway is an alternative hydrogen sink to methanogenesis in the rumen. Functional gene-based analysis is the ideal approach for investigating organisms capable of this metabolism (acetogens). However, existing tools targeting the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene (fhs) are compromised by lack of specificity due to the involvement of formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) in other pathways. Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) is unique to the acetyl-CoA pathway and, in the present study, acetyl-CoA synthase genes (acsB) were recovered from a range of acetogens to facilitate the design of acsB-specific PCR primers. fhs and acsB libraries were used to examine acetogen diversity in the bovine rumen and forestomach of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), a native Australian marsupial demonstrating foregut fermentation analogous to rumen fermentation but resulting in lower methane emissions. Novel, deduced amino acid sequences of acsB and fhs affiliated with the Lachnospiraceae in both ecosystems and the Ruminococcaeae/Blautia group in the rumen. FTHFS sequences that probably originated from nonacetogens were identified by low "homoacetogen similarity" scores based on analysis of FTHFS residues, and comprised a large proportion of FTHFS sequences from the tammar wallaby forestomach. A diversity of FTHFS and ACS sequences in both ecosystems clustered between the Lachnospiraceae and Clostridiaceae acetogens but without close sequences from cultured isolates. These sequences probably originated from novel acetogens. The community structures of the acsB and fhs libraries from the rumen and the tammar wallaby forestomach were different (LIBSHUFF, P < 0.001), and these differences may have significance for overall hydrogenotrophy in both ecosystems.

  13. Embryo-endometrial interactions during early development after embryonic diapause in the marsupial tammar wallaby.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Shaw, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The marsupial tammar wallaby has the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal. Reproduction in the tammar is seasonal, regulated by photoperiod and also lactation. Reactivation is triggered by falling daylength after the austral summer solstice in December. Young are born late January and commence a 9-10-month lactation. Females mate immediately after birth. The resulting conceptus develops over 6- 7 days to form a unilaminar blastocyst of 80-100 cells and enters lactationally, and later seasonally, controlled diapause. The proximate endocrine signal for reactivation is an increase in progesterone which alters uterine secretions. Since the diapausing blastocyst is surrounded by the zona and 2 other acellular coats, the mucoid layer and shell coat, the uterine signals that maintain or terminate diapause must involve soluble factors in the secretions rather than any direct cellular interaction between uterus and embryo. Our studies suggest involvement of a number of cytokines in the regulation of diapause in tammars. The endometrium secretes platelet activating factor (PAF) and leukaemia inhibitory factor, which increase after reactivation. Receptors for PAF are low on the blastocyst during diapause but are upregulated at reactivation. Conversely, there is endometrial expression of the muscle segment homeobox gene MSX2 throughout diapause, but it is rapidly downregulated at reactivation. These patterns are consistent with those observed in diapausing mice and mink after reactivation, despite the very different patterns of endocrine control of diapause in these 3 divergent species. These common patterns suggest a similar underlying mechanism for diapause, perhaps common to all mammals, but which is activated in only a few. PMID:25023683

  14. Costs of Rearing the Wrong Sex: Cross-Fostering to Manipulate Offspring Sex in Tammar Wallabies.

    PubMed

    Schwanz, Lisa E; Robert, Kylie A

    2016-01-01

    Sex allocation theory assumes that offspring sex (son vs. daughter) has consequences for maternal fitness. The most compelling experiment to test this theory would involve manipulating offspring sex and measuring the fitness consequences of having the "wrong" sex. Unfortunately, the logistical challenges of such an experiment limit its application. In tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii), previous evidence suggests that mothers in good body condition are more likely to produce sons compared to mothers in poor condition, in support of the Trivers-Willard Hypothesis (TW) of condition-dependent sex allocation. More recently, we have found in our population of tammar wallabies that females with seemingly poor access to resources (based on condition loss over the dry summer) are more likely to produce sons, consistent with predictions from the Local Resource Competition (LRC) hypothesis, which proposes that production of sons or daughters is driven by the level of potential competition between mothers and philopatric daughters. We conducted a cross-fostering experiment in free-ranging tammar wallabies to disassociate the effects of rearing and birthing offspring of each sex. This allowed us to test the prediction of the LRC hypothesis that rearing daughters reduces the future direct fitness of mothers post-weaning and the prediction of the TW hypothesis that rearing sons requires more energy during lactation. Overall, we found limited costs to the mother of rearing the "wrong" sex, with switching of offspring sex only reducing the likelihood of a mother having a pouch young the following year. Thus, we found some support for both hypotheses in that rearing an unexpected son or an unexpected daughter both lead to reduced future maternal fitness. The study suggests that there may be context-specific costs associated with rearing the "wrong" sex. PMID:26849128

  15. Costs of Rearing the Wrong Sex: Cross-Fostering to Manipulate Offspring Sex in Tammar Wallabies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sex allocation theory assumes that offspring sex (son vs. daughter) has consequences for maternal fitness. The most compelling experiment to test this theory would involve manipulating offspring sex and measuring the fitness consequences of having the “wrong” sex. Unfortunately, the logistical challenges of such an experiment limit its application. In tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii), previous evidence suggests that mothers in good body condition are more likely to produce sons compared to mothers in poor condition, in support of the Trivers-Willard Hypothesis (TW) of condition-dependent sex allocation. More recently, we have found in our population of tammar wallabies that females with seemingly poor access to resources (based on condition loss over the dry summer) are more likely to produce sons, consistent with predictions from the Local Resource Competition (LRC) hypothesis, which proposes that production of sons or daughters is driven by the level of potential competition between mothers and philopatric daughters. We conducted a cross-fostering experiment in free-ranging tammar wallabies to disassociate the effects of rearing and birthing offspring of each sex. This allowed us to test the prediction of the LRC hypothesis that rearing daughters reduces the future direct fitness of mothers post-weaning and the prediction of the TW hypothesis that rearing sons requires more energy during lactation. Overall, we found limited costs to the mother of rearing the “wrong” sex, with switching of offspring sex only reducing the likelihood of a mother having a pouch young the following year. Thus, we found some support for both hypotheses in that rearing an unexpected son or an unexpected daughter both lead to reduced future maternal fitness. The study suggests that there may be context-specific costs associated with rearing the “wrong” sex. PMID:26849128

  16. Immunohistochemical localization of T-lymphocyte subsets in the developing lymphoid tissues of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Duncan, Louise G; Nair, Sham V; Deane, Elizabeth M

    2012-12-01

    Research into marsupial adaptive immunity during ontogeny has been hampered by the lack of antibodies that react to marsupial immunological cell populations. In this study, newly synthesised polyclonal antibodies to the T cell marker, CD8, have been developed and used to investigate the ontogeny and distribution of this T cell population in the tammar wallaby. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the distribution of the CD8 lymphocytes in the lymphoid tissues of tammar neonates during the first 144 days of pouch life was similar to that of the eutherian mammals. However, CD8α(+) lymphocytes were observed in the intestines of tammar neonates prior to their first appearance in the cervical thymus, an observation that has not been found in eutherians. A dual labelling immunohistochemical approach was used for the indirect demonstration of CD4 and enabled the simultaneous detection in the tammar wallaby tissues of the two major T-lymphocyte populations, CD4 and CD8 that are associated with adaptive immunity. As in eutherian mammals, CD4(+) cells were the predominant T cell lymphocyte subset observed in the spleen while in the nodal tissues, an age-related decrease in the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio was noted. These antibodies provide a new immunological tool to study the role of T cell subsets in marsupial immunity and disease pathogenesis studies. PMID:22929957

  17. Phosphoglycerate kinase pseudogenes in the tammar wallaby and other macropodid marsupials.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D W; Holland, E A; Rudman, K; Donald, J A; Zehavi-Feferman, R; McKenzie, L M; Sinclair, A H; Spencer, J A; Graves, J A; Poole, W E

    1994-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3; PGK) exists in two forms in marsupials. PGK1 is an X-linked house-keeping enzyme, and PGK2 is a mainly testis-specific enzyme under autosomal control. We have used PGK1 probes derived from two closely related species of macropodid marsupials (kangaroos and wallabies) to demonstrate the existence of a large family of pseudogenes in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). Over 30 fragments are detectable after Taq digestion. We estimate that there are 25-30 copies per genome. Most are autosomally inherited and are apparently not closely linked. Only two restriction fragments that appeared to be sex linked could be detected. Varying degrees of hybridization of fragments to the probes suggest different levels of homology, and hence different ages of origin. The existence of two PGK1 homologous restriction fragments from the X and a large number from the autosomes was also demonstrated by somatic cell hybridization for two other macropodid species, the wallaroo (M. robustus) and the red kangaroo (M. rufus). These results are compared with those from human and mouse, and it is suggested that the propensity of PGK1 to form pseudogenes is an ancient (approximately 130 MYR BP) characteristic of mammals. The high level of polymorphism detected in the tammar makes these PGK1 probes potentially useful for measuring genetic variability in this species and other macropodids.

  18. Phosphoglycerate kinase pseudogenes in the tammar wallaby and other macropodid marsupials.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D W; Holland, E A; Rudman, K; Donald, J A; Zehavi-Feferman, R; McKenzie, L M; Sinclair, A H; Spencer, J A; Graves, J A; Poole, W E

    1994-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3; PGK) exists in two forms in marsupials. PGK1 is an X-linked house-keeping enzyme, and PGK2 is a mainly testis-specific enzyme under autosomal control. We have used PGK1 probes derived from two closely related species of macropodid marsupials (kangaroos and wallabies) to demonstrate the existence of a large family of pseudogenes in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). Over 30 fragments are detectable after Taq digestion. We estimate that there are 25-30 copies per genome. Most are autosomally inherited and are apparently not closely linked. Only two restriction fragments that appeared to be sex linked could be detected. Varying degrees of hybridization of fragments to the probes suggest different levels of homology, and hence different ages of origin. The existence of two PGK1 homologous restriction fragments from the X and a large number from the autosomes was also demonstrated by somatic cell hybridization for two other macropodid species, the wallaroo (M. robustus) and the red kangaroo (M. rufus). These results are compared with those from human and mouse, and it is suggested that the propensity of PGK1 to form pseudogenes is an ancient (approximately 130 MYR BP) characteristic of mammals. The high level of polymorphism detected in the tammar makes these PGK1 probes potentially useful for measuring genetic variability in this species and other macropodids. PMID:8000135

  19. Postnatal epigenetic reprogramming in the germline of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epigenetic reprogramming is essential to restore totipotency and to reset genomic imprints during mammalian germ cell development and gamete formation. The dynamic DNA methylation change at DMRs (differentially methylated regions) within imprinted domains and of retrotransposons is characteristic of this process. Both marsupials and eutherian mammals have genomic imprinting but these two subgroups have been evolving separately for up to 160 million years. Marsupials have a unique reproductive strategy and deliver tiny, altricial young that complete their development within their mother's pouch. Germ cell proliferation in the genital ridge continues after birth in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), and it is only after 25 days postpartum that female germ cells begin to enter meiosis and male germ cells begin to enter mitotic arrest. At least two marsupial imprinted loci (PEG10 and H19) also have DMRs. To investigate the evolution of epigenetic reprogramming in the marsupial germline, here we collected germ cells from male pouch young of the tammar wallaby and analysed the methylation status of PEG10 and H19 DMR, an LTR (long terminal repeat) and a non-LTR retrotransposons. Results Demethylation of the H19 DMR was almost completed by 14 days postpartum and de-novo methylation started from 34 days postpartum. These stages correspond to 14 days after the completion of primordial germ cell migration into genital ridge (demethylation) and 9 days after the first detection of mitotic arrest (re-methylation) in the male germ cells. Interestingly, the PEG10 DMR was already unmethylated at 7 days postpartum, suggesting that the timing of epigenetic reprogramming is not the same at all genomic loci. Retrotransposon methylation was not completely removed after the demethylation event in the germ cells, similar to the situation in the mouse. Conclusions Thus, despite the postnatal occurrence of epigenetic reprogramming and the persistence of genome

  20. Antigenic compartmentation of the cerebellar cortex in an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby Macropus eugenii.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Hassan; Hoy, Nathan; Marotte, Lauren R; Hawkes, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellar cortex is apparently uniform in composition, but a complex heterogeneous pattern can be revealed by using biochemical markers such as zebrin II/aldolase C, which is expressed by a subset of Purkinje cells that form a highly reproducible array of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes. The architecture revealed by zebrin II expression is conserved among many taxa of birds and mammals. In this report zebrin II immunohistochemistry has been used in both section and whole-mount preparations to analyze the cerebellar architecture of the Australian tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). The gross appearance of the wallaby cerebellum is remarkable, with unusually elaborate cerebellar lobules with multiple sublobules and fissures. However, despite the morphological complexity, the underlying zone and stripe architecture is conserved and the typical mammalian organization is present. PMID:22907194

  1. Immunohistochemistry of the lymphoid tissues of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii

    PubMed Central

    Old, Julie M; Deane, Elizabeth M

    2002-01-01

    The lymphoid tissues of the metatherian mammal, the adult tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, were investigated using immunohistochemical techniques. Five cross-reactive antibodies previously shown to recognize surface markers in marsupial tissues and five previously untested antibodies were used. The distribution of T-cells in the tissue beds of spleen, lymph node, thymus, gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) was documented using antibodies to CD3 and CD5. Similarly, B-cells were identified in the same tissues using anti-CD79b. Antibodies to CD8, CD31, CD79a and CD68 failed to recognize cells in these tissue beds. In general the pattern of cellular distribution identified using these antibodies was similar to that observed in other marsupial and eutherian lymphoid tissues. This study provides further information on the commonality of lymphoid tissue structure in the two major groups of extant mammals, metatherians and eutherians. PMID:12363276

  2. Isolation of proteins from subacrosomal region of spermatozoa from a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Zhang, X; Wade, M; Harris, M; Nickel, M

    1998-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that subacrosomal proteins are necessary for the attachment of the acrosome onto the nucleus during sperm formation, and for the stability of the nuclear membrane during fertilization. For the first time, subacrosomal proteins have been isolated from a marsupial species, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), using a method developed in our laboratory. Whole ejaculated spermatozoa were fractionated into head and tail sections by ultrasonication to extract subacrosomal proteins. The heads (> 95% purity) were then isolated from tail sections using centrifugation with a three-step discontinuous sucrose gradient (35, 68 and 75% (w/v). The heads were treated with 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 which stripped off the acrosome, but not the subacrosomal proteins, from the head. The proteins were finally extracted by 100 mmol NaOH l-1. Four prominent subacrosomal polypeptides, with molecular masses of 45, 38, 33 and 29 kDa, were recognized from the SDS-PAGE gel. The localization of these polypeptides (particularly the 45 kDa polypeptide) was confirmed by fluorescent and immunogold labelling with polyclonal antibodies raised in mice against the obtained polypeptides. In wallaby testes, the 45 kDa polypeptide was detected as early as at the step 3 spermatid and was mainly associated with the membrane of the newly formed acrosome vesicle. This polypeptide was also found on the acrosomal membrane of all older spermatids. The 45 kDa polypeptide was found on the acrosomal region of the spermatozoa collected from the caput, corpus and cauda of the epididymis. The similarity of the sperm anatomy of the tammar wallaby with that of other marsupials, such as the brushtail possum, implies that this procedure could be applied effectively to other marsupial species with minor modification.

  3. Uterine flushing proteome of the tammar wallaby after reactivation from diapause.

    PubMed

    Martin, Florine C; Ang, Ching-Seng; Gardner, David K; Renfree, Marilyn B; Shaw, Geoff

    2016-11-01

    The marsupial tammar wallaby has the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, up to 11 months, during which there is no cell division or blastocyst growth. Since the blastocyst in diapause is surrounded by acellular coats, the signals that maintain or terminate diapause involve factors that reside in uterine secretions. The nature of such factors remains to be resolved. In this study, uterine flushings (UFs) were used to assess changes in uterine secretions of tammars using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) during diapause (day 0 and 3) and reactivation days (d) 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11 and 24 after removal of pouch young (RPY), which initiates embryonic development. This study supports earlier suggestions that the presence of specific factors stimulate reactivation, early embryonic growth and cell proliferation. A mitogen, hepatoma-derived growth factor and soluble epidermal growth factor receptors were observed from d3 until at least d11 RPY when these secreted proteins constituted 21% of the UF proteome. Binding of these factors to specific cellular receptors or growth factors may directly stimulate DNA synthesis and division in endometrial gland cells. Proteins involved in the p53/CDKN1A (p21) cell cycle inhibition pathway were also observed in the diapause samples. Progesterone and most of the oestrogen-regulated proteins were present in the UF after d3, which is concomitant with the start of blastocyst mitoses at d4. We propose that once the p21 inhibition of the cell cycle is lost, growth factors including HDGF and EGFR are responsible for reactivation of the diapausing blastocyst via the uterine secretions.

  4. DNA fingerprinting in relation to male dominance and paternity in a captive colony of tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Ewen, K R; Temple-Smith, P D; Bowden, D K; Marinopoulos, J; Renfree, M B; Yan, H

    1993-09-01

    The tammar wallaby has a polygynous mating system in which the dominant male usually controls initial access to oestrous females by mating first and then guarding the female from the advances of other subordinate males. In this study we used DNA fingerprinting with a human 3' hypervariable region (HVR) alpha globin probe to examine the paternity of pouch young progeny from 13 female tammars that were given continual access during the breeding season to a group of four sexually mature males. Constant individual-specific DNA profiles were observed for each animal. Paternity for 22 pouch young was successfully assigned using visual and computer-based analyses. However, no statistical difference was observed between the number of young sired by any of the four males (chi 2 = 2, d.f. = 3, P > 0.1). Mate guarding by the dominant male in our captive breeding group was not, therefore, sufficient to prevent successful subsequent matings by subordinates nor to enhance the genetic contribution of this male to the next generation. In each analysis, visual and computer assignments of paternity coincided, and these concurred with the results of a relatedness test which found that a large number of DNA bands were shared by sires and their progeny. The results from this paternity study show that first mating and subsequent mate guarding by the dominant male tammar wallaby in our captive group do not significantly skew the outcome of paternity towards this male and away from other males that subsequently mate with each female.

  5. In search of neutrophil granule proteins of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Ambatipudi, Kiran; Deane, Elizabeth M

    2008-02-01

    Two approaches have been used to isolate and identify proteins of the granules of neutrophils of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Stimulation with PMA, Ionomycin and calcium resulted in exocytosis of neutrophil granules as demonstrated with electron microscopy. However proteomic analysis using two dimensional gel electrophoresis, in-gel trypsin digestion followed by nano liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) failed to identify any anticipated granule proteins in the reaction supernatants. Subsequent use of differential centrifugation and lysis followed by the application of the same proteomic analysis approach resulted in the isolation and confident identification of 39 proteins, many of which are known to be present in the granules of neutrophils of eutherian mammals or play a role in degranulation. These proteins notably consisted of the known antimicrobials, myeloperoxidase (MPO), serine proteinase, dermcidin, lysozyme and alkaline phosphatase. A number of important known antimicrobials, however, were not detected and these include defensins and cathelicidins. This is the first report of the neutrophil granule proteins of any marsupial and complements previous reports on the cytosolic proteins. PMID:17706783

  6. Chromosome evolution in kangaroos (Marsupialia: Macropodidae): cross species chromosome painting between the tammar wallaby and rock wallaby spp. with the 2n = 22 ancestral macropodid karyotype.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, R J; Eldridge, M D; Toder, R; Ferguson-Smith, M A; O'Brien, P C; Graves, J A

    1999-06-01

    Marsupial mammals show extraordinary karyotype stability, with 2n = 14 considered ancestral. However, macropodid marsupials (kangaroos and wallabies) exhibit a considerable variety of karyotypes, with a hypothesised ancestral karyotype of 2n = 22. Speciation and karyotypic diversity in rock wallabies (Petrogale) is exceptional. We used cross species chromosome painting to examine the chromosome evolution between the tammar wallaby (2n = 16) and three 2n = 22 rock wallaby species groups with the putative ancestral karyotype. Hybridization of chromosome paints prepared from flow sorted chromosomes of the tammar wallaby to Petrogale spp., showed that this ancestral karyotype is largely conserved among 2n = 22 rock wallaby species, and confirmed the identity of ancestral chromosomes which fused to produce the bi-armed chromosomes of the 2n = 16 tammar wallaby. These results illustrate the fission-fusion process of karyotype evolution characteristic of the kangaroo group.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of a novel Strandberg-type polyoxoselenomolybdate Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Nagazi, Ichraf; Haddad, Amor

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H2O. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of the first Strandberg-type polyoxoselenomolybdate Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the novel compound. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chirality of the space group C2 of compound implies that it is expected to have nonlinear optical (NLO) properties -- Abstract: An inorganic compound formulated as Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (1) has been isolated by conventional solution method and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder XRD, IR, UV-vis spectra, and cyclic voltammetry measurements. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2 with unit a = 19.701 (3) Angstrom-Sign , b = 10.296 (2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 12.134 (4) Angstrom-Sign , {beta} = 106.96 (2) Degree-Sign and Z = 4. The crystal structure of (1) is built up from a Strandberg clusters connected through hydrogen-bonding interactions into a three-dimensional supramolecular network.

  8. Testicular development and maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in the male tammar, Macropus eugenii.

    PubMed

    Williamson, P; Fletcher, T P; Renfree, M B

    1990-03-01

    Testicular growth and maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis were assessed in male tammars from 12 to 25 months of age to establish the time of sexual maturity. The testicular dimensions and body weights of 20 male tammars, approximately 12 months of age at the beginning of the study, were measured monthly for 1 year. Groups of 3 animals were castrated at 13, 19 and 25 months of age and their testes sectioned for histological examination. Testicular volume increased between 12 and 24 months of age and was highly correlated with body weight (r = 0.91). In the 13-month group the seminiferous tubules were closed with few mitotic figures. Spermatogenesis had begun in 2 of the 19-month animals. All stages of spermatogenesis were present in the other 19-month male, and in all of the 25-month males. Basal FSH concentrations increased with the age of the animal (21.0 +/- 32.48, 94.40 +/- 55.18 and 193.05 +/- 40.21 ng/ml (mean +/- s.d.) at 19, 20 and 25 months respectively) while basal LH concentrations were similar at 20 months and 25 months (0.43 +/- 0.18 and 0.58 +/- 0.25 ng/ml respectively). Basal testosterone concentrations were also similar 0.11 +/- 0.04, 0.35 +/- 0.16 and 0.22 +/- 0.10 ng/ml in 13-, 19- and 25-month-old animals. LHRH injection in tammars at 13, 19 and 25 months of age induced release of both LH and testosterone 10-30 min after injection. The hormone concentrations increased in both magnitude and duration with increasing age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Chronic treatment of female tammar wallabies with deslorelin implants during pouch life: effects on reproductive maturation.

    PubMed

    Herbert, C A; Eckery, D C; Trigg, T E; Cooper, D W

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on attempts to delay puberty in a model marsupial species using the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist deslorelin. Female tammar wallaby pouch young received deslorelin (5 mg) or placebo implants (n=8/group) when they were 193±2 days old. Sexual maturity was significantly delayed in deslorelin-treated animals, with the first successful production of offspring in treated and control animals occurring at 813±62 and 430±42 days of age, respectively. This delay was associated with a period of retarded pouch and teat development. Progesterone concentrations remained at basal levels throughout the first breeding season, indicating the absence of luteal cycles in treated females. Recovery and maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis was a gradual process. Treated animals failed to respond to GnRH challenge at 12 months of age and had a reduced LH response at 18 months of age, before attaining full responsiveness by 24 months of age. Despite this apparent pituitary recovery by 24 months of age, as evidenced by complete teat eversion and LH responsiveness to GnRH, the time to first parturition was significantly delayed beyond this time in three females. This suggests that there may be longer-lasting effects at the level of the ovary and/or on FSH secretion. The significant delay in the onset of sexual maturation in response to chronic GnRH agonist treatment in this model marsupial species may be of practical significance to the management of fertility in captive and semi-free range marsupial populations.

  10. Sex-linked and autosomal microsatellites provide new insights into island populations of the tammar wallaby

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A J; FitzSimmons, N N; Chambers, B; Renfree, M B; Sarre, S D

    2014-01-01

    The emerging availability of microsatellite markers from mammalian sex chromosomes provides opportunities to investigate both male- and female-mediated gene flow in wild populations, identifying patterns not apparent from the analysis of autosomal markers alone. Tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii), once spread over the southern mainland, have been isolated on several islands off the Western Australian and South Australian coastlines for between 10 000 and 13 000 years. Here, we combine analyses of autosomal, Y-linked and X-linked microsatellite loci to investigate genetic variation in populations of this species on two islands (Kangaroo Island, South Australia and Garden Island, Western Australia). All measures of diversity were higher for the larger Kangaroo Island population, in which genetic variation was lowest at Y-linked markers and highest at autosomal markers (θ=3.291, 1.208 and 0.627 for autosomal, X-linked and Y-linked data, respectively). Greater relatedness among females than males provides evidence for male-biased dispersal in this population, while sex-linked markers identified genetic lineages not apparent from autosomal data alone. Overall genetic diversity in the Garden Island population was low, especially on the Y chromosome where most males shared a common haplotype, and we observed high levels of inbreeding and relatedness among individuals. Our findings highlight the utility of this approach for management actions, such as the selection of animals for translocation or captive breeding, and the ecological insights that may be gained by combining analyses of microsatellite markers on sex chromosomes with those derived from autosomes. PMID:24169646

  11. Effects of water restriction on nitrogen metabolism and urea recycling in the macropodid marsupials Macropus eugenii (tammar wallaby) and Thylogale thetis (red-necked pademelon).

    PubMed

    Chilcott, M J; Moore, S A; Hume, I D

    1985-01-01

    The effects of water restriction on nitrogen metabolism were compared in the semi-arid adapted tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and a wallaby from a moist forest environment, the red-necked pademelon (Thylogale thetis). On a medium (9 to 13%) protein diet water restriction depressed dry matter and nitrogen intakes in both species. Nitrogen balance remained positive, but fell further in the pademelons. Urea excretion decreased in the tammars, but increased in the pademelons. Urea recycling as a proportion of urea entry rate tended to increase in the tammars but not in the pademelons. These findings suggest that T. thetis is not as well adapted as M. eugenii to coping with water shortages. In a second experiment water restriction depressed nitrogen balance in tammars on both high (15%) and low (5%) protein diets, but only on the latter diet did nitrogen balance become negative. Urea recycling was greater on the low than on the high protein diet, but was unaffected by water restriction. Although better able to withstand water stress, M. eugenii was unable to cope with both water stress and a low protein diet together. The reported ability of M. eugenii to maintain water intake by drinking sea water during the dry season when fresh water is unavailable and vegetation is of low protein content is thus of great ecological significance. PMID:3837040

  12. Chronic treatment of male tammar wallabies with deslorelin implants during pouch life: effects on development, puberty, and reproduction in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Herbert, C A; Eckery, D C; Trigg, T E; Cooper, D W

    2007-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of chronic GnRH agonist (deslorelin) treatment on sexual maturation in the male tammar wallaby. Slow-release deslorelin or placebo implants were administered to male pouch young (n = 10/group) when they were between 180 and 200 days old, to determine if disruption of the pituitary-testicular axis during development altered the timing of sexual maturation or had long-term effects on adult reproductive function. Deslorelin treatment caused retardation of testicular growth and reduced the serum FSH and testosterone concentrations between 12 and 24 mo of age. Maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was also delayed in treated animals at 13 and 19 mo of age. Despite these alterations in the pattern and timing of neuroendocrine development, sexual maturation was not permanently blocked in these animals and deslorelin-treated animals reached sexual maturity at the same age as treated animals, as evidenced by a fully functional pituitary-testicular axis and proven fertility at 25 mo of age. The ability of the treated animals to reach puberty at the same time as control animals, despite delayed maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, suggests that puberty in the male tammar wallaby is additionally regulated by other, gonadotropin-independent factors.

  13. A comparative proteomic analysis of skin secretions of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the wombat (Vombatus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Ambatipudi, Kiran; Joss, Janice; Deane, Elizabeth

    2007-12-01

    The secretome of the pouch skin of the model marsupial the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii has been investigated using techniques of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, in-gel trypsin digestion followed by nanoliquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Differences in the patterns of secreted proteins were observed in the female pouch at three stages of maturity - reproductively immature; reproductively mature and active and mature, postreproductively active. Skin from the underarm area of mature females had a markedly different secreted protein profile. The greatest diversity of proteins was seen in the mature reproductive pouch and from an opportunistic sample collected from the pouch another mature female marsupial, the common wombat, Vombatus ursinus. A total of 20 proteins were confidently identified from the pouch skin secretions of the tammar wallaby and wombats, whilst 20 proteins were tentatively identified. In all skin secretomes, globins were the most abundant proteins whilst the antimicrobial, dermcidin was detected in the wombat sample. Some proteins such as keratin and actin could be sourced to sloughed and degraded skin cells. A number of proteins were present at such low concentrations that confident identification was not possible. This was compounded by the lack of a comprehensive database of marsupial proteins which constrains the reliability of automated identification protocols. PMID:20483304

  14. Sub-cellular localisation of alkaline phosphatase activity in the cytoplasm of tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) neutrophils and eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Hulme-Moir, K Lisa; Clark, Phillip

    2011-07-15

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) has been used in studies of neutrophil morphology and function as a marker for identifying different granule populations. In human neutrophils, ALP is found within secretory vesicles, a rapidly mobilisable vesicle population important for upregulating membrane receptors during early activation. Intra-cellular ALP activity in the heterophils of rabbits and guinea pigs, in contrast, is found only in secondary granules. The neutrophils and eosinophils of tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) have previously been reported to contain large amounts of ALP activity when stained using routine cytochemical techniques. To define the subcellular location of ALP in this species, cell suspensions were examined using cerium chloride cytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). ALP was found in 2 distinct cytoplasmic compartments. One compartment displayed morphology consistent with a subpopulation of secondary granules while a second tubulo-vesicular population appeared similar to the secretory vesicles of human neutrophils. Thin tubular vesicles containing ALP were also identified within the cytoplasm of tammar wallaby eosinophils. Large numbers of ALP-containing vesicles have not been recognised previously in eosinophils and this may represent a novel cytoplasmic compartment. In both cell types, ALP-containing structures showed alteration in morphology following stimulation with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) and PMA. PMID:21596444

  15. FOXA1 and SOX9 Expression in the Developing Urogenital Sinus of the Tammar Wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Gamat, Melissa; Chew, Keng Yih; Shaw, Geoffrey; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian prostate is a compact structure in humans but multi-lobed in mice. In humans and mice, FOXA1 and SOX9 play pivotal roles in prostate morphogenesis, but few other species have been examined. We examined FOXA1 and SOX9 in the marsupial tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which has a segmented prostate more similar to human than to mouse. In males, prostatic budding in the urogenital epithelium (UGE) was initiated by day 24 postpartum (pp), but in the female the UGE remained smooth and had begun forming the marsupial vaginal structures. FOXA1 was upregulated in the male urogenital sinus (UGS) by day 51 pp, whilst in the female UGS FOXA1 remained basal. FOXA1 was localised in the UGE in both sexes between day 20 and 80 pp. SOX9 was upregulated in the male UGS at day 21-30 pp and remained high until day 51-60 pp. SOX9 protein was localised in the distal tips of prostatic buds which were highly proliferative. The persistent upregulation of the transcription factors SOX9 and FOXA1 after the initial peak and fall of androgen levels suggest that in the tammar, as in other mammals, these factors are required to sustain prostate differentiation, development and proliferation as androgen levels return to basal levels. PMID:26406875

  16. Adaptation to herbivory by the Tammar wallaby includes bacterial and glycoside hydrolase profiles different from other herbivores.

    PubMed

    Pope, P B; Denman, S E; Jones, M; Tringe, S G; Barry, K; Malfatti, S A; McHardy, A C; Cheng, J-F; Hugenholtz, P; McSweeney, C S; Morrison, M

    2010-08-17

    Metagenomic and bioinformatic approaches were used to characterize plant biomass conversion within the foregut microbiome of Australia's "model" marsupial, the Tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). Like the termite hindgut and bovine rumen, key enzymes and modular structures characteristic of the "free enzyme" and "cellulosome" paradigms of cellulose solubilization remain either poorly represented or elusive to capture by shotgun sequencing methods. Instead, multigene polysaccharide utilization loci-like systems coupled with genes encoding beta-1,4-endoglucanases and beta-1,4-endoxylanases--which have not been previously encountered in metagenomic datasets--were identified, as were a diverse set of glycoside hydrolases targeting noncellulosic polysaccharides. Furthermore, both rrs gene and other phylogenetic analyses confirmed that unique clades of the Lachnospiraceae, Bacteroidales, and Gammaproteobacteria are predominant in the Tammar foregut microbiome. Nucleotide composition-based sequence binning facilitated the assemblage of more than two megabase pairs of genomic sequence for one of the novel Lachnospiraceae clades (WG-2). These analyses show that WG-2 possesses numerous glycoside hydrolases targeting noncellulosic polysaccharides. These collective data demonstrate that Australian macropods not only harbor unique bacterial lineages underpinning plant biomass conversion, but their repertoire of glycoside hydrolases is distinct from those of the microbiomes of higher termites and the bovine rumen. PMID:20668243

  17. A comparative proteomic analysis of skin secretions of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the wombat (Vombatus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Ambatipudi, Kiran; Joss, Janice; Deane, Elizabeth

    2007-12-01

    The secretome of the pouch skin of the model marsupial the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii has been investigated using techniques of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, in-gel trypsin digestion followed by nanoliquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Differences in the patterns of secreted proteins were observed in the female pouch at three stages of maturity - reproductively immature; reproductively mature and active and mature, postreproductively active. Skin from the underarm area of mature females had a markedly different secreted protein profile. The greatest diversity of proteins was seen in the mature reproductive pouch and from an opportunistic sample collected from the pouch another mature female marsupial, the common wombat, Vombatus ursinus. A total of 20 proteins were confidently identified from the pouch skin secretions of the tammar wallaby and wombats, whilst 20 proteins were tentatively identified. In all skin secretomes, globins were the most abundant proteins whilst the antimicrobial, dermcidin was detected in the wombat sample. Some proteins such as keratin and actin could be sourced to sloughed and degraded skin cells. A number of proteins were present at such low concentrations that confident identification was not possible. This was compounded by the lack of a comprehensive database of marsupial proteins which constrains the reliability of automated identification protocols.

  18. Developmental changes in the electroencephalogram and responses to a noxious stimulus in anaesthetized tammar wallaby joeys (Macropus eugenii eugenii).

    PubMed

    Diesch, T J; Mellor, D J; Johnson, C B; Lentle, R G

    2010-04-01

    The tammar wallaby joey is born extremely immature and most of its neurological development occurs in the maternal pouch. It is not known at what in-pouch age functions such as conscious sensory perception commence. We determined the electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to noxious stimulation in lightly anaesthetized tammar wallaby joeys. Baseline median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies, total power (Ptot) and frequency spectra between 1 and 30 Hz of the EEG power spectrum were determined. Joeys aged less than 127 days showed little or no EEG activity. Prolonged periods of spontaneous EEG activity were present by 142 days. This activity increased, as did the power in all frequencies, while the duration of any intervening isoelectric periods decreased with increasing in-pouch age. EEG responses to a noxious stimulus (toe clamping) changed with increasing in-pouch age as there was no response from joeys aged 94-127 days (no EEG), a minimal decrease in the F50 in those aged between 142 and 181 days (P = 0.052) and a greater decrease in the F50 in those aged between 187 and 261 days (P < 0.001). The pattern of these changes, which presumably reflects anatomical and functional maturation of the cerebral cortex, is similar to, but develops more slowly than, that reported in the rat. The opening of the eyes and development of the pelage are discussed as markers of when brain development may be sufficient for joeys to consciously perceive noxious sensations including pain.

  19. The olfactory system of the tammar wallaby is developed at birth and directs the neonate to its mother's pouch odours.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Y; Fletcher, Terrence P; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-11-01

    In kangaroos and wallabies at birth the highly altricial newborn young climbs unassisted from the urogenital opening to the teat. Negative geotropism is important for the initial climb to the pouch opening, but nothing is known of the signals that then direct the neonate downwards to the teat. Here we show that the newborn tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) has the olfactory apparatus to detect smell. Both the main olfactory system and vomeronasal organ (VNO) are developed at the time of birth. Receptor cells of the main olfactory epithelium immunopositive for G(oalpha)-protein project to the three layered main olfactory bulb (MOB). The receptor epithelium of the VNO contains G-protein immunopositive cells and has olfactory knob-like structures. The VNO is connected to an area between the two MOBs. Next, using a functional test, we show that neonates can respond to odours from their mother's pouch. When neonatal young are presented with a choice of a pouch-odour-soaked swab or a saline swab, they choose the swab with their mother's pouch secretions significantly more often (P<0.05) than the saline swab. We conclude that both olfactory systems are capable of receiving odour signals at birth, a function that must be a critical adaptation for the survival of an altricial marsupial neonate such as the tammar for its journey to the pouch.

  20. Retention of different-sized particles and derived gut fill estimate in tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii): physiological and methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Munn, Adam J; Tomlinson, Susie; Savage, Tom; Clauss, Marcus

    2012-02-01

    The capacity of the digestive tract is an important parameter in understanding digestive adaptations, particularly in herbivores. Measures of this capacity ('gut fill') are commonly performed in killed animals, which has ethical and logistical implications. Alternatively, dry matter gut contents (DMC) can be estimated in live animals from food intake, digesta retention and digestibility, based on physical principles (Holleman and White, Can. J. Zool. 67, 488-494, 1989). Although this method has been used to some extent, it still awaits thorough validation. Here we estimated DMC in seven tammar wallabies during 5-day feeding trials and compared the results to those gained from dissections immediately after the trials. Calculated DMC exceeded that actually measured by 29 ± 22%. A closer inspection of the data suggested that this was partly due to the fact that DMC as measured by dissection is susceptible to short-term influences such as daily variation in food intake, whereas the calculated DMC represents an integrative measure over the whole period of the feeding trial. Correlations between both the measured digesta retention times, and the calculated DMC, with the measured wet contents mass suggest that it is particularly the DMC determined via dissection that needs to be measured with care. For a comparison of gut capacities, the calculated DMC therefore can be considered adequate, but should for a more widespread use be validated in further studies including more species and experimental regimes controlling food intake variation. Additionally, we tested whether very small (100-500 μm) and small (500-1000 μm) particles were retained differently in the tammar wallabies. There was no indication of such a difference. Whether the macropod forestomach selectively passes a certain particle fraction (that represents microbes) with the generally faster-passing fluids remains to be investigated with even smaller markers, e.g. labelled bacteria. PMID:22094100

  1. Sexual differentiation in three unconventional mammals: spotted hyenas, elephants and tammar wallabies.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Stephen E; Short, Roger V; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2005-11-01

    The present review explores sexual differentiation in three non-conventional species: the spotted hyena, the elephant and the tammar wallaby, selected because of the natural challenges they present for contemporary understanding of sexual differentiation. According to the prevailing view of mammalian sexual differentiation, originally proposed by Alfred Jost, secretion of androgen and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) by the fetal testes during critical stages of development accounts for the full range of sexually dimorphic urogenital traits observed at birth. Jost's concept was subsequently expanded to encompass sexual differentiation of the brain and behavior. Although the central focus of this review involves urogenital development, we assume that the novel mechanisms described in this article have potentially significant implications for sexual differentiation of brain and behavior, a transposition with precedent in the history of this field. Contrary to the "specific" requirements of Jost's formulation, female spotted hyenas and elephants initially develop male-type external genitalia prior to gonadal differentiation. In addition, the administration of anti-androgens to pregnant female spotted hyenas does not prevent the formation of a scrotum, pseudoscrotum, penis or penile clitoris in the offspring of treated females, although it is not yet clear whether the creation of masculine genitalia involves other steroids or whether there is a genetic mechanism bypassing a hormonal mediator. Wallabies, where sexual differentiation occurs in the pouch after birth, provide the most conclusive evidence for direct genetic control of sexual dimorphism, with the scrotum developing only in males and the pouch and mammary glands only in females, before differentiation of the gonads. The development of the pouch and mammary gland in females and the scrotum in males is controlled by genes on the X chromosome. In keeping with the "expanded" version of Jost's formulation, secretion

  2. The cone visual pigments of an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii): sequence, spectral tuning, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Samir S; Wakefield, Matthew J; Tada, Takashi; Marotte, Lauren; Yokoyama, Shozo; Marshall Graves, Jenny A

    2003-10-01

    Studies on marsupial color vision have been limited to very few species. There is evidence from behavioral, electroretinographic (ERG), and microspectrophotometric (MSP) measurements for the existence of both dichromatic and trichromatic color vision. No studies have yet investigated the molecular mechanisms of spectral tuning in the visual pigments of marsupials. Our study is the first to determine the mRNA sequence, infer the amino acid sequence, and determine, by in vitro expression, the spectra of the cone opsins of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). This yielded some information on mechanisms and evolution of spectral tuning of these pigments. The tammar wallaby retina contains only short-wavelength sensitive (SWS) and middle-wavelength sensitive (MWS) pigment mRNAs. This predicts dichromatic color vision, which is consistent with conclusions from previous behavioral studies ( Hemmi 1999). We found that the wallaby has a SWS1 class pigment of 346 amino acids. Sequence comparison with eutherian SWS pigments predicts that this SWS1 pigment absorbs maximally (lambdamax) at 424 nm and, therefore, is a blue rather than a UV pigment. This (lambdamax) is close to that of the in vitro-expressed wallaby SWS pigment (lambdamax of 420 +/- 2 nm) and to that determined behaviorally (420 nm). The difference from the mouse UV pigment (lambdamax of 359 nm) is largely accounted for by the F86Y substitution, in agreement with in vitro results comparing a variety of other SWS pigments. This suggests that spectral tuning employing F86Y substitution most likely arose independently in the marsupials and ungulates as a result of convergent evolution. An apparently different mechanism of spectral tuning of the SWS1 pigments, involving five amino acid positions, evolved in primates. The wallaby MWS pigment has 363 amino acids. Species comparisons at positions critical to spectral tuning predict a lambdamax near 530 nm, which is close to that of the in vitro

  3. The cone visual pigments of an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii): sequence, spectral tuning, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Samir S; Wakefield, Matthew J; Tada, Takashi; Marotte, Lauren; Yokoyama, Shozo; Marshall Graves, Jenny A

    2003-10-01

    Studies on marsupial color vision have been limited to very few species. There is evidence from behavioral, electroretinographic (ERG), and microspectrophotometric (MSP) measurements for the existence of both dichromatic and trichromatic color vision. No studies have yet investigated the molecular mechanisms of spectral tuning in the visual pigments of marsupials. Our study is the first to determine the mRNA sequence, infer the amino acid sequence, and determine, by in vitro expression, the spectra of the cone opsins of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). This yielded some information on mechanisms and evolution of spectral tuning of these pigments. The tammar wallaby retina contains only short-wavelength sensitive (SWS) and middle-wavelength sensitive (MWS) pigment mRNAs. This predicts dichromatic color vision, which is consistent with conclusions from previous behavioral studies ( Hemmi 1999). We found that the wallaby has a SWS1 class pigment of 346 amino acids. Sequence comparison with eutherian SWS pigments predicts that this SWS1 pigment absorbs maximally (lambdamax) at 424 nm and, therefore, is a blue rather than a UV pigment. This (lambdamax) is close to that of the in vitro-expressed wallaby SWS pigment (lambdamax of 420 +/- 2 nm) and to that determined behaviorally (420 nm). The difference from the mouse UV pigment (lambdamax of 359 nm) is largely accounted for by the F86Y substitution, in agreement with in vitro results comparing a variety of other SWS pigments. This suggests that spectral tuning employing F86Y substitution most likely arose independently in the marsupials and ungulates as a result of convergent evolution. An apparently different mechanism of spectral tuning of the SWS1 pigments, involving five amino acid positions, evolved in primates. The wallaby MWS pigment has 363 amino acids. Species comparisons at positions critical to spectral tuning predict a lambdamax near 530 nm, which is close to that of the in vitro

  4. A novel whey protein synthesized only in late lactation by the mammary gland from the tammar (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, K R; Messer, M; Elliott, C; Maher, F; Shaw, D C

    1987-01-01

    A major whey protein which appears in milk from the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) only during the second half of lactation (late lactation protein-A, LLP-A) was purified to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. An Mr of 21,600 +/- 2000 was calculated from its amino acid composition. A computer-based comparison of the sequence of the first 69 amino acid residues with the Atlas of Protein Sequence data base showed no significant homology with known proteins. Antiserum to LLP-A was prepared in rabbits, and single radial immunodiffusion was used to measure the amounts of LLP-A in milk during the first 40 weeks of lactation. LLP-A was first detected at 26 weeks; thereafter its concentration increased abruptly, to reach a maximum of 26 g/l at approx. 36 weeks of lactation. Explants prepared from mammary gland biopsies at 20 and 35 weeks of lactation were exposed to [3H]amino acids for 8 h; immunoprecipitation of tissue extracts showed that, whereas the rate of casein synthesis was the same at both stages of lactation, LLP-A was synthesized only by the 35-week mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3109381

  5. Intestinal lactase (beta-galactosidase) and other glycosidase activities in suckling and adult tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Walcott, P J; Messer, M

    1980-10-01

    The activities of various glycosidases in homogenates of the small intestinal mucosa of two adult and 18 suckling tammar wallabies (M. eugenii) aged from 6 to 50 weeks were investigated. Lactase (beta-D-galactosidase), beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase activities were high during the first 34 weeks post partum and then declined to very low levels. Maltase, isomaltase, sucrase and trehalase activities were very low or absent during the first 34 weeks, and then increased. The lactase activity was unusual in being greater in the distal than the middle or proximal thirds of the intestine, and in its low pH optimum (pH 4.6), inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate but not by Tris, and lack of cellobiase activity. These properties are those of a lysosomal acid beta-galactosidase rather than of a brush border neutral lactase. The maltase activity had the characteristics of a lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase early in lactation and of a brush border neutral maltase in adult animals. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to changes in dietary carbohydrates during weaning and to the mode of digestion of milk carbohydrates by the pouch young. PMID:6783021

  6. A 33 kDa molecular marker of sperm acrosome differentiation and maturation in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Wade, M A; Lin, M

    1999-09-01

    This study was undertaken to identify potential molecular markers of acrosomal biogenesis and post-testicular maturation in marsupials, using the tammar wallaby as a model species. A two-step sperm extraction procedure yielded two protein extracts of apparent acrosomal origin and a tail extract. The extracts were analysed by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Several prominent polypeptide bands (45, 38 and 33 kDa) appeared common to both acrosomal extracts. Antiserum raised against the 33 kDa polypeptide from the inner acrosomal membrane matrix (IAMM) extract showed immunoreactivity with 45, 38 and 33 kDa polypeptides in both acrosomal extracts, indicating that the 33 kDa polypeptide was related to the proteins in the 45 and 38 kDa bands. Therefore, the antiserum was used as a molecular probe. Indirect immuno-fluorescence indicated that the acrosome was the major location of the 33 kDa polypeptide. This contention was confirmed by ultrastructural study: immunogold labelling indicated that the 33 kDa polypeptide associated with acrosomal matrix components throughout acrosomal development in the testes and throughout post-testicular maturation in the epididymis. The label clearly delineated the changing morphology of the maturing marsupial acrosome. This is the first study to use immunocytochemical techniques to chart testicular and post-testicular development of any sperm organelle in a marsupial. As a result of this study, a 33 kDa molecular marker of marsupial acrosome differentiation and maturation has been identified. It may be possible to chart similar events in other marsupial species and identify opportunities for manipulating fertility. PMID:10645248

  7. WFDC2 is differentially expressed in the mammary gland of the tammar wallaby and provides immune protection to the mammary gland and the developing pouch young.

    PubMed

    Watt, Ashalyn P; Sharp, Julie A; Lefevre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2012-03-01

    WAP four disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) is a four disulfide core (4-DSC) protein secreted in the milk of the tammar wallaby. It is comprised of two 4-DSC domains assigned domain III at the NH2-terminal end and domain II at the COOH-terminal end. The WFDC2 gene was expressed only during pregnancy, early lactation, towards the end of lactation and involution. The WFDC2 protein showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and this activity resided with domain II. There was no antibacterial activity detected against Enterococcus faecalis. The observed expression pattern of tammar WFDC2 and its antibacterial activity suggests a role to either reduce mastitis in the mammary gland caused by S. aureus or to protect the gut of the young at a time when it is not immune-competent. The latter effect could be achieved without disturbing the balance of commensal gut flora such as E. faecalis. PMID:22024352

  8. Biosynthesis of marsupial milk oligosaccharides. II: Characterization of a beta 6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase in lactating mammary glands of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii.

    PubMed

    Urashima, T; Messer, M; Bubb, W A

    1992-09-15

    Tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) mammary glands contain a UDP-GlcNAc:Gal beta 1----3Gal beta 1----4Glc beta 1----6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GlcNAcT) whose activity has been characterized with respect to the effect of pH, apparent Km for acceptor, effects of bivalent metal ions, acceptor specificity and identity of products. The enzyme did not show an absolute requirement for any bivalent metal ion but its activity was increased markedly by Mg2+, Ca2+ and Ba2+ and, to a lesser extent, by Mn2+. When Gal beta 1----3Gal beta 1----4Glc was used as acceptor, the product was Gal beta 1----3[GlcNAc beta 1----6]Gal beta 1----4Glc. With Gal beta 1----3Gal beta 1----3Gal beta 1----4Glc as acceptor, the product was shown, by 1H-NMR spectroscopy and exo-beta-galactosidase digestion, to be a novel pentasaccharide with the structure Gal beta 1----3[GlcNAc beta 1----6]Gal beta 1----3Gal beta 1----4Glc, suggesting that the enzyme recognises the non-reducing end of the acceptor substrate, rather than the reducing end. PMID:1388055

  9. Crustal structure and kinematics of the TAMMAR propagating rift system on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from seismic refraction and satellite altimetry gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Richard L.; Tilmann, Frederik; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The TAMMAR segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge forms a classic propagating system centred about two degrees south of the Kane Fracture Zone. The segment is propagating to the south at a rate of 14 mm yr-1, 15 per cent faster than the half-spreading rate. Here, we use seismic refraction data across the propagating rift, sheared zone and failed rift to investigate the crustal structure of the system. Inversion of the seismic data agrees remarkably well with crustal thicknesses determined from gravity modelling. We show that the crust is thickened beneath the highly magmatic propagating rift, reaching a maximum thickness of almost 8 km along the seismic line and an inferred (from gravity) thickness of about 9 km at its centre. In contrast, the crust in the sheared zone is mostly 4.5-6.5 km thick, averaging over 1 km thinner than normal oceanic crust, and reaching a minimum thickness of only 3.5 km in its NW corner. Along the seismic line, it reaches a minimum thickness of under 5 km. The PmP reflection beneath the sheared zone and failed rift is very weak or absent, suggesting serpentinisation beneath the Moho, and thus effective transport of water through the sheared zone crust. We ascribe this increased porosity in the sheared zone to extensive fracturing and faulting during deformation. We show that a bookshelf-faulting kinematic model predicts significantly more crustal thinning than is observed, suggesting that an additional mechanism of deformation is required. We therefore propose that deformation is partitioned between bookshelf faulting and simple shear, with no more than 60 per cent taken up by bookshelf faulting.

  10. Crustal structure and kinematics of the TAMMAR propagating rift system on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from seismic refraction and satellite altimetry gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Richard L.; Tilmann, Frederik; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    The TAMMAR segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge forms a classic propagating system centred about two degrees south of the Kane Fracture Zone. The segment is propagating to the south at a rate of 14 mm/yr, 15 % faster than the half-spreading rate. Here we use seismic refraction data across the propagating rift, sheared zone and failed rift to investigate the crustal structure of the system. Inversion of the seismic data agrees remarkably well with crustal thicknesses determined from gravity modelling. We show that the crust is thickened beneath the highly magmatic propagating rift, reaching a maximum thickness of almost 8 km along the seismic line and an inferred (from gravity) thickness of about 9 km at its centre. In contrast, the crust in the sheared zone is mostly 4.5-6.5 km thick, averaging over 1 km thinner than normal oceanic crust, and reaching a minimum thickness of only 3.5 km in its NW corner. Along the seismic line it reaches a minimum thickness of under 5 km. The PmP reflection beneath the sheared zone and failed rift is very weak or absent, suggesting serpentinisation beneath the Moho, and thus effective transport of water through the sheared zone crust. We ascribe this increased porosity in the sheared zone to extensive fracturing and faulting during deformation. We show that a bookshelf-faulting kinematic model predicts significantly more crustal thinning than is observed, suggesting that an additional mechanism of deformation is required. We therefore propose that deformation is partitioned between bookshelf faulting and simple shear, with no more than 60 % taken up by bookshelf faulting.

  11. A quantitative study of the morphological development and bacterial colonisation of the gut of the tammar wallaby Macropus eugenii eugenii and brushtail possum Trichosurus vulpecula during in-pouch development.

    PubMed

    Lentle, R G; Dey, D; Hulls, C; Mellor, D J; Moughan, P J; Stafford, K J; Nicholas, K

    2006-11-01

    We compared the rates of change of various morphological parameters of the stomach, small intestine, caecum and colon of tammar wallabies and brushtail possums with body mass during in-pouch development. These were correlated with changes in the numbers of bacterial species in the various gut segments. In the pouch-young of both species, the wet tissue masses of all gut segments increased with body mass in a positively allometric manner (i.e. with a body mass exponent > 1), suggesting that the mass of each component was disproportionately low at birth, but increased disproportionately rapidly postnatally. However, the lengths of the wallaby stomach and small intestine scaled isometrically with respect to body mass (i.e. with a body mass exponent around 0.33), which may indicate that the shape of these components changes to the adult form during early neonatal development. Conversely, the length of the caecum and colon of both wallabies and possums scaled in a positively allometric manner with respect to body mass, showing area to volume compensation. This may indicate a more general pattern of disproportionately rapid postnatal enlargement in areas that are distal to the principal sites of neonatal digestion (i.e. the stomach). The numbers of bacterial species present in the various gastrointestinal segments of both species were low in animals aged 100 days or less but there was a significant increase in microbial diversity in the caecum of brushtail possums aged over 100 days. The possum caecum also showed the greatest rate of increase in wet tissue mass relative to body mass. It is postulated that caecal development may act as a nidus for establishment of communities of commensal microflora in the developing marsupial. PMID:16819652

  12. Pulmonary cytochrome P450 enzymes belonging to the CYP4B subfamily from an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Milic, Natalie L; Ngo, Suong N T; Marchant, Ceilidh L; Height, Tamara A; McKinnon, Ross A

    2011-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are critically important in the oxidative metabolism of a diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. We have previously reported the cloning and characterisation of the koala CYP4A15, the first reported member of the CYP4 family from marsupials, and have demonstrated important species differences in CYP4A activity and tissue expression. In the present study, the cloning of CYP4B1 in the wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and their expression across marsupials is described. Rabbit anti-mouse CYP4B1 antibody detected immunoreactive proteins in lung and liver microsomes from all test marsupials, with relative weak signal detected from the koala, suggesting a species-specific expression. Microsomal 2-aminofluorene bio-activation (a CYP4B1 marker) in wallaby lung was comparable to that of rabbit, with significant higher activities detected in wallaby liver and kidneys compared to rabbit. A 1548bp wallaby lung CYP4B complete cDNA, designated CYP4B1, which encodes a protein of 510 amino acids and shares 72% nucleotide and 69% amino acid sequence identity to human CYP4B1, was cloned by polymerase chain reaction approaches. The results demonstrate the presence of wallaby CYP4B1 that shares several common features with other published CYP4Bs; however the wallaby CYP4B1 cDNA contains four extra amino acid residues at the NH₂-terminal, a fundamentally conserved transmembrane anchor of all eukaryote CYPs.

  13. DDX4 (VASA) is conserved in germ cell development in marsupials and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Hickford, Danielle E; Frankenberg, Stephen; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2011-10-01

    DDX4 (VASA) is an RNA helicase expressed in the germ cells of all animals. To gain greater insight into the role of this gene in mammalian germ cell development, we characterized DDX4 in both a marsupial (the tammar wallaby) and a monotreme (the platypus). DDX4 is highly conserved between eutherian, marsupial, and monotreme mammals. DDX4 protein is absent from tammar fetal germ cells but is present from Day 1 postpartum in both sexes. The distribution of DDX4 protein during oogenesis and spermatogenesis in the tammar is similar to eutherians. Female tammar germ cells contain DDX4 protein throughout all stages of postnatal oogenesis. In males, DDX4 is in gonocytes, and during spermatogenesis it is present in spermatocytes and round spermatids. A similar distribution of DDX4 occurs in the platypus during spermatogenesis. There are several DDX4 isoforms in the tammar, resulting from both pre- and posttranslational modifications. DDX4 in marsupials and monotremes has multiple splice variants and polyadenylation motifs. Using in silico analyses of genomic databases, we found that these previously unreported splice variants also occur in eutherians. In addition, several elements implicated in the control of Ddx4 expression in the mouse, including RGG (arginine-glycine-glycine) and dimethylation of arginine motifs and CpG islands within the Ddx4 promoter, are also highly conserved. Collectively these data suggest that DDX4 is essential for the regulation of germ cell proliferation and differentiation across all three extant mammalian groups-eutherians, marsupials, and monotremes.

  14. Paf receptor expression in the marsupial embryo and endometrium during embryonic diapause.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Jane C; Shaw, Geoff; O'Neill, Chris; Frankenberg, Stephen; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2014-01-01

    The control of reactivation from embryonic diapause in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) involves sequential activation of the corpus luteum, secretion of progesterone that stimulates endometrial secretion and subsequent changes in the uterine environment that activate the embryo. However, the precise signals between the endometrium and the blastocyst are currently unknown. In eutherians, both the phospholipid Paf and its receptor, platelet-activating factor receptor (PTAFR), are present in the embryo and the endometrium. In the tammar, endometrial Paf release in vitro increases around the time of the early progesterone pulse that occurs around the time of reactivation, but whether Paf can reactivate the blastocyst is unknown. We cloned and characterised the expression of PTAFR in the tammar embryo and endometrium at entry into embryonic diapause, during its maintenance and after reactivation. Tammar PTAFR sequence and protein were highly conserved with mammalian orthologues. In the endometrium, PTAFR was expressed at a constant level in the glandular epithelium across all stages and in the luminal epithelium during both diapause and reactivation. Thus, the presence of the receptor appears not to be a limiting factor for Paf actions in the endometrium. However, the low levels of PTAFR in the embryo during diapause, together with its up-regulation and subsequent internalisation at reactivation, supports earlier results suggesting that endometrial Paf could be involved in reactivation of the tammar blastocyst from embryonic diapause. PMID:24123130

  15. GRB10 imprinting is eutherian mammal specific.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-12-01

    GRB10 is an imprinted gene differently expressed from two promoters in mouse and human. Mouse Grb10 is maternally expressed from the major promoter in most tissues and paternally expressed from the brain-specific promoter within specific regions of the fetal and adult central nervous system. Human GRB10 is biallelically expressed from the major promoter in most tissues except in the placental villus trophoblast where it is maternally expressed, whereas the brain-specific promoter is paternally expressed in the fetal brain. This study characterized the ortholog of GRB10 in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) to investigate the origin and evolution of imprinting at this locus. The protein coding exons and predicted amino acid sequence of tammar GRB10 were highly conserved with eutherian GRB10. The putative first exon, which is located in the orthologous region to the eutherian major promoter, was found in the tammar, but no exon was found in the downstream region corresponding to the eutherian brain-specific promoter, suggesting that marsupials only have a single promoter. Tammar GRB10 was widely expressed in various tissues including the brain but was not imprinted in any of the tissues examined. Thus, it is likely that GRB10 imprinting evolved in eutherians after the eutherian-marsupial divergence approximately 160 million years ago, subsequent to the acquisition of a brain-specific promoter, which resides within the imprinting control region in eutherians. PMID:22787282

  16. Mammary cell-activating factor regulates the hormone-independent transcription of the early lactation protein (ELP) gene in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Renfree, Marilyn B; Cane, Kylie N

    2016-11-15

    The regulation of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) early lactation protein (ELP) gene is complex. ELP is responsive to the lactogenic hormones; insulin (I), hydrocortisone (HC) and prolactin (PRL) in mammary gland explants but could not be induced with lactogenic hormones in tammar primary mammary gland cells, nor in KIM-2 conditionally immortalised murine mammary epithelial cells. Similarly, ELP promoter constructs transiently-transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells constitutively expressing the prolactin receptor (PRLR) and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)5A were unresponsive to prolactin, unlike the rat and mouse β-casein (CSN2) promoter constructs. Identification of the minimal promoter required for the hormone-independent transcription of tammar ELP in HEK293Ts and comparative analysis of the proximal promoters of marsupial ELP and the orthologous eutherian colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene suggests that mammary cell-activating factor (MAF), an E26 transformation-specific (ETS) factor, may bind to an AGGAAG motif and activate tammar ELP. PMID:27452799

  17. Mammary cell-activating factor regulates the hormone-independent transcription of the early lactation protein (ELP) gene in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Renfree, Marilyn B; Cane, Kylie N

    2016-11-15

    The regulation of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) early lactation protein (ELP) gene is complex. ELP is responsive to the lactogenic hormones; insulin (I), hydrocortisone (HC) and prolactin (PRL) in mammary gland explants but could not be induced with lactogenic hormones in tammar primary mammary gland cells, nor in KIM-2 conditionally immortalised murine mammary epithelial cells. Similarly, ELP promoter constructs transiently-transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells constitutively expressing the prolactin receptor (PRLR) and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)5A were unresponsive to prolactin, unlike the rat and mouse β-casein (CSN2) promoter constructs. Identification of the minimal promoter required for the hormone-independent transcription of tammar ELP in HEK293Ts and comparative analysis of the proximal promoters of marsupial ELP and the orthologous eutherian colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene suggests that mammary cell-activating factor (MAF), an E26 transformation-specific (ETS) factor, may bind to an AGGAAG motif and activate tammar ELP.

  18. TOXOPLASMOSIS IN WALLABIES (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS, MACROPUS EUGENII ): BLINDNESS, TREATMENT WITH ATOVAQUONE, AND ISOLATION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Australasian marsupials, especially wallabies are highly susceptible to clinical toxoplasmosis. Three wallabies (1Tammar, Macropus eugenii no.1, and 2 Bennett’s, Macropus rufogriseus, no.2 and 3) imported from New Zealand to Pennsylvania were diagnosed to have toxoplasmosis after arrival in the US. ...

  19. Ancient Antimicrobial Peptides Kill Antibiotic-Resistant Pathogens: Australian Mammals Provide New Options

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianghui; Wong, Emily S. W.; Whitley, Jane C.; Li, Jian; Stringer, Jessica M.; Short, Kirsty R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.

    2011-01-01

    Background To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics the 10×'20 Initiative declared the urgent need for a global commitment to develop 10 new antimicrobial drugs by the year 2020. Naturally occurring animal antibiotics are an obvious place to start. The recently sequenced genomes of mammals that are divergent from human and mouse, including the tammar wallaby and the platypus, provide an opportunity to discover novel antimicrobials. Marsupials and monotremes are ideal potential sources of new antimicrobials because they give birth to underdeveloped immunologically naïve young that develop outside the sterile confines of a uterus in harsh pathogen-laden environments. While their adaptive immune system develops innate immune factors produced either by the mother or by the young must play a key role in protecting the immune-compromised young. In this study we focus on the cathelicidins, a key family of antimicrobial peptide genes. Principal Finding We identified 14 cathelicidin genes in the tammar wallaby genome and 8 in the platypus genome. The tammar genes were expressed in the mammary gland during early lactation before the adaptive immune system of the young develops, as well as in the skin of the pouch young. Both platypus and tammar peptides were effective in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens. One potent peptide, expressed in the early stages of tammar lactation, effectively killed multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. Conclusions and Significance Marsupial and monotreme young are protected by antimicrobial peptides that are potent, broad spectrum and salt resistant. The genomes of our distant relatives may hold the key for the development of novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:21912615

  20. The functional development of Leydig cells in a marsupial

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher M; Shaw, Geoff; Clark, Joan; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    Leydig cells are the major source of androgen in the male mammal. We describe here for the first time the development of the Leydig cell in a macropodid marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Leydig cells are first recognized morphologically 2 days after birth with the appearance of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of certain interstitial cells. Lipid content closely matches the steroid content of the developing testis and marks the maturation of the steroid synthesis pathway in the tammar testis. Morphologically mature Leydig cells, marked by distinct mitochondria with tubular cristae and an extensive anastomosing network of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, are developed by day 10 after birth – the time of peak testosterone content in perinatal tammar testes. The volume percentage of each cell type in the testis does not change over time so the growth of each cellular component keeps pace with growth of the whole testis. There was no morphological or quantitative evidence of a change from one population of Leydig cells to another in the tammar testis as has been reported in several other species including the rat, mouse and human. Maturation of the testis is also marked by the development of tight junctions between the cell membranes of adjacent Sertoli cells. These appear around day 30 after birth and coincide with the onset of mitotic arrest in male germ cells. Overall, the development of the Leydig cell in the tammar wallaby follows a similar pattern to that seen in other mammals, although the start of Leydig cell differentiation is, like many other organ systems in marsupials, post natal, not fetal and there appears to be only a single population of Leydig cells. PMID:18069991

  1. DDX4 (VASA) is conserved in germ cell development in marsupials and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Hickford, Danielle E; Frankenberg, Stephen; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2011-10-01

    DDX4 (VASA) is an RNA helicase expressed in the germ cells of all animals. To gain greater insight into the role of this gene in mammalian germ cell development, we characterized DDX4 in both a marsupial (the tammar wallaby) and a monotreme (the platypus). DDX4 is highly conserved between eutherian, marsupial, and monotreme mammals. DDX4 protein is absent from tammar fetal germ cells but is present from Day 1 postpartum in both sexes. The distribution of DDX4 protein during oogenesis and spermatogenesis in the tammar is similar to eutherians. Female tammar germ cells contain DDX4 protein throughout all stages of postnatal oogenesis. In males, DDX4 is in gonocytes, and during spermatogenesis it is present in spermatocytes and round spermatids. A similar distribution of DDX4 occurs in the platypus during spermatogenesis. There are several DDX4 isoforms in the tammar, resulting from both pre- and posttranslational modifications. DDX4 in marsupials and monotremes has multiple splice variants and polyadenylation motifs. Using in silico analyses of genomic databases, we found that these previously unreported splice variants also occur in eutherians. In addition, several elements implicated in the control of Ddx4 expression in the mouse, including RGG (arginine-glycine-glycine) and dimethylation of arginine motifs and CpG islands within the Ddx4 promoter, are also highly conserved. Collectively these data suggest that DDX4 is essential for the regulation of germ cell proliferation and differentiation across all three extant mammalian groups-eutherians, marsupials, and monotremes. PMID:21653890

  2. The functional development of Leydig cells in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Butler, Christopher M; Shaw, Geoff; Clark, Joan; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    Leydig cells are the major source of androgen in the male mammal. We describe here for the first time the development of the Leydig cell in a macropodid marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Leydig cells are first recognized morphologically 2 days after birth with the appearance of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of certain interstitial cells. Lipid content closely matches the steroid content of the developing testis and marks the maturation of the steroid synthesis pathway in the tammar testis. Morphologically mature Leydig cells, marked by distinct mitochondria with tubular cristae and an extensive anastomosing network of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, are developed by day 10 after birth - the time of peak testosterone content in perinatal tammar testes. The volume percentage of each cell type in the testis does not change over time so the growth of each cellular component keeps pace with growth of the whole testis. There was no morphological or quantitative evidence of a change from one population of Leydig cells to another in the tammar testis as has been reported in several other species including the rat, mouse and human. Maturation of the testis is also marked by the development of tight junctions between the cell membranes of adjacent Sertoli cells. These appear around day 30 after birth and coincide with the onset of mitotic arrest in male germ cells. Overall, the development of the Leydig cell in the tammar wallaby follows a similar pattern to that seen in other mammals, although the start of Leydig cell differentiation is, like many other organ systems in marsupials, post natal, not fetal and there appears to be only a single population of Leydig cells.

  3. ARX/Arx is expressed in germ cells during spermatogenesis in both marsupial and mouse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongshi; Pask, Andrew J; Hu, Yanqiu; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2014-03-01

    The X-linked aristaless gene, ARX, is essential for the development of the gonads, forebrain, olfactory bulb, pancreas, and skeletal muscle in mice and humans. Mutations cause neurological diseases, often accompanied by ambiguous genitalia. There are a disproportionately high number of testis and brain genes on the human and mouse X chromosomes. It is still unknown whether the X chromosome accrued these genes during its evolution or whether genes that find themselves on the X chromosome evolve such roles. ARX was originally autosomal in mammals and remains so in marsupials, whereas in eutherian mammals it translocated to the X chromosome. In this study, we examined autosomal ARX in tammars and compared it with the X-linked Arx in mice. We detected ARX mRNA in the neural cells of the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain, and olfactory bulbs in developing tammars, consistent with the expression in mice. ARX was detected by RT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization in the developing tammar wallaby gonads of both sexes, suggestive of a role in sexual development as in mice. We also detected ARX/Arx mRNA in the adult testis in both tammars and mice, suggesting a potential novel role for ARX/Arx in spermiogenesis. ARX transcripts were predominantly observed in round spermatids. Arx mRNA localization distributions in the mouse adult testis suggest that it escaped meiotic sex chromosome inactivation during spermatogenesis. Our findings suggest that ARX in the therian mammal ancestor already played a role in male reproduction before it was recruited to the X chromosome in eutherians.

  4. Genome sequence of an Australian kangaroo, Macropus eugenii, provides insight into the evolution of mammalian reproduction and development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We present the genome sequence of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which is a member of the kangaroo family and the first representative of the iconic hopping mammals that symbolize Australia to be sequenced. The tammar has many unusual biological characteristics, including the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, extremely synchronized seasonal breeding and prolonged and sophisticated lactation within a well-defined pouch. Like other marsupials, it gives birth to highly altricial young, and has a small number of very large chromosomes, making it a valuable model for genomics, reproduction and development. Results The genome has been sequenced to 2 × coverage using Sanger sequencing, enhanced with additional next generation sequencing and the integration of extensive physical and linkage maps to build the genome assembly. We also sequenced the tammar transcriptome across many tissues and developmental time points. Our analyses of these data shed light on mammalian reproduction, development and genome evolution: there is innovation in reproductive and lactational genes, rapid evolution of germ cell genes, and incomplete, locus-specific X inactivation. We also observe novel retrotransposons and a highly rearranged major histocompatibility complex, with many class I genes located outside the complex. Novel microRNAs in the tammar HOX clusters uncover new potential mammalian HOX regulatory elements. Conclusions Analyses of these resources enhance our understanding of marsupial gene evolution, identify marsupial-specific conserved non-coding elements and critical genes across a range of biological systems, including reproduction, development and immunity, and provide new insight into marsupial and mammalian biology and genome evolution. PMID:21854559

  5. Seminiferous cord formation is regulated by hedgehog signaling in the marsupial.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin Wei; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-03-01

    The signaling molecule DHH, secreted by Sertoli cells, has essential regulatory functions in testicular differentiation. DHH is required for the differentiation of peritubular myoid cells that line the seminiferous cords and steroidogenic Leydig cells. The testicular cords in Dhh-null male mice lack a basal lamina and develop abnormally. To date, the DHH-signaling pathway has never been examined outside of any eutherian mammals. This study examined the effects of inhibition of DHH signaling in a marsupial mammal, the tammar wallaby, by culturing gonads in vitro in the presence of the hedgehog-signaling inhibitors cyclopamine and forskolin. Disruption of hedgehog signaling in the tammar testes caused highly disorganized cord formation. SOX9 protein remained strongly expressed in Sertoli cells, laminin distribution was highly fragmented, and germ cells were distributed around the cortical regions of treated testes in an ovarianlike morphology. This suggests that hedgehog signaling regulates cord formation in the tammar wallaby testis as it does in eutherian mammals. These data demonstrate that the hedgehog pathway has been highly conserved in mammals for at least 160 million years. PMID:22133695

  6. The subventricular zone is the developmental milestone of a 6-layered neocortex: comparisons in metatherian and eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Amanda F P; Kondo, Shinichi; Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Chodroff, Rebecca A; Sirey, Tamara M; Bluy, Lisa E; Webber, Natalie; DeProto, Jamin; Karlen, Sarah J; Krubitzer, Leah; Stolp, Helen B; Saunders, Norman R; Molnár, Zoltán

    2010-05-01

    The major lineages of mammals (Eutheria, Metatheria, and Monotremata) diverged more than 100 million years ago and have undergone independent changes in the neocortex. We found that adult South American gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) possess a significantly lower number of cerebral cortical neurons compared with the mouse (Mus musculus). To determine whether the difference is reflected in the development of the cortical germinal zones, the location of progenitor cell divisions was examined in opossum, tammar wallaby, and rat. The basic pattern of the cell divisions was conserved, but the emergence of a distinctive band of dividing cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) occurred relatively later in the opossum (postnatal day [P14]) and the tammar wallaby (P40) than in rodents. The planes of cell divisions in the ventricular zone (VZ) were similar in all species, with comparable mRNA expression patterns of Brn2, Cux2, NeuroD6, Tbr2, and Pax6 in opossum (P12 and P20) and mouse (embryonic day 15 and P0). In conclusion, the marsupial neurodevelopmental program utilizes an organized SVZ, as indicated by the presence of intermediate (or basal) progenitor cell divisions and gene expression patterns, suggesting that the SVZ emerged prior to the Eutherian-Metatherian split.

  7. Molecular evolution of a novel marsupial S100 protein (S100A19) which is expressed at specific stages of mammary gland and gut development.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Joly H L; Wynne, Alicia; Lefèvre, Christophe; Familari, Mary; Nicholas, Kevin R; Sharp, Julie A

    2013-10-01

    S100 proteins are calcium-binding proteins involved in controlling diverse intracellular and extracellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and antimicrobial function. We recently identified a S100-like cDNA from the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) stomach. Phylogentic analysis shows wallaby S100A19 forms a new clade with other marsupial and monotreme S100A19, while this group shows similarity to eutherian S100A7 and S100A15 genes. This is also supported by amino acid and domain comparisons. We show S100A19 is developmentally-regulated in the tammar wallaby gut by demonstrating the gene is expressed in the forestomach of young animals at a time when the diet consists of only milk, but is absent in older animals when the diet is supplemented with herbage. During this transition the forestomach phenotype changes from a gastric stomach into a fermentation sac and intestinal flora changes with diet. We also show that S100A19 is expressed in the mammary gland of the tammar wallaby only during specific stages of lactation; the gene is up-regulated during pregnancy and involution and not expressed during the milk production phase of lactation. Comparison of the tammar wallaby S100A19 protein sequence with S100 protein sequences from eutherian, monotreme and other marsupial species suggest the marsupial S100A19 has two functional EF hand domains, and an extended His tail. An evolutionary analysis of S100 family proteins was carried out to gain a better understanding of the relationship between the S100 family member functions. We propose that S100A19 gene/protein is the ancestor of the eutherian S100A7 gene/protein, which has subsequently modified its original function in eutherians. This modified function may have arisen due to differentiation of evolutionary pressures placed on gut and mammary gland developmental during mammal evolution. The highly regulated differential expression patterns of S100A19 in the tammar wallaby suggests that S100A19 may play

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyoxometalates incorporating with anilinium cations and facile preparation of hybrid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Keisuke; Srifa, Atthapon; Isikawa, Eri; Naruke, Haruo

    2010-08-01

    The self-assembly reaction of tungstate and copper(II) in the presence of aniline (ANI) and phosphoric acid led to the formation of an anilinium (ANIH +) salt of mono-substituted Keggin-type polyoxotungstophosphate (ANIH) 5[PCu(H 2O)W 11O 39](ANI)·8H 2O ( 1), while the reaction of heptamolybdate in the coexistence of copper(II), phosphoric acid and ANI yielded an ANIH + salt of Strandberg-type pentamolybdodiphosphate, (ANIH) 2[(PO 4) 2Mo 5O 15{Cu(ANI) 2(H 2O)} 2](ANI)·2H 2O ( 2). These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray single-crystal analysis. The compound 1, crystallizing in trigonal, P3¯,a = 13.883(4), c = 10.187(3) Å, Z = 1, consists of copper mono-substituted Keggin-typed [PCu(H 2O)W 11O 39] 5- anion surrounded by six ANI molecules, of which five are protonated (ANIH +). The compound 2, crystallizing in triclinic, P1¯,a = 13.98(2), b = 14.73(1), c = 16.24(1) Å, α = 111.27(3), β = 97.42(3), γ = 99.54(4)°, Z = 2, consists of Strandberg-type pentamolybdodiphospate [(PO 4) 2Mo 5O 15] 6- anions interconnected by two Cu(ANI) 2(H 2O) linkers to form a 1D-chain structure. A potentiostatic electrolysis of 1 in aqueous solution gave rise to electropolymerization of the ANIH + cations (and ANI) and deposition with the [PCu(H 2O)W 11O 39] 5- anion on an ITO electrode, forming a nano-structured polyaniline/[PCu(H 2O)W 11O 39] 5- hybrid thin film.

  9. Ozone tropospheric and stratospheric trends (1995-2008) over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigouroux, Corinne; Demoulin, Philippe; Blumenstock, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Klyft, Jon; Palm, Mathias; Gardiner, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Five ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79°N to 28°N, all part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), have joined their efforts to homogenize and optimize the retrievals of ozone profiles from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) solar absorption spectra. Using the optimal estimation method, distinct vertical information can be obtained in four layers: ground--10 km, 10--18 km, 18--27 km, and 27--42 km, in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends1. Vigouroux et al. (2008)2 applied this method to the ozone data and discussed the trends of the total columns and of the partial columns in the above four layers, over the period 1995-2004. Here, we present and discuss an update of this analysis for the 1995-2008 period. We obtain, among others, that at all the stations, the ozone total columns trends are non significant while the trends in the upper stratospheric layer (27-42 km) are significantly positive. 1 Gardiner, T., Forbes, A., Woods, P., De Mazière, M., Vigouroux, C., Mahieu, E., Demoulin, P., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Blumenstock, T., Hase, F., Kramer, I., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Ellingsen, K., and Gauss, M.: Method for evaluating trends in greenhouse gases from ground-based remote FTIR measurements over Europe, ACP, 8, 6719-6727, 2008. 2 Vigouroux, C., De Mazière, M., Demoulin, P., Servais, C., Hase, F., Blumenstock, T., Kramer, I., Schneider, M., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Rockmann, A., Gardiner, T., Coleman, M., and Woods, P. : Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations, ACP, 8, 6865-6886, 2008.

  10. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-08-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  11. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  12. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-08-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  13. Phenypressin (Phe2-Arg8-vasopressin), a new neurohypophysial peptide found in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, M T; Hurpet, D; Chauvet, J; Acher, R

    1980-10-16

    Recent investigations on marsupial neurohypophysial hormones have revealed that species belonging to the Australian family Macropodidae and the American family Didelphidae have, apart from an oxytocin-like hormone, two vasopressin-like peptides which can be separated either by ion-exchange chromatography or chromatoelectrophoresis. The major pressor hormone of two Australian species, the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and the tammar (Macropus eugenii), has been identified as lysine vasopressin by its amino acid sequence anda its pharmacological properties. We report here that the minor pressor hormone, which chromatographs on Amberlite CG-50 like arginine vasopressin, differs from it in sequence only at position 2 where phenylalanine replaces the tyrosine of arginine vasopressin.

  14. Lactation transcriptomics in the Australian marsupial, Macropus eugenii: transcript sequencing and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christophe M; Digby, Matthew R; Whitley, Jane C; Strahm, Yvan; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Lactation is an important aspect of mammalian biology and, amongst mammals, marsupials show one of the most complex lactation cycles. Marsupials, such as the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) give birth to a relatively immature newborn and progressive changes in milk composition and milk production regulate early stage development of the young. Results In order to investigate gene expression in the marsupial mammary gland during lactation, a comprehensive set of cDNA libraries was derived from lactating tissues throughout the lactation cycle of the tammar wallaby. A total of 14,837 express sequence tags were produced by cDNA sequencing. Sequence analysis and sequence assembly were used to construct a comprehensive catalogue of mammary transcripts. Sequence data from pregnant and early or late lactating specific cDNA libraries and, data from early or late lactation massively parallel sequencing strategies were combined to analyse the variation of milk protein gene expression during the lactation cycle. Conclusion Results show a steady increase in expression of genes coding for secreted protein during the lactation cycle that is associated with high proportion of transcripts coding for milk proteins. In addition, genes involved in immune function, translation and energy or anabolic metabolism are expressed across the lactation cycle. A number of potential new milk proteins or mammary gland remodelling markers, including noncoding RNAs have been identified. PMID:17997866

  15. Dichromatic colour vision in wallabies as characterised by three behavioural paradigms.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Wiebke; Hemmi, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Despite lacking genetic evidence of a third cone opsin in the retina of any Australian marsupial, most species tested so far appear to be trichromatic. In the light of this, we have re-examined colour vision of the tammar wallaby which had previously been identified as a dichromat. Three different psychophysical tests, based on an operant conditioning paradigm, were used to confirm that colour perception in the wallaby can be predicted and conclusively explained by the existence of only two cone types. Firstly, colour-mixing experiments revealed a Confusion Point between the three primary colours of a LCD monitor that can be predicted by the cone excitation ratio of the short- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones. Secondly, the wavelength discrimination ability in the wallaby, when tested with monochromatic stimuli, was found to be limited to a narrow range between 440 nm and 500 nm. Lastly, an experiment designed to test the wallaby's ability to discriminate monochromatic lights from a white light provided clear evidence for a Neutral Point around 485 nm where discrimination consistently failed. Relative colour discrimination seemed clearly preferred but it was possible to train a wallaby to perform absolute colour discriminations. The results confirm the tammar wallaby as a dichromat, and so far the only behaviourally confirmed dichromat among the Australian marsupials. PMID:24489742

  16. Identification of a novel PNMA-MS1 gene in marsupials suggests the LTR retrotransposon-derived PNMA genes evolved differently in marsupials and eutherians.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Sawa; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pelekanos, Matthew; Clark, Helen; Ono, Ryuichi; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2013-10-01

    Two major gene families derived from Ty3/Gypsy long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons were recently identified in mammals. The sushi-ichi retrotransposon homologue (SIRH) family comprises 12 genes: 11 in eutherians including Peg10 and Peg11/Rtl1 that have essential roles in the eutherian placenta and 1 that is marsupial specific. Fifteen and 12 genes were reported in the second gene family, para-neoplastic antigen MA (PNMA), in humans and mice, respectively, although their biological functions and evolutionary history remain largely unknown. Here, we identified two novel candidate PNMA genes, PNMA-MS1 and -MS2 in marsupials. Like all eutherian-specific PNMA genes, they exhibit the highest homology to a Gypsy12_DR (DR, Danio rerio) Gag protein. PNMA-MS1 is conserved in both Australian and South American marsupial species, the tammar wallaby and grey short-tailed opossum. However, no PNMA-MS1 orthologue was found in eutherians, monotremes or non-mammalian vertebrates. PNMA-MS1 was expressed in the ovary, mammary gland and brain during development and growth in the tammar, suggesting that PNMA-MS1 may have acquired a marsupial-specific function. However, PNMA-MS2 seems to be a pseudogene. The absence of marsupial orthologues of eutherian PNMA genes suggests that the retrotransposition events of the Gypsy12_DR-related retrotransposons that gave rise to the PNMA family occurred after the divergence of marsupials and eutherians. PMID:23704700

  17. Dichromatic colour vision in wallabies as characterised by three behavioural paradigms.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Wiebke; Hemmi, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Despite lacking genetic evidence of a third cone opsin in the retina of any Australian marsupial, most species tested so far appear to be trichromatic. In the light of this, we have re-examined colour vision of the tammar wallaby which had previously been identified as a dichromat. Three different psychophysical tests, based on an operant conditioning paradigm, were used to confirm that colour perception in the wallaby can be predicted and conclusively explained by the existence of only two cone types. Firstly, colour-mixing experiments revealed a Confusion Point between the three primary colours of a LCD monitor that can be predicted by the cone excitation ratio of the short- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones. Secondly, the wavelength discrimination ability in the wallaby, when tested with monochromatic stimuli, was found to be limited to a narrow range between 440 nm and 500 nm. Lastly, an experiment designed to test the wallaby's ability to discriminate monochromatic lights from a white light provided clear evidence for a Neutral Point around 485 nm where discrimination consistently failed. Relative colour discrimination seemed clearly preferred but it was possible to train a wallaby to perform absolute colour discriminations. The results confirm the tammar wallaby as a dichromat, and so far the only behaviourally confirmed dichromat among the Australian marsupials.

  18. Dichromatic Colour Vision in Wallabies as Characterised by Three Behavioural Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Wiebke; Hemmi, Jan M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite lacking genetic evidence of a third cone opsin in the retina of any Australian marsupial, most species tested so far appear to be trichromatic. In the light of this, we have re-examined colour vision of the tammar wallaby which had previously been identified as a dichromat. Three different psychophysical tests, based on an operant conditioning paradigm, were used to confirm that colour perception in the wallaby can be predicted and conclusively explained by the existence of only two cone types. Firstly, colour-mixing experiments revealed a Confusion Point between the three primary colours of a LCD monitor that can be predicted by the cone excitation ratio of the short- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones. Secondly, the wavelength discrimination ability in the wallaby, when tested with monochromatic stimuli, was found to be limited to a narrow range between 440 nm and 500 nm. Lastly, an experiment designed to test the wallaby’s ability to discriminate monochromatic lights from a white light provided clear evidence for a Neutral Point around 485 nm where discrimination consistently failed. Relative colour discrimination seemed clearly preferred but it was possible to train a wallaby to perform absolute colour discriminations. The results confirm the tammar wallaby as a dichromat, and so far the only behaviourally confirmed dichromat among the Australian marsupials. PMID:24489742

  19. Promoter-specific expression and imprint status of marsupial IGF2.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-01-01

    In mice and humans, IGF2 has multiple promoters to maintain its complex tissue- and developmental stage-specific imprinting and expression. IGF2 is also imprinted in marsupials, but little is known about its promoter region. In this study, three IGF2 transcripts were isolated from placental and liver samples of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Each transcript contained a unique 5' untranslated region, orthologous to the non-coding exons derived from promoters P1-P3 in the human and mouse IGF2 locus. The expression of tammar IGF2 was predominantly from the P2 promoter, similar to humans. Expression of IGF2 was higher in pouch young than in the adult and imprinting was highly tissue and developmental-stage specific. Interestingly, while IGF2 was expressed throughout the placenta, imprinting seemed to be restricted to the vascular, trilaminar region. In addition, IGF2 was monoallelically expressed in the adult mammary gland while in the liver it switched from monoalleleic expression in the pouch young to biallelic in the adult. These data suggest a complex mode of IGF2 regulation in marsupials as seen in eutherian mammals. The conservation of the IGF2 promoters suggests they originated before the divergence of marsupials and eutherians, and have been selectively maintained for at least 160 million years.

  20. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum and skin: Clinical manifestations, histopathology, pathomechanism, perspectives of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Barbara; Bobyr, Ivan; Campanati, Anna; Molinelli, Elisa; Consales, Veronica; Brisigotti, Valerio; Scarpelli, Marina; Racchini, Stefano; Offidani, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pseudoxantoma elasticum (PXE), also known as Groenblad-Strandberg syndrome, is a rare heritable disease with an estimated prevalence of 1:50,000 in the general population. PXE is considered a prototype of multisystem ectopic mineralization disorders and it is characterized by aberrant mineralization of soft connective tissue with degeneration of the elastic fibers, involving primarily the eyes, the cardiovascular system, and the skin. Cutaneous lesions consist of small, asymptomatic, yellowish papules or larger coalescent plaques, typically located on the neck and the flexural areas. PXE is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 (ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 6) gene that encodes a transmembrane ATP binding efflux transporter, normally expressed in the liver and the kidney; however, the exact mechanism of ectopic mineralization remains largely unknown. The histological examination of cutaneous lesions, revealing accumulation of pleomorphic elastic structures in middermis, is essential for the definitive diagnosis of PXE, excluding PXE-like conditions. PXE is currently an intractable disease; although the cutaneous findings primarily present a cosmetic problem, they signify the risk for development of ocular and cardiovascular complications associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of this rare form of hereditary connective tissue disorders, focus on the pathogenesis, the clinical manifestation, and the differential diagnosis of PXE. Emphasis is also placed on the management of cutaneous lesions and treatment perspectives of PXE. PMID:26361562

  1. [Evolution of vasopressins in marsupials: a new hormone, phenypressin (Phe2-Arg8-vasopressin), present in the Macropodidae].

    PubMed

    Chauvet, M T; Hurpet, D; Chauvet, J; Acher, R

    1980-10-13

    A duplication of the pressor hormone has been found in some marsupials, either American species belonging to the family Didelphidae or Australian species belonging to the family Macropodidae. Two pressor peptides, lysine vasopressin and phenypressin (Phe2-Arg8-vasopressin) have been chemically identified in the red Kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and the Tammar (Macropus eugenii). In contrast, the brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), a species belonging to the family Phalangeridae, has a single pressor hormone, arginine vasopressin. Because this latter hormone was also found in a prototherian species, the Echidna, it might be assumed that it is the product of a primitive gene and that a duplication and subsequent mutations led to lysine vasopressin and phenypressin in Macropodidae.

  2. Common procedures in hedgehogs, prairie dogs, exotic rodents, and companion marsupials.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Delaney, Cathy A

    2006-05-01

    Nondomesticated species are commonly being kept as companion animals. These include the African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albi-ventris), the North American black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys lu-dovicianus), and exotic rodents such as the degu (Octodon degus)and duprasi or fat-tailed gerbil (Pachyuromys duprasi). Common companion marsupials include the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps),Bennett's or Tammar (Dama) wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus rufo-griseus and Macropus eugenii, respectively), the Brazilian or South American gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and the North American Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Although many of these animals are now bred domestically and are fairly docile when human-raised, they are essentially wild animals and hence have strong instincts to hide illness and pain.

  3. Artificial light at night desynchronizes strictly seasonal reproduction in a wild mammal.

    PubMed

    Robert, Kylie A; Lesku, John A; Partecke, Jesko; Chambers, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Change in day length is an important cue for reproductive activation in seasonally breeding animals to ensure that the timing of greatest maternal investment (e.g. lactation in mammals) coincides with favourable environmental conditions (e.g. peak productivity). However, artificial light at night has the potential to interfere with the perception of such natural cues. Following a 5-year study on two populations of wild marsupial mammals exposed to different night-time levels of anthropogenic light, we show that light pollution in urban environments masks seasonal changes in ambient light cues, suppressing melatonin levels and delaying births in the tammar wallaby. These results highlight a previously unappreciated relationship linking artificial light at night with induced changes in mammalian reproductive physiology, and the potential for larger-scale impacts at the population level.

  4. Antibodies to the Ross River virus in captive marsupials in urban areas of eastern New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Old, Julie M; Deane, Elizabeth M

    2005-07-01

    Serum samples collected from 224 tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) in two captive populations in urban areas in eastern New South Wales Australia, between December 1999 and May 2004, were tested for antibodies to Ross River virus (RRV). In one population in northwest Sydney, 21 animals (11%) tested positive, and in another population in Newcastle, New South Wales, thirteen (33%) of the animals were positive. Antibodies were detected in four of 11 wallaroos (Macropus robustus) (36%) but not in parma wallabies (Macropus parma) (n=5), koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) (n=12) and southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) (n=2) from the Sydney area. These data support the possible role of marsupials as urban amplifying hosts for RRV. PMID:16244073

  5. Ultrasonography of wallaby prenatal development shows that the climb to the pouch begins in utero.

    PubMed

    Drews, Barbara; Roellig, Kathleen; Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoff; Buentjen, Ina; Herbert, Catherine A; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2013-01-01

    Marsupials have a functional placenta for a shorter period of time compared to that of eutherian species, and their altricial young reach the teats without any help from the mother. We have monitored the short intrauterine development of one marsupial, the tammar wallaby, with high-resolution ultrasound from reactivation of the 100-cell diapausing blastocyst to birth. The expanding blastocyst could be visualized when it had reached a diameter of 1.5 mm. From at least halfway through pregnancy, there are strong undulating movements of the endometrium that massage the expanding vesicle against the highly secretory endometrial surface. These unique movements possibly enhance exchange of uterine secretions and gases between the mother and embryo. There was a constant rate of development measured ultrasonographically from mid-gestation, regardless of when the blastocyst reactivated. Interestingly climbing movements by the fetus began in utero about 3 days before birth, mimicking those required to climb to the pouch. PMID:23492830

  6. A new class of retroviral and satellite encoded small RNAs emanates from mammalian centromeres.

    PubMed

    Carone, Dawn M; Longo, Mark S; Ferreri, Gianni C; Hall, Laura; Harris, Melissa; Shook, Nicole; Bulazel, Kira V; Carone, Benjamin R; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Michael J; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional framework of the eukaryotic centromere core has been described in budding yeast and rice, but for most eukaryotes and all vertebrates it remains largely unknown. The lack of large pericentric repeats in the tammar wallaby has made it possible to map and identify the transcriptional units at the centromere in a mammalian species for the first time. We show that these transcriptional units, comprised of satellites and a retrovirus, are bound by centromere proteins and that they are the source of a novel class of small RNA. The endogenous retrovirus from which these small RNAs are derived is now known to be in the centromere domain of several vertebrate classes. The discovery of this new RNA form brings together several independent lines of evidence that point to a conserved retroviral-encoded processed RNA entity within eukaryotic centromeres.

  7. Artificial light at night desynchronizes strictly seasonal reproduction in a wild mammal

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Kylie A.; Lesku, John A.; Partecke, Jesko; Chambers, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Change in day length is an important cue for reproductive activation in seasonally breeding animals to ensure that the timing of greatest maternal investment (e.g. lactation in mammals) coincides with favourable environmental conditions (e.g. peak productivity). However, artificial light at night has the potential to interfere with the perception of such natural cues. Following a 5-year study on two populations of wild marsupial mammals exposed to different night-time levels of anthropogenic light, we show that light pollution in urban environments masks seasonal changes in ambient light cues, suppressing melatonin levels and delaying births in the tammar wallaby. These results highlight a previously unappreciated relationship linking artificial light at night with induced changes in mammalian reproductive physiology, and the potential for larger-scale impacts at the population level. PMID:26423847

  8. Autosomal localization of the amelogenin gene in monotremes and marsupials: implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Watson, J M; Spencer, J A; Graves, J A; Snead, M L; Lau, E C

    1992-11-01

    We have determined by Southern blot analysis that DNA sequences homologous to the AMG gene probe are present in the genomes of both marsupial and monotreme mammals, although adult monotremes lack teeth. In situ hybridization and Southern analysis of cell hybrids demonstrate that AMG homologues are located on autosomes. In the Tammar Wallaby, AMG homologues are located on chromosomes 5q and 1q and in the Platypus, on chromosomes 1 and 2. The autosomal location of the AMG homologues provides additional support for the hypothesis that an autosomal region equivalent to the human Xp was translocated to the X chromosome in the Eutheria after the divergence of the marsupials 150 million years ago. The region containing the AMG gene is therefore likely to have been added 80-150 million years ago to a pseudoautosomal region shared by the ancestral eutherian X and Y chromosome; the X and Y alleles must have begun diverging after this date.

  9. Common procedures in hedgehogs, prairie dogs, exotic rodents, and companion marsupials.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Delaney, Cathy A

    2006-05-01

    Nondomesticated species are commonly being kept as companion animals. These include the African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albi-ventris), the North American black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys lu-dovicianus), and exotic rodents such as the degu (Octodon degus)and duprasi or fat-tailed gerbil (Pachyuromys duprasi). Common companion marsupials include the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps),Bennett's or Tammar (Dama) wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus rufo-griseus and Macropus eugenii, respectively), the Brazilian or South American gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and the North American Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Although many of these animals are now bred domestically and are fairly docile when human-raised, they are essentially wild animals and hence have strong instincts to hide illness and pain. PMID:16759954

  10. Antibodies to the Ross River virus in captive marsupials in urban areas of eastern New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Old, Julie M; Deane, Elizabeth M

    2005-07-01

    Serum samples collected from 224 tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) in two captive populations in urban areas in eastern New South Wales Australia, between December 1999 and May 2004, were tested for antibodies to Ross River virus (RRV). In one population in northwest Sydney, 21 animals (11%) tested positive, and in another population in Newcastle, New South Wales, thirteen (33%) of the animals were positive. Antibodies were detected in four of 11 wallaroos (Macropus robustus) (36%) but not in parma wallabies (Macropus parma) (n=5), koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) (n=12) and southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) (n=2) from the Sydney area. These data support the possible role of marsupials as urban amplifying hosts for RRV.

  11. Effects of nutritional manipulation on body composition in the developing marsupial, Macropus eugenii.

    PubMed

    Hetz, Jennifer A; Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoffrey; Stefanidis, Aneta; Cowley, Michael A; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-06-15

    When 60-day-old tammar wallaby pouch young (Macropus eugenii) are fostered to mothers at 120 days of lactation, their growth, developmental rate and maturation of their GH/IGF axes are markedly accelerated. To determine the effect of fostering on energy intake, body composition and fat accretion, we first measured total body fat and lean mass in these young. Next, we mimicked the triglyceride oleic and palmitic acid composition of 120-day milk by supplementing 60 day young with these fatty acids and comparing their growth with that of growth accelerated young. There was no difference in the weight or growth axis maturation of supplemented young but there was significantly more body fat in these and in the growth-accelerated fostered young than in controls. We conclude that the accelerated growth and GH/IGF axis maturation observed previously in fostered young is most likely due to increased milk consumption and earlier access to specific nutrients.

  12. Effects of nutritional manipulation on body composition in the developing marsupial, Macropus eugenii.

    PubMed

    Hetz, Jennifer A; Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoffrey; Stefanidis, Aneta; Cowley, Michael A; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-06-15

    When 60-day-old tammar wallaby pouch young (Macropus eugenii) are fostered to mothers at 120 days of lactation, their growth, developmental rate and maturation of their GH/IGF axes are markedly accelerated. To determine the effect of fostering on energy intake, body composition and fat accretion, we first measured total body fat and lean mass in these young. Next, we mimicked the triglyceride oleic and palmitic acid composition of 120-day milk by supplementing 60 day young with these fatty acids and comparing their growth with that of growth accelerated young. There was no difference in the weight or growth axis maturation of supplemented young but there was significantly more body fat in these and in the growth-accelerated fostered young than in controls. We conclude that the accelerated growth and GH/IGF axis maturation observed previously in fostered young is most likely due to increased milk consumption and earlier access to specific nutrients. PMID:27032712

  13. Molecular evolution of monotreme and marsupial whey acidic protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP), a major whey protein present in milk of a number of mammalian species has characteristic cysteine-rich domains known as four-disulfide cores (4-DSC). Eutherian WAP, expressed in the mammary gland throughout lactation, has two 4-DSC domains, (DI-DII) whereas marsupial WAP, expressed only during mid-late lactation, contains an additional 4-DSC (DIII), and has a DIII-D1-DII configuration. We report the expression and evolution of echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and platypus (Onithorhynchus anatinus) WAP cDNAs. Predicted translation of monotreme cDNAs showed echidna WAP contains two 4-DSC domains corresponding to DIII-DII, whereas platypus WAP contains an additional domain at the C-terminus with homology to DII and has the configuration DIII-DII-DII. Both monotreme WAPs represent new WAP protein configurations. We propose models for evolution of the WAP gene in the mammalian lineage either through exon loss from an ancient ancestor or by rapid evolution via the process of exon shuffling. This evolutionary outcome may reflect differences in lactation strategy between marsupials, monotremes, and eutherians, and give insight to biological function of the gene products. WAP four-disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) proteins were also identified in echidna, platypus and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) lactating mammary cells. WFDC2 proteins are secreted proteins not previously associated with lactation. Mammary gland expression of tammar WFDC2 during the course of lactation showed WFDC2 was elevated during pregnancy, reduced in early lactation and absent in mid-late lactation.

  14. Kallmann syndrome 1 gene is expressed in the marsupial gonad.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanqiu; Yu, Hongshi; Shaw, Geoff; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2011-03-01

    Kallmann syndrome is characterized by hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and anosmia. The syndrome can be caused by mutations in several genes, but the X-linked form is caused by mutation in the Kallmann syndrome 1 (KAL1). KAL1 plays a critical role in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal migration that is essential for the normal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Interestingly, KAL1 appears to be missing from the rodent X, and no orthologue has been detected as yet. We investigated KAL1 during development and in adults of an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Marsupial KAL1 maps to an autosome within a group of genes that was added as a block to the X chromosome in eutherian evolution. KAL1 expression was widespread in embryonic and adult tissues. In the adult testis, tammar KAL1 mRNA and protein were detected in the germ cells at specific stages of differentiation. In the adult testis, the protein encoded by KAL1, anosmin-1, was restricted to the round spermatids and elongated spermatids. In the adult ovary, anosmin-1 was not only detected in the oocytes but was also localized in the granulosa cells throughout folliculogenesis. This is the first examination of KAL1 mRNA and protein localization in adult mammalian gonads. The protein localization suggests that KAL1 participates in gametogenesis not only through the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by activation of GnRH neuronal migration, but also directly within the gonads themselves. Because KAL1 is autosomal in marsupials but is X-linked in eutherians, its conserved involvement in gametogenesis supports the hypothesis that reproduction-related genes were actively recruited to the eutherian X chromosome.

  15. Distribution of CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide in mature and developing marsupial brain.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, K W S; Mai, J K

    2010-01-01

    CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) is a neuromodulator involved in feeding, drug reward, stress and cardiovascular function. We have immunohistochemically studied the distribution of the CART peptide in the brains of two adult marsupial species: the brown antechinus (Antechinus stuartii) as a representative of polyprotodont marsupials and the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) as a representative of diprotodont marsupials. We have also examined the distribution of CART during postnatal development in the tammar wallaby. There were similarities and differences both between the two marsupial species and between the marsupials and eutherians in CART distribution. Both marsupials showed immunoreactivity to CART in the olfactory bulb, piriform cortex, extended amygdala, the supraoptic, paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus, somatosensory and auditory nuclei of the brainstem, vagal/solitary complex, raphe obscurus and raphe pallidus and presumptive presympathetic neurons of the ventrolateral medulla, as has been seen in eutherians. On the other hand, immunoreactivity to CART was weak in or absent from isocortical areas, and immunoreactivity to CART was poor or minimal in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens of both species; regions where immunoreactivity to CART is very strong in the brains of eutherians. During development, CART was present at birth (P0) in the lateral trigeminal ganglion, spinal trigeminal tract and the vagal sensorimotor complex, but did not appear in mid- or forebrain regions until much later (from P37). These anatomical findings indicate that although CART is likely to serve very similar functions in both eutherians and marsupials, there are potentially functionally significant differences between the two mammalian groups. PMID:20881368

  16. Kallmann syndrome 1 gene is expressed in the marsupial gonad.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanqiu; Yu, Hongshi; Shaw, Geoff; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2011-03-01

    Kallmann syndrome is characterized by hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and anosmia. The syndrome can be caused by mutations in several genes, but the X-linked form is caused by mutation in the Kallmann syndrome 1 (KAL1). KAL1 plays a critical role in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal migration that is essential for the normal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Interestingly, KAL1 appears to be missing from the rodent X, and no orthologue has been detected as yet. We investigated KAL1 during development and in adults of an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Marsupial KAL1 maps to an autosome within a group of genes that was added as a block to the X chromosome in eutherian evolution. KAL1 expression was widespread in embryonic and adult tissues. In the adult testis, tammar KAL1 mRNA and protein were detected in the germ cells at specific stages of differentiation. In the adult testis, the protein encoded by KAL1, anosmin-1, was restricted to the round spermatids and elongated spermatids. In the adult ovary, anosmin-1 was not only detected in the oocytes but was also localized in the granulosa cells throughout folliculogenesis. This is the first examination of KAL1 mRNA and protein localization in adult mammalian gonads. The protein localization suggests that KAL1 participates in gametogenesis not only through the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by activation of GnRH neuronal migration, but also directly within the gonads themselves. Because KAL1 is autosomal in marsupials but is X-linked in eutherians, its conserved involvement in gametogenesis supports the hypothesis that reproduction-related genes were actively recruited to the eutherian X chromosome. PMID:21123819

  17. The common gamma chain cytokine interleukin-21 is expressed by activated lymphocytes from two macropod marsupials, Macropus eugenii and Onychogalea fraenata.

    PubMed

    Suthers, A N; Old, J M; Young, L J

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, interleukin-21 is a member of the common gamma chain cytokine family that also includes IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9 and IL-15. IL-21 has pleiotropic effects on both myeloid and lymphoid immune cells and as a consequence, the biological actions of IL-21 are broad: regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses and playing a pivotal role in antiviral, inflammatory and antitumour cellular responses. While IL-21 genes have been characterized in mammals, birds, fish and amphibians, there are no reports for any marsupial species to date. We characterized the expressed IL-21 gene from immune tissues of two macropod species, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), a model macropod, and the closely related endangered bridled nailtail wallaby (Onychogalea fraenata). The open reading frame of macropod IL-21 is 462 nucleotides in length and encodes a 153-mer putative protein that has 46% identity with human IL-21. Despite the somewhat low amino acid conservation with other mammals, structural elements and residues essential for IL-21 conformation and receptor association were conserved in the macropod IL-21 predicted peptides. The detection of IL-21 gene expression in T-cell-enriched tissues, combined with analysis of the promotor region of the tammar wallaby gene, suggests that macropod IL-21 is expressed in stimulated T cells but is not readily detected in other cells and tissues. The similarity of gene expression profile and functionally important amino acid residues to eutherian IL-21 makes it unlikely that the differences in B- and T-cell responses that are reported for some marsupial species are due to a lack of important functional residues or IL-21 gene expression in this group of mammals. PMID:27306193

  18. Early onset of ghrelin production in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoff; Fletcher, Terry P; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-02-27

    Ghrelin regulates appetite in mammals and can stimulate growth hormone (GH) release from the pituitary. In rats and humans, ghrelin cells appear in the stomach during late fetal life. Nevertheless, the role of ghrelin in early mammalian development is not well understood. Marsupials deliver highly altricial young that weigh less than 1g so they must feed and digest milk at a comparatively immature stage of development. Since they complete their growth and differentiation while in the pouch, they are accessible models in which to determine the time course of ghrelin production during development. We examined the distribution of gastric ghrelin cells, plasma ghrelin concentrations and pituitary expression of the ghrelin receptor (ghsr-1alpha) and GH in the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. There were ghrelin immunopositive cells in the developing mesenchyme of the stomach from day 10 post partum (pp) to day 150pp. Subsequently ghrelin protein in the fore-stomach declined and was absent by day 250pp but remained in the gastric cells of the hind-stomach. Ghrelin was detected in the developing pancreas from day 10pp but was absent by day 150pp and in the adult. Pituitary ghsr-1alpha expression and plasma concentrations of ghrelin increased significantly up to day 70-120pp while GH expression was also elevated, declining with GH to reach adult levels by day 180pp. These results demonstrate an early onset of gastric ghrelin expression in the tammar in concert with a functional stomach at a relatively earlier stage than that of developmentally more mature eutherian young.

  19. Acid-base balance in the developing marsupial: from ectotherm to endotherm.

    PubMed

    Andrewartha, Sarah J; Cummings, Kevin J; Frappell, Peter B

    2014-05-01

    Marsupial joeys are born ectothermic and develop endothermy within their mother's thermally stable pouch. We hypothesized that Tammar wallaby joeys would switch from α-stat to pH-stat regulation during the transition from ectothermy to endothermy. To address this, we compared ventilation (Ve), metabolic rate (Vo2), and variables relevant to blood gas and acid-base regulation and oxygen transport including the ventilatory requirements (Ve/Vo2 and Ve/Vco2), partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2), carbon dioxide (PaCO2), pHa, and oxygen content (CaO2) during progressive hypothermia in ecto- and endothermic Tammar wallabies. We also measured the same variables in the well-studied endotherm, the Sprague-Dawley rat. Hypothermia was induced in unrestrained, unanesthetized joeys and rats by progressively dropping the ambient temperature (Ta). Rats were additionally exposed to helox (80% helium, 20% oxygen) to facilitate heat loss. Respiratory, metabolic, and blood-gas variables were measured over a large body temperature (Tb) range (∼15-16°C in both species). Ectothermic joeys displayed limited thermogenic ability during cooling: after an initial plateau, Vo2 decreased with the progressive drop in Tb. The Tb of endothermic joeys and rats fell despite Vo2 nearly doubling with the initiation of cold stress. In all three groups the changes in Vo2 were met by changes in Ve, resulting in constant Ve/Vo2 and Ve/Vco2, blood gases, and pHa. Thus, although thermogenic capability was nearly absent in ectothermic joeys, blood acid-base regulation was similar to endothermic joeys and rats. This suggests that unlike some reptiles, unanesthetized mammals protect arterial blood pH with changing Tb, irrespective of their thermogenic ability and/or stage of development.

  20. Quantitative land-cover change in space and time over the last 11 000 years in the Baltic Sea catchment area and Norway - implications for studies on vegetation-climate interactions and land-use as a forcing of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trondman, Anna-Kari; Gaillard, Marie-José; Nielsen, Anne Birgitte; Shinya, Sugita; John, Birks; Anne, Bjune; Mihkel, Kangur; Per, Lagerås; Malgorzata, Latalowa; Matts, Lindbladh; Anneli, Poska; Siim, Veski

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of the effect of human-induced land-cover change (land-use) on climate in the past is still a subject of debate. Although we know that both biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes between the land surface and the atmosphere due to anthropogenic land-cover change lead to significant effects on climate, we still know little on the net effect of both types of processes. For instance climate modelling studies have shown that the extent of deforestation in Europe between 6k and 0.2k - as proposed by the KK scenarios of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change (ALCC) of Kaplan et al (2009) - has either warming or cooling biogeophysical effects on the geographical location (Strandberg et al., 2014). Further progress in our understanding of the effects of land-use change on climate greatly depends on the availability of reliable, empirical data on past land-use changes in quantitative terms. We present here pollen-based estimates of regional vegetation cover over the Holocene in the catchment of the Baltic Sea and in Norway. The regional abundance of individual plant species, genus, and groups of taxa were estimated at a 0.5k - to 0.1k - calender year time resolution using 339 pollen records and the REVEALS model (Sugita, 2007). Although there are very large differences between pollen percentages and REVEALS estimates of plant cover in terms of percentage values, the general trends in relative changes of the large landscape units (coniferous trees, deciduous trees, and open land) over time are comparable between the two. However, the ages obtained for the establishment of all tree taxa using a "REVEALS estimate threshold" of 1% are almost all older (by 0.5k years or more) than the ages inferred earlier from pollen percentages, and the times of maximum abundances of the tree taxa, as well as the relationships trees/openland and coniferous/deciduous are different between pollen percentages and plant cover. The pollen-based REVEALS cover of open land confirms the

  1. Chemical characterization of milk oligosaccharides of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Urashima, Tadasu; Taufik, Epi; Fukuda, Rino; Nakamura, Tadashi; Fukuda, Kenji; Saito, Tadao; Messer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Previous structural characterizations of marsupial milk oligosaccharides had been performed in only two macropod species, the tammar wallaby and the red kangaroo. To clarify the homology and heterogeneity of milk oligosaccharides among marsupial species, which could provide information on their evolution, the oligosaccharides of the koala milk carbohydrate fraction were characterized in this study. Neutral and acidic oligosaccharides were separated from the carbohydrate fraction of milk of the koala, a non-macropod marsupial, and characterized by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The structures of the neutral saccharides were found to be Gal(β1-4)Glc (lactose), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-galactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3',3″-digalactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novopentaose I) and Gal(β1-3){Gal(β1-4)[Fuc(α1-3)]GlcNAc(β1-6)}Gal(β1-4)Glc (fucosyl lacto-N-novopentaose I), while those of the acidic saccharides were Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-SL), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Gal (sialyl 3'-galactosyllactose), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a), Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-6)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose b), Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose c), and Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3){Gal(β1-4)[Fuc(α1-3)]GlcNAc(β1-6)}Gal(β1-4)Glc (fucosyl sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a). The neutral oligosaccharides, other than fucosyl lacto-N-novopentaose I, a novel hexasaccharide, had been found in milk of the tammar wallaby, a macropod marsupial, while the acidic oligosaccharides, other than fucosyl sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a had been identified in milk carbohydrate of the red kangaroo. The presence of fucosyl oligosaccharides is a significant feature of koala milk, in which it differs from milk of the tammar wallaby and the red kangaroo.

  2. Cytochrome P450 CYP3A in marsupials: cloning and characterisation of the second identified CYP3A subfamily member, isoform 3A78 from koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    El-Merhibi, Adaweyah; Ngo, Suong N T; Crittenden, Tamara A; Marchant, Ceilidh L; Stupans, Ieva; McKinnon, Ross A

    2011-11-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are critically important in the oxidative metabolism of a diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. Previously, we cloned and characterised the CYP2C, CYP4A, and CYP4B gene subfamilies from marsupials and demonstrated important species-differences in both activity and tissue expression of these CYP enzymes. Recently, we isolated the Eastern grey kangaroo CYP3A70. Here we have cloned and characterised the second identified member of marsupial CYP3A gene subfamily, CYP3A78 from the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). In addition, we have examined the gender-differences in microsomal erythromycin N-demethylation activity (a CYP3A marker) and CYP3A protein expression across test marsupial species. Significant differences in hepatic erythromycin N-demethylation activity were observed between male and female koalas, with the activity detected in female koalas being 2.5-fold higher compared to that in male koalas (p<0.01). No gender-differences were observed in tammar wallaby or Eastern grey kangaroo. Immunoblot analysis utilising anti-human CYP3A4 antibody detected immunoreactive proteins in liver microsomes from all test male and female marsupials including the koala, tammar wallaby, and Eastern grey kangaroo, with no gender-differences detected across test marsupials. A 1610 bp koala hepatic CYP3A complete cDNA, designated CYP3A78, was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approaches. It displays 64% nucleotide and 57% amino acid sequence identity to the Eastern grey kangaroo CYP3A70. The CYP3A78 cDNA encodes a protein of 515 amino acids, shares approximately 68% nucleotide and 56% amino acid sequence identity to human CYP3A4, and displays high sequence similarity to other published mammalian CYP3As from human, monkey, cow, pig, dog, rat, rabbit, mouse, hamster, and guinea pig. Collectively, this study provides primary molecular data regarding koala hepatic CYP3A78 gene and enables further functional analyses of CYP

  3. Control of jaw movements in two species of macropodines (Macropus eugenii and Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Crompton, A W; Barnet, J; Lieberman, D E; Owerkowicz, T; Skinner, J; Baudinette, R V

    2008-06-01

    The masticatory motor patterns of three tammar wallabies and two red kangaroos were determined by analyzing the pattern of electromyographic (EMG) activity of the jaw adductors and correlating it with lower jaw movements, as recorded by digital video and videoradiography. Transverse jaw movements were limited by the width of the upper incisal arcade. Molars engaged in food breakdown during two distinct occlusal phases characterized by abrupt changes in the direction of working-side hemimandible movement. Separate orthal (Phase I) and transverse (Phase II) trajectories were observed. The working-side lower jaw initially was drawn laterally by the balancing-side medial pterygoid and then orthally by overlapping activity in the balancing- and working-side temporalis and the balancing-side superficial masseter and medial pterygoid. Transverse movement occurred principally via the working-side medial pterygoid and superficial masseter. This pattern contrasted to that of placental herbivores, which are known to break down food when they move the working-side lower jaw transversely along a relatively longer linear path without changing direction during the power stroke. The placental trajectory results from overlapping activity in the working- and balancing-side adductor muscles, suggesting that macropods and placental herbivores have modified the primitive masticatory motor pattern in different ways.

  4. Molecular insights into evolution of the vertebrate gut: focus on stomach and parietal cells in the marsupial, Macropus eugenii.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Joly; De Iongh, Robbert; Nicholas, Kevin; Familari, Mary

    2009-09-15

    Gastrulation in vertebrate embryos results in the formation of the primary germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm, which contain the progenitors of the tissues of the entire fetal body. Extensive studies undertaken in Xenopus, zebrafish and mouse have revealed a high degree of conservation in the genes and cellular mechanisms regulating endoderm formation. Nodal, Mix and Sox gene factor families have been implicated in the specification of the endoderm across taxa. Considerably less is known about endoderm development in marsupials. In this study we review what is known about the molecular aspects of endoderm development, focusing on evolution and development of the stomach and parietal cells and highlight recent studies on parietal cells in the stomach of Tammar Wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Although the regulation of parietal cells has been extensively studied, very little is known about the regulation of parietal cell differentiation. Intriguingly, during late-stage forestomach maturation in M. eugenii, there is a sudden and rapid loss of parietal cells, compared with the sharp increase in parietal cell numbers in the hindstomach region. This has provided a unique opportunity to study the development and regulation of parietal cell differentiation. A PCR-based subtractive hybridization strategy was used to identify candidate genes involved in this phenomenon. This will allow us to dissect the molecular mechanisms that underpin regulation of parietal cell development and differentiation, which have been a difficult process to study and provide markers that can be used to study the evolutionary origin of these cells in vertebrates.

  5. Post-natal imprinting: evidence from marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, J M; Pask, A J; Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been identified in therian (eutherian and marsupial) mammals but not in prototherian (monotreme) mammals. Imprinting has an important role in optimising pre-natal nutrition and growth, and most imprinted genes are expressed and imprinted in the placenta and developing fetus. In marsupials, however, the placental attachment is short-lived, and most growth and development occurs post-natally, supported by a changing milk composition tailor-made for each stage of development. Therefore there is a much greater demand on marsupial females during post-natal lactation than during pre-natal placentation, so there may be greater selection for genomic imprinting in the mammary gland than in the short-lived placenta. Recent studies in the tammar wallaby confirm the presence of genomic imprinting in nutrient-regulatory genes in the adult mammary gland. This suggests that imprinting may influence infant post-natal growth via the mammary gland as it does pre-natally via the placenta. Similarly, an increasing number of imprinted genes have been implicated in regulating feeding and nurturing behaviour in both the adult and the developing neonate/offspring in mice. Together these studies provide evidence that genomic imprinting is critical for regulating growth and subsequently the survival of offspring not only pre-natally but also post-natally. PMID:24595366

  6. Identification multiplex assay of 19 terrestrial mammal species present in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Laca, Ana; Linacre, Adrian M T; Gleeson, Dianne M; Tobe, Shanan S

    2013-12-01

    An identification assay has been developed that allows accurate detection of 19 of the most common terrestrial mammals present in New Zealand (cow, red deer, goat, dog, horse, hedgehog, cat, tammar wallaby, mouse, weasel, ferret, stoat, sheep, rabbit, Pacific rat, Norway rat, ship rat, pig, and brushtail possum). This technique utilizes species-specific primers that, combined in a multiplex PCR, target small fragments of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Each species, except hedgehog, produces two distinctive species-specific fragments, making the assay self-confirmatory and enabling the identification of multiple species simultaneously in DNA mixtures. The multiplex assay detects as little as 100 copies of mitochondrial DNA, which makes it a very reliable tool for degraded and trace samples. Reliability, accuracy, reproducibility, and sensitivity tests to validate the technique were performed. The technique featured here enabled a prompt response in a predation specific event, but can also be useful for wildlife management and conservation, pest incursions detection, forensic, and industrial purposes in a very simple and cost-effective manner.

  7. Marsupial Genome Sequences: Providing Insight into Evolution and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Janine E.

    2012-01-01

    Marsupials (metatherians), with their position in vertebrate phylogeny and their unique biological features, have been studied for many years by a dedicated group of researchers, but it has only been since the sequencing of the first marsupial genome that their value has been more widely recognised. We now have genome sequences for three distantly related marsupial species (the grey short-tailed opossum, the tammar wallaby, and Tasmanian devil), with the promise of many more genomes to be sequenced in the near future, making this a particularly exciting time in marsupial genomics. The emergence of a transmissible cancer, which is obliterating the Tasmanian devil population, has increased the importance of obtaining and analysing marsupial genome sequence for understanding such diseases as well as for conservation efforts. In addition, these genome sequences have facilitated studies aimed at answering questions regarding gene and genome evolution and provided insight into the evolution of epigenetic mechanisms. Here I highlight the major advances in our understanding of evolution and disease, facilitated by marsupial genome projects, and speculate on the future contributions to be made by such sequences. PMID:24278712

  8. A new role for muscle segment homeobox genes in mammalian embryonic diapause

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Bartos, Amanda; Fenelon, Jane; Lefèvre, Pavine; Daikoku, Takiko; Shaw, Geoff; Maxson, Robert; Murphy, Bruce D.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian embryonic diapause is a phenomenon defined by the temporary arrest in blastocyst growth and metabolic activity within the uterus which synchronously becomes quiescent to blastocyst activation and implantation. This reproductive strategy temporally uncouples conception from parturition until environmental or maternal conditions are favourable for the survival of the mother and newborn. The underlying molecular mechanism by which the uterus and embryo temporarily achieve quiescence, maintain blastocyst survival and then resume blastocyst activation with subsequent implantation remains unknown. Here, we show that uterine expression of Msx1 or Msx2, members of an ancient, highly conserved homeobox gene family, persists in three unrelated mammalian species during diapause, followed by rapid downregulation with blastocyst activation and implantation. Mice with uterine inactivation of Msx1 and Msx2 fail to achieve diapause and reactivation. Remarkably, the North American mink and Australian tammar wallaby share similar expression patterns of MSX1 or MSX2 as in mice—it persists during diapause and is rapidly downregulated upon blastocyst activation and implantation. Evidence from mouse studies suggests that the effects of Msx genes in diapause are mediated through Wnt5a, a known transcriptional target of uterine Msx. These studies provide strong evidence that the Msx gene family constitutes a common conserved molecular mediator in the uterus during embryonic diapause to improve female reproductive fitness. PMID:23615030

  9. Comparative pathology of pulmonary hydatid cysts in macropods and sheep.

    PubMed

    Barnes, T S; Hinds, L A; Jenkins, D J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Lightowlers, M W; Coleman, G T

    2011-01-01

    The development and appearance of hydatid cysts of Echinococcus granulosus in experimentally infected tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) and sheep during the period 9-17 months post-infection (mpi) were studied. Cysts of unknown age were also examined from mature, naturally infected sheep. The cysts grew more rapidly and became fertile within a shorter period in wallabies compared with sheep. Cysts from the wallabies were larger in absolute size and were larger relative to the size of the lungs. Microscopical examination revealed that wallaby hydatid cysts developed in small bronchioles. Hydatid cysts in the wallabies had a thicker germinal membrane, with more nuclei and a thicker laminated layer (LL), than hydatid cysts of similar age found in sheep. In contrast, the adventitial layer was thicker in the ovine cysts, comprising a hyalinized layer of degenerate collagen and necrotic cellular debris surrounded by a layer of granulation tissue that was largely absent from lesions in the wallabies. Multilocular cysts were present in sheep, but not in wallabies. The greater thickness of the germinal membrane in wallaby cysts suggests greater parasite activity, which may explain the more rapid growth rate in this host, whereas the thicker adventitial layer in sheep cysts may be restrictive to growth while simultaneously protecting the hydatid from the host immune response. These differences in the parasite-host relationship between macropods and sheep may reflect the relatively recent introduction of the parasite into Australia. PMID:20846666

  10. Early cell lineage specification in a marsupial: a case for diverse mechanisms among mammals.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen; Shaw, Geoff; Freyer, Claudia; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2013-03-01

    Early cell lineage specification in eutherian mammals results in the formation of a pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM) and trophoblast. By contrast, marsupials have no ICM. Here, we present the first molecular analysis of mechanisms of early cell lineage specification in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby. There was no overt differential localisation of key lineage-specific transcription factors in cleavage and early unilaminar blastocyst stages. Pluriblast cells (equivalent to the ICM) became distinguishable from trophoblast cells by differential expression of POU5F1 and, to a greater extent, POU2, a paralogue of POU5F1. Unlike in the mouse, pluriblast-trophoblast differentiation coincided with a global nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transition of CDX2 localisation. Also unlike in the mouse, Hippo pathway factors YAP and WWTR1 showed mutually distinct localisation patterns that suggest non-redundant roles. NANOG and GATA6 were conserved as markers of epiblast and hypoblast, respectively, but some differences to the mouse were found in their mode of differentiation. Our results suggest that there is considerable evolutionary plasticity in the mechanisms regulating early lineage specification in mammals. PMID:23344710

  11. Diversity of color vision: not all Australian marsupials are trichromatic.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Wiebke; Natoli, Riccardo C; Hemmi, Jan M

    2010-01-01

    Color vision in marsupials has recently emerged as a particularly interesting case among mammals. It appears that there are both dichromats and trichromats among closely related species. In contrast to primates, marsupials seem to have evolved a different type of trichromacy that is not linked to the X-chromosome. Based on microspectrophotometry and retinal whole-mount immunohistochemistry, four trichromatic marsupial species have been described: quokka, quenda, honey possum, and fat-tailed dunnart. It has, however, been impossible to identify the photopigment of the third cone type, and genetically, all evidence so far suggests that all marsupials are dichromatic. The tammar wallaby is the only Australian marsupial to date for which there is no evidence of a third cone type. To clarify whether the wallaby is indeed a dichromat or trichromatic like other Australian marsupials, we analyzed the number of cone types in the "dichromatic" wallaby and the "trichromatic" dunnart. Employing identical immunohistochemical protocols, we confirmed that the wallaby has only two cone types, whereas 20-25% of cones remained unlabeled by S- and LM-opsin antibodies in the dunnart retina. In addition, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the rod photopigment (rod opsin) is expressed in cones which would have explained the absence of a third cone opsin gene. Our study is the first comprehensive and quantitative account of color vision in Australian marsupials where we now know that an unexpected diversity of different color vision systems appears to have evolved. PMID:21151905

  12. Isoforms of the CD79 signal transduction component of the macropod B-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Suthers, Amy N; Young, Lauren J

    2014-12-01

    B cell responses and their concomitant signal transduction pathways are not well understood in marsupial mammals, despite the availability of gene expression data for key immunoglobulin genes and for elements of the CD79a/CD79b heterodimer signalling complex for two model marsupials. Broader studies of factors that influence B cell responses are still hampered by a lack of species-specific reagents and there are few reports of other factors that influence gene expression such as the potential for splice variants in BCR components, which may influence immune signalling pathways. In this study, we characterise CD79a and CD79b genes in the endangered macropod marsupial, Onychogalea fraenata (the bridled nailtail wallaby) and show that domains and residues important for the structural and functional integrity of both monomers are conserved in this species, consistent with results previously reported for the closely-related macropod, Macropus eugenii (the tammar wallaby). We extend this work to report the detection of splice variants for CD79a and CD79b in wallaby species; three CD79a isoforms and one CD79b isoform. Of these, two CD79a isoforms and the CD79b isoform have not been reported in any other mammalian species. PMID:25064685

  13. Backdoor pathway for dihydrotestosterone biosynthesis: implications for normal and abnormal human sex development.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Maki; Homma, Keiko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2013-04-01

    We review the current knowledge about the "backdoor" pathway for the biosynthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). While DHT is produced from cholesterol through the conventional "frontdoor" pathway via testosterone, recent studies have provided compelling evidence for the presence of an alternative "backdoor" pathway to DHT without testosterone intermediacy. This backdoor pathway is known to exist in the tammar wallaby pouch young testis and the immature mouse testis, and has been suggested to be present in the human as well. Indeed, molecular analysis has identified pathologic mutations of genes involved in the backdoor pathway in genetic male patients with undermasculinized external genitalia, and urine steroid profile analysis has argued for the relevance of the activated backdoor pathway to abnormal virilization in genetic females with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and 21-hydroxylase deficiency. It is likely that the backdoor pathway is primarily operating in the fetal testis in a physiological condition to produce a sufficient amount of DHT for male sex development, and that the backdoor pathway is driven with a possible interaction between fetal and permanent adrenals in pathologic conditions with increased 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels. These findings provide novel insights into androgen biosynthesis in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:23073980

  14. A dual role for SHH during phallus development in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Chew, K Y; Pask, A J; Hickford, D; Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian phallus arises from identical primordia in both sexes and is patterned in part by the key morphogen Sonic hedgehog (SHH). We have investigated SHH and other morphogens during phallus development in the tammar wallaby. In this marsupial, testis differentiation and androgen production occurs just after birth, but it takes a further 50-60 days before the phallus becomes sexually dimorphic. One day before birth, SHH was expressed in both sexes in the urethral epithelium. In males, there was a marked upregulation of SHH, GLI2, and AR at day 50 postpartum, a time when testicular androgen production falls. SHH, GLI2, and AR were downregulated in female pouch young treated with androstanediol from days 24-50, but not when treatments were begun at day 29, suggesting an early window of androgen sensitivity. SHH, GLI2, and AR expression in the phallus of males castrated at day 23 did not differ from controls, but there was an increase in SHH and GLI2 and a decrease in FGF8 and BMP4 expression when the animals were castrated at day 29. These results suggest that the early patterning by SHH is androgen-independent followed by an androgen-dependent window of sensitivity and a sharp rise in SHH expression after androgen withdrawal at day 50. PMID:24480851

  15. Further characterisation of two Eimeria species (Eimeria quokka and Eimeria setonicis) in quokkas (Setonix brachyurus).

    PubMed

    Austen, J M; Friend, J A; Yang, R; Ryan, U M

    2014-03-01

    The identification and characterisation of novel Eimeria species has largely been based on sporulated oocyst and sporocyst morphology, the host species and the geographical range. Variation in the size and shape of Eimeria oocysts across their host range however, make the identification and characterisation of novel species using traditional methodologies alone problematic. The use of molecular markers and phylogenetic analysis has greatly advanced our ability to characterise Eimeria species and has recently been applied to understand evolutionary relationships among Eimeria species from Australian marsupials. In the present study, Eimeria species isolated from quokkas (Setonix brachyurus) captured from Two Peoples Bay, Bald Island and Rottnest Island, Western Australia, were morphologically identified as Eimeria quokka and Eimeria setonicis. Both Eimeria species were identified as being polymorphic in nature with regards to sporulated oocyst and sporocyst morphometrics. Phylogenetic analysis using 18S rRNA and COI (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) genes, grouped E. quokka and E. setonicis within the Eimeria marsupial clade together with Eimeria trichosuri from brushtail possums, Eimeria macropodis from tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) and several unidentified macropod Eimeria species from western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus). This study is the first to characterise E. quokka and E. setonicis by molecular analysis, enabling more extensive resolution of evolutionary relationships among marsupial-derived Eimeria species. PMID:24508502

  16. A new role for muscle segment homeobox genes in mammalian embryonic diapause.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Bartos, Amanda; Fenelon, Jane; Lefèvre, Pavine; Daikoku, Takiko; Shaw, Geoff; Maxson, Robert; Murphy, Bruce D; Renfree, Marilyn B; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian embryonic diapause is a phenomenon defined by the temporary arrest in blastocyst growth and metabolic activity within the uterus which synchronously becomes quiescent to blastocyst activation and implantation. This reproductive strategy temporally uncouples conception from parturition until environmental or maternal conditions are favourable for the survival of the mother and newborn. The underlying molecular mechanism by which the uterus and embryo temporarily achieve quiescence, maintain blastocyst survival and then resume blastocyst activation with subsequent implantation remains unknown. Here, we show that uterine expression of Msx1 or Msx2, members of an ancient, highly conserved homeobox gene family, persists in three unrelated mammalian species during diapause, followed by rapid downregulation with blastocyst activation and implantation. Mice with uterine inactivation of Msx1 and Msx2 fail to achieve diapause and reactivation. Remarkably, the North American mink and Australian tammar wallaby share similar expression patterns of MSX1 or MSX2 as in mice-it persists during diapause and is rapidly downregulated upon blastocyst activation and implantation. Evidence from mouse studies suggests that the effects of Msx genes in diapause are mediated through Wnt5a, a known transcriptional target of uterine Msx. These studies provide strong evidence that the Msx gene family constitutes a common conserved molecular mediator in the uterus during embryonic diapause to improve female reproductive fitness. PMID:23615030

  17. Determining microsatellite genotyping reliability and mutation detection ability: an approach using small-pool PCR from sperm DNA.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Anna J; Sarre, Stephen D; Fitzsimmons, Nancy N; Aitken, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite genotyping from trace DNA is now common in fields as diverse as medicine, forensics and wildlife genetics. Conversely, small-pool PCR (SP-PCR) has been used to investigate microsatellite mutation mechanisms in human DNA, but has had only limited application to non-human species. Trace DNA and SP-PCR studies share many challenges, including problems associated with allelic drop-out, false alleles and other PCR artefacts, and the need to reliably identify genuine alleles and/or mutations. We provide a framework for the validation of such studies without a multiple tube approach and demonstrate the utility of that approach with an analysis of microsatellite mutations in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). Specifically, we amplified three autosomal microsatellites from somatic DNA to characterise efficiency and reliability of PCR from low-template DNA. Reconstruction experiments determined our ability to discriminate mutations from parental alleles. We then developed rules to guide data interpretation. We estimated mutation rates in sperm DNA to range from 1.5 × 10(-2) to 2.2 × 10(-3) mutations per locus per generation. Large multi-step mutations were observed, providing evidence for complex mutation processes at microsatellites and potentially violating key assumptions in the stepwise mutation model. Our data demonstrate the necessity of actively searching for large mutation events when investigating microsatellite evolution and highlight the need for a thorough understanding of microsatellite amplification characteristics before embarking on SP-PCR or trace DNA studies.

  18. Circulating levels of prolactin and progesterone in a wild population of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) Marsupialia: Macropodidae.

    PubMed

    Muths, E; Hinds, L A

    1996-03-01

    Circulating progesterone and prolactin levels were measured in shot and live-caught wild red kangaroos using radioimmunoassays validated for the red kangaroo. The objective of the study was to correlate hormone profiles with reproductive status and determine if red kangaroos follow the general pattern elucidated for other macropodids. During Phase 2a lactation ( < 70 days) plasma progesterone concentrations were < 189 pg/ml (n = 41). This value increased to > 600 pg/ml (n = 32) during the transition to Phase 3 lactation (181 to 235 days) when the quiescent corpus luteum and embryo were reactivated. Progesterone concentrations then decreased to < 300 pg/ml (n = 29) during dual lactation when females were suckling a neonate and a young at foot. Concentrations of prolactin during Phase 2a were < 6 ng/ml (n = 17). Coincident with the period of reactivation of the diapausing blastocyst (181 to 235 days), plasma prolactin concentrations increased to 15 ng/ml (n = 32), then decreased and remained low through the subsequent stage of dual lactation. These results indicate that progesterone and prolactin profiles in wild red kangaroos follow patterns found previously in other macropodid species, the tammar and Bennett's wallabies.

  19. Circulating levels of prolactin and progesterone in a wild population of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) Marsupialia: Macropodidae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Hinds, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Circulating progesterone and prolactin levels were measured in shot and live-caught wild red kangaroos using radioimmunoassays validated for the red kangaroo. The objective of the study was to correlate hormone profiles with reproductive status and determine if red kangaroos follow the general pattern elucidated for other macropodids. During Phase 2a lactation (<70 days) plasma progesterone concentrations were <189 pg/ml (n= 41). This value increased to >600 pg/ml (n= 32) during the transition to Phase 3 lactation (181 to 235 days) when the quiescent corpus luteum and embryo were reactivated. Progesterone concentrations then decreased to <300 pg/ml (n= 29) during dual lactation when females were suckling a neonate and a young at foot. Concentrations of prolactin during Phase 2a were <6 ng/ml (n= 17). Coincident with the period of reactivation of the diapausing blastocyst (181 to 235 days), plasma prolactin concentrations increased to 15 ng/ml (n= 32), then decreased and remained low through the subsequent stage of dual lactation. These results indicate that progesterone and prolactin profiles in wild red kangaroos follow patterns found previously in other macropodid species, the tammar and Bennett's wallabies.

  20. Ruminants genome no longer contains Whey Acidic Protein gene but only a pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Hajjoubi, Siham; Rival-Gervier, Sylvie; Hayes, Hélène; Floriot, Sandrine; Eggen, André; Piumi, François; Chardon, Patrick; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Thépot, Dominique

    2006-03-29

    Whey Acidic Protein (WAP) has been identified in the milk of only a few species, including mouse, rat, rabbit, camel, pig, tammar wallaby, brushtail possum, echidna and platypus. Despite intensive studies, it has not yet been found in the milk of Ruminants. We have isolated and characterized genomic WAP clones from ewe, goat and cow, identified their chromosomal localization and examined the expression of the endogenous WAP sequence in the mammary glands of all three species. The WAP sequences were localized on chromosome 4 (4q26) as expected from comparative mapping data. The three ruminant WAP sequences reveal the same deletion of a nucleotide at the end of the first exon when compared with the pig sequence. Due to this frameshift mutation, the putative proteins encoded by these sequences do not harbor the features of a usual WAP protein with two four-disulfide core domains. Moreover, RT-PCR experiments have shown that these sequences are not transcribed and are, thus, pseudogenes. This loss of functionality of the gene in Ruminants raises the question of the biological role of the WAP. Some putative roles previously suggested for WAP are discussed. PMID:16483732

  1. The candidate sex-reversing DAX1 gene is autosomal in marsupials: Implications for the evolution of sex determination in mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Pask, A.; Toder, R.; Wilcox, S.A.

    1997-05-01

    The human X-linked DAX1 gene was cloned from the region of the short arm of the human X found in duplicate in sex-reversed X{sub dup}Y females. DAX1 is suggested to be required for ovarian differentiation and to play an important role in mammalian sex determination or differentiation pathways. Its proposed dose-dependent effect on sexual development suggests that DAX1 could represent an evolutionary link with an ancestral sex-determining mechanism that depended on the dosage of an X-linked gene. Furthermore, DAX1 could also represent the putative X-linked switch gene, which independently controls sexual dimorphisms in marsupial mammals in an X-dose-dependent manner. If DAX1 has a present role in marsupial sexual differentiation or had an ancestral role in mammalian sex determination, it would be expected to lie on the marsupial X chromosome, despite the autosomal localization of other human Xp genes. We therefore cloned and mapped the DAX1 gene in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). DAX1 was located on wallaby chromosome 5p near other human Xp genes, indicating that it was originally autosomal and that it is not involved in X-linked dose-dependent sex determination in an ancestral mammal nor in marsupial sexual differentiation. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  2. A dual role for SHH during phallus development in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Chew, K Y; Pask, A J; Hickford, D; Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian phallus arises from identical primordia in both sexes and is patterned in part by the key morphogen Sonic hedgehog (SHH). We have investigated SHH and other morphogens during phallus development in the tammar wallaby. In this marsupial, testis differentiation and androgen production occurs just after birth, but it takes a further 50-60 days before the phallus becomes sexually dimorphic. One day before birth, SHH was expressed in both sexes in the urethral epithelium. In males, there was a marked upregulation of SHH, GLI2, and AR at day 50 postpartum, a time when testicular androgen production falls. SHH, GLI2, and AR were downregulated in female pouch young treated with androstanediol from days 24-50, but not when treatments were begun at day 29, suggesting an early window of androgen sensitivity. SHH, GLI2, and AR expression in the phallus of males castrated at day 23 did not differ from controls, but there was an increase in SHH and GLI2 and a decrease in FGF8 and BMP4 expression when the animals were castrated at day 29. These results suggest that the early patterning by SHH is androgen-independent followed by an androgen-dependent window of sensitivity and a sharp rise in SHH expression after androgen withdrawal at day 50.

  3. Early cell lineage specification in a marsupial: a case for diverse mechanisms among mammals.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen; Shaw, Geoff; Freyer, Claudia; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2013-03-01

    Early cell lineage specification in eutherian mammals results in the formation of a pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM) and trophoblast. By contrast, marsupials have no ICM. Here, we present the first molecular analysis of mechanisms of early cell lineage specification in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby. There was no overt differential localisation of key lineage-specific transcription factors in cleavage and early unilaminar blastocyst stages. Pluriblast cells (equivalent to the ICM) became distinguishable from trophoblast cells by differential expression of POU5F1 and, to a greater extent, POU2, a paralogue of POU5F1. Unlike in the mouse, pluriblast-trophoblast differentiation coincided with a global nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transition of CDX2 localisation. Also unlike in the mouse, Hippo pathway factors YAP and WWTR1 showed mutually distinct localisation patterns that suggest non-redundant roles. NANOG and GATA6 were conserved as markers of epiblast and hypoblast, respectively, but some differences to the mouse were found in their mode of differentiation. Our results suggest that there is considerable evolutionary plasticity in the mechanisms regulating early lineage specification in mammals.

  4. A centromere-specific retroviral element associated with breaks of synteny in macropodine marsupials.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, G C; Marzelli, M; Rens, W; O'Neill, R J

    2004-01-01

    Studies of chromosome evolution have focused heavily on the evolution of conserved syntenic, gene-rich domains. It is obvious, however, that the centromere plays an equally important role in chromosome evolution, through its involvement in fissions, centric fusions, translocations, inversions and centric shifts. It is unclear how the centromere, either as a functioning unit of the chromosome or as a DNA sequence motif, has been involved in these processes. Marsupials of the family Macropodidae (kangaroos, wallabies, rat kangaroos and potoroos) offer unique insights into current theories expositing centromere emergence during karyotypic diversification and speciation. Tracing the genomic distribution of centromeric sequences in a model macropodine (subfamily Macropodinae: kangaroos and wallabies) species, Macropus eugenii (tammar wallaby), indicates these sequences have played an important role in chromosome evolution through possible segmental duplications associated with phylogenetically conserved breaks of synteny, pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions. Hybrids between different kangaroo species provide evidence that the centromere is unstable within this group of mammals and is involved in a large number of chromosome aberrations. A better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic factors that define centromeres and how centromeres may mediate changes in chromosome architecture are critical not only to our understanding of basic cellular functioning but also to our understanding of the process of speciation.

  5. Hosts of the exotic ornate kangaroo tick, Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum Koch, on southern Yorke Peninsula, South Australia.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Helen P; Petit, Sophie; Dixon, Bruce; Andrews, Ross H

    2007-10-01

    Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum is assumed to be endemic to south-western Western Australia (including Barrow Island), Queensland (excluding Cape York Peninsula), and New South Wales, south to Dubbo and Barham. The species has been recorded on a range of mammalian hosts including macropods and domestic animals. In Queensland, A. triguttatum triguttatum is implicated in the epidemiology of Q fever. In 2000, the species was detected on southern Yorke Peninsula in South Australia. We aimed to identify A. triguttatum triguttatum's hosts through trapping, sampling of carcasses, and opportunistic capture of vertebrates on Yorke Peninsula. A. triguttatum triguttatum was removed from black rats (Rattus rattus), wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), Tammar wallabies (M. eugenii eugenii), domesticated cats and dogs, and humans. Before this study, A. triguttatum triguttatum had not been found on black rats or rabbits in the wild. This research has implications for the management of wildlife, livestock, and visitors on Yorke Peninsula. The potential for A. triguttatum triguttatum to spread to other areas of Yorke Peninsula and South Australia is considerable, as visitors (tourists) to southern Yorke Peninsula report the presence of ticks both on themselves and among camping equipment on arriving home.

  6. Evidence for local relaxin ligand-receptor expression and function in arteries.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jacqueline; Parry, Laura J; Matthews, Julianna E; Kerchner, Laurie J; Indovina, Kimberly; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Doty, Ketah D; Debrah, Dan O; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Conrad, Kirk P

    2006-11-01

    Relaxin is a 6 kDa protein hormone produced by the corpus luteum and secreted into the blood during pregnancy in rodents and humans. Growing evidence indicates that circulating relaxin causes vasodilatation and increases in arterial compliance, which may be among its most important actions during pregnancy. Here we investigated whether there is local expression and function of relaxin and relaxin receptor in arteries of nonpregnant females and males. Relaxin-1 and its major receptor, Lgr7, mRNA are expressed in thoracic aortas, small renal and mesenteric arteries from mice and rats of both sexes, as well as in small renal arteries from female tammar wallabies (an Australian marsupial). Using available antibodies for rat and mouse Lgr7 receptor and rat relaxin, we also identified protein expression in arteries. Small renal arteries isolated from relaxin-1 gene-deficient mice demonstrate enhanced myogenic reactivity and decreased passive compliance relative to wild-type (WT) and heterozygous mice. Taken together, these findings reveal an arterial-derived, relaxin ligand-receptor system that acts locally to regulate arterial function.

  7. Plasma progesterone levels in the pregnant female rat-kangaroo (Bettongia gaimardi).

    PubMed

    Jones, S M; Rose, R W

    1992-08-01

    Plasma progesterone levels were measured in female bettongs (small macropodid marsupials) under two natural regimes: (1) during "delayed" gestation (initiated by removal of pouch young, RPY) and (2) during the pregnancy prior to pouch vacation when a young still occupies the pouch (i.e., during lactation). Basal levels of progesterone were 0.15-0.5 ng/ml. There was a transient peak of progesterone (0.7 ng/ml) early in gestation at Day 4 RPY. After Day 6 RPY, progesterone levels remained elevated (1.2-1.5 ng/ml) until they dropped sharply to basal levels on the day of birth. This pattern of progesterone secretion during delayed gestation is similar to that seen in other marsupials, such as the tammar wallaby. There was no significant difference between the progesterone profiles of the two experimental groups. We deduce, then, that lactation had no effect on corpus luteum function (as assessed by plasma progesterone levels) in the pregnant bettong.

  8. Comparative analysis of ATRX, a chromatin remodeling protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel J; Pask, Andrew J; Huynh, Kim; Renfree, Marilyn B; Harley, Vincent R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2004-09-15

    The ATRX protein, associated with X-linked alpha-thalassaemia, mental retardation and developmental abnormalities including genital dysgenesis, has been proposed to function as a global transcriptional regulator within a multi-protein complex. However, an understanding of the composition and mechanics of this machinery has remained elusive. We applied inter-specific comparative analysis to identify conserved elements which may be involved in regulating the conformation of chromatin. As part of this study, we cloned and sequenced the entire translatable coding region (7.4 kb) of the ATRX gene from a model marsupial (tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii). We identify an ATRX ancestral core, conserved between plants, fish and mammals, comprising the cysteine-rich and SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like regions and protein interaction domains. Our data are consistent with the model of the cysteine-rich region as a DNA-binding zinc finger adjacent to a protein-binding (plant homeodomain-like) domain. Alignment of vertebrate ATRX sequences highlights other conserved elements, including a negatively charged mammalian sequence which we propose to be involved in binding of positively charged histone tails.

  9. Collision-based mechanics of bipedal hopping.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Anne K; Lee, David V; McGowan, Craig P

    2013-08-23

    The muscle work required to sustain steady-speed locomotion depends largely upon the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass and the degree to which this energy can be stored and returned elastically. Previous studies have found that large bipedal hoppers can elastically store and return a large fraction of the energy required to hop, whereas small bipedal hoppers can only elastically store and return a relatively small fraction. Here, we consider the extent to which large and small bipedal hoppers (tammar wallabies, approx. 7 kg, and desert kangaroo rats, approx. 0.1 kg) reduce the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass by reducing collisions. We hypothesize that kangaroo rats will reduce collisions to a greater extent than wallabies since kangaroo rats cannot elastically store and return as high a fraction of the mechanical energy of hopping as wallabies. We find that kangaroo rats use a significantly smaller collision angle than wallabies by employing ground reaction force vectors that are more vertical and center of mass velocity vectors that are more horizontal and thereby reduce their mechanical cost of transport. A collision-based approach paired with tendon morphometry may reveal this effect more generally among bipedal runners and quadrupedal trotters.

  10. Has anthropogenic land-cover change been a significant climate forcing in the past? - An assessment for the Baltic Sea catchment area based on a literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Marie-Jose; Kaplan, Jed O.; Kleinen, Thomas; Brigitte Nielsen, Anne; Poska, Anneli; Samuelsson, Patrick; Strandberg, Gustav; Trondman, Anna-Kari

    2015-04-01

    still an urgent need to better understand the biogeophysical effects on regional and continental climate of afforestation in the hemiboreal and boreal regions, and their significance in relation to the biogeochemical effects. (1) Trondman, A.-K. et al. (2014) Global Change Biology (2014), doi: 10.1111/gcb.12737 (2) Strandberg, G. et al. (2014) Climate of the Past 10, 661-680.

  11. On seasonality of the indirect greenhouse gas CO above Europe: an altitude-resolved picture from long-term FTIR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussmann, Ralf; Rettinger, Markus; Borsdorff, Tobias

    2010-05-01

    , F., Kramer, I., Mahieu, E., Mellqvist, J., Notholt, J., Novelli. P. C., Rockmann, A., Scheel, H. E., Schneider, M., Schulz, A., Strandberg, A., Sussmann, R., Tanimoto, H., Velazco, V., Drummond, J. R., and Gille, J. C.: Increased Northern Hemispheric carbon monoxide burden in the troposphere in 2002 and 2003 detected from the ground and from space, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 563-573, 2005.

  12. Appendix: Limits on the use of heterodyning and amplification in optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.

    1992-11-01

    The development of optical fibers, lasers, and mixers at optical frequencies has offered the hope that active methods can contribute to optical interferometry. Heterodyning, in particular, looks attractive, even though bandwidths are narrower than one would like at present; one might expect this limitation to lessen as technology develops. That expectation, unfortunately, is not likely to benefit interferometry at optical wavelengths because of the intervention of quantum mechanics and the second law of thermodynamics, as Burke (1985a) pointed out. So much 'second quantization' noise is generated that only at infrared frequencies, somewhere in the 10-100 micron range, can one look forward to heterodyning in any realistic sense. The reason is easily understood. Every amplifier, in the quantum limit, works by stimulated emission, even though this basic truth is not obvious at radio frequencies. This means that there must be spontaneous emission occurring within every amplifier, and Strandberg (1957) showed that this implied a limiting noise temperature, TN = h nu/k, for any amplifier. Burke (1969) used this result to demonstrate that, if it were not for this quantum noise, the VLBI method would allow one to tell which slit a photon went through before forming an interference pattern, thus violating basic tenants of quantum mechanics. In essence, the second quantization condition Delta N Delta phi greater than or = 1 saves one from paradox. One can state the conclusion simply: any amplifier produces approximately one photon per Hertz of bandwidth. In optical interferometry, one will certainly want bandwidth in the 1012 to 1014 Hz range, and that implies an intolerable cacophony of noise photons. Only at infrared frequencies can one tolerate the quantum noise, where the natural noise background may be high and the mixers are not as efficient as one would hope for. The crossover at present is about 10 or 20 microns, but the boundary will shift to longer wavelengths as

  13. Ozone tropospheric and stratospheric trends (1995-2012) at six ground-based FTIR stations (28°N to 79°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigouroux, Corinne; De Mazière, Martine; Demoulin, Philippe; Servais, Christian; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Kohlepp, Regina; Barthlott, Sabine; García, Omaira; Mellqvist, Johan; Persson, Glenn; Palm, Mathias; Notholt, Justus; Hannigan, James; Coffey, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), contributing ground-based stations have joined their efforts to homogenize and optimize the retrievals of ozone profiles from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) solar absorption spectra. Using the optimal estimation method, distinct vertical information can be obtained in four layers: ground-10 km, 10-18 km, 18-27 km, and 27-42 km, in addition to total column amounts. In a previous study, Vigouroux et al. (2008)1 applied a bootstrap resampling method to determine the trends of the ozone total and four partial columns, over the period 1995-2004 at Western European stations. The updated trends for the period 1995-2009 have been published in the WMO 2010 report2. Here, we present the updated trends and their uncertainties, for the 1995-2012 period, for the different altitude ranges, above five European stations (28°N-79°N) and above the station Thule, Greenland (77°N). In this work, the trends have been estimated using a multiple regression model including some explanatory variables responsible for the ozone variability, such as the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the solar flux, the Arctic Oscillation (AO) or El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). A major result is the significant positive trend of ozone in the upper stratosphere, observed at the Jungfraujoch (47°N), which is a typical mid-latitude site, as well as at the high latitude stations. This positive trend in the upper stratosphere at Jungfraujoch provides a sign of ozone recovery at mid-latitudes. 1 Vigouroux, C., De Mazière, M., Demoulin, P., Servais, C., Hase, F., Blumenstock, T., Kramer, I., Schneider, M., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Rockmann, A., Gardiner, T., Coleman, M., and Woods, P. : Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations, ACP, 8, 6865-6886, 2008. 2 Douglass, A., and

  14. Chemical characterization of acidic oligosaccharides in milk of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Anraku, Tatsuro; Fukuda, Kenji; Saito, Tadao; Messer, Michael; Urashima, Tadasu

    2012-04-01

    In the milk of marsupials, oligosaccharides usually predominate over lactose during early to mid lactation. Studies have shown that tammar wallaby milk contains a major series of neutral galactosyllactose oligosaccharides ranging in size from tri- to at least octasaccharides, as well as β(1-6) linked N-acetylglucosamine-containing oligosaccharides as a minor series. In this study, acidic oligosaccharides were purified from red kangaroo milk and characterized by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, to be as follows: Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-SL), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl 3'-galactosyllactose), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a), Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-6)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose b), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc. These acidic oligosaccharides were shown to be sialylated or sulfated in the non-reducing ends to the major linear and the minor branched series of neutral oligosaccharides of tammar wallaby milk.

  15. Expression analysis of Cdx2 and Pou5f1 in a marsupial, the stripe-faced dunnart, during early development.

    PubMed

    Familari, Mary; Au, Phil Chi Khang; de Iongh, Robb U; Cruz, Yolanda; Selwood, Lynne

    2016-02-01

    The first lineage allocation during mouse development forms the trophectoderm and inner cell mass, in which Cdx2 and Pou5f1 display reciprocal expression. Yet Cdx2 is not required for trophectoderm specification in other mammals, such as the human, cow, pig, or in two marsupials, the tammar and opossum. The role of Cdx2 and Pou5f1 in the first lineage allocation of Sminthopsis macroura, the stripe-faced dunnart, is unknown. In this study, expression of Cdx2 and Pou5f1 during oogenesis, development from cleavage to blastocyst stages, and in the allocation of the first three lineages was analyzed for this dunnart. Cdx2 mRNA was present in late antral-stage oocytes, but not present again until Day 5.5. Pou5f1 mRNA was present from primary follicles to zygotes, and then expression resumed starting at the early unilaminar blastocyst stage. All cleavage stages and the pluriblast and trophoblast cells co-expressed CDX2 and POU5F1 proteins, which persisted until early stages of hypoblast formation. Hypoblast cells also show co-localisation of POU5F1 and CDX2 once they were allocated, and this persisted during their division and migration. Our studies suggest that CDX2, and possibly POU5F1, are maternal proteins, and that the first lineage to differentiate is the trophoblast, which differentiates to trophectoderm after shell loss one day before implantation. In the stripe-faced dunnart, cleavage cells, as well as trophoblast and pluriblast cells, are polarized, suggesting the continued presence of CDX2 in both lineages until late blastocyst stages may play a role in the formation and maintenance of polarity. PMID:26613191

  16. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A; Menzies, Brandon R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials-which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya-also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell-cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto-maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses-displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected-plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades.

  17. DAX1/NR0B1 was expressed during mammalian gonadal development and gametogenesis before it was recruited to the eutherian X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Stickels, Robert; Clark, Kevin; Heider, Thomas N; Mattiske, Deidre M; Renfree, Marilyn B; Pask, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) gene is an orphan nuclear receptor that is X-linked in eutherian mammals and plays a critical role in the establishment and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis. Duplication or overexpression of NR0B1 in eutherian males causes male to female sex reversal, and mutation and deletions of NR0B1 cause testicular defects. Thus, gene dosage is critical for the function of NR0B1 in normal gonadogenesis. However, NR0B1 is autosomal in all noneutherian vertebrates, including marsupials and monotreme mammals, and two active copies of the gene are compatible with both male and female gonadal development. In the current study, we examined the evolution and expression of autosomal NR0B1 during gonadal development in a marsupial (the tammar wallaby) as compared to the role of its X-linked orthologues in a eutherian (the mouse). We show that NR0B1 underwent rapid evolutionary change when it relocated from its autosomal position in the nonmammalian vertebrates, monotremes, and marsupials to an X-linked location in eutherian mammals. Despite the acquisition of a novel genomic location and a unique N-terminal domain, NR0B1 protein distribution was remarkably similar between mice and marsupials both throughout gonadal development and during gamete formation. A conserved accumulation of NR0B1 protein was observed in developing oocytes, where its function appears to be critical in the early embryo, prior to zygotic genome activation. Together these findings suggest that NR0B1 had a conserved role in gonadogenesis that existed long before it moved to the X chromosome and despite undergoing significant evolutionary change.

  18. Evolution of shorter and more hydrophilic transthyretin N-termini by stepwise conversion of exon 2 into intron 1 sequences (shifting the 3' splice site of intron 1)

    PubMed

    Aldred, A R; Prapunpoj, P; Schreiber, G

    1997-06-01

    Transthyretin cDNA was cloned from Eastern Grey Kangaroo liver and its nucleotide sequence determined. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence of kangaroo transthyretin, together with data obtained previously for transthyretins from other vertebrate species [Duan, W., Richardson, S. J., Babon, J. J., Heyes, R. J., Southwell, B. R., Harms, P. J., Wettenhall, R. E. H., Dziegielewska, K. M., Selwood, L., Bradley, A. J., Brack, C. M. & Schreiber, G. (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 227, 396-406], showed that the N-terminus is the region which changes most distinctly during evolution. It has been shown for human, mouse and rat transthyretins, that this region is encoded by DNA at the border of exon 1 and exon 2. Therefore, this section of transthyretin genomic DNA was amplified by PCR and directly sequenced for the Buffalo Rat, Tammar Wallaby, Eastern Grey Kangaroo, Stripe-faced Dunnart, Short-tailed Grey Opossum and White Leghorn Chicken. The splice sites at both ends of intron 1 were identified by comparison with the cDNA sequences. The obtained data suggest that the N-termini of transthyretin evolved by successive shifts of the 3' splice site of intron 1 in the 3' direction, resulting in successive shortening of the 5' end of exon 2. At the protein level, this resulted in a shorter and more hydrophilic N-terminal region of transthyretin. Successive shifts in splice sites may be an evolutionary mechanism of general importance, since they can lead to stepwise changes in the properties of proteins. This could be a molecular mechanism for positive Darwinian selection.

  19. Steroidogenesis of the testis -- new genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Flück, Christa E; Pandey, Amit V

    2014-05-01

    Defects of androgen biosynthesis cause 46,XY disorder of sexual development (DSD). All steroids are produced from cholesterol and the early steps of steroidogenesis are common to mineralocorticoid, glucocorticoid and sex steroid production. Genetic mutations in enzymes and proteins supporting the early biosynthesis pathways cause adrenal insufficiency (AI), DSD and gonadal insufficiency. The classic androgen biosynthesis defects with AI are lipoid CAH, CYP11A1 and HSD3B2 deficiencies. Deficiency of CYP17A1 rarely causes AI, and HSD17B3 or SRD5A2 deficiencies only cause 46,XY DSD and gonadal insufficiency. All androgen biosynthesis depends on 17,20 lyase activity of CYP17A1 which is supported by P450 oxidoreductase (POR) and cytochrome b5 (CYB5). Therefore 46,XY DSD with apparent 17,20 lyase deficiency may be due to mutations in CYP17A1, POR or CYB5. Illustrated by patients harboring mutations in SRD5A2, normal development of the male external genitalia depends largely on dihydrotestosterone (DHT) which is converted from circulating testicular testosterone (T) through SRD5A2 in the genital skin. In the classic androgen biosynthetic pathway, T is produced from DHEA and androstenedione/-diol in the testis. However, recently found mutations in AKR1C2/4 genes in undervirilized 46,XY individuals have established a role for a novel, alternative, backdoor pathway for fetal testicular DHT synthesis. In this pathway, which has been first elucidated for the tammar wallaby pouch young, 17-hydroxyprogesterone is converted directly to DHT by 5α-3α reductive steps without going through the androgens of the classic pathway. Enzymes AKR1C2/4 catalyse the critical 3αHSD reductive reaction which feeds 17OH-DHP into the backdoor pathway. In conclusion, androgen production in the fetal testis seems to utilize two pathways but their exact interplay remains to be elucidated. PMID:24793988

  20. Seroprevalence of retrovirus in North American captive macropodidae.

    PubMed

    Georoff, Timothy A; Joyner, Priscilla H; Hoover, John P; Payton, Mark E; Pogranichniy, Roman M

    2008-09-01

    Laboratory records of serology results from captive macropodidae sampled between 1997 and 2005 were reviewed to assess the seroprevalence of retrovirus exposure. Serum samples from 269 individuals (136 males, 133 females) representing 10 species of macropods housed in 31 North American captive collections were analyzed for retrovirus antibody using an indirect immunofluorescent assay. The prevalence of positive antibody titers comparing male versus female, between species, between age groups, and among animals with identified parentage was examined by nonparametric statistical analyses. Median age of animals at time of sample collection was 36 mo (range 2-201 mo). Total percentage seropositive was 20.4%. Serum antibody was detected in 31 of 47 (66.0%) tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), nine of 24 (37.5%) yellow-footed rock wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus), four of 11 (36.4%) swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor), 10 of 80 (12.5%) red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), and one of 54 (1.9%) parma wallaby (Macropus parma). No individuals of western gray kangaroo (n=3) (Macropus fuliginosus), eastern gray kangaroo (n=19) (Macropus giganteus), common wallaroo (n=6) (Macropus robustus), red kangaroo (n=11) (Macropus rufus), or Matschie's tree kangaroo (n=14) (Dendrolagus matschiei) were positive for retrovirus antibody. These results demonstrate that five species of captive macropods have a history of exposure to retrovirus, with the highest percentage seropositive and highest statistical correlation in M. eugenii (pair-wise Fisher's exact test, alpha = 0.05). Additionally, one wild-caught M. eugenii was confirmed seropositive during quarantine period, indicating that retrovirus exposure may exist in wild populations.

  1. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A.; Menzies, Brandon R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials—which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya—also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto–maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses—displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected—plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades. PMID:25605903

  2. Sequencing and mapping hemoglobin gene clusters in the australian model dasyurid marsupial sminthopsis macroura

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, A.A.; Wheeler, D.; Lefevre, C.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Hope, R.; Kuliwaba, J.; Nicholas, K.R.; Westermanc, M.; Graves, J.A.M.

    2004-07-26

    Comparing globin genes and their flanking sequences across many species has allowed globin gene evolution to be reconstructed in great detail. Marsupial globin sequences have proved to be of exceptional significance. A previous finding of a beta-like omega gene in the alpha cluster in the tammar wallaby suggested that the alpha and beta cluster evolved via genome duplication and loss rather than tandem duplication. To confirm and extend this important finding we isolated and sequenced BACs containing the alpha and beta loci from the distantly related Australian marsupial Sminthopsis macroura. We report that the alpha gene lies in the same BAC as the beta-like omega gene, implying that the alpha-omega juxtaposition is likely to be conserved in all marsupials. The LUC7L gene was found 3' of the S. macroura alpha locus, a gene order shared with humans but not mouse, chicken or fugu. Sequencing a BAC contig that contained the S. macroura beta globin and epsilon globin loci showed that the globin cluster is flanked by olfactory genes, demonstrating a gene arrangement conserved for over 180 MY. Analysis of the region 5' to the S. macroura epsilon globin gene revealed a region similar to the eutherian LCR, containing sequences and potential transcription factor binding sites with homology to eutherian hypersensitive sites 1 to 5. FISH mapping of BACs containing S. macroura alpha and beta globin genes located the beta globin cluster on chromosome 3q and the alpha locus close to the centromere on 1q, resolving contradictory map locations obtained by previous radioactive in situ hybridization.

  3. DAX1/NR0B1 was expressed during mammalian gonadal development and gametogenesis before it was recruited to the eutherian X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Stickels, Robert; Clark, Kevin; Heider, Thomas N; Mattiske, Deidre M; Renfree, Marilyn B; Pask, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) gene is an orphan nuclear receptor that is X-linked in eutherian mammals and plays a critical role in the establishment and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis. Duplication or overexpression of NR0B1 in eutherian males causes male to female sex reversal, and mutation and deletions of NR0B1 cause testicular defects. Thus, gene dosage is critical for the function of NR0B1 in normal gonadogenesis. However, NR0B1 is autosomal in all noneutherian vertebrates, including marsupials and monotreme mammals, and two active copies of the gene are compatible with both male and female gonadal development. In the current study, we examined the evolution and expression of autosomal NR0B1 during gonadal development in a marsupial (the tammar wallaby) as compared to the role of its X-linked orthologues in a eutherian (the mouse). We show that NR0B1 underwent rapid evolutionary change when it relocated from its autosomal position in the nonmammalian vertebrates, monotremes, and marsupials to an X-linked location in eutherian mammals. Despite the acquisition of a novel genomic location and a unique N-terminal domain, NR0B1 protein distribution was remarkably similar between mice and marsupials both throughout gonadal development and during gamete formation. A conserved accumulation of NR0B1 protein was observed in developing oocytes, where its function appears to be critical in the early embryo, prior to zygotic genome activation. Together these findings suggest that NR0B1 had a conserved role in gonadogenesis that existed long before it moved to the X chromosome and despite undergoing significant evolutionary change. PMID:25395677

  4. Host-parasite associations of Eimeria spp. (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) in kangaroos and wallabies of the genus Macropus (Marsupialia:Macropodidae).

    PubMed

    Barker, I K; O'Callaghan, M G; Beveridge, I

    1989-05-01

    Faecal samples from 514 kangaroos and wallabies representing 12 species of the genus Macropus were examined for oocysts of Eimeria spp. Six species of Eimeria were redescribed from their type hosts, and on the basis of finding homologous oocysts in the faeces of other Macropus spp., host ranges for these coccidia were extended. Eimeria hestermani Mykytowycz, 1964 is redescribed from M. giganteus (eastern grey kangaroo) and is described from M. fuliginosus (western grey kangaroo), M. rufogriseus (red-necked wallaby), M. dorsalis (black-striped wallaby), and M. eugenii (tammar wallaby). E. toganmainensis Mykytowycz, 1964 is redescribed from M. rufus (red kangaroo) and the host range is extended to M. giganteus, M. fuliginosus, M. rufogriseus and M. eugenii. E. wilcanniensis Mykytowycz, 1964 is redescribed from M. rufus, and the host range is extended to M. giganteus, M. fuliginosus and M. robustus (euro or wallaroo). E. macropodis Wenyon & Scott, 1925 is redescribed from M. rufogriseus, and is described from M. giganteus, M. fuliginosus, M. rufus, M. irma (western brush wallaby), M. parryi (whip-tailed wallaby), M. dorsalis, M. eugenii, and M. parma (parma wallaby). E. fausti Yakimoff & Matschoulsky, 1936, E. cunnamullensis Mykytowycz, 1964 and E. purchasei Mykytowycz, 1964 are synonymized with E. macropodis. E. marsupialium Yakimoff & Matschoulsky, 1936 is redescribed from M. giganteus, and from M. fuliginosus. E. gungahlinensis Mykytowycz, 1964 is redescribed from M. fuliginosus, and from M. giganteus. Seven new species of Eimeria are described. E. flindersi, new species, is described from M. eugenii, M. rufogriseus, and M. antilopinus (antilopine wallaroo). E. prionotemni, new species, is described from M. eugenii, M. parryi, M. rufogriseus, M. agilis (agile wallaby) and M. dorsalis. E. mykytowyczi, new species, is described from M. agilis, M. antilopinus, and M. parryi. E. parryi, new species, is described from M. parryi. E. yathongensis, new species, is

  5. Expression profiles of the immune genes CD4, CD8β, IFNγ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in mitogen-stimulated koala lymphocytes (Phascolarctos cinereus) by qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Maher, Iona E; Griffith, Joanna E; Lau, Quintin; Reeves, Thomas; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the immune response of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is needed urgently, but has been limited by scarcity of species-specific reagents and methods for this unique and divergent marsupial. Infectious disease is an important threat to wild populations of koalas; the most widespread and important of these is Chlamydial disease, caused by Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia pneumoniae. In addition, koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is of 100% prevalence in northern Australia, has been proposed as an important agent of immune suppression that could explain the koala's susceptibility to disease. The correct balance of T regulatory, T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 lymphocyte responses are important to an individual's susceptibility or resistance to chlamydial infection. The ability to study chlamydial or KoRV pathogenesis, effects of environmental stressors on immunity, and the response of koalas to vaccines under development, by examining the koala's adaptive response to natural infection or in-vitro stimulation, has been limited to date by a paucity of species- specific reagents. In this study we have used cytokine sequences from four marsupial genomes to identify mRNA sequences for key T regulatory, Th1 and Th2 cytokines interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interferon gamma (IFNγ) along with CD4 and CD8β. The koala sequences used for primer design showed >58% homology with grey short-tailed opossum, >71% with tammar wallaby and 78% with Tasmanian devil amino acid sequences. We report the development of real-time RT-PCR assays to measure the expression of these genes in unstimulated cells and after three common mitogen stimulation protocols (phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin, phorbol myristate acetate/phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A). Phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin was found to be the most effective mitogen to up-regulate the production of IL-4, IL-10 and IFNγ. IL-6 production was not consistently up-regulated by

  6. Identification and transcript analysis of a novel wallaby (Macropus eugenii) basal-like breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julie A; Mailer, Sonia L; Thomson, Peter C; Lefèvre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2008-01-01

    Background A wide variety of animal models have been used to study human breast cancer. Murine, feline and canine mammary tumor cell lines have been studied for several decades and have been shown to have numerous aspects in common with human breast cancer. It is clear that new comparative approaches to study cancer etiology are likely to be productive. Results A continuous line of breast carcinoma cells (WalBC) was established from a primary breast cancer that spontaneously arose in a female tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). The primary tumor was 1.5 cm3 and although large, did not appear to invade the stroma and lacked vimentin expression. The WalBC cell line was cultured from the primary tumor and passaged for 22 months. WalBC cells displayed an epithelial morphology when grown on plastic, were not EGF responsive, stained strongly for cyto-keratin and negatively for vimentin. WalBC cells were shown to be non-invasive within a Matrigel invasion assay and failed to produce tumors following transplantation into nude mice. Gene expression profiling of WalBC cells was performed using a cDNA microarray of nearly 10,000 mammary gland cDNA clones and compared to normal primary mammary cells and profiles of human breast cancer. Seventy-six genes were down-regulated and sixty-six genes were up-regulated in WalBC cells when compared to primary mammary cells. WalBC cells exhibited expression of known markers of basal invasive human breast cancers as well as increased KRT17, KRT 14 and KRT 19, DSP, s100A4, NDRG-1, ANXA1, TK1 and AQP3 gene expression and decreased gene expression of TIMP3, VIM and TAGLN. New targets for breast cancer treatment were identified such as ZONAB, PACSIN3, MRP8 and SUMO1 which have human homologues. Conclusion This study demonstrates how novel models of breast cancer can provide new fundamental clues regarding cancer etiology which may lead to new human treatments and therapies. PMID:18179684

  7. Scaling of the spring in the leg during bouncing gaits of mammals.

    PubMed

    Lee, David V; Isaacs, Michael R; Higgins, Trevor E; Biewener, Andrew A; McGowan, Craig P

    2014-12-01

    Trotting, bipedal running, and especially hopping have long been considered the principal bouncing gaits of legged animals. We use the radial-leg spring constant [Formula: see text] to quantify the stiffness of the physical leg during bouncing gaits. The radial-leg is modeled as an extensible strut between the hip and the ground and [Formula: see text] is determined from the force and deflection of this strut in each instance of stance. A Hookean spring is modeled in-series with a linear actuator and the stiffness of this spring [Formula: see text] is determined by minimizing the work of the actuator while reproducing the measured force-deflection dynamics of an individual leg during trotting or running, and of the paired legs during hopping. Prior studies have estimated leg stiffness using [Formula: see text], a metric that imagines a virtual-leg connected to the center of mass. While [Formula: see text] has been applied extensively in human and comparative biomechanics, we show that [Formula: see text] more accurately models the spring in the leg when actuation is allowed, as is the case in biological and robotic systems. Our allometric analysis of [Formula: see text] in the kangaroo rat, tammar wallaby, dog, goat, and human during hopping, trotting, or running show that [Formula: see text] scales as body mass to the two-third power, which is consistent with the predictions of dynamic similarity and with the scaling of [Formula: see text]. Hence, two-third scaling of locomotor spring constants among mammals is supported by both the radial-leg and virtual-leg models, yet the scaling of [Formula: see text] emerges from work-minimization in the radial-leg model instead of being a defacto result of the ratio of force to length used to compute [Formula: see text]. Another key distinction between the virtual-leg and radial-leg is that [Formula: see text] is substantially greater than [Formula: see text], as indicated by a 30-37% greater scaling coefficient for [Formula

  8. Chemical characterization of milk oligosaccharides of the eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus).

    PubMed

    Urashima, Tadasu; Sun, Yiliang; Fukuda, Kenji; Hirayama, Kentaro; Taufik, Epi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Saito, Tadao; Merchant, Jim; Green, Brian; Messer, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Structural characterizations of marsupial milk oligosaccharides have been performed in four species to date: the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). To clarify the homology and heterogeneity of milk oligosaccharides among marsupials, the oligosaccharides in the carbohydrate fraction of eastern quoll milk were characterized in this study. Neutral and acidic oligosaccharides were separated and characterized by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The structures of the neutral oligosaccharides were Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-galactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3",3'-digalactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novopentaose I), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (galactosyl lacto-N-novopentaose I), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (galactosyl lacto-N-novopentaose II), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (galactosyl lacto-N-novopentaose III) and Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novooctaose). The structures of the acidic oligosaccharides detected are Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-sialyllactose), Gal(β1-3)(O-3-sulfate)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novopentaose I sulfate a), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)(O-3-sulfate)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novopentaose I sulfate b), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a), Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose c), Neu5Ac(α2-3) Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc, and Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc with an α(2

  9. Chemical characterization of milk oligosaccharides of the eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus).

    PubMed

    Urashima, Tadasu; Sun, Yiliang; Fukuda, Kenji; Hirayama, Kentaro; Taufik, Epi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Saito, Tadao; Merchant, Jim; Green, Brian; Messer, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Structural characterizations of marsupial milk oligosaccharides have been performed in four species to date: the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). To clarify the homology and heterogeneity of milk oligosaccharides among marsupials, the oligosaccharides in the carbohydrate fraction of eastern quoll milk were characterized in this study. Neutral and acidic oligosaccharides were separated and characterized by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The structures of the neutral oligosaccharides were Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-galactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3",3'-digalactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novopentaose I), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (galactosyl lacto-N-novopentaose I), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (galactosyl lacto-N-novopentaose II), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (galactosyl lacto-N-novopentaose III) and Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novooctaose). The structures of the acidic oligosaccharides detected are Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-sialyllactose), Gal(β1-3)(O-3-sulfate)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novopentaose I sulfate a), Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)(O-3-sulfate)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novopentaose I sulfate b), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a), Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose c), Neu5Ac(α2-3) Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc, and Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc with an α(2

  10. Chemical characterization of milk oligosaccharides of the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Kentaro; Taufik, Epi; Kikuchi, Megumi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Fukuda, Kenji; Saito, Tadao; Newgrain, Keith; Green, Brian; Messer, Michael; Urashima, Tadasu

    2016-09-01

    Previous structural characterizations of marsupial milk oligosaccharides have been performed in the tammar wallaby, red kangaroo, koala, common brushtail possum and the eastern quoll. To clarify the homology and heterogeneity of milk oligosaccharides among marsupial species, which could provide information on their evolution, the oligosaccharides of wombat milk carbohydrate were characterized in this study. Neutral and acidic oligosaccharides were isolated from the carbohydrate fractions of two samples of milk of the common wombat and characterized by (1) H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The structures of six neutral saccharides were found to be Gal(β1-4)Glc (lactose), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-galactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3',3"-digalactosyllactose), Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (galactosyl lacto-N-novopentaose I) and Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (lacto-N-novooctaose), while those of six acidic saccharides were Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc. (sialyl 3'-galactosyllactose), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl 3',3"-digalactosyllactose), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a), Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose c), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc,, Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc and Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc. In addition, small amounts of sulfated oligosaccharides but no oligosaccharides containing Neu5Gc or α(2-6) linked Neu5Ac were detected. PMID:26608481