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Sample records for strange baryons sigma

  1. Strangeness in the baryon ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-10-01

    We compute the strangeness content of the baryon octet and decuplet states based on an analysis of recent lattice simulations of the BMW, PACS, LHPC and HSC groups for the pion-mass dependence of the baryon masses. Our results rely on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian and large-Nc sum rule estimates of the counter terms relevant for the baryon masses at N3LO. A partial summation is implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop contributions to the baryon self energies. A simultaneous description of the lattice results of the BMW, LHPC, PACS and HSC groups is achieved. From a global fit we determine the axial coupling constants F ≃ 0.45 and D ≃ 0.80 in agreement with their values extracted from semi-leptonic decays of the baryons. Moreover, various flavor symmetric limits of baron octet and decuplet masses as obtained by the QCDSF-UKQCD group are recovered. We predict the pion- and strangeness sigma terms and the pion-mass dependence of the octet and decuplet ground states at different strange quark masses.

  2. Strange Baryon Physics in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-11-01

    Strange baryon spectra and form factors are key probes to study excited nuclear matter. The use of lattice QCD allows us to test the strength of the Standard Model by calculating strange baryon quantities from first principles.

  3. Strangeness S = -3 and -4 baryon-baryon interactions in chiral EFT

    SciTech Connect

    Haidenbauer, Johann

    2011-10-24

    I report on recent progress in the description of baryon-baryon systems within chiral effective field theory. In particular, I discuss results for the strangeness S = -3 to -4 baryon-baryon systems, obtained to leading order.

  4. Strangeness S = -3 and -4 baryon-baryon interactions in chiral EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidenbauer, Johann

    2011-10-01

    I report on recent progress in the description of baryon-baryon systems within chiral effective field theory. In particular, I discuss results for the strangeness S = -3 to -4 baryon-baryon systems, obtained to leading order.

  5. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ωb and Ω_{bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations.

  6. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  7. Strange Baryon to Meson Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, Eleazar; Ayala, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    We present a model to compute baryon and meson transverse momentum distributions, and their ratios, in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The model allows to compute the probability to form colorless bound states of either two or three quarks as functions of the evolving density during the collision. The qualitative differences of the baryon to meson ratio for different collision energies and for different particle species can be associated to the different density dependent probabilities and to the combinatorial factors which in turn depend on whether the quarks forming the bound states are heavy or light. We compare to experimental data and show that we obtain a good description up to intermediate values of pt.

  8. Strangeness -2 and -3 Baryons in a Constituent Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts

    2007-09-19

    We apply a quark model developed in earlier work to the spectrum of baryons with strangeness -2 and -3. The model describes a number of well-established baryons successfully, and application to cascade baryons allows the quantum numbers of some known states to be deduced.

  9. Observation of the Heavy Baryons Sigma b and Sigma b*.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-11-16

    We report an observation of new bottom baryons produced in pp collisions at the Tevatron. Using 1.1 fb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four Lambda b 0 pi+/- resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode Lambda b 0-->Lambda c + pi-, where Lambda c+-->pK* pi+. We interpret these states as the Sigma b(*)+/- baryons and measure the following masses: m Sigma b+=5807.8 -2.2 +2.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, m Sigma b- =5815.2+/-1.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, and m(Sigma b*)-m(Sigma b)=21.2-1.9 +2.0(stat.)-0.3+0.4(syst.) MeV/c2.

  10. Observation of the doubly strange b baryon Omegab-.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; DeVaughan, K; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Komissarov, E V; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-12-05

    We report the observation of the doubly strange b baryon Omegab- in the decay channel Omegab(-)-->J/psiOmega-, with J/psi-->mu+mu(-) and Omega(-)-->LambdaK(-)-->(ppi-)K-, in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we observe 17.8+/-4.9(stat)+/-0.8(syst) Omegab- signal events at a mass of 6.165+/-0.010(stat)+/-0.013(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.4sigma, corresponding to a probability of 6.7 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation.

  11. Direct observation of the strange b baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panov, G; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-08-03

    We report the first direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi(b)- (Xi(b)+). We reconstruct the decay Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, with J/psi-->mu+mu-, and Xi--->Lambdapi--->ppi-pi- in pp collisions at square root of s =1.96 TeV. Using 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector, we observe 15.2 +/- 4.4(stat)(-0.4)(+1.9)(syst) Xi(b)- candidates at a mass of 5.774 +/- 0.011(stat) +/- 0.015(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.5 sigma, equivalent to a probability of 3.3 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation. Normalizing to the decay Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda, we measure the relative rate sigma(Xi(b-) x B(Xi)b})- -->J/psiXi-)/sigma(Lambda(b)) x B(Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda) = 0.28+/-0.09(stat)(-0.08)(+0.09)(syst).

  12. Strange form factors of octet and decuplet baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Soon-Tae

    1999-11-22

    The strange form factors of baryon octet are evaluated, in the chiral models with the general chiral SU(3) group structure, to yield the theoretical predictions comparable to the recent experimental data of SAMPLE Collaboration and to study the spin symmetries. Other model predictions are also briefly reviewed to compare with our results and then the strange form factors of baryon octet and decuplet are predicted.

  13. Nucleon sigma term and strange quark content from lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ohki, H.; Fukaya, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Yamada, N.; Matsufuru, H.; Noaki, J.; Shintani, E.; Onogi, T.

    2008-09-01

    We calculate the nucleon sigma term in two-flavor lattice QCD utilizing the Feynman-Hellman theorem. Both sea and valence quarks are described by the overlap fermion formulation, which preserves exact chiral and flavor symmetries on the lattice. We analyze the lattice data for the nucleon mass using the analytical formulae derived from the baryon chiral perturbation theory. From the data at valence quark mass set different from sea quark mass, we may extract the sea quark contribution to the sigma term, which corresponds to the strange quark content. We find that the strange quark content is much smaller than the previous lattice calculations and phenomenological estimates.

  14. Strangeness production at high baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satz, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    We propose to measure strange and non-strange hadron abundances at NICA in both AA and pp collisions, in order to test the validity range and possible extension schemes for present explanations of the energy and collision dependence of strange particle suppression.

  15. Strangeness as a probe to baryon-rich QCD matter at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We elucidate a prospect of strangeness fluctuation measurements in the heavy-ion collision at NICA energies. The strangeness fluctuation is sensitive to quark deconfinement. At the same time strangeness has a strong correlation with the baryon number under the condition of vanishing net strangeness, which leads to an enhancement of Λ0, Ξ0, Ξ-, and K+ at high baryon density. The baryon density is maximized around the NICA energies, and strangeness should be an ideal probe to investigate quark deconfinement phenomena of baryon-rich QCD matter created at NICA. We also utilize the hadron resonance gas model to estimate a mixed fluctuation of strangeness and baryon number.

  16. The baryon spectroscopy: strong decays and strange suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Tecocoatzi, H.

    2017-07-01

    In this contribution, we present the open-flavor strong decays of light baryons computed within the framework of quark model. The transition amplitudes are computed using a modified {3}0P operator, where a mechanism strange suppression is taken into account. Also we discus the strange suppression within an extension of the quark model. Invited talk presented at Symposium on Nuclear Physics, January 4-7 2017, Cocoyoc(Mexico).

  17. Search for doubly charmed baryons and study of charmed strange baryons at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Iijima, T.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Ban, Y.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lee, S. -H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peng, T.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-03-17

    We report results of a study of doubly charmed baryons and charmed strange baryons. The analysis is performed using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  18. Baryon number and strangeness: signals of a deconfinedantecedent

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Koch, V.; Randrup, J.

    2005-06-29

    The correlation between baryon number and strangeness is used to discern the nature of the deconfined matter produced at vanishing chemical potential in high-energy nuclear collisions at the BNL RHIC. Comparisons of results of various phenomenological models with correlations extracted from lattice QCD calculations suggest that a quasi-particle picture applies. At finite baryon densities, such as those encountered at the CERN SPS, it is demonstrated that the presence of a first-order phase transition and the accompanying development of spinodal decomposition would significantly enhance the number of strangeness carriers and the associated fluctuations.

  19. Strange baryons in a chiral quark-meson model (II). broken SU(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Judith A.; Birse, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    The chiral-quark meson model is used to study baryon properties with realistic breaking of SU(3). The symmetry breaking is assumed to be strong, so that a random phase approximation (RPA) can be used. In this the strange baryons are described as excitations built on the hedgehog soliton and have an excitation energy of 315 MeV. Other properties of strange baryons are obtained by an approximate spin-isospin projection from the RPA wave function. The magnetic moments agree reasonably well with experiment, but the deviations from the experimental values suggest that the method is valid for the case of rather stronger symmetry breaking than is realistic. The dependence of the RPA energy on the magnitude of the symmetry breaking is examined, and found to be strongly nonlinear for realistic values. This supports the idea that a large πN sigma commutator need not imply a large strange-quark content in the proton. For reasonable values of the scalar meson masses the strange-quark condensate is found to be less than 5% of the total, at the mean-field level. We also estimate the contribution to the condensate from RPA correlations. Within a one-mode approximation we find these to be very small, ˜2%.

  20. Strange Baryonic Matter and Kaon Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    In this contribution we address the question whether kaon condensation could occur in strongly interacting self-bound strange hadronic matter. In our comprehensive dynamical relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculations of nuclear and hypernuclear systems containing several antikaons we found saturation of bar K separation energy as well as the associated nuclear and bar K density distributions upon increasing the number of bar K mesons. The saturation pattern was found to be a universal feature of these multi-strangeness configurations. Since in all cases the bar K separation energy does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that bar K mesons do not provide the physical "strangeness" degrees of freedom for self-bound strange hadronic matter.

  1. Baryon Resonances in the Strangeness Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ju-Jun; Wang, En; Wu, Jia-Jun

    We have studied the N*(2120), Δ*(1940), and the possible Σ*(1380) resonances in the γp → K+Λ(1520), pp → nK+Σ(1385), and Λp → Λpπ0 reactions within the resonance model and the effective Lagrangian approach. It is shown that when the contributions from these baryonic states were considered, the current experimental measurement could be well reproduced. In addition, we also demonstrate that the angular distributions provide direct information of these reactions, which could be useful for the investigation of those states and may be tested by future experiments.

  2. Octet baryon masses and sigma terms from an SU(3) chiral extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Ross; Thomas, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of the remarkable new results for octet baryon masses calculated in 2+1- avour lattice QCD using a low-order expansion about the SU(3) chiral limit. We demonstrate that, even though the simulation results are clearly beyond the power-counting regime, the description of the lattice results by a low-order expansion can be significantly improved by allowing the regularisation scale of the effective field theory to be determined by the lattice data itself. The model dependence of our analysis is demonstrated to be small compared with the present statistical precision. In addition to the extrapolation of the absolute values of the baryon masses, this analysis provides a method to solve the difficult problem of fine-tuning the strange-quark mass. We also report a determination of the sigma terms for all of the octet baryons, including an accurate value of the pion-nucleon sigma term and the first determination of the strangeness sigma term based on 2+1-flavour l

  3. Electroproduction of baryon-meson states and strangeness suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santopinto, E.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Bijker, R.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the electroproduction ratios of baryon-meson states from nucleon, inferring from the sea quarks in the nucleon using an extension of the quark model that takes into account the sea. As a result we provide, with no adjustable parameters, the predictions of ratios of exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK+, Σ* K, ΣK, pπ0, and nπ+. These predictions are in agreement with the new JLab experimental data showing that sea quarks play an important role in the electroproduction. We also predicted further ratios of exclusive reactions that can be measured and tested in future experiments. In particular, we suggested new experiments on deuterium and tritium. Such measurements can provide crucial tests of different predictions concerning the structure of nucleon and its sea quarks helping to solve an outstanding problem. Finally, we compute the so called strangeness suppression factor, λs, that is the suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, and we found that our finding with this simple extension of the quark model is in good agreement with the results of JLab and CERN experiments.

  4. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbietti, L.

    2016-01-01

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N* resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c2 in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000)++ are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  5. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbietti, L.

    2016-01-22

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N{sup *} resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c{sup 2} in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000){sup ++} are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  6. A Study of Double-Charm and Charm-Strange Baryons inElectron-Positron Annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Adam J.; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    In this dissertation I describe a study of double-charm and charm-strange baryons based on data collected with the BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In this study I search for new baryons and make precise measurements of their properties and decay modes. I seek to verify and expand upon double-charm and charm-strange baryon observations made by other experiments. The BABAR Detector is used to measure subatomic particles that are produced at the PEP-II storage rings. I analyze approximately 300 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events in a search for the production of double-charm baryons. I search for the double-charm baryons {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} (containing the quarks ccd) and {Xi}{sup ++}{sub cc} (ccu) in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}, respectively. No statistically significant signals for their production are found, and upper limits on their production are determined. Statistically significant signals for excited charm-strange baryons are observed with my analysis of approximately 500 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events. The charged charm-strange baryons {Xi}{sub c}(2970){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +} are found in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, the same decay mode used in the {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} search. The neutral charm-strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup 0} is observed in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}. I also search for excited charm-strange baryon decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. No significant charm-strange baryon signals a f h these decay modes. For each excited charm-strange baryon state that I observe, I measure its mass, natural width (lifetime), and production rate. The properties of these excited charm-strange baryons and their

  7. A Study of Excited Charm-Strange Baryons withEvidence for new Baryons Xi_c(3055)+ and Xi_c(3123)+

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-10-30

    We present a study of excited charm-strange baryon states produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at or near a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, in a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We study strong decays of charm-strange baryons to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. This study confirms the existence of the states {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup +}, and {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup -}, with a more accurate determination of the {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +} mass and width. We also present evidence for two new states, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +}, decaying through the intermediate resonant modes {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}K{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520){sup ++}K{sup -}, respectively. For each of these baryons, we measure the yield in each final state, determine the statistical significance, and calculate the product of the production cross-section and branching fractions. We also measure the masses and widths of these excited charm-strange baryons.

  8. Low-lying charmed and charmed-strange baryon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Wei, Ke-Wei; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we systematically study the mass spectra and strong decays of 1 P and 2 S charmed and charmed-strange baryons in the framework of non-relativistic constituent quark models. With the light quark cluster-heavy quark picture, the masses are simply calculated by a potential model. The strong decays are studied by the Eichten-Hill-Quigg decay formula. Masses and decay properties of the well-established 1 S and 1 P states can be reproduced by our method. Σ _c(2800)^{0,+,++} can be assigned as a Σ _{c2}(3/2^-) or Σ _{c2}(5/2^-) state. We prefer to interpret the signal Σ _c(2850)^0 as a 2S(1/2^+) state although at present we cannot thoroughly exclude the possibility that this is the same state as Σ _c(2800)^0. Λ _c(2765)^+ or Σ _c(2765)^+ could be explained as the Λ _c^+(2S) state or Σ ^+_{c1}(1/2^-) state, respectively. We propose to measure the branching ratio of B(Σ _c(2455)π )/B(Σ _c(2520)π ) in the future, which may disentangle the puzzle of this state. Our results support Ξ _c(2980)^{0,+} as the first radial excited state of Ξ _c(2470)^{0,+} with J^P=1/2^+. The assignment of Ξ _c(2930)^0 is analogous to Σ _c(2800)^{0,+,++}, i.e., a Ξ ^' _{c2}(3/2^-) or Ξ ^' _{c2}(5/2^-) state. In addition, we predict some typical ratios among partial decay widths, which are valuable for experimental search for these missing charmed and charmed-strange baryons.

  9. Observation of the sigma_b baryons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pursley, Jennifer M.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-03-01

    We present a measurement of four new bottom baryons in proton-antiproton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four {Lambda}{sup 0}{sub b}{pi}{+-} resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode {Lambda}{sup 0}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{pi}{sup -}, where {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The probability for the background to produce a similar or larger signal is less than 8.3 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of greater than 5.2 {sigma}. We interpret these baryons as the {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}} baryons.

  10. Measurements of Direct CP Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Strange Bottom Mesons and Bottom Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We report measurements of direct CP-violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we obtain the first measurements of direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons, A{sub CP}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = +0.39 {+-} 0.15 (stat) {+-} 0.08 (syst), and botton baryons, A{sub CP}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}) = + 0.03 {+-} 0.17 (stat) {+-} 0.05 (syst) and A{sub CP} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -}) = +0.37 {+-} 0.17 (stat) {+-} 0.03 (syst). In addition, they measure CP violation in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays with 3.5{sigma} significance, A{sub CP} (B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = -0.086 {+-} 0.023 (stat) {+-} 0.009 (syst), in agreement with the current world average. Measurements of branching fractions of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays are also updated.

  11. Measurements of Direct CP Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Strange Bottom Mesons and Bottom Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Brucken, E.; Devoto, F.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Casal, B.; Cuevas, J.; Gomez, G.; Palencia, E.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Amerio, S.; Dorigo, T.; Gresele, A.; Lazzizzera, I.

    2011-05-06

    We report measurements of direct CP--violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we obtain the first measurements of direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons, A{sub CP}(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +})=+0.39{+-}0.15(stat){+-}0.08(syst), and bottom baryons, A{sub CP}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}p{pi}{sup -})=+0.03{+-}0.17(stat){+-}0.05(syst) and A{sub CP}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}pK{sup -})=+0.37{+-}0.17(stat){+-}0.03(syst). In addition, we measure CP violation in B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays with 3.5{sigma} significance, A{sub CP}(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=-0.086{+-}0.023(stat){+-}0.009(syst), in agreement with the current world average. Measurements of branching fractions of B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays are also updated.

  12. On the search for the electric dipole moment of strange and charm baryons at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, F. J.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; Marangotto, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Merli, A.; Neri, N.; Oyanguren, A.; Ruiz Vidal, J.

    2017-03-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) of fundamental particles provide powerful probes for physics beyond the Standard Model. We propose to search for the EDM of strange and charm baryons at LHC, extending the ongoing experimental program on the neutron, muon, atoms, molecules and light nuclei. The EDM of strange Λ baryons, selected from weak decays of charm baryons produced in p p collisions at LHC, can be determined by studying the spin precession in the magnetic field of the detector tracking system. A test of CPT symmetry can be performed by measuring the magnetic dipole moment of Λ and \\overline{Λ} baryons. For short-lived {Λ} ^+c and {Ξ} ^+c baryons, to be produced in a fixed-target experiment using the 7 TeV LHC beam and channeled in a bent crystal, the spin precession is induced by the intense electromagnetic field between crystal atomic planes. The experimental layout based on the LHCb detector and the expected sensitivities in the coming years are discussed.

  13. Helicity Amplitudes and Electromagnetic Decays of Strange Baryon Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Cauteren, T.; Ryckebusch, J.; Metsch, B. C.; Petry, H. R.

    2006-06-01

    We present results for the helicity amplitudes of the lowest-lying hyperon resonances Y*, computed within the framework of the Bonn constituent-quark model, which is based on the Bethe-Salpeter approach1-3. The seven parameters entering the model are fitted against the best known baryon masses4. Accordingly, the results for the helicity amplitudes are genuine predictions. Some hyperon resonances are seen to couple more strongly to a virtual photon with finite Q2 than to a real photon. Other Y*'s, such as the S01(1670) Λ resonance or the S11 (1620) Σ resonance, have large electromagnetic decay widths and couple very strongly to real photons. The negatively-charged and neutral members of a Σ* triplet may couple only moderately to the Σ(1193), while the positively-charged member of the same Σ* triplet displays a relatively large coupling to the Σ+(1193) state. This illustrates the necessity of investigating all isospin channels in order to obtain a complete picture of the hyperon spectrum.

  14. Flavor structure of Λ baryons from lattice QCD: From strange to charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubler, Philipp; Takahashi, Toru T.; Oka, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    We study Λ baryons of spin-parity 1/2± with either a strange or charm valence quark in full 2 +1 flavor lattice QCD. Multiple S U (3 ) singlet and octet operators are employed to generate the desired single baryon states on the lattice. Via the variational method, the couplings of these states to the different operators provide information about the flavor structure of the Λ baryons. We make use of the gauge configurations of the PACS-CS Collaboration and chirally extrapolate the results for the masses and S U (3 ) flavor components to the physical point. We furthermore gradually change the hopping parameter of the heaviest quark from strange to charm to study how the properties of the Λ baryons evolve as a function of the heavy quark mass. It is found that the baryon energy levels increase almost linearly with the quark mass. Meanwhile, the flavor structure of most of the states remains stable, with the exception of the lowest 1/2- state, which changes from a flavor singlet Λ to a Λc state with singlet and octet components of comparable size. Finally, we discuss whether our findings can be interpreted with the help of a simple quark model and find that the negative-parity Λc states can be naturally explained as diquark excitations of the light u and d quarks. On the other hand, the quark-model picture does not appear to be adequate for the negative-parity Λ states, suggesting the importance of other degrees of freedom to describe them.

  15. SELEX: Recent Progress in the Analysis of Charm-Strange and Double-Charm Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Engelfried, Jurgen

    2007-02-01

    SELEX (Fermilab Experiment 781) [1] employs beams of {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}, and protons at around 600 GeV/c to study production and decay properties of charmed baryons. It took data in the 1996/7 fixed target run and is currently analyzing those data. Here they focus on recently obtained results concerning the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime and the doubly-charmed baryons {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++}.

  16. Evidence for the production of the charmed, doubly strange baryon Ω c in e +e - annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Cronström, H. I.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Reiner, R.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Becker, U.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Kahn, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Seidel, S. C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1992-08-01

    Using the detector ARGUS at the storage ring DORIS II of DESY, we have found evidence for the production of the charmed and doubly strange baryon Ω c through its decay channel Ξ -K -π +π +. Its mass has been determined to be ((2719.0±7.0±2.5)MeV/ c2, and the product of production cross section and branching ratio the above channel to be (2.41±0.90±0.30) pb.

  17. Centrality Dependent Strange Baryon Production in P-A and its Implications for Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R.

    2000-09-22

    BNL E910 has measured strange baryon production as a function of collision centrality for 17.5 GeV/c p-Au collisions. Collision centrality is defined by v{sub 1} the mean number projectile-nucleon interactions estimated from the ''grey'' track multiplicity. The measured {Lambda} yield increases faster than the participant scaling expectation for v {le} 3 and then saturates. A simple parameterization of this dependence applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions reproduces the measured E866 km. and WA97 {Lambda} centrality dependent yields. The increase in {Lambda} production to v {le} 3 is also evident for {Lambda}s which are leading baryons, in disagreement with predictions from RQMD.

  18. Strange Baryon Electromagnetic Form Factors and SU(3) Flavor Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey-Wen; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    We study the nucleon, Sigma and cascade octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and the effects of SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking from 2+1-flavor lattice calculations. We find that electric and magnetic radii are similar; the maximum discrepancy is about 10\\%. In the pion-mass region we explore, both the quark-component and full-baryon moments have small SU(3) symmetry breaking. We extrapolate the charge radii and the magnetic moments using three-flavor heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HBXPT). The systematic errors due to chiral and continuum extrapolations remain significant, giving rise to charge radii for $p$ and $\\Sigma^-$ that are 3--4 standard deviations away from the known experimental ones. Within these systematics the predicted $\\Sigma^+$ and $\\Xi^-$ radii are 0.67(5) and 0.306(15)~fm$^2$ respectively. When the next-to-next-to-leading order of HBXPT is included, the extrapolated magnetic moments are less than 3 standard deviations away from PDG values, and the d

  19. Strangeness driven phase transitions in compressed baryonic matter and their relevance for neutron stars and core collapsing supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2015-02-24

    We discuss the thermodynamics of compressed baryonic matter with strangeness within non-relativistic mean-field models with effective interactions. The phase diagram of the full baryonic octet under strangeness equilibrium is built and discussed in connection with its relevance for core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars. A simplified framework corresponding to (n, p, Λ)(+e)-mixtures is employed in order to test the sensitivity of the existence of a phase transition on the (poorely constrained) interaction coupling constants and the compatibility between important hyperonic abundances and 2M{sub ⊙} neutron stars.

  20. Enhanced strange baryon production in Au+Au collisions compared to p+p at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; McClain, C. J.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the observed differences in production rates of strange and multistrange baryons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV compared to p+p interactions at the same energy. The strange baryon yields in Au+Au collisions, when scaled down by the number of participating nucleons, are enhanced relative to those measured in p+p reactions. The enhancement observed increases with the strangeness content of the baryon, and it increases for all strange baryons with collision centrality. The enhancement is qualitatively similar to that observed at the lower collision energy {radical}s{sub NN} = 17.3 GeV. The previous observations are for the bulk production, while at intermediate p{sub T},1 < p{sub T} < 4 GeV/c, the strange baryons even exceed binary scaling from p+p yields.

  1. Nature of charmed strange baryons Ξc(3055 ) and Ξc(3080 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ze; Ye, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Ailin

    2016-12-01

    The hadronic decay widths and some ratios of branching fractions of the newly observed charmed strange baryons, Ξc(3055 )0 , Ξc(3055 )+, and Ξc(3080 )+ are calculated in a 3P0 model. In the calculation, they are considered as 34 kinds of D-wave charmed strange baryons. Among these assignments, Ξc(3055 )+ is very possibly a JP=5/2+ Ξ^c3' (5/2+) or Ξˇc32(5/2+). In these two assignments, Ξc(3055 )+ has the total decay width Γ =10.1 MeV and Γ =7.6 MeV , respectively. The predicted ratios Γ (Ξc(3055)+→Λ D+)/Γ(Ξc(3055)+→ Σc++K-)=3.39. Ξc(3055)+ is also very possibly a JP=7/2+ Ξ^c3 '(7/2+) or Ξˇc3 2(7/2+). In these two assignments, Ξc(3055 )+ has the total decay width Γ =9.7 MeV and Γ =6.3 MeV , respectively. The predicted ratios Γ (Ξc(3055 )+→Λ D+)/Γ (Ξc(3055 )+→Σc++K-)=5.91 or 6.04. As an isospin partner of Ξc(3055 )+, Ξc(3055 )0is also very possibly a JP=5/2+ Ξ^c3 '(5/2+) or Ξˇc3 2(5/2+). In these assignments, Ξc(3055 )0 has the total decay width Γ =10.9 MeV and Γ =7.0 MeV . The predicted ratios Γ (Ξc(3055 )0→Λ D0)/Γ (Ξc(3055 )0→Σc+K-)=4.24 or 4.20. Ξc(3055 )0 is also very possibly a JP=7/2+ Ξ^c3 '(7/2+) or Ξˇc3 2(7/2+). In these assignments, Ξc(3055 )0 has the total decay width Γ =10.3 MeV and Γ =7.1 MeV . The predicted ratios Γ (Ξc(3055 )0→Λ D0)/Γ (Ξc(3055 )0→Σc+K-)=7.47 or 7.56. The results agree well with recent experimental data from Belle. Ξc(3080)+ seems impossible to identify with a D-wave charmed strange baryon.

  2. Charmed and strange baryon production in 29 GeV electron positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.R.

    1988-06-01

    This dissertation presents measurements of the production rates of baryons with different strangeness and spin. The analyses presented here use data taken with the Mark III detector at the PEP storage ring, operating at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The ..xi../sup /minus// production rate is measured to be 0.017 +- 0.004 +- 0.004 per hadronic event, ..cap omega../sup /minus// production is measured to be 0.014 +- 0.006 +- 0.004 per hadronic event, and ..xi..*/sup 0/ production is less than 0.006 per hadronic event at a 90% confidence level. These measurements place strong constraints on models of baryon production. In particular, the unexpectedly high rate of ..cap omega../sup /minus// production is difficult to explain in any diquark based model. Semileptonic ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ decays have also been observed. Because neither the branching ratios nor the production rate are well known, it is difficult to interpret these results. However, they do indicate that the branching ratio for ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. ..lambda..l..nu.. may be higher than previous experimental measurements. 85 refs., 45 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Production of neutral Sigma baryon in 91.2 GeV quark - anti-quark events at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legan, Christopher Kenneth

    1997-09-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of one of the three isospin states of the JP = [1/over 2]+ octet Σ baryons, the Σ0. In addition, the analysis yields the first differential cross-section measurement of the Σ0 hyperon in e+e/sp-/to q/bar q events. The unique particle identification capabilities of the DELPHI detector at LEP are used to obtain an increased efficiency by extending the standard Λ-finding algorithm. The average number of Σ0's produced per Z0 decay is calculated to beN(Σ0)/Zhad0=0.101/pm 0.008( stat)/pm 0.014(syst)/pm 0.007(extrap) eqno(0.1) The measurement is about 30% above the prediction of the scJETSET model, but nevertheless is compatible with scJETSET within 2 /sigma. Comparison with ARGUS results at /sqrt[s] = 10 GeV reveals similar levels of spin and strangeness suppression in hyperon production, within errors.

  4. Measurements of direct CP violating asymmetries in charmless decays of strange bottom mesons and bottom baryons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; 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Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-05-06

    We report measurements of direct CP-violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we obtain the first measurements of direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons, A(CP)(B(s)(0)→K(-)π(+))=+0.39±0.15(stat)±0.08(syst), and bottom baryons, A(CP)(Λ(b)(0)→pπ(-))=+0.03±0.17(stat)±0.05(syst) and A(CP)(Λ(b)(0)→pK(-))=+0.37±0.17(stat)±0.03(syst). In addition, we measure CP violation in B(0)→K(+)π(-) decays with 3.5σ significance, A(CP)(B(0)→K(+)π(-))=-0.086±0.023(stat)±0.009(syst), in agreement with the current world average. Measurements of branching fractions of B(s)(0)→K(+)K(-) and B(0)→π(+)π(-) decays are also updated.

  5. Decays of negative parity non-strange baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Jose L. Goity; Carlos L. Schat; Norberto Scoccola

    2004-04-01

    The decays of non-strange negative parity baryons via the emission of single {pi} and {eta} mesons are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. A basis of spin-flavor operators is established to that order, and with this basis the different partial wave decay amplitudes are obtained. The unknown effective coefficients are determined by fitting to the S- and D-wave partial widths as provided by the PDG. A full set of relations between widths that result at the leading order, i.e. order N{sub c0}, is given and tested with the data. The rather large errors of the input partial widths, that result from the often discrepant results for the resonance parameters from different analyses of the data, lead to a rather good fit at the leading order N{sub c0}. The next to leading order fit fails for that reason to pin down with satisfactory accuracy the effective sub leading effective constants.

  6. Localized N, {lambda}, {sigma}, and {xi} single-particle potentials in finite nuclei calculated with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, M.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2009-05-15

    Localized single-particle potentials for all octet baryons, N, {lambda}, {sigma}, and {xi}, in finite nuclei, {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 28}Si, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 90}Zr, are calculated using the quark-model baryon-baryon interactions. G matrices evaluated in symmetric nuclear matter in the lowest order Brueckner theory (LOBT) are applied to finite nuclei in local density approximation. Nonlocal potentials are localized by a zero-momentum Wigner transformation. Empirical single-particle properties of the nucleon and the {lambda} hyperon in a nuclear medium have been known to be explained semiquantitatively in the LOBT framework. Attention is focused in the present consideration on predictions for the {sigma} and {xi} hyperons. The unified description for the octet baryon-baryon interactions by the SU{sub 6} quark model enables us to obtain less ambiguous extrapolation to the S=-1 and S=-2 sectors based on the knowledge in the NN sector than other potential models. The {sigma} mean field is shown to be weakly attractive at the surface, but turns out to be repulsive inside, which is consistent with the experimental evidence. The {xi} hyperon s.p. potential is also attractive at the nuclear surface region, and inside it fluctuates around zero. Hence {xi} hypernuclear bound states are unlikely. We also evaluate energy shifts of the {sigma}{sup -} and {xi}{sup -} atomic levels in {sup 28}Si and {sup 56}Fe, using the calculated s.p. potentials.

  7. Observation of the doubly strange b-Baryon Ωb-

    SciTech Connect

    Jose de Jesus Hernandez Orduna

    2011-02-01

    This thesis reports the first experimental evidence of the doubly strange b-baryon Ωb- (ssb) following the decay channel Ωb- → J/Ψ(1S) μ+μ- Ω- Λ K- p π- in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 Tev. Using approximately 1.3 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, they observe 17.8 ± 4.9(stat) ± 0.8(syst) Ωb- signal events at 6.165 ± 0.010(stat) ± 0.013(syst) GeV/c2 with a corresponding significance of 5.4 σ, meaning that the probability of the signal coming from a fluctuation in the background is 6.7 x 10-8. The theoretical model we have to describe what we believe are the building blocks of nature and the interactions between them, is known as Standard Model. The Standard Model is the combination of Electroweak Theory and Quantum Chromodynamics into a single core in the attempt to include all interactions of subatomic particles except those due to gravity in a simple framework. This model has proved highly accurate in predicting certain interactions, but it does not explain all aspects of subatomic particles. For example, it cannot say how many particles there should be or what their masses are. The search goes on for a more complete theory, and in particular an unified field theory describing the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces. Twelve elementary particles are known in the Standard Model: the Fermions. They have spin -1/2 and obey the Pauli Exclusion Principle. Fermions are divided into six Quarks: up u, down d, charm c, strange s, top t and, bottom b; and six Leptons: electron e, muon μ, ττ, electron neutrino ve, muon neutrino vμ and, τ neutrino vτ. Quarks interact via the strong force because they carry color charge, electromagnetically because of their electric charge and via the weak nuclear interaction

  8. Subthreshold production of {sigma}(1385) baryons in Al+Al collisions at 1.9A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, X.; Andronic, A.; Hartmann, O. N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Kim, Y. J.; Koczon, P.; Leifels, Y.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuettauf, A.; Herrmann, N.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Cordier, E.; Merschmeyer, M.; Pelte, D.; Crochet, P.; Barret, V.; Bastid, N.; Dupieux, P.

    2007-11-15

    First measurement of subthreshold {sigma}(1385) production is presented. Experimental data are presented for Al+Al reactions at 1.9A GeV measured with the FOPI detector at SIS/GSI. The {sigma}(1385)/{lambda} ratio is found to be in good agreement with the transport and statistical model predictions. The results allow for a better understanding of subthreshold strangeness production and strangeness exchange reaction which is the dominant process for K{sup -} production below and close-to threshold.

  9. Strange meson-baryon interaction in hot and dense medium: recent progress for a road to GSI/FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, D.; Tolos, L.; Aichelin, J.; Bratkovskaya, E.

    2016-01-01

    We report recent results on the dynamics of strange hadrons in two-body reactions relevant for near-threshold production in heavy-ion collisions at GSI/FAIR and NICA-Dubna. In particular, K¯N scattering in hot and dense nuclear matter is studied within a chiral unitary framework in coupled channels, setting up the starting point for implementations in microscopic off-shell transport approaches. We focus on the calculation of transition rates with special attention to the excitation of hyperon resonances and isospin effects. Additionally, we explore “unconventional” strangeness generation by meson-meson and meson-baryon interactions in connection with recent HADES observations of deep sub-threshold Φ and Ξ production.

  10. Multi-strange baryon production in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Boyer, B.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Bugaiev, K.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, W.; Carena, F.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; de Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, R.; Ferretti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanova, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jancurová, L.; Jang, H. J.; Jangal, S.; Janik, R.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, P.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, T.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S.; Kim, B.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, K. S.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Leistam, L.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oh, S.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pal, S.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pujol Teixido, J.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, S.; Sano, M.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Scott, P. A.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Sinha, T.; Sinha, B. C.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilk, A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2012-06-01

    A measurement of the multi-strange Ξ- and Ω- baryons and their antiparticles by the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presented for inelastic proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The transverse momentum (pT) distributions were studied at mid-rapidity (| y | < 0.5) in the range of 0.6 baryons, and in the range of 0.8 Baryons and antibaryons were measured as separate particles and we find that the baryon to antibaryon ratio of both particle species is consistent with unity over the entire range of the measurement. The statistical precision of the current data has allowed us to measure a difference between the mean pT of Ξ- (Ξbar+) and Ω- (Ωbar+). Particle yields, mean pT, and the spectra in the intermediate pT range are not well described by the PYTHIA Perugia 2011 tune Monte Carlo event generator, which has been tuned to reproduce the early LHC data. The discrepancy is largest for Ω- (Ωbar+). This PYTHIA tune approaches the pT spectra of Ξ- and Ξbar+ baryons below pT < 0.85 GeV / c and describes the Ξ- and Ξbar+ spectra above pT > 6.0 GeV / c. We also illustrate the difference between the experimental data and model by comparing the corresponding ratios of (Ω- +Ωbar+) / (Ξ- +Ξbar+) as a function of transverse mass.

  11. Multi-strange baryon production in psbnd Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasar, C.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-07-01

    The multi-strange baryon yields in Pbsbnd Pb collisions have been shown to exhibit an enhancement relative to pp reactions. In this work, Ξ and Ω production rates have been measured with the ALICE experiment as a function of transverse momentum, pT, in psbnd Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV. The results cover the kinematic ranges 0.6 GeV / c strange baryons have been identified by reconstructing their weak decays into charged particles. The pT spectra are analysed as a function of event charged-particle multiplicity, which in psbnd Pb collisions ranges over one order of magnitude and lies between those observed in pp and Pbsbnd Pb collisions. The measured pT distributions are compared to the expectations from a Blast-Wave model. The parameters which describe the production of lighter hadron species also describe the hyperon spectra in high multiplicity psbnd Pb collisions. The yield of hyperons relative to charged pions is studied and compared with results from pp and Pbsbnd Pb collisions. A continuous increase in the yield ratios as a function of multiplicity is observed in psbnd Pb data, the values of which range from those measured in minimum bias pp to the ones in Pbsbnd Pb collisions. A statistical model qualitatively describes this multiplicity dependence using a canonical suppression mechanism, in which the small volume causes a relative reduction of hadron production dependent on the strangeness content of the hyperon.

  12. Formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K{sup +} collisions with Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}pXe', obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, are reanalyzed using increased statistics and updated selections. Our previous evidence for formation of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance with mass near 1538 MeV is confirmed. The statistical significance of the signal reaches some 8{sigma} (6{sigma}) standard deviations when estimated as S/{radical}B (S/{radical}B + S. The mass and intrinsic width of the {Theta}{sup +} baryon are measured as m = 1538 {+-} 2 MeV and {Gamma} = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV.

  13. Global Analysis Of The Negative Parity Non-Strange Baryons In The 1/N{sub c} Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose L.; Gonzalez de Urreta, Emiliano Jose; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2014-02-01

    A global study of the negative parity non-strange baryon observables is performed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. Masses, partial decay widths and photo-couplings are simultaneously analyzed. A main objective is to determine the composition of the spin 1/2 and 3/2 nucleon states, which come in pairs and involve two mixing angles which can be determined and tested for consistency by the mentioned observables. The issue of the assignment of those nucleon states to the broken SU(4) X O(3) mixed-symmetry multiplet is studied in detail, with the conclusion that the assignment made in the old studies based on the non-relativistic quark model is the preferred one. In addition, the analysis involves an update of the input data with respect to previous works.

  14. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Meson cloud models describe the proton sea in terms of fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from states which contain a kaon and a Lambda or Sigma hyperon. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these states to determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented by meson-baryon splitting functions, which determine the total strangeness of the proton. Strangeness asymmetry, the difference between momentum distributions of the s and sbar quarks in the proton, arises because the quarks are constituents of different hadrons. For the parton distributions of the s(sbar) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. We show that strangeness asymmetry depends strongly on the parton distributions used for the hadrons in the cloud. We compare our results to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  15. Baryon-strangeness correlations in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 -200 GeV from the UrQMD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenzhen; Luo, Xiaofeng; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2017-01-01

    Fluctuations and correlations of conserved charges are sensitive observables for studying the QCD phase transition and critical point in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We have studied the centrality and energy dependence of mixed cumulants (up to fourth order) between net baryon and net strangeness in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 , 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV from the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. To compare with other theoretical calculations, we normalize these mixed cumulants by various order cumulants of net-strangeness distributions. We found that the results obtained from UrQMD calculations are comparable with the results from lattice QCD at low temperature and hadron resonance gas model. The ratios of mixed cumulants (R11B S,R13B S,R22B S,R31B S ) from UrQMD calculations show weak centrality dependence. However, the mixed-cumulant ratios R11B S and R31B S show strong increase at low energy, while the R13B S and R22B S are similar at different energies. Furthermore, we have also studied the correlations between different hadron species and their contributions to the net-baryon and net-strangeness correlations. These model studies can provide baselines for searching for the signals of QCD phase transition and critical point in heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Further evidence for formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K{sup +} collisions with Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G. Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.

    2007-01-15

    We have continued our investigation of the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}} K{sup 0}pXe' in the bubble chamber DIANA. In agreement with our previous results based on part of the present statistics, formation of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance with mass of 1537 {+-} 2 MeV/c{sup 2} is observed in the elementary transition K{sup +}n {sup {yields}} K{sup 0}p on a neutron bound in the xenon nucleus. The visible width of the peak is consistent with being entirely due to instrumental resolution and allows one to place an upper limit on its intrinsic width: {gamma} < 9 MeV/c{sup 2}. A more precise estimate of the resonance intrinsic width, {gamma} = 0.36 {+-} 0.11 MeV/c{sup 2}, is obtained from the ratio between the numbers of resonant and nonresonant charge-exchange events. The signal is observed in a restricted interval of incident K{sup +} momentum that is consistent with smearing of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance by Fermi motion of the target neutron. The statistical significance of the signal is some 7.3, 5.3, and 4.3 standard deviations for the estimators S/{radical}B,S/{radical}(S+B) and S/{radical}(S+2B), respectively. This observation confirms and reinforces our earlier results, and offers strong evidence for formation of a pentaquark baryon with positive strangeness in the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}n {sup {yields}} K{sup 0}p on a bound neutron.

  17. New results on strange and multistrange baryon production and charged kaon production in sulphur sulphur interactions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Abatzis, S.; Andersen, E.; Andrighetto, A.; Antinori, F.; Barnes, R.P.; Bayes, A.C.; Benayoun, M.; Beusch, W.; Bohm, J.; Carney, J.N.; Carrer, N.; de la Cruz, B.; Davies, J.P.; Di Bari, D.; Elia, D.; Evans, D.; Fanebust, K.; Fini, R.; French, B.R.; Ghidini, B.; Helstrup, H.; Holme, A.K.; Jacholkowski, A.; Kahane, J.; Katchanov, V.A.; Kinson, J.B.; Kirk, A.; Knudson, K.; Kralik, I.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lassalle, J.C.; Lenti, V.; Leruste, P.; Lietava, R.; Loconsole, R.A.; Lovhoiden, G.; Manzari, V.; Morando, M.; Navach, F.; Narjoix, J.L.; Pellegrini, F.; Quercigh, E.; Licci, R.; Sandor, L.; Safarik, K.; Segato, G.; Singovsky, A.V.; Sene, M.; Sene, R.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.; Urban, J.; Vassiliadis, G.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Venables, M.; Volte, A.; Votruba, M.F.; Zavada, P.; O. Villalobos Baillie for the WA94 Collaboration

    1995-07-20

    Strange and multistrange baryon and antibaryon production has been studied in sulphur sulphur interactions at 200 GeV/{ital c} per nucleon at central rapidity. Particle production ratios and transverse mass spectra are presented for {Lambda}, {Xi}{sup {minus}}, {bar {Xi}} and {bar {Xi}}{sup {minus}}. In addition preliminary results on charged kaon production are presented, and the status of identified charged particle track reconstruction using the Omega RICH is reviewed. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Study of Charmed Baryon Sigma(C)(2800) Production at the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmded, Shamona

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation reports on a study of search for an orbitally excited state of charmed baryons Σ$0\\atop{c}$(2800) and Σ$++\\atop{c}$(2800). They measure the widths, momentum spectrum and production cross-section for these states decaying into a Λ$+\\atop{c}$ and a charged π.

  19. Production du baryon Sigma+ dans les collisions e+e- au LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, Andre

    Les mécanismes de production des baryons dans les interactions e+e- font l'objet de nombreuses études. De plus, les modes de production des baryons étranges semblent faire appel A des processus spécifiques, qui sont encore mal compris. Notre étude de la production des baryons Σ+ dans les interactions e+e- nous permet de formuler certaines remarques sur l'état des connaîssances acquises sur le sujet. Une methode de reconstruction originale et des critères de sélection spécifiques ont été développés afin d'identifier des baryons Σ+ de haute Energie ( ES+ > 5 GeV), partir de leur canal de désintégration en un proton et un π0 (S+-->p+p0 ). Trois mesures principales sont réalisées à partir de notre échantillon de baryons reconstruits. Le nombre mesuré de baryons Σ+ produits par événement e +e- à 91 GeV est de: =0.102+/-0.006(stat.) +/-0.008(syst.) +/-0.003(extrap.) où les erreurs sont dues à la statistique, aux systématiques et à la procédure d'extrapolation. Ce résultat est en accord avec ceux obtenus précédemment, mais avec des erreurs réduites. La section efficace différentielle en fonction de l'energie est mesurée et comparée aux prédictions des principaux générateurs Monte-Carlo (JETSET7.4(MOPS), JETSET7.4 et HERWIG5.9). A haute énergie, HERWIG ne semble pas reproduire les mesures, aussi bien que les deux versions de JETSET. Enfin, la position du maximum de la section efficace différentielle de production des baryons Σ+ en fonction de l'impulsion est mesurée. On trouve: overlinexoverlineS+=2.32+/- 0.47 Une étude spécifique du générateur JETSET7.4(MOPS) est réalisee, afin de mieux comprendre les mécanismes de production de l'étrangeté et du spin dans la production des baryons. Aucun générateur ne semble capable de décrire de manière simultanée la production du spin et de l'étrangeté.

  20. Group theoretical study of nonstrange and strange mixed symmetric baryon states [N{sub c}-1,1] in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2010-06-01

    Using group theory arguments we extend and complete our previous work by deriving all SU(6) exact wave functions associated with the spectrum of mixed symmetric baryon states [N{sub c}-1,1] in the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The extension to SU(6) enables us to study the mass spectra of both strange and nonstrange baryons, while previous work was restricted to nonstrange baryons described by SU(4). The wave functions are specially written in a form to allow a comparison with the approximate, customarily used wave functions, where the system is separated into a ground state core and an excited quark. We show that the matrix elements of the flavor operator calculated with the exact wave functions acquire the same asymptotic form at large N{sub c}, irrespective of the spin-flavor multiplet contained in [N{sub c}-1,1], while with the approximate wave function one cannot obtain a similar behavior. The isoscalar factors of the permutation group of N{sub c} particles derived here can be used in any problem where a given fermion system is described by the partition [N{sub c}-1,1], and one fermion has to be separated from the rest.

  1. Study of inclusive strange-baryon production and search for pentaquarks in two-photon collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, S.; Barczyk, A.; Barillère, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Böhm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J. G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de La Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Déglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degré, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; de Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M. A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Y.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Grenier, G.; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S. R.; Jin, B. N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberría, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kräber, M.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krüger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R. R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G. B.; Muanza, G. S.; Muijs, A. J. M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Nowak, H.; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M. A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P. G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, K.; Roe, B. P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X. W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, S. C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; van de Walle, R. T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S. C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zöller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of inclusive production of the Λ, Ξ- and Ξ*(1530) baryons in two-photon collisions with the L3 detector at LEP are presented. The inclusive differential cross sections for Λ and Ξ- are measured as a function of the baryon transverse momentum, pt, and pseudo-rapidity, η. The mean number of Λ, Ξ- and Ξ*(1530) baryons per hadronic two-photon event is determined in the kinematic range 0.4 GeV

  2. Associated strangeness production in the pp{yields}pK{sup +}K{sup -}p and pp{yields}pK{sup +{pi}0{Sigma}0} reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Jujun; Wilkin, Colin

    2010-08-15

    The total and differential cross sections for associated strangeness production in the pp{yields}pK{sup +}K{sup -}p and pp{yields}pK{sup +{pi}0{Sigma}0} reactions have been studied in a unified approach using an effective Lagrangian model. It is assumed that both the K{sup -}p and {pi}{sup 0{Sigma}0} final states originate from the decay of the {Lambda}(1405) that was formed in the production chain pp{yields}p(N*(1535){yields}K{sup +{Lambda}}(1405)). The available experimental data are well reproduced, especially the ratio of the two total cross sections, which is much less sensitive to the particular model of the entrance channel. The significant coupling of the N*(1535) to {Lambda}(1405)K is further evidence for large ss-bar components in the quark wave function of the N*(1535).

  3. Strangeness -2 hypertriton.

    PubMed

    Garcilazo, H; Valcarce, A

    2013-01-04

    We solve for the first time, the Faddeev equations for the bound state problem of the coupled ΛΛN-ΞNN system to study whether or not a hypertriton with strangeness -2 may exist. We make use of the interactions obtained from a chiral quark model describing the low-energy observables of the two-baryon systems with strangeness 0, -1, and -2 and three-baryon systems with strangeness 0 and -1. The ΛΛN system alone is unbound. However, when the full coupling to ΞNN is considered, the strangeness -2 three-baryon system with quantum numbers (I,J(P)) = (1/2,1/2(+)) becomes bound, with a binding energy of about 0.5 MeV. This result is compatible with the nonexistence of a stable (Λ)(3)H with isospin one.

  4. Strange hadronic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schafner, J. |; Dover, C.B. |; Gal, A. ||; Greiner, C. |; Stoecker, H. |

    1993-02-01

    In an extended mean field theory, there is found a large class of bound multi-strange objects, formed from combinations of (p,n,{Lambda} {Xi}{sup 0} {Xi}{sup {minus}}, baryons, which are stable against strong decay. A maximal binding energy per baryon of E{sub B}/A {approx} {minus}21 MeV, strangeness per baryon of {integral}{sub s} {approx} 1--1.2, charge per baryon of {integral}{sub q} {approx} {minus}-0.1 to 0.1, and baryon density of 2.5--3 times that of ordinary nuclei are predicted. For A {ge} 6, stable combinations involving only ({Lambda},{Xi}{sup 0},{Xi}) hyperons are obtained.

  5. Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-09-29

    We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur.

  6. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d +Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barnby, L. S.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons (Λ ,Λ ¯) and mesons (KS0) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT <6 GeV /c ) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d +Au , Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.

  7. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d+Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Here we present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons (more » $$Λ,\\overline{Λ}$$) and mesons (K$$0\\atop{S}$$ ) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT< 6 GeV/c) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$$_{NN}$$ = 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.« less

  8. Observation of an exotic S = +1 baryon in exclusive photoproduction from the deuteron.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, S; Hicks, K; Carman, D S; Pasyuk, E; Schumacher, R A; Smith, E S; Tedeschi, D J; Todor, L; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S P; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; De Vita, R; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Lawrence, D; Li, J; Lima, A; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Murphy, L Y; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J; Sapunenko, V; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Strakovsky, I I; Stavinsky, A; Stoler, P; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2003-12-19

    In an exclusive measurement of the reaction gammad-->K(+)K(-)pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S=+1 is seen in the K(+)n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1.542+/-0.005 GeV/c(2) with a measured width of 0.021 GeV/c(2) FWHM, which is largely determined by experimental mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is (5.2+/-0.6)sigma. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with recent reports of a narrow S=+1 baryon by other experimental groups.

  9. Strange probes of the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical advances in hypernuclear physics are reviewed. An appraisal is given of various suggestions for using strange probes to test partial quark deconfinement in nuclei and meson exchange vs quark-gluon exchange descriptions of baryon-baryon interactions. 76 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Bavontaweepanya, R.; Kobdaj, C.; Schwarz, K.

    2014-09-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self-energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-Nc sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Values for all counterterms relevant at N3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of 39-1+2 MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of σsN=84-4+28 MeV. The flavor SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with (802±4) and (1103±6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  11. Structure of Lambda(1405) and threshold behavior of pi Sigma scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yoichi Ikeda, Tesuo Hyodo, Daisuke Jido, Hiroyuki Kamano, Toru Sato, Koichi Yazaki

    2011-01-01

    The scattering length and effective range of the pi-Sigma channel are studied in order to characterize the strangeness S = -1 meson-baryon scattering and the Lambda (1405) resonance. We examine various off-shell dependence of the amplitude in dynamical chiral models to evaluate the threshold quantities with the constraint at the KN threshold. We find that the pi-Sigma threshold parameters are important to the structure of the Lambda (1405) resonance and provide further constraints on the subthreshold extrapolation of the KN interaction.

  12. Strangeness in hadronic stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorren, R.; Prakash, M.; Ellis, P. J.

    1995-12-01

    We examine the presence of strangeness-bearing components, hyperons and kaons, in dense neutron star matter. Calculations are performed using relativistic mean field models, in which both the baryon-baryon and kaon-baryon interactions are mediated by meson exchange. Results of kaon condensation are found to be qualitatively similar to previous work with chiral models, if compatibility of the kaon optical potentials is required. The presence of strangeness, be it in the form of hyperons or kaons, implies a reduction in the maximum mass and a relatively large number of protons, sufficient to allow rapid cooling to take place. The need to improve upon the poorly known couplings of the strange particles, which determine the composition and structure of neutron stars, is stressed. We also discuss generic problems with effective masses in mean field theories.

  13. Identified Light and Strange Hadron Spectra at √{sNN} = 14.5 GeV and Systematic Study of Baryon/Meson Effect at Intermediate Transverse Momentum with STAR at RHIC BES I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, James D.

    2016-12-01

    With the recently measured Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 14.5 GeV, STAR completed its first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at RHIC. The main motivation of the BES program is the study of the QCD phase diagram and the search for a conjectured critical point. Amongst the various collision energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV, that have been previously presented by STAR, collisions at 14.5 GeV will provide data set in the relatively large chemical potential gap between the 11.5 and 19.6 GeV center-of-mass energies. In this contribution, we report new STAR measurements of Au+Au at √{sNN} = 14.5 GeV that include identified light particle RCP and spectra, as well as measurements of the strange hadrons (Ks0, Λ , Ξ , Ω, and ϕ). The spectra from both light and strange particles cover a significant range of the intermediate transverse momentum (2 baryon-to-meson ratio at intermediate pT from BES Phase I. We will discuss its physics implications and whether hadronic interactions at late stage dominate the collision dynamics.

  14. Additional strange hadrons from QCD thermodynamics and strangeness freezeout in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Ding, H-T; Hegde, P; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Maezawa, Y; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Sharma, S; Soeldner, W; Wagner, M

    2014-08-15

    We compare lattice QCD results for appropriate combinations of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number fluctuations with predictions from two hadron resonance gas (HRG) models having different strange hadron content. The conventionally used HRG model based on experimentally established strange hadrons fails to describe the lattice QCD results in the hadronic phase close to the QCD crossover. Supplementing the conventional HRG with additional, experimentally uncharted strange hadrons predicted by quark model calculations and observed in lattice QCD spectrum calculations leads to good descriptions of strange hadron thermodynamics below the QCD crossover. We show that the thermodynamic presence of these additional states gets imprinted in the yields of the ground-state strange hadrons leading to a systematic 5-8 MeV decrease of the chemical freeze-out temperatures of ground-state strange baryons.

  15. Strange skyrmion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-01

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  16. Strange skyrmion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-20

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  17. Measurements of strangeness production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1995-07-15

    Simulations of the ability of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) detector to measure strangeness production in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC are presented. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of short lived particles using a high resolution inner tracker. The prospects for performing neutral kaon interferometry are discussed. Simulation results for measurements of strange and multi-strange baryons are presented.

  18. Consistency between SU(3) and SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory for the nucleon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiu-Lei; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Geng, Li-Sheng; Ledwig, Tim; Meng, Jie; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Treating the strange quark mass as a heavy scale compared to the light quark mass, we perform a matching of the nucleon mass in the SU(3) sector to the two-flavor case in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. The validity of the 19 low-energy constants appearing in the octet baryon masses up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order [1] is supported by comparing the effective parameters (the combinations of the 19 couplings) with the corresponding low-energy constants in the SU(2) sector [2]. In addition, it is shown that the dependence of the effective parameters and the pion-nucleon sigma term on the strange quark mass is relatively weak around its physical value, thus providing support to the assumption made in Ref. [2] that the SU(2) baryon chiral perturbation theory can be applied to study nf = 2 + 1 lattice QCD simulations as long as the strange quark mass is close to its physical value.

  19. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Strangeness asymmetry in the proton may arise from fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from the KΛ , KΣ , K* Λ and K* Σ states. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these pairs to represent the strange meson cloud. We determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a hybrid convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented either by light-cone wave functions or meson-baryon splitting functions. For the parton distributions of the s(s) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. The momentum distributions of the s and s quarks in each Fock state differ because they are constituents of different hadrons. We present our results for proton strangeness asymmetry, and compare them to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  20. Baryons and chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei

    The relevance of chiral symmetry in baryons is highlighted in three examples in the nucleon spectroscopy and structure. The first one is the importance of chiral dynamics in understanding the Roper resonance. The second one is the role of chiral symmetry in the lattice calculation of πNσ term and strangeness. The third one is the role of chiral U(1) anomaly in the anomalous Ward identity in evaluating the quark spin and the quark orbital angular momentum. Finally, the chiral effective theory for baryons is discussed.

  1. Observation of an Exotic Baryon with S=+1 in Photoproduction from the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Lei Guo; Dennis Weygand; Paul Stoler; Marco Battaglieri; Raffaella De Vita; Gary Adams; Ji Li; Mina Nozar; Carlos Salgado; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; Gerard Audit; Thierry Auger; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Steve Barrow

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} K{sup +}n was studied at Jefferson Lab using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S = +1 and mass M = 1555 {+-} 10 MeV/c{sup 2} was observed in the nK{sup +} invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM = 26 MeV/c{sup 2}), and its statistical significance is 7.8 {+-} 1.0 {sigma}. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by a chiral soliton model for the {Theta}{sup +} baryon. In addition, the pK{sup +} invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction {gamma} p {yields} K{sup -} K{sup +}p with high statistics in search of doubly-charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  2. Observation of an exotic baryon with S=+1 in photoproduction from the proton.

    PubMed

    Kubarovsky, V; Guo, L; Weygand, D P; Stoler, P; Battaglieri, M; DeVita, R; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Farhi, L; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Frolov, V; Funsten, H; Gaff, S J; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gothe, R; Gordon, C I O; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Ilieva, Y; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kelley, J H; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Longhi, A; Lukashin, K; Major, R W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Mozer, M U; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; O'Brien, J T; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Sabourov, K; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, T; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weisberg, A; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2004-01-23

    The reaction gamma p-->pi(+)K(-)K(+)n was studied at Jefferson Laboratory using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S=+1 and mass M=1555+/-10 MeV/c(2) was observed in the nK(+) invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM=26 MeV/c(2)), and its statistical significance is (7.8+/-1.0)sigma. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by the chiral soliton model for the Theta(+) baryon. In addition, the pK(+) invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction gamma p-->K(-)K(+)p with high statistics in search of doubly charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  3. The qqqqq components and hidden flavor contributions to the baryon magnetic moments

    SciTech Connect

    An, C. S.; Li, Q. B.; Riska, D. O.; Zou, B. S.

    2006-11-15

    The contributions from the qqqqq components to the magnetic moments of the octet as well as the {delta}{sup ++} and {omega}{sup -} decuplet baryons are calculated for the configurations that are expected to have the lowest energy if the hyperfine interaction depends on both spin and flavor. The contributions from the uu,dd, and the ss components are given separately. It is shown that addition of qqqqq admixtures to the ground state baryons can improve the overall description of the magnetic moments of the baryon octet and decuplet in the quark model without SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking, beyond that of the different constituent masses of the strange and light-flavor quarks. The explicit flavor (and spin) wave functions for all the possible configurations of the qqqqq components with light and strange qq pairs are given for the baryon octet and decuplet. Admixtures of {approx}10% of the qqqqq configuration where the flavor-spin symmetry is [4]{sub FS}[22]{sub F}[22]{sub S}, which is likely to have the lowest energy, in particular reduces the deviation from the empirical values of the magnetic moments {sigma}{sup -} and the {xi}{sup 0} compared with the static qqq quark model.

  4. Observation of an Exotic S = +1 Baryon in Exclusive Photoproduction from the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan Stepanyan; Kenneth Hicks; Daniel Carman; Evgueni Pasyuk; Reinhard Schumacher; Elton Smith; David Tedeschi; Luminita Todor

    2003-12-19

    In an exclusive measurement of the reaction {gamma}d {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} p n, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S = +1 is seen in the K{sup +}n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1542 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2} with a measured width of 21 MeV/c{sup 2} FWHM, equivalent to the experimental invariant mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is 5.3 {+-} 0.5 {sigma} for a Gaussian peak shape on top of a smooth background.

  5. Hadronic molecules in the heavy baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.; Ortega, P. G.

    2016-01-22

    We study possible baryon molecules in the non-strange heavy baryon spectrum. We include configurations with a heavy-meson and a light baryon. We find several structures, in particular we can understand the Λ{sub c}(2940) as a D*N molecule with J{sup P} = 3/2{sup −} quantum numbers. We also find D{sup (*)}Δ candidates for the recently discovered X{sub c}(3250) resonance.

  6. Pion-nucleon scattering in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, De-Liang; Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a third order calculation of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude in a chiral effective field theory with pions, nucleons and delta resonances as explicit degrees of freedom. We work in a manifestly Lorentz invariant formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory using dimensional regularization and the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. In the delta resonance sector, the on mass-shell renormalization is realized as a complex-mass scheme. By fitting the low-energy constants of the effective Lagrangian to the S- and P -partial waves a satisfactory description of the phase shifts from the analysis of the Roy-Steiner equations is obtained. We predict the phase shifts for the D and F waves and compare them with the results of the analysis of the George Washington University group. The threshold parameters are calculated both in the delta-less and delta-full cases. Based on the determined low-energy constants, we discuss the pion-nucleon sigma term. Additionally, in order to determine the strangeness content of the nucleon, we calculate the octet baryon masses in the presence of decuplet resonances up to next-to-next-to-leading order in SU(3) baryon chiral perturbation theory. The octet baryon sigma terms are predicted as a byproduct of this calculation.

  7. Baryonic Spectroscopy at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang

    Based on 106 million Ψ(3686) events collected with BESIII detector at BEPCII, some results on excited baryons from the partial wave analysis are presented. In the decay of ψ(3686) to pbar{p}π 0, two new baryonic excited states, Jpc = 1/2 + N(2300) and Jpc = 5/2 - N(2570) are significant, and additional 5 well known N* excited states are observed. In ψ(3686) to pbar{p}η , an excited-nucleon state N(1535) is dominant. In ψ(3686) to K - Λ bar{Ξ} + + c.c., two hyperons Ξ(1690) and Ξ(1820) are observed. In ψ(3686) to Λ bar{Σ }π + c.c., some excited strange baryons bar{Λ }* and Σ* are measured on the Σ+π- and Λπ- mass spectra.

  8. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  9. Strangeness in ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Francesca; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Strangeness production has been measured by the ALICE experiment in different collision systems at the unprecedented center-of-mass energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. In Pb–Pb collisions at TeV the relative production of strange and multi-strange baryons relative to pions is observed to follow a saturating trend with increasing centrality, and reaching values that are consistent with those predicted by thermal model calculations in the Grand-Canonical ensemble. More recently, the multiplicity dependence of strangeness production in small systems such as pp and p–Pb has also been investigated. An overview of the most recent results on strangeness production is reported, including the first observation of strangeness enhancement with charged particle multiplicity in pp collisions.

  10. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  11. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d+Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barnby, L. S.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-07-28

    Here we present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons ( $Λ,\\overline{Λ}$) and mesons (K$0\\atop{S}$ ) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT< 6 GeV/c) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$$_{NN}$ = 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.

  12. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d+Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barnby, L. S.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-07-28

    Here we present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons ( $Λ,\\overline{Λ}$) and mesons (K$0\\atop{S}$ ) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT< 6 GeV/c) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$$_{NN}$ = 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.

  13. Strange and heavy mesons in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Daniel; Abreu, Luciano M.; Bratkovskaya, Elena; Ilner, Andrej; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Ramos, Angels; Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.

    2014-04-01

    We present selected results on the properties of strange and heavy-flavoured mesons in a hot and dense nuclear medium, with emphasis in selfconsistent coupled-channel approaches based on the chiral Lagrangian. In the strangeness sector, we discuss how the enhanced reactivity of light strange vectors at FAIR conditions can be tied to in-medium effects on their predominant decay modes (e.g. bar K* → bar Kπ) and to the excitation of strange baryons in vector-meson nucleon interactions. In the heavy-flavour sector, we focus on recent determinations of the transport coefficients of charmed and bottomed mesons in a hadron gas at vanishing baryonic chemical potential. We comment on the role of microscopic transport simulations to establish a connection between theoretical models and experimental observables from heavy-ion collisions (HICs).

  14. Baryon properties in the relativistic quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, D.; Faustov, R. N.; Galkin, V. O.

    2017-09-01

    Properties of heavy and strange baryons are investigated in the framework of the relativistic quark-diquark picture. It is based on the relativistic quark model of hadrons, which was previously successfully applied for the calculation of meson properties. It is assumed that two quarks in a baryon form a diquark and baryon is considered as the bound quark-diquark system. The relativistic effects and diquark internal structure are consistently taken into account. Calculations are performed up to rather high orbital and radial excitations of heavy and strange baryons. On this basis the Regge trajectories are constructed. The rates of semileptonic decays of heavy baryons are calculated. The obtained results agree well with available experimental data.

  15. Fully Coupled Channel Approach to Doubly Strange s-Shell Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, H.; Shinmura, S.; Akaishi, Y.; Myint, Khin Swe

    2005-05-27

    We describe ab initio calculations of doubly strange, S=-2, s-shell hypernuclei ({sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H, {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He, and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He) as a first attempt to explore the few-body problem of the full-coupled channel scheme for these systems. The wave function includes {lambda}{lambda}, {lambda}{sigma}, N{xi}, and {sigma}{sigma} channels. Minnesota NN, D2{sup '} YN, and simulated YY potentials based on the Nijmegen hard-core model are used. Bound-state solutions of these systems are obtained. We find that a set of phenomenological B{sub 8}B{sub 8} interactions among the octet baryons in S=0,-1, and -2 sectors, which is consistent with all of the available experimental binding energies of S=0,-1, and -2 s-shell (hyper)nuclei, can predict a particle stable bound state of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H. For {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He, {lambda}N-{sigma}N and {xi}N-{lambda}{sigma} potentials significantly affect the net {lambda}{lambda}-N{xi} coupling, and a large {xi} probability is obtained even for a weaker {lambda}{lambda}-N{xi} potential.

  16. A proposal to construct SELEX - segmented large-x baryon spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, J.,; Edelstein, R.; Gibaut, D.; Lipton, R.; Potter, D.; Lach, J.; Stutte, L.; Li, Yun-Shan; Tang, Fu-Kun; Lang, Feng-Fei; Li, Cheng-Ze; Denisov, A.S.; Golovtsov, V.; Grachev, V.; Krivshich, A.; Kuropatkin, N.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; Vorobyov, A.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Iowa U. /Sao Paulo U. /Yale U.

    1987-11-01

    Heavy flavor experiments currently in progress at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders or in the fixed target programs at CERN and Fermilab are aimed at collecting large samples (> 10,000 reconstructed events) of charmed events. These experiments will provide a great deal of information about charmed meson systems, but the expected yield of charmed baryons is not large--10% or less of the sample size. The most detailed study of the charm strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} comes not from a large-statistics central production experiment at high energy but rather from a 20-day run at modest beam flux in the CERN hyperon beam. This proposal exploits the advantages in triggering and particle identification of large-x production to make a systematic study of charm baryon production and decay systematics. For the dominant ({approx} 10% branching ratio) modes of these baryons, they expect to collect 10{sup 6} triggered events in each mode per running period. This will give adequate statistics to study even highly suppressed modes. The study of meson systematics by the Mark III spectrometer at SPEAR led to a revolution in the understanding of charmed meson decay mechanisms. No present experiment will supply a similar data set for the charmed baryons. A fixed target experiment cannot supply the absolute branching ratios that e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation on the {Upsilon}(3770) resonance provides for the Mark III data. They can supply relative branching ratios for the non-leptonic and semileptonic decay modes of charmed baryons and establish the importance of two-body resonance modes in the decay mechanism. This information, along with lifetime measurements for {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup ++}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup 0}, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons, will permit evaluation in the baryon sector of the role of color suppression, Pauli suppression, sextet enhancement and other varied mechanisms which influence decay rates of charmed

  17. Studying meson baryon systems with strangeness +1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemchandani, K. P.; Martinez Torres, A.; Navarra, F. S.; Nielsen, M.; Tolos, L.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the results of our recent study of the s-wave KN-K*N coupled interaction. The K*N amplitude is obtained by calculating t- and u- channel diagrams and a contact interaction. For the KN amplitude we calculate the Weinberg-Tomozawa term obtained from the lowest order chiral Lagrangian. The KN ↔ K*N amplitudes are calculated by replacing the photon by a vector meson in the standard Kroll-Ruderman term. The subtraction constants required to calculate the loops are fixed by demanding the KN amplitudes to fit the data available on the isospin 0 and 1 s-wave phase shifts. We find that the coupling between the two channels plays an important in the isospin 0 configuration. We obtain updated amplitudes and cross sections for the KN and K*N systems, which can be used to understand some recent findings of K, K* production in p-p and p-A collisions studied by the Hades collaboration. We also look for resonances in these systems but find none.

  18. Strangeness at high temperatures: from hadrons to quarks.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Ding, H-T; Hegde, P; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Maezawa, Y; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Sharma, S; Soeldner, W; Wagner, M

    2013-08-23

    Appropriate combinations of up to fourth order cumulants of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number and electric charge fluctuations, obtained from lattice QCD calculations, have been used to probe the strangeness carrying degrees of freedom at high temperatures. For temperatures up to the chiral crossover, separate contributions of strange mesons and baryons can be well described by an uncorrelated gas of hadrons. Such a description breaks down in the chiral crossover region, suggesting that the deconfinement of strangeness takes place at the chiral crossover. On the other hand, the strangeness carrying degrees of freedom inside the quark gluon plasma can be described by a weakly interacting gas of quarks only for temperatures larger than twice the chiral crossover temperature. In the intermediate temperature window, these observables show considerably richer structures, indicative of the strongly interacting nature of the quark gluon plasma.

  19. Heavy flavor baryon states at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Sally; /New Mexico U.

    2011-08-01

    Precision measurements of the masses and widths of the bottom baryon resonances {Sigma}{sub b} and {Sigma}*{sub b} and charm baryons {Lambda}{sub c}(2595), {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), {Sigma}{sub c}(2455), and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) are reported. A new measurement of {Lambda}{sub b} production is described. The studies include the first measurement of the widths and isospin mass splittings of the members of the {Sigma}{sub b} family. The charm baryons are examined through their strong decays to the {Lambda}{sub c} ground state, and measurements of their mass differences relative to the ground state, and corresponding decay widths, are reported. The data were collected by the CDF and D0 detectors for 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions during Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  20. Strangeness exchange reactions and hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recent progress in the spectroscopy of ..lambda.. and ..sigma.. hypernuclei is reviewed. Prospects for the production of doubly strange hypernuclei at a future kaon factory are assessed. It is suggested that the (K/sup -/,K/sup +/) reaction on a nuclear target may afford an optimal way of producing the H dibaryon, a stable six quark object with J/sup ..pi../ = O/sup +/, S = -2.

  1. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-09-01

    The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

  2. Missing baryonic resonances in the Hagedorn spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man Lo, Pok; Marczenko, Michał; Redlich, Krzysztof; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2016-08-01

    The hadronic medium of QCD is modeled as a gas of point-like hadrons, with its composition determined by the Hagedorn mass spectrum. The spectrum consists of a discrete and a continuous part. The former is determined by the experimentally confirmed resonances tabulated by the Particle Data Group (PDG), while the latter can be extracted from the existing lattice data. This formulation of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) provides a transparent framework to relate the fluctuation of conserved charges as calculated in the lattice QCD approach to the particle content of the medium. A comparison of the two approaches shows that the equation of state is well described by the standard HRG model, which includes only a discrete spectrum of known hadrons. The corresponding description in the strange sector, however, shows clear discrepancies, thus a continuous spectrum is added to incorporate the effect of missing resonances. We propose a method to extract the strange-baryon spectrum from the lattice data. The result is consistent with the trend set by the unconfirmed strange baryons resonances listed by the PDG, suggesting that most of the missing interaction strength for the strange baryons reside in the | S| = 1 sector. This scenario is also supported by recent lattice calculations, and might be important in the energy region covered by the NICA accelerator in Dubna, where in the heavy-ion collisions, baryons are the dominating degrees of freedom in the final state.

  3. Bottom-strange mesons in hyperonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Divakar; Mishra, Amruta

    2014-11-01

    The in-medium behavior of bottom-strange pseudoscalar mesons in hot, isospin asymmetric and dense hadronic environment is studied using a chiral effective model. The same was recently generalized to the heavy quark sector and employed to study the behavior of open-charm and open-bottom mesons. The heavy quark (anti-quark) is treated as frozen and all medium modifications of these bottom-strange mesons are due to their strange anti-quark (quark) content. We observe a pronounced dependence of their medium mass on baryonic density and strangeness content of the medium. Certain aspects of these in-medium interactions are similar to those observed for the strange-charmed mesons in a preceding investigation, such as the lifting of mass-degeneracy of BS0 and {\\bar B}S0 mesons in hyperonic matter, while the same is respected in vacuum as well as in nuclear matter. In general, however, there is a remarkable distinction between the two species, even though the formalism predicts a completely analogous in-medium interaction Lagrangian density. We discuss in detail the reason for different in-medium behavior of these bottom-strange mesons as compared to charmed-strange mesons, despite the dynamics of the heavy quark being treated as frozen in both cases.

  4. Strangeness in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV observed with the STAR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnby, Lee S.; STAR Collaboration; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Curto, G. Lo; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lynn, D.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, M. L.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Mitchell, J.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Radomski, S.; Rai, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J. G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sandweiss, J.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schüttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; umbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Thomas, J. H.; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, J. W.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zborovský, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2002-07-01

    The STAR detector has made a variety of measurements of strange and other hadronic species in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV. A comparison of kaon and pion production enables an examination of the systematics of strangeness production with energy by comparing them to lower energy collisions. Anti-baryon to baryon ratios indicate a much reduced net-baryon density and transverse momentum spectra show that a picture of transverse expansion seems appropriate.

  5. Complete strangeness measurements in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomášik, Boris; Kolomeitsev, Evgeni E.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss strangeness production in heavy-ion collisions within and around the energy range of the planned NICA facility. We describe a minimal statistical model, in which the total strangeness yield is fixed by the observed or calculated K+ multiplicity. We show how the exact strangeness conservation can be taken into account on event-by-event basis in such a model. We argue that from strange particle yields one can reveal information about the collision dynamics and about possible modifications of particle properties in medium. This can be best achieved if the complete strangeness measurement is performed, i.e. kaons, antikaons, hyperons and multistrange hyperons are registered in the same experimental setup. In particular, production of hadrons containing two and more strange quarks, like Ξ and Ω baryons could be of interest.

  6. Excited baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2012-04-01

    We briefly describe the 1/Nc expansion method for studying baryon masses. Two approaches of the large Nc excited baryons have been proposed so far. The first one, based on the Hartree picture, treats the baryon as a ground state core and an excited quark and the second one, suggested recently, considers the baryon globally, without decoupling the system. The masses of excited states of mixed orbital symmetry of nonstrange and strange baryons belonging to the lowest [70, -] multiplet are calculated in the 1/Nc expansion to order 1/Nc with the new method which allows to considerably reduce the number of linearly independent operators entering the mass formula. The status of the resonance Λ(1405) is discussed.

  7. Inclusive Sigma- photoproduction on the neutron via the reaction gamma n (p) ---> K+ Sigma- (p)

    SciTech Connect

    Jorn Langheinrich; Ana Lima; Barry Berman

    2006-06-01

    The analysis described here is part of a comprehensive survey of the elementary strangeness photoproduction cross sections on the nucleon. The six elementary strangeness reactions are {gamma}n {yields} K{sup 0}{Lambda} and {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda} {gamma}n {yields} K{sup 0}{Sigma}{sup 0} and {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} {gamma}n {yields} K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup -} and {gamma}p {yields} K{sup 0}{Sigma}|{sup +}

  8. A meson cloud model of strangeness asymmetry in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Greg; Raschko, David; Hansen, Chase

    2013-10-01

    We use a meson cloud model to describe strangeness in the proton. In this model the proton can fluctuate into meson-baryon pairs, as allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. The leading contributions to strangeness are from the meson-baryon pairs K Λ or K Σ. In this model, the probability of finding strange quark pairs depends on both the splitting functions, which represent the probability of splitting into a given meson-baryon state, and the phenomenological vertex form factors. Because the s and {s} quarks reside in different hadrons, their momentum distributions will differ, as suggested by the NuTeV anomaly and recent global parton distribution fits. We compare our results to other theoretical calculations and to experimental data from HERMES and ATLAS, and to global parton distribution fits. Supported in part by NSF Grants No. 0855656 and 1205686.

  9. Strange behavior of rapidity dependent strangeness enhancement of particles containing and not containing leading quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Kalyan; Bhattacharjee, B.

    2017-09-01

    Rapidity dependent strangeness enhancement factors for the identified particles have been studied with the help of a string based hadronic transport model UrQMD-3.3 (Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics) at FAIR energies. A strong rapidity dependent strangeness enhancement could be observed with our generated data for Au + Au collisions at the beam energy of 30A GeV. The strangeness enhancement is found to be maximum at mid-rapidity for the particles containing leading quarks while for particles consisting of produced quarks only, the situation is seen to be otherwise. Such rapidity dependent strangeness enhancement could be traced back to the dependence of rapidity width on centrality or otherwise on the distribution of net-baryon density.

  10. Density-dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petschauer, Stefan; Haidenbauer, Johann; Kaiser, Norbert; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon-baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  11. STOPPING AND BARYON TRANSPORT IN HEAVY ION REACTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK, F.

    2005-02-05

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  12. Unique signatures for QGP in strangeness sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, V. K.; Singh, C. P.

    1998-03-01

    We suggest that the variations of certain strange particle ratios either with the energy density or with the baryon density constitute a significant signal for identification of the QGP formation in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. We use realistic equations of state (EOS) for the QGP as well as for dense, hot hadron gas (HG) scenarios. We suggest that a direct comparison of the ratios obtained in the QGP and HG scenarios will be immensely helpful in identifying the QGP formation.

  13. Differential cross section and polarization extractions for gamma p going to K+sigma0 and gamma p going to phi p using CLAS at Jefferson Lab, towards a partial wave analysis in search of missing baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Biplab

    In the first part of this work, we present differential cross section and polarization measurements for the reactions gammap → K+Sigma0 and gammap → φp. The data were collected using the large-acceptance CLAS detector stationed in Ball B at Jefferson Lab. An unpolarized energy-tagged photon beam produced via bremsstrahlung and a liquid hydrogen cryotarget was used for this, during the so-called g11a experimental run-period. The kinematic coverage of our results is from near production threshold to s = 2.84 GeV in energy and -0.95 ≤ costhetac.m. ≤ +0.95 in the meson production angle thetac.m.. For the most part, our results are finely binned in 10-MeV-wide s bins. For the φp channel, we analyze both the charged (φ → K+K -) and the neutral (φ → K0SK0L ) decay modes. For K+Sigma 0, our work corresponds to a 300 MeV increase in energy coverage for the differential cross sections and forms the first extensive recoil polarization world dataset. For φp, where previous world data is either non-existent or exist with wide energy bins and very limited statistics, our results will be the first extensive world dataset for both the cross sections and the spin density matrix elements r0MM' . Our K+Sigma0 results are now published as PRC 82, 025202 (2010) [1] and the φp results are also nearing completion of internal Collaboration analysis review. In addition, we have also been able to extend upon a previous K+Λ analysis in the backward-angles and near-threshold kinematic regimes, using a higher statistics dataset. The second segment consists of setting up a general framework for performing a coupled-channel partial wave analysis (PWA) on these extracted data results. Our final goal is to search for the so-called "missing" baryon resonances, that is, states predicted by quark models, but absent in conventional piN analyses. We construct the amplitudes and polarization observables required for this PWA. For polarizations in the pseudo-scalar sector, sign

  14. Observation of the {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon and measurement of the properties of the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Ketchum, W.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Lee, H. S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.

    2009-10-01

    We report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {omega}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {omega}{sup -}{yields}{lambda}K{sup -}, and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0x10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4{+-}6.8(stat){+-}0.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat){+-}0.02(syst) ps. In addition, for the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon we measure a mass of 5790.9{+-}2.6(stat){+-}0.8(syst) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat){+-}0.02(syst) ps. Under the assumption that the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {omega}{sub b}{sup -} are produced with similar kinematic distributions to the {lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, we find ({sigma}({xi}{sub b}{sup -})B({xi}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{xi}{sup -})/{sigma}({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})B({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}))=0.167{sub -0.025}{sup +0.037}(stat){+-}0.012(syst) and ({sigma}({omega}{sub b}{sup -})B({omega}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{omega}{sup -})/{sigma}({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})B({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}))=0.045{sub -0.012}{sup +0.017}(stat){+-} 0.004(syst) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20 GeV/c.

  15. Heavy baryons - Recent and very new results

    SciTech Connect

    Peter S Cooper

    2003-01-15

    Recent results on observations, properties and decay modes of the charmed and beauty baryons will be reviewed. Candidates for several new high mass states which include a cleanly-identified daughter {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon are seen in data from the SELEX experiment at Fermilab. These states are candidates for doubly-charmed baryons: a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} state and a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} state. These candidates are more than 5{sigma} signals in each case at masses of 3520 and 3460 MeV respectively.

  16. Holographic Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Piljin

    We review baryons in the D4-D8 holographic model of low energy QCD, with the large Nc and the large't Hooft coupling limit. The baryon is identified with a bulk soliton of a unit Pontryagin number, which from the four-dimensional viewpoint translates to a modified Skyrmion dressed by condensates of spin one mesons. We explore classical properties and find that the baryon in the holographic limit is amenable to an effective field theory description. We also present a simple method to capture all leading and subleading interactions in the 1/Nc and the derivative expansions. An infinitely predictive model of baryon-meson interactions is thus derived, although one may trust results only for low energy processes, given various approximations in the bulk. We showcase a few comparisons to experiments, such as the leading axial couplings to pions, the leading vector-like coupling, and a qualitative prediction of the electromagnetic vector dominance that involves the entire tower of vector mesons.

  17. Strangeness observables and pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kabana, Sonia

    2004-12-02

    We review the experimental evidence on firstly, strangeness production as a signature for the QCD phase transition and secondly, pentaquarks, the latest and most exotic manifestations of strangeness in hadrons.

  18. In Medium Properties of Charmed Strange Mesons in Dense Hadron ic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil

    2015-05-01

    The medium modifications of the charmed strange mesons in the dense hadronic matter are investigated within chiral S U(4) model. The charmed strange meson properties modifies due to their interactions with the nucleons, hyperons and the scalar mesons (scalar-isoscalar mesons ( σ, ζ), scalar isovector meson ( δ)) in the dense hadronic medium. The various parameters used in the chiral model are obtained by fitting the vacuum baryon masses and saturation properties of nuclear matter. The non-linear coupled equations of the scalar fields are solved to obtain their baryon density, isospin and strangeness dependent values. Furthermore, the dispersion relations are derived for charmed strange mesons. Effects of isospin asymmetry and strangeness on the energies of charmed strange mesons are investigated. The in medium properties of charmed strange mesons can be particularly relevant to the experiments with neutron rich beams at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, Germany, as well as to experiments at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) laboratory, USA. The present study of the in medium properties of charmed strange mesons will be of direct relevance for the observables from the compressed baryonic matter, resulting from the heavy ion collision experiments.

  19. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  20. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D.E.; Kahana, S.H.

    1998-02-01

    A two phase cascade, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy Ion-Ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy ion experiments at the CERN SPS.

  1. Recent Results on Charmed Baryons with Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuboyama, T.

    2006-11-17

    The Belle detector has accumulated e+e- collision data corresponding to 600 fb-1 at the {upsilon}(4S) energy. The paper presents the improved measurement of known charmed baryons; {xi}c and {xi}c(2645), as well as observation of new states; {sigma}c(2800), {xi}cx(2980) and {xi}cx(3077)

  2. Phase transition of the baryon-antibaryon plasma in hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.; Iazzi, F.; Pigato, D.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the presence of thermodynamic instabilities in a hot and dense nuclear medium where a phase transition from a gas of massive hadrons to a nearly massless baryon, antibaryon plasma can take place. The analysis is performed by requiring the global conservation of baryon number and zero net strangeness in the framework of an effective relativistic mean field theory with the inclusion of the Δ(1232)-isobars, hyperons and the lightest pseudoscalar and vector meson degrees of freedom. Similarly to the low density nuclear liquid-gas phase transition, we show that such a phase transition is characterized by both mechanical instability (fluctuations on the baryon density) that by chemical- diffusive instability (fluctuations on the strangeness concentration). It turns out that, in this situation, phases with different values of antibaryon-baryon ratios and strangeness content may coexist.

  3. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  4. Cascade ({xi}) Physics: a New Approach to Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B. M. K.

    2006-11-17

    Cascade hyperons have two special characteristics, which are particularly valuable as experimental and theoretical tools: cascades have strangeness minus two and their widths are quite narrow compared to the N* and {delta}+ resonances. The narrow width allows the detection by the missing mass or invariant mass techniques. The makeup of the cascade states is two ''massive'' strange and one light quark, this makes them much more amendable to Lattice Gauge calculations. Using the well established Flavor Symmetry of QCD we can use a comparison of the Cascades with the N* and {delta}* resonances to make a conclusive search for the 'Unseen Resonances' of the quark model, for Hybrid Baryons, Meson-Baryon Bound States and other Exotica. We can investigate the flavor dependence of confinement: is the string tension between two strange quarks the same as between two down quarks?.

  5. The search for strange pentaquarks at ZEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Z.

    2005-10-06

    A study of states and enhancements reconstructed using the invariant-mass spectra associated with strange baryons has been performed in ep collisions with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 121 pb-1. The invariant-mass spectra were reconstructed in several kinematic regions with the main emphasis on the spectra which are sensitive to the production of pentaquarks. The candidate {theta}+ signal was found to be produced predominantly in the forward hemisphere in the laboratory frame. This is unlike the case for the {lambda}(1520) or the {lambda}c, and indicates that the {theta}+ may have an unusual production mechanism related to proton-remnant fragmentation.

  6. Kaon condensation and multi-strange matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2010-04-01

    We report on dynamical calculations of multi- K¯ hypernuclei, which were performed by adding K¯ mesons to particle-stable configurations of nucleons, Λ and Ξ hyperons. The K¯ separation energy as well as the baryonic densities saturate with the number of antikaons. We demonstrate that the saturation is a robust feature of multi- K¯ hypernuclei. Because the K¯ separation energy B does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that kaon condensation is unlikely to occur in finite strong-interaction self-bound {N,Λ,Ξ} strange hadronic systems.

  7. The physics of strange matter

    SciTech Connect

    Olinto, A.V. |

    1991-12-01

    Strange matter may be the ground state of matter. We review the phenomenology and astrophysical implications of strange matter, and discuss the possible ways for testing the strange matter hypothesis.

  8. Baryonic popcorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Melnikov, Dmitry; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2012-11-01

    In the large N c limit cold dense nuclear matter must be in a lattice phase. This applies also to holographic models of hadron physics. In a class of such models, like the generalized Sakai-Sugimoto model, baryons take the form of instantons of the effective flavor gauge theory that resides on probe flavor branes. In this paper we study the phase structure of baryonic crystals by analyzing discrete periodic configurations of such instantons. We find that instanton configurations exhibit a series of "popcorn" transitions upon increasing the density. Through these transitions normal (3D) lattices expand into the transverse dimension, eventually becoming a higher dimensional (4D) multi-layer lattice at large densities. We consider 3D lattices of zero size instantons as well as 1D periodic chains of finite size instantons, which serve as toy models of the full holographic systems. In particular, for the finite-size case we determine solutions of the corresponding ADHM equations for both a straight chain and for a 2D zigzag configuration where instantons pop up into the holographic dimension. At low density the system takes the form of an "abelian anti- ferromagnetic" straight periodic chain. Above a critical density there is a second order phase transition into a zigzag structure. An even higher density yields a rich phase space characterized by the formation of multi-layer zigzag structures. The finite size of the lattices in the transverse dimension is a signal of an emerging Fermi sea of quarks. We thus propose that the popcorn transitions indicate the onset of the "quarkyonic" phase of the cold dense nuclear matter.

  9. Chiral baryon with quantized pions

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, J.A.; Price, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    The authors consider a hybrid chiral baryon model starting from the Gell-Mann-Levy linear sigma model with the sigma and pion fields coupled to quarks. Instead of employing the standard hedgehog ansatz, the authors solve the model using a Fock-space configuration consisting of a component with three quarks plus a component with three quarks and an explicit pion. In each component, the quarks (and pion) are directly coupled to the spin and isospin appropriate to a nucleon and the coupling is preserved throughout the calculation. The authors minimizes the groundstate expectation value of the Gell-Mann-Levy Hamiltonian to obtain the equations of motion which are solved self-consistently. They calculatess the canonical set of nucleon observables and compare them with previous work.

  10. Baryon Spectroscopy Results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kooten, R.

    2010-08-05

    The Tevatron at Fermilab continues to collect data at high luminosity resulting in datasets in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The high collision energies allow for the observation of new heavy quark baryon states not currently accessible at any other facility. In addition to the ground state Lb, the spectroscopy and properties of the new heavy baryon states {Omega}{sub b}, {Xi}{sub b}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} as measured by the CDF and DOe Collaborations will be presented.

  11. Nonextensive statistical effects and strangeness production in hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.; Pigato, D.

    2012-12-01

    By means of an effective relativistic nuclear equation of state in the framework of the nonextensive statistical mechanics, characterized by power-law quantum distributions, we study the phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon density. The analysis is performed by requiring the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number, electric charge fraction and zero net strangeness. We show that nonextensive statistical effects strongly influence the strangeness production during the pure hadronic phase and the hadron-quark-gluon mixed phase transition, also for small deviations from the standard Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics.

  12. Strangeness in STAR experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shusu; STAR collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present the recent results of strangeness production at the mid-rapidity in Au + Au collisions at RHIC, from to 200 GeV. Elliptic asymmetry v 2 of multi-strange baryon Ω and φ mesons are similar to that of pions and protons in the intermediate pT range (2 - 5 GeV/c) in GeV Au + Au collisions, indicating that the major part of collective ow has been built up at partonic stage. The breaking of mass ordering between φ mesons and protons in the low pT range (< 1 GeV/c) is consistent with a picture that φ mesons are less sensitive to later hadronic interaction. The nuclear modification factor R CP and baryon to meson ratio change dramatically when the collision energy is lower than 19.6 GeV. It suggests a possible change of the created QCD medium properties at lower energies compared to those from high energies.

  13. Sigma Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balgovind, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The GLA Fourth-Order model is needed to smooth the topography. This is to remove the Gibbs phenomenon. The Gibbs phenomenon occurs whenever we truncate a Fourier Series. The Sigma factors were introduced to reduce the Gibbs phenomenon. It is found that the smooth Fourier series is nothing but the original Fourier series with its coefficients multiplied by corresponding sigma factors. This operator can be applied many times to obtain high order sigma filtered field and is easily applicable using FFT. It is found that this filter is beneficial in deriving the topography.

  14. Dirac's Covariant Constraint Dynamics Applied to the Baryon Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Joshua; Crater, Horace

    2010-02-01

    A baryon is a hadron containing three quarks in a combination of up, down, strange, charm, or bottom. For prediction of the baryon energy spectrum, a baryon is modeled as a three-body system with the interacting forces coming from a set of two-body potentials that depend on the distance between the quarks, the spin-spin and spin-orbit angular momentum coupling terms, and a tensor term. Techniques and equations are derived from Todorov's work on constraint dynamics and the quasi-potential equation together with Two Body Dirac equations developed by Crater and Van Alstine, and adapted to this specific problem by further use of Sazdjian's N-body constraints dynamics for general confined systems. Baryon spectroscopy results are presented and compared with experiment. Typically, a best fit method is used in the analyses that employ several different algorithms, including a gradient approach, Monte Carlo modeling, and simulated annealing methods. )

  15. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions ( pp , e^+e^- below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well.

  16. Flavour Oscillations in Dense Baryonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We suggest that fast neutral meson oscillations may occur in a dense baryonic matter, which can influence the balance of s/¯s quarks in the nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus interactions, if primordial multiplicities of neutral K 0, mesons are sufficiently asymmetrical. The phenomenon can occur even if CP symmetry is fully conserved, and it may be responsible for the enhanced sub-threshold production of multi-strange hyperons observed in the low-energy A+A and p+A interactions.

  17. Measurement of strange particle production in the NICA fixed-target programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Volker

    2016-08-01

    Strange particles provide a sensitive tool to study the dense and hot matter created in relativistic nuclear collisions. Although strangeness production in such collisions has been a topic of experimental and theoretical research for many years, its understanding is far from being complete. This holds in particular for multi-strange hyperons and for lower collision energies as relevant for NICA and FAIR. Multi-strange particles, being sensitive to both the mechanism of strangeness production and the net-baryon density, are expected to shed light on the state of the created matter and to indicate possible transitions to new phases of strongly interacting matter. We thus advocate the measurement of hyperons and φ mesons in a fixed-target experiment at NICA (BM@N), which can be achieved by a relatively compact detector system.

  18. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Solovieva, E. I.

    2015-12-15

    Apresent-day classification of charmed baryons is presented, a quark model for ground states is briefly described, and the energy levels of excited states are analyzed. In addition, a survey of experimentally observed states of charmed baryons is given.

  19. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-06

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  20. [Through strangeness to oneself].

    PubMed

    Sorgedrager, D B

    1993-11-01

    "Being strange" as opposed to "being oneself" is part of the thinking in all cultures. Belonging to a given culture is actually defined by ones identity and by "being oneself". Both concepts--"being oneself" or "being strange"--are rational and related constructs. Whatever they are confronted with, for most human beings it is self-evident to differentiate between subject and object, between "being oneself" or "being strange". This explains why thinking often occurs in opposites or polarities, as an either/or. All "being strange" has its origins in one's own self. "Being strange" becomes most obvious when persons, gestalt or cultures strongly deviate from one's own familiar situation. It is part of man's disposition to be cautious, suspicious of and at distance from everything considered strange and different. That explains his xenophobia feelings and actions. Behind this attitude we can always discover one's wish to preserve the familiar beliefs--combined with an uneasiness to give up one's thinking and behaviour that is proven and routine. It is only by reflecting on our own culture and our own inheritance that we have the possibility to come to terms with our own ethnic identity and foreign behavioral patterns. If we do not try to understand other cultures while keeping our own cultural identity, tensions and violent conflicts will inevitably result.

  1. Instability of the hedgehog shape for the octet baryon in the chiral quark soliton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Satoru; Futami, Yasuhiko

    2003-04-01

    In this paper the stability of the hedgehog shape of the chiral soliton is studied for the octet baryon with the SU(3) chiral quark soliton model. The strangeness degrees of freedom are treated by a simplified bound-state approach, which omits the locality of the kaon wave function. The mean field approximation for the flavor rotation is applied to the model. The classical soliton changes shape according to the strangeness. The baryon appears as a rotational band of the combined system of the deformed soliton and the kaon.

  2. Strangeness S =-1 hyperon-nucleon scattering in covariant chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Wen; Ren, Xiu-Lei; Geng, Li-Sheng; Long, Bingwei

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the successes of covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory in one-baryon systems and in heavy-light systems, we study relevance of relativistic effects in hyperon-nucleon interactions with strangeness S =-1 . In this exploratory work, we follow the covariant framework developed by Epelbaum and Gegelia to calculate the Y N scattering amplitude at leading order. By fitting the five low-energy constants to the experimental data, we find that the cutoff dependence is mitigated, compared with the heavy-baryon approach. Nevertheless, the description of the experimental data remains quantitatively similar at leading order.

  3. Improved Light Cone Model calculation of strangeness asymmetry in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, Garrett; Fox, Jordan; Tuppan, Sam

    2014-09-01

    We expect strangeness in the proton from the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which allows for the proton to split into a meson and a baryon, such as a K and a Λ. Our goal is to accurately model the momentum distributions of the strange quarks and anti-strange quarks in the proton. We choose the Light Cone Model because it is a natural explanation for strangeness and for s (x) ≠ s (x) . In the Light Cone Model of Cao and Signal, α is a single parameter in the meson-baryon fluctuation functions f (y) and in the s and s distributions of the mesons and baryons. These functions are exponentials in which α is related to the spatial extent of the particles. Because the s and s are in different environments, we explore an array of values for α which reflect the sizes of the particles and study this effect on our model. We compare our results to global pdfs and experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES and ATLAS. We expect strangeness in the proton from the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which allows for the proton to split into a meson and a baryon, such as a K and a Λ. Our goal is to accurately model the momentum distributions of the strange quarks and anti-strange quarks in the proton. We choose the Light Cone Model because it is a natural explanation for strangeness and for s (x) ≠ s (x) . In the Light Cone Model of Cao and Signal, α is a single parameter in the meson-baryon fluctuation functions f (y) and in the s and s distributions of the mesons and baryons. These functions are exponentials in which α is related to the spatial extent of the particles. Because the s and s are in different environments, we explore an array of values for α which reflect the sizes of the particles and study this effect on our model. We compare our results to global pdfs and experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES and ATLAS. This research has been supported in part by the Research in Undergraduate Institutions program of the National Science Foundation, Grant No. 1205686.

  4. Strangeness production in high-energy collisions and Hawking-Unruh radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Yassin, Hayam; Abo Elyazeed, Eman R.

    The assumption that the production of quark-antiquark pairs and their sequential string-breaking takes place, likely as a tunneling process, through the event horizon of the color confinement determines the freezeout temperature and gives a plausible interpretation for the thermal pattern of elementary and nucleus-nucleus collisions. When relating the black-hole electric charges to the baryon-chemical potentials, it was found that the phenomenologically deduced parameters from the ratios of various particle species and the higher-order moments of net-proton multiplicity in the statistical thermal models and Polyakov linear-sigma model agree well with the ones determined from the thermal radiation from charged black hole. Accordingly, the resulting freezeout conditions, such as normalized entropy density s/T3 = 7 and average energy per particle /≃ 1GeV, are confirmed at finite chemical potentials as well. Furthermore, the problem of strangeness production in elementary collisions can be interpreted by thermal particle production from the Hawking-Unruh radiation. Consequently, the freezeout temperature depends on the quark masses. This leads to a deviation from full equilibrium and thus a suppression of the strangeness production in the elementary collisions. But in nucleus-nucleus collisions, an average temperature should be introduced in order to dilute the quark masses. This nearly removes the strangeness suppression. An extension to finite chemical potentials is introduced. The particle ratios of kaon-to-pion (K+/π+), phi-to-kaon (ϕ/K‑) and antilambda-to-pion (Λ¯/π‑) are determined from Hawking-Unruh radiation and compared with the thermal calculations and the measurements in different experiments. We conclude that these particle ratios can be reproduced, at least qualitatively, as Hawking-Unruh radiation at finite chemical potential. With increasing energy, both K+/π+ and ϕ/K‑ keep their maximum values at low SPS energies. But the further

  5. Properties of JP=1/2+ baryon octets at low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Gupta, Pallavi; Upadhyay, Alka

    2017-06-01

    The statistical model in combination with the detailed balance principle is able to phenomenologically calculate and analyze spin- and flavor-dependent properties like magnetic moments (with effective masses, with effective charge, or with both effective mass and effective charge), quark spin polarization and distribution, the strangeness suppression factor, and \\overline{d}-\\overline{u} asymmetry incorporating the strange sea. The s\\overline{s} in the sea is said to be generated via the basic quark mechanism but suppressed by the strange quark mass factor ms>m_{u,d}. The magnetic moments of the octet baryons are analyzed within the statistical model, by putting emphasis on the SU(3) symmetry-breaking effects generated by the mass difference between the strange and non-strange quarks. The work presented here assumes hadrons with a sea having an admixture of quark gluon Fock states. The results obtained have been compared with theoretical models and experimental data.

  6. Strangeness production in heavy ion collisions: What have we learned with the energy increase from SPS to RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, Grazyna

    2002-08-23

    A review of strange particle production in heavy ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies is presented. The particle yields and ratios from SPS and RHIC are discussed in view of the newest developments in understanding collision dynamics, and in view of their role in the search for a quark gluon plasma. A strangeness enhancement, most notably observed in CERN Pb-beam results, shows a remarkable two fold global enhancement with a much larger effect seen in the case of multistrange baryons. Hadronic models did fail to explain this pattern. At RHIC energy strangeness assumes a different role, since temperatures are higher and the central rapidity region almost baryon-free. An intriguing question: ''Did RHIC change the way we understand strangeness production in heavy ion collisions ?'' is discussed.

  7. Enhanced production of multi-strange hadrons in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; An, M.; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovska, J.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; di Ruzza, B.; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Coral, D. M. Goméz; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, M. Mohisin; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lehner, S.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Vargas, H. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; García, G. Martínez; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; de Godoy, D. A. Moreira; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; da Luz, H. Natal; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; de Oliveira, R. A. Negrao; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Oleniacz, J.; da Silva, A. C. Oliveira; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, X.; da Costa, H. Pereira; Peresunko, D.; Lezama, E. Perez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Doce, O. Vázquez; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Vickovic, L.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Tello, A. Villatoro; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yalcin, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-06-01

    At sufficiently high temperature and energy density, nuclear matter undergoes a transition to a phase in which quarks and gluons are not confined: the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Such an exotic state of strongly interacting quantum chromodynamics matter is produced in the laboratory in heavy nuclei high-energy collisions, where an enhanced production of strange hadrons is observed. Strangeness enhancement, originally proposed as a signature of QGP formation in nuclear collisions, is more pronounced for multi-strange baryons. Several effects typical of heavy-ion phenomenology have been observed in high-multiplicity proton-proton (pp) collisions, but the enhanced production of multi-strange particles has not been reported so far. Here we present the first observation of strangeness enhancement in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions. We find that the integrated yields of strange and multi-strange particles, relative to pions, increases significantly with the event charged-particle multiplicity. The measurements are in remarkable agreement with the p-Pb collision results, indicating that the phenomenon is related to the final system created in the collision. In high-multiplicity events strangeness production reaches values similar to those observed in Pb-Pb collisions, where a QGP is formed.

  8. Cumulants of event-by-event net-strangeness distributions in Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 -200 GeV within an UrQMD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chang; Xu, Ji; Luo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Fluctuations of conserved quantities, such as baryon, electric charge, and strangeness number, are sensitive observables in heavy-ion collisions to search for the QCD phase transition and critical point. In this paper, we performed a systematical analysis on the various cumulants and cumulant ratios of event-by-event net-strangeness distributions in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 , 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV from an ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics model. We performed a systematical study on the contributions from various strange baryons and mesons to the net-strangeness fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the cumulants and cumulant ratios of net-strangeness distributions extracted from different strange particles show very different centrality and energy-dependence behavior. By comparing with the net-kaon fluctuations, we found that the strange baryons play an important role in the fluctuations of net strangeness. This study can provide useful baselines to study the QCD phase transition and search for the QCD critical point by using the fluctuations of net strangeness in heavy-ion collisions experiment. It can help us to understand noncritical physics contributions to the fluctuations of net strangeness.

  9. Intrinsic strange distributions in the nucleon from the light-cone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salajegheh, Maral

    2015-10-01

    Precise knowledge of the strange and antistrange quark distributions of the nucleon is a major step toward better understanding of the strong interaction and the nucleon structure. Moreover, the s -s ¯ asymmetry in the nucleon plays an important role in some physical processes involving hadrons. The goal of this paper is the study of intrinsic strange contribution to the strange sea of the nucleon. To this aim, we calculate the intrinsic strange distributions from the various light-cone models, including Brodsky, Hoyer, Peterson, and Sakai (BHPS); scalar five-quark; and meson-baryon models and then compare their results. These models can lead to the rather different distributions for the intrinsic strange that are dominated in different values of x . Furthermore, the meson-baryon model leads to the s -s ¯ asymmetry that can be comparable in some situations to the result obtained from the global analysis of PDFs. We also present a simple parametrization for each model prediction of intrinsic strange distribution.

  10. Strangeness at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker

    2005-09-28

    In this contribution the authors discuss the physics of strange hadrons in low energy ({approx_equal} 1-2 AGeV) heavy ion collision. In this energy range the relevant strange particle are the kaons and anti-kaons. The most interesting aspect concerning these particles are so called in-medium modifications. They will attempt to review the current status of understanding of these in medium modifications. In addition they briefly discuss other issues related with kaon production, such as the nuclear equation of state and chemical equilibrium.

  11. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  12. Measurement of b-Baryons with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, Joachim; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-10-01

    We report the observation of new bottom baryon states. The most recent result is the observation of the baryon {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Xi}{sup -}. The significance of the signal corresponds to 7.7{sigma} and the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 5792.9{+-}2.5(stat.){+-}1.7(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. In addition we observe four resonances in the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} spectra, consistent with the bottom baryons {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}}. All observations are in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  13. Two alternative versions of strangeness

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Kazuhikoa

    2008-01-01

    The concept of strangeness emerged from the low energy phenomenology before the entry of quarks in particle physics. The connection between strangeness and isospin is rather accidental and loose and we recognize later that the definition of strangeness is model-dependent. Indeed, in Gell-Mann’s triplet quark model we realize that there is a simple alternative representation of strangeness. When the concept of generations is incorporated into the quark model we find that only the second alternative version of strangeness remains meaningful, whereas the original one does no longer keep its significance. PMID:18997448

  14. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star`s equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  15. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star's equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  16. Equivalence of light-front and covariant approaches in meson-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chueng-Ryong Ji, Wally Melnitchouk

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate the equivalence of the light-front, equal-time and covariant formulations in meson-baryon interactions. In particular, we discuss the self-energy Sigma of a nucleon dressed by pion loops with the pseudovector piNN coupling. It is shown that the leading nonanalytic behavior of Sigma is equivalent whichever formulations are used for the derivation.

  17. Impact of finite density on spectroscopic parameters of decuplet baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.; Sundu, H.

    2016-12-01

    The decuplet baryons, Δ , Σ*, Ξ*, and Ω-, are studied in nuclear matter by using the in-medium QCD sum rules. By fixing the three-momentum of the particles under consideration at the rest frame of the medium, the negative energy contributions are removed. It is obtained that the parameters of the Δ baryon are more affected by the medium against the Ω- state, containing three strange quarks, whose mass and residue are not considerably affected by the medium. We also find the vector and scalar self-energies of these baryons in nuclear matter. By the recent progresses at the P ¯ ANDA experiment at the FAIR and NICA facility, it may be possible to study the in-medium properties of such states, even the multistrange Ξ* and Ω- systems, in the near future.

  18. Strangeness production at Saturne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, R.

    1995-02-01

    Since many years strangeness production is studied at Saturne in a large variety of experiments. I will remind here the work performed at the SPES4 facility by a Bonn-Orsay-Saclay collaboration and on the research program, in progress now, of the Dubna-Indiana-Saclay-Torino (DISTO) collaboration.

  19. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  20. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; ...

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  1. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  2. Baryon-Baryon {8} \\otimes {8}-Channels Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    The extended-soft-core model ESC08 is presented. The ESC-models are at present the most complete meson-exchange models for the baryon-baryon interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SU(3)f-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges in the form of the pomeron and odderon potentials, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, special features are: (a) the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors, (b) the odderon-exchage representing the exchange of the odd-number gluons-exchange, whereas the pomeron represents the even-number gluon-exchange, and (c) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC), although in ESC08a,b,c an admixture of 3S1 quark-pair creation is present. This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F+D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are excellent. This is marked in particularly by the NN-results, namely χ p.d.p.2 = 1.08 for ESC08a,b,c. Also, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide extra repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1, T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0, T = 1/2)-channels, although the strength is constrained by SU(3) symmetry and the Σ+p experimental X-sections. In the S = -2 sector the ΛΛ-interaction is weak, which is in accordance with the NAGARA

  3. (Multi-)strange hadron and light (anti-)nuclei production with ALICE at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Ramona

    2016-01-22

    Thanks to its excellent tracking performance and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the identification of light (anti-)(hyper)nuclei and for the measurement of (multi-)strange particles over a wide range of transverse momentum. Deuterons, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He and their corresponding anti-nuclei are identified via their specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement provided by the Time-Of-Flight detector. Strange and multi-strange baryons and mesons as well as (anti-)hypertritons are reconstructed via their topological decays. Detailed measurements of (multi-)strange hadron production in pp, p–Pb and Pb–Pb collision and of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypertritons in Pb–Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC are presented. The experimental results will be compared with the predictions of both statistical hadronization and coalescence models.

  4. Meson and baryon correlation studies using the PEP-TPC/2. gamma. Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.T.

    1991-03-01

    Results on vector meson, and strange and charmed-baryon production are presented for data taken during the period 1982--1986 using the TPC/2{gamma} detector at PEP. Vector mesons ({rho}{sup 0}, K{sup *} and {phi}) with 0, 1 and 2 strange quarks are used to obtain redundant measures of strange-quark suppression and of the vector to pseudoscalar ratio in hadronization. Measurements of the production rates of {Lambda}, {Xi}{sup {minus}}, {Omega} and {Xi}{sup *0} hyperons and for the {Lambda}{sub c} and of rapidity correlations between {Lambda}{bar {Lambda}} pairs provide sensitive tests of baryon production in fragmentation models. In addition, two- and three-particle correlations between like sign pions provide further evidence for the Bose-Einstein effect in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions including the relativistic motion of particle sources. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Strange stars, strange dwarfs, and planetary-like strange-matter objects

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Schaab, C.; Weigel, M.K.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of the properties of all possible equilibrium sequences of compact strange-matter stars with nuclear crusts, which range from strange stars to strange dwarfs. In contrast to their non-strange counterparts--neutron stars and white dwarfs--their properties are determined by two (rather than one) parameters, the central star density and the density at the base of the nuclear crust. This leads to stellar strange-matter configurations whose properties are much more complex than those of the conventional sequence. As an example, two generically different categories of stable strange dwarfs are found, which could be the observed white dwarfs. Furthermore the authors find very-low-mass strange stellar objects, with masses as small as those of Jupiter or even lighter planets. Such objects, if abundant enough, should be seen by the presently performed gravitational microlensing searches.

  6. Strangeness Prospects with the CBM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The CBM experiment will study strongly interacting matter at high net-baryon densities with nuclear collisions up to 45A GeV beam energy at the future FAIR facility. With interaction rates unprecedented in heavy-ion collisions, CBM will give access also to extremely rare probes and thus to the early stage of the collisions, in search for the first-order phase transition from confined to deconfined matter and the QCD critical point. The CBM physics programme will be started with beams delivered by the SIS-100 synchrotron, providing energies from 2 to 11 GeV/nucleon for heavy nuclei, up to 14 GeV/nucleon for light nuclei, and 30 GeV for protons. The highest net baryon densities will be explored with ion beams up to 45 GeV/nucleon energy delivered by SIS-300 in a later stage of the FAIR project. After several years of preparation, the CBM experiment now enters the realisation phase. In this article, we report on the current status of the system developments and the expected physics performance for strange and charmed observables, as well as on the roadmap towards the first data taking.

  7. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbers $N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$ and $\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $J^{P}=1^{+}$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.

  8. ON THE BARYON FRACTIONS IN CLUSTERS AND GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xinyu; Bregman, Joel N.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rasia, Elena

    2010-08-10

    We present the baryon fractions of 2MASS groups and clusters as a function of cluster richness using total and gas masses measured from stacked ROSAT X-ray data and stellar masses estimated from the infrared galaxy catalogs. We detect X-ray emission even in the outskirts of clusters, beyond r {sub 200} for richness classes with X-ray temperatures above 1 keV. This enables us to more accurately determine the total gas mass in these groups and clusters. We find that the optically selected groups and clusters have flatter temperature profiles and higher stellar-to-gas mass ratios than the individually studied, X-ray bright clusters. We also find that the stellar mass in poor groups with temperatures below 1 keV is comparable to the gas mass in these systems. Combining these results with individual measurements for clusters, groups, and galaxies from the literature, we find a break in the baryon fraction at {approx}1 keV. Above this temperature, the baryon fraction scales with temperature as f{sub b} {proportional_to} T {sup 0.20{+-}0.03}. We see significantly smaller baryon fractions below this temperature and the baryon fraction of poor groups joins smoothly onto that of systems with still shallower potential wells such as normal and dwarf galaxies where the baryon fraction scales with the inferred velocity dispersion as f{sub b} {proportional_to} {sigma}{sup 1.6}. The small scatter in the baryon fraction at any given potential well depth favors a universal baryon loss mechanism and a preheating model for the baryon loss. The scatter is, however, larger for less massive systems. Finally, we note that although the broken power-law relation can be inferred from data points in the literature alone, the consistency between the baryon fractions for poor groups and massive galaxies inspires us to fit the two categories of objects (galaxies and clusters) with one relation.

  9. Strange fireball as an explanation of the muon excess in Auger data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Goldberg, Haim; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2017-03-01

    We argue that ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray collisions in Earth's atmosphere can probe the strange quark density of the nucleon. These collisions have center-of-mass energies ≳1 04.6A GeV , where A ≥14 is the nuclear baryon number. We hypothesize the formation of a deconfined thermal fireball which undergoes a sudden hadronization. At production the fireball has a very high matter density and consists of gluons and two flavors of light quarks (u , d ). Because the fireball is formed in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation region, the high baryochemical potential damps the production of u u ¯ and d d ¯ pairs, resulting in gluon fragmentation mainly into s s ¯. The strange quarks then become much more abundant and upon hadronization the relative density of strange hadrons is significantly enhanced over that resulting from a hadron gas. Assuming the momentum distribution functions can be approximated by Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, we estimate a kaon-to-pion ratio of about 3 and expect a similar (total) baryon-to-pion ratio. We show that, if this were the case, the excess of strange hadrons would suppress the fraction of energy which is transferred to decaying π0's by about 20%, yielding an ˜40 % enhancement of the muon content in atmospheric cascades, in agreement with recent data reported by the Pierre Auger Collaboration.

  10. Photon Beam Asymmetry Measurement from the gamma n -> K+ Sigma- Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munevar Espitia, Edwin

    Strangeness channels are important in the experimental search for missing baryon resonances. Phenomenological reaction models for the extraction of resonance parameters, such as coupled-channels analyses, require data for many observables, in different channels, and on different targets. The analysis presented in this thesis is the first measurement of the beam asymmetry over a wide range in the kaon azimuthal center-of-mass angle (which is essential for accessing the s-channel contribution) for the exclusive gamma n → K+ Sigma-- reaction, using the deuteron as a quasi-free neutron target. The data used were from the CLAS g13b run period (experiment E06-103) at Jefferson Lab, which used linearly polarized tagged real photons with energies between 1.1 and 2.3 GeV. Results are shown for two photon-energy bins: 1.9-2.1 and 2.1-2.3 GeV. They agree well (within uncertainties) with the beam asymmetries obtained at LEPS for forward angles, but show a clear disagreement with the predictions from the current Kaon-MAID over wide range of kaon c.m. angles.

  11. SU(2) and SU(3) chiral perturbation theory analyses on baryon masses in 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, K.-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Izubuchi, T.; Kadoh, D.; Namekawa, Y.; Ukita, N.; Kanaya, K.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the quark mass dependence of baryon masses in 2+1 flavor lattice QCD using SU(3) heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory up to one-loop order. The baryon mass data used for the analyses are obtained for the degenerate up-down quark mass of 3 to 24 MeV and two choices of the strange quark mass around the physical value. We find that the SU(3) chiral expansion fails to describe both the octet and the decuplet baryon data if phenomenological values are employed for the meson-baryon couplings. The SU(2) case is also examined for the nucleon. We observe that higher order terms are controlled only around the physical point. We also evaluate finite size effects using SU(3) heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, finding small values of order 1% even at the physical point.

  12. Strangeness suppression of qq creation observed in exclusive reactions.

    PubMed

    Mestayer, M D; Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Pereira, S Anefalos; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Garillon, B; Garçon, M; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Simonyan, A; Sokhan, D; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tang, W; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2014-10-10

    We measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK(+), pπ(0), and nπ(+), with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  13. Precision Holographic Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Piljin

    2011-10-21

    We overview a holographic QCD based on the D4-D8 string theory model, with emphasis on baryons and nucleon-meson interactions thereof. Baryons are realized as holographic images of Skyrmions, but with much qualitative changes. This allows us to derive, without adjustable parameters, couplings of baryons to the entire tower of spin one mesons and also to pseudoscalar mesons. We find some surprisingly good match against empirical values for nucleons, in particular. Tensor couplings to all axial-vectors and iso-singlet vectors all vanish, while, for {rho} mesons, tensor couplings are found to be dominant. We close with various cautionary comments and speculations.

  14. Strangeness enhancement - a potential signature for QGP phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, V. K.; Singh, C. P.

    1997-09-01

    Strangeness enhancement has always been considered as a potential signature for deconfining as well as chiral symmetry restoring quark-hadron phase transition. We obtain the ratios Λ¯/Λ, Ξ¯/Ξ and K+/K- from a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) using a modified equation of state (EOS). Similarly these ratios are also obtained from a hadron gas (HG) by using a thermodynamically consistent equation of state (EOS) which incorporates the finite size, hard-core repulsive interactions among baryons as an excluded volume effect. We then suggest that the variations of these ratios either with the energy density or with baryon density can serve as a potential signature for detecting a QGP formation in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Penta-Quark States with Strangeness, Hidden Charm and Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Zou, Bing-Song

    The classical quenched quark models with three constituent quarks provide a good description for the baryon spatial ground states, but fail to reproduce the spectrum of baryon excited states. More and more evidences suggest that unquenched effects with multi-quark dynamics are necessary ingredients to solve the problem. Several new hyperon resonances reported recently could fit in the picture of penta-quark states. Based on this picture, some new hyperon excited states were predicted to exist; meanwhile with extension from strangeness to charm and beauty, super-heavy narrow N* and Λ* resonances with hidden charm or beauty were predicted to be around 4.3 and 11 GeV, respectively. Recently, two of such N* with hidden charm might have been observed by the LHCb experiment. More of those states are expected to be observed in near future. This opens a new window in order to study hadronic dynamics for the multi-quark states.

  16. Strange stars at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Subharthi; Bagchi, Manjari; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2006-03-01

    We calculate strange star properties, using large Nc approximation with built-in chiral symmetry restoration (CSM). We used a relativistic Hartree Fock meanfield approximation method, using a modi.ed Richardson potential with two scale parameters Λ and Λ', to find a new set of equation of state (EOS) for strange quark matter. We take the effect of temperature (T) on gluon mass, in addition to the usual density dependence, and find that the transition T from hadronic matter to strange matter is 80 MeV. Therefore formation of strange stars may be the only signal for formation of QGP with asymptotic freedom (AF) and CSM.

  17. Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.W.

    1982-05-01

    We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

  18. Spectrum and Structure of Excited Baryons with CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution I discuss recent results in light quark baryon spectroscopy involving CLAS data and higher level analysis results from the partial wave analysis by the Bonn-Gatchina group. New baryon states were discovered largely based on the open strangeness production channels γp → K+Λ and γp → K+Σ0. The data illustrate the great potential of the kaon-hyperon channel in the discovery of higher mass baryon resonances in s-channel production. Other channels with discovery potential, such as γp → pω and γp → ϕp are also discussed. In the second part I will demonstrate on data the sensitivity of meson electroproduction to expose the active degrees of freedom underlying resonance transitions as a function of the probed distance scale. For several of the prominent excited states in the lower mass range the short distance behavior is described by a core of three dressed-quarks with running quark mass, and meson-baryon contributions make up significant parts of the excitation strength at large distances. Finally, I give an outlook of baryon resonance physics at the 12 GeV CEBAF electron accelerator. Talk presented at the CRC-16 Symposium, Bonn University, June 6-9, 2016.

  19. Charm Baryon Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    B-factories Belle and BaBar during its operation made not only measurements connected with B-meson decays but also numerous observation and measurements in charm physics. In particular, their results on charm baryon decays and spectroscopy have enlarged and enriched the current picture of heavy flavour hadrons. In this talk we overview current status of charm baryons and their excited states.

  20. Baryons as relativistic three-quark bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios; Williams, Richard; Alkofer, Reinhard; Fischer, Christian S.

    2016-11-01

    We review the spectrum and electromagnetic properties of baryons described as relativistic three-quark bound states within QCD. The composite nature of baryons results in a rich excitation spectrum, whilst leading to highly non-trivial structural properties explored by the coupling to external (electromagnetic and other) currents. Both present many unsolved problems despite decades of experimental and theoretical research. We discuss the progress in these fields from a theoretical perspective, focusing on nonperturbative QCD as encoded in the functional approach via Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. We give a systematic overview as to how results are obtained in this framework and explain technical connections to lattice QCD. We also discuss the mutual relations to the quark model, which still serves as a reference to distinguish 'expected' from 'unexpected' physics. We confront recent results on the spectrum of non-strange and strange baryons, their form factors and the issues of two-photon processes and Compton scattering determined in the Dyson-Schwinger framework with those of lattice QCD and the available experimental data. The general aim is to identify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the plethora of observable phenomena in terms of the underlying quark and gluon degrees of freedom.

  1. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: (III) Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Lin, H; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2010-01-19

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3} {approx} (2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multi-baryon systems.

  2. Strangeness in nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardoni, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The presence of exotic particles in the core of neutron stars (NS) has been questioned for a long time. At present, it is still an unsolved problem that drives intense research efforts, both theoretical and experimental. The appearance of strange baryons in the inner regions of a NS, where the density can exceed several times the nuclear saturation density, is likely to happen due to energetic considerations. The onset of strange degrees of freedom is considered as an effective mechanism to soften the equation of state (EoS). This softening affects the entire structure of the star, reducing the pressure and therefore the maximum mass that the star can stably support. The observation of two very massive NS with masses of the order of 2M⊙ seems instead to rule out soft EoS, apparently excluding the possibility of hyperon formation in the core of the star. This inconsistency, usually referred to as the hyperon puzzle, is based on what we currently know about the interaction between strange particles and normal nucleons. The combination of a poor knowledge of the hypernuclear interactions and the difficulty of obtaining clear astrophysical evidence of the presence of hyperons in NS makes the understanding of the behavior of strange degrees of freedom in NS an intriguing theoretical challenge. We give our contribution to the discussion by studying the general problem of the hyperon-nucleon interaction. We attack this issue by employing a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) technique, that has proven to be successful in the description of strongly correlated Fermion systems, to the study of finite size nuclear systems including strange degrees of freedom, i.e. hypernuclei. We show that many-body hypernuclear forces are fundamental to properly reproduce the ground state physics of Λ hypernuclei from light- to medium-heavy. However, the poor abundance of experimental data on strange nuclei leaves room for a good deal of indetermination in the construction of hypernuclear

  3. Stranger in a strange land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter

    2005-06-01

    The important new results and trends presented at Strangeness in Quark Matter 2004 are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on strangeness and charm production, bulk dynamics, thermal models and the relevance of elementary systems to our understanding of heavy ion reactions. With of course, a nod to Robert A Heinlein, but without the messianic overtones.

  4. Strange experiments at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to report recent progress in nuclear experiments involving strangeness which have been carried out at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron over the past three years. These recent developments are noted in three areas: few body systems and dibaryons; strange probes of the nucleus; and associated production of hypernuclei. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Electroproduction of Strange Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Hungerford

    2002-06-01

    The advent of high-energy, CW-beams of electrons now allows electro-production and precision studies of nuclei containing hyperons. Previously, the injection of strangeness into a nucleus was accomplished using secondary beams of mesons, where beam quality and target thickness limited the missing mass resolution. We review here the theoretical description of the (e, e'K+) reaction mechanism, and discuss the first experiment demonstrating that this reaction can be used to precisely study the spectra of light hypernuclei. Future experiments based on similar techniques, are expected to attain even better resolutions and rates.

  6. Probing the strange nature of the nucleon with phi photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.M.

    1997-03-06

    The presence inside the nucleon of a significant component of strange-antistrange quark pairs has been invoked to explain a number of current puzzles in the low energy realm of QCD. The {sigma} term in {pi}N scattering is a venerable conundrum which can be explained with a 10%--20% admixture. The spin crisis brought on by the EMC result and follow on experiments was first interpreted as requiring a large strange content of s quarks whose spin helped cancel the contribution of the u and d quarks to the nucleon spin, again of order 10%. Excess phi meson production in p{anti p} annihilation at LEAR has also been explained in terms of up to a 19% admixture of s{anti s} pairs. Charm production in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering would appear to provide evidence for a 3% strange sea. It is clear that a definite probe of the strange quark content would be an invaluable tool in unraveling a number of mysteries. The longitudinal beam target asymmetry in {psi} photoproduction is a particularly sensitive probe of that content. It is explored here.

  7. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense

  8. ``Towards Strange Metallic Holography'

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; Tong, David; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-08-26

    We initiate a holographic model building approach to 'strange metallic' phenomenology. Our model couples a neutral Lifshitz-invariant quantum critical theory, dual to a bulk gravitational background, to a finite density of gapped probe charge carriers, dually described by D-branes. In the physical regime of temperature much lower than the charge density and gap, we exhibit anomalous scalings of the temperature and frequency dependent conductivity. Choosing the dynamical critical exponent z appropriately we can match the non-Fermi liquid scalings, such as linear resistivity, observed in strange metal regimes. As part of our investigation we outline three distinct string theory realizations of Lifshitz geometries: from F theory, from polarized branes, and from a gravitating charged Fermi gas. We also identify general features of renormalization group flow in Lifshitz theories, such as the appearance of relevant charge-charge interactions when z {ge} 2. We outline a program to extend this model building approach to other anomalous observables of interest such as the Hall conductivity.

  9. Perturbative and nonperturbative contributions to the strange quark asymmetry in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guan-Qiu; Cao, Fu-Guang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Signal, A. I.

    2012-12-01

    There are two mechanisms for the generation of an asymmetry between the strange and anti-strange quark distributions in the nucleon: nonperturbative contributions originating from nucleons fluctuating into virtual baryon-meson pairs such as ΛK and ΣK, and perturbative contributions arising from gluons splitting into strange and anti-strange quark pairs. While the nonperturbative contributions are dominant in the large- x region, the perturbative contributions are more significant in the small- x region. We calculate this asymmetry taking into account both nonperturbative and perturbative contributions, thus giving a more accurate evaluation of this asymmetry over the whole domain of x. We find that the perturbative contributions are generally a few times larger in magnitude than the nonperturbative contributions, which suggests that the best region to detect this asymmetry experimentally is in the region 0.02< x<0.03. We find that the asymmetry may have more than one node, which is an effect that should be taken into account, e.g. for parameterizations of the strange and anti-strange quark distributions used in global analysis of parton distributions.

  10. Can doubly strange dibaryon resonances be discovered at RHIC?

    SciTech Connect

    Paganis, S. D.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Ray, R. L.; Tang, J.-L.; Udagawa, T.; Longacre, R. S.

    2000-08-01

    The baryon-baryon continuum invariant mass spectrum generated from relativistic nucleus + nucleus collision data may reveal the existence of doubly strange dibaryons not stable against strong decay if they lie within a few MeV of threshold. Furthermore, since the dominant component of these states is a superposition of two color-octet clusters which can be produced intermediately in a color-deconfined quark-gluon plasma (QGP), an enhanced production of dibaryon resonances could be a signal of QGP formation. A total of eight, doubly strange dibaryon states are considered for experimental search using the STAR detector (solenoidal tracker at RHIC) at the new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These states may decay to {lambda}{lambda} and/or p{xi}{sup -}, depending on the resonance energy. STAR's large acceptance, precision tracking and vertex reconstruction capabilities, and large data volume capacity, make it an ideal instrument to use for such a search. Detector performance and analysis sensitivity are studied as a function of resonance production rate and width for one particular dibaryon which can directly strong decay to p{xi}{sup -}, but not {lambda}{lambda}. Results indicate that such resonances may be discovered using STAR if the resonance production rates are comparable to coalescence model predictions for dibaryon bound states. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbersmore » $$N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$$ and $$\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $$J^{P}=1^{+}$$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.« less

  12. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  13. Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions at the AGS: recent results from E917.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-C.; Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Britt, H. C.; Chang, W. C.; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Nanal, V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    1999-03-30

    Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions has been measured via the yields of K{sup +} , K{sup {minus}} at 6, 8 AGeV and of {bar {Lambda}} at 10.8 AGeV beam kinetic energy in experiment E917. By varying the collision centrally and beam energy, a systematic search for indications of new phenomena and in-medium effects under high baryon density is undertaken.

  14. The role of the baryon junction in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Stephen Earl

    The non-perturbative nature of the conserved baryon number of nuclei is investigated by studying the role of the baryon junction in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The junction, J, of a baryon originates in the Standard Model of Strong Interactions (QCD) and is the vertex which connects the color flux (Wilson) lines flowing from the three valence quarks. In high energy interactions, the baryon junction can play a dynamical role through the Regge exchange of junction states. We show that the junction exchange provides a natural mechanism for the transport of baryon number into the central rapidity region and has the remarkable ability to produce valence hyperons, including W- baryons. This mechanism is used to describe the observed baryon stopping and associated hyperon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. We also show that junction - antijunction excitations or JJ loops provide a new mechanism for baryon pair production and lead to enhanced hyperon and antihyperon production. The combination of these two mechanisms is able to explain part of the anomalous hyperon production observed in Pb + Pb collisions at the SPS. Using the junction initial state dynamics, final state strangeness exchange interactions are shown to further enhance hyperon production and are proposed as an explanation of the remaining anomalous hyperon production. With larger phase space (higher energy) accessible at the newly constructed BNL RHIC facility, we propose that the observation of valence W- baryons in pp collisions will be a decisive observable to confirm the junction exchange picture of baryon number transport. In addition, we note that novel rapidity correlations between baryons and antibaryons of completely different quark flavors, like D++(uuu) and W+( ss s) , are predicted by the JJ loop mechanism. For numerical calculations of multiparticle observables associated with these junction mechanisms, we developed the HIJING/BB¯ nuclear event generator. HIJING

  15. The role of quark distances in baryon multiplet mass differences

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, T.

    1996-10-01

    On the basis of solutions of the three-body Schroedinger equation with harmonic oscillators potential, the quark distances in baryons are expressed as mass dependent terms. The isomultiplet mass differences of octet and decuplet baryons are explained well when a dynamical isospin-breaking effect (m{sub u} {ne} m{sub d}) in the quark distances is introduced. In particular the author obtains R{sub dd} < R{sub uu}, a result which is in the right direction at least to reproduce {Sigma}{sub c}{sup ++} {minus} {Sigma}{sub c}{sup 0}= 2.5 MeV, in good agreement with the experimental findings 2.5 {+-} 1.0 MeV.

  16. Observation and mass measurement of the baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-08-03

    We report the observation and measurement of the mass of the bottom, strange baryon Xi(b)- through the decay chain Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, where J/psi-->mu+mu-, Xi- -->Lambdapi-, and Lambda-->ppi-. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 6.6 x 10(-15), or 7.7 Gaussian standard deviations. The Xi(b)- mass is measured to be 5792.9+/-2.5(stat) +/- 1.7(syst) MeV/c2.

  17. Magnetic moments of octet baryons and sea antiquark polarizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2005-01-01

    Using generalized Sehgal equations for magnetic moments of baryon octet and taking into account {sigma}{sup 0}-{lambda} mixing and two particle corrections to independent quark contributions we obtain very good fit using experimental values for errors of such moments. We present sum rules for quark magnetic moments ratios and for integrated spin densities ratios. Because of the SU(3) structure of our equations the results for magnetic moments of quarks and their densities depend on two additional parameters. Using information from deep inelastic scattering and baryon {beta}-decays we discuss the dependence of antiquark polarizations on introduced parameters. For some plausible values of these parameters we show that these polarizations are small if we neglect angular momenta of quarks. Our very good fit to magnetic moments of baryon octet can still be improved by using specific model for angular momentum of quarks.

  18. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  19. Grammatical complexity of strange sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Ditza; Procaccia, Itamar

    1990-06-01

    Chaotic dynamical systems can be organized around an underlying strange set, which is comprised of all the unstable periodic orbits. In this paper, we quantify the complexity of such an organization; this complexity addresses the difficulty of predicting the structure of the strange set from low-order data and is independent of the entropy and the algorithmic complexity. We refer to the new measure as the grammatical complexity. The notion is introduced, discussed, and illustrated in the context of simple dynamical systems. In addition, the grammatical complexity is generalized to include metric properties arising due to the nonuniform distribution of the invariant measure on the strange set.

  20. Strange nucleon form-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, F. E.; Paschke, K. D.

    2017-07-01

    A broad program measuring parity-violation in electron-nuclear scattering has now provided a large set of precision data on the weak-neutral-current form-factors of the proton. Under comparison with well-measured electromagnetic nucleon form-factors, these measurements reveal the role of the strange quark sea on the low-energy interactions of the proton through the strange-quark-flavor vector form-factors. This review will describe the experimental program and the implications of the global data for the strange-quark vector form-factors. We present here a new fit to the world data.

  1. Nuclear matter at high temperature and low net baryonic density

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R. S.; Duarte, S. B.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-11-12

    We study the effect of the {sigma}-{omega} mesons interaction on nucleon-antinucleon matter properties. This interaction is employed in the context of the linear Walecka model to discuss the behavior of this system at high temperature and low net baryonic density regime. The field equations are solved in the relativistic mean-field approximation and our results show that the phase transition pointed out in the literature for this regime is eliminated when the meson interaction are considered.

  2. Dense cold baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinskiy, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    A possibility of studying cold nuclear matter on the Nuclotron-NICA facility at baryonic densities characteristic of and higher than at the center of a neutron star is considered based on the data from cumulative processes. A special rare-event kinematic trigger for collisions of relativistic ions is proposed for effective selection of events accompanied by production of dense baryonic systems. Possible manifestations of new matter states under these unusual conditions and an experimental program for their study are discussed. Various experimental setups are proposed for these studies, and a possibility of using experimental setups at the Nuclotron-NICA facility for this purpose is considered.

  3. Baryon spectrum in large N{sub c} chiral soliton and in quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Shunderuk, Andrei M.

    2006-05-01

    Strangeness contents of baryons are calculated within the rigid rotator model for arbitrary number of colors N{sub c}. The problem of extrapolation to realistic value N{sub c}=3 is noted, based on explicit calculations and comparison of the rigid rotator and rigid oscillator variants of the model. Some features of exotic baryon spectra ({l_brace}10{r_brace}, {l_brace}27{r_brace}, and {l_brace}35{r_brace}-plets of baryons) obtained in the chiral soliton approach can be understood in terms of simplified quark (4qq) wave functions. The effective mass of strange antiquark in different SU(3) multiplets of pentaquarks should depend on the particular multiplet, to link the predictions of soliton and quark models. The estimate of the 6{sub F} and 3{sub F} diquarks mass difference can be made from comparison with chiral soliton model results for masses of exotic baryons from different SU(3) multiplets. The masses of baryons partners with different values of spin J are also estimated.

  4. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (III) Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Detmold, William; Lin, Huey-Wen; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin; Torok, Aaron M.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L^3 ~ (2.5 fm)^3, and a spatial lattice spacing of b ~ 0.123 fm. Luscher’s method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The N-Sigma interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the ^3 S _1 channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N-Lambda interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is Lambda-Lambda, indicating that the Lambda-Lambda interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of the NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting

  5. Study of Excited Ξ Baryons in p̅p-Collisions with the P¯ANDA Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, Jennifer; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Ritman, James; Stockmanns, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the excitation pattern of baryons is indispensable for the understanding of non-perturbative QCD. Up to now only the nucleon excitation spectrum has been subject to systematic experimental studies, while very little is known on excited states of double or triple strange baryons. In studies of antiproton-proton collisions, the P̅ANDA experiment is well-suited for a comprehensive baryon spectroscopy program in the multi-strange and charm sector. In the present study we focus on excited Ξ- states. For final states containing a Ξ- Ξ̅+ pair, cross sections of the order of μb are expected, corresponding to production rates of ~ 106/d at a luminosity L = 1031 cm-2 s-1. Here we present the reconstruction of the reaction p̅p → Ξ (1820)- Ξ̅+ with Ξ (1820)- → Λ K- and its charged conjugate channel with the P̅ANDA detector.

  6. Strangeness and onset of deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.

    2012-05-15

    I will review the current status of global strangeness production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions with particular emphasis on recent results from core-corona model. I will discuss its relevance for the detection of the onset of deconfinement.

  7. Strangeness and onset of deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.

    2012-05-01

    I will review the current status of global strangeness production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions with particular emphasis on recent results from core-corona model. I will discuss its relevance for the detection of the onset of deconfinement.

  8. Baryons and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1997-03-01

    The author presents an idiosyncratic view of baryons which calls for a marriage between quark-based and hadronic models of QCD. He advocates a treatment based on valence quark plus glue dominance of hadron structure, with the sea of q pairs (in the form of virtual hadron pairs) as important corrections.

  9. Inflating with baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    We present a field theory solution to the eta problem. By making the inflaton field the phase of a baryon of SU( N c ) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory we show that all operators that usually spoil the flatness of the inflationary potential are absent. Our solution naturally generalizes to non-supersymmetric theories.

  10. Problems in baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.

    1994-04-01

    Current issues and problems in the physics of ground- and excited-state baryons are considered, and are classified into those which should be resolved by CEBAF in its present form, and those which may require CEBAF to undergo an energy upgrade to 8 GeV or more. Recent theoretical developments designed to address these problems are outlined.

  11. Study ofe+e- to Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma^0,Sigma^0 anti-Sigma^0 using Initial State Radiation with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-09-14

    We study the e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda gamma, Lambda anti-Sigma0 gamma, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 gamma processes using 230 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the BaBar detector at e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. From the analysis of the baryon-antibaryon mass spectra the cross sections for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma0, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 are measured in the dibaryon mass range from threshold up to 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. The ratio of electric and magnetic form factors, |G{sub E}/G{sub M}|, is measured for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, and limits on the relative phase between Lambda form factors are obtained. We also measure the J/psi --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 and psi(2S) --> Lambda anti-Lambda branching fractions.

  12. Spontaneous baryogenesis without baryon isocurvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new class of spontaneous baryogenesis models that does not produce baryon isocurvature perturbations. The baryon chemical potential in these models is independent of the field value of the baryon-generating scalar, hence the scalar field fluctuations are blocked from propagating into the baryon isocurvature. We demonstrate this mechanism in simple examples where spontaneous baryogenesis is driven by a non-canonical scalar field. The suppression of the baryon isocurvature allows spontaneous baryogenesis to be compatible even with high-scale inflation.

  13. Compositeness of the strange, charm, and beauty odd parity Λ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Recio, C.; Hidalgo-Duque, C.; Nieves, J.; Salcedo, L. L.; Tolos, L.

    2015-08-01

    We study the dependence on the quark mass of the compositeness of the lowest-lying odd parity hyperon states. Thus, we pay attention to Λ -like states in the strange, charm, and beauty sectors which are dynamically generated using a unitarized meson-baryon model. In the strange sector we use a SU(6) extension of the Weinberg-Tomozawa meson-baryon interaction, and we further implement the heavy-quark spin symmetry to construct the meson-baryon interaction when charmed or beauty hadrons are involved. In the three examined flavor sectors, we obtain two JP=1 /2- and one JP=3 /2- Λ states. We find that the Λ states which are bound states (the three Λb) or narrow resonances [one Λ (1405 ) and one Λc(2595 )] are well described as molecular states composed of s -wave meson-baryon pairs. The 1/2- wide Λ (1405 ) and Λc(2595 ) as well as the 3/2- Λ (1520 ) and Λc(2625 ) states display smaller compositeness so they would require new mechanisms, such as d -wave interactions.

  14. Where Is the Sigma_{b}?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, C.; Minamikawa, T.; Miura, K.; Watanabe, T.

    1992-03-01

    The masses of s-wave bottom baryons are discussed in a semirelativistic quark model, on the basis of a quark-distance relation. We stress that the Sigma_{b} is heavier than Xi('}_{b) (b[su], b[sd]) containing the antisymmetric su(or sd) subsystem. We conclude that the two candidates for Lambda_{b} with very different masses are different states; Basile et al.'s result 5425(+175}_{-75) MeV is Lambda_{b}(b[du]), but Arenton et al.'s result ~ 5750 MeV is Xi('0}_{b) (b[su]).

  15. Strange Quark Magnetic Moment of the Nucleon at the Physical Point.

    PubMed

    Sufian, Raza Sabbir; Yang, Yi-Bo; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Liang, Jian; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2017-01-27

    We report a lattice QCD calculation of the strange quark contribution to the nucleon's magnetic moment and charge radius. This analysis presents the first direct determination of strange electromagnetic form factors including at the physical pion mass. We perform a model-independent extraction of the strange magnetic moment and the strange charge radius from the electromagnetic form factors in the momentum transfer range of 0.051  GeV^{2}≲Q^{2}≲1.31  GeV^{2}. The finite lattice spacing and finite volume corrections are included in a global fit with 24 valence quark masses on four lattices with different lattice spacings, different volumes, and four sea quark masses including one at the physical pion mass. We obtain the strange magnetic moment G_{M}^{s}(0)=-0.064(14)(09)μ_{N}. The four-sigma precision in statistics is achieved partly due to low-mode averaging of the quark loop and low-mode substitution to improve the statistics of the nucleon propagator. We also obtain the strange charge radius ⟨r_{s}^{2}⟩_{E}=-0.0043(16)(14)  fm^{2}.

  16. Strange Quark Magnetic Moment of the Nucleon at the Physical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sufian, Raza Sabbir; Yang, Yi-Bo; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Liang, Jian; Liu, Keh-Fei; χ QCD Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report a lattice QCD calculation of the strange quark contribution to the nucleon's magnetic moment and charge radius. This analysis presents the first direct determination of strange electromagnetic form factors including at the physical pion mass. We perform a model-independent extraction of the strange magnetic moment and the strange charge radius from the electromagnetic form factors in the momentum transfer range of 0.051 GeV2≲Q2≲1.31 GeV2 . The finite lattice spacing and finite volume corrections are included in a global fit with 24 valence quark masses on four lattices with different lattice spacings, different volumes, and four sea quark masses including one at the physical pion mass. We obtain the strange magnetic moment GMs(0 )=-0.064 (14 )(09 )μN. The four-sigma precision in statistics is achieved partly due to low-mode averaging of the quark loop and low-mode substitution to improve the statistics of the nucleon propagator. We also obtain the strange charge radius ⟨rs2⟩E=-0.0043 (16 )(14 ) fm2 .

  17. Vacuum structure in the quantum nonlinear. sigma. -model

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, H. ); Kanada, H.; So, H. )

    1991-12-14

    In this paper the vacuum structure with a non-trivial winding number (the baryon number) of a quantum nonlinear {sigma}-model is investigated. Some falling paths to the vacuum are found in a finite-dimensional subspace of the infinite-dimensional configuration space. It is also shown by numerical calculation that the anti-baryon density is appeared in the outer region on the way of some paths falling into the vacuum. In addition, we also discuss some configurations without hedgehog ansatz.

  18. Strangeness Physics at CLAS in the 6 GeV Era

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard A.

    2016-04-01

    A very brief overview is presented of varied strangeness-physics studies that have been conducted with the CLAS system in the era of 6 GeV beam at Jefferson Lab. A full bibliography of articles related to open strangeness production is given, together with some physics context for each work. One natural place where these studies could be continued, using a K L beam and the GlueX detector, is in the further investigation of the Λ(1405) baryon. The line shapes and cross sections of this state were found, using photoproduction at CLAS, to differ markedly in the three possible Σπ final states. The analogous strong-interaction reactions using a K L beam could further bring this phenomenon into focus. 1. The CLAS program ran from 1998 to 2012, during the time when the maximum Jefferson Lab beam energy was 6 GeV. An important thrust of this program was to investigate the spectrum of N * and Δ * (non-strange) baryon resonances using photo-and electro-production reactions. To this end, final states containing strange particles (K mesons and low-mass hyperons) played a significant role. The reason for this is partly due to favorable kinemat-ics. When the total invariant energy W (= √ s) of a baryonic system exceeds 1.6 GeV it becomes possible to create the lightest strangeness-containing final state, K + Λ. This is a two-body final state that is straightforward to reconstruct in the CLAS detector system [1], and theoretically it is easier to deal with two-body reaction amplitudes than with three-and higher-body reaction amplitudes. In the mass range W > 1.6 GeV the decay modes of excited nucleons tend to not to favor two-body π-nucleon final states but rather multi-pion states. As input to partial-wave decompositions and resonance-extraction models, therefore, the strangeness-containing final states of high-mass nucleon excitations have had importance. Excited baryons decay through all possible channels simultaneously, constrained by unitarity of course

  19. Lattice studies of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2004-10-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances, and describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons. Finally, I discuss direct probes of the quark and gluon structure of baryons through the lattice measurement of the moments of quark distributions and of Generalized Parton Distributions.

  20. Baryons with functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Christian S.

    2017-01-01

    We summarise recent results on the spectrum of ground-state and excited baryons and their form factors in the framework of functional methods. As an improvement upon similar approaches we explicitly take into account the underlying momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. For light octet and decuplet baryons we find a spectrum in very good agreement with experiment, including the level ordering between the positive- and negative-parity nucleon states. Comparing the three-body framework with the quark-diquark approximation, we do not find significant differences in the spectrum for those states that have been calculated in both frameworks. This situation is different in the electromagnetic form factor of the Δ, which may serve to distinguish both pictures by comparison with experiment and lattice QCD.

  1. Baryons in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2007-04-01

    We study baryons in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8¯ multi-D-brane system. In holographic QCD, the baryon appears as a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in a four-dimensional effective theory of mesons. We call this topological soliton brane-induced Skyrmion. Some review of D4/D8/D8¯ holographic QCD is presented from the viewpoints of recent hadron physics and QCD phenomenologies. A four-dimensional effective theory with pions and ρ mesons is uniquely derived from the non-Abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of D8 brane with D4 supergravity background at the leading order of large Nc, without small amplitude expansion of meson fields to discuss chiral solitons. For the hedgehog configuration of pion and ρ-meson fields, we derive the energy functional and the Euler-Lagrange equation of brane-induced Skyrmion from the meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. Performing the numerical calculation, we obtain the soliton solution and figure out the pion profile F(r) and the ρ-meson profile G˜(r) of the brane-induced Skyrmion with its total energy, energy density distribution, and root-mean-square radius. These results are compared with the experimental quantities of baryons and also with the profiles of standard Skyrmion without ρ mesons. We analyze interaction terms of pions and ρ mesons in brane-induced Skyrmion, and find a significant ρ-meson component appearing in the core region of a baryon.

  2. Baryons in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2007-04-15

    We study baryons in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D-brane system. In holographic QCD, the baryon appears as a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in a four-dimensional effective theory of mesons. We call this topological soliton brane-induced Skyrmion. Some review of D4/D8/D8 holographic QCD is presented from the viewpoints of recent hadron physics and QCD phenomenologies. A four-dimensional effective theory with pions and {rho} mesons is uniquely derived from the non-Abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of D8 brane with D4 supergravity background at the leading order of large N{sub c}, without small amplitude expansion of meson fields to discuss chiral solitons. For the hedgehog configuration of pion and {rho}-meson fields, we derive the energy functional and the Euler-Lagrange equation of brane-induced Skyrmion from the meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. Performing the numerical calculation, we obtain the soliton solution and figure out the pion profile F(r) and the {rho}-meson profile G-tilde(r) of the brane-induced Skyrmion with its total energy, energy density distribution, and root-mean-square radius. These results are compared with the experimental quantities of baryons and also with the profiles of standard Skyrmion without {rho} mesons. We analyze interaction terms of pions and {rho} mesons in brane-induced Skyrmion, and find a significant {rho}-meson component appearing in the core region of a baryon.

  3. Magnetized strange quark matter and magnetized strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Felipe, R. Gonzalez; Martinez, A. Perez; Rojas, H. Perez; Orsaria, M.

    2008-01-15

    Strange quark matter could be found in the core of neutron stars or forming strange quark stars. As is well known, these astrophysical objects are endowed with strong magnetic fields that affect the microscopic properties of matter and modify the macroscopic properties of the system. In this article we study the role of a strong magnetic field in the thermodynamical properties of a magnetized degenerate strange quark gas, taking into account {beta}-equilibrium and charge neutrality. Quarks and electrons interact with the magnetic field via their electric charges and anomalous magnetic moments. In contrast to the magnetic field value of 10{sup 19} G, obtained when anomalous magnetic moments are not taken into account, we find the upper bound B < or approx. 8.6x10{sup 17} G, for the stability of the system. A phase transition could be hidden for fields greater than this value.

  4. Charm Baryon Studies at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, V.; /Iowa U.

    2006-04-21

    The authors present a precision measurement of the mass of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and studies of the production and decay of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup 0} charm baryons using data collected by the BABAR experiment. To keep the systematic uncertainty as low as possible, the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass measurement is performed using the low Q-value decays, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}. Several hadronic final states involving an {Omega}{sup -} and a {Xi}{sup -} hyperon are analyzed to reconstruct the {Xi}{sub c}{sup 0} and the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}.

  5. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Fernandez, F.; Garcilazo, H.

    2006-02-11

    We study the mass spectrum of baryons with two and three charmed quarks. For double charm baryons the spin splitting is found to be smaller than standard quark-model potential predictions. This splitting is not influenced either by the particular form of the confining potential or by the regularization taken for the contact term of the spin-spin potential. We consistently predict the spectra for triply charmed baryons.

  6. Observation of an Exotic Baryon with S=+1 in Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubarovsky, V.; Guo, L.; Weygand, D. P.; Stoler, P.; Battaglieri, M.; Devita, R.; Adams, G.; Li, Ji; Nozar, M.; Salgado, C.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Benmouna, N.; Berman, B. L.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carman, D. S.; Carnahan, B.; Cetina, C.; Chen, S.; Ciciani, L.; Cole, P. L.; Connelly, J.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Farhi, L.; Fatemi, R.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Frolov, V.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Gothe, R.; Gordon, C. I.; Griffioen, K.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hancock, D.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Heimberg, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Ilieva, Y.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Juengst, H. G.; Kelley, J. H.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Langheinrich, J.; Lawrence, D.; Longhi, A.; Lukashin, K.; Major, R. W.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; McAleer, S.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S. A.; Mozer, M. U.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; O'Brien, J. T.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Opper, A. K.; Osipenko, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Sargsyan, M.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Shafi, A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, T.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Todor, L.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weisberg, A.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction γp→π+K-K+n was studied at Jefferson Laboratory using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3 5.47GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S=+1 and mass M=1555±10 MeV/c2 was observed in the nK+ invariant mass spectrum. The peak’s width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM=26 MeV/c2), and its statistical significance is (7.8±1.0)σ. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by the chiral soliton model for the Θ+ baryon. In addition, the pK+ invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction γp→K-K+p with high statistics in search of doubly charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  7. Chiral quantum baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Mignaco, J.A.; Wulck, S.

    1989-03-27

    We show that a classical soliton for the nonlinear Su(2) sigma model in the hedgehog configuration admits a stable solution, when quantized through collective coordinates, which may be identified with the nucleon. The whole approach depends on a single, dimensional, and arbitrary constant. Numerical results seem to converge for the mass and for the right value of the weak axial-vector coupling.

  8. Strange nonchaotic self-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalnine, Alexey Yu.; Kuznetsov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-01

    An example of strange nonchaotic attractor (SNA) is discussed in a dissipative system of mechanical nature driven by a constant torque applied to one of the elements of the construction. So the external force is not oscillatory, and the system is autonomous. Components of the motion with incommensurable frequencies emerge due to the irrational ratio of the sizes of the involved rotating elements. We regard the phenomenon as strange nonchaotic self-oscillations, and its existence sheds new light on the question of feasibility of SNA in autonomous systems.

  9. Relativistic Quark-Model Results for Baryon Ground and Resonant States

    SciTech Connect

    Plessas, W.; Melde, T.

    2008-10-13

    Latest results from a study of baryon ground and resonant states within relativistic constituent quark models are reported. After recalling some typical spectral properties, the description of ground states, especially with regard to the nucleon and hyperon electromagnetic structures, is addressed. In the following, recent covariant predictions for pion, eta, and kaon partial decay widths of light and strange baryon resonances below 2 GeV are summarized. These results exhibit a characteristic pattern that is distinct from nonrelativistic or relativized decay studies performed so far. Together with a detailed analysis of the spin, flavor, and spatial structures of the wave functions, it supports a new and extended classification scheme of baryon ground and resonant states into SU(3) flavor multiplets.

  10. Pion-nucleon {sigma} term in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A.

    1995-05-01

    We calculate both the connected and disconnected contributions to the {pi}-{ital N} {sigma} term in quenched lattice QCD with the Wilson quark action on a 12{sup 3}{times}20 lattice at {beta}=5.7 with the lattice spacing {ital a}{approx}0.14 fm. The latter is evaluated with the variant wall source method, previously applied successfully for {pi}-{pi} scattering lengths and the {eta}{prime} meson mass. We found the disconnected contribution to be about twice as large as the connected one. The value for the full {pi}-{ital N} {sigma} term {sigma}=40--60 MeV is consistent with the experimental estimates. The nucleon matrix element of the strange quark density {ital {bar s}s} is fairly large in our result.

  11. Results on Charm Baryon Spectroscopy from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Felix

    2011-05-01

    Due to an excellent mass resolution and a large amount of available data, the CDF experiment, located at the Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator, allows the precise measurement of spectroscopic properties, like mass and decay width, of a variety of states. This was exploited to examine the first orbital excitations of the {Lambda}{sub c} baryon, the resonances {Lambda}{sub c}(2595) and {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), in the decay channel {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as the {Lambda}{sub c} spin excitations {Sigma}{sub c}(2455) and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) in its decays to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} final states in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb{sup -1}. We present measurements of the mass differences with respect to the {Lambda}{sub c} and the decay widths of these states, using significantly higher statistics than previous experiments.

  12. System Size and Energy Dependence on Strangeness Production in 22 GeV Cu+Cu Collisions at RHIC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    relativistic speeds approaching the speed of light before they meet in an extremely high temperature collision. The Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR...extremely high energy and temperature. This project determines the yield of strange quarks through measurements of K0-short mesons as well as Lambda and Anti...charge. These quarks are never observed alone, but are observable in the form of baryons (3 quarks) or mesons (a quark-anti-quark pair). The

  13. Strange-quark-matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1989-11-01

    We investigate the implications of rapid rotation corresponding to the frequency of the new pulsar reported in the supernovae remnant SN1987A. It places very stringent conditions on the equation of state if the star is assumed to be bound by gravity alone. We find that the central energy density of the star must be greater than 13 times that of nuclear density to be stable against the most optimistic estimate of general relativistic instabilities. This is too high for the matter to consist of individual hadrons. We conclude that it is implausible that the newly discovered pulsar, if its half-millisecond signals are attributable to rotation, is a neutron star. We show that it can be a strange quark star, and that the entire family of strange stars can sustain high rotation if strange matter is stable at an energy density exceeding about 5.4 times that of nuclear matter. We discuss the conversion of a neutron star to strange star, the possible existence of a crust of heavy ions held in suspension by centrifugal and electric forces, the cooling and other features. 34 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. How strange is pion electroproduction?

    DOE PAGES

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert; Zhang, Xilin

    2015-11-18

    We consider pion production in parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) in the presence of nucleon strangeness in the framework of partial wave analysis with unitarity. Using the experimental bounds on the strange form factors obtained in elastic PVES, we study the sensitivity of the parity-violating asymmetry to strange nucleon form factors. For forward kinematics and electron energies above 1 GeV, we observe that this sensitivity may reach about 20% in the threshold region. With parity-violating asymmetries being as large as tens p.p.m., this study suggests that threshold pion production in PVES can be used as a promising way to better constrainmore » strangeness contributions. Using this model for the neutral current pion production, we update the estimate for the dispersive γZ-box correction to the weak charge of the proton. In the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, our new prediction reads ReVγZ(E = 1.165 GeV) = (5.58 ±1.41) ×10–3, an improvement over the previous uncertainty estimate of ±2.0 ×10–3. Our new prediction in the kinematics of the upcoming MESA/P2 experiment reads ReVγZ(E = 0.155 GeV) = (1.1 ±0.2) ×10–3.« less

  15. Will strangeness win the prize?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapusta, Joseph I.

    2001-03-01

    Five groups have made predictions involving the production of strange hadrons and entered them in a competition set up by Barbara Jacak, Xin-Nian Wang and myself in the spring of 1998 for the purpose of comparing with first-year physics results from RHIC. These predictions are summarized and evaluated.

  16. A strange cat in Dublin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2012-11-01

    Not many life stories in physics involve Nazis, illicit sex, a strange cat and the genetic code. Thus, a new biography of the great Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger is always of interest, and with Erwin Schrödinger and the Quantum Revolution, veteran science writer John Gribbin does not disappoint.

  17. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  18. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  19. lambda. and. sigma. hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Millener, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The present status of structure calculations for p-shell ..lambda.. hypernuclei, including the phenomenological determination of ..lambda..N effective interaction matrix elements, is briefly reviewed. For ..sigma.. hypernuclei the Nijmegen potential model D is used for guidance in constructing ..sigma..N effective interactions. The structure of /sub ..sigma..//sup 12/Be and /sub ..sigma..//sup 12/C, including isospin mixing in the later case, is discussed, and a comparison is made with experimental data. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Staggered baryon operators with flavor SU(3) quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2007-06-01

    The construction of the first baryon operators for staggered lattice QCD exploited the taste symmetry to emulate physical quark flavor; contemporary 2+1 flavor simulations explicitly include three physical quark flavors and necessitate interpreting a valence sector with 12 quarks. After discussing expected features of the resulting baryon spectrum, I consider the spectra of operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS, the direct product of flavor SU(3){sub F} and the geometrical time-slice group of the 1-flavor staggered theory. I then describe the construction of a set of maximally local baryon operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS and enumerate this set. In principle, the operators listed here could be used to extract the masses of all the lightest spin-(1/2) and spin-(3/2) baryon resonances of staggered QCD. Using appropriate operators from this set in partially quenched simulations should allow for particularly clean 2+1 flavor calculations of the masses of the nucleon, {delta}, {sigma}*, {xi}*, and {omega}{sup -}.

  1. Baryon stopping probes deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolschin, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Stopping and baryon transport in central relativistic Pb + Pb and Au + Au collisions are reconsidered with the aim to find indications for the transition from hadronic to partonic processes. At energies reached at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron ( √{s_{NN}} = 6.3-17.3 GeV) and at RHIC (62.4 GeV) the fragmentation-peak positions as obtained from the data depend linearly on the beam rapidity and are in agreement with earlier results from a QCD-based approach that accounts for gluon saturation. No discontinuities in the net-proton fragmentation peak positions occur in the expected transition region from partons to hadrons at 6-10GeV. In contrast, the mean rapidity loss is predicted to depend linearly on the beam rapidity only at high energies beyond the RHIC scale. The combination of both results offers a clue for the transition from hard partonic to soft hadronic processes in baryon stopping. NICA results could corroborate these findings.

  2. Holographic Baryons and Instanton Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Melnikov, Dmitry; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    In a wide class of holographic models, like the one proposed by Sakai and Sugimoto, baryons can be approximated by instantons of non-abelian gauge fields that live on the world-volume of flavor D-branes. In the leading order, those are just the Yang-Mills instantons, whose solutions can be constructed from the celebrated ADHM construction. This fact can be used to study various properties of baryons in the holographic limit. In particular, one can attempt to construct a holographic description of the cold dense nuclear matter phase of baryons. It can be argued that holographic baryons in such a regime are necessarily in a solid crystalline phase. In this review we summarize the known results on the construction and phases of crystals of the holographic baryons.

  3. Holographic baryons and instanton crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Melnikov, Dmitry; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2015-06-01

    In a wide class of holographic models, like the one proposed by Sakai and Sugimoto, baryons can be approximated by instantons of non-Abelian gauge fields that live on the world-volume of flavor D-branes. In the leading order, those are just the Yang-Mills instantons, whose solutions can be constructed from the celebrated Atiyah-Drinfeld-Hitchin-Manin (ADHM) construction. This fact can be used to study various properties of baryons in the holographic limit. In particular, one can attempt to construct a holographic description of the cold dense nuclear matter phase of baryons. It can be argued that holographic baryons in such a regime are necessarily in a solid crystalline phase. In this review, we summarize the known results on the construction and phases of crystals of the holographic baryons.

  4. Baryon magnetic moments and baryon masses in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Phuoc Dai

    1999-11-01

    This thesis is concerned with baryon structure in QCD, mainly the theory of the baryon magnetic moments and baryon masses. I derived the usual quark model for the moments with corrections for the binding of the quarks analytically in a quenched Wilson-loop approach to QCD, and have successfully built a loop expansion approach to get beyond the quenched approximation. This theory of the baryon magnetic moments (octet, decuplet and transition) uses only three parameters, the effective quark moments μu, μ s, and a wave function parameter λ which is constrained by theory and experiment. It fits the moments much better than other models. I extend the loop expansion approach to the study of the baryon masses from the quark model, and find that the masses in the baryon octet and decuplet are very well described. The reliability of the form factors used to describe to compositeness of the hadrons is discussed. A detailed study of the structure of the loop corrections show that they contain terms with the tree level structure of the baryon masses, and a left over component coming from the quark spin-spin exchange interaction that is responsible for the violations of the Gell-Mann - Okubo mass relations.

  5. Strange particle production in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, K.G. III

    1996-04-01

    A study has been made of neutral strange baryons and pseudoscalar mesons produced in hadronic decays of the weak gauge boson V. The experiment was performed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, which has the unique capability of colliding highly polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons. Overall production rates and spectra of the K{sup 0} and the {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) were measured and compared with other experiments as well as with Quantum Chromodynamics calculations. The combination of the small, stable beam spots produced by the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) and the precision vertexing capabilities of the SLC Large Detector (SLD) permitted the separation of the hadronic events into three quark flavor-enriched samples. An unfolding was performed to obtain flavor-pure samples, and for the first time measurements were made of K{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) production rates and spectra in uds, c, and b quark events at the Z{sup 0} pole. This measurement revealed significant production differences. Utilizing the large quark production asymmetry due to the polarized electron beam, high-purity quark and antiquark jet samples were obtained. The first measurement of production differences of the {Lambda}{sup 0} baryon in quark and antiquark jets was performed, which provided clear evidence for a leading particle effect at high momenta.

  6. Six Sigma in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMahieu, Paul G.; Nordstrum, Lee E.; Cudney, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is one of seven in this volume that aims to elaborate different approaches to quality improvement in education. It delineates a methodology called Six Sigma. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the origins, theoretical foundations, core principles and a case study demonstrating an application of Six Sigma in a…

  7. Six Sigma in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMahieu, Paul G.; Nordstrum, Lee E.; Cudney, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is one of seven in this volume that aims to elaborate different approaches to quality improvement in education. It delineates a methodology called Six Sigma. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the origins, theoretical foundations, core principles and a case study demonstrating an application of Six Sigma in a…

  8. Polarisation observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Fegan

    2012-04-01

    The FROST experiment at Jefferson Lab used the CLAS detector in Hall B with the intention of performing a complete measurement of polarization observables associated with strangeness photoproduction, in combination with data from previous JLab experiments. This was achieved by utilizing the FROST polarized target in conjunction with polarized photon beams, allowing direct measurement of beam-target double polarization observables. By studying strangeness reactions, such as {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0}, it may be possible to find 'missing' baryon resonances, predicted by symmetric quark models but not observed in previous experiments, whose results are consistent with the di-quark model. It is thought these 'missing' resonances remain undiscovered because they have different coupling strengths for different reaction channels, such as the strangeness reactions, whereas the current data is dominated by studies of pN reactions. Observing these resonances therefore has important implications for our knowledge of the excited states of nucleons, and the models predicting the quark interactions within them. The G polarization observable is one of the beam-target double polarization observables, associated with a longitudinally polarized target and a linearly polarized photon beam, and its measurement for the strangeness reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0} is the focus of the work presented.

  9. Electromagnetic properties of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, T.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Martin-Camalich, J.

    2011-10-21

    We discuss the chiral behavior of the nucleon and {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic properties within the framework of a SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. Our one-loop calculation is complete to the order p{sup 3} and p{sup 4}/{Delta} with {Delta} as the {Delta}(1232)-nucleon energy gap. We show that the magnetic moment of a resonance can be defined by the linear energy shift only when an additional relation between the involved masses and the applied magnetic field strength is fulfilled. Singularities and cusps in the pion mass dependence of the {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic moments reflect a non-fulfillment. We show results for the pion mass dependence of the nucleon iso-vector electromagnetic quantities and present preliminary results for finite volume effects on the iso-vector anomalous magnetic moment.

  10. RX J1856.5-3754 as a possible strange star candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Jillian Anne; Page, Dany

    2007-04-01

    RX J1856.5-3754 has been proposed as a strange star candidate due to its very small apparent radius measured from its X-ray thermal spectrum. However, its optical emission requires a much larger radius and thus most of the stellar surface must be cold and undetectable in X-rays. In the case the star is a neutron star such a surface temperature distribution can be explained by the presence of a strong toroidal field in the crust (Pérez-Azorín et al.: Astron. Astrophys. 451, 1009 (2006); Geppert et al.: Astron. Astrophys. 457, 937 (2006)) We consider a similar scenario for a strange star with a thin baryonic crust to determine if such a magnetic field induced effect is still possible.

  11. Including the {delta}(1232) resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, C.; Wies, N.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2005-11-01

    Baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit {delta}(1232) degrees of freedom is considered. The most general interactions of pions, nucleons, and {delta} consistent with all underlying symmetries as well as with the constraint structure of higher-spin fields are constructed. By use of the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme, a manifestly Lorentz-invariant effective-field theory with a systematic power counting is obtained. As applications, we discuss the mass of the nucleon, the pion-nucleon {sigma} term, and the pole of the {delta} propagator.

  12. Baryon spectroscopy in a hybrid model with quantized pions

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.E.; McNeil, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    The authors extend their earlier calculations of baryon properties in a hybrid quark model based on the Gell-Mann-Levy linear sigma model. They have avoided the projection problems associated with the standard hedgehog ansatz by solving the model using a Fock-space configuration which explicitly incorporates the correct isospin and angular momentum couplings in every component. This Fock-space configuration has components involving three quarks and various numbers of quantal pions. They minimize the ground-state expectation value of their Hamiltonian to obtain the equations of motion which they solve self-consistently. They calculate the canonical set of nucleon observables and compare with previous work.

  13. Charmed baryon spectroscopy with Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Lesiak, Tadeusz

    2007-02-27

    Recent studies concerning charmed baryon spectroscopy, performed by the Belle collaboration, are briefly described. We report the first observation of two new baryons {xi}cx(2980) and {xi}cx(3077), a precise determination of the masses of {xi}c(2645) and {xi}c(2815), observation of the {lambda}c(2940)+ and experimental constraints on the possible spin-parity of the {lambda}c(2880)+. Observations of several exclusive decays of B mesons to the final states containing charmed baryons are also briefly presented.

  14. Pentaquarks and strange tetraquark mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Semenova, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    We consider the interplay of the pentaquark states and strange tetraquark states in the decay Λb0 → K-J/ψp. Possible existence of (csc¯ū)-states is taken up and their manifestation in the K-J/ψ-channel is discussed. It is emphasized that these exotic mesons can imitate broad bumps in the pJ/ψ-channel.

  15. Stochastic isocurvature baryon fluctuations, baryon diffusion, and primordial nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki-Suonio, H.; Jedamzik, K.; Mathews, G.J.

    1997-04-01

    We examine effects on primordial nucleosynthesis from a truly random, one-dimensional spatial distribution in the baryon-to-photon ratio ({eta}). We generate stochastic fluctuation spectra characterized by different spectral indices and rms fluctuation amplitudes. For the first time we explicitly calculate the effects of baryon diffusion on the nucleosynthesis yields of such stochastic fluctuations. We also consider the collapse instability of large mass scale inhomogeneities. Our results are generally applicable to any primordial mechanism producing fluctuations in {eta} which can be characterized by a spectral index. In particular, these results apply to primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuation (PIB) models. The amplitudes of fluctuations that are scale-invariant in baryon fluctuation (PIB) models. The amplitudes of fluctuations that are scale-invariant in baryon density are found to be severely constrained by primordial nucleosynthesis. However, when the {eta} distribution is characterized by decreasing fluctuation amplitudes with increasing length scale, surprisingly large fluctuation amplitudes on the baryon diffusion scale are allowed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  16. Sigma Receptor Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2015-12-08

    Sigma receptors, both Sigma-1(S1R) and Sigma-2 (S2R), are small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated sites. A number of drugs bind to sigma receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol and (+)-pentazocine, an opioid analgesic. Sigma receptors are implicated in many central nervous system disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease and conditions associated with motor control, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Described in this unit are radioligand binding assays used for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R. Methods detailed include a radioligand saturation binding assay for defining receptor densities and a competitive inhibition binding assay employing [³H]-(+)-pentazocine for identifying and characterizing novel ligands that interact with S1R. Procedures using [³H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([³H]-DTG), a nonselective sigma receptor ligand, are described for conducting a saturation binding and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R site. These protocols are of value in drug discovery in identifying new sigma ligands and in the characterization of these receptors.

  17. Strangeness suppression of qq¯ creation observed in exclusive reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; ...

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK+, pπ0, and nπ+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  18. Pure sea-quark contributions to the magnetic form factors of Σ baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D. B.; Thomas, A. W.

    2015-08-01

    We propose the pure sea-quark contributions to the magnetic form factors of Σ baryons, GΣ-u and GΣ+d,as priority observables for the examination of sea-quark contributions to baryon structure, both in present lattice QCD simulations and possible future experimental measurement. GΣ-u, the u -quark contribution to the magnetic form factor of Σ-,and GΣ+d, the d -quark contribution to the magnetic form factor of Σ+,are similar to the strange-quark contribution to the magnetic form factor of the nucleon, but promise to be larger by an order of magnitude. We explore the size of this quantity within chiral effective field theory, including both octet and decuplet intermediate states. The finite range regularization approach is applied to deal with ultraviolet divergences. Drawing on an established connection between quenched and full QCD, this approach makes it possible to predict the sea-quark contribution to the magnetic form factor purely from the meson loop. In the familiar convention where the quark charge is set to unity GΣ-u=GΣ+d. We find a value of -0.38-0.17+0.16 μN , which is about seven times larger than the strange magnetic moment of the nucleon found in the same approach. Including quark charge factors, the u -quark contribution to the Σ- magnetic moment exceeds the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment by a factor of 14.

  19. Study of reactions disclosing hidden charm pentaquarks with or without strangeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oset, Eulogio; Chen, Hua-Xing; Feijoo, Albert; Geng, Li-Sheng; Liang, Wei-Hong; Li, De-Min; Lu, Jun-Xu; Magas, Vladymir K.; Nieves, Juan; Ramos, Angels; Roca, Luis; Wang, En; Xie, Ju-Jun

    2016-10-01

    We present results for five reactions, Λb → J / ψK- p, Λb → J / ψηΛ, Λb → J / ψπ- p, Λb → J / ψK0 Λ and Ξb- → J / ψK- Λ, where combining information from the meson baryon interaction, using the chiral unitary approach, and predictions made for molecular states of hidden charm, with or without strangeness, we can evaluate invariant mass distributions for the light meson baryon states, and for those of J / ψp or J / ψΛ. We show that with the present available information, in all of these reactions one finds peaks where the pentaquark states show up. In the Λb → J / ψK- p and Λb → J / ψπ- p reactions we show that the results obtained from our study are compatible with present experimental observations.

  20. The effect of finite temperature and chemical potential on nucleon properties in the logarithmic quark sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Shady, M.; Abu-Nab, A.

    2015-12-01

    The logarithmic quark sigma model is applied to study the nucleon properties at finite temperature and chemical potential. The field equations have been solved numerically in the mean-field approximation by using the extended iteration method at finite temperature and baryon chemical potential. Baryon properties are investigated, such as the hedgehog mass, the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron, and the pion-nucleon coupling constant. We find that the hedgehog mass and the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron increase with increasing temperature and chemical potential, while the pion-nucleon coupling constant decreases. A comparison with the original sigma model and QCD sum rules is presented. We conclude that the logarithmic quark sigma model successfully describes baryon properties of a hot and dense medium.

  1. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, D.; Kovacs, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-25

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  2. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, D.; Kovács, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-01

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  3. Baryonic Operators for Lattice Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. Edwards; R. Fiebig; G. Fleming; U.M. Heller; C. Morningstar; D. Richards; I. Sato; S. Wallace

    2004-03-01

    The construction of baryonic operators for determining the N* excitation spectrum is discussed. The operators are designed with one eye towards maximizing overlaps with the low-lying states of interest, and the other eye towards minimizing the number of sources needed in computing the required quark propagators. Issues related to spin identification are outlined. Although we focus on tri-quark baryon operators, the construction method is applicable to both mesons and penta-quark operators.

  4. Investigating strangeness in the proton by studying the effects of Light Cone parton distributions in the Meson Cloud Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuppan, Sam; Budnik, Garrett; Fox, Jordan

    2014-09-01

    The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. This research has been supported in part by the

  5. Octet baryon magnetic moments from lattice QCD: Approaching experiment from a three-flavor symmetric point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Wilhelm, Jonas; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas

    2017-06-01

    Lattice QCD calculations with background magnetic fields are used to determine the magnetic moments of the octet baryons. Computations are performed at the physical value of the strange quark mass, and two values of the light quark mass, one corresponding to the S U (3 )F-symmetric point, where the pion mass is mπ˜800 MeV , and the other corresponding to a pion mass of mπ˜450 MeV . The moments are found to exhibit only mild pion-mass dependence when expressed in terms of appropriately chosen magneton units—the natural baryon magneton. A curious pattern is revealed among the anomalous baryon magnetic moments which is linked to the constituent quark model, however, careful scrutiny exposes additional features. Relations expected to hold in the large-Nc limit of QCD are studied; and, in one case, a clear preference for the quark model over the large-Nc prediction is found. The magnetically coupled Λ -Σ0 system is treated in detail at the S U (3 )F point, with the lattice QCD results comparing favorably with predictions based on S U (3 )F symmetry. This analysis enables the first extraction of the isovector transition magnetic polarizability. The possibility that large magnetic fields stabilize strange matter is explored, but such a scenario is found to be unlikely.

  6. Progress towards understanding baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker; Roberts, Winston

    2013-07-01

    The composite nature of baryons manifests itself in the existence of a rich spectrum of excited states, in particular in the important mass region 1?2 GeV for the light-flavoured baryons. The properties of these resonances can be identified by systematic investigations using electromagnetic and strong probes, primarily with beams of electrons, photons, and pions. After decades of research, the fundamental degrees of freedom underlying the baryon excitation spectrum are still poorly understood. The search for hitherto undiscovered but predicted resonances continues at many laboratories around the world. Recent results from photo- and electroproduction experiments provide intriguing indications for new states and shed light on the structure of some of the known nucleon excitations. The continuing study of available data sets with consideration of new observables and improved analysis tools have also called into question some of the earlier findings in baryon spectroscopy. Other breakthrough measurements have been performed in the heavy-baryon sector, which has seen a fruitful period in recent years, in particular at the B factories and the Tevatron. First results from the large hadron collider indicate rapid progress in the field of bottom baryons. In this review, we discuss the recent experimental progress and give an overview of theoretical approaches.

  7. Supersymmetric sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Bagger, J.A.

    1984-09-01

    We begin to construct the most general supersymmetric Lagrangians in one, two and four dimensions. We find that the matter couplings have a natural interpretation in the language of the nonlinear sigma model.

  8. Sigma factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Eric; Sanschagrin, François; Levesque, Roger C

    2008-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as in most bacterial species, the expression of genes is tightly controlled by a repertoire of transcriptional regulators, particularly the so-called sigma (sigma) factors. The basic understanding of these proteins in bacteria has initially been described in Escherichia coli where seven sigma factors are involved in core RNA polymerase interactions and promoter recognition. Now, 7 years have passed since the completion of the first genome sequence of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. Information from the genome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 identified 550 transcriptional regulators and 24 putative sigma factors. Of the 24 sigma, 19 were of extracytoplasmic function (ECF). Here, basic knowledge of sigma and ECF proteins was reviewed with particular emphasis on their role in P. aeruginosa global gene regulation. Summarized data are obtained from in silico analysis of P. aeruginosasigma and ECF including rpoD (sigma(70)), RpoH (sigma(32)), RpoF (FliA or sigma(28)), RpoS (sigma(S) or sigma(38)), RpoN (NtrA, sigma(54) or sigma(N)), ECF including AlgU (RpoE or sigma(22)), PvdS, SigX and a collection of uncharacterized sigma ECF, some of which are implicated in iron transport. Coupled to systems biology, identification and functional genomics analysis of P. aeruginosasigma and ECF are expected to provide new means to prevent infection, new targets for antimicrobial therapy, as well as new insights into the infection process.

  9. Galaxy Cluster Baryon Fractions Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2013-11-01

    We measure the baryons contained in both the stellar and hot-gas components for 12 galaxy clusters and groups at z ~ 0.1 with M = 1-5 × 1014 M ⊙. This paper improves upon our previous work through the addition of XMM-Newton X-ray data, enabling measurements of the total mass and masses of each major baryonic component—intracluster medium, intracluster stars, and stars in galaxies—for each system. We recover a mean relation for the stellar mass versus halo mass, M_{\\star }\\propto M_{500}^{-0.52+/- 0.04}, that is 1σ shallower than in our previous result. We confirm that the partitioning of baryons between the stellar and hot-gas components is a strong function of M 500; the fractions of total mass in stars and X-ray gas within a sphere of radius r 500 scale as f_{\\star }\\propto M_{500}^{-0.45+/- 0.04} and f_{gas}\\propto M_{500}^{0.26+/- 0.03}, respectively. We also confirm that the combination of the brightest cluster galaxy and intracluster stars is an increasingly important contributor to the stellar baryon budget in lower halo masses. Studies that fail to fully account for intracluster stars typically underestimate the normalization of the stellar baryon fraction versus M 500 relation by ~25%. Our derived stellar baryon fractions are also higher, and the trend with halo mass weaker, than those derived from recent halo occupation distribution and abundance matching analyses. One difference from our previous work is the weak, but statistically significant, dependence here of the total baryon fraction upon halo mass: f_{bary}\\propto M_{500}^{0.16+/- 0.04}. For M 500 >~ 2 × 1014, the total baryon fractions within r 500 are on average 18% below the universal value from the seven year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) analysis, or 7% below for the cosmological parameters from the Planck analysis. In the latter case, the difference between the universal value and cluster baryon fractions is less than the systematic uncertainties associated with

  10. B baryon production and decays and B hadron lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, S.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review the most recent results concerning B Baryons at CDF and D0, including the observation and the study of the properties of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}, {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup {+-}(*)}, the observation of new {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay modes, and a new measurement of the lifetime of the b hadrons in decays with a J/{Psi}. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is observed through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{Psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{Psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} pK{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, and the lifetime 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. For the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} the mass is measured 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and the lifetime 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. A new accurate measurement of the properties of the resonances {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}, and {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -} has been performed in 6 fb{sup -1} of data, and the masses have been determined, m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}) = 5811.2{sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}) = 5815.5{sub -0.5}{sup +0.6}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}) = 5832.0 {+-} 0.7(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.), and m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -}) = 5835.0 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.). The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma

  11. Maximum rotation frequency of strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zdunik, J.L.; Haensel, P. )

    1990-07-15

    Using the MIT bag model of strange-quark matter, we calculate the maximum angular frequency of the uniform rotation of strange stars. After studying a broad range of the MIT bag-model parameters, we obtain an upper bound of 12.3 kHz.

  12. Strangeness detection in ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Safarik, K.

    1995-07-15

    The authors present some parameters of the ALICE detector which concern the detection of strange particles. The results of a simulation for neutral strange particles and cascades, together with estimated rates are presented. They also briefly discuss the detection of charged K-mesons. Finally, they mention the possibility of open charm particle detection.

  13. Strangeness production with protons and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1993-04-01

    We discuss the spectrum of physics questions related to strangeness which could be addressed with intense beams of protons and pions in the few GeV region. We focus on various aspects of strangeness production, including hyperon production in pp collisions, studies of hyperon-nucleon scattering, production of hypernuclei in proton and pion-nucleus collisions, and spin phenomena in hypernuclei.

  14. Observation of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-09-02

    The observation of the bottom, strange baryon Ξ(b)(0) through the decay chain Ξ(b)(0)→Ξ(c)(+)π-, where ΞΞ(c)(+)→Ξ- π+ π+, Ξ-→Λπ-, and Λ→pπ-, is reported by using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2  fb(-1) from pp collisions at square root(s)=1.96  TeV recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal of 25.3(-5.4)(+5.6) candidates is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 3.6×10(-12), corresponding to 6.8 gaussian standard deviations. The Ξ(b)(0) mass is measured to be 5787.8±5.0(stat)±1.3(syst)  MeV/c2. In addition, the Ξ(b)- baryon is observed through the process Ξ(b)-→Ξ(c)(0)π-, where Ξ(c)(0)→Ξ- π+, Ξ-→Λπ-, and Λ→pπ-.

  15. Analysis of 56-plet Positive Parity Baryon Decays in the 1/Nc Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity, Norberto Scoccola, Chandana Jayalath

    2009-10-01

    The partial decay widths of positive parity baryons belonging to 56-plets of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion. The channels considered are those with emission of a single pion, K or K-bar mesons, and the analysis is carried out to subleading order in 1/Nc and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. The results for the multiplet [56,0+], to which the Roper resonance belongs, indicate a poor description at leading order, requiring large next to leading order corrections. For the multiplet [56,2+], the P-wave decays in the non-strange sector are well described at leading order and important SU(3) breaking corrections are necessary to describe transitions involving strangeness, on the other hand, the F-wave decays require the next to leading order corrections, which turn out to be however of natural magnitude.

  16. The baryonic susceptibility near critical temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shu

    2010-08-05

    We discuss the role of quarks and baryons near the QCD phase transition. The former is modelled in the spirit of PNJL model, while the latter is splitted into two classes: 'stringy' and 'non-stringy' baryons. We represent the non-stringy baryons by a sum over the resonance on equal footing, and obtain the density of states of stringy baryons from string inspired model at finite-T. Our model produce a rise and fall of baryonic contribution to the susceptibility, which is in qualitative agreement with lattice results. We also discuss the chiral effect on the baryonic mass and susceptibility.

  17. A low-dimensional analogue of holographic baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Baryons in holographic QCD correspond to topological solitons in the bulk. The most prominent example is the Sakai-Sugimoto model, where the bulk soliton in the five-dimensional spacetime of AdS-type can be approximated by the flat space self-dual Yang-Mills instanton with a small size. Recently, the validity of this approximation has been verified by comparison with the numerical field theory solution. However, multi-solitons and solitons with finite density are currently beyond numerical field theory computations. Various approximations have been applied to investigate these important issues and have led to proposals for finite density configurations that include dyonic salt and baryonic popcorn. Here we introduce and investigate a low-dimensional analogue of the Sakai-Sugimoto model, in which the bulk soliton can be approximated by a flat space sigma model instanton. The bulk theory is a baby Skyrme model in a three-dimensional spacetime with negative curvature. The advantage of the lower-dimensional theory is that numerical simulations of multi-solitons and finite density solutions can be performed and compared with flat space instanton approximations. In particular, analogues of dyonic salt and baryonic popcorn configurations are found and analysed.

  18. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  19. a Study of the Semileptonic Decay Properties of Charmed Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Richard George

    1993-01-01

    The first significant observations of the semileptonic decay of the charmed baryons Lambda_sp {c}{+} and Xi _sp{c}{0} have been made using the ARGUS detector at the e^+e^ - storage ring DORIS II at DESY. The ARGUS detector is a 4pi magnetic solenoidal detector used to observe e^+e^- annihilations at a center-of-mass energy around 10.4 GeV. The semileptonic decay modes studied are Lambda_sp{c}{+}to Lambda l^+X, Lambda_sp {c}{+} to Lambda^*l^+X, and Xi_sp{c}{0} to Xi^-l^+X where l^+ is an e ^+ or a mu^+, and X is any low mass neutral particle combination containing a neutrino. Because the neutrino cannot be detected in this experiment great care must be taken in considering all possible sources of contributing background. After this background subtraction the cross section times branching ratio were determined to be,eqalign {&sigma(e^+e^-toLambda _sp{c}{+}X)cdot BR(Lambda _sp{c}{+}toLambda l^+X) = 4.15 +/- 1.03 +/- 1.18 pb cr&sigma(e^+e^-toXi _sp{c}{0}X)cdot BR(Xi _sp{c}{0}toXi^ -l^+X) = 0.74 +/- 0.24 +/- 0.09 pb cr&sigma(e^+e^-toLambda _sp{c}{+}X)cdot BR(Lambda _sp{c}{+}to(Sigma(1385) pi)^0 e^+X)=cr&sk{130 } 1.10 +/- 0.95 +/- 0.29 pb.cr }The branching ratios can be extracted from these numbers and compared with theoretical calculations. These measurements are found to be consistent with some, but not all charmed baryon semileptonic decay models. Comparison of the shape of the Lambda l^+ mass distribution from Lambda _sp{c}{+}toLambda l^+nu_{l} decays with those of the Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) model calculations of Korner and Kramer determined the ratio of the HQET form factors to be R_{f } = f_2/f_1 = +3.2_sp {-2.2}{+infty}. Also, observation of the polarization angular distribution of the Lambda daughter baryon from these decays found alpha_{Lambda _{c}} = -0.91 +/- 0.42 +/- 0.25 for events in the mass region 1.85 < M(Lambda l^+) < 2.20 GeV/c^2. This last measurement is in agreement with the HQET predictions of alpha _{Lambda_{c}} to -1 in the limit q^2

  20. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold, William Detmold, Konstantinos Orginos, Aaron Torok, Silas R Beane, Thomas C Luu, Assumpta Parreno, Martin Savage, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-04-01

    The $\\pi^+\\Sigma^+$, $\\pi^+\\Xi^0$ , $K^+p$, $K^+n$, and $K^0 \\Xi^0$ scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find $a_{\\pi^+\\Sigma^+} = ?0.197 ± 0.017$ fm, and $a_{\\pi^+\\Xi^0} = ?0.098 0.017$ fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  1. Aspects of excited baryon phenomenology in the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2010-11-12

    We report on the application of the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD to the description of the properties of non-strange excited baryons belonging to the [70, 1{sup -}]-plet. In particular, we present the results of an improved determination of the corresponding mixing angles obtained by performing a simultaneous fit of masses and strong decay widths. We find {theta}{sub 1} 0.47{+-}0.06 and {theta}{sub 3} = 2.74{+-}0.07. These values are within the range of those determined in previous non-global analyses but have smaller uncertainties.

  2. Observation of an Exotic S=+1 Baryon in Exclusive Photoproduction from the Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyan, S.; Hicks, K.; Carman, D. S.; Pasyuk, E.; Schumacher, R. A.; Smith, E. S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Todor, L.; Adams, G.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S. P.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Berman, B. L.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carnahan, B.; Chen, S.; Ciciani, L.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; de Vita, R.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dhuga, K. S.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fatemi, R.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Gordon, C. I.; Gothe, R.; Griffioen, K.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Heimberg, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Juengst, H. G.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Lawrence, D.; Li, J.; Lima, A.; Livingston, K.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; McAleer, S.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Brien, J.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Opper, A. K.; Osipenko, M.; Park, K.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J.; Sapunenko, V.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stavinsky, A.; Stoler, P.; Suleiman, R.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.

    2003-12-01

    In an exclusive measurement of the reaction γd→K+K-pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S=+1 is seen in the K+n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1.542±0.005 GeV/c2 with a measured width of 0.021 GeV/c2 FWHM, which is largely determined by experimental mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is (5.2±0.6)σ. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with recent reports of a narrow S=+1 baryon by other experimental groups.

  3. Charmed baryon spectroscopy from CLEO at CESR

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Sajjad

    1999-02-17

    Charmed baryon spectroscopy has been unfolding since the discovery of the first charmed baryon in 1975. The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has now established itself as a charmed particle factory. In this report, we present results on charmed baryon production at CESR using the CLEO detector.

  4. Parity doubling of nucléons, Delta and Omega baryons across the deconfinement phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; De Boni, Davide; Hands, Simon; Praki, Chrisanthi; Jäger, Benjamin; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar

    2017-03-01

    In this work we analyse positive- and negative-parity channels for the nucleón (spin 1/2 octet), Δ and Ω baryons (spin 3/2 decuplet) using lattice QCD. In Nature, at zero temperature, chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken, causing positive- and negative-parity ground states to have different masses. However, chiral symmetry is expected to be restored (for massless quarks) around the crossover temperature, implying that the two opposite parity channels should become degenerate. Here we study what happens in a temperature range which includes both the hadronic and the quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase. By analysing the correlation and spectral functions via exponential fits and the Maximum Entropy Method respectively, we have found parity doubling for the nucleon and Δ baryon channels in the QGP phase. For the Ω baryon we see a clear signal of parity doubling at the crossover temperature, which is however not complete, due to the nonzero strange quark mass. Moreover, in-medium effects in the hadronic phase are evident for all three baryons, in particular for the negative-parity ground states. This might have implications for the hadron resonance gas model. In this work we used the FASTSUM anisotropic Nf = 2 + 1 ensembles.

  5. and : candidates for charmed-strange mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qin-Tao; Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Newly observed two charmed-strange resonances, and , are investigated by calculating their Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed strong decays, which shows that they are suitable candidates for the and states in the charmed-strange meson family. Our study also predicts other main decay modes of and , which can be accessible at the future experiment. In addition, the decay behaviors of the spin partners of and , i.e., and , are predicted in this work, which are still missing at present. The experimental search for the missing and charmed-strange mesons is an intriguing and challenging task for further experiments.

  6. Observation of the Ωb- baryon and measurement of the properties of the Ξb- and Ωb- baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Tesarek, R.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-10-01

    We report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon Ωb- through the decay chain Ωb-→J/ψΩ-, where J/ψ→μ+μ-, Ω-→ΛK-, and Λ→pπ-, using 4.2fb-1 of data from pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0×10-8, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The Ωb- mass is measured to be 6054.4±6.8(stat)±0.9(syst)MeV/c2. The lifetime of the Ωb- baryon is measured to be 1.13-0.40+0.53(stat)±0.02(syst)ps. In addition, for the Ξb- baryon we measure a mass of 5790.9±2.6(stat)±0.8(syst)MeV/c2 and a lifetime of 1.56-0.25+0.27(stat)±0.02(syst)ps. Under the assumption that the Ξb- and Ωb- are produced with similar kinematic distributions to the Λb0 baryon, we find (σ(Ξb-)B(Ξb-→J/ψΞ-))/(σ(Λb0)B(Λb0→J/ψΛ))=0.167-0.025+0.037(stat)±0.012(syst) and (σ(Ωb-)B(Ωb-→J/ψΩ-))/(σ(Λb0)B(Λb0→J/ψΛ))=0.045-0.012+0.017(stat)±0.004(syst) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20GeV/c.

  7. SIGMA RECEPTOR BINDING ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    CHU, UYEN B.; RUOHO, ARNOLD E.

    2016-01-01

    Sigma receptors belong to a class of small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated receptors, of which there are two subtypes: the Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) and the Sigma-2 receptor (S2R). Both S1R and S2R bind to a number of drugs including antipsychotic, haloperidol, and the opioid analgesic, (+)-pentazocine. Sigma receptors are implicated in multiple disease pathologies associated with the nervous system including diseases affecting motor control such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzeimher's disease. This unit describes methods for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R using radioligand-binding assays. In the first section, radioligand saturation binding assay to determine receptor densities and competitive inhibition assays to characterize affinities of novel compounds are presented for S1R using the selective S1R ligand, [3H]-(+)-pentazocine. The second section describes radioligand saturation binding assay and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R using a non-selective S1R and S2R ligand, [3H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([3H]-DTG). PMID:26646191

  8. Nuclear physics with strange particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of strange particle interactions with nuclear systems is reviewed. We discuss the relative merits of various reactions such as (K/sup -/, ..pi../sup +-/), (..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/), or (..gamma.., K/sup +/) for hypernuclear production. The structure of /sub ..lambda..//sup 13/C is analyzed in some detail, in order to illustrate the role of the ..lambda..N residual interaction and approximate dynamical symmetries in hypernuclear structure. Recent results on the single particle states of a ..lambda.. in heavy systems, as revealed by (..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/) reaction studies, are used to extract information on the density dependence and effective mass which characterize the ..lambda..-nucleus mean field. Finally, we develop the idea the K/sup +/-nucleus scattering at low energies is sensitive to the subtle ''swelling'' effects for nucleons bound in nuclei. 64 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Examination of strangeness instabilities and effects of strange meson couplings in dense strange hadronic matter and compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, James R.; Gulminelli, Francesca; Menezes, Débora P.

    2017-02-01

    Background: The emergence of hyperon degrees of freedom in neutron star matter has been associated to first-order phase transitions in some phenomenological models, but conclusions on the possible physical existence of an instability in the strangeness sector are strongly model dependent. Purpose: The purposes of the present study are to assess whether strangeness instabilities are related to specific values of the largely unconstrained hyperon interactions and to study the effect of the strange meson couplings on phenomenological properties of neutron stars and supernova matter, once these latter are fixed to fulfill the constraints imposed by hypernuclear data. Method: We consider a phenomenological relativistic mean field model (RMF) model sufficiently simple to allow a complete exploration of the parameter space. Results: We show that no instability at supersaturation density exists for the RMF model, as long as the parameter space is constrained by basic physical requirements. This is at variance with a nonrelativistic functional, with a functional behavior fitted through ab initio calculations. Once the study is extended to include the full octet, we show that the parameter space allows reasonable radii for canonical neutron stars as well as massive stars above two-solar mass, together with an important strangeness content of the order of 30%, slightly decreasing with increasing entropy, even in the absence of a strangeness-driven phase transition. Conclusions: We conclude that the hyperon content of neutron stars and supernova matter cannot be established with present constraints, and is essentially governed by the unconstrained coupling to the strange isoscalar meson.

  10. Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nyiri, J.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Semenova, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm are considered as diquark-diquark-antiquark composite systems. Spin and isospin content of such exotic states is discussed and masses are evaluated.

  11. Strange quark matter fragmentation in astrophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulucci, L.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-06-01

    The conjecture of Bodmer-Witten-Terazawa suggesting a form of quark matter (Strange Quark Matter) as the ground state of hadronic interactions has been studied in laboratory and astrophysical contexts by a large number of authors. If strange stars exist, some violent events involving these compact objects, such as mergers and even their formation process, might eject some strange matter into the interstellar medium that could be detected as a trace signal in the cosmic ray flux. To evaluate this possibility, it is necessary to understand how this matter in bulk would fragment in the form of strangelets (small lumps of strange quark matter in which finite effects become important). We calculate the mass distribution outcome using the statistical multifragmentation model and point out several caveats affecting it. In particular, the possibility that strangelets fragmentation will render a tiny fraction of contamination in the cosmic ray flux is discussed.

  12. Strange Creatures: An Additive Wood Sculpture Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project where students create strange creatures using scraps of wood. Discusses how the students use the wood and other materials. Explains that the students also write about the habitat characteristics of their creatures. Includes learning objectives. (CMK)

  13. Bare strange quark stars: formation and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renxin

    Recent achievements of bare strange stars are briefly reviewed. A nascent protostrange star should be bare because of strong mass ejection and high temperature after the supernova detonation flame, and a crust can also hardly form except for a super-Eddington accretion. The magnetosphere of a bare strange star is composed mainly of e± pair plasma, where both inner and outer vacuum gaps work for radio as well as high energy nonthermal emission. A featureless thermal spectrum is expected since no ion is above the quark surface, whilst electron cyclotron lines could appear in some bare strange stars with suitable magnetic fields. Various astrophysical implications of bare strange stars are discussed.

  14. Strange Creatures: An Additive Wood Sculpture Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project where students create strange creatures using scraps of wood. Discusses how the students use the wood and other materials. Explains that the students also write about the habitat characteristics of their creatures. Includes learning objectives. (CMK)

  15. Strangeness contributions to nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ross Young

    2006-09-11

    We review a recent theoretical determination of the strange quark content of the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon. These are compared with a global analysis of current experimental measurements in parity-violating electron scattering.

  16. Glueball-baryon interactions in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Wen

    2017-10-01

    Studying the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model with type IIA string theory, we find the glueball-baryon interaction is predicted in this model. The glueball is identified as the 11D gravitational waves or graviton described by the M5-brane supergravity solution. Employing the relation of M-theory and type IIA string theory, glueball is also 10D gravitational perturbations which are the excited modes by close strings in the bulk of this model. On the other hand, baryon is identified as a D4-brane wrapped on S4 which is named as baryon vertex, so the glueball-baryon interaction is nothing but the close string/baryon vertex interaction in this model. Since the baryon vertex could be equivalently treated as the instanton configurations on the flavor brane, we identify the glueball-baryon interaction as ;graviton-instanton; interaction in order to describe it quantitatively by the quantum mechanical system for the collective modes of baryons. So the effective Hamiltonian can be obtained by considering the gravitational perturbations in the flavor brane action. With this Hamiltonian, the amplitudes and the selection rules of the glueball-baryon interaction can be analytically calculated in the strong coupling limit. We show our calculations explicitly in two characteristic situations which are ;scalar and tensor glueball interacting with baryons;. Although there is a long way to go, our work provides a holographic way to understand the interactions of baryons in hadronic physics and nuclear physics by the underlying string theory.

  17. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker

    2009-10-01

    A brief overview of strangeness physics with the CLAS detector at JLab is given, mainly covering the domain of nucleon resonances. Several excited states predicted by the symmetric constituent quark model may have signiffcant couplings to the K+ or K0 channels. I will discuss data that are relevant in the search for such states in the strangeness channel, and give an outlook on the future prospects of the N* program at JLab with electromagnetic probes.

  18. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-04-25

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects.

  19. Strange Particle Production in $p+p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta,N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-31

    We present strange particle spectra and yields measured atmid-rapidity in sqrt text s=200 GeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions atRHIC. We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass(mathrm mT \\equiv\\sqrt mathrm p_T 2+\\mathrm m2) scaling of hadronproduction in p+p collisions seems to break down at higher \\mt and thatthere is a difference in the shape of the \\mt spectrum between baryonsand mesons. We observe mid-rapidity anti-baryon to baryon ratios nearunity for Lambda and Xi baryons and no dependence of the ratio ontransverse momentum, indicating that our data do not yet reach thequark-jet dominated region. We show the dependence of the mean transversemomentum (\\mpt) on measured charged particle multiplicity and on particlemass and infer that these trends are consistent with gluon-jet dominatedparticle production. The data are compared to previous measurements fromCERN-SPS, ISR and FNAL experiments and to Leading Order (LO) and Next toLeading order (NLO) string fragmentation model predictions. We infer fromthese comparisons that the spectral shapes and particle yields from $p+p$collisions at RHIC energies have large contributions from gluon jetsrather than quark jets.

  20. Observation of the Omega(b)- Baryon and Measurement of the Properties of the Xi(b)- and Omega(b)- Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    The authors report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0 x 10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. In addition, for the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon they measure a mass of 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps.

  1. a Study of the Decay Properties of the Charmed Baryon Charmed Positive Lambda Baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlesworth, Catriona Elizabeth Kaye

    The charmed baryon Lambda_sp {c}{+} has been observed using the ARGUS detector in the DORIS II e^{+ }e^- storage ring at DESY. The ARGUS experiment is a 4pi magnetic solenoidal detector used to observe e^{+}e ^- annihilations at center-of-mass energies around 10.4 GeV. We have studied 5 decays modes of the Lambda_sp{c}{+}. The decay mode Lambda_sp{c} {+}to pK^-pi^+ was used to measure the Lambda_sp {c}{+} fragmentation properties. A value of 0.24 +/- 0.04 was found for the Peterson et al. parameter epsilon, and the sigma(Lambda_sp{c }{+}) cdot BR( Lambda_sp{c}{+}to pK^-pi^+) was measured to be 12.0 +/- 1.1 +/- 1.3) pb. The decay modes Lambda_sp {c}{+}toLambdapi^+ and Lambda_sp{c} {+}toSigma^0pi^+ were also studied. In the former the asymmetry parameter alpha_{Lambda _{c}} was measured to be -1.0 +/- 0.5, indicating that parity is maximally violated in this decay. The two production cross section times branching ratios were measured to be (2.2 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.3) pb and (2.0 +/- 0.7 +/- 0.3) pb respectively. Finally, a search was made for evidence of W-exchange in the decay Lambda_sp{c}{+} toXi^-K^+pi^+. This final state can arise through a simple spectator decay or via the more exotic W-exchange decay into Xi ^{*0}K^+, where the Xi^{*0} subsequently decays into Xi^-pi^+. The two body rate was measured to be (35 +/- 17)% of the three body rate, indicating that a significant portion of the Xi^-K^+pi ^+ final state may occur via W-exchange.

  2. The nucleon sigma term

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S; Tandy, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    The explicit chiral symmetry breaking component of the nucleon mass generated by the bare quark mass is extracted from a mean field treatment of chiral meson modes produced by a QCD-based model field theory. Because of the underlying finite range gluon propagator, bosonization produces a distributed dynamics of dressed quarks and finite size chiral meson fields that is totally determined by the amplitude functions of the quark propagator. The authors take the latter from a recent confining representation constrained by soft chiral meson physics. The sigma term is generated consistently from that level. A hedgehog format facilitates the mean field solution. New contributions to the sigma term arise which are not present in the point-coupling limit and the resulting value will be presented.

  3. Production of $\\mathbf {\\Sigma (1385)^{\\pm }}$ and $\\mathbf {\\Xi (1530)^{0}}$ in proton–proton collisions at $\\mathbf {\\sqrt{s}=}7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D’Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. -Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; SVN, M. Keil; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X. -G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal’Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. -P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhuo, Zhou; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-01-10

    The production of the strange and double-strange baryon resonances (Σ(1385)±, Ξ(1530)0) has been measured at mid-rapidity (|y|<0.5) in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. Transverse momentum spectra for inelastic collisions are compared to QCD-inspired models, which in general underpredict the data. Lastly, a search for the Φ(1860) pentaquark, decaying in the Ξπ channel, has been carried out but no evidence is seen.

  4. Production of $$\\mathbf {\\Sigma (1385)^{\\pm }}$$ and $$\\mathbf {\\Xi (1530)^{0}}$$ in proton–proton collisions at $$\\mathbf {\\sqrt{s}=}7$$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; ...

    2015-01-10

    The production of the strange and double-strange baryon resonances (Σ(1385)±, Ξ(1530)0) has been measured at mid-rapidity (|y|<0.5) in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. Transverse momentum spectra for inelastic collisions are compared to QCD-inspired models, which in general underpredict the data. Lastly, a search for the Φ(1860) pentaquark, decaying in the Ξπ channel, has been carried out but no evidence is seen.

  5. Six Sigma pricing.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, ManMohan S; Sodhi, Navdeep S

    2005-05-01

    Many companies are now good at managing costs and wringing out manufacturing efficiencies. The TQM movement and the disciplines of Six Sigma have seen to that. But the discipline so often brought to the cost side of the business equation is found far less commonly on the revenue side. The authors describe how a global manufacturer of industrial equipment, which they call Acme Incorporated, recently applied Six Sigma to one major revenue related activity--the price-setting process. It seemed to Acme's executives that pricing closely resembled many manufacturing processes. So, with the help of a Six Sigma black belt from manufacturing, a manager from Acme's pricing division recruited a team to carry out the five Six Sigma steps: Define what constitutes a defect. At Acme, a defect was an item sold at an unauthorized price. Gather data and prepare it for analysis. That involved mapping out the existing pricing-agreement process. Analyze the data. The team identified the ways in which people failed to carry out or assert effective control at each stage. Recommend modifications to the existing process. The team sought to decrease the number of unapproved prices without creating an onerous approval apparatus. Create controls. This step enabled Acme to sustain and extend the improvements in its pricing procedures. As a result of the changes, Acme earned dollar 6 million in additional revenue on one product line alone in the six months following implementation--money that went straight to the bottom line. At the same time, the company removed much of the organizational friction that had long bedeviled its pricing process. Other companies can benefit from Acme's experience as they look for ways to exercise price control without alienating customers.

  6. Recent study for multibaryon states with strangeness in pC interaction at 10 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, P. Zh.

    2013-08-15

    Strange multibaryon states with {Lambda}-hyperon and K{sub s}{sup 0} -meson subsystems has been studied from 700 000 stereo photographs or 10{sup 6} inelastic interactions which was obtained from expose of 2-m propane bubble chamber (PBC) LHEP, JINR to proton beams at 10 GeV/c. The obtained results from PBC can be divided into three subjects: in-medium effects of hadronic particles; baryon spectroscopy; hyper-nucleus production. At present the experimental situation is confused; so is theory. New accelerator research complexes has unique possibility for high-statistic and 4{pi}-geometry study of exotic states.

  7. Strange magnetic form factor of the proton at $Q^2 = 0.23$ GeV$^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Leinweber, Derek; Thomas, Anthony; Young, Ross

    2009-06-01

    We determine the $u$ and $d$ quark contributions to the proton magnetic form factor at finite momentum transfer by applying chiral corrections to quenched lattice data. Heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is applied at next to leading order in the quenched, and full QCD cases for the valence sector using finite range regularization. Under the assumption of charge symmetry these values can be combined with the experimental values of the proton and neutron magnetic form factors to deduce a relatively accurate value for the strange magnetic form factor at $Q^2=0.23$ GeV$^2$, namely $G_M^s=-0.034 \\pm 0.021$ $\\mu_N$.

  8. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This "missing baryon" puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above ∼5 x 10(13)h(-1)(72)M. This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons.

  9. Spontaneous superfluid current generation in the kaon condensed color flavor locked phase at nonzero strange quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kryjevski, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    We find that for a large enough strange quark mass, m{sub s}{sup 2}/4{mu}{delta}>2/3(1-0.023) ({mu} is the quark number chemical potential, {delta} is the superconducting gap), the kaon condensed color flavor locked (CFL) phase of asymptotically dense strongly interacting 3 flavor quark matter is unstable with respect to spontaneous generation of currents of Nambu Goldstone bosons due to spontaneous breaking of baryon number symmetry and hypercharge symmetry in the CFLK{sup 0} ground state. The total baryon and hypercharge currents vanish in the ground state. We find that CFLK{sup 0} and the new state are separated by a first order phase transition. The result is derived in the mean field approximation of high density effective theory with electromagnetic interactions turned off.

  10. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  11. The status of pentaquark baryons

    SciTech Connect

    V.D. Burkert

    2006-06-01

    The status of the search for peritaquark baryon states is reviewed in light of new results from the first two dedicated experiments from CLAS at Jefferson Lab and of new analyses from several labs on the Theta^+(1540). Evidence for and against the heavier pentaquark states, the Xi(1862) and the Theta^0_c(3100) observed at CERN and at HERA, respectively, are also discussed. I conclude that the evidence against the latter two heavier pentaquark baryons is rapidly increasing making their existence highly questionable. I also conclude that the evidence for the Theta^+ state has significantly eroded with the recent CLAS results, and just leaves room for a possible state with an intrinsic width of Gamma < 0.5 MeV. Preliminary new evidence from various experiments will be discussed as well.

  12. Superqualitons: Baryons in Dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Deog Ki

    QCD predicts matter at high density should exhibit color superconductivity. We review briefly several pertinent properties of color superconductivity and then discuss how baryons are realized in color superconductors. Especially, we explain an attempt to describe the color-flavor locked quark matter in terms of bosonic degrees of freedom, where the gapped quarks and Fermi sea are realized as Skyrmions, called superqualitons, and Q-matter, respectively.

  13. Studies of charmed strange baryons in the Λ D final state at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.; Iijima, T.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hirose, S.; Hou, W.-S.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Niiyama, M.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, H.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yelton, J.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of Ξc(3055 )0, observed by its decay into the final-state Λ D0, and present the first observation and evidence of the decays of Ξc(3055 )+and Ξc(3080)+ into Λ D+. We also perform a combined analysis of the Λ D+ with the Σc++K- and Σc*++K- decay modes to measure the ratios of branching fractions, masses and widths with improved accuracy. We measure the ratios of branching fractions B (Ξc(3055)+→ΛD+)/ B(Ξc(3055)+→Σc++ K-)=5.09±1.01 ±0.76 , B(Ξc(3080)+→ΛD+)/ B(Ξc(3080)+→Σc++ K-)=1.29±0.30 ±0.15 , and B(Ξc(3080)+→Σc*++ K-)/B(Ξc(3080)+→ Σc++K-)=1.07 ±0.27 ±0.04 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. The analysis is performed using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  14. Tree level semileptonic {sigma}{sub b} to nucleon decay in light cone QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Bayar, M.; Sarac, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Using the most general form of the interpolating current of the heavy spin 1/2, {sigma}{sub b} baryon and distribution amplitudes of the nucleon, the transition form factors of the semileptonic {sigma}{sub b}{yields}Nl{nu} decay are calculated in the framework of light-cone QCD sum rules. It is obtained that the form factors satisfy the heavy quark effective theory relations. The obtained results for the related form factors are used to estimate the decay rate of this transition.

  15. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rare modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in our knowledge of fundamental physics. They have revealed to us CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K/sup 0/-anti K/sup 0/ mixing has provided us with one of our most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to our knowledge of fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they may bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, ..mu.. decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given. (WHK)

  16. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon mass is measured using {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} decays reconstructed in 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass is measured to be 2286.46 {+-} 0.14 MeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  17. Baryon-Baryon Interaction in a Chiral-Quark Mean - Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Fernando Javier

    The nontopological soliton solution of a chirally invariant Lagrangian which incorporates the linear (sigma) -model BB84,KR84 is used as a model for Baryons. The nucleon-nucleon interaction is modeled by the interaction of two such solitons. The soliton-soliton interaction is calculated adiabatically by extremizing the energy of the two-soliton system subject to the constraint that the inter-soliton separation is fixed. The fields and wavefunctions are expanded in a two-center harmonic oscillator basis thus permitting essentially arbitrary tri-axial deformations. The hedgehog form is imposed on the spin-isospin wavefunction of the solitons. The isospin (or spin) of the two solitons may be quantized along different directions thus introducing a dependence in the energy on the relative orientation of the quantization axes. This permits the extraction of a low energy effective NN potential by an approximate method. An OBE calculation between identical undeformed solitons shows that the pion form factor is quite soft. It also suggests that the mass ((TURN)550 MeV) of the (sigma) -meson, responsible for intermediate range attraction in the central potential of phenomenological meson-exchange models, is a consequence of the coupling of a heavier (sigma) -meson with lighter pions. The Euler-Lagrange equations for the six-quark system are solved approximately using a variational method. The solutions exhibit a dynamical boundary which divides the NN interaction into two domains, an exterior domain where the solitons maintain their identity and the six-quark system is appropriately described as two distinct solitons, and an interior domain where the system is more appropriately described as a single highly deformed soliton. The boundary occurs sharply for critical inter-soliton separations in the range 0.8 - 0.1 fm. The even parity interior solution and the critical separation are shown to be consistent with the energy independence of the F-matrix at low energy in the

  18. The Architects of Modern Physics & Sigma Pi Sigma Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gary

    2004-10-01

    While the tools of modern physics were being honed throughout the last century, physicist Marsh W. White (no relation) served as the installation officer for over 200 chapters of the physics honor society, Sigma Pi Sigma. Years earlier, though, his 1926 thesis ``The Energy of High Velocity Electrons'' served as a direct test of one of Einstein's most radical 1905 ideas. The ``red books'' of Sigma Pi Sigma, into which all inductees pen their names, include some of the most talented quantum mechanics of the 20th century, such as Edward Teller and George Gamow. In this talk, I will review these and other links between Sigma Pi Sigma and some of the architects of modern physics.

  19. Decay properties of double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-08-05

    We study the semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  20. Towards precision spectroscopy of baryonic resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; Ronchen, Deborah

    2017-01-26

    Recent progress in baryon spectroscopy is reviewed. In a common effort, various groups have analyzed a set of new high-precision polarization observables from ELSA. The Julich-Bonn group has finalized the analysis of pion-induced meson-baryon production, the potoproduction of pions and eta mesons, and (almost) the KΛ final state. Lastly, as data become preciser, statistical aspects in the analysis of excited baryons become increasingly relevant and several advances in this direction are proposed.

  1. Mean field theory of the linear sigma-model: chiral solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.; Ripka, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mean field theory of the chiral invariant sigma-model is outlined. bound states (solitons) of valence quarks are obtained self-consistently using a hedgehog shape for the pion field. A schematic model for the coupled fermion-boson fields is presented. Renormalization is worked out for the fermion one-loop corrections and numerical results presented for the purely scalar-field case. The interpretation of the baryon number of the perturbed vacuum is considered.

  2. Comparison of the extended linear {sigma} model and chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, W.P.; Kubodera, K.; Myhrer, F.

    2005-09-01

    The pion-nucleon-scattering amplitudes are calculated in tree approximation with the use of the extended linear sigma model (ELSM) as well as heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HB{chi}PT), and the nonrelativistic forms of the ELSM results are compared with those of HB{chi}PT. We find that the amplitudes obtained in ELSM do not agree with those derived from the more fundamental effective approach, HB{chi}PT.

  3. Mean field theory of the linear sigma-model: Chiral solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, S.; Ripka, G.

    The mean field theory of the chiral invariant sigma-model is outlined. Bound states (solitons) of valence quarks are obtained self-consistently using a hedgehog shape for the pion field. A schematic model for the coupled fermion-boson fields is presented. Renormalization is worked out for the fermion one-loop corrections and numerical results presented for the purely scalar-field case. The interpretation of the baryon number of the perturbed vacuum is considered.

  4. Mean field theory of the linear sigma-model: Chiral solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.; Ripka, G.

    1984-02-20

    The mean field theory of the chiral invariant sigma-model is outlined. Bound states (solitons) of valence quarks are obtained self-consistently using a hedgehog shape for the pion field. A schematic model for the coupled fermion-boson fields is presented. Renormalization is worked out for the fermion one-loop corrections and numerical results presented for the purely scalar-field case. The interpretation of the baryon number of the perturbed vacuum is considered.

  5. Octet baryon magnetic moments from lattice QCD: Approaching experiment from a three-flavor symmetric point

    DOE PAGES

    Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; ...

    2017-06-23

    We used lattice QCD calculations with background magnetic fields to determine the magnetic moments of the octet baryons. Computations are performed at the physical value of the strange quark mass, and two values of the light quark mass, one corresponding to the SU(3) flavor-symmetric point, where the pion mass is mπ ~ 800 MeV, and the other corresponding to a pion mass mπ ~ 450 MeV. The moments are found to exhibit only mild pion-mass dependence when expressed in terms of appropriately chosen magneton units---the natural baryon magneton. This suggests that simple extrapolations can be used to determine magnetic momentsmore » at the physical point, and extrapolated results are found to agree with experiment within uncertainties. A curious pattern is revealed among the anomalous baryon magnetic moments which is linked to the constituent quark model, however, careful scrutiny exposes additional features. Relations expected to hold in the large-Nc limit of QCD are studied; and, in one case, the quark model prediction is significantly closer to the extracted values than the large-Nc prediction. The magnetically coupled Λ-Σ0 system is treated in detail at the SU(3)F point, with the lattice QCD results comparing favorably with predictions based on SU(3)F symmetry. Our analysis enables the first extraction of the isovector transition magnetic polarizability. The possibility that large magnetic fields stabilize strange matter is explored, but such a scenario is found to be unlikely.« less

  6. Relativistic mean field approximation to baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2005-02-01

    We stress the importance of the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking for understanding the low-energy structure of baryons. The Mean Field Approximation to baryons is formulated, which solves several outstanding paradoxes of the naive quark models, and which allows to compute parton distributions at low virtuality in a consistent way. We explain why this approach to baryons leads to the prediction of relatively light exotic pentaquark baryons, in contrast to the constituent models which do not take seriously the importance of chiral symmetry breaking. We briefly discuss why, to our mind, it is easier to produce exotic pentaquarks at low than at high energies.

  7. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This “missing baryon” puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above . This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  8. Baryon semileptonic decays: the Mexican contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Martinez, Alfonso

    2006-09-25

    We give a detailed account of the techniques to compute radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays developed over the years by Mexican collaborations. We explain how the method works by obtaining an expression for the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of polarized baryons including radiative corrections to order O({alpha}q/{pi}M1), where q is the four-momentum transfer and M1 is the mass of the decaying baryon. From here we compute the totally integrated spin angular asymmetry coefficient of the emitted baryon and compare its value with other results.

  9. Axial-vector form factors for the low lying octet baryons in the chiral quark constituent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2014-10-01

    We have calculated the axial-vector form factors of the low-lying octet baryons (N, Σ, Ξ, and Λ) in the chiral constituent quark model. In particular, we have studied the implications of chiral symmetry breaking and SU(3) symmetry breaking for the singlet (gA0) and nonsinglet (gA3 and gA8) axial-vector coupling constants expressed as combinations of the spin polarizations at zero momentum transfer. The conventional dipole form of parametrization has been used to analyze the Q2 dependence of the axial-vector form factors [GA0(Q2), GA3(Q2), and GA8(Q2)]. The total strange singlet and nonsinglet contents [Gs0(Q2), Gs3(Q2), and Gs8(Q2)] of the nucleon determining the strange quark contribution to the nucleon spin (Δs) have also been discussed.

  10. Momentum distributions of strange and anti-strange quarks in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Chase; Raschko, David; Netzel, Greg

    2013-10-01

    Strangeness in the proton has been confirmed by experiment. We are using the statistical method of Zhang et al., which explained the u - d asymmetry in the proton. We expand the model to include strange quarks, to explain the existence of strangeness in the proton. We used RAMBO in order to create a Bjorken-x distribution for the partons in the proton. We adjusted RAMBO to include the strange quark mass. In order to suppress the transitions to states that include s - s pairs, we calculate energy distributions for the gluons and allow gluons to split into s - s pairs only if the gluon is above the energy threshold of twice the mass of a strange quark. We expand our view to include the meson cloud model, attempting a different approach at explaining strangeness in the proton. After Q2 evolution, we compare our calculations of strangeness probability and S+ (x) to HERMES and ATLAS data, as well as global parton distribution fits. Supported in part by NSF Grants No. 0855656 and 1205686.

  11. Recent results from strangeness in transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Botvina, A. S.; Bleicher, M.

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings we discuss recent developments in the microscopic description of strange particle production in nuclear collisions. We put a special emphasis on the production of hypernuclei at the upcoming FAIR and NICA facilities as well as the deep sub threshold, ϕ and Ξ- production yields measured with the HADES experiment. Employing new resonance decay channels we obtain a satisfactory description of ϕ and Ξ- production in deep sub threshold Ar+KCl reactions. Our results implicate that no new medium effects are required to describe the rare strange particle production data from low energy nuclear collisions.

  12. Characterization of strange attractors as inhomogeneous fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladin, G.; Vulpiani, A.

    1984-09-01

    The geometry of strange attractors of chaotic dynamical systems is investigated analytically within the framework of fractal theory. A set of easily computable exponents which generalize the fractal dimensionality and characterize the inhomogeneity of the fractals of strange attractors is derived, and sample computations are shown. It is pointed out that the fragmentation process described is similar to models of intermittency in fully developed turbulence. The exponents for the sample problems are computed in the same amount of CPU time as the computation of nu by the method of Grassberger and Procaccia (1983) but provide more information; less time is required than for the nu(n) computation of Hentschel and Procaccia (1983).

  13. Electromagnetic signals from bare strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Strange stars with a crystalline color superconducting crust can sustain large shear stresses, supporting torsional oscillations of large amplitude. We consider a simple model of strange star with a bare quark matter surface. When a torsional oscillation is excited, for example by a stellar glitch, the positive charge at the star surface oscillates, with typical kHz frequencies, for a 1km thick crust, to hundreds of Hz, for a 9km thick crust. Higher frequencies, of the order of few GHz, can be reached if the star crust is of the order of few centimeters thick. The estimated emitted power is of the order of 10^{45}{ erg/s}.

  14. Pentaquark spectroscopy: exotic {theta} baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, R.; Giannini, M.M.; Santopinto, E.

    2004-09-13

    We propose a collective stringlike model of q4q-bar pentaquarks with the geometry of an equilateral tetrahedron in which the four quarks are located at the four corners and the antiquark in its center. The nonplanar equilibrium configuration is a consequence of the permutation symmetry of the four quarks. In an application to the spectrum of exotic {theta} baryons, we find that the ground state pentaquark has angular momentum and parity Jp 1/2- and a small magnetic moment of 0.382 {mu}N. The decay width is suppressed by the spatial overlap with the decay products.

  15. BRYNTRN: A baryon transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Chun, Sang Y.; Hong, B. S.; Buck, Warren W.; Lamkin, S. L.; Ganapol, Barry D.; Khan, Ferdous; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an interaction data base and a numerical solution to the transport of baryons through an arbitrary shield material based on a straight ahead approximation of the Boltzmann equation are described. The code is most accurate for continuous energy boundary values, but gives reasonable results for discrete spectra at the boundary using even a relatively coarse energy grid (30 points) and large spatial increments (1 cm in H2O). The resulting computer code is self-contained, efficient and ready to use. The code requires only a very small fraction of the computer resources required for Monte Carlo codes.

  16. Importance of Baryon-Baryon Coupling in Hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.; Carlson, J. A.; Lehman, D. R.

    The Λ N-Σ N coupling in Λ-hypernuclei and ΛΛ-Ξ N coupling in ΛΛ-hypernuclei produce novel physics not observed in the conventional, non-strange sector. Effects of ΛleftrightarrowΣ conversion in ^3_ΛH are reviewed. The role of Λ N-Σ N coupling suppression in the A=4, 5 Λ-hypernuclei due to Pauli blocking is highlighted, and the implications for the structure of ^{10}_ΛB are explored. Suppression of ΛΛ-Ξ N conversion in ^6_ΛΛHe is hypothesized as the reason that the < V_ΛΛ> matrix element is small. Measurement of ^4_ΛΛH is proposed to investigate the full ΛΛ-Ξ N interaction. The implication for ΛΛ analog states is discussed.

  17. Constraint on the growth factor of the cosmic structure from the damping of the baryon acoustic oscillation signature

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Gen; Sato, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Huetsi, Gert

    2009-12-15

    We determine a constraint on the growth factor by measuring the damping of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the matter power spectrum using the Sloan digital sky survey luminous red galaxy sample. We obtain an effective upper limit on {sigma}{sub 8}D{sub 1}(z=0.3) using the damping of the baryon acoustic oscillation signature, where {sigma}{sub 8} is the root mean square overdensity in a sphere of radius 8h{sup -1} Mpc and D{sub 1}(z) is the growth factor at redshift z. The above result assumes that other parameters are fixed and the cosmology is taken to be a spatially flat cold dark matter universe with the cosmological constant.

  18. Strange dibaryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    We review theoretical predictions for the mass spectrum of strange dibaryons, with emphasis on S = /minus/2 states. In a version of the Callen-Klebanov model applied to dibaryons, the lowest-lying configuration is an SU(3) flavor (10*) with J/sup ..pi../ = O/sup +/ and isospin I = 1, in contrast to the six-quark (Q/sup 6/) bag model, which yields the H dibaryon (flavor (1), J/sup ..pi../ = O/sup +/, I = O) as the lowest S = /minus/2 excitation. Possible experimental consequences of this difference level order are discussed. For the H, we discuss formation rates in relativistic heavy ion collisions. For Brookhaven AGS energies (15 GeV/A), we find a rate of order 10/sup /minus/2/ H's per central collision. Since the H is produced in a high multiplicity environment in heavy ion collisions, its detection poses a problem. Several possible detection schemes for the H are investigated. These include studies of weak decays (..sigma../sup minus/p ''vees''), diffractive dissociation (Hp ..-->.. ..lambda lambda..p ..-->.. 3p + 2..pi../sup /minus//) and nuclear fragments with anomalous charge/mass ratios. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Consistent analysis of the [70,1{sup -}] baryon properties in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2011-05-23

    We report on the application of the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD to the description of the properties of non-strange excited baryons belonging to the [70,1{sup -}]-plet. In particular, we present the results of an improved determination of the corresponding mixing angles obtained by performing a simultaneous fit of masses, strong decay widths and e.m. helicity amplitudes. We find {theta}{sub 1} = 0.40(8) and {theta}{sub 3} = 2.81(10). These values are compatible with those determined in previous non-global analyses but have smaller uncertainties.

  20. Consistent analysis of the masses and decays of the [70, 1-] baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2012-04-01

    We apply the 1/Nc expansion of QCD to the description of the properties of the masses and decays of non-strange excited baryons belonging to the [70, 1-]-plet. In particular, we present the results of an improved determination of the corresponding mixing angles obtained by performing a simultaneous fit of these quantities. We find θ1 = 0.40(8) and θ3 = 2.81(10). These values are compatible with those determined in previous non-global analyses but have smaller uncertainties.

  1. QCD phase diagram at finite baryon and isospin chemical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2010-12-01

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is explored for thermal systems with finite baryon- and isospin-chemical potentials, {mu}{sub B} and {mu}{sub iso}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The PNJL model with the scalar-type eight-quark interaction can reproduce lattice QCD data at not only {mu}{sub iso}={mu}{sub B}=0, but also {mu}{sub iso}>0 and {mu}{sub B}=0. In the {mu}{sub iso}-{mu}{sub B}-T space, where T is temperature, the critical endpoint of the chiral phase transition in the {mu}{sub B}-T plane at {mu}{sub iso}=0 moves to the tricritical point of the pion-superfluidity phase transition in the {mu}{sub iso}-T plane at {mu}{sub B}=0 as {mu}{sub iso} increases. The thermodynamics at small T is controlled by {radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{pi}{sup 2}) defined by the chiral and pion condensates, {sigma} and {pi}.

  2. Weak production of strange particles and η mesons off the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Rafi; Athar, M. Sajjad; Simo, I. Ruiz; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2015-10-15

    The strange particle production induced by (anti)neutrino off nucleon has been studied for |ΔS| = 0 and |ΔS| = 1 channels. The reactions those we have considered are for the production of single kaon/antikaon, eta and associated particle production processes. We have developed a microscopical model based on the SU(3) chiral Lagrangian. The basic parameters of the model are f{sub π}, the pion decay constant, Cabibbo angle, the proton and neutron magnetic moments and the axial vector coupling constants for the baryons octet. For antikaon production we have also included Σ*(1385) resonance and for eta production S{sub 11}(1535) and S{sub 11}(1650) resonances are included.

  3. RX J1856.5-3754: A Strange Star with Solid Quark Surface?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Renxin; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2003-01-01

    The featureless spectra of isolated 'neutron stars' may indicate that they are actually bare strange stars but a definitive conclusion on the nature of the compact objects cannot be reached until accurate and theoretically calculated spectra of the bare quark surface are known. However due to the complex nonlinearity of quantum chromodynamics it is almost impossible to present a definitive and accurate calculation of the density-dominated quark-gluon plasma from the first principles. Nevertheless it was suggested that cold quark matter with extremely high baryon density could be in a solid state. Within the realms of this possibility we have fitted the 500ks Chandra LETG/HRC data for the brightest isolated neutron star RX 51856.5-3754 with a phenomenological spectral model and found that electric conductivity of quark matter on the stellar surface is about 1.5 x 10(exp 16)/s.

  4. Color-flavor locked phase of high density QCD at nonzero strange quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kryjevski, Andrei; Yamada, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    We compute free energy of quark matter at asymptotically high baryon number density in the presence of nonzero strange quark mass including dynamics of pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons due to chiral symmetry breaking, extending previously existing analysis based on perturbative expansion in m{sub s}{sup 2}/4{mu}{delta}. We demonstrate that the CFLK{sup 0} state has lower free energy than the symmetric CFL state for 0

  5. Separated Structure Functions for the Exclusive Electroproduction of K+Lambda and K+Sigma0 Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel Ambrozewicz; Daniel Carman; Rob Feuerbach; Mac Mestayer; Brian Raue; Reinhard Schumacher; Avtandil Tkabladze

    2006-11-19

    We report measurements of the exclusive electroproduction of K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} final states from a proton target using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The separated structure functions {sigma}{sub T}, {sigma}{sub L},{sigma}{sub TT}, and {sigma}{sub LT} were extracted from the {Phi}- and {epsilon}-dependent differential cross sections taken with electron beam energies of 2.567, 4.056, and 4.247 GeV. This analysis represents the first {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} separation with the CLAS detector, and the first measurement of the kaon electroproduction structure functions away from parallel kinematics. The data span a broad range of momentum transfers from 0.5 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 2.8 GeV{sup 2} and invariant energy from 1.6 {le} W {le} 2.4 GeV, while spanning nearly the full center-of-mass angular range of the kaon. The separated structure functions reveal clear differences between the production dynamics for the {Lambda} and {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperons. These results provide an unprecedented data sample with which to constrain current and future models for the associated production of strangeness, which will allow for a better understanding of the underlying resonant and non-resonant contributions to hyperon production.

  6. Production and decay of baryonic resonances in pion induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygoda, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Pion induced reactions give unique opportunities for an unambiguous description of baryonic resonances and their coupling channels. A systematic energy scan and high precision data, in conjunction with a partial wave analysis, allow for the study of the excitation function of the various contributions. A review of available world data unravels strong need for modern facilities delivering measurements with a pion beam. Recently, HADES collaboration collected data in pion-induced reactions on light (12C) and heavy (74W) nuclei at a beam momentum of 1.7 GeV/c dedicated to strangeness production. It was followed by a systematic scan at four different pion beam momenta (0.656, 0.69, 0.748 and 0.8 GeV/c) in π- - p reaction in order to tackle the role of N(1520) resonance in conjunction with the intermediate ρ production. First results on exclusive channels with one pion (π- p) and two pions (nπ+π-, pπ-π0) in the final state are discussed.

  7. Observation of the $\\Xi_b^0$ Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-07-01

    The observation of the bottom, strange baryon {Xi}{sup 0}{sub b} through the decay chain {Xi}{sup 0}{sub b} {yields} {Xi}{sup +}{sub c} {pi}{sup -}, where {Xi}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}, is reported using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 ft{sup -1} from p{anti p} collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 1.96 TeV recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal of 25.3{sup +5.6}{sub -5.4} candidates is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 3.6 x 10{sup -12}, corresponding to 6.8 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Xi}{sup 0}{sub b} mass is measured to be 5787.8 {+-} 5.0(stat) {+-} 1.3(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. In addition, the {Xi}{sup -}{sub b} is observed through the process {Xi}{sup -}{sub b} {yields} {Xi}{sup 0}{sub c} {pi}{sup -}, where {Xi}{sup 0}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda} {pi}{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}.

  8. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  9. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  10. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  11. Baryon and lepton violation in astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, E. W.

    The cosmological and astrophysical significance of baryon and lepton number violating process is the subject of this paper. The possibility of baryon-number violating processes in the electroweak transition in the early universe is reviewed. The implications of lepton-number violation via Nambu-Goldstone bosons are discussed in detail.

  12. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-30

    The {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}p, K{sup +}n, {bar K}{sup 0}{Sigma}{sup +}, and {bar K}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0} scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}} = -0.197 {+-} 0.017 fm, and a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}} = -0.098 {+-} 0.017 fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  13. Faddeev equation studies of SU{sub f}(3) baryons spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Cahill, R.T.; Tandy, P.C.

    1995-08-01

    The spectroscopy of baryons composed of u, d and s quarks is being studied using a separable approximation to the quark-quark scattering kernel. As in the studies of mesons, the kernel is obtained by using a separable approximation to invert the DSE for the quark propagator. An initial focus of the study is to analyze the importance of diffuse diquark correlations in baryons and to determine accurately the effective mass and radius of these correlations. This Faddeev equation approach, which employs confined, dressed-quark quasi-particles, is a natural framework within which to calculate the {pi}-N {sigma}-term ({sigma}{sub N}) and preliminary results are in good agreement with the experimentally determined value. This indicates that {sigma}{sub N} is simply and directly related to the shift in the nucleon mass due to the nonzero bare quark masses. The approach also provides a straightforward, microscopic understanding of mass-splittings. The Faddeev amplitudes obtained will form the basis for the calculation of scattering observables such as electromagnetic form factors and Compton scattering.

  14. Baryon symmetric big bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Both the quantum theory and Einsteins theory of special relativity lead to the supposition that matter and antimatter were produced in equal quantities during the big bang. It is noted that local matter/antimatter asymmetries may be reconciled with universal symmetry by assuming (1) a slight imbalance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, annihilation, and a subsequent remainder of matter; (2) localized regions of excess for one or the other type of matter as an initial condition; and (3) an extremely dense, high temperature state with zero net baryon number; i.e., matter/antimatter symmetry. Attention is given to the third assumption, which is the simplest and the most in keeping with current knowledge of the cosmos, especially as pertains the universality of 3 K background radiation. Mechanisms of galaxy formation are discussed, whereby matter and antimatter might have collided and annihilated each other, or have coexisted (and continue to coexist) at vast distances. It is pointed out that baryon symmetric big bang cosmology could probably be proved if an antinucleus could be detected in cosmic radiation.

  15. Sigma receptors and cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been well documented as a protein target for cocaine and have been shown to be involved in the toxic and stimulant actions of cocaine. Strategies to reduce the access of cocaine to sigma receptors have included antisense oligonucleotides to the sigma-1 receptor protein as well as small molecule ligand with affinity for sigma receptor sites. These results have been encouraging as novel protein targets that can attenuate the actions of cocaine are desperately needed as there are currently no medications approved for treatment of cocaine toxicity or addiction. Many years of research in this area have yet to produce an effective treatment and much focus was on dopamine systems. A flurry of research has been carried out to elucidate the role of sigma receptors in the blockade of cocaine effects but this research has yet to yield a clinical agent. This review summarizes the work to date on the linkage of sigma receptors and the actions of cocaine and the progress that has been made with regard to small molecules. Although there is still a lack of an agent in clinical trials with a sigma receptor mechanism of action, work is progressing and the ligands are becoming more selective for sigma systems and the potential remains high.

  16. Manage your human sigma.

    PubMed

    Fleming, John H; Coffman, Curt; Harter, James K

    2005-01-01

    If sales and service organizations are to improve, they must learn to measure and manage the quality of the employee-customer encounter. Quality improvement methodologies such as Six Sigma are extremely useful in manufacturing contexts, but they're less useful when it comes to human interactions. To address this problem, the authors have developed a quality improvement approach they refer to as Human Sigma. It weaves together a consistent method for assessing the employee-customer encounter and a disciplined process for managing and improving it. There are several core principles for measuring and managing the employee-customer encounter: It's important not to think like an economist or an engineer when assessing interactions because emotions inform both sides' judgments and behavior. The employee-customer encounter must be measured and managed locally, because there are enormous variations in quality at the work-group and individual levels. And to improve the quality of the employee-customer interaction, organizations must conduct both short-term, transactional interventions and long-term, transformational ones. Employee engagement and customer engagement are intimately connected--and, taken together, they have an outsized effect on financial performance. They therefore need to be managed holistically. That is, the responsibility for measuring and monitoring the health of employee-customer relationships must reside within a single organizational structure, with an executive champion who has the authority to initiate and manage change. Nevertheless, the local manager remains the single most important factor in local group performance. A local manager whose work group shows suboptimal performance should be encouraged to conduct interventions, such as targeted training, performance reviews, action learning, and individual coaching.

  17. Measurement of neutral strange particle production in the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the production of primary K(S)0 and Lambda particles in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV in the region transverse to the leading charged-particle jet in each event. The average multiplicity and average scalar transverse momentum sum of K(S)0 and Lambda particles measured at pseudorapidities abs(eta) < 2 rise with increasing charged-particle jet pt in the range 1-10 GeV and saturate in the region 10-50 GeV. The rise and saturation of the strange particle yields and transverse momentum sums in the underlying event are similar to those observed for inclusive charged particles, which confirms the impact-parameter picture of multiple parton interactions. The results are compared to recent tunes of the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA simulations underestimate the data by 15-30% for K(S)0 mesons and by about 50% for Lambda baryons, a deficit similar to that observed for the inclusive strange particle production in non-single-diffractive proton-proton collisions. The constant strange- to charged-particle activity ratios and the similar trends for mesons and baryons indicate that the multiparton-interaction dynamics is decoupled from parton hadronization, which occurs at a later stage.

  18. Relating the strangeness content of the nucleon with the mass shift of the ϕ meson in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gubler, Philipp; Ohtani, Keisuke

    2016-01-22

    The behavior of the ϕ meson at finite density is studied, making use of a QCD sum rule approach in combination with the maximum entropy method. It is demonstrated that a possible mass shift of the ϕ in nuclear matter is strongly correlated to the strangeness content of the nucleon, which is proportional to the strange sigma term, σ{sub sN}. In contrast to earlier studies, our results show that, depending on the value of σ{sub sN}, the ϕ meson could receive both a positive or negative mass shift at nuclear matter density. We find that these results depend only weakly on potential modifications of the width of the ϕ meson peak and on assumptions made on the behavior of four-quark condensates at finite density.

  19. Masses of doubly and triply charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ke-Wei; Chen, Bing; Guo, Xin-Heng

    2015-10-01

    Until now, the first reported doubly charmed baryon Ξcc +(3520 ) is still a puzzle. It was discovered and confirmed by SELEX collaboration, but not confirmed by LHCb, BABAR, BELLE, FOCUS, or any other collaboration. In the present paper, by employing Regge phenomenology, we first express the mass of the ground state (L =0 ) doubly charmed baryon Ωcc *+ as a function of masses of the well established light baryons and singly charmed baryons. Inserting the recent experimental data, the mass of Ωcc *+ is given to be 3809 ±36 MeV , which is independent of any unobservable parameters. Then, with the quadratic mass relations, we calculate the masses of the ground state triply charmed baryon Ωcc c ++ and doubly charmed baryons Ξcc (*)++, Ξcc (*)+ , and Ωcc + [the mass of Ξcc + is determined as 3520-40+41 MeV , which agrees with the mass of Ξcc +(3520 ) ]. The isospin splitting MΞcc ++-MΞcc +=0.4 ±0.3 MeV . After that, masses of the orbitally excited (L =1 , 2, 3) doubly and triply charmed baryons are estimated. The results are reasonable comparing with those extracted in many other approaches. We suggest more efforts to study doubly and triply charmed baryons both theoretically and experimentally, not only for the abundance of baryon spectra, but also for numerically examining whether the linear mass relations or the quadratic mass relations are realized in nature. Our predictions are useful for the discovery of unobserved doubly and triply charmed baryon states and the JP assignment of these states.

  20. The mystery of the strange formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Tony

    2016-10-01

    On a recent visit to the Wilhelm Röntgen memorial in Wurzburg, Germany, I noticed two strange trigonometric formulae set in the terrazzo floor at the western entrance to the building that houses Röntgen's X-ray laboratory.

  1. 'Strange money': risk, finance and socialized debt.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Nigel

    2011-03-01

    This paper explores an essential but neglected aspect of recent discussions of the banking and financial system, namely money itself. Specifically, I take up a distinction drawn by Susan Strange which has never been fully elaborated: between a financial system that is global, and an international monetary system that remains largely territorial. I propose a sociological elaboration of this distinction by examining each category, 'finance' and 'money', in terms of its distinctive orientation to risk and debt. Money is distinguished by its high degree of liquidity and low degree of risk, corresponding to expectations that derive from its status as a 'claim upon society'- a form of socialized debt. But as Strange argued, these features of money are being undermined by the proliferation of sophisticated instruments of financial risk management -'strange money'- that, as monetary substitutes, both weaken states' capacity to manage money, and more broadly, contribute to 'overbanking'. The ultimate danger, according to Strange, is the 'death of money'. The paper concludes by exploring the implications of the distinction for sociological arguments about the changing nature of money.

  2. Seismic Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Vigdor

    2004-01-01

    Two decades ago, Witten suggested that the ground state of matter might be material of nuclear density made from up, down and strange quarks. Since then, much effort has gone into exploring astrophysical and other implications of this possibility. For example, neutron stars would almost certainly be strange quark stars; dark matter might be strange quark matter. Searches for stable strange quark matter have been made in various mass ranges, with negative, but not conclusive results. Recently, we [D. Anderson, E. Herrin, V. Teplitz, and I. Tibuleac, Bull. Seis. Soc. of Am. 93, 2363 (2003)] reported a positive result for passage through the Earth of a multi-ton "nugget" of nuclear density in a search of about a million seismic reports, to the U.S. Geological Survey for the years 1990-93, not associated with known Earthquakes. I will present the evidence (timing of first signals to the 9 stations involved, first signal directions, and unique waveform characteristics) for our conclusion and discuss potential improvements that could be obtained from exploiting the seismologically quieter environments of the moon and Mars.

  3. Strangeness chemical equilibration in a quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2007-01-15

    We study, in the dynamically evolving quark-gluon plasma (QGP) fireball formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the growth of strangeness yield toward and beyond the chemical equilibrium. We account for the contribution of the direct strangeness production and evaluate the thermal-QCD strangeness production mechanisms. The specific yield of strangeness per entropy, s/S, is the primary target variable. We explore the effect of collision impact parameter, i.e., fireball size, on kinetic strangeness chemical equilibration in QGP. Insights gained in studying the RHIC data with regard to the dynamics of the fireball are applied to the study of strangeness production at the LHC. We use these results and consider the strange hadron relative particle yields at RHIC and LHC in a systematic fashion. We consider both the dependence on s/S and the direct dependence on the participant number.

  4. Hidden-charm molecular pentaquarks and their charm-strange partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of one-pion-exchange (OPE) model, we study the hidden-charm and charm-strange molecular pentaquark systems composed of a heavy baryon (Σc , Σc*) and a vector meson (Kbar* ,Dbar*), where the S-D mixing effect is considered in our calculation. Our result shows that the ΣcDbar* molecular state with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 3 /2-) and the Σc⁎ Dbar* molecular state with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 5 /2-) exist in the mass range of the observed Pc (4380) and Pc (4450), respectively. Moreover, we predict two other hidden-charm molecular pentaquarks with configurations ΣcDbar* (I = 3 / 2 ,JP = 1 /2-) and Σc* Dbar* (I = 3 / 2 ,JP = 1 /2-) and two charm-strange molecular pentaquarks Pcs (3340) and Pcs (3400) corresponding to the ΣcKbar* configuration with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 3 /2-) and the Σc* Kbar* configuration with (I = 1 / 2 ,JP = 5 /2-), respectively. Additionally, we also predict some hidden-bottom Σb(*)/SUP>B* and Bc-like Σc(*)/SUP>B* /Σb(*)/SUP>Dbar* pentaquarks.

  5. Simple estimates of the masses of pentaquarks with hidden beauty or strangeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir; Potashnikova, Irina

    2016-04-01

    The masses of cryptoexotic pentaquarks with hidden beauty are estimated phenomenologically using the results by the LHCb Collaboration which discovered recently the cryptoexotic pentaquarks with hidden charm. The expected masses of the hidden beauty pentaquarks are about 10.8 GeV and 10.7 GeV in the limit of some kind of heavy quark symmetry. The states with hidden strangeness considered in a similar way have masses of about 2.37 GeV and 2.30 GeV, several hundred MeV higher than states discussed previously in connection with the relatively light positive strangeness pentaquark θ+. Empirical data on the spectra of pentaquarks can be used to get information about quarkonia interaction with nucleons. The results obtained for the case of heavy flavors are in fair agreement with the model of isospin (pion) exchange between flavored baryons and antiflavored vector mesons proposed by Karliner and Rosner, and in qualitative agreement with the bound-state version of the chiral soliton model.

  6. Strangeness production in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aid, S.; Anderson, M.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Babaev, A.; Bähr, J.; Bán, J.; Ban, Y.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Barschke, R.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bispham, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Burton, M. J.; Calvet, D.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charlet, M.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Cocks, S.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davis, C. L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Delcourt, B.; Di Nezza, P.; Dirkmann, M.; Dixon, P.; Dlugosz, W.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, A.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Fahr, A. B.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieseer, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gaede, F.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Glazov, A.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Gorelov, I.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Griffiths, R. K.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Haiduk, L.; Hampel, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. M.; Henschel, H.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hewitt, K.; Hildesheim, W.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Holtom, T.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Hütte, M.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kander, M.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kaufmann, O.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Köhler, T.; Köhne, J. H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Lacour, D.; Laforge, B.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langenegger, U.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Lehner, F.; Levonian, S.; Lindström, G.; Lindstroem, M.; Link, J.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Lomas, J. W.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, G.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.-O.; Megliori, A.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moeck, J.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, D.; Müller, G.; Müller, M.; Müller, M.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Négri, I.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Niggli, H.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oakden, M.; Oberlack, H.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Palmen, P.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pawletta, H.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pieuchot, A.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Rabbertz, K.; Rädel, G.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riepenhausen, F.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleif, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Specka, A.; Spiekermann, J.; Spielman, S.; Spitzer, H.; Squinabol, F.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Steiner, H.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stößlein, U.; Stolze, K.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taševský, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Theissen, J.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vandenplas, D.; Vazdik, Y.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walther, A.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; West, L. R.; Wilksen, T.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wittek, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zini, P.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; Zuber, K.; zurNedden, M.; H1 Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Measurements of K0 meson and Λ baryon production in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering (DIS) are presented in the kinematic range 10 < Q2 < 70 GeV 2 and 10 -4 < x < 10 -2. The measurements, obtained using the H1 detector at the HEPA collider, are discussed in the light of possible mechanisms for increased strangeness production at low Bjorken- x. Comparisons of the xF spectra, where xF is the fractional longitudinal momentum in the hadronic centre-of-mass frame, are made with results from electron-positron annihilation. The xF spectra and the K0 "seagull" plot are compared with previous DIS results. The mean K0 and Λ multiplicities are studied as a function of the centre-of-mass energy W and are observed to be consistent with a logarithmic increase with W when compared with previous measurements. A comparison of strangeness production in diffractive and non-diffractive DIS is made. An upper limit of 0.9 nb, at the 95% confidence level, is placed on the cross section for QCD instanton induced events.

  7. Extraction of the photon beam asymmetry Sigma in pi 0 photoproduction off the proton using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Nathan Andrew

    The CBELSA/TAPS experiment at the electron accelerator ELSA, in Bonn, Germany, was used in order to study the photoproduction of neutral pions off the proton with a linearly polarized photon beam; Neutral pions were reconstructed through their dominant decay mode into two photons. The photons were detected in a barrel/forward electromagnetic calorimeter system which covered 99% of the 4pi solid angle. The Crystal Barrel CsI(Tl) calorimeter detected photons at polar angles from 30° to 168°, while TAPS, a BaF2 spectrometer, covered forward polar angles from 5.8° to 30° and served as a fast trigger; Both calorimeters had complete azimuthal angular coverage. Coherent bremsstrahlung of electrons in a diamond radiator was used to produce a linearly polarized beam of photons with a coherent peak at 1305 or 1610 MeV. The analysis of these two datasets allowed for the measurement of the photon beam asymmetry in the beam photon energy range of 920 to 1680 MeV. For the first time, these results cover the very forward polar angles of the neutral pion. The measurements are compared to the SAID, MAID, and BnGa models and to previous measurements. These new measurements of the photon beam asymmetry contribute to the ongoing experimentally-driven exploration of the N and Delta resonances. The study of strange baryons provides a link between the strong interaction physics of the excited nucleons and the heavy flavor baryons. The upcoming GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab is expected to provide an opportunity to examine strange baryons in much greater detail than ever before. GEANT-based Monte Carlo simulations of Cascade baryons at the GlueX experiment were conducted in order to better understand the capabilities of this experiment. A proposal, "An initial study of mesons and baryons containing strange quarks with GlueX", was submitted to the 40th Jefferson Lab Program Advisory Committee (PAC), in part, supported by these Cascade baryon simulations. 200 days of additional beam

  8. Light baryons and their excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios

    2016-11-01

    We study ground states and excitations of light octet and decuplet baryons within the framework of Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev equations. We improve upon similar approaches by explicitly taking into account the momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. We perform calculations in both the three-body Faddeev framework and the quark-diquark approximation in order to assess the impact of the latter on the spectrum. Our results indicate that both approaches agree well with each other. The resulting spectra furthermore agree one-to-one with experiment, provided well-known deficiencies of the rainbow-ladder approximation are compensated for. We also discuss the mass evolution of the Roper and the excited Δ with varying pion mass and analyze the internal structure in terms of their partial wave decompositions.

  9. Baryon-meson mass inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Nussinov, S.

    1983-12-05

    It is suggested that the inequality m/sub B/>(3/2)m/sub M/ is a rigorous result in quantum chromodynamics. The analog for a (q/sub 1/. . .q/sub N/) baryon in SU(N) is m/sub B/>((1/2)N)m/sub M/. The inequality is proved for weak coupling and a version of the strong-coupling expansion where a separation H/sub q//sub 1/q/sub 2/q/sub 3/ = H/sub 12/+H/sub 23/+H/sub 31/ of the problem can be achieved. Implications for quantum chromodynamics and composite models are briefly discussed.

  10. Six sigma for revenue retrieval.

    PubMed

    Plonien, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Deficiencies in revenue retrieval due to failures in obtaining charges have contributed to a negative bottom line for numerous hospitals. Improving documentation practices through a Six Sigma process improvement initiative can minimize opportunities for errors through reviews and instill structure for compliance and consistency. Commitment to the Six Sigma principles with continuous monitoring of outcomes and constant communication of results to departments, management, and payers is a strong approach to reducing the financial impact of denials on an organization's revenues and expenses. Using Six Sigma tools can help improve the organization's financial performance not only for today, but also for health care's uncertain future.

  11. Properties of Weakly-decaying Bottom Baryons, Xi_b^- and Omega_b^-, at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Behari, Satyajit; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2009-10-01

    We present properties of weakly decaying bottom baryons, {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeVf, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They report the observation of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}. Significance of the observed signal is estimated to be 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass and lifetime are measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst). ps, respectively. In addition, the mass and lifetime of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon are measured to be 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps, respectively. Under the assumption that the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} are produced with similar kinematic distributions as the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, we measure {sigma}({Xi}{sub b}{sup -}){Beta}({Xi}{sub b}{sup -}) {yields} J/{psi}({Xi}{sup -})/{sigma}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}){Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} {Lambda}) = 0.167{sub -0.025}{sup +0.037}(stat.) {+-} 0.012(syst.) and {sigma}({omega}{sub b}{sup -}){Beta}({Omega}{sub b}{sup -} J/{psi} {Omega}{sup -})/{sigma}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}){Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) {yields} J/{psi} {Lambda} = 0.045{sub 0.012}{sup +0.017}(stat.) {+-} 0.004(syst.) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20 GeV/c.

  12. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    SciTech Connect

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-09-19

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15%. Finally, we find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  13. More About the Light Baryon Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the light baryon spectrum obtained from a recent quark-diquark calculation, implementing non-pointlike diquarks that are self-consistently calculated from their Bethe-Salpeter equations. We examine the orbital angular momentum content in the baryons' rest frame and highlight the fact that baryons carry all possible values of L compatible with their spin, without the restriction P=(-1)^L which is only valid nonrelativistically. We furthermore investigate the meaning of complex conjugate eigenvalues of Bethe-Salpeter equations, their possible connection with `anomalous' states, and we propose a method to eliminate them from the spectrum.

  14. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15%. We find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  15. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  16. Magnetic Moments of Delta and Omega- baryons with dynamical clover fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, Christopher; Orginos, Konstantinos; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole moment of the Delta(1232) and Omega- baryons with 2+1-flavors of clover fermions on anisotropic lattices using a background magnetic field. This is the first dynamical calculation of these magnetic moments using a background field technique. The calculation for Omega- is done at the physical strange quark mass, with the result in units of the physical nuclear magneton µ_(Omega-) = -1.93(8)(12) (where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic) compared to the experimental number: -2.02(5). The Delta has been studied at three unphysical quark masses, corresponding to pion mass 366, 438, and 548 MeV. The pion-mass dependence is compared with the behavior obtained from chiral effective-field theory.

  17. Phenomenology of strangeness production at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasser Tawfik, Abdel; Yassin, Hayam; Abo Elyazeed, Eman R.; Maher, Muhammad; Magied Diab, Abdel; Abdel Wahab, Magda; Abou El Dahab, Eiman

    2016-12-01

    The strange-quark occupation factor (γ_s) is determined from the statistical fit of the multiplicity ratio {K}^+/π+ in a wide range of nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies (\\sqrt{sNN} ). From this single-strange-quark subsystem, γ_s(\\sqrt{sNN}) was parametrized as a damped trigonometric functionality and successfully implemented into the hadron resonance gas model, at chemical semi-equilibrium. Various particle ratios including {K}^-/ π- , Λ/π- , and \\barΛ/π- are well reproduced. The phenomenology of γ_s(\\sqrt{sNN}) suggests that the hadrons (γs rises) at \\sqrt{sNN} ≃ 7 \\text{GeV} seem to undergo a phase transition to a mixed phase (γs decreases), which is then derived into partons (γs remains unchanged with increasing \\sqrt{sNN} ), at \\sqrt{sNN} ≃ 20 \\text{GeV} .

  18. Analytical signal analysis of strange nonchaotic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kopal; Prasad, Awadhesh; Singh, Harinder P; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2008-04-01

    We apply an analytical signal analysis to strange nonchaotic dynamics. Through this technique it is possible to obtain the spectrum of instantaneous intrinsic mode frequencies that are present in a given signal. We find that the second-mode frequency and its variance are good order parameters for dynamical transitions from quasiperiodic tori to strange nonchaotic attractors (SNAs) and from SNAs to chaotic attractors. Phase fluctuation analysis shows that SNAs and chaotic attractors behave identically within short time windows as a consequence of local instabilities in the dynamics. In longer time windows, however, the globally stable character of SNAs becomes apparent. This methodology can be of great utility in the analysis of experimental time series, and representative applications are made to signals obtained from Rössler and Duffing oscillators.

  19. Maximum mass of neutron stars and strange neutron-star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunik, J. L.; Haensel, P.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The recent measurement of mass of PSR J1614-2230 rules out most existing models of the equation of state (EOS) of dense matter with high-density softening due to hyperonization that were based on the recent hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon interactions, which leads to a "hyperon puzzle". Aims: We study a specific solution of this hyperon puzzle that consists of replacing a too soft hyperon core by a sufficiently stiff quark core. In terms of the quark structure of the matter, one replaces a strangeness-carrying baryon phase of confined quark triplets, some of them involving s quarks, by a quark plasma of deconfined u, d, and s quarks. Methods: We constructed an analytic approximation that fits modern EOSs of the two flavor (2SC) and the color-flavor-locked (CFL) color-superconducting phases of quark matter very well. Then, we used it to generate a continuum of EOSs of quark matter. This allowed us to simulate continua of sequences of first-order phase transitions at prescribed pressures, from hadronic matter to the 2SC and then to the CFL state of color-superconducting quark matter. Results: We obtain constraints in the parameter space of the EOS of superconducting quark cores, EOS.Q, resulting from Mmax > 2 M⊙. These constraints depend on the assumed EOS of baryon phase, EOS.B. We also derive constraints that would result from significantly higher measured masses. For 2.4 M⊙ the required stiffness of the CFL quark core is close to the causality limit while the density jump at the phase transition is very small. Conclusions: The condition Mmax > 2 M⊙ puts strong constraints on the EOSs of the 2SC and CFL phases of quark matter. Density jumps at the phase transitions have to be sufficiently small and sound speeds in quark matter sufficiently large. The condition of thermodynamic stability of the quark phase results in a maximum mass of hybrid stars similar to that of purely baryon stars. This is due to the phase transition of quark matter back to

  20. Parity partners in the baryon resonance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ya; Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D.; Segovia, Jorge; Xu, Shu-Sheng; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-07-01

    We describe a calculation of the spectrum of flavor-SU(3 ) octet and decuplet baryons, their parity partners, and the radial excitations of these systems, made using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector × vector contact interaction as the foundation for the relevant few-body equations. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking generates nonpointlike diquarks within these baryons and hence, using the contact interaction, flavor-antitriplet scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and flavor-sextet axial-vector quark-quark correlations can all play active roles. The model yields reasonable masses for all systems studied and Faddeev amplitudes for ground states and associated parity partners that sketch a realistic picture of their internal structure: ground-state, even-parity baryons are constituted, almost exclusively, from like-parity diquark correlations, but orbital angular momentum plays an important role in the rest-frame wave functions of odd-parity baryons, whose Faddeev amplitudes are dominated by odd-parity diquarks.

  1. Large Halos of Missing Baryons Around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel

    2009-10-01

    If galaxies had the cosmological baryon-to-dark matter ratio, they would have 3-30 times their observed baryon mass. These missing baryons are undetected, but some fraction may surround a galaxy with a hot diffuse halo extending to R_virial (250 kpc). A loosely bound gaseous halo could be stripped in a cluster or group environment, but should be relatively undisturbed around isolated late-type spirals. Existing observations of spirals are mainly of nearby systems, where only the inner parts fit in a field of view so a halo on the scale of R_virial would pass unnoticed. To detect or place limits on a large halo of missing baryons, we propose to observe isolated L* spirals sufficiently distant that we can detect emission to at least R_virial.

  2. PWA prospects for K+Lambda and K+Sigma^0 photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Biplab Dey, Michael E. McCracken, Curtis A. Meyer

    2012-04-01

    We present a status update on the CMU group PWA efforts in the strangeness (K{sup +}{Lambda}/K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0}) sector. The bulk of the currently available data comes from recently published CLAS g11a results, with extensive polarization data expected soon from the CLAS g8 and g9 set of experiments. We give a brief description of issues pertaining to different sign conventions for the polarization observables in the literature, and normalization discrepancies between the CLAS-g11a results and older high energy data from SLAC/CEA/DESY that used an untagged photon beam.

  3. The PANDA physics program: Strangeness and more

    SciTech Connect

    Iazzi, Felice; Collaboration: PANDA Collaboration

    2016-06-21

    The physics program of the PANDA experiment at FAIR is illustrated, with a particular attention to the planned activity in the field of the doubly strange systems. The investigation of these systems can help, among others, to shed light on the role of the hyperons in the composition of the neutron stars. The great advantages that can be reached in the field of the charmed systems and nucleon structure by using high quality and intense antiproton beams are also recalled.

  4. Calculation of the dimension of strange attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinetskii, G. G.; Potapov, A. B.

    1988-07-01

    Algorithms for calculating the dimension of strange attractors of dynamic systems are presented. Algorithms proposed for calculating the capacity, information dimension, and correlation index make it possible to reduce the amount of computations and the memory size. Calculations of the dimension of a Kantor set and a Feigenbaum attractor are considered as tests. Examples of calculations of the dimension of attractors of certain systems of ordinary differential equations are also considered.

  5. SEARCH FOR NUCLEI CONTAINING TWO STRANGE QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MAY,M.

    1997-10-13

    This paper discusses a search for nuclei containing two strange quarks performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The goals and approach of experiment E885 are reviewed. Preliminary missing mass spectra for a subset of the data are presented, showing sensitivity for {Xi} hypernuclei and H particle searches. Existence of an angular correlation between pions in the sequential decay of {Lambda}{Lambda} hypernuclei is suggested on theoretical grounds.

  6. Meson and baryon spectroscopy on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  7. Charmed-strange mesons revisited: Mass spectra and strong decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qin-Tao; Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by the present experimental status of charmed-strange mesons, we perform a systematic study of the charmed-strange meson family in which we calculate the mass spectra of the charmed-strange meson family by taking a screening effect into account in the Godfrey-Isgur model and investigate the corresponding strong decays via the quark pair creation model. These phenomenological analyses of charmed-strange mesons not only shed light on the features of the observed charmed-strange states, but also provide important information on future experimental search for the missing higher radial and orbital excitations in the charmed-strange meson family, which will be a valuable task in LHCb, the forthcoming Belle II, and PANDA.

  8. Spin and flavor strange quark content of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Dahiya, Harleen; Gupta, Manmohan

    2008-07-01

    Several spin and flavor dependent parameters characterizing the strangeness content of the nucleon have been calculated in the chiral constituent quark model with configuration mixing ({chi}CQM{sub config}) which is known to provide a satisfactory explanation of the ''proton spin crisis'' and related issues. In particular, we have calculated the strange spin polarization {delta}s, the strangeness contribution to the weak axial vector couplings {delta}{sub 8} etc., strangeness contribution to the magnetic moments {mu}(p){sup s} etc., the strange quark flavor fraction f{sub s}, the strangeness dependent quark flavor ratios (2s/u+d) and (2s/u+d) etc. Our results are consistent with the recent experimental observations.

  9. Two- and quasi-two-body strange particle final state production in. pi. /sup +/p interactions at low to intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.

    1982-10-01

    The two and quasi-two body final states ..sigma../sup +/K/sup +/, ..sigma../sup +/K* (892)/sup +/, ..sigma..*(1385)/sup +/K/sup +/, ..sigma..(1385)/sup +/K*(892)/sup +/ produced by neutral strangeness exchange in ..pi../sup +/p interactions are studied using our own 1-3 GeV/c data, comprising the 14 incident momenta of a two million picture bubble chamber experiment, in combination with the world data on the same and related channels. Because low energy resonance formation is not strongly coupled to the ..sigma..,..sigma..* production channels, at very modest incident momenta their dominant features are seen to be understandable in terms of high energy hypercharge exchange phenomenology. We find that Regge models fitted to data in the 10 to 20 GeV/c range adequately describe the ..sigma.. and ..sigma..* channels down to within a few hundred MeV/c of threshold and out to large center of mass scattering angles, and that over the range of the available world data weak exchange degeneracy expectations for these reactions are at least qualitatively successful. We observe that the SU(2), SU(3) flavor symmetries successfully describe these hypercharge exchange processes and relate them to charge exchange via sum rules and equalities expressing flavor independence of the strong interaction; in particular, we derive and test on the available world data a mass broken SU(3) sum rule for ..pi../sup +/p ..-->.. K/sup +/..sigma../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup 0/..lambda.., K/sup -/p ..-->.. anti K/sup 0/n and test over a wider range of momenta than before an earlier expression relating ..sigma..* and ..delta.. production. We also find at least qualitative agreement between quark model predictions for forward hypercharge exchange and the data, and we find that 90/sup 0/ hypercharge exchange cross sections also conform to the expectations of the quark constituent picture for hadrons.

  10. Running Head: Implementing Six Sigma Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Jamie Eleaitia Mae

    2005-01-01

    Six Sigma is an organization wide program that provides common set of goals, language, and methodology for improving the overall quality of the processes within the organization (Davis & Heineke 2004). Six Sigma main concern is for the customer. What will the customers want? Need? Six Sigma has a model that helps Sigma get implemented DMAIC model…

  11. Strangeness production in antiproton annihilation on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugnon, J.; Deneye, P.; Vandermeulen, J.

    1990-04-01

    The strangeness production in antiproton annihilation on nuclei is investigated by means of a cascade-type model, within the frame of the conventional picture of the annihilation on a single nucleon followed by subsequent rescattering proceeding in the hadronic phase. The following hadrons are introduced: N, Λ, Σ, Λ¯, π, η, ω, K, and K¯ and, as far as possible, the experimental reaction cross sections are used in our simulation. The numerical results are compared with experimental data up to 4 GeV/c. The Λ¯ yield is correctly reproduced, while the Λ and Ks yields are overestimated in the p¯Ta and p¯Ne cases. On the other hand, the rapidity and perpendicular momentum distributions are well reproduced. It is shown that total strange yield is not very much affected by the associated production taking place during the rescattering process. It is also shown that the Λ/Ks ratio is largely due to the strangeness exchange reactions induced by antikaons. In particular, values of the order of 1 to 3 are expected in the energy range investigated here, independently of the detail of the hadronic phase dynamics. Finally, it is stressed that rapidity distributions are consistent with the rescattering process. Comparison with other works and implications of our results are examined.

  12. The electromagnetic Sigma-to-Lambda hyperon transition form factors at low energies

    DOE PAGES

    Granados, Carlos; Leupold, Stefan; Perotti, Elisabetta

    2017-06-09

    Using dispersion theory the low-energy electromagnetic form factors for the transition of a Sigma to a Lambda hyperon are related to the pion vector form factor. The additionally required input, i.e. the two-pion-Sigma-Lambda amplitudes are determined from relativistic next-to-leading-order (NLO) baryon chiral perturbation theory including the baryons from the octet and optionally from the decuplet. Pion rescattering is again taken into account by dispersion theory. It turns out that the inclusion of decuplet baryons is not an option but a necessity to obtain reasonable results. The electric transition form factor remains very small in the whole low-energy region. The magneticmore » transition form factor depends strongly on one not very well determined low-energy constant of the NLO Lagrangian. Furthermore, one obtains reasonable predictive power if this low-energy constant is determined from a measurement of the magnetic transition radius. Such a measurement can be performed at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR).« less

  13. The electromagnetic Sigma-to-Lambda hyperon transition form factors at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Carlos; Leupold, Stefan; Perotti, Elisabetta

    2017-06-01

    Using dispersion theory the low-energy electromagnetic form factors for the transition of a Sigma to a Lambda hyperon are related to the pion vector form factor. The additionally required input, i.e. the two-pion-Sigma-Lambda amplitudes are determined from relativistic next-to-leading-order (NLO) baryon chiral perturbation theory including the baryons from the octet and optionally from the decuplet. Pion rescattering is again taken into account by dispersion theory. It turns out that the inclusion of decuplet baryons is not an option but a necessity to obtain reasonable results. The electric transition form factor remains very small in the whole low-energy region. The magnetic transition form factor depends strongly on one not very well determined low-energy constant of the NLO Lagrangian. One obtains reasonable predictive power if this low-energy constant is determined from a measurement of the magnetic transition radius. Such a measurement can be performed at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR).

  14. The baryon content of the Cosmic Web

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Big-Bang nucleosynthesis indicates that baryons account for 5% of the Universe’s total energy content[1]. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two[2,3]. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not yet condensed into virialised halos, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web: a low-density plasma at temperature 105–107 K known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM)[3,4,5,6]. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars[7,8,9,10] and hot gas between interacting clusters[11,12,13,14]. These observations were however unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of ten-million-degree gas associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster[15] were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we reveal hot gas structures that are coherent over 8 Mpc scales. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10% of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. PMID:26632589

  15. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  16. The baryonic mass function of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Read, J I; Trentham, Neil

    2005-12-15

    In the Big Bang about 5% of the mass that was created was in the form of normal baryonic matter (neutrons and protons). Of this about 10% ended up in galaxies in the form of stars or of gas (that can be in molecules, can be atomic, or can be ionized). In this work, we measure the baryonic mass function of galaxies, which describes how the baryonic mass is distributed within galaxies of different types (e.g. spiral or elliptical) and of different sizes. This can provide useful constraints on our current cosmology, convolved with our understanding of how galaxies form. This work relies on various large astronomical surveys, e.g. the optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (to observe stars) and the HIPASS radio survey (to observe atomic gas). We then perform an integral over our mass function to determine the cosmological density of baryons in galaxies: Omega(b,gal)=0.0035. Most of these baryons are in stars: Omega(*)=0.0028. Only about 20% are in gas. The error on the quantities, as determined from the range obtained between different methods, is ca 10%; systematic errors may be much larger. Most (ca 90%) of the baryons in the Universe are not in galaxies. They probably exist in a warm/hot intergalactic medium. Searching for direct observational evidence and deeper theoretical understanding for this will form one of the major challenges for astronomy in the next decade.

  17. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  18. Spin-flavor composition of excited baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Ishara; Goity, Jose

    2015-10-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1 /Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU (6) × O (3) , where the [ 56 ,lP =0+ ] ground state and excited baryons, and the [ 56 ,2+ ] and [ 70 ,1- ] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to O 1 /Nc and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. Predictions for physically unknown states for each multiplet are obtained. From the quark-mass dependence of the coefficients in the baryon mass formulas an increasingly simpler picture of the spin-flavor composition of the baryons is observed with increasing pion mass (equivalently, increasing mu , d masses), as measured by the number of significant mass operators. This work was supported in part by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177 under which JSA operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J. L. G.), and by the NSF (USA) through Grant PHY-0855789 and PHY-1307413 (I. P. F and J. L. G).

  19. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  20. Strange quark contribution to the nucleon form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baunack, S.

    PoS(Confinement8)078 According to QCD, the nucleon is made up of valence quarks, sea quarks and gluons. Concern- ing the quark sea, also strange quarks can contribute to the nucleon properties. Parity violating electron scattering offers a tool to investigate the strange quark contribution to the nucleon form factors parameterized by the strange form factors GE and Gs . The theoretical framework to ac- s M cess these strange form factors is outlined here and an overview of the existing world data is given. The measurements performed by the A4 collaboration at the electron accelerator facility MAMI are described here in more details and preliminary results are reported.

  1. Subdiffusion due to strange nonchaotic dynamics: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takahito

    2011-06-01

    We numerically investigate diffusion phenomena in quasiperiodically forced systems with spatially periodic potentials using a lift of the quasiperiodically forced circle map and a quasiperiodically forced damped pendulum. These systems exhibit several types of dynamics: quasiperiodic, strange nonchaotic, and chaotic. The strange nonchaotic and chaotic dynamics induce deterministic diffusion of orbits. The diffusion type gradually changes from logarithmic to subdiffusive within a strange nonchaotic regime and finally becomes normal in a chaotic regime. Fractal time-series analysis shows that the subdiffusion is caused by the antipersistence property of strange nonchaotic motion.

  2. Disentanglement of Electromagnetic Baryon Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadasivan, Daniel; Doring, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Through recent advances in experimental techniques, the precise extraction of the spectrum of baryonic resonances and their properties becomes possible. Helicity couplings at the resonance pole are fundamental parameters describing the electromagnetic properties of resonances and enabling the comparison of theoretical models with data. We have extracted them from experiments carried out at Jefferson Lab and other facilities using a multipole analysis within the Julich-Bonn framework. Special attention has been paid to the uncertainties and correlations of helicity couplings. Using the world data on the reaction γp -> ηp , we have calculated, for the first time, the covariance matrix. Our results are useful in several ways. They quantify uncertainties but also correlations of helicity couplings. Second, they can tell us quantitatively how useful a given polarization measurement is. Third, they can tell us how the measurement of a new observable would constrain and disentangle the resonance properties which could be helpful in the design of new experiments. Finally, on the subject of the missing resonance problem, model selection techniques and statistical tests allow us to quantify the significance of whether a resonance exists. Supported by NSF CAREER Grant No. PHY-1452055, NSF PIF Grant No. 1415459, by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC05-06OR23177, and by Research Center Julich through the HPC grant jikp07.

  3. New sum rule determination of the nucleon mass and strangeness content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrallah, N. F.; Schilcher, K.

    2014-04-01

    A new QCD calculation of the mass of the nucleon is presented. It makes use of a polynomial kernel in the dispersion integrals tailored to practically eliminate the contribution of the unknown 1/2+ and 1/2- continuum. This approach avoids the arbitrariness and instability attached to the Borel kernel used in previous sum rules calculations. Our method yields stable results for the nucleon mass and coupling for standard values of the condensates. The prediction of the nucleon mass in the chiral limit is mN=(830±50) MeV. When the nucleon sigma terms are added this gives MN=990±50 MeV, which leaves little room for a large strangeness content of the nucleon.

  4. The REFLEX galaxy cluster survey. VII. Omegam and sigma8 from cluster abundance and large-scale clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuecker, P.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C. A.; Guzzo, L.

    2003-02-01

    For the first time the large-scale clustering and the mean abundance of galaxy clusters are analysed simultaneously to get precise constraints on the normalized cosmic matter density Omegam and the linear theory RMS fluctuations in mass sigma8 . A self-consistent likelihood analysis is described which combines, in a natural and optimal manner, a battery of sensitive cosmological tests where observational data are represented by the (Karhunen-Loéve) eigenvectors of the sample correlation matrix. This method breaks the degeneracy between Omegam and sigma8. The cosmological tests are performed with the ROSAT ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX) cluster sample. The computations assume cosmologically flat geometries and a non-evolving cluster population mainly over the redshift range 0sigma random errors of Omegam = 0.341 +0.031-0.029 and sigma8 = 0.711 +0.039-0.031. Possible systematic errors are evaluated by estimating the effects of uncertainties in the value of the Hubble constant, the baryon density, the spectral slope of the initial scalar fluctuations, the mass/X-ray luminosity relation and its intrinsic scatter, the biasing scheme, and the cluster mass density profile. All these contributions sum up to total systematic errors of sigmaOmega_m=+0.087-0.071 and sigma sigma_8 =+0.120-0.162.

  5. Radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays with the emission of a polarized baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, R.

    2010-07-29

    We present an overview of the calculation of radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. We discuss both charged and neutral decaying baryons, restricted to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Our analysis is specialized to cover two possible scenarios: The center-of-mass frames of the emitted and the decaying baryons. We have accounted for terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum-transfer and M{sup 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  6. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.

    In our best current understanding of the growth of structure in the Universe, visibly complex distributions of gas and stars form and evolve into a wide range of galaxies inside overdensities of dark matter. Re-creating the observed diversity in the organization of baryonic mass within dark matter halos represents a key challenge for galaxy formation models. In this dissertation, I constrain the distribution of baryonic and non-baryonic matter in a statistically representative sample of 44 nearby galaxies defined from the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science (EDGES) survey to address the growth of galaxy disks in dark matter halos. I trace the gravitational potentials of each galaxy using rotation curves derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations of neutral hydrogen (HI). The measured rotation curves are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6 mum images for the stellar content, the HI observations for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. The HI kinematics are supplemented with optical integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations to measure the central ionized gas kinematics in 26 galaxies. Distributions of baryonic-to-total mass ratios are determined from the rotation curve decompositions under different assumptions about the contribution of the stellar component, and are compared to global and radial properties of the dominant stellar populations extracted from optical and near-infrared photometry. Galaxies are grouped into clusters of similar baryonic-to-total mass distributions to examine whether they also exhibit similar star and gas properties. The radial distribution of baryonic-to-total mass in a galaxy does not appear to correlate with any characteristics of its star formation history. This result encapsulates the challenge facing simulations to create galaxies which evolve with different star formation histories but similar

  7. STRANGE GOINGS ON IN QUARK MATTER.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFER,T.

    2001-06-05

    We review recent work on how the superfluid state of three flavor quark matter is affected by non-zero quark masses and chemical potentials. The study of hadronic matter at high baryon density has recently attracted a lot of interest. At zero baryon density chiral symmetry is broken by a quark-anti-quark condensate. At high density condensation in the quark-anti-quark channel is suppressed. Instead, attractive interactions in the color anti-symmetric quark-quark channel favor the formation of diquark condensates. As a consequence, cold dense quark matter is expected to be a color superconductor. The symmetry breaking pattern depends on the density, the number of quark flavors, and their masses. A particularly symmetric phase is the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of three flavor quark matter. This phase is believed to be the true ground state of ordinary matter at very large density.

  8. Phases and approximations of baryonic popcorn in a low-dimensional analogue of holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot-Ripley, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    The Sakai-Sugimoto model is the most pre-eminent model of holographic QCD, in which baryons correspond to topological solitons in a five-dimensional bulk spacetime. Recently it has been shown that a single soliton in this model can be well approximated by a flat-space self-dual Yang-Mills instanton with a small size, although studies of multi-solitons and solitons at finite density are currently beyond numerical computations. A lower-dimensional analogue of the model has also been studied in which the Sakai-Sugimoto soliton is replaced by a baby Skyrmion in three spacetime dimensions with a warped metric. The lower dimensionality of this model means that full numerical field calculations are possible, and static multi-solitons and solitons at finite density were both investigated, in particular the baryonic popcorn phase transitions at high densities. Here we present and investigate an alternative lower-dimensional analogue of the Sakai-Sugimoto model in which the Sakai-Sugimoto soliton is replaced by an O(3)-sigma model instanton in a warped three-dimensional spacetime stabilized by a massive vector meson. A more detailed range of baryonic popcorn phase transitions are found, and the low-dimensional model is used as a testing ground to check the validity of common approximations made in the full five-dimensional model, namely approximating fields using their flat-space equations of motion, and performing a leading order expansion in the metric.

  9. Dirac sigma models from gauging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikov, Vladimir; Strobl, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The G/G WZW model results from the WZW-model by a standard procedure of gauging. G/G WZW models are members of Dirac sigma models, which also contain twisted Poisson sigma models as other examples. We show how the general class of Dirac sigma models can be obtained from a gauging procedure adapted to Lie algebroids in the form of an equivariantly closed extension. The rigid gauge groups are generically infinite dimensional and a standard gauging procedure would give a likewise infinite number of 1-form gauge fields; the proposed construction yields the requested finite number of them. Although physics terminology is used, the presentation is kept accessible also for a mathematical audience.

  10. Q-balls of clusterized baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mişicu, Ş.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, W.

    2017-01-01

    Properties of baryonic matter made of nucleons and α-particles are studied within a relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. The Lagrangian describing the relativistic field ϕ of α-particles is allowed to contain also self-interaction terms. Various types of RMF parametrizations are employed to calculate the energy of α-particles embedded in the baryonic matter. We first consider baryonic systems with small admixtures of α-particles and calculate the energy spectrum as a function of baryon density. Then we turn to the case of pure α-matter and derive once again the energy spectrum, this time as a function of α-particle density, with and without quartic self-interaction. In the second part of the paper, we focus on the ground-state properties (energy per particle, radii of the spherical lumps made of α-particles) of charge neutralized Q-balls formed of baryonic α-particles for the case of linear σ and ω fields and nonlinear (quartic+sextic) self-interactions of the ϕ field.

  11. Baryon Spectroscopy and the Origin of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Klempt, Eberhard

    2010-08-05

    The proton mass arises from spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry and the formation of constituent quarks. Their dynamics cannot be tested by proton tomography but only by studying excited baryons. However, the number of excited baryons is much smaller than expected within quark models; even worse, the existence of many known states has been challenged in a recent analysis which includes - compared to older analyses - high-precision data from meson factories. Hence {pi}N elastic scattering data do not provide a well-founded starting point of any phenomenological analysis of the baryon excitation spectrum. Photoproduction experiments now start to fill in this hole. Often, they confirm the old findings and even suggest a few new states. These results encourage attempts to compare the pattern of observed baryon resonances with predictions from quark models, from models generating baryons dynamically from meson-nucleon scattering amplitudes, from models based on gravitational theories, and with the conjecture that chiral symmetry may be restored at high excitation energies. Best agreement is found with a simple mass formula derived within AdS/QCD. Consequences for our understanding of QCD are discussed as well as experiments which may help to decide on the validity of models.

  12. Torsional Oscillations of Nonbare Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia; Parisi, Alessandro; Pilo, Luigi; Tonelli, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Strange stars are one of the possible compact stellar objects that can form after a supernova collapse. We consider a model of a strange star having an inner core in the color-flavor locked phase surmounted by a crystalline color superconducting (CCSC) layer. These two phases constitute the quarksphere, which we assume to be the largest and heaviest part of the strange star. The next layer consists of standard nuclear matter forming an ionic crust, hovering on the top of the quarksphere and prevented from falling by a strong dipolar electric field. The dipolar electric field arises because quark matter is confined in the quarksphere by the strong interaction, but electrons can leak outside forming an electron layer a few hundred fermi thick separating the ionic crust from the underlying quark matter. The ionic matter and the CCSC matter constitute two electromagnetically coupled crust layers. We study the torsional oscillations of these two layers. Remarkably, we find that if a fraction larger than 10-4 of the energy of a Vela-like glitch is conveyed to a torsional oscillation, the ionic crust will likely break. The reason is that the very rigid and heavy CCSC crust layer will absorb only a small fraction of the glitch energy, leading to a large-amplitude torsional oscillation of the ionic crust. The maximum stress generated by the torsional oscillation is located inside the ionic crust and is very close to the star’s surface. This peculiar behavior leads to a much easier crust cracking than in standard neutron stars.

  13. TORSIONAL OSCILLATIONS OF NONBARE STRANGE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia; Parisi, Alessandro; Pilo, Luigi; Tonelli, Francesco

    2015-12-20

    Strange stars are one of the possible compact stellar objects that can form after a supernova collapse. We consider a model of a strange star having an inner core in the color-flavor locked phase surmounted by a crystalline color superconducting (CCSC) layer. These two phases constitute the quarksphere, which we assume to be the largest and heaviest part of the strange star. The next layer consists of standard nuclear matter forming an ionic crust, hovering on the top of the quarksphere and prevented from falling by a strong dipolar electric field. The dipolar electric field arises because quark matter is confined in the quarksphere by the strong interaction, but electrons can leak outside forming an electron layer a few hundred fermi thick separating the ionic crust from the underlying quark matter. The ionic matter and the CCSC matter constitute two electromagnetically coupled crust layers. We study the torsional oscillations of these two layers. Remarkably, we find that if a fraction larger than 10{sup −4} of the energy of a Vela-like glitch is conveyed to a torsional oscillation, the ionic crust will likely break. The reason is that the very rigid and heavy CCSC crust layer will absorb only a small fraction of the glitch energy, leading to a large-amplitude torsional oscillation of the ionic crust. The maximum stress generated by the torsional oscillation is located inside the ionic crust and is very close to the star’s surface. This peculiar behavior leads to a much easier crust cracking than in standard neutron stars.

  14. Results from CERN experiment NA36 on strangeness production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Measurements of the production of strange particles in the reactions S + Pb and S + S at beam momentum 200GeV/c per nucleon are presented. A short description of CERN experiment NA36 and the methods of raw data analysis, is followed by physics results concentrating on the dependence of strange particle production on multiplicity. Transverse momentum distributions are also presented.

  15. Strangeness and charm production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Nu

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the dynamical effects of strangeness and charm production in high energy nuclear collisions. In order to understand the early stage dynamical evolution, it is necessary to study the transverse momentum distributions of multi-strange hadrons like {Xi} and {Omega} and charm mesons like J/{Psi} as a function of collision centrality.

  16. Neutrino Dominated Accretion Flow Around a Strange Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhibo, Hao; Zigao, Dai

    2013-10-01

    The "strange star - NDAF" model (NDAF: Neutrino Dominated Accretion Flow) is proposed as an alternative central engine of gamma-ray bursts for unifying the interpretation of the prompt emission and postburst activities of gamma-ray bursts. The structure of NDAF around a strange star is calculated. Different from other central compact objects, the strange star will feed back the phase transition energy of strangization on the accretion flow, with neutrinos as energy carriers. The friction between NDAF and strange star is ignored in this paper. The results indicate: firstly, the structure of NDAF around a strange star is sensitive to accretion rate; secondly, if accretion rate is larger than 0.18 Mʘ s-1, the "strange star - NDAF" model can unify the explanation on the prompt emission and postburst activities of gamma-ray bursts, and the range of allowable accretion rates is wider than that in frictionless "neutron star - NDAF" models; thirdly, the range of annihilation energy of "strange star - NDAF" model is very wide, when the accretion rate is higher than 0.3 Mʘ s-1, the annihilation energy is greater than 1051 erg; finally, if the accretion rate is greater than 0.3 Mʘ s-1, the annihilation energy of "strange star - NDAF" model is larger than what of "black hole - NDAF" model at the same accretion rate by more than one order of magnitude, it is favorable to explaining some extremely energetic gamma-ray bursts.

  17. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  18. Stability of charged strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Arbañil, José D. V.; Malheiro, Manuel

    2015-12-17

    We investigate the hydrostatic equilibrium and the stability of charged stars made of a charged perfect fluid. The matter contained in the star follows the MIT bag model equation of state and the charge distribution to a power-law of the radial coordinate. The hydrostatic equilibrium and the stability of charged strange stars are analyzed using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation and the Chandrasekhar’s equation pulsation, respectively. These two equation are modified from their original form to the inclusion of the electric charge. We found that the stability of the star decreases with the increment of the central energy density and with the increment of the amount of charge.

  19. Associated strangeness production on light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, J.; Kingler, J.; Lippert, C.

    1991-04-01

    The study of light hyper-nuclei via associated strangeness production in (p, K+) reactions is discussed. Though the process is characterized by a very large momentum transfer the presence of short range correlations is expected to rise the cross section up to the order of nb/sr. Two approved proposals for high resolution studies of this reaction are discussed and respective detection limits are presented. The first is scheduled for October 1990 at the SPES4 spectrometer at the SATURNE acclerator (LNS Saclay). The second deals with the planned upgrading of the BIG KARL magnetic spectrograph at the cooled beam facility COSY being bulit at Forschungsanlage Jülich.

  20. Seismic search for strange quark nuggets

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, Eugene T.; Rosenbaum, Doris C.; Teplitz, Vigdor L.

    2006-02-15

    Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to 1 ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

  1. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  2. Primordial nucleosynthesis and primoridal isocurvature baryon fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.T.; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Jedamzik, K.

    1995-10-01

    Recently, there has been interest in inflation-generated cosmological primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuation (PIB) models as a means to account for the large scale clustering of galaxies. However, the extension of the isocurvature fluctuations contained in such models to the mass scales of nucleosynthesis would imply large stochastic fluctuations in baryon-to-photon ratio during the epoch of primordial nucleosynthesis. We discuss constraints on the spectral index and rms amplitude of such fluctuations based upon the computed light element abundances. Our calculations include nuclear reaction networks in up to 40,000 zones in which stockastic fluctuations are spatially resolved. The effects of baryon diffusion among the fluctuations are also explicitly coupled and followed during nucleosynthesis. We confirm that the fluctuations must be significantly damped compared to a straight-forward extension of the cosmological PIB models.

  3. Production and decay of charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Hiyama, Emiko; Kim, SangHo; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Nagahiro, Hideko; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Oka, Makoto; Shirotori, Kotaro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss reactions involving charmed baryons to explore their unique features. A well known phenomenon, the separation of the two internal motions of the ρ and λ types of a three-quark system is revisited. First we discuss the mass spectrum of low lying excitations as function of the heavy quark mass, smoothly connecting the SU (3) and heavy quark limits. The properties of these modes can be tested in the production and decay reactions of the baryons. For production, we consider a one step process which excites dominantly λ modes. We find abundant production rates for some of the excited states. For decay, we study a pion emission process which provides a clean tool to test the structure of heavy quark systems due to the well controlled low energy dynamics of pions and quarks. Both production and decay of charmed baryons are issues for future experiments at J-PARC.

  4. Heavy Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Roberts; Muslema Pervin

    2007-11-14

    A quark model is applied to the spectrum of baryons containing heavy quarks. The model gives masses for the known heavy baryons that are in agreement with experiment, but for the doubly-charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}$, the model prediction is too heavy. Mixing between the $\\Xi_Q$ and $\\Xi_Q^\\prime$ states is examined and is found to be small for the lowest lying states. In contrast with this, mixing between the $\\Xi_{bc}$ and $\\Xi_{bc}^\\prime$ states is found to be large, and the implication of this mixing for properties of these states is briefly discussed. We also examine heavy-quark spin-symmetry multiplets, and find that many states in the model can be placed in such multiplets.

  5. The Baryon Census in a Multiphase Intergalactic Medium: 30% of the Baryons May Still be Missing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Smith, Britton D.; Danforth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    Although galaxies, groups, and clusters contain ~10% of the baryons, many more reside in the photoionized and shocked-heated intergalactic medium (IGM) and in the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We update the baryon census in the (H I) Lyα forest and warm-hot IGM (WHIM) at 105-6 K traced by O VI λ1032, 1038 absorption. From Enzo cosmological simulations of heating, cooling, and metal transport, we improve the H I and O VI baryon surveys using spatially averaged corrections for metallicity (Z/Z ⊙) and ionization fractions (f H I , f O VI ). Statistically, the O VI correction product correlates with column density, (Z/Z ⊙)f O VI ≈ (0.015)(N O VI /1014 cm-2)0.70, with an N O VI -weighted mean of 0.01, which doubles previous estimates of WHIM baryon content. We also update the Lyα forest contribution to baryon density out to z = 0.4, correcting for the (1 + z)3 increase in absorber density, the (1 + z)4.4 rise in photoionizing background, and cosmological proper length dl/dz. We find substantial baryon fractions in the photoionized Lyα forest (28% ± 11%) and WHIM traced by O VI and broad-Lyα absorbers (25% ± 8%). The collapsed phase (galaxies, groups, clusters, CGM) contains 18% ± 4%, leaving an apparent baryon shortfall of 29% ± 13%. Our simulations suggest that ~15% reside in hotter WHIM (T >= 106 K). Additional baryons could be detected in weaker Lyα and O VI absorbers. Further progress requires higher-precision baryon surveys of weak absorbers, down to minimum column densities N H I >= 1012.0 cm-2, N O VI >= 1012.5 cm-2, N O VII >= 1014.5 cm-2, using high signal-to-noise data from high-resolution UV and X-ray spectrographs.

  6. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, J. L.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2007-02-12

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  7. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Scoccola, Norberto

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  8. An effective theory of baryons and mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaczko, Gregory Bela

    I develop an effective theory to describe the low energy behavior of baryons. The theory is motivated by several issues facing nonperturbative quantum chromodynamic (QCD) calculations: the use of the quenched approximation for exact QCD calculations, the apparent success of nonrelativistic quark flavor models and the difficulties of standard, chiral perturbation theories. These problems are addressed by considering the baryon as a composite object, preserving the spin and flavor identity of the constituent quarks. This approach differs from standard chiral perturbation theory techniques that treat baryons as elementary particles. The method also allows us to construct effective quark-meson interactions that approximate the loop effects omitted in exact QCD calculations using the quenched approximation. These quark-meson interactions enable reparametrizations of the tree level interactions for many of the calculated loop results, reducing the size and improving the convergence of the loop diagrams. Furthermore, we relate tree-level couplings in the effective theory to equivalent matrix elements of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic quark models. This effective theory introduces several new elements. We construct a new octet baryon operator and octet baryon propagator. We also develop new effective mass and magnetic moment couplings that significantly reduce the number of free parameters in the theory, providing physical interpretation for the parameters appearing in standard chiral perturbation theory and improving its predictability. The theory is successfully used to determine baryon masses and magnetic moments using a small number of free parameters. We duplicate previous numerical results from chiral perturbation theory and provide improved results in many cases. In all cases, we determine excellent fits to the masses and moments using a small number of free parameters.

  9. Six Sigma in healthcare delivery.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conduct a comprehensive review and assessment of the extant Six Sigma healthcare literature, focusing on: application, process changes initiated and outcomes, including improvements in process metrics, cost and revenue. Data were obtained from an extensive literature search. Healthcare Six Sigma applications were categorized by functional area and department, key process metric, cost savings and revenue generation (if any) and other key implementation characteristics. Several inpatient care areas have seen most applications, including admission, discharge, medication administration, operating room (OR), cardiac and intensive care. About 42.1 percent of the applications have error rate as their driving metric, with the remainder focusing on process time (38 percent) and productivity (18.9 percent). While 67 percent had initial improvement in the key process metric, only 10 percent reported sustained improvement. Only 28 percent reported cost savings and 8 percent offered revenue enhancement. These results do not favorably assess Six Sigma's overall effectiveness and the value it offers healthcare. Results are based on reported applications. Future research can include directly surveying healthcare organizations to provide additional data for assessment. Future application should emphasize obtaining improvements that lead to significant and sustainable value. Healthcare staff can use the results to target promising areas. This article comprehensively assesses Six Sigma healthcare applications and impact.

  10. Heavy flavor baryons in hypercentral mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bhavin; Rai, Ajay Kumar; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2008-05-01

    Heavy flavor baryons containing single and double charm (beauty) quarks with light flavor combinations are studied using the hypercentral description of the three-body problem. The confinement potential is assumed as hypercentral Coulomb plus power potential with power index ν. The ground state masses of the heavy flavor, J^P={1/2}^+ and {3/2}^+ baryons are computed for different power indices, ν starting from 0.5 to 2.0. The predicted masses are found to attain a saturated value in each case of quark combinations beyond the power index ν=1.0.

  11. Baryon onset in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Alexander; Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    The critical baryon chemical potential for the onset of nuclear matter is a function of the vacuum mass and the binding energy. Both quantities are affected by an external magnetic field. We show within two relativistic mean-field models – including magnetic catalysis, but omitting the anomalous magnetic moment – that a magnetic field increases both the vacuum mass and the binding energy. For sufficiently large magnetic fields, the effect on the vacuum mass dominates and as a result the critical baryon chemical potential is increased.

  12. Probing the Baryon Cycle in Galaxy Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davé, Romeel

    2017-03-01

    Galaxies are born and grow within a cosmic ecosystem, in which they receive material from surrounding intergalactic gas via gravitationally-driven inflows and expel material via powerful galactic outflows. These processes, collectively referred to as the baryon cycle, are increasingly believed to govern galaxy growth over cosmic time. I discuss new insights on the baryon cycle using analytic models and hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution, particularly emphasizing how galaxy outskirts are the prime locale within which to observe these processes in action by examining observational tracers such as rest-ultraviolet absorption lines and the neutral and molecular gas content of galaxies.

  13. Roper resonance and the baryon spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsey, J. A.; Afnan, I. R.

    1989-10-01

    We present a method for calculating the baryon spectrum in the cloudy-bag model in which the masses of the baryons are identical to the poles of the S matrix in the complex energy plane. In particular, we demonstrate that the width for the decay of these resonances by pion emission is dependent on whether the calculations are carried out on the real energy axis or at the resonance poles, the latter being consistent with the scattering experiments that determine these widths. Results for N*(1440) are presented.

  14. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  15. Observational tests of Baryon symmetric cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence for Baryon symmetric (matter/antimatter) cosmology and future observational tests are reviewed. The most significant consequences of Baryon symmetric cosmology lie in the prediction of an observable cosmic background of gamma radiation from the decay of pi(0)-mesons produced in nucleon-antinucleon annihilations. Equations for the prediction of the amma ray background spectrum for the case of high redshifts are presented. The theoretical and observational plots of the background spectrum are shown to be in good agreement. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons and the use of high energy neutrino astronomy to look for antimatter elsewhere in the universe are also addressed.

  16. Measurement of inclusive baryon production in B meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Cronström, H. I.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Reiner, R.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Seidel, S. C.; Tsamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Śchmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Zivko, T.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1992-03-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we have studied B meson decays into baryons p and Λ. From the simultaneous analysis of p and Λ yields, p bar p and Λbar p correlations, and various lepton-baryon and lepton-baryon-antibaryon correlations the inclusive branching ratio is found to be BR ( B→baryons)=(6.8±0.5±0.3)%.

  17. Dilepton and strangeness production probed with HADES

    SciTech Connect

    Rustamov, A.

    2012-05-15

    With the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at GSI we have studied dilepton production in the few-GeV energy regime in various collisions systems, from elementary NN, over pA, up to the medium-heavy Ar + KCl system. We have thus confirmed the puzzling results of the former DLS Collaboration at the Bevalac. While we have traced the origin of the excess pair yield in CC collisions to elementary pp and pn processes, in our Ar + KCl data a contribution from the dense phase of the collision has been identified. Together with the e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs, we have also obtained in the Ar + KCl system at 1.76 A GeV a high-statistics data set on open and hidden strangeness, i.e. K{sup {+-}}, K{sub s}{sup 0}, {Lambda}, {phi}, and {Xi}{sup -}, allowing for a comprehensive discussion of strangeness production in this system.

  18. Radial stability of anisotropic strange quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbañil, José D. V.; Malheiro, M.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the anisotropy in the equilibrium and stability of strange stars is investigated through the numerical solution of the hydrostatic equilibrium equation and the radial oscillation equation, both modified from their original version to include this effect. The strange matter inside the quark stars is described by the MIT bag model equation of state. For the anisotropy two different kinds of local anisotropic σ = pt-pr are considered, where pt and pr are respectively the tangential and the radial pressure: one that is null at the star's surface defined by pr(R) = 0, and one that is nonnull at the surface, namely, σs = 0 and σs ≠ 0. In the case σs = 0, the maximum mass value and the zero frequency of oscillation are found at the same central energy density, indicating that the maximum mass marks the onset of the instability. For the case σs ≠ 0, we show that the maximum mass point and the zero frequency of oscillation coincide in the same central energy density value only in a sequence of equilibrium configurations with the same value of σs. Thus, the stability star regions are determined always by the condition dM/dρc > 0 only when the tangential pressure is maintained fixed at the star surface's pt(R). These results are also quite important to analyze the stability of other anisotropic compact objects such as neutron stars, boson stars and gravastars.

  19. Singularity-free anisotropic strange quintessence star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali

    2015-04-01

    Present paper provides a new model of anisotropic strange star corresponding to the exterior Schwarzschild metric. The Einstein field equations have been solved by utilizing the Krori-Barua (KB) ansatz (Krori and Barua in J. Phys. A, Math. Gen. 8:508, 1975) in presence of quintessence field characterized by a parameter ω q with . The obtained solutions are free from central singularity. Our model is potentially stable. The numerical values of mass of the different strange stars SAXJ1808.4-3658(SS1) (radius=7.07 km), 4U1820-30 (radius=10 km), Vela X-12 (radius=9.99 km), PSR J 1614-2230 (radius=10.3 km) obtained from our model is very close to the observational data that confirms the validity of our proposed model. The interior solution is also matched to the exterior Schwarzschild spacetime in presence of thin shell where negative surface pressure is required to hold the thin shell against collapsing.

  20. Strangeness production with polarized protons at Saturne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seonho

    1998-08-01

    At high energies, significant polarization effects have long been observed in inclusive Λ production from the collision of unpolarized hadrons. Although many experiments on hyperon production have been performed, very few used polarized hadron beams and none have involved exclusive measurements. An independent puzzle in the strangeness sector has been revealed by recent observations of a large violation of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule in φ-meson production by anti-protons. These violations have been interpreted by some to indicate sizeable strange-quark content of the nucleon. Understanding these two problems constitutes the major goal of the DISTO program at Saturne. The DISTO experiment is designed to study hyperons (Λ, Σ) and vector mesons (φ, ω) produced in p-->p collisions at three incident proton momenta: 3.67, 3.31 and 2.94GeV/c. Detection of all charged particles in the final state allows exclusive measurements for hyperons, while the use of polarized beam makes it possible to measure analyzing powers Ay and the spin transfer coefficient DNN, in addition to the polarization of the outgoing hyperon. An outline of the physics motivation and a brief description of the experimental setup is given. Some preliminary results from the data taken at 3.67GeV/c are presented.

  1. Strange Particles and Heavy Ion Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bassalleck, Bernd; Fields, Douglas

    2016-04-28

    This very long-running grant has supported many experiments in nuclear and particle physics by a group from the University of New Mexico. The gamut of these experiments runs from many aspects of Strangeness Nuclear Physics, to rare Kaon decays, to searches for exotic Hadrons such as Pentaquark or H-Dibaryon, and finally to Spin Physics within the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC. These experiments were performed at a number of laboratories worldwide: first and foremost at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), but also at CERN, KEK, and most recently at J-PARC. In this Final Technical Report we summarize progress and achievements for this award since our last Progress Report, i.e. for the period of fall 2013 until the award’s termination on November 30, 2015. The report consists of two parts, representing our two most recent experimental efforts, participation in the Nucleon Spin Physics program of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL – Task 1, led by Douglas Fields; and participation in several Strangeness Nuclear Physics experiments at J-PARC, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Center in Tokai-mura, Japan – Task 2, led by Bernd Bassalleck.

  2. Strangeness electroproduction on the nucleon at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, Daniel S.; CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    High-precision measurements of strange particle production from both proton and neutron targets are a core part of the physics programwith the CLAS spectrometer in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Measurements have been carried out at beam energies up to 6 GeV in experiments with polarized beams and polarized targets. This talk will focus on the electroproduction measurements that have been completed, which include cross sections and hyperon polarization observables for K+Y (Y = ΛΣ0) final states over a broad kinematic range in momentum transfer Q2 and invariant energy W, while spanning nearly the full kaon center-of-mass angular range. These data in the strangeness sector are necessary to better understand the different productionmechanisms for Λ and Σ hyperons and to disentangle the different resonant and non-resonant amplitudes in the intermediate state. The usefulness of the CLAS electroproduction data as part of a coupled-channel model fit will be discussed as well as an outlook of this program for the future.

  3. THE CORRELATION FUNCTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AND DETECTION OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-10

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z {<=} 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model {xi}(r) = (r/R{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}} on the scales of 10 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R{sub 0} = 18.84 {+-} 0.27 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 15 and a smaller length of R{sub 0} = 16.15 {+-} 0.13 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 5. The power-law index of {gamma} = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r {approx} 110 h{sup -1} Mpc with a significance of {approx}1.9{sigma}. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 200 h{sup -1} Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are D{sub v} (z{sub m} = 0.276) = 1077 {+-} 55(1{sigma}) Mpc and h = 0.73 {+-} 0.039(1{sigma}), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density {Omega}{sub m} h{sup 2} = 0.093 {+-} 0.0077(1{sigma}), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3{sigma}. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  4. Strange particle production in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s}=0.9 mbox {TeV} with ALICE at the LHC. The ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, K.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biolcati, E.; Blanc, A.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Bortolin, C.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Boyer, B.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Erasmo, G. D.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Azevedo Moregula, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Remigis, R.; de Rooij, R.; Delagrange, H.; Delgado Mercado, Y.; Dellacasa, G.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubuisson, J.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furano, F.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Gemme, R.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; González Santos, H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Hernández, C.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jancurová, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, S. P.; Jena, S.; Jirden, L.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jovanović, P.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, E.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S. H.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kolevatov, R.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskih, A.; Kornaś, E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krumbhorn, D.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lea, R.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Leistam, L.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, X.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Lopez, X.; López Noriega, M.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mendez Lorenzo, P.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Mereu, P.; Miake, Y.; Midori, J.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Muhuri, S.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munoz, J.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nendaz, F.; Newby, J.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Obayashi, H.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Øvrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Platt, R.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Rademakers, O.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Rammler, M.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinský, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saiz, P.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Samanta, T.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Søgaard, C.; Soloviev, A.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stock, R.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Tagridis, C.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Traczyk, T.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zabrodin, E.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zenin, A.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zichichi, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.

    2011-03-01

    The production of mesons containing strange quarks (mbox {mathrm {K0S}}, φ) and both singly and doubly strange baryons (mbox {mathrm {Λ }}, mbox {overline {Λ }}, and mbox {mathrm {Ξ -+overline {Ξ }+}}) are measured at mid-rapidity in pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 0.9 TeV with the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The results are obtained from the analysis of about 250 k minimum bias events recorded in 2009. Measurements of yields (d N/d y) and transverse momentum spectra at mid-rapidity for inelastic pp collisions are presented. For mesons, we report yields () of 0.184±0.002( stat.)±0.006( syst.) for mbox {mathrm {K0S}} and 0.021±0.004( stat.)±0.003( syst.) for φ. For baryons, we find =0.048±0.001( stat.)±0.004( syst.) for mbox {mathrm {Λ }}, 0.047±0.002( stat.)±0.005( syst.) for mbox {overline {Λ }} and 0.0101±0.0020( stat.)±0.0009( syst.) for mbox {mathrm {Ξ -+overline {Ξ }+}}. The results are also compared with predictions for identified particle spectra from QCD-inspired models and provide a baseline for comparisons with both future pp measurements at higher energies and heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Baryon Regge Trajectories and the 1/Nc Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Matagne, Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    Baryon Regge trajectories are discussed in the light of the 1/Nc expansion. The approximate dynamical symmetry SU(6)x O(3) is used to identify the spin-flavor singlet component of baryon masses. By fitting to the known baryon spectrum, this component is shown to produce distinct Regge trajectories for SU(6) 56- and 70-plets which are remarkably linear.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Photonic Sigma Delta ADCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    65 APPENDIX B. MATLAB CODE FOR PHOTONIC SIGMA DELTA ADC.................67 APPENDIX C. SUBROUTINE FUNCTIONS...PHOTONIC SIGMA DELTA ADC FLOW CHART 66 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 67 APPENDIX B. MATLAB CODE FOR PHOTONIC SIGMA DELTA ADC Program File...addition, a MATLAB simulation designed previously was used to simulate the behavior of the photonic sigma delta ADC. It was modified to speed up the

  7. Relationships between CMMI (trademark) and Six Sigma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    profitability is the central motive of Six Sigma. The quest to achieve the desired level of performance (as measured by sigma or another gauge) is based on...34* Lean 2 combined with Six Sigma is an increasingly occurring variant of the Six Sigma movement. The tactical aspects of Lean- Kaizen Events, in...particular-can be implemented within the existing DMAIC or DFSS frameworks. In a Kaizen Event, people examine the current state of a process or product and

  8. All strange and terrible events: A search for the H dibaryon

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, B.

    1995-12-01

    No six-quark bound hadron, (other than the loosely bound deuteron) has been observed, despite several experimental searches. Some models of quark dynamics predict the existence of such a state, the doubly-strange six-quark H dibaryon (uuddss) being the most likely. The mass of the H would be between that of the deuteron and the 2m{sub {Lambda}} strong interaction decay threshold. In 1992, Experiment E888 at Brookhaven National Lab`s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron collected data to search for this particle. The detector consisted of a two-arm spectrometer with drift chamber tracking and two magnets for momentum analysis, scintillator hodoscope triggering, Cerenkov particle identification, an electromagnetic calorimeter, and a muon hodoscope and rangefinder. The experiment searched for the decay {Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -} from the weak decays of H {yields} {Lambda}n and H {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}n (followed by {Sigma}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{gamma}). This search was sensitive to weakly decaying H dibaryons with lifetimes from 6-230 us with production cross-sections greater than {approximately}2 {mu}b/steradian.

  9. Strange-face illusions during inter-subjective gazing.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Giovanni B

    2013-03-01

    In normal observers, gazing at one's own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, triggers the perception of strange faces, a new visual illusion that has been named 'strange-face in the mirror'. Individuals see huge distortions of their own faces, but they often see monstrous beings, archetypal faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and animals. In the experiment described here, strange-face illusions were perceived when two individuals, in a dimly lit room, gazed at each other in the face. Inter-subjective gazing compared to mirror-gazing produced a higher number of different strange-faces. Inter-subjective strange-face illusions were always dissociative of the subject's self and supported moderate feeling of their reality, indicating a temporary lost of self-agency. Unconscious synchronization of event-related responses to illusions was found between members in some pairs. Synchrony of illusions may indicate that unconscious response-coordination is caused by the illusion-conjunction of crossed dissociative strange-faces, which are perceived as projections into each other's visual face of reciprocal embodied representations within the pair. Inter-subjective strange-face illusions may be explained by the subject's embodied representations (somaesthetic, kinaesthetic and motor facial pattern) and the other's visual face binding. Unconscious facial mimicry may promote inter-subjective illusion-conjunction, then unconscious joint-action and response-coordination.

  10. The CMU Baryon Amplitude Analysis Program

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Bellis

    2007-10-01

    The PWA group at Carnegie Mellon University has developed a comprehensive approach and analysis package for the purpose of extracting the amplitudes for photoproduced baryon resonances. The end goal is to identify any missing resonances that are predicted by the constituent quark model, but not definitively observed in experiments. The data comes from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab.

  11. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  12. Baryonic Distributions in Galaxy Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role and significance of dark matter in the evolution of baryonic components (i.e., conversion of the gaseous disk into stars) is a critical aspect for realistic models of galaxy evolution. In an effort to address fundamental questions regarding the growth and distribution of stellar disks in dark matter halos in a statistical manner, we have undertaken a project correlating structural properties and star formation activity with the dark matter properties of the host galaxy. The project uses a statistical sample of 45 nearby galaxies which are optimally suited for rotation curve decomposition analysis. The dataset includes deep Spitzer 3.6μm images to trace the stellar distribution, neutral and ionized gas rotation curves to trace the total mass distribution, and optical images to examine the dominant stellar populations. Using a sub-set of galaxies from the full sample, we find that the distribution of the baryonic mass relative to the total mass is roughly self-similar in more massive galaxies when normalized by the average stellar disk scale length measured at 3.6μm. We additionally observe an emerging trend between total baryonic mass and the radius at which the total mass distribution transitions from baryon-dominated to dark matter-dominated. However, we find no significant correlation between the distribution of dark matter and structural properties of the stellar disk, such as changes in color or star formation activity.

  13. The CMU Baryon Amplitude Analysis Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, Matt

    2007-05-01

    The PWA group at Carnegie Mellon University has developed a comprehensive approach and analysis package for the purpose of extracting the amplitudes for photoproduced baryon resonances. The end goal is to identify any missing resonances that are predicted by the constituent quark model, but not definitively observed in experiments. The data comes from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab.

  14. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  15. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  16. Baryons in the unquenched quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, R.; Díaz-Gómez, S.; Lopez-Ruiz, M. A.; Santopinto, E.

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution, we present the unquenched quark model as an extension of the constituent quark model that includes the effects of sea quarks via a {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-antiquark pair-creation mechanism. Particular attention is paid to the spin and flavor content of the proton, magnetic moments and β decays of octet baryons.

  17. Parity partners in the baryon resonance spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Ya; Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D.; ...

    2017-07-28

    Here, we describe a calculation of the spectrum of flavor-SU(3) octet and decuplet baryons, their parity partners, and the radial excitations of these systems, made using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector x vector contact interaction as the foundation for the relevant few-body equations. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking generates nonpointlike diquarks within these baryons and hence, using the contact interaction, flavor-antitriplet scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and flavor-sextet axial-vector quark-quark correlations can all play active roles. The model yields reasonable masses for all systems studied and Faddeev amplitudes for ground states and associated parity partners that sketch a realistic picture of theirmore » internal structure: ground-state, even-parity baryons are constituted, almost exclusively, from like-parity diquark correlations, but orbital angular momentum plays an important role in the rest-frame wave functions of odd-parity baryons, whose Faddeev amplitudes are dominated by odd-parity diquarks.« less

  18. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  19. Constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter and baryon isocurvature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jerome; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2009-12-15

    We set constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter - radiation and baryon -radiation isocurvature fluctuations through modulus decay, assuming the modulus remains light during inflation. We find that the moduli problem becomes worse at the perturbative level as a significant part of the parameter space m{sub {sigma}} (modulus mass) - {sigma}{sub inf} (modulus vacuum expectation value at the end of inflation) is constrained by the nonobservation of significant isocurvature fluctuations. We discuss in detail the evolution of the modulus vacuum expectation value and perturbations, in particular, the consequences of Hubble scale corrections to the modulus potential, and the stochastic motion of the modulus during inflation. We show, in particular, that a high modulus mass scale m{sub {sigma}} > or approx. 100 TeV, which allows the modulus to evade big bang nucleosynthesis constraints is strongly constrained at the perturbative level. We find that generically, solving the moduli problem requires the inflationary scale to be much smaller than 10{sup 13} GeV.

  20. Holographic black hole engineering at finite baryon chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo

    2017-04-01

    This is a contribution for the Proceedings of the Conference Hot Quarks 2016, held at South Padre Island, Texas, USA, 12-17 September 2016. I briefly review some thermodynamic and baryon transport results obtained from a bottom-up Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holographic model engineered to describe the physics of the quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon density. The results for the equation of state, baryon susceptibilities, and the curvature of the crossover band are in quantitative agreement with the corresponding lattice QCD results with 2 + 1 flavors and physical quark masses. Baryon diffusion is predicted to be suppressed by increasing the baryon chemical potential.

  1. Unified origin for baryonic visible matter and antibaryonic dark matter.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E; Sigurdson, Kris; Tulin, Sean

    2010-11-19

    We present a novel mechanism for generating both the baryon and dark matter densities of the Universe. A new Dirac fermion X carrying a conserved baryon number charge couples to the standard model quarks as well as a GeV-scale hidden sector. CP-violating decays of X, produced nonthermally in low-temperature reheating, sequester antibaryon number in the hidden sector, thereby leaving a baryon excess in the visible sector. The antibaryonic hidden states are stable dark matter. A spectacular signature of this mechanism is the baryon-destroying inelastic scattering of dark matter that can annihilate baryons at appreciable rates relevant for nucleon decay searches.

  2. Magnetic moments of negative parity baryons in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Savcı, M.

    2014-03-01

    Using the most general form of the interpolating current for the octet baryons, the magnetic moments of the negative-parity baryons are calculated within the light-cone sum rules. The contributions coming from diagonal transitions of the positive-parity baryons and also from a nondiagonal transition between positive- and negative-parity baryons are eliminated by considering the combinations of different sum rules corresponding to the different Lorentz structures. A comparison of our results on magnetic moments of the negative-parity baryons with the other approaches existing in the literature is presented.

  3. Magnetic moments of JP=3/2- baryons in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Savcı, M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic moments of the low lying, negative parity, spin-3 /2 baryons, including the Λ* baryon, are calculated within the light cone QCD sum rules method. The contributions coming from the positive parity, spin-3 /2 baryons, as well as from the positive and negative parity spin-1 /2 baryons are eliminated by constructing combinations of various invariant amplitudes corresponding to the coefficients of the different Lorentz structures. We also present the results for the magnetic moments of the positive parity, spin-3 /2 baryons.

  4. The sausage sigma model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suneeta, Vardarajan

    2015-06-01

    Fateev’s sausage sigma models in two and three dimensions are known to be integrable. We study their stability under renormalization group (RG) flow in the target space by using results from the mathematics of Ricci flow. We show that the three-dimensional sausage is unstable, whereas the two-dimensional sausage appears to be stable at least at leading order as it approaches the sphere. We speculate that the stability results obtained are linked to the classification of ancient solutions to Ricci flow (i.e., sigma models that are nonperturbative in the infrared regime) in two and three dimensions. We also describe a class of perturbations of the three-dimensional sausage (with the same continuous symmetries) which remarkably decouple. This indicates that there could be a new solution to RG flow, which is described at least perturbatively as a deformation of the sausage.

  5. On the Stability of Strange Dwarf Hybrid Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Harris, Steven P.; Sachdeva, Pratik S.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the stability of “strange dwarfs”: white-dwarf-sized stars with a density discontinuity between a small dense core of quark matter and a thick low-density mantle of degenerate electrons. Previous work on strange dwarfs suggested that such a discontinuity could stabilize stars that would have been classified as unstable by the conventional criteria based on extrema in the mass–radius relation. We investigate the stability of such stars by numerically solving the Sturm–Liouville equations for the lowest-energy modes of the star. We find that the conventional criteria are correct, and strange dwarfs are not stable.

  6. Lean six sigma in healthcare.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Henk; Verver, John P S; van den Heuvel, Jaap; Bisgaard, Soren; Does, Ronald J M M

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare, as with any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient, and up-to-date. This article outlines a methodology and presents examples to illustrate how principles of Lean Thinking and Six Sigma can be combined to provide an effective framework for producing systematic innovation efforts in healthcare. Controlling healthcare cost increases, improving quality, and providing better healthcare are some of the benefits of this approach.

  7. Branes in Poisson sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Falceto, Fernando

    2010-07-28

    In this review we discuss possible boundary conditions (branes) for the Poisson sigma model. We show how to carry out the perturbative quantization in the presence of a general pre-Poisson brane and how this is related to the deformation quantization of Poisson structures. We conclude with an open problem: the perturbative quantization of the system when the boundary has several connected components and we use a different pre-Poisson brane in every component.

  8. Topological sigma models on supermanifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bei

    2017-02-01

    This paper concerns constructing topological sigma models governing maps from semirigid super Riemann surfaces to general target supermanifolds. We define both the A model and B model in this general setup by defining suitable BRST operators and physical observables. Using supersymmetric localization, we express correlation functions in these theories as integrals over suitable supermanifolds. In the case of the A model, we obtain an integral over the supermoduli space of "superinstantons". The language of supergeometry is used extensively throughout this paper.

  9. The Strange Quark Polarisation from COMPASS data

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2009-12-17

    The strange quark helicity distribution {delta}s(x) was derived at LO from the inclusive asymmetry A{sub a,d} and the semi-inclusive asymmetries A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup +}, A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup -}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K+}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K-}, measured by COMPASS in polarised deep inelastic muon-deuteron scattering. The distribution of {delta}s(x) is compatible with zero in the whole measured range. The value of the first moment of {delta}s and its error are very sensitive to the assumed value of the ratio of the s-bar-quark to u-quark fragmentation functions into positive kaons {integral}D(K+/s)(z)dz/{integral}D{sub u}{sup K+}(z)dz.

  10. The Universe is a Strange Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    Our understanding of ordinary matter is remarkably accurate and complete, but it is based on principles that are very strange and unfamiliar. As I'll explain, we've come to understand matter to be a Music of the Void, in a remarkably literal sense. Just as we physicists finalized that wonderful understanding, towards the end of the twentieth century, astronomers gave us back our humility, by informing us that ordinary matter - what we, and chemists and biologists, and astronomers themselves, have been studying all these centuries constitutes only about 5% of the mass of the universe as a whole. I'll describe some of our promising attempts to rise to this challenge by improving, rather than merely complicating, our description of the world.

  11. Chiral 2D "strange metals" from SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkooz, Micha; Narayan, Prithvi; Zait, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Familiar field theories may contain closed subsectors made out of only fermions, which can be used to explore new and unusual phases of matter in lower dimensions. We focus on the fermionic su(1, 1) sector in SYM and on its ground states, which are Fermi surface states/operators. By computing their spectrum to order ( g {YM/2} N)2, we argue that fluctuations around this Fermi surface, within the sector and in the limit k F → ∞, are governed by a chiral 1+1 dimensional sector of the "strange metal" coset SU( N ) N ⊗ SU( N ) N /SU( N )2 N . On the gravity side, the conjectured dual configuration is an S = 0 degeneration of a rotating black hole. On general grounds we expect that the near horizon excitations of ( S = 0, Ω = 1, J → ∞) degenerations of black holes will be governed by a chiral sector of a 1+1 CFT.

  12. Pentaquark baryons in the SU(3) quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yongseok; Kim, Hungchong

    2004-11-01

    We study the SU(3) group structure of pentaquark baryons which are made of four quarks and one antiquark. The pentaquark baryons form 1, 8, 10, 10-bar, 27, and 35 multiplets in the SU(3) quark model. First, the flavor wave functions of all the pentaquark baryons are constructed in the SU(3) quark model and then the flavor SU(3) symmetry relations for the interactions of the pentaquarks with three-quark baryons and pentaquark baryons are obtained. Constructing the general interactions in SU(3) could be important for understanding the pentaquark baryon properties from reaction mechanisms. We also discuss possible pentaquarks in 27-plet and 35-plet and their decay channels that can be used to identify them in future experiments. The mass sum rules for the pentaquark baryons are also presented.

  13. Strange Stars, Neutron Stars and Pulsar Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; Horvath, J. E.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha conjeturado que una partlecula de dieciocho quarks, sin Carga, sin espi'n y sin colar (quark-alfa) podri'a ser estable a ba5as tern peraturas y presiones aiTh COfl respecto a materia extrafla. Presentamos en este trabajo la estmctura de estrellas extraflas incluyendo los efectos y apariencia de parti'culas uark-alfa en las capas exteriores. La estruc tura interna ya no es hoinogenea del centro a la superficie, sino que muestra un centro de materia extrafla, capas s6lidas y una costra delgada de materia normal en la superficie. La superficie de materia nonnal permite la fornaci6n de una magnetosfera, la que se piensa sea el sitlo en donde ocurre la emisi6n del pulsar. La superficie de superflui'do ayuda a explicar el fen6rneno de `glitch', el cual ba sido observado en muchos pulsares. Se discute la ecuaci6n de estado para rnateria quark-alfa relevante en este regimen. ABSTIZACT:It has been conjectured that an quark, uncharged, spinless and colorless particle Cquark-alpha) could be stable at low pressures and temperatures even with respect to strange matter. We present in work tlie structure of stars including the effects of the appearance of quark-alpi' particles ii their outer layers. The internal structure is no longer from tlie center to the surface, but show a strange matter core, a solid and superfluid layers and a thin crust of normal matter at the surface. The normal matter surface allows tlie fon tion of a magnetosphere, whicl is to be tl place where pulsar emission occurs. A superfluid layer helps to explain tlie glitch , wlflch has been observed in . equation of state for quark-alpha matter relevant in regime is also discussed. Keq LA)OtL : ARY S - OF STATF - ?.ACT

  14. Properties of color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars in a new quark mass scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qian; Chen, ShiWu; Peng, GuangXiong; Xu, JianFeng

    2013-09-01

    Considering the effect of one-gluon-exchange interaction between quarks, the color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars are investigated in a new quark mass density-dependent model. It is found that the color-flavor locked strange quark matter can be more stable if the one-gluon-exchange effect is included. The lower density behavior of the sound velocity in this model is different from the previous results. Moreover, the new equation of state leads to a heavier acceptable maximum mass, supporting the recent observation of a compact star mass as large as about 2 times the solar mass.

  15. PREFACE: Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo; Kodama, Takeshi; Padula, Sandra; Takahashi, Jun

    2010-09-01

    The 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) was held in Brazil from 27 September to 2 October 2009 at Hotel Atlântico, Búzios, Rio de Janeiro. The conference was jointly organized by Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Universidade Estadual Paulista and Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Over 120 scientists from Argentina, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, South Africa, Switzerland, the UK and the USA gathered at the meeting to discuss the physics of hot and dense matter through the signals of strangeness and also the behavior of heavy quarks. Group photograph The topics covered were strange and heavy quark production in nuclear collisions, strange and heavy quark production in elementary processes, bulk matter phenomena associated with strange and heavy quarks, and strangeness in astrophysics. In view of the LHC era and many other upcoming new machines, together with recent theoretical developments, sessions focused on `New developments and new facilities' and 'Open questions' were also included. A stimulating round-table discussion on 'Physics opportunities in the next decade in the view of strangeness and heavy flavor in matter' was chaired in a relaxed atmosphere by Grazyna Odyniec and conducted by P Braun-Munzinger, W Florkowski, K Redlich, K Šafařík and H Stöcker, We thank these colleagues for pointing out to young participants new physics directions to be pursued. We also thank J Dunlop and K Redlich for excellent introductory lectures given on the Sunday evening pre-conference session. In spite of the not-so-helpful weather, the beauty and charm of the town of Búzios helped to make the meeting successful. Nevertheless, the most important contributions were the excellent talks, whose contents are part of these proceedings, given

  16. K meson-nucleus interactions: strangeness and nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is provided of some straightforward K-nuclear and ..lambda..-hypernuclear systems. A discussion of less straightforward speculations on H-dibaryons and strange quark matter by many authors, is also given. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Strangeness production in small and large collision systems at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Mark T.

    2006-07-01

    We present measurements of strange and multi-strange hadrons in p+p collisions at √s =200 GeV measured by STAR. We will compare these preliminary results to leading-order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD models widely believed to describe the production mechanisms. In particular we will point out recent changes of the model calculations which improve the agreement with our data significantly and will discuss the physics consequences. In larger collision systems, produced with heavy ions at RHIC, we observe the centrality dependence of strange and multi-strange particle production. The non-linear dependency between (anti)-hyperon yields and the system size Npart seems to indicate that the correlation volume does not scale exactly with Npart in contradiction to previous assumptions by thermal models.

  18. ScienceCast 30: The Strange Attraction of Gale Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-29

    NASA's newest rover Curiosity is getting ready to leave Earth. It's destination: Gale crater on Mars. Today's story from Science@NASA explains the attraction of this Martian crater with a strangely-sculpted mountain the middle.

  19. Role of strangeness in hybrid stars and possible observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.

    2015-05-01

    We study the effects of strangeness on the quark sector of a hybrid-star equation of state. Since the model we use to describe quarks is the same as the one we use to describe hadrons, we can also study the effects of strangeness on the chiral symmetry restoration and deconfinement phase transitions (first order or crossover). Finally, we analyze the combined effects of hyperons and quarks on global properties of hybrid stars such as mass, radius, and cooling profiles. It is found that a large amount of strangeness in the core is related to the generation of twin-star solutions, which can have the same mass as the lower or zero strangeness counterpart, but with smaller radii.

  20. Intriguing aspects of strangeness production at CERN energies

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, G.

    1996-07-01

    Strange particle production in pp, pA and AA collisions at CERN SPS energies is reviewed. First results from Pb beam experiments are briefly presented. The emerging picture (still incomplete) is discussed.

  1. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution.

    PubMed

    Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-26

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2-4) that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  2. The expression and functional characterization of sigma (sigma) 1 receptors in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Aydar, Ebru; Onganer, Pinar; Perrett, Rebecca; Djamgoz, Mustafa B; Palmer, Christopher P

    2006-10-28

    Sigma (sigma) receptors have been implicated in cancer. However, to date there is little molecular data demonstrating the role of sigma1 receptors in cancer. Expression of sigma1 receptors in various human cancer cell lines in comparison to non-cancerous cell lines was investigated, using real time RT-PCR and by western blotting with a sigma1 receptor specific antibody. Our results indicate that cancer cells express higher levels of sigma1 receptors than corresponding non-cancerous cells. Localization of the sigma1 receptor was investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, expression was visualized predominantly at the cell periphery. We have tested the effect of sigma1 and sigma2 drugs and a sigma1 receptor silencing construct on various aspects of the metastatic process on two breast cell lines of different metastatic potential and a normal breast cell line. Both sigma1 and sigma2 drugs and the sigma1 receptor silencing construct had effects on proliferation and adhesion for breast cancer cell lines, compared to a non-cancerous breast cell line. This data suggests sigma1 receptor plays a role in proliferation and adhesion of breast cancer cells. Therefore, it is likely to be a potential target for the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  3. Study of excited Ξc states decaying into Ξc0 and Ξc+ baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelton, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jeon, H. B.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kato, Y.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Niiyama, M.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Widmann, E.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Using a data sample of 980 fb-1 of e+e- annihilation data taken with the Belle detector operating at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider, we report the results of a study of excited Ξc states that decay, via the emission of photons and/or charged pions, into Ξc0 or Ξc+ ground state charmed-strange baryons. We present new measurements of the masses of all members of the Ξc', Ξc(2645 ), Ξc(2790 ), Ξc(2815 ), and Ξc(2980 ) isodoublets, measurements of the intrinsic widths of those that decay strongly, and evidence of previously unknown transitions.

  4. Overview of Issues Surrounding Strangeness in the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony W.

    2009-12-17

    The calculation of the strangeness content of the nucleon and its experimental verification is a fundamental step in establishing non-perturbative QCD as the correct theory describing the structure of hadrons. It holds a role in QCD analogous to the correct calculation of the Lamb shift in QED. We review the latest developments in the vector and scalar matrix elements of the strange quarks in the proton, where there has recently been considerable progress.

  5. Higher dimensional strange quark matter solutions in self creation cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Şen, R.; Aygün, S.

    2016-03-25

    In this study, we have generalized the higher dimensional flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe solutions for a cloud of string with perfect fluid attached strange quark matter (SQM) in Self Creation Cosmology (SCC). We have obtained that the cloud of string with perfect fluid does not survive and the string tension density vanishes for this model. However, we get dark energy model for strange quark matter with positive density and negative pressure in self creation cosmology.

  6. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo ); Benvenuto, O.G. La Plata ); Vucetich, H. La Plata )

    1992-05-15

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature {ital T} for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios.

  7. GENERAL: Non-Spherical Gravitational Collapse of Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Zade S.; D, Patil K.; N, Mulkalwar P.

    2008-05-01

    We study the non-spherical gravitational collapse of the strange quark null fluid. The interesting feature which emerges is that the non-spherical collapse of charged strange quark matter leads to a naked singularity whereas the gravitational collapse of neutral quark matter proceeds to form a black hole. We extend the earlier work of Harko and Cheng [Phys. Lett. A 266 (2000) 249] to the non-spherical case.

  8. Overview of Issues Surrounding Strangeness in the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    A. W. Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The calculation of the strangeness content of the nucleon and its experimental verification is a fundamental step in establishing non-perturbative QCD as the correct theory describing the structure of hadrons. It holds a role in QCD analogous to the correct calculation of the Lamb shift in QED. We review the latest developments in the vector and scalar matrix elements of the strange quarks in the proton, where there has recently been considerable progress.

  9. Imaging sigma receptors: applications in drug development.

    PubMed

    Collier, Thomas Lee; Waterhouse, Rikki N; Kassiou, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been implicated in a myriad of cellular functions, biological processes and diseases. While the precise biological functions of sigma receptors have not been elucidated, recent work has shed some light on to these enigmatic systems. Sigma receptors have recently been a target of drug development related to psychiatric and neurological disorders. Sigma ligands have also been shown to modulate endothelial cell proliferation and can control angiogenesis which makes them a promising target for oncology applications. Other areas currently being investigated include treatment of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine and immune system disorders. Of interest is that the human sigma-1 receptor gene contains a steroid binding component, and several gonadal steroids, including progesterone, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), interact with sigma-1 receptors. Of the steroids examined thus far, progesterone binds with the highest affinity to human sigma-1 receptors, with a reported affinity (Ki) as high as 30 nM while the other steroids exhibit lower affinity. For this and other reasons, sigma-1 receptors have been proposed as a link between the central nervous system and the endocrine and reproductive systems. Taken together, the above information highlights an important yet largely unexplored but promising area of research to examine the biological function and therapeutic potential of sigma receptors. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of these sites with a focus on specific areas where in vivo sigma receptor imaging is currently being investigated.

  10. THE BARYON CENSUS IN A MULTIPHASE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM: 30% OF THE BARYONS MAY STILL BE MISSING

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W.; Smith, Britton D. E-mail: smit1685@msu.edu

    2012-11-01

    Although galaxies, groups, and clusters contain {approx}10% of the baryons, many more reside in the photoionized and shocked-heated intergalactic medium (IGM) and in the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We update the baryon census in the (H I) Ly{alpha} forest and warm-hot IGM (WHIM) at 10{sup 5-6} K traced by O VI {lambda}1032, 1038 absorption. From Enzo cosmological simulations of heating, cooling, and metal transport, we improve the H I and O VI baryon surveys using spatially averaged corrections for metallicity (Z/Z {sub Sun }) and ionization fractions (f {sub HI}, f {sub OVI}). Statistically, the O VI correction product correlates with column density, (Z/Z {sub Sun })f {sub OVI} Almost-Equal-To (0.015)(N {sub OVI}/10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}){sup 0.70}, with an N {sub OVI}-weighted mean of 0.01, which doubles previous estimates of WHIM baryon content. We also update the Ly{alpha} forest contribution to baryon density out to z = 0.4, correcting for the (1 + z){sup 3} increase in absorber density, the (1 + z){sup 4.4} rise in photoionizing background, and cosmological proper length dl/dz. We find substantial baryon fractions in the photoionized Ly{alpha} forest (28% {+-} 11%) and WHIM traced by O VI and broad-Ly{alpha} absorbers (25% {+-} 8%). The collapsed phase (galaxies, groups, clusters, CGM) contains 18% {+-} 4%, leaving an apparent baryon shortfall of 29% {+-} 13%. Our simulations suggest that {approx}15% reside in hotter WHIM (T {>=} 10{sup 6} K). Additional baryons could be detected in weaker Ly{alpha} and O VI absorbers. Further progress requires higher-precision baryon surveys of weak absorbers, down to minimum column densities N {sub HI} {>=} 10{sup 12.0} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVI} {>=} 10{sup 12.5} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVII} {>=} 10{sup 14.5} cm{sup -2}, using high signal-to-noise data from high-resolution UV and X-ray spectrographs.

  11. Two Baryons with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas; Savage, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The quantization condition for two particle systems with arbitrary number of two-body open coupled-channels, spin and masses in a finite cubic volume is presented. The condition presented is in agreement with all previous studies of two-body systems in a finite volume. The result is fully relativistic and holds for all momenta below inelastic thresholds and is exact up to exponential volume corrections that are governed by m{sub {pi}} L, where m{sub {pi}} is the pion mass and L is the spatial extent of my box. Its implication for the studies of coupled-channel baryon-baryon systems is discussed, and the necessary tools for implementing the formalism are review.

  12. Exotic Baryon Resonances in the Skyrme Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonov, Dmitri; Petrov, Victor

    We outline how one can understand the Skyrme model from the modern perspective. We review the quantization of the SU(3) rotations of the Skyrmion, leading to the exotic baryons that cannot be made of three quarks. It is shown that in the limit of large number of colors the lowest-mass exotic baryons can be studied from the kaon-Skyrmion scattering amplitudes, an approach known after Callan and Klebanov. We follow this approach and find, both analytically and numerically, a strong Θ+ resonance in the scattering amplitude that is traced to the rotational mode. The Skyrme model does predict an exotic resonance Θ+ but grossly overestimates the width. To understand better the factors affecting the width, it is computed by several methods giving, however, identical results. In particular, we show that insofar as the width is small, it can be found from the transition axial constant. The physics leading to a narrow Θ+ resonance is briefly reviewed and affirmed.

  13. Heavy baryons in the large Nc limit

    DOE PAGES

    Albertus, C.; Ruiz Arriola, Enrique; Fernando, Ishara P.; ...

    2015-09-16

    It is shown that in the large Nc limit heavy baryon masses can be estimated quantitatively in a 1/Nc expansion using the Hartree approximation. The results are compared with available lattice calculations for different values of the ratio between the square root of the string tension and the heavy quark mass tension independent of Nc. Using a potential adjusted to agree with the one obtained in lattice QCD, a variational analysis of the ground state spin averaged baryon mass is performed using Gaussian Hartree wave functions. Relativistic corrections through the quark kinetic energy are included. Lastly, the results provide goodmore » estimates for the first sub-leading in 1/Nc corrections.« less

  14. Baryon Spectrum Analysis using Covariant Constraint Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Joshua; Crater, Horace

    2012-03-01

    The energy spectrum of the baryons is determined by treating each of them as a three-body system with the interacting forces coming from a set of two-body potentials that depend on both the distance between the quarks and the spin and orbital angular momentum coupling terms. The Two Body Dirac equations of constraint dynamics derived by Crater and Van Alstine, matched with the quasipotential formalism of Todorov as the underlying two-body formalism are used, as well as the three-body constraint formalism of Sazdjian to integrate the three two-body equations into a single relativistically covariant three body equation for the bound state energies. The results are analyzed and compared to experiment using a best fit method and several different algorithms, including a gradient approach, and Monte Carlo method. Results for all well-known baryons are presented and compared to experiment, with good accuracy.

  15. Baryon number current in holographic noncommutative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Tadahito; Ohtake, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    We consider the noncommutative deformation of the finite-temperature holographic QCD (Sakai-Sugimoto) model in external electric and magnetic field and evaluate the effect of the noncommutativity on the properties of the conductor-insulator phase transition associated with a baryon number current. Although the noncommutative deformation of the gauge theory does not change the phase structure with respect to the baryon number current, the transition temperature Tc, the transition electric field ec, and magnetic field bc in the conductor-insulator phase transition depend on the noncommutativity parameter θ . Namely, the noncommutativity of space coordinates have an influence on the shape of the phase diagram for the conductor-insulator phase transition. On the other hand, the allowed range of the noncommutativity parameter can be restricted by the reality condition of the constants of motion.

  16. An Unquenched Quark Model of Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, Roelof; Santopinto, Elena

    2007-10-26

    We present the formalism for a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. The present approach is an extension of the fiux-tube breaking model of Geiger and Isgur in which now the contribution of quark-antiquark pairs can be studied for any inital baryon, for any fiavor of the qq-bar pair (not only ss-bar but also uu-bar and dd-bar) and for arbitrary hadron wave functions. The method is illustrated with an application to the spin of the proton and the flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea.

  17. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  18. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more » as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

  19. Understanding the baryon and meson spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    A brief overview is given of what we know of the baryon and meson spectra, with a focus on what are the key internal degrees of freedom and how these relate to strong coupling QCD. The challenges, experimental, theoretical and phenomenological, for the future are outlined, with particular reference to a program at Jefferson Lab to extract hadronic states in which glue unambiguously contributes to their quantum numbers.

  20. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-08-01

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in the study of baryon resonances. The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of polarization observables. The N* program at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) includes experimental studies with linearly and circularly polarized tagged photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized nucleon targets, and recoil polarizations. An overview of these experimental studies and recent results will be given.