Science.gov

Sample records for strangeness excitation functions

  1. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ωb and Ω_{bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations.

  2. Latest Results on Orbitally Excited Strange Bottom Mesons with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelov, Igor V.; /New Mexico U.

    2006-10-01

    The authors present the latest results on the spectroscopy of orbitally excited strange bottom mesons from {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF data. The measurements are performed with fully reconstructed B decays collected by the CDF II detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in both the di-muon and the fully hadronic trigger paths.

  3. Exploring Strange Nonchaotic Attractors through Jacobian Elliptic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Hoz, A. Martinez; Chacon, R.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of Jacobian elliptic functions (JEFs) for inquiring into the reshaping effect of quasiperiodic forces in nonlinear nonautonomous systems exhibiting strange nonchaotic attractors (SNAs). Specifically, we characterize analytically and numerically some reshaping-induced transitions starting from SNAs in the context of…

  4. Strangeness-changing response functions: an alternative approach to hypernuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2001-01-01

    We study strangeness-changing response functions as an alternative description of hypernuclear structure. Hypernuclear states are treated in the same manner as any other conventional nuclear excitation that emerges from the response of the nuclear ground state to an external probe. The nuclear response is calculated using a random-phase approximation to an effective relativistic mean-field model that reproduces bulk properties of normal nuclei. The relevant meson-baryon vertices are constrained by imposing SU(3)-flavour symmetry, while the residual hyperon-particle-nucleon-hole interaction is assumed to be mediated by the two lightest S = -1 mesons: the pseudoscalar kaon and its vector partner K*(892). We use this model to analyse the spectra of 16YO and 40YCa hypernuclei.

  5. Excited bottom and bottom-strange mesons in the quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Qi-Fang; Pan, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yan-Yan; Wang, En; Li, De-Min

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand the possible q q ¯ quark-model assignments of the BJ(5840 ) and BJ(5960 ) recently reported by the LHCb Collaboration, we evaluate mass spectra, strong decays, and radiative decays of bottom and bottom-strange mesons in a nonrelativistic quark model. Comparing these predictions with the relevant experimental results, we suggest that the BJ(5840 ) and BJ(5960 ) can be identified as the B (2 1S0) and B (1 3D3) , respectively, and the B (5970 ) reported by the CDF Collaboration can be interpreted as the B (2 3S1) or B (1 3D3) . Further precise measurements of the width, spin and decay modes of the B (5970 ) are needed to distinguish these two assignments. These predictions of bottom and bottom-strange mesons can provide useful information to further experimental investigations.

  6. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  7. Study of natural spin-parity strange meson radial excitations in K/sup -/p. -->. K/sup -/. pi. /sup +/n at 11 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, L.S.

    1980-12-01

    Results are presented from a high statistics study of the reaction K/sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup -/..pi../sup +/n at 11 GeV/c. This data was selected offline from an approx. 1000 event/..mu..b K/sup -/p experiment run on the Large Aperture Solenoid Spectrometer (LASS) at SLAC which triggered on essentially the total inelastic cross section. This K/sup -/..pi../sup +/n sample, after cuts, contained approx. 42,000 events in the K..pi.. invariant mass region from 0.65 GeV to 2.30 GeV, and absolute value t' < 0.2 GeV/sup 2/. A spherical harmonic angular moments analysis of this data is presented, as well as an energy independent partial wave analysis (PWA) of these angular moments. The nearly uniform acceptance characteristics of this data allowed a detailed analysis, which yielded information on natural spin-parity strange meson resonances in the K..pi.. invariant mass range from 0.65 GeV to 2.30 GeV. The well established K*(895), K*(1430), and K*(1780) are observed, and clear evidence is presented for a J/sup P/ = 4/sup +/ strange meson state at a mass of 2.08 GeV. The K/sup -/..pi../sup +/ elastic scattering partial waves extracted in this PWA show unambiguous evidence for a relatively narrow S wave resonance near 1.42 GeV in the K..pi.. invariant mass. This state is a confirmation of the 0/sup +/ K(1500) seen in previous PWA's. A new higher S wave resonance is clearly seen unambiguously near 1.90 GeV. Unambiguous evidence is presented for a relatively wide P wave resonance in the 1.70 GeV region.A second new P wave resonance also is seen in two of four ambiguous partial wave solutions in the 2.10 GeV region. These resonance states are discussed within the framework of a simple harmonic oscillator quark model. In particular three of the underlying resonances are discussed as possible natural spin-parity strange meson radial excitations.

  8. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  9. Dynamics of strangeness production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming

    2010-11-15

    Within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, the dynamics of strangeness (K{sup 0,+}, {Lambda}, and {Sigma}{sup -,0,+}) production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies is investigated systematically, with the strange particles considered to be produced mainly by inelastic collisions of baryon-baryon and pion-baryon. Collisions in the region of suprasaturation densities of the dense baryonic matter formed in heavy-ion collisions dominate the yields of strangeness production. Total multiplicities as functions of incident energies and collision centralities are calculated with the Skyrme parameter SLy6. The excitation function of strangeness production is analyzed and also compared with the KaoS data for K{sup +} production in the reactions {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au.

  10. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  11. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor-acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene-perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  12. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker

    2009-10-01

    A brief overview of strangeness physics with the CLAS detector at JLab is given, mainly covering the domain of nucleon resonances. Several excited states predicted by the symmetric constituent quark model may have signiffcant couplings to the K+ or K0 channels. I will discuss data that are relevant in the search for such states in the strangeness channel, and give an outlook on the future prospects of the N* program at JLab with electromagnetic probes.

  13. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

    PubMed

    Komeilipoor, Naeem; Pizzolato, Fabio; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Cesari, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST). While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally), single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1), and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  14. Strange quarks in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1991-06-01

    We survey the field of strange particle nuclear physics, starting with the spectroscopy of strangeness S = {minus}1 {Lambda} hypernuclei, proceeding to an interpretation of recent data on S = {minus}2 {Lambda}{Lambda} hypernuclear production and decay, and finishing with some speculations on the production of multi-strange nuclear composites (hypernuclei or strangelets'') in relativistic heavy ion collisions. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Excitation Spectra of Nucleobases with Multiconfigurational Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Mickaël; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Hedegård, Erik D

    2016-01-14

    Range-separated hybrid methods between wave function theory and density functional theory (DFT) can provide high-accuracy results, while correcting some of the inherent flaws of both the underlying wave function theory and DFT. We here assess the accuracy for excitation energies of the nucleobases thymine, uracil, cytosine, and adenine, using a hybrid between complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and DFT methods. The method is based on range separation, thereby avoiding all double-counting of electron correlation and is denoted long-range CASSCF short-range DFT (CAS-srDFT). Using a linear response extension of CAS-srDFT, we compare the first 7-8 excited states of the nucleobases with perturbative multireference approaches as well as coupled cluster based methods. Our results show that the CAS-srDFT method can provide accurate excitation energies in good correspondence with the computationally more expensive methods. PMID:26669578

  16. Charmed-strange mesons revisited: Mass spectra and strong decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qin-Tao; Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by the present experimental status of charmed-strange mesons, we perform a systematic study of the charmed-strange meson family in which we calculate the mass spectra of the charmed-strange meson family by taking a screening effect into account in the Godfrey-Isgur model and investigate the corresponding strong decays via the quark pair creation model. These phenomenological analyses of charmed-strange mesons not only shed light on the features of the observed charmed-strange states, but also provide important information on future experimental search for the missing higher radial and orbital excitations in the charmed-strange meson family, which will be a valuable task in LHCb, the forthcoming Belle II, and PANDA.

  17. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  18. Strangeness in Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Benaoum, Hachemi

    2008-04-01

    Results of the parity violating asymmetry APV for longitudinally polarized 3 GeV electrons from both hydrogen and helium cryogenic targets, at small scatteting angle thetalab~6 ° are presented. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of GEs and GMs, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for 4He is a function solely of GEs. The combination of the two results therefore allows GEs and GMs to be separately determined.

  19. Strange Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Satoshi N.

    2014-04-01

    "Strange" means 1) unusual or surprising, especially in a way that is difficult to explain or understand or 2) having strangeness degree of freedom. Light nuclear systems with strangeness, light hypernuclei, are perfect playground to study baryon force which would be a bridge between well established nuclear force in low energy region and QCD, the first principle of the strong interaction. Overview of study of light hypernuclei is given and recent experimental findings are reviewed.

  20. The physics of strange matter

    SciTech Connect

    Olinto, A.V. |

    1991-12-01

    Strange matter may be the ground state of matter. We review the phenomenology and astrophysical implications of strange matter, and discuss the possible ways for testing the strange matter hypothesis.

  1. Strangeness in the Meson Cloud Model

    SciTech Connect

    Signal, A. I.

    2010-07-27

    I review progress in calculating strange quark and antiquark distributions of the nucleon using the meson cloud model. This progress parallels that of the meson cloud model, which is now a useful theoretical basis for understanding symmetry breaking in nucleon parton distribution functions. I examine the breaking of symmetries involving strange quarks and antiquarks, including quark--antiquark symmetry in the sea, SU(3) flavour symmetry and SU(6) spin-flavour symmetry.

  2. Strangeness -2 hypertriton.

    PubMed

    Garcilazo, H; Valcarce, A

    2013-01-01

    We solve for the first time, the Faddeev equations for the bound state problem of the coupled ΛΛN-ΞNN system to study whether or not a hypertriton with strangeness -2 may exist. We make use of the interactions obtained from a chiral quark model describing the low-energy observables of the two-baryon systems with strangeness 0, -1, and -2 and three-baryon systems with strangeness 0 and -1. The ΛΛN system alone is unbound. However, when the full coupling to ΞNN is considered, the strangeness -2 three-baryon system with quantum numbers (I,J(P)) = (1/2,1/2(+)) becomes bound, with a binding energy of about 0.5 MeV. This result is compatible with the nonexistence of a stable (Λ)(3)H with isospin one.

  3. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  4. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama; Collins, Liam; Strelcov, Evgheni; Okatan, Mahmut B; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  5. Excitation function calculations for α + 93Nb nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, M.; Tel, E.; Sarpün, İ. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the excitation functions of alpha-induced reactions on the 93Nb target nucleus were calculated by using ALICE-ASH code. The hybrid model, Weisskopf-Ewing model and geometry dependent hybrid model in this code were used to understand the alpha-niobium interaction. The contribution on the nuclear interaction of compound and pre-compound processes, with variation of the incident alpha particle energy, was presented. Furthermore, the reaction cross sections were calculated by using different level density models such as Superfluid nuclear model, Fermi gas model and Kataria-Ramamurthy Fermi gas model. Obtaining a good agreement between the calculated and the measured cross sections, the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models were varied. Finally, the proper choice of the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models was found to be quite important in order to obtain the more realistic cross section values.

  6. Functional Assessment of Corticospinal System Excitability in Karate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Messina, Giovanni; Valenzano, Anna; Monda, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Messina, Antonietta; Petito, Annamaria; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ciliberti, Michela Anna Pia; Monda, Marcellino; Capranica, Laura; Cibelli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in the coordination performance of karate athletes through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods Thirteen right-handed male karate athletes (25.0±5.0 years) and 13 matched non-athlete controls (26.7±6.2 years) were enrolled. A single-pulse TMS was applied using a figure-eight coil stimulator. Resting motor threshold (rMT) was determined. Surface electromyography was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Motor evoked potential (MEP) latencies and amplitudes at rMT, 110%, and 120% of rMT were considered. Functional assessment of the coordination performance was assessed by in-phase (IP) and anti-phase (AP) homolateral hand and foot coordination tasks performed at 80, 120, and 180 bpm. Results Compared to controls, athletes showed lower rMT (p<0.01), shorter MEP latency (p<0.01) and higher MEP amplitude (p<0.01), with a significant correlation (r = 0.50, p<0.01) between rMT and MEP latency. Coordination decreased with increasing velocity, and better IP performances emerged compared to AP ones (p<0.001). In general, a high correlation between rMT and coordination tasks was found for both IP and AP conditions. Conclusion With respect to controls, karate athletes present a higher corticospinal excitability indicating the presence of an activity-dependent alteration in the balance and interactions between inhibitory and facilitatory circuits determining the final output from the M1. Furthermore, the high correlation between corticospinal excitability and coordination performance could support sport-specific neurophysiological arrangements. PMID:27218465

  7. Strangeness at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker

    2005-09-28

    In this contribution the authors discuss the physics of strange hadrons in low energy ({approx_equal} 1-2 AGeV) heavy ion collision. In this energy range the relevant strange particle are the kaons and anti-kaons. The most interesting aspect concerning these particles are so called in-medium modifications. They will attempt to review the current status of understanding of these in medium modifications. In addition they briefly discuss other issues related with kaon production, such as the nuclear equation of state and chemical equilibrium.

  8. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars. PMID:25699444

  9. Strange fluctuations at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aziz, Mohamed; Gavin, Sean

    2004-01-01

    Net charge fluctuations measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC agree with hadronic event generators, suggesting that more sensitive fluctuation observables are needed to extract information on collision dynamics. Important information on isospin fluctuations can be extracted from K0SK± measurements. Gavin and Kapusta proposed that disoriented chiral condensate can produce extraordinary isospin fluctuations in both strange and non-strange mesons. However, even in the absence of such a contribution, we argue that this observable is very sensitive to the collision dynamics.

  10. Two alternative versions of strangeness

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Kazuhikoa

    2008-01-01

    The concept of strangeness emerged from the low energy phenomenology before the entry of quarks in particle physics. The connection between strangeness and isospin is rather accidental and loose and we recognize later that the definition of strangeness is model-dependent. Indeed, in Gell-Mann’s triplet quark model we realize that there is a simple alternative representation of strangeness. When the concept of generations is incorporated into the quark model we find that only the second alternative version of strangeness remains meaningful, whereas the original one does no longer keep its significance. PMID:18997448

  11. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  12. Some light-ion excitation-function measurements on titanium, yttrium, and europium, and associated results

    SciTech Connect

    West, H.I. Jr.; Lanier, R.G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Nuckolls, R.M.; Nagle, R.J.; O`Brien, H.; Frehaut, J.; Adam, A.; Philis, C.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses: Fabrication of Plastic-Matrix-Encapsulated Accelerator Targets and Their Use in Measuring Nuclear Excitation Functions; Correcting Excitation Function Data in the Low Energy Region for Finite Thickness of the Target Foils, Including Effects of Straggling; Excitation Functions for the Nuclear Reactions on Titanium Leading to the Production {sup 48}V, {sup 44}Sc and {sup 47}Sc by Proton, Deuteron and Triton Irradiations at 0--35 MeV; Some Excitation Functions of Proton and Deuteron Induced Reactions on {sup 89}Y; Measurements of the Excitation Functions of the Isobaric Chain {sup 87}Y, {sup 87}Y{sup m}, {sup 87}Y{sup g} and {sup 87}Sr{sup m}; Levels in {sup 87}Y Observed in the Decay of {sup 87}Zr; and Nuclear Reaction Excitation Functions from the Irradiation of {sup 151,153}Eu with Protons And deuterons up to 35 MeV.

  13. Excitation Control: Balancing PSD-95 Function at the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Dove; El-Husseini, Alaa

    2008-01-01

    Excitability of individual neurons dictates the overall excitation in specific brain circuits. This process is thought to be regulated by molecules that regulate synapse number, morphology and strength. Neuronal excitation is also influenced by the amounts of neurotransmitter receptors and signaling molecules retained at particular synaptic sites. Recent studies revealed a key role for PSD-95, a scaffolding molecule enriched at glutamatergic synapses, in modulation of clustering of several neurotransmitter receptors, adhesion molecules, ion channels, cytoskeletal elements and signaling molecules at postsynaptic sites. In this review we will highlight mechanisms that control targeting of PSD-95 at the synapse, and discuss how this molecule influences the retention and clustering of diverse synaptic proteins to regulate synaptic structure and strength. We will also discuss how PSD-95 may maintain a balance between excitation and inhibition in the brain and how alterations in this balance may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:18946537

  14. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    In the absence of actual building accelerometer data, the linear response of a structure to strong ground motion is estimated by the convolution of the dynamic response of the structure with an input ground motion. The input motion is usually provided by a local `reference' station record. In this study, we look at whether actual recorded ground motion at two instrumented buildings with well studied dynamic properties can be satisfactorily modeled using a local ground station. All stations record continuous 24-bit data streams on the CISN network, so analysis of a variety of weak earthquake motions, as well as ambient noise, is possible. Our buildings are the 9-story reinforced concrete Millikan Library (CISN Station MIK) and the 3-story braced steel frame Broad Center (CBC), both on the Caltech Campus. Motions recorded on their upper floors are compared with motions from ground stations located in the basement of a lightweight wood-frame house (GSA), and in a subsurface vault (CRP). All stations are within 200m of each other. Recent work using the new continuous datastream indicates that the natural frequencies of these structures can vary by up to 5% during normal ambient conditions, due to such factors as changing building usage, diurnal temperature variation, and wind/rainfall events. These shifts can be sudden, and models of building motions are sensitive to these previously un-documented changes. Further, during stronger motions, such as forced vibration testing, and minor earthquake shaking, natural frequencies are shown to drop by up to 10% (2003 M5.4 Big Bear Earthquake, Δ = 119km), with near-instantaneous recovery once the excitation is over. Moderate earthquakes can temporarily reduce frequencies by up to 30% with no apparent structural damage (1971 M6.6 San Fernando Earthquake, Δ = 31km). Post-event permanent reductions of about 10% have been observed. The ability to monitor these evolving dynamic characteristics makes a re-evaluation of the

  15. Dissociative excitation of the N(+)(5S) state by electron impact on N2 - Excitation function and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable N(+)(5S) ions were produced in the laboratory by dissociative excitation of N2 with energetic electrons. The resulting radiative decay of the N(+)(5S) state was observed with sufficient resolution to completely resolve the doublet from the nearby N2 molecular radiation. The excitation function was measured from threshold to 500 eV. The cross section peaks at a high electron energy and also exhibits a high threshold energy both of which are typical of dissociative excitation-ionization processes. This finding complicates the explanation of electron impact on N2 as the mechanism for the source of the 2145 A 'auroral mystery feature' by further increasing the required peak cross section. It is suggested that the apparent N(+)(5S) quenching in auroras may be an artifact due to the softening of the electron energy spectrum in the auroral E region.

  16. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  17. One-electron and multi-electron transitions observed in the excitation function of the dissociative photoionization excitation of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Masashi; Ukai, Masatoshi; Machida, Shuntaro; Kameta, Kosei; Ehresmann, Arno; Kouchi, Noriyuki; Hatano, Yoshihiko; Hayaishi, Tatsuji; Shigemasa, Eiji; Ito, Kenji

    1996-05-01

    The excitation function of the dissociative photoionization excitation ( DIE) of 0953-4075/29/9/017/img14 has been measured with the detection technique of coincidence between photoion 0953-4075/29/9/017/img15 and a fluorescence photon emitted from an excited atom N* using extreme- UV synchrotron radiation ( SR) as an excitation source in the energy region of 35 - 65 eV. The axis of the detection system was set at two angles, parallel or perpendicular with respect to the major axis of the elliptically polarized SR, in the present measurement. The coincidence spectra obtained in this energy region show at least two qualitatively different structures originating from two different DIE processes. The major components of the DIE in the present energy region are ascribed to the dissociation of the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img16 state which is strongly coupled with correlation states in the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img17 symmetry. In addition, DIE from other precursor states in the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img18 symmetry or dissociative photo-double ionization excitation ( DDIE) was also observed.

  18. Strange experiments at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to report recent progress in nuclear experiments involving strangeness which have been carried out at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron over the past three years. These recent developments are noted in three areas: few body systems and dibaryons; strange probes of the nucleus; and associated production of hypernuclei. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Strangeness in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Both perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms contribute to strangeness in the proton sea. We have developed a hybrid model in which non-perturbative contributions are calculated in a meson cloud model which expands the proton in terms of meson-baryon states, and perturbative contributions are calculated in a statistical model which expands the proton in terms of quark-gluon states. The perturbative contributions are represented in the parton distributions of the ``bare'' hadrons in the meson cloud. We compare our results to the recent experimental data of ATLAS and HERMES. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  20. Electroproduction of Strange Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Hungerford

    2002-06-01

    The advent of high-energy, CW-beams of electrons now allows electro-production and precision studies of nuclei containing hyperons. Previously, the injection of strangeness into a nucleus was accomplished using secondary beams of mesons, where beam quality and target thickness limited the missing mass resolution. We review here the theoretical description of the (e, e'K+) reaction mechanism, and discuss the first experiment demonstrating that this reaction can be used to precisely study the spectra of light hypernuclei. Future experiments based on similar techniques, are expected to attain even better resolutions and rates.

  1. ``Towards Strange Metallic Holography'

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; Tong, David; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-08-26

    We initiate a holographic model building approach to 'strange metallic' phenomenology. Our model couples a neutral Lifshitz-invariant quantum critical theory, dual to a bulk gravitational background, to a finite density of gapped probe charge carriers, dually described by D-branes. In the physical regime of temperature much lower than the charge density and gap, we exhibit anomalous scalings of the temperature and frequency dependent conductivity. Choosing the dynamical critical exponent z appropriately we can match the non-Fermi liquid scalings, such as linear resistivity, observed in strange metal regimes. As part of our investigation we outline three distinct string theory realizations of Lifshitz geometries: from F theory, from polarized branes, and from a gravitating charged Fermi gas. We also identify general features of renormalization group flow in Lifshitz theories, such as the appearance of relevant charge-charge interactions when z {ge} 2. We outline a program to extend this model building approach to other anomalous observables of interest such as the Hall conductivity.

  2. Self-Consistent Optimization of Excited States within Density-Functional Tight-Binding.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Le, Khoa; Irle, Stephan

    2016-01-12

    We present an implementation of energies and gradients for the ΔDFTB method, an analogue of Δ-self-consistent-field density functional theory (ΔSCF) within density-functional tight-binding, for the lowest singlet excited state of closed-shell molecules. Benchmarks of ΔDFTB excitation energies, optimized geometries, Stokes shifts, and vibrational frequencies reveal that ΔDFTB provides a qualitatively correct description of changes in molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies due to excited-state relaxation. The accuracy of ΔDFTB Stokes shifts is comparable to that of ΔSCF-DFT, and ΔDFTB performs similarly to ΔSCF with the PBE functional for vertical excitation energies of larger chromophores where the need for efficient excited-state methods is most urgent. We provide some justification for the use of an excited-state reference density in the DFTB expansion of the electronic energy and demonstrate that ΔDFTB preserves many of the properties of its parent ΔSCF approach. This implementation fills an important gap in the extended framework of DFTB, where access to excited states has been limited to the time-dependent linear-response approach, and affords access to rapid exploration of a valuable class of excited-state potential energy surfaces.

  3. Functional patterned multiphoton excitation deep inside scattering tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Bègue, Aurélien; Leshem, Ben; Schwartz, Osip; Stell, Brandon M.; Bradley, Jonathan; Oron, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina

    2013-04-01

    Stochastic distortion of light beams in scattering samples makes in-depth photoexcitation in brain tissue a major challenge. A common solution for overcoming scattering involves adaptive pre-compensation of the unknown distortion. However, this requires long iterative searches for sample-specific optimized corrections, which is a problem when applied to optical neurostimulation where typical timescales in the system are in the millisecond range. Thus, photoexcitation in scattering media that is independent of the properties of a specific sample would be an ideal solution. Here, we show that temporally focused two-photon excitation with generalized phase contrast enables photoexcitation of arbitrary spatial patterns within turbid tissues with remarkable robustness to scattering. We demonstrate three-dimensional confinement of tailored photoexcitation patterns >200 µm in depth, both in numerical simulations and through brain slices combined with patch-clamp recording of photoactivated channelrhodopsin-2.

  4. The strange flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizota, Taketo; Kurogi, Kouhei; Ohya, Yuji; Okajima, Atsushi; Naruo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-05-01

    The strange three-dimensional flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls is one of the most interesting and unknown phenomenon associated with the trajectories of sports balls. Many spectators have experienced numerous exciting and emotional instances while observing the curious flight behaviour of these balls. We examine the aerodynamic mechanisms of erratic ball behaviours through real flight observations, unsteady force measurements and flow pattern visualisations. The strange behaviour is elucidated by the relationship between the unsteady forces on the ball and the wake flow. The irregular changes in position for twin longitudinal vortices have already been discovered in the supercritical Reynolds number region of a sphere with a smooth surface. This finding is applicable to the strange behaviour of the flight of soccer balls with this supercritical flow. The players, spectators, and television viewers will gain greater insight into the effects of soccer ball flights.

  5. The strange flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls.

    PubMed

    Mizota, Taketo; Kurogi, Kouhei; Ohya, Yuji; Okajima, Atsushi; Naruo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The strange three-dimensional flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls is one of the most interesting and unknown phenomenon associated with the trajectories of sports balls. Many spectators have experienced numerous exciting and emotional instances while observing the curious flight behaviour of these balls. We examine the aerodynamic mechanisms of erratic ball behaviours through real flight observations, unsteady force measurements and flow pattern visualisations. The strange behaviour is elucidated by the relationship between the unsteady forces on the ball and the wake flow. The irregular changes in position for twin longitudinal vortices have already been discovered in the supercritical Reynolds number region of a sphere with a smooth surface. This finding is applicable to the strange behaviour of the flight of soccer balls with this supercritical flow. The players, spectators, and television viewers will gain greater insight into the effects of soccer ball flights. PMID:23695000

  6. The strange flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls

    PubMed Central

    Mizota, Taketo; Kurogi, Kouhei; Ohya, Yuji; Okajima, Atsushi; Naruo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The strange three-dimensional flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls is one of the most interesting and unknown phenomenon associated with the trajectories of sports balls. Many spectators have experienced numerous exciting and emotional instances while observing the curious flight behaviour of these balls. We examine the aerodynamic mechanisms of erratic ball behaviours through real flight observations, unsteady force measurements and flow pattern visualisations. The strange behaviour is elucidated by the relationship between the unsteady forces on the ball and the wake flow. The irregular changes in position for twin longitudinal vortices have already been discovered in the supercritical Reynolds number region of a sphere with a smooth surface. This finding is applicable to the strange behaviour of the flight of soccer balls with this supercritical flow. The players, spectators, and television viewers will gain greater insight into the effects of soccer ball flights. PMID:23695000

  7. Multiple-Resonance Local Wave Functions for Accurate Excited States in Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zulfikri, Habiburrahman; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel class of local multideterminant Jastrow-Slater wave functions for the efficient and accurate treatment of excited states in quantum Monte Carlo. The wave function is expanded as a linear combination of excitations built from multiple sets of localized orbitals that correspond to the bonding patterns of the different Lewis resonance structures of the molecule. We capitalize on the concept of orbital domains of local coupled-cluster methods, which is here applied to the active space to select the orbitals to correlate and construct the important transitions. The excitations are further grouped into classes, which are ordered in importance and can be systematically included in the Jastrow-Slater wave function to ensure a balanced description of all states of interest. We assess the performance of the proposed wave function in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and excited-state geometry optimization of retinal models whose π → π* state has a strong intramolecular charge-transfer character. We find that our multiresonance wave functions recover the reference values of the total energies of the ground and excited states with only a small number of excitations and that the same expansion can be flexibly used at very different geometries. Furthermore, significant computational saving can also be gained in the orbital optimization step by selectively mixing occupied and virtual orbitals based on spatial considerations without loss of accuracy on the excitation energy. Our multiresonance wave functions are therefore compact, accurate, and very promising for the calculation of multiple excited states of different character in large molecules.

  8. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  9. Core and valence excitations in resonant X-ray spectroscopy using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur K and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\textrm {L}_{2,3}$\\end{document}L2,3 edges. Comparison of the simulated XANES signals with experiment shows that the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the static exchange method. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals give some insights into the correlation of different excitations in the molecule. PMID:23181305

  10. Core and Valence Excitations in Resonant X-ray Spectroscopy using Restricted Excitation Window Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-11-21

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur K and L2,3 edges. The simulated XANES signals from the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory (REW-TDDFT) and the static exchange (STEX) method are compared with experiments, showing that REW-TDDFT is more accurate and computationally less expensive than STEX. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals from REW-TDDFT give some insights on the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

  11. Magnetic monopoles and strange matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañudo, J.; Seguí, A.

    1986-01-01

    We show that if the density of grand unified monopoles at T⋍200 MeV id of the order of or greater than 4.4×1021 cm-3 they annihilate all of the strange matter produced in the quagma-hadron phase transition which of the unverse undergoes at this temperature. We also study gravitational capture of monopoles by lumps of strange matter. This yield upper limits on the density of monopoles for different sizes of strange ball. On leave of absence from Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.

  12. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  13. Comparison of the hydrological excitation functions HAM of polar motion for the period 1980.0-2007.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Pasnicka, M.; Kolaczek, B.

    2011-10-01

    In this study we compared contributions of polar motion excitation determined from hydrological models and harmonic coefficients of the Earth gravity field obtained from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). Hydrological excitation function (hydrological angular momentum - HAM) has been estimated from models of global hydrology, based on the observed distribution of surface water, snow, ice and soil moisture. All of them were compared with observed Geodetic Angular Momentum (GAM), excitations of polar motion. The spectra of these excitation functions of polar motion and residual geodetic excitation function G-A-O obtained from GAM by elimination of atmospheric and oceanic excitation functions were computed too. Phasor diagrams of the seasonal components of the polar motion excitation functions of all HAM excitation functions as well as of two GRACE solutions: CSR, CNES were determined and discussed.

  14. Linearity condition for orbital energies in density functional theory (V): Extension to excited state calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Kensei; Iizuka, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A new scheme is proposed for constructing an orbital-specific (OS) exchange-correlation functional that satisfies multiple linearity conditions for orbital energies (LCOEs). The Hartree-Fock exchange portions in the OS exchange-correlation functional, based on a multiply range-separated functional, are set so as to satisfy the multiple LCOEs. The current scheme has also been extended to calculations of core, valence, and Rydberg excitations. Numerical assessments on ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies have confirmed accurate descriptions of core, valence, and Rydberg orbitals by the OS hybrid functional.

  15. Fragment-based configuration interaction wave function to calculate environmental effect on excited states in proteins and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Jun-ya

    2013-05-01

    Solvatochromic effect in proteins and solutions was described by a configuration interaction singles (CIS) wave function with fragment-localized molecular orbitals. Coarse-grained analysis indicated that the CI wave function can be described by local excitations and charge-transfer (CT) excitations between the chromophore and the environment. We developed an atomic-orbital direct runcated CIS code and applied the excited states of retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin and MeOH environments, and those of s-trans-acrolein in water. Number of excitation operators was significantly reduced by eliminating the CT excitations between the environmental fragments. The truncated CIS wave functions reproduced the original excitation energies very well.

  16. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Is as Accurate as CASPT2 for Electronic Excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Chad E; Ghosh, Soumen; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-02-01

    A correct description of electronically excited states is critical to the interpretation of visible-ultraviolet spectra, photochemical reactions, and excited-state charge-transfer processes in chemical systems. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory and a new kind of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here, we show that MC-PDFT with a first-generation on-top density functional performs as well as CASPT2 for an organic chemistry database including valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer excitations. The results are very encouraging for practical applications. PMID:26794241

  17. Excited State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-01

    The optical response of excited states is a key property used to probe photophysical and photochemical dynamics. Additionally, materials with a large nonlinear absorption cross-section caused by two-photon (TPA) and excited state absorption (ESA) are desirable for optical limiting applications. The ability to predict the optical response of excited states would help in the interpretation of transient absorption experiments and aid in the search for and design of optical limiting materials. We have developed an approach to obtain excited state absorption spectra by combining real-time (RT) and linear-response (LR) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Being based on RT-TDDFT, our method is aimed at tackling larger molecular complexes and materials systems where excited state absorption is predominantly seen and many time-resolved experimental efforts are focused. To demonstrate our method, we have calculated the ground and excited state spectra of H₂⁺ and H₂ due to the simplicity in the interpretation of the spectra. We have validated our new approach by comparing our results for butadiene with previously published results based on quadratic response (QR). We also present results for oligofluorenes, where we compare our results with both QR-TDDFT and experimental measurements. Because our method directly measures the response of an excited state, stimulated emission features are also captured; although, these features are underestimated in energy which could be attributed to a change of the reference from the ground to the excited state.

  18. Strangeness and onset of deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.

    2012-05-15

    I will review the current status of global strangeness production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions with particular emphasis on recent results from core-corona model. I will discuss its relevance for the detection of the onset of deconfinement.

  19. Torsional oscillations of strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Strange stars are one of the hypothetical compact stellar objects that can be formed after a supernova explosion. The existence of these objects relies on the absolute stability of strange collapsed quark matter with respect to standard nuclear matter. We discuss simple models of strange stars with a bare quark matter surface, thus standard nuclear matter is completely absent. In these models an electric dipole layer a few hundreds Fermi thick should exist close to the star surface. Studying the torsional oscillations of the electrically charged layer we estimate the emitted power, finding that it is of the order of 1045 erg/s, meaning that these objects would be among the brightest compact sources in the heavens. The associated relaxation times are very uncertain, with values ranging between microseconds and minutes, depending on the crust thickness. Although part of the radiated power should be absorbed by the electrosphere surrounding the strange star, a sizable fraction of photons should escape and be detectable.

  20. Theoretical Issues in Strangeness Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laget, Jean-Marc

    2000-12-31

    After pioneering works on hypernuclei, strangeness production mechanisms have been studied in hadron collisions and photoreactions in the sixties. Recent experiments at SATURNE and COSY, in the hadronic sector, as well as ELSA and JLab, in the electromagnetic sector, have confirmed our basic ideas on the reaction mechanisms. In the near future, strangeness production at JLab, HERMES and COMPASS may prove to be a powerful tool to study hadronic matter.

  1. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  2. Assessing Accuracy of Exchange-Correlation Functionals for the Description of Atomic Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Marcin; Hanas, Martyna

    2016-09-01

    The performance of exchange-correlation functionals for the description of atomic excitations is investigated. A benchmark set of excited states is constructed and experimental data is compared to Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) calculations. The benchmark results show that for the selected group of functionals good accuracy may be achieved and the quality of predictions provided is competitive to computationally more demanding coupled-cluster approaches. Apart from testing the standard TDDFT approaches, also the role of self-interaction error plaguing DFT calculations and the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation kernels is given some insight.

  3. Communication: Exciton analysis in time-dependent density functional theory: How functionals shape excited-state characters.

    PubMed

    Mewes, Stefanie A; Plasser, Felix; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Excited-state descriptors based on the one-particle transition density matrix referring to the exciton picture have been implemented for time-dependent density functional theory. State characters such as local, extended ππ(∗), Rydberg, or charge transfer can be intuitively classified by simple comparison of these descriptors. Strong effects of the choice of the exchange-correlation kernel on the physical nature of excited states can be found and decomposed in detail leading to a new perspective on functional performance and the design of new functionals.

  4. Communication: Exciton analysis in time-dependent density functional theory: How functionals shape excited-state characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Stefanie A.; Plasser, Felix; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Excited-state descriptors based on the one-particle transition density matrix referring to the exciton picture have been implemented for time-dependent density functional theory. State characters such as local, extended ππ∗, Rydberg, or charge transfer can be intuitively classified by simple comparison of these descriptors. Strong effects of the choice of the exchange-correlation kernel on the physical nature of excited states can be found and decomposed in detail leading to a new perspective on functional performance and the design of new functionals.

  5. Gravimetric excitation function of polar motion from the GRACE RL05 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Impact of land hydrosphere on polar motion excitation is still not as well known as the impact of the angular momentum of the atmosphere and ocean. Satellite mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2002 provides additional information about mass distribution of the land hydrosphere. However, despite the use of similar computational procedures, the differences between GRACE data series made available by the various centers of computations are still considerable. In the paper we compare three series of gravimetric excitation functions of polar motion determined from Rl05 GRACE solution from the Center for Space Research (CSR), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). These data are used to determine the gravimetric polar motion excitation function. Gravimetric signal is compared also with the geodetic residuals computed by subtracting atmospheric and oceanic signals from geodetic excitation functions of polar motion. Gravimetric excitation functions obtained on the basis of JPL data differ significantly from the geodetic residuals while and the series obtained from CSR and GFZ are more compatible.

  6. Thick-target transmission method for excitation functions of interaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, M.; Ebata, S.; Imai, S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method, called as thick-target transmission (T3) method, to obtain an excitation function of interaction cross sections. In an ordinal experiment to measure the excitation function of interaction cross sections by the transmission method, we need to change the beam energy for each cross section. In the T3 method, the excitation function is derived from the beam attenuations measured at the targets of different thicknesses without changing the beam energy. The advantage of the T3 method is the simplicity and availability for radioactive beams. To confirm the availability, we perform a simulation for the 12C + 27Al system with the PHITS code instead of actual experiments. Our results have large uncertainties but well reproduce the tendency of the experimental data.

  7. Asymmetries between strange and antistrange particle production inpion-proton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, T.D.; Vogt, R.

    2002-01-29

    Recent measurements of the asymmetries between Feynman x-distributions of strange and antistrange hadrons in {pi}{sup -}A interactions show a strong effect as a function of x{sub F}. We calculate strange hadron production in the context of the intrinsic model and make predictions for particle/antiparticle asymmetries in these interactions.

  8. Detection of time-frequency relations between geodetic and geophysical excitation functions of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeszotko, A.; Kosek, W.; Popinski, W.

    2009-09-01

    The redistribution of mass in the atmosphere, oceans and hydrology and the changes of the wind and ocean currents velocities are important sources of polar motion excitation. Relations between the geodetic excitation function and the effective angular momentum functions of the atmosphere, oceans and hydrology are examined in the time-frequency domain by means of coherence and phase synchronization. Coherence may be interpreted as a correlation coefficient between oscillations with the same frequencies present in two time series whereas phase synchronization allow to investigate the phase agreement between these oscillations.

  9. Assessment of the ΔSCF density functional theory approach for electronic excitations in organic dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalczyk, T.; Yost, S. R.; Van Voorhis, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the accuracy of the ΔSCF method for computing low-lying HOMO→LUMO transitions in organic dye molecules. For a test set of vertical excitation energies of 16 chromophores, surprisingly similar accuracy is observed for time-dependent density functional theory and for ΔSCF density functional theory. In light of this performance, we reconsider the ad hoc ΔSCF prescription and demonstrate that it formally obtains the exact stationary density within the adiabatic approximation, partially justifying its use. The relative merits and future prospects of ΔSCF for simulating individual excited states are discussed.

  10. Strange quark condensate from QCD sum rules to five loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Cesareo A.; Nasrallah, Nasrallah F.; Schilcher, Karl

    2008-02-01

    It is argued that it is valid to use QCD sum rules to determine the scalar and pseudoscalar two-point functions at zero momentum, which in turn determine the ratio of the strange to non-strange quark condensates Rsu = langlebar ssrangle/langlebar qqrangle with (q = u, d). This is done in the framework of a new set of QCD Finite Energy Sum Rules (FESR) that involve as integration kernel a second degree polynomial, tuned to reduce considerably the systematic uncertainties in the hadronic spectral functions. As a result, the parameters limiting the precision of this determination are ΛQCD, and to a major extent the strange quark mass. From the positivity of Rsu there follows an upper bound on the latter: \\overline{ms}(2 GeV) <= 121 (105) MeV, for ΛQCD = 330 (420) MeV.

  11. Excitation functions for actinides produced in the interactions of sup 31 P with sup 248 Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Leyba, J.D.; Henderson, R.A.; Hall, H.L.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.A.; Kreek, S.A.; Brady, E.K.; Gregorich, K.E.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California )

    1991-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of various isotopes of Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm from the interactions of 174- and 239-MeV {sup 31}P projectiles with {sup 248}Cm. The isotopic distributions were symmetric and displayed full widths at half maximum of 2.5, 2.5, and 2.25 mass units for Bk, Cf, and Fm, respectively. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur for those reaction channels which involve the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy is a positive quantity. The maxima of the excitation functions occur at those projectile energies which are consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The effects of the odd proton in the {sup 31}P projectile on the final isotopic distributions are discussed.

  12. Employment of sawtooth-shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling for improving resistance measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Li, Shujuan; Yan, Wenjuan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve higher measurement accuracy of routine resistance without increasing the complexity and cost of the system circuit of existing methods, this paper presents a novel method that exploits a shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling technology. The excitation signal source for resistance measurement is modulated by the sawtooth-shaped-function signal, and oversampling technology is employed to increase the resolution and the accuracy of the measurement system. Compared with the traditional method of using constant amplitude excitation signal, this method can effectively enhance the measuring accuracy by almost one order of magnitude and reduce the root mean square error by 3.75 times under the same measurement conditions. The results of experiments show that the novel method can attain the aim of significantly improve the measurement accuracy of resistance on the premise of not increasing the system cost and complexity of the circuit, which is significantly valuable for applying in electronic instruments.

  13. Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under Wave Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. S.; Cai, F.; Xu, W. M.

    2011-09-28

    The ship motion equation with a cosine wave excitement force describes the slip moments in regular waves. A new kind of wave excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine functions was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular waves. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the wave excitement force was applied by sums of cosine functions. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.

  14. Oncogenic osteomalacia: strange tumours in strange places.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D.; Bar, R. S.; Weidner, N.; Wener, M.; Lee, F.

    1985-01-01

    Two patients presented with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and were subsequently found to have small tumours unusual histopathology and location causing the osteomalacia. Each tumour was found after an intensive search for occult masses. Studies of vitamin D metabolism and renal tubular function before and after surgery yielded further insight into the pathophysiology of oncogenic osteomalacia. These cases demonstrate that microscopic quantities of tumour are capable of causing the syndrome and further illustrate the high index of suspicion often necessary to locate causative tumours in patients with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:4022870

  15. Production of strange particles in hadronization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1987-08-01

    Strange particles provide an important tool for the study of the color confinement mechanisms involved in hadronization processes. We review data on inclusive strange-particle production and on correlations between strange particles in high-energy reactions, and discuss phenomenological models for parton fragmentation. 58 refs., 24 figs.

  16. Strangeness production at high baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satz, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    We propose to measure strange and non-strange hadron abundances at NICA in both AA and pp collisions, in order to test the validity range and possible extension schemes for present explanations of the energy and collision dependence of strange particle suppression.

  17. Strange attractors and their periodic repetition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiudong; Oksasoglu, Ali

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present some important findings regarding a comprehensive characterization of dynamical behavior in the vicinity of two periodically perturbed homoclinic solutions. Using the Duffing system, we illustrate that the overall dynamical behavior of the system, including strange attractors, is organized in the form of an asymptotic invariant pattern as the magnitude of the applied periodic forcing approaches zero. Moreover, this invariant pattern repeats itself with a multiplicative period with respect to the magnitude of the forcing. This multiplicative period is an explicitly known function of the system parameters. The findings from the numerical experiments are shown to be in great agreement with the theoretical expectations. PMID:21456842

  18. Strange nonchaotic self-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalnine, Alexey Yu.; Kuznetsov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-01

    An example of strange nonchaotic attractor (SNA) is discussed in a dissipative system of mechanical nature driven by a constant torque applied to one of the elements of the construction. So the external force is not oscillatory, and the system is autonomous. Components of the motion with incommensurable frequencies emerge due to the irrational ratio of the sizes of the involved rotating elements. We regard the phenomenon as strange nonchaotic self-oscillations, and its existence sheds new light on the question of feasibility of SNA in autonomous systems.

  19. Plasmon excitations in sodium atomic planes: a time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Ji; Xu, Yuehua; Ke, San-Huang

    2012-08-01

    The collective electronic excitation in planar sodium clusters is studied by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The formation and development of the resonances in photoabsorption spectra are investigated in terms of the shape and size of the two-dimensional (2D) systems. The nature of these resonances is revealed by the frequency-resolved induced charge densities present on a real-space grid. For long double chains, the excitation is similar to that in long single atomic chains, showing longitudinal modes, end and central transverse modes. However, for 2D planes consisting of (n × n) atoms with n being up to 16, new 2D characteristic modes emerge regardless of the symmetries considered. For in-plane excitations, besides the equivalent end mode, mixed modes with contrary polarity occur. The relation between the frequency of the primary modes and the system size is similar to the case of a 2D electron gas but with a correction due to the realistic atomic structure. For excitations perpendicular to the plane there are corner, side center, bulk center, and circuit modes. Our calculation reveals the importance of dimensionality for plasmon excitation and how it evolves from 1D to 2D.

  20. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  1. Measurement of fusion excitation functions in the system {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Earlier measurements of fusion reactions involving {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo projectiles and Ni-targets showed surprisingly large fusion yields at low energies which could not be explained by coupled-channels calculations. The main difference to similar measurements involving the neighboring {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo isotopes was the different slope of the excitation functions at sub-barrier energies. An analysis of a variety of experiments showed a correlation between the nuclear structure and the slope of the excitation functions, with the {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} transitional nuclei ({sup 78}Kr, {sup 100}Mo) exhibiting shallower slopes than the {open_quotes}stiff{close_quotes} nuclei ({sup 86}Kr, {sup 92}Mo) measured at the same energies with respect to the barrier. In this experiment we studied the fusion excitation function involving two transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo. The measurements were performed with {sup 78}Kr beams from the ECR source at energies between 285-370 MeV. Separation of the evaporation nucleus from the elastically scattered particles was achieved by measuring time-of-flight and magnetic rigidity in the gas-filled spectrograph. The data were completely analyzed. A comparison of the cross sections with measurements for the system {sup 86}Kr + {sup 92}Mo populating the same compound nucleus {sup 178}Pt. It shows good agreement at the highest energies, but quite different falloffs of the excitation functions toward lower energies. Coupled-channels calculations, including multi-phonon excitation for the two systems, are being performed.

  2. Will strangeness win the prize?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapusta, Joseph I.

    2001-03-01

    Five groups have made predictions involving the production of strange hadrons and entered them in a competition set up by Barbara Jacak, Xin-Nian Wang and myself in the spring of 1998 for the purpose of comparing with first-year physics results from RHIC. These predictions are summarized and evaluated.

  3. A strange cat in Dublin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2012-11-01

    Not many life stories in physics involve Nazis, illicit sex, a strange cat and the genetic code. Thus, a new biography of the great Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger is always of interest, and with Erwin Schrödinger and the Quantum Revolution, veteran science writer John Gribbin does not disappoint.

  4. How strange is pion electroproduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert; Zhang, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    We consider pion production in parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) in the presence of nucleon strangeness in the framework of partial wave analysis with unitarity. Using the experimental bounds on the strange form factors obtained in elastic PVES, we study the sensitivity of the parity-violating asymmetry to strange nucleon form factors. For forward kinematics and electron energies above 1 GeV, we observe that this sensitivity may reach about 20% in the threshold region. With parity-violating asymmetries being as large as tens p.p.m., this study suggests that threshold pion production in PVES can be used as a promising way to better constrain strangeness contributions. Using this model for the neutral current pion production, we update the estimate for the dispersive γZ-box correction to the weak charge of the proton. In the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, our new prediction reads Re □γZV (E = 1.165 GeV) = (5.58 ± 1.41) ×10-3, an improvement over the previous uncertainty estimate of ± 2.0 ×10-3. Our new prediction in the kinematics of the upcoming MESA/P2 experiment reads Re □γZV (E = 0.155 GeV) = (1.1 ± 0.2) ×10-3.

  5. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer.

    PubMed

    Kullie, Ossama

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn2 and Cd2 dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s(2) + 6s6p), (6s(2) + 6s7s), and (6s(2) + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg2. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg2 including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd2, and Zn2, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg2.

  6. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullie, Ossama

    2014-01-01

    In previous works on Zn2 and Cd2 dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s2 + 6s6p), (6s2 + 6s7s), and (6s2 + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg2. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg2 including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd2, and Zn2, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg2.

  7. Chaotic /strange/ and periodic behavior in instability saturation by the oscillating two-stream instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Ott, E.

    1981-01-01

    The nonlinear Schroedinger equation with linear growth and damping is truncated to three waves. The resulting system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations describes the excitation of linearly damped waves by the oscillating two-stream instability driven by a linearly unstable pump wave. This system represents a simple model for the nonlinear saturation of a linearly unstable wave. The model is examined analytically and numerically as a function of the dimensionless parameters of the system. It is found that the model can exhibit a wealth of characteristic dynamical behavior including stationary equilibria, Hopf bifurcations to periodic orbits, period doubling bifurcations, chaotic solutions characteristic of a strange attractor, tangent bifurcations from chaotic to periodic solutions, transient chaos, and hysteresis. Many of these features are shown to be explainable on the basis of one-dimensional maps. In the case of chaotic solutions, evidence for the presence of a strange attractor is provided by demonstrating Cantor set-like structure (i.e., scale invariance) in the surface of section.

  8. Measurement of excitation functions in alpha induced reactions on natCu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Zaman, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    The excitation functions of 66,67,68Ga, 62,63,65Zn, 61,64Cu, and 58,60Co radionuclides in the natCu(α, x) reaction were measured in the energy range from 15 to 42 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation method at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured results were compared with the literature data as well as the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2013 and TENDL-2014 libraries based on the TALYS-1.6 code. The integral yields for thick targets of the produced radionuclides were also determined from the measured excitation functions and the stopping power of natural copper.

  9. Measurement of the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg Excitation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C.M.; Dragojevic, I.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Eichler, R.; Garcia, M.A.; Gates, J.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.; Nitsche, H.

    2010-03-19

    The excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from 259Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, 2n)258Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved 258Sg half-life of ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  10. Generating functions and stability study of multivariate self-excited epidemic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, A. I.; Sornette, D.

    2011-09-01

    We present a stability study of the class of multivariate self-excited Hawkes point processes, that can model natural and social systems, including earthquakes, epileptic seizures and the dynamics of neuron assemblies, bursts of exchanges in social communities, interactions between Internet bloggers, bank network fragility and cascading of failures, national sovereign default contagion, and so on. We present the general theory of multivariate generating functions to derive the number of events over all generations of various types that are triggered by a mother event of a given type. We obtain the stability domains of various systems, as a function of the topological structure of the mutual excitations across different event types. We find that mutual triggering tends to provide a significant extension of the stability (or subcritical) domain compared with the case where event types are decoupled, that is, when an event of a given type can only trigger events of the same type.

  11. Communication: Excited states, dynamic correlation functions and spectral properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2012-11-21

    In this communication, we propose a method for obtaining isolated excited states within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo framework. This method allows for stable sampling with respect to collapse to lower energy states and requires no uncontrolled approximations. In contrast with most previous methods to extract excited state information from quantum Monte Carlo methods, this results from a modification to the underlying propagator, and does not require explicit orthogonalization, analytic continuation, transient estimators, or restriction of the Hilbert space via a trial wavefunction. Furthermore, we show that the propagator can directly yield frequency-domain correlation functions and spectral functions such as the density of states which are difficult to obtain within a traditional quantum Monte Carlo framework. We demonstrate this approach with pilot applications to the neon atom and beryllium dimer.

  12. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  13. Two-photon excitation of porphyrin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Secret, Emilie; Maynadier, Marie; Gallud, Audrey; Chaix, Arnaud; Bouffard, Elise; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Marcotte, Nathalie; Mongin, Olivier; El Cheikh, Khaled; Hugues, Vincent; Auffan, Mélanie; Frochot, Céline; Morère, Alain; Maillard, Philippe; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Sailor, Michael J; Garcia, Marcel; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Cunin, Frédérique

    2014-12-01

    Porous silicon nanoparticles (pSiNPs) act as a sensitizer for the 2-photon excitation of a pendant porphyrin using NIR laser light, for imaging and photodynamic therapy. Mannose-functionalized pSiNPs can be vectorized to MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through a mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism to provide a 3-fold enhancement of the 2-photon PDT effect.

  14. Comparison of polar motion excitation functions computed from different sets of gravimetric coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Winska, M.; Birylo, M.

    2015-08-01

    Since its launch in February, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has been source of data of temporal changes in Earth's gravity field. These gravity fields can be used to determine the changing mass field of the Earth caused by redistribution of the geophysical fluids, and from that excitations of polar motion. The so-called Level 2 gravity field product are available, in the form of changes in the coefficients: C_{nm}, S_{nm}. Since 2002 until the present time there are still attempts to better process these data. In this study we estimate gravimetric excitation of polar motion using a recent series of C_{21}, S_{21} coefficients. In our calculations we use several series developed by different centers. Firstly, we compare these gravimetric functions with each other. Then we examine the compatibility of these functions with hydrological signal in observed geodetic excitation function. We focus on seasonal and subseasonal time scales. The main purpose is to explore which from these several solutions are closed.

  15. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-07-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function.

  16. Neutron stars and strange matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1986-01-01

    The likelihood is investigated that quark matter with strangeness of order unity resides in neutron stars. In the strong coupling regime near rho/sub 0/ this is found to be unlikely. Considering higher densities where perturbative expansions are used, we find a lower bound to be at 7rho/sub 0/ for the transition density. This is higher than the inferred density of observed neutron stars, and thus the transition to quark matter is precluded. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Measurement of the fusion excitation function for 19O + 12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 × 103 p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Using silicon detectors, micro-channel plate detectors, and an ionization chamber, evaporation residues were detected in the angular range θlab <= 23° with high efficiency. Initial experimental results including measurement of the fusion cross-section to approximately the 100 mb level will be presented. The measured excitation function will be compared to theoretical predictions. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  18. A closer look at the apparent correlation of structural and functional connectivity in excitable neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messé, Arnaud; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; König, Peter; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the structural connectivity (SC) and functional connectivity (FC) of neural systems is a central focus in brain network science. It is an open question, however, how strongly the SC-FC relationship depends on specific topological features of brain networks or the models used for describing excitable dynamics. Using a basic model of discrete excitable units that follow a susceptible - excited - refractory dynamic cycle (SER model), we here analyze how functional connectivity is shaped by the topological features of a neural network, in particular its modularity. We compared the results obtained by the SER model with corresponding simulations by another well established dynamic mechanism, the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, in order to explore general features of the SC-FC relationship. We showed that apparent discrepancies between the results produced by the two models can be resolved by adjusting the time window of integration of co-activations from which the FC is derived, providing a clearer distinction between co-activations and sequential activations. Thus, network modularity appears as an important factor shaping the FC-SC relationship across different dynamic models.

  19. Measurement of fusion excitation function for 7Li+64Ni near the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Total fusion (TF) excitation function has been measured for the system 7Li + 64Ni at the energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections have been estimated through the online detection of characteristic γ-rays of the ERs. The summed ER cross sections yielding the experimental TF cross section have been compared with the theoretical one dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) prediction. The measured and the model cross sections are very close to each other at above barrier energies. However, an enhancement of the experimental TF cross section with respect to the 1DBPM prediction is observed at below barrier energies. Coupled channels (CC) calculation with inelastic excitations alone could not explain the enhancement. The origin of the enhancement is identified as due to the enhanced population of the αxn channels.

  20. A developmental switch in the excitability and function of the starburst network in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Jian; Lee, Seunghoon; Zhou, Z Jimmy

    2004-12-01

    Dual patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ uncaging revealed Ca2+-dependent corelease of ACh and GABA from, and the presence of reciprocal nicotinic and GABAergic synapses between, starburst cells in the perinatal rabbit retina. With maturation, the nicotinic synapses between starburst cells dramatically diminished, whereas the GABAergic synapses remained and changed from excitatory to inhibitory, indicating a coordinated conversion of the starburst network excitability from an early hyperexcitatory to a mature nonepileptic state. We show that this transition allows the starburst cells to use their neurotransmitters for two completely different functions. During early development, the starburst network mediates recurrent excitation and spontaneous retinal waves, which are important for visual system development. After vision begins, starburst cells release GABA in a prolonged and Ca2+-dependent manner and inhibit each other laterally via direct GABAergic synapses, which may be important for visual integration, such as the detection of motion direction.

  1. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Kullie, Ossama E-mail: ossama.kullie@unistra.fr

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn{sub 2} and Cd{sub 2} dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s{sup 2} + 6s6p), (6s{sup 2} + 6s7s), and (6s{sup 2} + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg{sub 2}. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg{sub 2} including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd{sub 2}, and Zn{sub 2}, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg{sub 2}.

  2. A few observations on strangeness production

    SciTech Connect

    Caines, Helen

    2006-07-11

    A few studies of the yields and spectra of strange particles produced in heavy-ion and elementary collisions are presented using results from RHIC and the SPS. The system size effects on strange particle production and their kinematics are studied. Evidence that entropy drives strangeness production is presented as is the nuclear modification factor, RAA, for strange baryons. Finally the mT spectra from p-p collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})= 200 GeV are shown which indicate that gluon, as opposed to quark, jets dominate the production.

  3. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  4. Beyond Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Using Only Single Excitations: Methods for Computational Studies of Excited States in Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    Herbert, John M; Zhang, Xing; Morrison, Adrian F; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-17

    Single-excitation methods, namely, configuration interaction singles and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), along with semiempirical versions thereof, represent the most computationally affordable electronic structure methods for describing electronically excited states, scaling as [Formula: see text] absent further approximations. This relatively low cost, combined with a treatment of electron correlation, has made TDDFT the most widely used excited-state quantum chemistry method over the past 20+ years. Nevertheless, certain inherent problems (beyond just the accuracy of this or that exchange-correlation functional) limit the utility of traditional TDDFT. For one, it affords potential energy surfaces whose topology is incorrect in the vicinity of any conical intersection (CI) that involves the ground state. Since CIs are the conduits for transitions between electronic states, the TDDFT description of photochemistry (internal conversion and intersystem crossing) is therefore suspect. Second, the [Formula: see text] cost can become prohibitive in large systems, especially those that involve multiple electronically coupled chromophores, for example, the antennae structures of light-harvesting complexes or the conjugated polymers used in organic photovoltaics. In such cases, the smallest realistic mimics might already be quite large from the standpoint of ab initio quantum chemistry. This Account describes several new computational methods that address these problems. Topology around a CI can be rigorously corrected using a "spin-flip" version of TDDFT, which involves an α → β spin-flipping transition in addition to occupied → virtual excitation of one electron. Within this formalism, singlet states are generated via excitation from a high-spin triplet reference state, doublets from a quartet, etc. This provides a more balanced treatment of electron correlation between ground and excited states. Spin contamination is problematic away from the

  5. Electronic excitation spectra from time-dependent density functional response theory using plane-wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Sprik, Michiel

    2000-11-01

    The time-dependent density functional response theory method for the computation of electronic excitation spectra has been implemented in a plane-wave basis set/pseudo-potential formalism. We compare our test results for N2 and H2CO to literature atomic basis set calculations and find good agreement. We also discuss some of the technical complications specific to the use of plane-wave basis sets. As an application, the thermally broadened photoabsorption spectrum of formamide at room temperature is computed by averaging over a number of vibrational configurations sampled from an ab initio molecular dynamics run and compared to experiment.

  6. Finding Limit Cycles in self-excited oscillators with infinite-series damping functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a simple method for finding the location of limit cycles of self excited oscillators whose damping functions can be represented by some infinite convergent series. We have used standard results of first-order perturbation theory to arrive at amplitude equations. The approach has been kept pedagogic by first working out the cases of finite polynomials using elementary algebra. Then the method has been extended to various infinite polynomials, where the fixed points of the corresponding amplitude equations cannot be found out. Hopf bifurcations for systems with nonlinear powers in velocities have also been discussed.

  7. Green's functions for analysis of dynamic response of wheel/rail to vertical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Traian

    2007-09-01

    An analytical model to simulate wheel/rail interaction using the Green's functions method is proposed in this paper. The model consists of a moving wheel on a discretely supported rail. Particularly for this model of rail, the bending and the longitudinal displacement are coupled due to the rail pad and a complex model of the rail pad is adopted. An efficient method for solving a time-domain analysis for wheel/rail interaction is presented. The method is based on the properties of the rail's Green functions and starting to these functions, a track's Green matrix is assembled for the numerical simulations of wheel/rail response due to three kinds of vertical excitations: the steady-state interaction, the rail corrugation and the wheel flat. The study points to influence of the worn rail—rigid contact—on variation in the wheel/rail contact force. The concept of pinned-pinned inhibitive rail pad is also presented.

  8. Charge asymmetry in rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} determined using explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnosov, Nikita; Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-11-28

    Very accurate non-Born-Oppenheimer quantum-mechanical calculations are performed to determine the average values of the interparticle distances and the proton-deuteron density function for the rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} ion. The states corresponding to excitations to all bound vibrational states (v = 0, …, 22) and simultaneously excited to the first excited rotational state (N = 1) are considered. To describe each state up to 8000 explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions are used. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians are variationally optimized using a procedure that employs the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results show an increasing asymmetry in the electron distribution with the vibrational excitation as the electron density shifts towards deuteron and away from the proton.

  9. The Strange Quark Polarisation from COMPASS data

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2009-12-17

    The strange quark helicity distribution {delta}s(x) was derived at LO from the inclusive asymmetry A{sub a,d} and the semi-inclusive asymmetries A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup +}, A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup -}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K+}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K-}, measured by COMPASS in polarised deep inelastic muon-deuteron scattering. The distribution of {delta}s(x) is compatible with zero in the whole measured range. The value of the first moment of {delta}s and its error are very sensitive to the assumed value of the ratio of the s-bar-quark to u-quark fragmentation functions into positive kaons {integral}D(K+/s)(z)dz/{integral}D{sub u}{sup K+}(z)dz.

  10. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  11. Strangeness detection in ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Safarik, K.

    1995-07-15

    The authors present some parameters of the ALICE detector which concern the detection of strange particles. The results of a simulation for neutral strange particles and cascades, together with estimated rates are presented. They also briefly discuss the detection of charged K-mesons. Finally, they mention the possibility of open charm particle detection.

  12. Maximum rotation frequency of strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zdunik, J.L.; Haensel, P. )

    1990-07-15

    Using the MIT bag model of strange-quark matter, we calculate the maximum angular frequency of the uniform rotation of strange stars. After studying a broad range of the MIT bag-model parameters, we obtain an upper bound of 12.3 kHz.

  13. Can we improve the calculation of some excitation functions for deuteron-induced reactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Chau, Huu-Tai

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the CDCC* approach to calculate (d,p) excitation functions. Starting from the CDCC* results, we derive some (d,p) differential and integrated cross sections, then using a simple semi-phenomenological model, we calculate the excitation functions for this process. We compare our calculations with the experimental cross sections for the 27Al (d, p)28Al, 58Fe(d, p)59Fe, 59Co(d, p)60Co, 75As(d, p)76As, 81Br(d, p)82Br, 84Kr(d, p)85Kr, 86Kr(d, p)87Kr, 108Pd (d, p)109Pd, 140Ce(d, p)141Ce, 142Ce(d, p)143Ce, 141Pr(d, p)142Pr, 165Ho(d, p)166Ho, and 180Hf (d, p)181Hf reactions. We plan to include these cross sections into evaluations of d-induced reactions and this could be a first step for improving of the quality of the next decade cross sections libraries.

  14. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-24

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  15. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  16. Strange musical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums. PMID:25437475

  17. Strange musical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums.

  18. Visualization of molecular fluorescence point spread functions via remote excitation switching fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang; Lu, Gang; Kenens, Bart; Rocha, Susana; Fron, Eduard; Yuan, Haifeng; Chen, Chang; Van Dorpe, Pol; Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Hutchison, James A.; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The enhancement of molecular absorption, emission and scattering processes by coupling to surface plasmon polaritons on metallic nanoparticles is a key issue in plasmonics for applications in (bio)chemical sensing, light harvesting and photocatalysis. Nevertheless, the point spread functions for single-molecule emission near metallic nanoparticles remain difficult to characterize due to fluorophore photodegradation, background emission and scattering from the plasmonic structure. Here we overcome this problem by exciting fluorophores remotely using plasmons propagating along metallic nanowires. The experiments reveal a complex array of single-molecule fluorescence point spread functions that depend not only on nanowire dimensions but also on the position and orientation of the molecular transition dipole. This work has consequences for both single-molecule regime-sensing and super-resolution imaging involving metallic nanoparticles and opens the possibilities for fast size sorting of metallic nanoparticles, and for predicting molecular orientation and binding position on metallic nanoparticles via far-field optical imaging. PMID:25687887

  19. Visualization of molecular fluorescence point spread functions via remote excitation switching fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Liang; Lu, Gang; Kenens, Bart; Rocha, Susana; Fron, Eduard; Yuan, Haifeng; Chen, Chang; Van Dorpe, Pol; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Hutchison, James A; Uji-I, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The enhancement of molecular absorption, emission and scattering processes by coupling to surface plasmon polaritons on metallic nanoparticles is a key issue in plasmonics for applications in (bio)chemical sensing, light harvesting and photocatalysis. Nevertheless, the point spread functions for single-molecule emission near metallic nanoparticles remain difficult to characterize due to fluorophore photodegradation, background emission and scattering from the plasmonic structure. Here we overcome this problem by exciting fluorophores remotely using plasmons propagating along metallic nanowires. The experiments reveal a complex array of single-molecule fluorescence point spread functions that depend not only on nanowire dimensions but also on the position and orientation of the molecular transition dipole. This work has consequences for both single-molecule regime-sensing and super-resolution imaging involving metallic nanoparticles and opens the possibilities for fast size sorting of metallic nanoparticles, and for predicting molecular orientation and binding position on metallic nanoparticles via far-field optical imaging. PMID:25687887

  20. SLEEPLESS is a bi-functional regulator of excitability and cholinergic synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meilin; Robinson, James E.; Joiner, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Although sleep is conserved throughout evolution, the molecular basis of its control is still largely a mystery. We previously showed that the quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a membrane-tethered protein that is required for normal sleep in Drosophila. SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein functions, at least in part, by upregulating the levels and open probability of Shaker (Sh) potassium channels to suppress neuronal excitability and enable sleep. Consistent with this proposed mechanism, loss-of-function mutations in Sh phenocopy qvr/sss null mutants. However, sleep is more genetically modifiable in Sh than in qvr/sss mutants, suggesting that sss may regulate additional molecules to influence sleep. Results Here we show that SSS also antagonizes nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to reduce synaptic transmission and promote sleep. Mimicking this antagonism with the nAChR inhibitor mecamylamine or by RNAi knockdown of specific nAChR subunits is sufficient to restore sleep to qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS occurs post-transcriptionally since the levels of nAChR mRNAs are unchanged in qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS may in fact be direct, since SSS forms a stable complex with and antagonizes fly nAChR function in transfected cells. Intriguingly, lynx1, a mammalian homolog of SSS, can partially restore normal sleep to qvr/sss mutants, and lynx1 can form stable complexes with Shaker-type channels and nAChRs. Conclusions Together, our data point to an evolutionarily conserved, bi-functional role for SSS and its homologs in controlling excitability and synaptic transmission in fundamental processes of the nervous system such as sleep. PMID:24613312

  1. SU(3) group structure of strange flavor hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Soon-Tae

    2015-01-01

    We provide the isoscalar factors of the SU(3) Clebsch-Gordan series 8⊗ 35 which are extensions of the previous works of de Swart, McNamee and Chilton and play practical roles in current ongoing strange flavor hadron physics research. To this end, we pedagogically study the SU(3) Lie algebra, its spin symmetries, and its eigenvalues for irreducible representations. We also evaluate the values of the Wigner D functions related to the isoscalar factors; these functions are immediately applicable to strange flavor hadron phenomenology. Exploiting these SU(3) group properties associated with the spin symmetries, we investigate the decuplet-to-octet transition magnetic moments and the baryon octet and decuplet magnetic moments in the flavor symmetric limit to construct the Coleman-Glashow-type sum rules.

  2. Strangeness Production in Au+Au Reactions at √ {SNN} = 62.4\\ GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, Ionut-Cristian

    The measurement of strangeness is a valuable tool for understanding the reaction mechanism of nuclear collisions since all the strange particles need to be created during the reaction. Also, strangeness enhancement is one of the predicted signals of the QGP. In the present work we will discuss the behaviour of the strangeness production (i.e. K/π ratio) with rapidity and baryo-chemical potential in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 A GeV. In this particular reaction, BRAHMS is able to identify particles over 3.5 rapidity units and thereby cover a wide range of bar {p}/p ratios, including the fragmentation region. We will show spectra and ratios of identified particles as a function of pT and rapidity.

  3. The Strange Quark Polarisation from Charged Kaon Production on Deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Windmolders, R.

    2009-08-04

    The strange quark helicity distribution {delta}s(x) is derived at LO from the semi-inclusive and inclusive spin asymmetries measured by the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The significance of the results is found to depend critically on the ratio of the s-bar and u quark fragmentation functions into kaons {integral}D{sub s-bar}{sup K+}(z)dz/{integral}D{sub u}{sup K+}(z)dz.

  4. π N and strangeness sigma terms at the physical point with chiral fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Liang, Jian; Liu, Keh-Fei; χ QCD Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Lattice QCD calculations with chiral fermions of the π N sigma term σπ N and strangeness sigma term σs N including chiral interpolation with continuum and volume corrections are provided in this work, with the excited-state contaminations subtracted properly. We calculate the scalar matrix element for the light/strange quark directly and find σπ N=45.9 (7.4 )(2.8 ) MeV , with the disconnected insertion part contributing 20(12)(4)%, and σs N=40.2 (11.7 )(3.5 ) MeV , which is somewhat smaller than σπ N. The ratio of the strange/light scalar matrix elements is y =0.09 (3 )(1 ) .

  5. Excitation spectra and correlation functions of quantum Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manuel; Assaad, Fakher F.; Hohenadler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We study one-dimensional Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) models with quantum phonons using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. Within statistical errors, we obtain identical results for the SSH model with acoustic phonons, and a related model with a coupling to an optical bond phonon mode. Based on this agreement, we first study the Peierls metal-insulator transition of the spinless SSH model, and relate it to the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition of a spinless Luttinger liquid. In the Peierls phase, the spectral functions reveal the single-particle and charge gap, and a central peak related to long-range order. For the spinful SSH model, which has a dimerized ground state for any nonzero coupling, we reveal a symmetry-related degeneracy of spin and charge excitations, and the expected spin and charge gaps as well as a central peak. Finally, we study the SSH-U V model with electron-phonon and electron-electron interaction. We observe a Mott phase with critical spin and bond correlations at weak electron-phonon coupling, and a Peierls phase with gapped spin excitations at strong coupling. We relate our findings to the extended Hubbard model, and discuss the physical origin of the agreement between optical and acoustic phonons.

  6. Spin contamination-free N-electron wave functions in the excitation-based configuration interaction treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E.; Oña, Ofelia B.; Capuzzi, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the spin contamination in N-electron wave functions provided by the excitation-based configuration interaction methods. We propose a procedure to ensure a suitable selection of excited N-electron Slater determinants with respect to a given reference determinant, required in these schemes. The procedure guarantees the construction of N-electron wave functions which are eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator S ˆ 2 , avoiding any spin contamination. Our treatment is based on the evaluation of the excitation level of the determinants by means of the expectation value of an excitation operator formulated in terms of spin-free replacement operators. We report numerical determinations of energies and < S ˆ 2 > expectation values, arising from our proposal as well as from traditional configuration interaction methods, in selected open-shell systems, in order to compare the behavior of these procedures and their computational costs.

  7. Calculation of vibrational and electronic excited state absorption spectra of arsenic-water complexes using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Lambrakos, S. G.; Shabaev, A.; Massa, L.

    2016-05-01

    Calculations are presented of vibrational and electronic excited-state absorption spectra for As-H2O complexes using density function theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT and TD-DFT can provide interpretation of absorption spectra with respect to molecular structure for excitation by electromagnetic waves at frequencies within the IR and UV-visible ranges. The absorption spectrum corresponding to excitation states of As-H2O complexes consisting of relatively small numbers of water molecules should be associated with response features that are intermediate between that of isolated molecules and that of a bulk system. DFT and TD-DFT calculated absorption spectra represent quantitative estimates that can be correlated with additional information obtained from laboratory measurements and other types of theory based calculations. The DFT software GAUSSIAN was used for the calculations of excitation states presented here.

  8. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  9. Efficient evaluation of dielectric response functions and calculations of ground and excited state properties beyond local Density Functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Viet Nguyen, H.; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-01

    A recently developed technique to diagonalize iteratively dielectric matrices [1], is used to carry out efficient, ab-initio calculations of dispersion interactions, and excited state properties of nanostructures. In particular, we present results for the binding energies of weakly bonded molecular crystals [2], obtained at the EXX/RPA level of theory, and for absorption spectra of semiconducting clusters, obtained by an iterative solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equations [3]. We show that the ability to obtain the eigenmodes of dielectric matrices from Density Functional perturbation theory, without computing single particle excited states, greatly improves the efficiency of both EXX/RPA and many body perturbation theory [3,4] calculations and opens the way to large scale computations. [1] H. Wilson, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B , 78, 113303, 2008; and H. Wilson, D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B, 79, 245106, 2009. [2] D. Lu, Y. Li, D. Rocca and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett, 102, 206411, 2009; and Y. Li, D. Lu, V. Nguyen and G. Galli, J. Phys. Chem. C (submitted) [3] D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, submitted. [4] D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 147601, 2008. Work was funded by DOE/Scidac DE-FC02-06ER25794 and DOE/BES DE-FG02-06ER46262.

  10. The use of coherence functions to determine dynamic excitation sources on launch vehicle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, S.; Halvorson, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of determining the relative contribution of simultaneous acoustic and mechanical inputs to the response of structures under combined dynamic loads was studied. An analytical technique developed by Bendat for calculating ordinary, partial, and multiple coherence functions, using an iterative nonmatrix approach was applied to data obtained from laboratory tests on a complex structural assembly. Testing was performed in an acoustically 'live' room. Up to three random inputs, having similar spectral content and varying degrees of mutual coherence, and a single output were used. Stationary and nonstationary inputs were used. It was concluded that the technique provided an effective method of identifying sources of dynamic excitation and evaluating their relative contributions to the measured output at structural resonances, for stationary random inputs. An attempt to apply the technique to nonstationary inputs did not yield consistent results.

  11. Penta-Quark States with Strangeness, Hidden Charm and Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Zou, Bing-Song

    The classical quenched quark models with three constituent quarks provide a good description for the baryon spatial ground states, but fail to reproduce the spectrum of baryon excited states. More and more evidences suggest that unquenched effects with multi-quark dynamics are necessary ingredients to solve the problem. Several new hyperon resonances reported recently could fit in the picture of penta-quark states. Based on this picture, some new hyperon excited states were predicted to exist; meanwhile with extension from strangeness to charm and beauty, super-heavy narrow N* and Λ* resonances with hidden charm or beauty were predicted to be around 4.3 and 11 GeV, respectively. Recently, two of such N* with hidden charm might have been observed by the LHCb experiment. More of those states are expected to be observed in near future. This opens a new window in order to study hadronic dynamics for the multi-quark states.

  12. Constraining the high-density behavior of the nuclear equation of state from strangeness production in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoing

    2011-06-15

    The dynamics of pions and strange particles in heavy-ion collisions in the region of 1A GeV energies is investigated by the lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model for probing the nuclear equation of state at suprasaturation densities. The total multiplicities and the ratios obtained in {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au over {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C systems are calculated for selected Skyrme parameters SkP, SLy6, Ska, and SIII, which correspond to different modulus of incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and different cases of the stiffness of symmetry energy. A decreasing trend of the excitation functions of the ratios for strange particle production with increasing incident energy was observed. The available data of K{sup +} production measured by KaoS collaboration are described well with the parameter SkP, which results in a soft equation of state. The conclusions cannot be modified by an in-medium kaon-nucleon potential.

  13. Strange particle production and s-quark asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, S.

    1996-08-01

    Using hadronic Z{sup 0} decays recorded by the SLD experiment at SLAC, we have studied the production of strange particles as a function of momentum. A high-purity sample of K{sup {+-}} was tagged using Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The {phi}, {Lambda} and K{sub s} were reconstructed in the K{sup +}K{sup -}, p-{pi} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} modes respectively, and CRID identification of K{sup {+-}} and p was used to obtain pure samples of {phi} and {Lambda}. We have used the high electron-beam polarisation delivered by the SLC to measure the left-right forward-backward production asymmetries of these particles, and discuss the relationship of these quantities to the underlying strange quark asymmetry in Z{sup 0} decays.

  14. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rate modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in fundamental physics: CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K0-anti K0 mixing has provided one of the most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, (SIGMA) decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given.

  15. A strange attractor of the Smale-Williams type in the chaotic dynamics of a physical system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S. P. Seleznev, E. P.

    2006-02-15

    A nonautonomous nonlinear system is constructed and implemented as an experimental device. As represented by a 4D stroboscopic Poincare map, the system exhibits a Smale-Williams-type strange attractor. The system consists of two coupled van der Pol oscillators whose frequencies differ by a factor of two. The corresponding Hopf bifurcation parameters slowly vary as periodic functions of time in antiphase with one another; i.e., excitation is alternately transferred between the oscillators. The mechanisms underlying the system's chaotic dynamics and onset of chaos are qualitatively explained. A governing system of differential equations is formulated. The existence of a chaotic attractor is confirmed by numerical results. Hyperbolicity is verified numerically by performing a statistical analysis of the distribution of the angle between the stable and unstable subspaces of manifolds of the chaotic invariant set. Experimental results are in qualitative agreement with numerical predictions.

  16. A multireference density functional approach to the calculation of the excited states of uranium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Eric V.

    An accurate and efficient hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Multireference Configuration Interaction (MRCI) model for computing electronic excitation energies in atoms and molecules was developed. The utility of a hybrid method becomes apparent when ground and excited states of large molecules, clusters of molecules, or even moderately sized molecules containing heavy element atoms are desired. In the case of large systems of lighter elements, the hybrid method brings to bear the numerical efficiency of the DFT method in computing the electron-electron dynamic correlation, while including non-dynamical electronic correlation via the Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation. Substantial reductions in the size of the CI expansion necessary to obtain accurate spectroscopic results are possible in the hybrid method. Where heavy element compounds are of interest, fully relativistic calculations based upon the Dirac Hamiltonian rapidly become computationally prohibitive, as the basis set requirements in four-component calculations increase by a factor of two or more in order to satisfy kinetic balance between the large electronic components and small positronic components, while the size of the MRCI Hamiltonian quadruples with respect to a non-relativistic calculation. In this hybrid method, applications to heavy element compounds such as bromine and uranium were accomplished through the use of relativistic effective core potentials, allowing for the first time both scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effect treatment necessary for the accurate calculation of electronic excitation energies in heavy elements in a Density Functional Theory Multireference Configuration Interaction Hybrid Model (DFT/MRCI) method. This implementation of the original hybrid method, developed by Grimme and Waletzke, was modified to remove inherent spin-multiplicity limitations, as well as reduce the number of free parameters used in the method from five to three. The DFT portion of

  17. Measuring strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J. ); Krein, G. Instituto de Fisica Teorica , Sao Paulo, SP ); Williams, A.G. Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL )

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are proposed to measure various strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon. Examples are electro- and neutrino- production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering from isospin zero targets, e.g., deuterons.

  18. Measuring strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Krein, G. |; Williams, A.G. |

    1991-12-31

    Experiments are proposed to measure various strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon. Examples are electro- and neutrino- production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering from isospin zero targets, e.g., deuterons.

  19. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  20. Strange Creatures: An Additive Wood Sculpture Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project where students create strange creatures using scraps of wood. Discusses how the students use the wood and other materials. Explains that the students also write about the habitat characteristics of their creatures. Includes learning objectives. (CMK)

  1. Strange quark matter fragmentation in astrophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulucci, L.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-06-01

    The conjecture of Bodmer-Witten-Terazawa suggesting a form of quark matter (Strange Quark Matter) as the ground state of hadronic interactions has been studied in laboratory and astrophysical contexts by a large number of authors. If strange stars exist, some violent events involving these compact objects, such as mergers and even their formation process, might eject some strange matter into the interstellar medium that could be detected as a trace signal in the cosmic ray flux. To evaluate this possibility, it is necessary to understand how this matter in bulk would fragment in the form of strangelets (small lumps of strange quark matter in which finite effects become important). We calculate the mass distribution outcome using the statistical multifragmentation model and point out several caveats affecting it. In particular, the possibility that strangelets fragmentation will render a tiny fraction of contamination in the cosmic ray flux is discussed.

  2. Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nyiri, J.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Semenova, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm are considered as diquark-diquark-antiquark composite systems. Spin and isospin content of such exotic states is discussed and masses are evaluated.

  3. Comparison of hydrological and GRACE-based excitation functions of polar motion in the seasonal spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Kolaczek, B.; Salstein, D. A.

    2008-04-01

    Understanding changes in the global balance of the Earths angular momentum due to the mass redistribution of geophysical fluids is needed to explain the observed polar motion. The impact of continental hydrologic signals, from land water, snow, and ice, on polar motion excitation (hydrological angular momentum-HAM), is still inadequately known. Although estimates of HAM have been made from several models of global hydrology based upon the observed distribution of surface water, snow, and soil moisture, the relatively sparse observation network and the presence of errors in the data and the geophysical fluid models preclude a full understanding of the HAM influence on polar motion variations. Recently the GRACE mission monitoring Earths time variable gravity field has allowed us to determine the mass term of polar motion excitation functions and compare them with the mass term derivable as a residual from the geodetic excitation functions and geophysical fluid motion terms on seasonal time scales. Differences between these mass terms in the years 2004 - 2005.5 are still on the order of 20 mas. Besides the overall mass excitation of polar motion comparisons with GRACE (RL04-release), we also intercompare the non-atmospheric, non-oceanic signals in the mass term of geodetic polar motion excitation with hydrological excitation of polar motion.

  4. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  5. A New Method To Evaluate Excited States Lifetimes Based on Green's Function: Application to Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Sulzer, David; Iuchi, Satoru; Yasuda, Koji

    2016-07-12

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSCs) are the promising device for electricity generation. However, the initial stage in which an electron is injected from a dye to the semiconductor has not been precisely understood. Standard quantum chemistry methods cannot handle infinite number of orbitals coming from the band structure of the semiconductor, whereas solid state calculations cannot handle many excited states at a reasonable computational cost. In this regard, we propose a new method to evaluate lifetimes of many excited states of a molecule on a semi-infinite surface. On the basis of the theory of resonance state, the effect of the semi-infinite semiconductor is encoded into the complex self-energy from surface Green's function. The lifetimes of excited states are evaluated through the imaginary part of the self-energy, and the self-energy correction is included into excitation energies obtained from time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This new method is applied to a DSSC system composed of black dye attached to the TiO2 semiconductor, and the computed lifetimes are linked to the natures of excited states and to the surface properties. The present method provides the firm ground for analysis of interplay between many excited states of the dye and band structure of the semiconductor. PMID:27310524

  6. A New Method To Evaluate Excited States Lifetimes Based on Green's Function: Application to Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Sulzer, David; Iuchi, Satoru; Yasuda, Koji

    2016-07-12

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSCs) are the promising device for electricity generation. However, the initial stage in which an electron is injected from a dye to the semiconductor has not been precisely understood. Standard quantum chemistry methods cannot handle infinite number of orbitals coming from the band structure of the semiconductor, whereas solid state calculations cannot handle many excited states at a reasonable computational cost. In this regard, we propose a new method to evaluate lifetimes of many excited states of a molecule on a semi-infinite surface. On the basis of the theory of resonance state, the effect of the semi-infinite semiconductor is encoded into the complex self-energy from surface Green's function. The lifetimes of excited states are evaluated through the imaginary part of the self-energy, and the self-energy correction is included into excitation energies obtained from time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This new method is applied to a DSSC system composed of black dye attached to the TiO2 semiconductor, and the computed lifetimes are linked to the natures of excited states and to the surface properties. The present method provides the firm ground for analysis of interplay between many excited states of the dye and band structure of the semiconductor.

  7. Calculation of excitation functions of proton, alpha and deuteron induced reactions for production of medical radioisotopes 122-125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artun, Ozan; Aytekin, Hüseyin

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the excitation functions for production of medical radioisotopes 122-125I with proton, alpha, and deuteron induced reactions were calculated by two different level density models. For the nuclear model calculations, the Talys 1.6 code were used, which is the latest version of Talys code series. Calculations of excitation functions for production of the 122-125I isotopes were carried out by using the generalized superfluid model (GSM) and Fermi-gas model (FGM). The results have shown that generalized superfluid model is more successful than Fermi-gas model in explaining the experimental results.

  8. Functional imaging of living Paramecium by means of confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Fronte, Paola; Raimondo, Marco; Fato, Marco; DeLeo, Gianluca; Beltrame, Francesco; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giberto; Ramoino, Paola

    2002-05-01

    Confocal and Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy allow gathering three-dimensional and temporal information from biological systems exploiting fluorescence labeling and autofluorescence properties. In this work we study biological events linked to functionality in Paramecium primaurelia. The internalization of material in ciliated one-celled organisms (protozoa) occurs via different mechanisms, even if most of nutrients, particulate or not, is taken up by food vacuoles formed at the bottom of the oral cavity. The endocytosis of small-sized molecules occurs at the parasomal sacs, located next the ciliar basal bodies. Vital fluorescent dyes (BSA-FITC, WGA-FITC, dextran-Texas Red, cholesteryl-Bodipy) and autofluorescence were used to study formation, movement, and fusion of vesicles during endocytosis and phagocytosis of Paramecium primaurelia. By immobilizing living cells pulsed with food vacuole and endosome markers at successive times after chasing in unlabeled medium, the intracellular movement and fusion of food vacuoles and of endosomes were visualized. A temporal analysis of fluorescence images and the false-color technique were used. Starting from time series or 3D data sets composite images were generated by associating with each originally acquired image a different color corresponding to each sampling point in time and along the z-axis. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging attempts are also outlined.

  9. Measuring excitation functions needed to interpret cosmogenic nuclide production in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Beverding, A.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Vincent, J.; Castaneda, C.; Reedy, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides produced in lunar rocks by cosmic ray interactions are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or gamma-ray spectroscopy. From these measurements, estimates of the solar proton flux over time periods characterized by the half-life of the isotope under study can be made, if all the cross sections for all the reactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are known. Proton production cross sections are very important because (approximately) 98% of solar cosmic rays and (approximately) 87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons in the lunar environment. Many of the needed cross sections have never been measured. Targets of C, Al, Si, SiO2, mg, K, Ca, Fe and Ni have been irradiated using three accelerators to cover a proton energy range of 25-500 MeV. Excitation functions for Be-7, Be-10, Na-22, and Al-26 production from Mg and Al will be reported, and the consequences of using these new cross section values to estimate solar proton fluxes discussed.

  10. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  11. Design and optimization for variable rate selective excitation using an analytic RF scaling function.

    PubMed

    Gai, Neville D; Zur, Yuval

    2007-11-01

    At higher B(0) fields, specific absorption rate (SAR) deposition increases. Due to maximum SAR limitation, slice coverage decreases and/or scan time increases. Conventional selective RF pulses are played out in conjunction with a time independent field gradient. Variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) is a technique that modifies the original RF and gradient waveforms such that slice profile is unchanged. The drawback is that the slice profile for off-resonance spins is distorted. A new VERSE algorithm based on modeling the scaled waveforms as a Fermi function is introduced. It ensures that system related constraints of maximum gradient amplitude and slew rate are not exceeded. The algorithm can be used to preserve the original RF pulse duration while minimizing SAR and peak b1 or to minimize the RF pulse duration. The design is general and can be applied to any symmetrical or asymmetrical RF waveform. The algorithm is demonstrated by using it to (a) minimize the SAR of a linear phase RF pulse, (b) minimize SAR of a hyperbolic secant RF pulse, and (c) minimize the duration of a linear phase RF pulse. Images with a T1-FLAIR (T1 FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) sequence using a conventional and VERSE adiabatic inversion RF pulse are presented. Comparison of images and scan parameters for different anatomies and coils shows increased scan coverage and decreased SAR with the VERSE inversion RF pulse, while image quality is preserved.

  12. The excitation functions of 187Re(n,2n) 186m,gRe reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; Kang, Meng-Xiao; Liu, Li-Le; Wang, Ji-Min; Chen, Xiong-Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new value for the emission probability of 137.144 keV γ-rays from 186gRe decay is recommended to be (9.47±0.03)/%. Using this value the measured cross sections for 187Re(n,2n)186mRe and 187Re(n,2n)186gRe reactions around 14 MeV are analyzed, and the cross section for 187Re(n,2n)186m+gRe reaction at 14.8 MeV is (2213±116) mb. The UNF code was adopted to calculate the cross sections for the 187Re(n,2n)186m+gRe reaction below 20 MeV, fitting to the value (2213±116) mb at 14.8 MeV using a set of optimum neutron optical potential parameters which were obtained based on the relevant experimental data of rhenium. The isomeric cross section ratio for the 187Re(n,2n)186m,gRe reaction was analyzed using the V-H method based on nuclear statistical theory. Combining these calculated results, the excitation functions for the 187Re(n,2n)186mRe and 187Re(n,2n)186gRe reactions were obtained. The obtained results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  13. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rare modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in our knowledge of fundamental physics. They have revealed to us CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K/sup 0/-anti K/sup 0/ mixing has provided us with one of our most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to our knowledge of fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they may bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, ..mu.. decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given. (WHK)

  14. On the resonance energy of the strange dibaryon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoichi Ikeda, Hiroyuki Kamano, Toru Sato

    2010-03-01

    The three-body resonance energies of the strange dibaryon are studied with the View the MathML source coupled-channels Faddeev equations. Our resonance energies are compared with those of an effective potential approach (EPA), where a coupling to the πYN channel is simulated by an effective View the MathML source potential, and the spectator momentum in the πYN Green function is neglected. About a 30% reduction of the binding energies due to neglecting the spectator momentum in the πYN Green's function is observed.

  15. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  16. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  17. Aromatic Lateral Substituents Influence the Excitation Energies of Hexaaza Lanthanide Macrocyclic Complexes: A Wave Function Theory and Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-09-24

    The high interest in lanthanide chemistry, and particularly in their luminescence, has been encouraged by the need of understanding the lanthanide chemical coordination and how the design of new luminescent materials can be affected by this. This work is focused on the understanding of the electronic structure, bonding nature, and optical properties of a set of lanthanide hexaaza macrocyclic complexes, which can lead to potential optical applications. Here we found that the DFT ground state of the open-shell complexes are mainly characterized by the manifold of low lying f states, having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The results obtained from the wave function theory calculations (SO-RASSI) put on evidence the multiconfigurational character of their ground state and it is observed that the large spin-orbit coupling and the weak crystal field produce a strong mix of the ground and the excited states. The electron localization function (ELF) and the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) support the idea of a dative interaction between the macrocyclic ligand and the lanthanide center for all the studied systems; noting that, this interaction has a covalent character, where the d-orbital participation is evidenced from NBO analysis, leaving the f shell completely noninteracting in the chemical bonding. From the optical part we observed in all cases the characteristic intraligand (IL) (π-π*) and ligand to metal charge-transfer (LMCT) bands that are present in the ultraviolet and visible regions, and for the open-shell complexes we found the inherent f-f electronic transitions on the visible and near-infrared region. PMID:26325624

  18. Cooling properties of Cloudy Bag strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y.; Cheng, K. S.; Chu, M. C.

    2003-04-01

    As the chiral symmetry is widely recognized as an important driver of the strong interaction dynamics, current strange stars models based on MIT bag models do not obey such symmetry. We investigate properties of bare strange stars using the Cloudy Bag model, in which a pion cloud coupled to the quark-confining bag is introduced such that chiral symmetry is conserved. The parameters in the model, namely the bag constant and strange quark mass are determined self-consistently by fitting the mass spectrum of baryons. Then the equation of state is obtained by evaluating the energy-momentum tensor of the system. We find that the stellar properties of the Cloudy Bag strange stars are similar to those of MIT Bag models. However, the decay of pions is a very efficient cooling way. In fact it can carry out most the thermal energy in a few milliseconds and directly convert them into 100 MeV photons via pion decay. This may be a very efficient γ-ray burst mechanism. Numerical results indicate that temperature of a Cloudy Bag strange star is sufficiently lower than a MIT one for the small gap energy of color superconductivity (/Δ=1 MeV). On the other hand, large gap energy (/Δ=100 MeV) can suppress the pion emissivity and hence the cooling curves of Cloudy model and MIT model are almost identical. The long term cooling behaviors of both MIT model and Cloudy model are determined by the color-flavor locked phase. The surface luminosity of a bare strange star is higher than that of a neutron star until 106 and 108 s for (/Δ=100 MeV) and (/Δ=1 MeV) respectively. After this period, the surface luminosity of a bare strange star becomes lower than that of a neutron star even rapidly cooling mechanisms, e.g. direct URCA process or pion condensation, exist in the neutron stars. Hence, the cooling behavior may provide a possible way to distinguish a compact object between a neutron star, MIT strange star and Cloudy Bag strange star in observations.

  19. Excitation function of the 60Ni(p ,γ )61Cu reaction from threshold to 16 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. S.; Sudár, S.; Spahn, I.; Shariff, M. A.; Qaim, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    Excitation function of the reaction 60Ni(p ,γ )61Cu was measured via the activation technique in the energy range of 1.3-16.0 MeV using a low-energy accelerator and a small cyclotron. The results are comparable to those previously obtained via prompt γ counting. In addition excitation functions of the more common competing 60Ni(p ,n )60Cu and 60Ni(p ,α )57Co reactions were also measured. Theoretical calculations on proton-induced reactions on 60Ni were performed using the nuclear model code talys. The results suggest that near the threshold of the reaction the compound nucleus mechanism dominates. Thereafter the contribution of direct interactions becomes rather strong, especially between 4 and 6 MeV, i.e., just below the threshold of the 60Ni(p ,n )60Cu reaction. The cross section at the maximum of the excitation function of each of the three reactions, namely, 60Ni(p ,γ )61Cu,60Ni(p ,n )60Cu , and 60Ni(p ,α )57Co , amounts to 2, 320, and 85 mb, respectively. The (p ,n ) reaction is thus the most commonly occurring process, and the (p ,γ ) reaction is the weakest, possibly due to higher probability of particle emission than γ-ray emission from the highly excited intermediate nucleus 61Cu formed in the interaction of a proton with the target nucleus 60Ni.

  20. Excited-State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Optical Limiting in Zinc Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Optical-limiting materials are capable of attenuating light to protect delicate equipment from high-intensity light sources. Phthalocyanines have attracted a lot of attention for optical-limiting applications due to their versatility and large nonlinear absorption. With excited-state absorption (ESA) being the primary mechanism for optical limiting behavior in phthalocyanines, the ability to tune the optical absorption of ground and excited states in phthalocyanines would allow for the development of advanced optical limiters. We recently developed a method for the calculation of ESA based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory propagation of an excited-state density. In this work, we apply the approach to zinc phthalocyanine, demonstrating the ability of our method to efficiently identify the optical limiting potential of a molecular complex.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide regulates cardiovascular function by influencing the excitability of subfornical organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Kuksis, Markus; Smith, Pauline M; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol) significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5). Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90) of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure.

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Cardiovascular Function by Influencing the Excitability of Subfornical Organ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kuksis, Markus; Smith, Pauline M.; Ferguson, Alastair V.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol) significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5). Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90) of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure. PMID:25144759

  3. Analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in time-dependent density functional theory: Formalism, implementation, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the formalism, implementation, and performance of the analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that extends our previous work [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011)] on the analytical Hessian in TDDFT within Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to full TDDFT. In contrast to TDA-TDDFT, an appreciable advantage of full TDDFT is that it maintains the oscillator strength sum rule, and therefore yields more precise results for the oscillator strength and other related physical quantities. For the excited-state harmonic vibrational frequency calculation, however, full TDDFT does not seem to be advantageous since the numerical tests demonstrate that the accuracy of TDDFT with and without TDA are comparable to each other. As a common practice, the computed harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled by a suitable scale factor to yield good agreement with the experimental fundamental frequencies. Here we apply both the optimized ground-state and excited-state scale factors to scale the calculated excited-state harmonic frequencies and find that the scaling decreases the root-mean-square errors. The optimized scale factors derived from the excited-state calculations are slightly smaller than those from the ground-state calculations.

  4. exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G0W0. Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  5. Exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G(0)W(0). Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more. PMID:25135665

  6. Polarisation observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Fegan

    2012-04-01

    The FROST experiment at Jefferson Lab used the CLAS detector in Hall B with the intention of performing a complete measurement of polarization observables associated with strangeness photoproduction, in combination with data from previous JLab experiments. This was achieved by utilizing the FROST polarized target in conjunction with polarized photon beams, allowing direct measurement of beam-target double polarization observables. By studying strangeness reactions, such as {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0}, it may be possible to find 'missing' baryon resonances, predicted by symmetric quark models but not observed in previous experiments, whose results are consistent with the di-quark model. It is thought these 'missing' resonances remain undiscovered because they have different coupling strengths for different reaction channels, such as the strangeness reactions, whereas the current data is dominated by studies of pN reactions. Observing these resonances therefore has important implications for our knowledge of the excited states of nucleons, and the models predicting the quark interactions within them. The G polarization observable is one of the beam-target double polarization observables, associated with a longitudinally polarized target and a linearly polarized photon beam, and its measurement for the strangeness reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0} is the focus of the work presented.

  7. Strangeness conservation in hot nuclear fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Letessier, J.; Tounsi, A. ); Heinz, U.; Sollfrank, J. ); Rafelski, J. )

    1995-04-01

    Within a thermal model generalized to allow for nonequilibrium strange particle abundances we study how the constraint that the balance of strangeness in a fireball is (nearly) zero impacts the allowable thermal fireball parameters. Using the latest data of the CERN-WA85 experiment for the case of 200[ital A] GeV S-[ital A] ([ital A][similar to]200) collisions we extract the values of the thermal parameters considering in detail the impact of hadronic resonance decays on the abundances and spectral form of strange baryons and antibaryons. Given these results and invoking further the observed charged particle multiplicities we are able to consider the (specific) entropy content of the fireball in order to understand the nature of the disagreement of the hadronic gas picture of the fireball with the experimental data.

  8. Ghost-interaction correction in ensemble density-functional theory for excited states with and without range separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Mehboob; Knecht, Stefan; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Ensemble density-functional theory (eDFT) suffers from the so-called "ghost-interaction" error when approximate exchange-correlation functionals are used. In this work, we present a rigorous ghost-interaction correction (GIC) scheme in the context of range-separated eDFT. The method relies on an exact decomposition of the ensemble short-range exchange-correlation energy into a multideterminantal exact exchange term, which involves the long-range interacting ensemble density matrix, instead of the Kohn-Sham (KS) one, and a complementary density-functional correlation energy. A generalized adiabatic connection formula is derived for the latter. In order to perform practical calculations, the complementary correlation functional is simply modeled by its ground-state local density approximation (LDA), while long-range interacting ground- and excited-state wave functions are obtained self-consistently by combining a long-range configuration-interaction calculation with a short-range LDA potential. We show that the GIC reduces the curvature of approximate range-separated ensemble energies drastically while providing considerably more accurate excitation energies, even for charge-transfer and double excitations. Interestingly, the method performs well also in the context of standard KS-eDFT, which is recovered when the range-separation parameter is set to 0.

  9. Measurements of strangeness production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1995-07-15

    Simulations of the ability of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) detector to measure strangeness production in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC are presented. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of short lived particles using a high resolution inner tracker. The prospects for performing neutral kaon interferometry are discussed. Simulation results for measurements of strange and multi-strange baryons are presented.

  10. The Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, James

    2015-07-09

    Scientists from all over the world visit the Center for Functional Nanomaterials to explore strange phenomena hidden on the nanoscale—an exciting and powerful landscape spanning just billionths of a meter. The U.S. Department of Energy opened the CFN, one of its five nanoscale science research centers in the United States, to develop unprecedented energy technologies and solve fundamental scientific puzzles. Learn more about the CFN: https://www.bnl.gov/cfn/.

  11. The Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Dickerson, James

    2016-07-12

    Scientists from all over the world visit the Center for Functional Nanomaterials to explore strange phenomena hidden on the nanoscale—an exciting and powerful landscape spanning just billionths of a meter. The U.S. Department of Energy opened the CFN, one of its five nanoscale science research centers in the United States, to develop unprecedented energy technologies and solve fundamental scientific puzzles. Learn more about the CFN: https://www.bnl.gov/cfn/.

  12. A simplified Tamm-Dancoff density functional approach for the electronic excitation spectra of very large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimme, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Two approximations in the Tamm-Dancoff density functional theory approach (TDA-DFT) to electronically excited states are proposed which allow routine computations for electronic ultraviolet (UV)- or circular dichroism (CD) spectra of molecules with 500-1000 atoms. Speed-ups compared to conventional time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) treatments of about two to three orders of magnitude in the excited state part at only minor loss of accuracy are obtained. The method termed sTDA ("s" for simplified) employs atom-centered Löwdin-monopole based two-electron repulsion integrals with the asymptotically correct 1/R behavior and perturbative single excitation configuration selection. It is formulated generally for any standard global hybrid density functional with given Fock-exchange mixing parameter ax. The method performs well for two standard benchmark sets of vertical singlet-singlet excitations for values of ax in the range 0.2-0.6. The mean absolute deviations from reference data are only 0.2-0.3 eV and similar to those from standard TD-DFT. In three cases (two dyes and one polypeptide), good mutual agreement between the electronic spectra (up to 10-11 eV excitation energy) from the sTDA method and those from TD(A)-DFT is obtained. The computed UV- and CD-spectra of a few typical systems (e.g., C60, two transition metal complexes, [7]helicene, polyalanine, a supramolecular aggregate with 483 atoms and about 7000 basis functions) compare well with corresponding experimental data. The method is proposed together with medium-sized double- or triple-zeta type atomic-orbital basis sets as a quantum chemical tool to investigate the spectra of huge molecular systems at a reliable DFT level.

  13. Some analytical models of anisotropic strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Over the years of the concept of local isotropy has become a too stringent condition in modeling relativistic self-gravitating objects. Taking local anisotropy into consideration, in this work, some analytical models of relativistic anisotropic charged strange stars have been developed. The Einstein-Maxwell gravitational field equations have been solved with a particular form of one of the metric potentials. The radial pressure and the energy density have been assumed to follow the usual linear equation of state of strange quark matter, the MIT bag model.

  14. Radial and angular correlations of two excited electrons. IV. Comparison of configuration-interaction wave functions with the group-theoretical basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. D.; Macek, J. H.

    1984-05-01

    Doubly-excited-state basis (DESB) functions of Herrick and Sinanoǧlu are compared with the large-scale configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions of Lipsky et al., and with the adiabatic channel functions in hyperspherical coordinates. It is shown that DESB functions will represent those states where the mean value of θ12 is large. Owing to the absence of intershell correlations, and a consequent underestimation of radial correlations, the DESB functions give excessive concentrations near θ12=0 for other, less sharply correlated in angle, states.

  15. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunsuke A; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases. PMID:26671367

  16. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  17. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  18. Measurement of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg excitation function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C. M.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Hoffman, D. C.; Nitsche, H.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K. E.; Eichler, R.

    2009-02-15

    The excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of 320{sub -100}{sup +110} pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from {sup 259}Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,2n){sup 258}Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved {sup 258}Sg half-life of 2.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6} ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  19. Excitation functions of (nat)Zn(p,x) nuclear reactions with proton beam energy below 18 MeV.

    PubMed

    Asad, Ali H; Chan, Sun; Morandeau, Laurence; Cryer, David; Smith, Suzanne V; Price, Roger I

    2014-12-01

    We measured the excitation functions of (nat)Zn (p,x) reactions up to 17.6MeV, using the stacked-foils activation technique. High-purity natural zinc (and copper) foils were irradiated with proton beams generated by an 18MeV isochronous cyclotron. Activated foils were measured using high-purity Ge gamma spectroscopy to quantify the radionuclides (61)Cu, (66)Ga, (67)Ga, and (65)Zn produced from the reactions. Thick-target integral yields were also deduced from the measured excitation functions of the produced radioisotopes. These results were compared with the published literature and were found to be in good agreement with most reports, particularly those most recently compiled.

  20. Excitation functions for (d,x) reactions on (133)Cs up to Ed=40MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M; Ignatyuk, A V

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions the excitation functions of the (133)Cs(d,x)(133m,133mg,131mg)Ba,(134,)(132)Cs and (12)(9m)Xe nuclear reactions were measured up to 40MeV deuteron energies by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-ray spectroscopy of activated samples. The results were compared with calculations performed with the theoretical nuclear reaction codes ALICE-IPPE-D, EMPIRE II-D and TALYS calculation listed in the TENDL-2014 library. A moderate agreement was obtained. Based on the integral yields deduced from our measured cross sections, production of (131)Cs via the (133)Cs(d,4n)(131)Ba→(131)Cs reaction and (133)Ba via (133)Cs(d,2n) reactions is discussed in comparison with other charged particle production routes. PMID:26773822

  1. Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Corradi, L.; Behera, B.R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Stefanini, A.M.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Wu, Y.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Sagaidak, R.N.; Atutov, S.N.; Mai, B.; Stancari, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Mariotti, E.; Khanbekyan, A.; Veronesi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr isotopes produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion-evaporation reaction have been measured at E{sub lab}=75-130 MeV via characteristic {alpha} decays by means of an electrostatic deflector and a semiconductor detector. Data have been compared with calculations giving barrier-passing (capture) cross sections and probabilities of the compound nucleus decay into different channels according to the standard statistical model.

  2. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene. PMID:27485768

  3. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  4. Strange Bedfellows; Physical and Biological Oceanographers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, W. S.

    2002-12-01

    When I started graduate study at Scripps in 1947, both the text, "The Oceans", and the curriculum - all students took the introductory courses in physics, chemistry, biology, and geology - conspired to create awareness of the interactions among these fields. In their preface, the authors spoke of the book as "an aid to the beginner and specialist alike in the coordination of the various fields of oceanography." Harald Sverdrup, perhaps the best known physical oceanographer of his day, introduced us to the interdisciplinary organization, ICES, wrote an important paper (1953) on "the vernal blooming of phytoplankton", and together with fishery biologist O.E.Sette, launched the world renowned CalCOFI program. Another noted physical oceanographer, Henry Stommel, 1949, teamed up with biologist Gordon Riley in a major study of the quantitative ecology of plankton. At the time, physical and biological oceanographers often seemed to be engaged in the same mission. The curriculum format, with its four basic courses, spread to most other graduate programs in oceanography, but the forces of specialization also spread. While the biological oceanographers have always seen the need to understand the milieu within which their creatures function, the physicists often seemed to chafe against wasting their time on squishy subjects like biology when there were so many more important and fascinating things to study. Interactions were further complicated by the confusion between "biological oceanography" and "marine biology", and by the status of "fishery biology" which was often disdained by oceanographers of all stripes. I propose to discuss the evolution of the relationship among these fields during the 60 years since "The Oceans" was first published, concluding with the present marriage of convenience, or at least amicable co-habitation, forced by the widespread concern over the threat of global warming and the need to understand its consequences. It has become clear that

  5. Strangeness production experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard

    2004-06-01

    Experimental results for photo- and electro-production of open strangeness from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are discussed. The results are from work completed by mid-2003 on elementary $KY$ production, nuclear targets, and the exotic $\\Theta^+$ state. It is shown how the increases in intensity and precision of JLab experiments over earlier work have allowed new phenomena to become measurable.

  6. Strange quark contribution to the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, Dean F.

    The strangeness contribution to the electric and magnetic properties of the nucleon has been under investigation experimentally for many years. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) gives theoretical predictions of these measurements by implementing the continuum gauge theory on a discrete, mathematical Euclidean space-time lattice which provides a cutoff removing the ultra-violet divergences. In this dissertation we will discuss effective methods using LQCD that will lead to a better determination of the strangeness contribution to the nucleon properties. Strangeness calculations are demanding technically and computationally. Sophisticated techniques are required to carry them to completion. In this thesis, new theoretical and computational methods for this calculation such as twisted mass fermions, perturbative subtraction, and General Minimal Residual (GMRES) techniques which have proven useful in the determination of these form factors will be investigated. Numerical results of the scalar form factor using these techniques are presented. These results give validation to these methods in future calculations of the strange quark contribution to the electric and magnetic form factors.

  7. 'Strange money': risk, finance and socialized debt.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Nigel

    2011-03-01

    This paper explores an essential but neglected aspect of recent discussions of the banking and financial system, namely money itself. Specifically, I take up a distinction drawn by Susan Strange which has never been fully elaborated: between a financial system that is global, and an international monetary system that remains largely territorial. I propose a sociological elaboration of this distinction by examining each category, 'finance' and 'money', in terms of its distinctive orientation to risk and debt. Money is distinguished by its high degree of liquidity and low degree of risk, corresponding to expectations that derive from its status as a 'claim upon society'- a form of socialized debt. But as Strange argued, these features of money are being undermined by the proliferation of sophisticated instruments of financial risk management -'strange money'- that, as monetary substitutes, both weaken states' capacity to manage money, and more broadly, contribute to 'overbanking'. The ultimate danger, according to Strange, is the 'death of money'. The paper concludes by exploring the implications of the distinction for sociological arguments about the changing nature of money.

  8. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  9. Seismic Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Vigdor

    2004-01-01

    Two decades ago, Witten suggested that the ground state of matter might be material of nuclear density made from up, down and strange quarks. Since then, much effort has gone into exploring astrophysical and other implications of this possibility. For example, neutron stars would almost certainly be strange quark stars; dark matter might be strange quark matter. Searches for stable strange quark matter have been made in various mass ranges, with negative, but not conclusive results. Recently, we [D. Anderson, E. Herrin, V. Teplitz, and I. Tibuleac, Bull. Seis. Soc. of Am. 93, 2363 (2003)] reported a positive result for passage through the Earth of a multi-ton "nugget" of nuclear density in a search of about a million seismic reports, to the U.S. Geological Survey for the years 1990-93, not associated with known Earthquakes. I will present the evidence (timing of first signals to the 9 stations involved, first signal directions, and unique waveform characteristics) for our conclusion and discuss potential improvements that could be obtained from exploiting the seismologically quieter environments of the moon and Mars.

  10. The pulsar PSR J0348-0432 and strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, Yu. L.; Grigoryan, A. K.; Shaginyan, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The possible constraints on the equation of state for superdense baryonic matter to which an accurate measurement of the mass for the binary radio pulsar PSR J0348-0432 ( M/ M⊙ = 2.01 ± 0.04) leads have been determined. We use the bag model for strange quark matter (SQM), where the transition to the SQM state occurs at an energy density that does not exceed twice the density in atomic nuclei. Therefore, on the curve of mass M for equilibrium superdense configurations versus central energy density ρ c (the M( ρ c ) curve), low-mass neutron stars and configurations consisting of SQM form one family in central density. The sets of three phenomenological bag constants (the vacuum pressure B, the quarkgluon interaction constant α c , and the strange quark mass ms) have been determined. Using them in the equation of state for SQM leads to maximum masses M max of equilibrium configurations greater than 2.01 M ⊙ ( M max ≥ 2.01 M ⊙). For such equations of state for configurations with M max and M/ M ⊙ = 2.01, we have calculated themass, the radius, the total number of baryons, and the redshift fromthe stellar surface as a function of the central energy density ρ c . It turns out that if we restrict the quark-gluon interaction constant α c , in terms of which the expansion is performed in the perturbation theory when determining the thermodynamic potentials Ω i , i = u, d, and s, to α c < 0.6, then, according to the derived equations of state, the above-mentioned pulsar can be a possible candidate for strange stars.

  11. Double excitations and state-to-state transition dipoles in π-π∗ excited singlet states of linear polyenes: Time-dependent density-functional theory versus multiconfigurational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Ivan A.; Tafur, Sergio; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of static and dynamic electron correlation on the nature of excited states and state-to-state transition dipole moments is studied with a multideterminant wave function approach on the example of all-trans linear polyenes ( C4H6 , C6H8 , and C8H10 ). Symmetry-forbidden singlet nAg states were found to separate into three groups: purely single, mostly single, and mostly double excitations. The excited-state absorption spectrum is dominated by two bright transitions: 1Bu-2Ag and 1Bu-mAg , where mAg is the state, corresponding to two-electron excitation from the highest occupied to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The richness of the excited-state absorption spectra and strong mixing of the doubly excited determinants into lower- nAg states, reported previously at the complete active space self-consistent field level of theory, were found to be an artifact of the smaller active space, limited to π orbitals. When dynamic σ-π correlation is taken into account, single- and double-excited states become relatively well separated at least at the equilibrium geometry of the ground state. This electronic structure is closely reproduced within time-dependent density-functional theory (TD DFT), where double excitations appear in a second-order coupled electronic oscillator formalism and do not mix with the single excitations obtained within the linear response. An extension of TD DFT is proposed, where the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) is invoked after the linear response equations are solved (a posteriori TDA). The numerical performance of this extension is validated against multideterminant-wave-function and quadratic-response TD DFT results. It is recommended for use with a sum-over-states approach to predict the nonlinear optical properties of conjugated molecules.

  12. Evaporation residue excitation function measurements in 50Ti- and 54Cr-induced reactions with lanthanide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Alfonso, M. C.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Bennett, M. E.; Frey, M. M.; Folden, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Cross sections for the production of shell-stabilized evaporation residues in the 50Ti+Gd160 , 159Tb, 162Dy , and 54Cr+Dy162 reactions are reported. The compound nucleus excitation energy range considered principally covers the 4 n evaporation channel with segments of the 3 n and 5 n channels also measured. The resultant production cross sections are for nuclides with Z =86 -90 . From an analysis based on a statistical model, it is concluded that a larger fission probability than that predicted by the Bohr-Wheeler transition-state theory is needed to describe the data. This outcome is attributed to the influence of collective nuclear excitations. Subsequently, the expected stability enhancement against fission due to the influence of the magic N =126 shell is not evident. The x n excitation functions measured in previous experiments in the reactions 48Ca+Gd154 , 159Tb,Dy162 , and 165Ho are combined with the present data for Z >20 projectiles to illustrate systematic behavior of measured cross sections as a function of the difference in fission barrier and neutron separation energy.

  13. Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Production upon Two-Photon Excitation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Functionalized Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gandra, Naveen; Chiu, Pui Lam; Li, Wenbing; Anderson, Yolanda R.; Mitra, Somenath; He, Huixin; Gao, Ruomei

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with -COOH (along with some sulphonation and nitration), and/or modified with chitosan were prepared and tested for their singlet oxygen (1O2) production. The emission from 1O2 observed upon SWNT irradiation at 532 nm was due to a two-photon process, while 1O2 production via excitation at 355 nm occurred through a conventional one-photon pathway. The relative quantum yield of 1O2 production at excitation wavelength of 532 nm was found to be 0.00, 0.07-0.13 and 0.24-0.54 for highly-functionalized, partially-functionalized and non-functionalized SWNT samples respectively. The nanotube-mediated generation of 1O2 may find applications in both targeted destruction of tumor cells and selective degradation of drug molecules. Our research provides a practical approach to modulate the production of reactive oxygen species from SWNTs via surface functionalization/modification. PMID:20046942

  14. Motor cortex maturation is associated with reductions in recurrent connectivity among functional subpopulations and increases in intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Biane, Jeremy S; Scanziani, Massimo; Tuszynski, Mark H; Conner, James M

    2015-03-18

    Behavior is derived from the configuration of synaptic connectivity among functionally diverse neurons. Fine motor behavior is absent at birth in most mammals but gradually emerges during subsequent postnatal corticospinal system maturation; the nature of circuit development and reorganization during this period has been largely unexplored. We investigated connectivity and synaptic signaling among functionally distinct corticospinal populations in Fischer 344 rats from postnatal day 18 through 75 using retrograde tracer injections into specific spinal cord segments associated with distinct aspects of forelimb function. Primary motor cortex slices were prepared enabling simultaneous patch-clamp recordings of up to four labeled corticospinal neurons and testing of 3489 potential synaptic connections. We find that, in immature animals, local connectivity is biased toward corticospinal neurons projecting to the same spinal cord segment; this within-population connectivity significantly decreases through maturation until connection frequency is similar between neurons projecting to the same (within-population) or different (across-population) spinal segments. Concomitantly, postnatal maturation is associated with a significant reduction in synaptic efficacy over time and an increase in intrinsic neuronal excitability, altering how excitation is effectively transmitted across recurrent corticospinal networks. Collectively, the postnatal emergence of fine motor control is associated with a relative broadening of connectivity between functionally diverse cortical motor neurons and changes in synaptic properties that could enable the emergence of smaller independent networks, enabling fine motor movement. These changes in synaptic patterning and physiological function provide a basis for the increased capabilities of the mature versus developing brain.

  15. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl− ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-01-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl− ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl− ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl− transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl− lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance and passive distribution—enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K+ and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  16. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-04-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl(-) ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl(-) ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl(-) transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl(-) lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions-high membrane conductance and passive distribution-enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K(+) and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  17. Searches for a possible strangeness S = -2 dibaryon

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    Since the advent of QCD there has been a strong interest in manifestations of quark degrees of freedom in medium energy nuclear and particle physics. Within the framework of multiquark states the emphasis has centered on states with more than three quarks bound by colour forces rather than by the conventional mesonic forces. Dibaryon systems have played an important role within that framework. One of the most spectacular and exciting predictions is the possible existence, according to the MIT bag model, of a stable, flavor-singlet, strangeness = /sup -/2,J/sup P/ = 0/sup +/ dihyperon, called by R. Jaffe the H particle. It is a six-quark object (2u, 2d, 2s quarks) with a predicted mass around 2150 MeV, i.e., below the ..lambda lambda.. mass with a binding energy around 80 MeV. Its decay channels would be restricted to ..sigma..N and ..lambda..N, via the weak interaction. The relevant two body states are shown. A similar prediction was obtained on the basis of the same model by Mulders et al., with a mass of 2164 MeV for this state. For completeness it should be mentioned that in a recent estimate of the center-of-mass correction to the static MIT bag model, the authors suggest that the dilambda mass moves up to just above the ..lambda lambda.. threshold. These calculations are undergoing further tets. Although all these results come from a specific model, Lipkin has argued that the general features of QCD and the known baryon mass splittings imply that the six-quark state with charge zero, spin zero, and strangeness = /sup -/2 would have the greatest binding potential.

  18. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses. PMID:27491409

  19. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-08-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses.

  20. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-07-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood-brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean -10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve -1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n = 5) and heart rate (HR) (-32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n = 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons.

  1. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-01-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood–brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean −10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve −1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n= 5) and heart rate (HR) (−32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n= 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons. PMID:23629509

  2. "Making strange": a role for the humanities in medical education.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Arno K; Wear, Delese

    2014-07-01

    Stories, film, drama, and art have been used in medical education to enhance empathy, perspective-taking, and openness to "otherness," and to stimulate reflection on self, others, and the world. Yet another, equally important function of the humanities and arts in the education of physicians is that of "making strange"-that is, portraying daily events, habits, practices, and people through literature and the arts in a way that disturbs and disrupts one's assumptions, perspectives, and ways of acting so that one sees the self, others, and the world anew. Tracing the development of this concept from Viktor Shklovsky's "enstrangement" (ostranenie) through Bertolt Brecht's "alienation effect," this essay describes the use of this technique to disrupt the "automaticity of thinking" in order to discover new ways of perceiving and being in the world.Enstrangement may be used in medical education in order to stimulate critical reflection and dialogue on assumptions, biases, and taken-for-granted societal conditions that may hinder the realization of a truly humanistic clinical practice. In addition to its ability to enhance one's critical understanding of medicine, the technique of "making strange" does something else: By disrupting fixed beliefs, this approach may allow a reexamination of patient-physician relationships in terms of human interactions and provide health care professionals an opportunity-an "open space"-to bear witness and engage with other individuals during challenging times.

  3. Nanoscale visualization of functional adhesion/excitability nodes at the intercalated disc

    PubMed Central

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L.; Keegan, Sarah; Lin, Xianming; Arcos, Tatiana; Feng-Xia-Liang; Korchev, Yuri E.; Gorelik, Julia; Fenyö, David; Rothenberg, Eli; Delmar, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion and electrical excitability are considered separate cellular properties. Studies of myelinated fibres, however, show that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) aggregate with cell adhesion molecules at discrete subcellular locations, such as the nodes of Ranvier. Demonstration of similar macromolecular organization in cardiac muscle is missing. Here we combine nanoscale-imaging (single-molecule localization microscopy; electron microscopy; and ‘angle view' scanning patch clamp) with mathematical simulations to demonstrate distinct hubs at the cardiac intercalated disc, populated by clusters of the adhesion molecule N-cadherin and the VGSC NaV1.5. We show that the N-cadherin-NaV1.5 association is not random, that NaV1.5 molecules in these clusters are major contributors to cardiac sodium current, and that loss of NaV1.5 expression reduces intercellular adhesion strength. We speculate that adhesion/excitability nodes are key sites for crosstalk of the contractile and electrical molecular apparatus and may represent the structural substrate of cardiomyopathies in patients with mutations in molecules of the VGSC complex. PMID:26787348

  4. Modeling Spin Fluctuations and Magnetic Excitations from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorni, Tommaso; Timrov, Iurii; Dal Corso, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano

    Harnessing spin fluctuations and magnetic excitations in materials is key in many fields of technology, spanning from memory devices to information transfer and processing, to name but a few. A proper understanding of the interplay between collective and single-particle spin excitations is still lacking, and it is expected that first-principle simulations based on TDDFT may shed light on this interplay, as well as on the role of important effects such as relativistic ones and related magnetic anisotropies. All the numerical approaches proposed so far to tackle this problem are based on the computationally demanding solution of the Sternheimer equations for the response orbitals or the even more demanding solution of coupled Dyson equations for the spin and charge susceptibilities. The Liouville-Lanczos approach to TDDFT has already proven to be a valuable alternative, the most striking of its features being the avoidance of sums over unoccupied single-particle states and the frequency-independence of the main numerical bottleneck. In this work we present an extension of this methodology to magnetic systems and its implementation in the Quantum ESPRESSO distribution, together with a few preliminary results on the magnon dispersions in bulk Fe.

  5. The Strangeness Physics Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Carman

    2007-01-08

    An extensive program of strange particle production off the nucleon is currently underway with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. This talk will emphasize strangeness electroproduction in the baryon resonance region between W=1.6 and 2.4 GeV, where indications of s-channel structure are suggestive of high-mass baryon resonances coupling to kaons and hyperons in the final state. Precision measurements of cross sections and polarization observables are being carried out with highly polarized electron and real photon beams at energies up to 6 GeV. The near-term and longer-term future of this program will also be discussed.

  6. Analytical signal analysis of strange nonchaotic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kopal; Prasad, Awadhesh; Singh, Harinder P; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2008-04-01

    We apply an analytical signal analysis to strange nonchaotic dynamics. Through this technique it is possible to obtain the spectrum of instantaneous intrinsic mode frequencies that are present in a given signal. We find that the second-mode frequency and its variance are good order parameters for dynamical transitions from quasiperiodic tori to strange nonchaotic attractors (SNAs) and from SNAs to chaotic attractors. Phase fluctuation analysis shows that SNAs and chaotic attractors behave identically within short time windows as a consequence of local instabilities in the dynamics. In longer time windows, however, the globally stable character of SNAs becomes apparent. This methodology can be of great utility in the analysis of experimental time series, and representative applications are made to signals obtained from Rössler and Duffing oscillators. PMID:18517723

  7. Electronically Excited States of Higher Acenes up to Nonacene: A Density Functional Theory/Multireference Configuration Interaction Study.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Holger F; Tönshoff, Christina; Doerr, Markus; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa

    2016-01-12

    While the optical spectra of the acene series up to pentacene provide textbook examples for the annulation principle, the spectra of the larger members are much less understood. The present work provides an investigation of the optically allowed excited states of the acene series from pentacene to nonacene, the largest acene observed experimentally, using the density functional based multireference configuration method (DFT/MRCI). For this purpose, the ten lowest energy states of the B2u and B3u irreducible representations were computed. In agreement with previous computational investigations, the electronic wave functions of the acenes acquire significant multireference character with increasing acene size. The HOMO → LUMO excitation is the major contributor to the (1)La state (p band, B2u) also for the larger acenes. The oscillator strength decreases with increasing length. The (1)Lb state (α band, B3u), so far difficult to assign for the larger acenes due to overlap with photoprecursor bands, becomes almost insensitive to acene length. The (1)Bb state (β band, B3u) also moves only moderately to lower energy with increasing acene size. Excited states of B3u symmetry that formally result from double excitations involving HOMO, HOMO-1, LUMO, and LUMO+1 decrease in energy much faster with system size. One of them (D1) has very small oscillator strength but becomes almost isoenergetic with the (1)La state for nonacene. The other (D2) also has low oscillator strength as long as it is higher in energy than (1)Bb. Once it is lower in energy than the (1)Bb state, both states interact strongly resulting in two states with large oscillator strengths. The emergence of two strongly absorbing states is in agreement with experimental observations. The DFT/MRCI computations reproduce experimental excitation energies very well for pentacene and hexacene (within 0.1 eV). For the larger acenes deviations are larger (up to 0.2 eV), but qualitative agreement is observed. PMID

  8. [Density functional theory study of surface-enhanced raman spectra and excited state of 1,4-benzenedithiol].

    PubMed

    Shao, Yang-Fan; Li, Chong-Yang; Feng, Yuan-Ming; Lin, Wang

    2014-02-01

    Raman scattering spectra and optimized geometries of the 1,4-benzenedithiol molecule and complexes have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional at the level of 6-311G+(d) basis set for C, H, S atoms and LanL2DZ for Ag, Au atoms, respectively. The optimized 1,4-benzenedithiol molecule was non-planar structure and the angle between benzene ring plane and S-H is 20.20. By means of the simulation of molecule adsorbed on gold and silver cluster, we concluded that gold clusters are nearly parallel to the benzenedithiol molecule and silver clusters are almost perpendicular to the molecular surface. The authors studied the interaction between Raman intensity and molecular properties, such as static polarizablity and charge distribution. The Raman intensity of 1,4-BDT-Au2, 1,4-BDT-Ag2 and Ag2-1,4-BDT-Au2 were in good agreement with static polarizability. The excited states of Ag2-1,4-BDT-Au2 complex were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). And the simulated absorption spectra and several allowed singlet excited states were analyzed to investigate the surface-enhanced Raman chemical enhancement mechanism. PMID:24822413

  9. Measurement of excitation function for 63Cu(n, p) 63Ni reaction up to En=15 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, S.; Shibata, T.; Imamura, M.; Ohkubo, T.; Satoh, S.; Uwamino, Y.; Nogawa, N.; Baba, M.; Matsuyama, S.; Iwasaki, S.

    1999-01-01

    The excitation function for the 63Cu(n, p) 63Ni reaction were measured using neutrons produced by the T(p, n) reaction at En=˜1.5 MeV, D(d, n) at En=˜6.5 MeV and T(d, n) at En=˜14 MeV, respectively. Irradiations were performed using the dynamitron accelerator at the Fast Neutron Laboratory of Tohoku University. After irradiation, the nickel was separated by anion-exchange and solvent extraction. The 63Ni was measured by liquid scintillation method. The cross sections obtained were compared with the calculated values of JENDL-3.

  10. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 16/O with /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M.; Henderson, R.A.; Lee, D.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nurmia, M.J.; Welch, R.B.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 90- to 150-MeV /sup 16/O ions. A comparison of the maxima of the mass-yield curves measured in this experiment with those for the reactions of /sup 18/O ions with /sup 249/Cf shows different shifts from those that have been measured for reactions of the /sup 16,18/O and /sup 20,22/Ne ion pairs with /sup 248/Cm. However, the shifts appear similar to those recently measured for reactions of these ion pairs with /sup 254/Es.

  11. Strangeness and meson-nucleon sigma terms

    SciTech Connect

    Dahiya, Harleen; Sharma, Neetika

    2011-10-21

    The chiral constituent quark model ({chi}CQM) has been extended to calculate the flavor structure of the nucleon through the meson-nucleon sigma terms which have large contributions from the quark sea and are greatly affected by chiral symmetry breaking and SU(3) symmetry breaking. The hidden strangeness component in the nucleon has also been investigated and its significant contribution is found to be consistent with the recent available experimental observations.

  12. Multiphoton excitation microscopy of in vivo human skin. Functional and morphological optical biopsy based on three-dimensional imaging, lifetime measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Masters, B R; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1998-02-01

    Two-photon excitation microscopy has the potential as an effective, noninvasive, diagnostic tool for in vivo examination of human deep tissue structure at the subcellular level. By using infrared photons as the excitation source in two-photon microscopy, a significant improvement in penetration depth can be achieved because of the much lower tissue scattering and absorption coefficients in the infrared wavelengths. Two-photon absorption occurs primarily at the focal point and provides the physical basis for optical sectioning. Multiphoton excitation microscopy at 730 nm was used to image in vivo human skin autofluorescence from the surface to a depth of about 200 microns. The spectroscopic data suggest that reduced pyridine nucleotides, NAD(P)H, are the primary source of the skin autofluorescence using 730 nm excitation. This study demonstrates the use of multiphoton excitation microscopy for functional imaging of the metabolic states of in vivo human skin cells and provides a functional and morphological optical biopsy.

  13. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions ( pp , e^+e^- below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well.

  14. Strangeness in the baryon ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-10-01

    We compute the strangeness content of the baryon octet and decuplet states based on an analysis of recent lattice simulations of the BMW, PACS, LHPC and HSC groups for the pion-mass dependence of the baryon masses. Our results rely on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian and large-Nc sum rule estimates of the counter terms relevant for the baryon masses at N3LO. A partial summation is implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop contributions to the baryon self energies. A simultaneous description of the lattice results of the BMW, LHPC, PACS and HSC groups is achieved. From a global fit we determine the axial coupling constants F ≃ 0.45 and D ≃ 0.80 in agreement with their values extracted from semi-leptonic decays of the baryons. Moreover, various flavor symmetric limits of baron octet and decuplet masses as obtained by the QCDSF-UKQCD group are recovered. We predict the pion- and strangeness sigma terms and the pion-mass dependence of the octet and decuplet ground states at different strange quark masses.

  15. The impact of s-bar{s} asymmetry on the strange electromagnetic form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasempour Nesheli, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The existence of the strange quark asymmetry in the nucleon sea has been indicated by both the experimental and theoretical analyses. Although it is well known that the s-bar{{s}} asymmetry is important for some processes in high-energy hadron collisions, it has also been indicated that it can be related to the strange Dirac form factor F 1 s. In this work, we have studied the impact of s- bar{{s}} asymmetry and its uncertainty from various modern parton distribution functions (PDFs) on F 1 s and compared the obtained results with the available experimental information. As a result, we found that the uncertainty in F 1 s( t) due to the s( x) - bar{s}( x) distribution is rather large so that it dominates the model uncertainty at all values of the squared momentum transfer t. However, taking into account the uncertainties, the theoretical predictions of F 1 s( t) are fully compatible with the estimate extracted from experiment. We concluded that the future accurate experimental data of the strange Dirac form factor might be used to put direct constraints on the strange content of the proton and reduce its uncertainty that has always been a challenge.

  16. Functional testing of space flight induced changes in tonic motor control by using limb-attached excitation and load devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallasch, Eugen; Kozlovskaya, Inessa

    2007-02-01

    Long term space flights induce atrophy and contractile changes on postural muscles such effecting tonic motor control. Functional testing of tonic motor control structures is a challenge because of the difficulties to deliver appropriate test forces on crew members. In this paper we propose two approaches for functional testing by using limb attached loading devices. The first approach is based on a frequency and amplitude controllable moving magnet exciter to deliver sinusoidal test forces during limb postures. The responding limb deflection is recorded by an embedded accelerometer to obtain limb impedance. The second approach is based on elastic limb loading to evoke self-excited oscillations during arm extensions. Here the contraction force at the oscillation onset provides information about limb stiffness. The rationale for both testing approaches is based on Feldman's λ-model. An arm expander based on the second approach was probed in a 6-month MIR space flight. The results obtained from the load oscillations, confirmed that this device is well suited to capture space flight induced neuromuscular changes.

  17. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  18. Genetic Inhibition of CaMKII in Dorsal Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Reduces Functional Excitatory Synapses and Enhances Intrinsic Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Klug, Jason R.; Mathur, Brian N.; Kash, Thomas L.; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T.; Robison, A. J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Lovinger, David M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Winder, Danny G.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response. PMID:23028932

  19. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    SciTech Connect

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Martens, M.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B{sub 1}) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  20. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    PubMed Central

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Martens, M.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B1) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  1. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  2. Time-dependent density functional theory study of cobalt corrinoids: Electronically excited states of coenzyme B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruniów, Tadeusz; Jaworska, Maria; Lodowski, Piotr; Zgierski, Marek Z.; Dreos, Renata; Randaccio, Lucio; Kozlowski, Pawel M.

    2009-09-01

    The analysis of the electronic spectra of adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and its derivative in which the trans axial base was replaced by a water molecule (AdoCbi-H2O) has been performed by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The latter corresponds to the situation encountered in strongly acidic conditions. The TDDFT electronic transitions and oscillator strengths were calculated at the optimized B3LYP and BP86 ground state equilibrium geometries. A comparison of the orbital energy diagrams obtained with the B3LYP and BP86 functionals reveals a different orbital order and composition of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals. In B3LYP the lowest-energy transitions are of π /d→π*, π /d→σ*, and π /d→d characters while in the case of BP86 they are mainly d /π→π* and d →π*. The long range charge transfer transitions involving excitations from adenine π orbitals to antibonding corrin π* orbital can be observed at low energies, especially in BP86 results. Calculated electronic excitations were used to simulate the absorption spectra for a direct comparison with the absorption spectra recorded for AdoCbl at different pH values. As previously found for methylcobalamin [see Andruniów et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 085101 (2008)] also for AdoCbl the two-parameter scaling technique is required to obtain a satisfactory agreement between theoretical and experimental spectra. Both functionals correctly predict the shifting of the lowest intense transition toward blue by approximately 13nm upon changing pH from 7 to 1.

  3. Torsional Oscillations of Nonbare Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia; Parisi, Alessandro; Pilo, Luigi; Tonelli, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Strange stars are one of the possible compact stellar objects that can form after a supernova collapse. We consider a model of a strange star having an inner core in the color-flavor locked phase surmounted by a crystalline color superconducting (CCSC) layer. These two phases constitute the quarksphere, which we assume to be the largest and heaviest part of the strange star. The next layer consists of standard nuclear matter forming an ionic crust, hovering on the top of the quarksphere and prevented from falling by a strong dipolar electric field. The dipolar electric field arises because quark matter is confined in the quarksphere by the strong interaction, but electrons can leak outside forming an electron layer a few hundred fermi thick separating the ionic crust from the underlying quark matter. The ionic matter and the CCSC matter constitute two electromagnetically coupled crust layers. We study the torsional oscillations of these two layers. Remarkably, we find that if a fraction larger than 10-4 of the energy of a Vela-like glitch is conveyed to a torsional oscillation, the ionic crust will likely break. The reason is that the very rigid and heavy CCSC crust layer will absorb only a small fraction of the glitch energy, leading to a large-amplitude torsional oscillation of the ionic crust. The maximum stress generated by the torsional oscillation is located inside the ionic crust and is very close to the star’s surface. This peculiar behavior leads to a much easier crust cracking than in standard neutron stars.

  4. TORSIONAL OSCILLATIONS OF NONBARE STRANGE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia; Parisi, Alessandro; Pilo, Luigi; Tonelli, Francesco

    2015-12-20

    Strange stars are one of the possible compact stellar objects that can form after a supernova collapse. We consider a model of a strange star having an inner core in the color-flavor locked phase surmounted by a crystalline color superconducting (CCSC) layer. These two phases constitute the quarksphere, which we assume to be the largest and heaviest part of the strange star. The next layer consists of standard nuclear matter forming an ionic crust, hovering on the top of the quarksphere and prevented from falling by a strong dipolar electric field. The dipolar electric field arises because quark matter is confined in the quarksphere by the strong interaction, but electrons can leak outside forming an electron layer a few hundred fermi thick separating the ionic crust from the underlying quark matter. The ionic matter and the CCSC matter constitute two electromagnetically coupled crust layers. We study the torsional oscillations of these two layers. Remarkably, we find that if a fraction larger than 10{sup −4} of the energy of a Vela-like glitch is conveyed to a torsional oscillation, the ionic crust will likely break. The reason is that the very rigid and heavy CCSC crust layer will absorb only a small fraction of the glitch energy, leading to a large-amplitude torsional oscillation of the ionic crust. The maximum stress generated by the torsional oscillation is located inside the ionic crust and is very close to the star’s surface. This peculiar behavior leads to a much easier crust cracking than in standard neutron stars.

  5. Density Relaxation in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Combining Relaxed Density Natural Orbitals and Multireference Perturbation Theories for an Improved Description of Excited States.

    PubMed

    Ronca, Enrico; Angeli, Celestino; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara

    2014-09-01

    Making use of the recently developed excited state charge displacement analysis [E. Ronca et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054110 (2014)], suited to quantitatively characterize the charge fluxes coming along an electronic excitation, we investigate the role of the density relaxation effects in the overall description of electronically excited states of different nature, namely, valence, ionic, and charge transfer (CT), considering a large set of prototypical small and medium-sized molecular systems. By comparing the response densities provided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and the corresponding relaxed densities obtained by applying the Z-vector postlinear-response approach [N. C. Handy and H. F. Schaefer, J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5031 (1984)] with those obtained by highly correlated state-of-the-art wave function calculations, we show that the inclusion of the relaxation effects is imperative to get an accurate description of the considered excited states. We also examine what happens at the quality of the response function when an increasing amount of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange is included in the functional, showing that the usually improved excitation energies in the case of CT states are not always the consequence of an improved description of their overall properties. Remarkably, we find that the relaxation of the response densities is always able to reproduce, independently of the extent of HF exchange in the functional, the benchmark wave function densities. Finally, we propose a novel and computationally convenient strategy, based on the use of the natural orbitals derived from the relaxed TDDFT density to build zero-order wave function for multireference perturbation theory calculations. For a significant set of different excited states, the proposed approach provided accurate excitation energies, comparable to those obtained by computationally demanding ab initio calculations.

  6. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  7. HD 207739 - A strange composite star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S. B.; Holm, A. V.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    This star, classified F8 IIe + B:, has a very unusual ultraviolet spectrum, with abnormally strong and numerous absorption features in the far-UV and exceptionally strong Mg II emission. There is some resemblance to shell and pre-main-sequence B stars, but it more closely matches the strange spectra of the eclipsing systems VV Cep and SX Cas, and it probably has considerable circumstellar material at fairly high temperature. HD 207739 is probably an interacting binary and needs to be monitored for light and velocity variations.

  8. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard

    2010-08-05

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the {Lambda}(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the {Xi} resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  9. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard Schumacher

    2010-08-01

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the Lambda(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the Xi resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  10. Seismic search for strange quark nuggets

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, Eugene T.; Rosenbaum, Doris C.; Teplitz, Vigdor L.

    2006-02-15

    Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to 1 ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

  11. Stability of charged strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Arbañil, José D. V.; Malheiro, Manuel

    2015-12-17

    We investigate the hydrostatic equilibrium and the stability of charged stars made of a charged perfect fluid. The matter contained in the star follows the MIT bag model equation of state and the charge distribution to a power-law of the radial coordinate. The hydrostatic equilibrium and the stability of charged strange stars are analyzed using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation and the Chandrasekhar’s equation pulsation, respectively. These two equation are modified from their original form to the inclusion of the electric charge. We found that the stability of the star decreases with the increment of the central energy density and with the increment of the amount of charge.

  12. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Sakurai, Minoru; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  13. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Sakurai, Minoru; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  14. Strangeness at high temperatures: from hadrons to quarks.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Ding, H-T; Hegde, P; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Maezawa, Y; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Sharma, S; Soeldner, W; Wagner, M

    2013-08-23

    Appropriate combinations of up to fourth order cumulants of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number and electric charge fluctuations, obtained from lattice QCD calculations, have been used to probe the strangeness carrying degrees of freedom at high temperatures. For temperatures up to the chiral crossover, separate contributions of strange mesons and baryons can be well described by an uncorrelated gas of hadrons. Such a description breaks down in the chiral crossover region, suggesting that the deconfinement of strangeness takes place at the chiral crossover. On the other hand, the strangeness carrying degrees of freedom inside the quark gluon plasma can be described by a weakly interacting gas of quarks only for temperatures larger than twice the chiral crossover temperature. In the intermediate temperature window, these observables show considerably richer structures, indicative of the strongly interacting nature of the quark gluon plasma.

  15. Excitation functions of alpha particle induced reactions on natTi up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. S.; Scholten, B.

    2016-08-01

    Excitation functions of the reactions natTi(α,x)48Cr, natTi(α,x)48V and natTi(α,x)46,48Sc were determined by the stacked-foil activation technique up to 40 MeV. The radioactivities produced in the natTi target were measured by γ-ray spectrometry using HPGe detector. The reaction natTi(α,x)51Cr was used to determine the beam parameters. New experimental values for the above reactions have been obtained. An intercomparison of our data with the available literature values has been done. The cross section results obtained in this work could be useful in defining new monitor reactions, radiation safety and isotope production.

  16. Converging genetic and functional brain imaging evidence links neuronal excitability to working memory, psychiatric disease, and brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Heck, A.; Fastenrath, M.; Ackermann, S.; Auschra, B.; Bickel, H.; Coynel, D.; Gschwind, L.; Jessen, F.; Kaduszkiewicz, H.; Maier, W.; Milnik, A.; Pentzek, M.; Riedel-Heller, S.G.; Ripke, S.; Spalek, K.; Sullivan, P.; Vogler, C.; Wagner, M.; Weyerer, S.; Wolfsgruber, S.; de Quervain, D.; Papassotiropoulos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Working memory, the capacity of actively maintaining task-relevant information during a cognitive task, is a heritable trait. Working memory deficits are characteristic for many psychiatric disorders. We performed genome-wide gene-set enrichment analyses in multiple independent data sets of young and aged cognitively healthy subjects (n = 2’824), and in a large schizophrenia case-control sample (n = 32’143). The voltage-gated cation channel activity gene-set, consisting of genes related to neuronal excitability, was robustly linked to performance in working memory-related tasks across ages, and to schizophrenia. Functional brain imaging in 707 healthy participants linked this gene-set also to working memory-related activity in the parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Gene-set analyses may help to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cognitive dimensions, brain activity and psychopathology. PMID:24529980

  17. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, Kenneth A.; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range 0 to 50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound to bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes.

  18. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Kenneth; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range of 0-50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high-energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound-to-bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes. PMID:26583412

  19. Universality in antiferromagnetic strange metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Stefan A.; Strack, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    We propose a theory of metals at the spin-density-wave quantum-critical point in spatial dimension d =2 . We provide a first estimate of the full set of critical exponents (dynamical exponent z =2.13 , correlation length ν =1.02 , spin susceptibility γ =0.96 , electronic non-Fermi liquid ητf=0.53 , spin-wave Landau damping ητb=1.06 ), which determine the universal power laws in thermodynamics and response functions in the quantum-critical regime relevant for experiments in heavy-fermion systems and iron pnictides. We present approximate numerical and analytical solutions of Polchinski-Wetterich-type flow equations with soft frequency regulators for an effective action of electrons coupled to spin-wave bosons. Performing the renormalization group in frequency instead of momentum space allows to track changes of the Fermi-surface shape and to capture Landau damping during the flow. The technique is easily generalizable from models retaining only patches of the Fermi surface to full, compact Fermi surfaces.

  20. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation.

  1. Calculations of Excitation Functions of Some Structural Fusion Materials for ( n, t) Reactions up to 50 MeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aktı, N. N.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2010-06-01

    Fusion serves an inexhaustible energy for humankind. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, the working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n, t) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn, and 56Fe have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27Al( n, t)25Mg, 51V( n, t)49Ti, 52Cr( n, t)50V, 55Mn( n, t)53Cr and 56Fe( n, t)54Mn reactions have been carried out up to 50 MeV incident neutron energy. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the geometry dependent hybrid model, hybrid model and the cascade exciton model. Equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, we have calculated ( n, t) reaction cross-sections by using new evaluated semi-empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  2. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-15

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency {omega} on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (={omega}/2{pi}) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f {<=} 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent ''hot tail'' is observed at f{>=} 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the ''hot tail'' is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of {omega}, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower {omega} may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency {nu}{sub en}; the transition being dictated by {omega} {approx} 2{pi}{nu}{sub en}.

  3. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-01

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency ω on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (=ω/2π) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f ≤ 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent "hot tail" is observed at f ≥ 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the "hot tail" is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of ω, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower ω may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency νen; the transition being dictated by ω ˜ 2πνen.

  4. Comparison of polar motion excitation function derived from equivalent water thickness data, obtained from filtered stokes coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagalski, T.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that the estimates of the Earth's gravity field produced by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission can be used to infer changes in equivalent water thickness (EWT). However, inadequately smoothed GRACE satellite mission EWT data contain significant striping and thus ought to be filtered to improve signal to noise ratio. We used Stokes coefficients data from GFZ (GeoForschungsZentrum), JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and CSR (Center for Space Research), filtered by decorrelation anisotropic filters: DDK3, DDK2 and DDK1 (Kusche et al., 2009) and made available in the ICGEM (International Center for Global Earth Models). To determine gravimetric excitation function of polar motion for the entire globe or selected areas, we convert gravity coefficients into Equivalent Water Thickness fields. To eliminate stripes from the maps of the EWT, one uses anisotropic filters (Kusche et al., 2009) that are smoothing the EWT data. In this study we investigate the influence of decorrelation anisotropic DDK filters used to process the GRACE EWT fields on the determined polar motion gravimetric excitation functions. We investigate the effect of these filters for four regions: 1) entire Earth, 2) ocean area, 3) land area and 4) Tibetan Plateau area (a rectangle bounded by 4 points A(37.N,78.E), B(37.N,102.E), C(28.N,78.E), D(28.N,102.E). Stokes coefficients are made available on the ICGEM web site. The data contain spherical harmonic coefficients delivered by three research centers: CSR, GFZ, JPL. The time span of the data is 2002 - 2010. The time resolution is 30 days. The ICGEM delivers either the raw Stokes coefficients or filtered Stokes coefficients after application of the anisotropic filters. Computation were based on the following equations

  5. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr/sup +/, HeNe/sup +/, NaAr, and Ar/sub 2/ and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca + h nu ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(5p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(4p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10/sup 3/ A/sup 2/ is estimated.

  6. Ground- and excited-state diatomic bond lengths, vibrational levels, and potential-energy curves from conventional and localized Hartree-Fock-based density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, Andrew M.; Tozer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Ground- and excited-state diatomic bond lengths, vibrational levels, and potential-energy curves are determined using conventional and localized Hartree-Fock (LHF)-based density-functional theory. Exchange only and hybrid functionals (with various fractions of exchange) are considered, together with a standard generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Ground-state bond lengths and vibrational wave numbers are relatively insensitive to whether orbital exchange is treated using the conventional or LHF approach. Excited-state calculations are much more sensitive. For a standard fraction of orbital exchange, N2 and CO vertical excitation energies at experimental bond lengths are accurately described by both conventional and LHF-based approaches, providing an asymptotic correction is present. Excited-state bond lengths and vibrational levels are more accurate with the conventional approach. The best quality, however, is obtained with an asymptotically corrected GGA functional. For the ground and lowest four singlet excited states, the GGA mean absolute errors in bond lengths are 0.006 Å (0.5%) and 0.011 Å (0.8%) for N2 and CO, respectively. Mean absolute errors in fundamental vibrational wavenumbers are 49 cm-1 (2.7%) and 68 cm-1 (5.0%), respectively. The GGA potential-energy curves are compared with near-exact Rydberg-Klein-Rees curves. Agreement is very good for the ground and first excited state, but deteriorates for the higher states.

  7. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  8. Rapid homeostatic plasticity of intrinsic excitability in a central pattern generator network stabilizes functional neural network output.

    PubMed

    Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2012-07-11

    Neurons and networks undergo a process of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes output by integrating activity levels with network and cellular properties to counter longer-term perturbations. Here we describe a rapid compensatory interaction among a pair of potassium currents, I(A) and I(KCa), that stabilizes both intrinsic excitability and network function in the cardiac ganglion of the crab, Cancer borealis. We determined that mRNA levels in single identified neurons for the channels which encode I(A) and I(KCa) are positively correlated, yet the ionic currents themselves are negatively correlated, across a population of motor neurons. We then determined that these currents are functionally coupled; decreasing levels of either current within a neuron causes a rapid increase in the other. This functional interdependence results in homeostatic stabilization of both the individual neuronal and the network output. Furthermore, these compensatory increases are mechanistically independent, suggesting robustness in the maintenance of neural network output that is critical for survival. Together, we generate a complete model for homeostatic plasticity from mRNA to network output where rapid post-translational compensatory mechanisms acting on a reservoir of channels proteins regulated at the level of gene expression provide homeostatic stabilization of both cellular and network activity. PMID:22787050

  9. Dilepton and strangeness production probed with HADES

    SciTech Connect

    Rustamov, A.

    2012-05-15

    With the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at GSI we have studied dilepton production in the few-GeV energy regime in various collisions systems, from elementary NN, over pA, up to the medium-heavy Ar + KCl system. We have thus confirmed the puzzling results of the former DLS Collaboration at the Bevalac. While we have traced the origin of the excess pair yield in CC collisions to elementary pp and pn processes, in our Ar + KCl data a contribution from the dense phase of the collision has been identified. Together with the e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs, we have also obtained in the Ar + KCl system at 1.76 A GeV a high-statistics data set on open and hidden strangeness, i.e. K{sup {+-}}, K{sub s}{sup 0}, {Lambda}, {phi}, and {Xi}{sup -}, allowing for a comprehensive discussion of strangeness production in this system.

  10. Notes on properties of holographic strange metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Pang, Da-Wei

    2010-11-01

    We investigate properties of holographic strange metals in p+2 dimensions, generalizing the analysis performed in [S. A. Hartnoll J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 04 (2010) 120]. The bulk spacetime is a p+2-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, while the role of charge carriers is played by probe D-branes. We mainly focus on massless charge carriers, where most of the results can be obtained analytically. We obtain exact results for the free energy and calculate the entropy density and the heat capacity, as well as the speed of sound at low temperature. We obtain the DC conductivity and DC Hall conductivity and find that the DC conductivity takes a universal form in the large density limit, while the Hall conductivity is also universal in all dimensions. We also study the resistivity in different limits and clarify the condition for the linear dependence on the temperature, which is a key feature of strange metals. We show that our results for the DC conductivity are consistent with those obtained via the Kubo formula and we obtain the charge diffusion constant analytically. The corresponding properties of massive charge carriers are also discussed in brief.

  11. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  12. Rapid development of Purkinje cell excitability, functional cerebellar circuit, and afferent sensory input to cerebellum in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Yi; Ulrich, Brittany; Issa, Fadi A; Wan, Jijun; Papazian, Diane M

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has significant advantages for studying the morphological development of the brain. However, little is known about the functional development of the zebrafish brain. We used patch clamp electrophysiology in live animals to investigate the emergence of excitability in cerebellar Purkinje cells, functional maturation of the cerebellar circuit, and establishment of sensory input to the cerebellum. Purkinje cells are born at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf). By 4 dpf, Purkinje cells spontaneously fired action potentials in an irregular pattern. By 5 dpf, the frequency and regularity of tonic firing had increased significantly and most cells fired complex spikes in response to climbing fiber activation. Our data suggest that, as in mammals, Purkinje cells are initially innervated by multiple climbing fibers that are winnowed to a single input. To probe the development of functional sensory input to the cerebellum, we investigated the response of Purkinje cells to a visual stimulus consisting of a rapid change in light intensity. At 4 dpf, sudden darkness increased the rate of tonic firing, suggesting that afferent pathways carrying visual information are already active by this stage. By 5 dpf, visual stimuli also activated climbing fibers, increasing the frequency of complex spiking. Our results indicate that the electrical properties of zebrafish and mammalian Purkinje cells are highly conserved and suggest that the same ion channels, Nav1.6 and Kv3.3, underlie spontaneous pacemaking activity. Interestingly, functional development of the cerebellum is temporally correlated with the emergence of complex, visually-guided behaviors such as prey capture. Because of the rapid formation of an electrically-active cerebellum, optical transparency, and ease of genetic manipulation, the zebrafish has great potential for functionally mapping cerebellar afferent and efferent pathways and for investigating cerebellar control of motor behavior.

  13. Cell adhesion molecule L1 contributes to neuronal excitability regulating the function of voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Lignani, Gabriele; Medrihan, Lucian; Bosco, Federica; Contestabile, Andrea; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Ferrea, Enrico; Schachner, Melitta; Benfenati, Fabio; Giovedì, Silvia; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    L1 (also known as L1CAM) is a trans-membrane glycoprotein mediating neuron-neuron adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic interactions. Although experimental evidence has implicated L1 in axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and pathfinding, its contribution to voltage-gated Na(+) channel function and membrane excitability has remained unknown. Here, we show that firing rate, single cell spiking frequency and Na(+) current density are all reduced in hippocampal excitatory neurons from L1-deficient mice both in culture and in slices owing to an overall reduced membrane expression of Na(+) channels. Remarkably, normal firing activity was restored when L1 was reintroduced into L1-deficient excitatory neurons, indicating that abnormal firing patterns are not related to developmental abnormalities, but are a direct consequence of L1 deletion. Moreover, L1 deficiency leads to impairment of action potential initiation, most likely due to the loss of the interaction of L1 with ankyrin G that produces the delocalization of Na(+) channels at the axonal initial segment. We conclude that L1 contributes to functional expression and localization of Na(+) channels to the neuronal plasma membrane, ensuring correct initiation of action potential and normal firing activity. PMID:26985064

  14. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  15. How Bond Length Alternation and Thermal Disorder Affect the Optical Excitation Energies of π-Conjugated Chains: A Combined Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Bois, Juliana; Körzdörfer, Thomas

    2016-04-12

    We dissect the sources of error leading to inaccuracies in the description of the geometry and optical excitation energies of π-conjugated polymers. While the ground-state bond length alternation is shown to be badly reproduced by standard functionals, the recently adapted functionals PBEh* and ωPBE* as well as the double hybrid functional XYGJ-OS manage to replicate results obtained at the CCSD(T) level. By analysis of the bond length alternation in the excited state, a sensitive dependence of the exciton localization on the long-range behavior of the functional and the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange present is shown. Introducing thermal disorder through molecular dynamics simulations allows the consideration of a range of thermally accessible configurations of each oligomer, including trans to cis rotations, which break the conjugation of the backbone. Thermal disorder has a considerable effect when combined with functionals that overestimate the delocalization of the excitation, such as B3LYP. For functionals with a larger amount of exact exchange such as our PBEh* and ωPBE*, however, the effect is small, as excitations are often localized enough to fit between twists in the chain. PMID:26960057

  16. Testing the bootstrap constraints in the strange sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov-Tian-Shansky, Kirill M.; Vereshagin, Vladimir V.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the bootstrap conditions that follow from the general postulates of effective scattering theory (EST) are checked in the strange sector. We construct the system of tree level bootstrap constraints for the renormalization prescriptions fixing the physical content of the theory. Then we perform the numerical testing of corresponding sum rules for the parameters of strange resonances. It is shown that, generally, the bootstrap constraints turn out consistent with presently known data on the strange resonance parameters. At the same time we point out few sum rules which cannot be saturated with modern data and discuss the possible reasons for such discrepancies.

  17. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J.

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using amore » numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.« less

  18. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J.

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using a numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.

  19. Dark matter heating in strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi; Wang, Wen; Zheng, XiaoPing

    2014-04-01

    We study the effect of dark matter heating on the temperature of typical strange star (SS hereafter) ( M = 1.4 M⊙, R = 10 km) in normal phase (NSS hereafter) and in a possible existing colour-flavour locked (CFL)phase (CSS hereafter). For NSS, the influence of dark matter heating is ignored until roughly 107 yr. After 107 yr, the dark matter heating is dominant that significantly delays the star cooling, which maintains a temperature much higher than that predicted by standard cooling model for old stars. Especially for CSS, the emissivity of dark matter will play a leading role after roughly 104 yr, which causes the temperature to rise. This leads to the plateau of surface temperature appearing in ˜106.5 yr which is earlier than that of NSS (˜107 yr).

  20. Associated Strangeness Production at COSY-TOF

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, S.; COSY-TOF Collaboration

    2000-12-31

    The associated strangeness production in elementary reactions like pp {yields} KYN close to reaction thresholds is one of the main topics to be investigated at the Time-of-Flight spectrometer TOF located at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY (FZ Juelich). The concept of the event reconstruction is based on the identification of the delayed hyperon and kaon decay ({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}, {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup 0}, n{pi}{sup +}, and K{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}). Since the highly granulated detector covers almost the full phase space, all differential distributions as well as total cross sections and the hyperon polarization can be extracted from the data.

  1. Thermodynamics and Geometry of Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizade, H.; Altaibayeva, A.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2015-06-01

    We study thermodynamic of strange quark matter (SQM) using the analytic expressions of free and internal energies. We investigate two regimes of the high density and low density separately. As a vital program, in the case of a massless gluon and massless quarks at finite temperature, we also present a geometry of thermodynamics for the gluon and Bosons using a Legendre invariance metric ,it is so called as geometrothermodynamic (GTD) to better understanding of the phase transition. The GTD metric and its second order scalar invariant have been obtained and we clarify the phase transition by study the singularities of the scalar curvature of this Riemannian metric. This method is ensemble dependence and to complete the phase transition, meanwhile we also investigate enthalpy and entropy and internal energy representations. Our work exposes new pictures of the nature of phase transitions in SQM.

  2. Role of nucleon strangeness in supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, T. J.; Alberg, Mary; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) evolution have highlighted the importance of thorough control over the microscopic physics responsible for such internal processes as neutrino heating. In particular, it has been suggested that modifications to the neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section can potentially play a crucial role in producing successful CCSN explosions. One possible source of such corrections can be found in a nonzero value for the nucleon's strange helicity content Δ s . In the present analysis, however, we show that theoretical and experimental progress over the past decade has suggested a comparatively small magnitude for Δ s , such that its sole effect is not sufficient to provide the physics leading to CCSN explosions.

  3. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  4. Maximum Mass of Strange Stars and Pulsars with the Most Accurately Measured Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, Yu. L.; Grigoryan, A. K.; Shahinyan, H. A.

    2015-06-01

    Strange quark matter (SQM) is studied using a bag model in which the transition to the SQM state takes place at energy densities of no more than twice the density in atomic nuclei. Thus, low mass neutron stars with a configuration consisting of SQM form a single family on a plot of the mass M of equilibrium superdense configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c (the M(ρ c ) curve). The bag model considered here depends on three constants: the vacuum pressure B, the quark-gluon interaction constant α c , and the strange quark mass m s . Sets of values of these constants are determined, which if used in the equation of state for SQM yield a maximal mass M max of the equilibrium quark configurations which exceeds the recently accurately determined mass of 2.01 M ⊙ for the binary radio pulsar PSR J0348+0432. The mass, radius, total baryon number, and red shift from the surface of the strange star are calculated for these configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c . The values of these integrated parameters are also calculated for each series with M max > 2.01 M ⊙ for superdense configurations with masses of 2.01, 1.97, and 1.44 solar masses, which have been determined with great accuracy from observations. It turns out that, according to the resulting equations of state, all of the three pulsars with the most accurately measured masses, may be possible candidate strange stars.

  5. PREFACE: Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo; Kodama, Takeshi; Padula, Sandra; Takahashi, Jun

    2010-09-01

    The 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) was held in Brazil from 27 September to 2 October 2009 at Hotel Atlântico, Búzios, Rio de Janeiro. The conference was jointly organized by Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Universidade Estadual Paulista and Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Over 120 scientists from Argentina, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, South Africa, Switzerland, the UK and the USA gathered at the meeting to discuss the physics of hot and dense matter through the signals of strangeness and also the behavior of heavy quarks. Group photograph The topics covered were strange and heavy quark production in nuclear collisions, strange and heavy quark production in elementary processes, bulk matter phenomena associated with strange and heavy quarks, and strangeness in astrophysics. In view of the LHC era and many other upcoming new machines, together with recent theoretical developments, sessions focused on `New developments and new facilities' and 'Open questions' were also included. A stimulating round-table discussion on 'Physics opportunities in the next decade in the view of strangeness and heavy flavor in matter' was chaired in a relaxed atmosphere by Grazyna Odyniec and conducted by P Braun-Munzinger, W Florkowski, K Redlich, K Šafařík and H Stöcker, We thank these colleagues for pointing out to young participants new physics directions to be pursued. We also thank J Dunlop and K Redlich for excellent introductory lectures given on the Sunday evening pre-conference session. In spite of the not-so-helpful weather, the beauty and charm of the town of Búzios helped to make the meeting successful. Nevertheless, the most important contributions were the excellent talks, whose contents are part of these proceedings, given

  6. Excitation function shape and neutron spectrum of the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernández, Guido; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Maggiore, Mario; Pranovi, Lorenzo; Prete, Gianfranco; Praena, Javier; Capote-Noy, Roberto; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lombardi, Augusto; Maran, Luca; Scian, Carlo; Munaron, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The forward-emitted low energy tail of the neutron spectrum generated by the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction on a thick target at a proton energy of 1893.6 keV was measured by time-of-flight spectroscopy. The measurement was performed at BELINA (Beam Line for Nuclear Astrophysics) of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. Using the reaction kinematics and the proton on lithium stopping power the shape of the excitation function is calculated from the measured neutron spectrum. Good agreement with two reported measurements was found. Our data, along with the previous measurements, are well reproduced by the Breit-Wigner single-resonance formula for s -wave particles. The differential yield of the reaction is calculated and the widely used neutron spectrum at a proton energy of 1912 keV was reproduced. Possible causes regarding part of the 6.5% discrepancy between the 197Au(n ,γ ) cross section measured at this energy by Ratynski and Kappeler [Phys. Rev. C 37, 595 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevC.37.595] and the one obtained using the Evaluated Nuclear Data File version B-VII.1 are given.

  7. Validation of Earth orientation parameters (EOP), geophysical excitation functions ( EF) and the second degree gravity field coefficients (GFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiker, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2012-04-01

    The project P9 of the research group "Earth rotation and geophysical processes" aims at the combined analysis and validation of Earth rotation observations and models (see Göttl et al. EGU 2012 poster). The EOP, EF and GFC are linked by the Earth tensor of inertia. This link is used for a sophisticated mutual validation. A least squares adjustment model which estimate the unknown tensor of inertia was developed for this purpose. Additionally variance and covariance components are estimated. The results of the adjustment model are the residuals for each data series and the adjusted tensor of inertia. It is assumed that the residuals contain the inconsistencies between the various time series. A thorough analysis of the residuals in the time and frequency domain reveals the systematic effects within the residuals. The adjusted variance and covariance components allow to check the standard deviations and in some cases the correlations given by the data centers. We present the results obtained from the combined analysis of IERS EOP, two different atmospheric and oceanic excitation functions (NCEP/ECCO from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and ERAInterim/OMCT from the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam) and six different gravity field solutions (five GRACE solutions and one SLR solution).

  8. Electronic bands and excited states of III-V semiconductor polytypes with screened-exchange density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2014-03-31

    The electronic band structures and excited states of III-V semiconductors such as GaP, AlP, AlAs, and AlSb for various polytypes are determined employing the screened-exchange density functional calculations implemented in the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave methods. We demonstrate that GaP and AlSb in the wurtzite (WZ) structure have direct gap while III-V semiconductors in the zinc blende, 4H, and 6H structures considered in this study exhibit an indirect gap. Furthermore, we find that inclusion of Al atoms less than 17% and 83% in the hexagonal Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}P and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As alloys, respectively, leads to a direct transition with a gap energy of ∼2.3 eV. The feasibility of III-V semiconductors with a direct gap in WZ structure offers a possible crystal structure engineering to tune the optical properties of semiconductor materials.

  9. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  10. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  11. New evolution equations for the joint response-excitation probability density function of stochastic solutions to first-order nonlinear PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, D.; Karniadakis, G.E.

    2012-08-30

    By using functional integral methods we determine new evolution equations satisfied by the joint response-excitation probability density function (PDF) associated with the stochastic solution to first-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). The theory is presented for both fully nonlinear and for quasilinear scalar PDEs subject to random boundary conditions, random initial conditions or random forcing terms. Particular applications are discussed for the classical linear and nonlinear advection equations and for the advection-reaction equation. By using a Fourier-Galerkin spectral method we obtain numerical solutions of the proposed response-excitation PDF equations. These numerical solutions are compared against those obtained by using more conventional statistical approaches such as probabilistic collocation and multi-element probabilistic collocation methods. It is found that the response-excitation approach yields accurate predictions of the statistical properties of the system. In addition, it allows to directly ascertain the tails of probabilistic distributions, thus facilitating the assessment of rare events and associated risks. The computational cost of the response-excitation method is order magnitudes smaller than the one of more conventional statistical approaches if the PDE is subject to high-dimensional random boundary or initial conditions. The question of high-dimensionality for evolution equations involving multidimensional joint response-excitation PDFs is also addressed.

  12. Neutral strange particle production in high energy neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wolin, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    In a high energy neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering experiment in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber filled with a Neon-Hydrogen mixture, production of the neutral strange particles K, Lambda, and anti-Lambda is observed. Global rates of neutral strange particle production, rates versus event kinematical variables, and strange particle kinematical distributions are presented. Absorption, rescattering, etc. of Lambda particles by the Ne nucleus is shown to be negligible within the statistical significance of the data. Production of both charged states the strange resonance Sigma(1385) is observed. These results are extensively compared to the predictions of the Lund model. The Lund model is found to reproduce the data well in most instances. The transverse momentum distribution for neutral K particles has a tail at high transverse momentum, in disagreement with the exponential decrease predicted by the model. Lambda particles are produced with higher average momentum and anti-Lambda's with lower average momentum than is predicted.

  13. Exploring strange nucleon form factors on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, Ronald; Brower, Richard C.; Clark, Michael A.; Fleming, George T.; Osborn, James C.; Rebbi, Claudio; Schaich, David

    2012-03-01

    We discuss techniques for evaluating sea quark contributions to hadronic form factors on the lattice and apply these to an exploratory calculation of the strange electromagnetic, axial, and scalar form factors of the nucleon. We employ the Wilson gauge and fermion actions on an anisotropic 243×64 lattice, probing a range of momentum transfer with Q2<1GeV2. The strange electric and magnetic form factors, GEs(Q2) and GMs(Q2), are found to be small and consistent with zero within the statistics of our calculation. The lattice data favor a small negative value for the strange axial form factor GAs(Q2) and exhibit a strong signal for the bare strange scalar matrix element ⟨N|s¯s|N⟩0. We discuss the unique systematic uncertainties affecting the latter quantity relative to the continuum, as well as prospects for improving future determinations with Wilson-like fermions.

  14. Mass ejection by strange star mergers and observational implications.

    PubMed

    Bauswein, A; Janka, H-T; Oechslin, R; Pagliara, G; Sagert, I; Schaffner-Bielich, J; Hohle, M M; Neuhäuser, R

    2009-07-01

    We determine the Galactic production rate of strangelets as a canonical input to calculations of the measurable cosmic ray flux of strangelets by performing simulations of strange star mergers and combining the results with recent estimates of stellar binary populations. We find that the flux depends sensitively on the bag constant of the MIT bag model of QCD and disappears for high values of the bag constant and thus more compact strange stars. In the latter case, strange stars could coexist with ordinary neutron stars as they are not converted by the capture of cosmic ray strangelets. An unambiguous detection of an ordinary neutron star would then not rule out the strange matter hypothesis.

  15. Benchmarking DFT and TD-DFT Functionals for the Ground and Excited States of Hydrogen-Rich Peptide Radicals.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Jacquemin, Denis; Cauët, Emilie; Frison, Gilles

    2014-08-12

    We assess the pros and cons of a large panel of DFT exchange-correlation functionals for the prediction of the electronic structure of hydrogen-rich peptide radicals formed after electron attachment on a protonated peptide. Indeed, despite its importance in the understanding of the chemical changes associated with the reduction step, the question of the attachment site of an electron and, more generally, of the reduced species formed in the gas phase through electron-induced dissociation (ExD) processes in mass spectrometry is still a matter of debate. For hydrogen-rich peptide radicals in which several positive groups and low-lying π* orbitals can capture the incoming electron in ExD, inclusion of full Hartree-Fock exchange at long-range interelectronic distance is a prerequisite for an accurate description of the electronic states, thereby excluding several popular exchange-correlation functionals, e.g., B3LYP, M06-2X, or CAM-B3LYP. However, we show that this condition is not sufficient by comparing the results obtained with asymptotically correct range-separated hybrids (M11, LC-BLYP, LC-BPW91, ωB97, ωB97X, and ωB97X-D) and with reference CASSCF-MRCI and EOM-CCSD calculations. The attenuation parameter ω significantly tunes the spin density distribution and the excited states vertical energies. The investigated model structures, ranging from methylammonium to hexapeptide, allow us to obtain a description of the nature and energy of the electronic states, depending on (i) the presence of hydrogen bond(s) around the cationic site(s), (ii) the presence of π* molecular orbitals (MOs), and (iii) the selected DFT approach. It turns out that, in the present framework, LC-BLYP and ωB97 yields the most accurate results.

  16. A comprehensive study of sensorimotor cortex excitability in chronic cocaine users: Integrating TMS and functional MRI data☆

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Colleen A.; DeVries, William; Dowdle, Logan T.; West, Julia A.; Siekman, Bradley; Li, Xingbao; George, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disruptions in motor control are often overlooked features of chronic cocaine users. During a simple sensorimotor integration task, for example, cocaine users activate a larger area of cortex than controls but have lower functional connectivity between the cortex and dorsal striatum, which is further correlated with poor performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether abnormal cortical excitability in cocaine users was related to disrupted inhibitory or excitatory mechanisms, as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods A battery of TMS measures were acquired from 87 individuals (50 cocaine dependent, 37 controls). Functional MRI data were acquired from a subset of 28 individuals who performed a block-design finger tapping task. Results TMS measures revealed that cocaine users had significantly higher resting motor thresholds and higher intracortical cortical facilitation (ICF) than controls. There was no between-group difference in either measure of cortical inhibition. Task-evoked BOLD signal in the motor cortex was significantly correlated with ICF in the cocaine users. There was no significant difference in brain-skull distance between groups. Conclusion These data demonstrated that cocaine users have disrupted cortical facilitation (as measured with TMS), which is related to elevated BOLD signal. Cortical inhibition, however, is largely intact. Given the relationship between ICF and glutamatergic agents, this may be a potentially fruitful and treatable target in addiction. Finally, among controls the distance from the scalp to the cortex was correlated with the motor threshold which may be a useful parameter to integrate into therapeutic TMS protocols in the future. PMID:26541870

  17. Preparation and functionalization of a visible-light-excited europium complex-modified luminescent protein for cell imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lu; Dai, Zhichao; Ye, Zhiqiang; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2014-03-01

    Lanthanide complex-based luminescent bioprobes have shown great utility in a variety of time-resolved luminescence bioassays, but these bioprobes often require UV excitation and suffer from problems related to bioaffinity and biocompatibility for in vivo applications. In this work, a new visible-light-excited europium(III) complex with the maximum excitation wavelength over 400 nm, BHHBB-Eu(3+)-BPT {BHHBB: 1,2-bis[4'-(1'',1'',1'',2'',2'',3'',3''-heptafluoro-4'',6''-hexanedion-6''-yl)-benzyl]-benzene; BPT: 2-(N,N-diethylanilin-4-yl)-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine}, has been synthesized for the preparation of an artificial luminescent protein that can be used as a visible-light-excited luminescent bioprobe for cell imaging. By encapsulating BHHBB-Eu(3+)-BPT into apoferritin with a simple dissociation-reassembly method, the luminescent protein, Eu@AFt, with a maximum excitation peak at 420 nm and a long luminescence lifetime of 365 μs was fabricated and successfully used for visible-light-excited time-resolved luminescence cell imaging. Moreover, by conjugating a mitochondria-targeting molecule, (5-N-succinimidoxy-5-oxopentyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide (SPTPP), onto the surface of Eu@AFt, a mitochondria-specifically-tracking luminescent probe, Eu@AFt-SPTPP, was further prepared and used for visible-light-excited confocal luminescence microscopy imaging to visualize the mitochondria of living cells.

  18. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo ); Benvenuto, O.G. La Plata ); Vucetich, H. La Plata )

    1992-05-15

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature {ital T} for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios.

  19. Overview of Issues Surrounding Strangeness in the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    A. W. Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The calculation of the strangeness content of the nucleon and its experimental verification is a fundamental step in establishing non-perturbative QCD as the correct theory describing the structure of hadrons. It holds a role in QCD analogous to the correct calculation of the Lamb shift in QED. We review the latest developments in the vector and scalar matrix elements of the strange quarks in the proton, where there has recently been considerable progress.

  20. GENERAL: Non-Spherical Gravitational Collapse of Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Zade S.; D, Patil K.; N, Mulkalwar P.

    2008-05-01

    We study the non-spherical gravitational collapse of the strange quark null fluid. The interesting feature which emerges is that the non-spherical collapse of charged strange quark matter leads to a naked singularity whereas the gravitational collapse of neutral quark matter proceeds to form a black hole. We extend the earlier work of Harko and Cheng [Phys. Lett. A 266 (2000) 249] to the non-spherical case.

  1. Higher dimensional strange quark matter solutions in self creation cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şen, R.; Aygün, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have generalized the higher dimensional flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe solutions for a cloud of string with perfect fluid attached strange quark matter (SQM) in Self Creation Cosmology (SCC). We have obtained that the cloud of string with perfect fluid does not survive and the string tension density vanishes for this model. However, we get dark energy model for strange quark matter with positive density and negative pressure in self creation cosmology.

  2. Excited meson radiative transitions from lattice QCD using variationally optimized operators

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, Christian J.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2015-06-02

    We explore the use of 'optimized' operators, designed to interpolate only a single meson eigenstate, in three-point correlation functions with a vector-current insertion. These operators are constructed as linear combinations in a large basis of meson interpolating fields using a variational analysis of matrices of two-point correlation functions. After performing such a determination at both zero and non-zero momentum, we compute three-point functions and are able to study radiative transition matrix elements featuring excited state mesons. The required two- and three-point correlation functions are efficiently computed using the distillation framework in which there is a factorization between quark propagation and operator construction, allowing for a large number of meson operators of definite momentum to be considered. We illustrate the method with a calculation using anisotopic lattices having three flavors of dynamical quark all tuned to the physical strange quark mass, considering form-factors and transitions of pseudoscalar and vector meson excitations. In conclusion, the dependence on photon virtuality for a number of form-factors and transitions is extracted and some discussion of excited-state phenomenology is presented.

  3. A generalized Bethe-Weizsaecker mass formula for strange hadronic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B. Washington Univ., Seattle, WA . Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Gal, A. Washington Univ., Seattle, WA . Inst. for Nuclear Theory)

    1992-12-01

    The Bethe-Weizsaecker nuclear mass formula is extended to strange hadronic matter composed of nucleons, lambdas and cascade hyperons. The generalized formula contains several volume and symmetry terms constrained by phenomenologically determined [lambda]-nuclear, [xi]-nuclear and [lambda][lambda] interaction parameters and by hyperon-hyperon ([lambda][lambda], [lambda][xi], [xi][xi]) interaction parameters suggested by One-Boson-Exchange models. We find that hypernuclei are generally unstable to [lambda][lambda] [yields] [xi]N conversion. For strange hadronic matter, as function of the baryon number A, the line of strong-interaction stability, along which a large strangeness fraction [vert bar]S[vert bar]/A [approx] 0.5 - 1.1 and a low charge fraction q/A [approx lt] 0.2 hold, and no fission occurs, is determined. The binding energy per baryon increases monotonically to its bulk limit, B/A [yields] 38 MeV, [vert bar]S[vert bar]/A [yields] 1.1 and q/A [yields] 0 for the parameters adopted here assuming that the hyperon species saturate at densities similar to those of protons and neutrons in nuclei. Even in the extreme limit of vanishingly small hyperon-hyperon interaction strengths, strange hadronic matter with B/A [yields] 15 MeV, [vert bar]S[vert bar]/A [yields] 0.7 and q/A [yields] 0 in the bulk limit should exist; the mass formula reproduces semi-quantitatively recent mean-field calculations which implicitly assumed weak hyperon-hyperon interactions.

  4. Moments of inertia for neutron and strange stars: Limits derived for the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejger, M.; Haensel, P.

    2002-12-01

    Recent estimates of the properties of the Crab nebula are used to derive constraints on the moment of inertia, mass and radius of the pulsar. To this purpose, we employ an approximate formula combining these three parameters. Our ``empirical formula'' I =~ a(x) M R2, where x=(M/Msun) (km/R), is based on numerical results obtained for thirty theoretical equations of state of dense matter. The functions a(x) for neutron stars and strange stars are qualitatively different. For neutron stars aNS(x)=x/(0.1+2x) for x<=0.1 (valid for M>0.2 Msun) and aNS(x)={2/ 9}(1+5x) for x>0.1. For strange stars aSS(x)={2/ 5}(1+x) (not valid for strange stars with crust and M<0.1 Msun). We obtain also an approximate expression for the maximum moment of inertia Imax,45 =~ (-0.37 + 7.12* xmax) (Mmax/Msun)(RM_max/ {10 km})2, where I45 = I/1045 g* cm2, valid for both neutron stars and strange stars. Applying our formulae to the evaluated values of ICrab, we derive constraints on the mass and radius of the pulsar. { A very conservative evaluation of the expanding nebula mass, Mneb=2 Msun, yields MCrab>1.2 Msun and RCrab= 10-14 km. Setting the most recent evaluation (``central value'') Mneb=4.6 Msun rules out most of the existing equations of state, leaving only the stiffest ones: MCrab>1.9 Msun, RCrab= 14-15 km.

  5. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu(3+), Bi(3+):REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-06-16

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated. PMID:27253384

  6. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics: Optical Excitation Function of H(1s-2p) Produced by electron Impact from Threshold to 1.8 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Slevin, J. A.; Shemansky, D. E.; McConkey, J. W.; Bray, I.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Ajello, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The optical excitation function of prompt Lyman-Alpha radiation, produced by electron impact on atomic hydrogen, has been measured over the extended energy range from threshold to 1.8 keV. Measurements were obtained in a crossed-beams experiment using both magnetically confined and electrostatically focused electrons in collision with atomic hydrogen produced by an intense discharge source. A vacuum-ultraviolet mono- chromator system was used to measure the emitted Lyman-Alpha radiation. The absolute H(1s-2p) electron impact excitation cross section was obtained from the experimental optical excitation function by normalizing to the accepted optical oscillator strength, with corrections for polarization and cascade. Statistical and known systematic uncertainties in our data range from +/- 4% near threshold to +/- 2% at 1.8 keV. Multistate coupling affecting the shape of the excitation function up to 1 keV impact energy is apparent in both the present experimental data and present theoretical results obtained with convergent close- coupling (CCC) theory. This shape function effect leads to an uncertainty in absolute cross sections at the 10% level in the analysis of the experimental data. The derived optimized absolute cross sections are within 7% of the CCC calculations over the 14 eV-1.8 keV range. The present CCC calculations converge on the Bethe- Fano profile for H(1s-2p) excitation at high energy. For this reason agreement with the CCC values to within 3% is achieved in a nonoptimal normalization of the experimental data to the Bethe-Fano profile. The fundamental H(1s-2p) electron impact cross section is thereby determined to an unprecedented accuracy over the 14 eV - 1.8 keV energy range.

  7. Tight-binding approximations to time-dependent density functional theory — A fast approach for the calculation of electronically excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüger, Robert; van Lenthe, Erik; Heine, Thomas; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new method of calculating electronically excited states that combines a density functional theory based ground state calculation with a linear response treatment that employs approximations used in the time-dependent density functional based tight binding (TD-DFTB) approach. The new method termed time-dependent density functional theory TD-DFT+TB does not rely on the DFTB parametrization and is therefore applicable to systems involving all combinations of elements. We show that the new method yields UV/Vis absorption spectra that are in excellent agreement with computationally much more expensive TD-DFT calculations. Errors in vertical excitation energies are reduced by a factor of two compared to TD-DFTB.

  8. Ground- and excited-state properties of inorganic solids from full-potential density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, P.; Vidya, R.; Vajeeston, P.; Kjekshus, A.; Fjellvåg, H.

    2003-12-01

    The development in theoretical condensed-matter science based on density-functional theory (DFT) has reached a level where it is possible, from "parameter-free" quantum mechanical calculations to obtain total energies, forces, vibrational frequencies, magnetic moments, mechanical and optical properties and so forth. The calculation of such properties are important in the analyses of experimental data and they can be predicted with a precision that is sufficient for comparison with experiments. It is almost impossible to do justice to all developments achieved by DFT because of its rapid growth. Hence, it has here been focused on a few advances, primarily from our laboratory. Unusual bonding behaviors in complex materials are conveniently explored using the combination of charge density, charge transfer, and electron-localization function along with crystal-orbital Hamilton-population analyses. It is indicated that the elastic properties of materials can reliably be predicted from DFT calculations if one takes into account the structural relaxations along with gradient corrections in the calculations. Experimental techniques have their limitations in studies of the structural stability and pressure-induced structural transitions in hydride materials whereas the present theoretical approach can be applied to reliably predict properties under extreme pressures. From the spin-polarized, relativistic full-potential calculations one can study novel materials such as ruthenates, quasi-one-dimensional oxides, and spin-, charge-, and orbital-ordering in magnetic perovskite-like oxides. The importance of orbital-polarization correction to the DFT to predict the magnetic anisotropy in transition-metal compounds and magnetic moments in lanthanides and actinides are emphasized. Apart from the full-potential treatment, proper magnetic ordering as well as structural distortions have to be taken into account to predict correctly the insulating behavior of transition-metal oxides

  9. Strangeness Prospects with the CBM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The CBM experiment will study strongly interacting matter at high net-baryon densities with nuclear collisions up to 45A GeV beam energy at the future FAIR facility. With interaction rates unprecedented in heavy-ion collisions, CBM will give access also to extremely rare probes and thus to the early stage of the collisions, in search for the first-order phase transition from confined to deconfined matter and the QCD critical point. The CBM physics programme will be started with beams delivered by the SIS-100 synchrotron, providing energies from 2 to 11 GeV/nucleon for heavy nuclei, up to 14 GeV/nucleon for light nuclei, and 30 GeV for protons. The highest net baryon densities will be explored with ion beams up to 45 GeV/nucleon energy delivered by SIS-300 in a later stage of the FAIR project. After several years of preparation, the CBM experiment now enters the realisation phase. In this article, we report on the current status of the system developments and the expected physics performance for strange and charmed observables, as well as on the roadmap towards the first data taking.

  10. The Strange World of Classical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David

    2010-02-01

    We have heard many times that the commonsense world of classical physics was shattered by Einstein's revelation of the laws of relativity. This is certainly true; the shift from our everyday notions of time and space to those revealed by relativity is one of the greatest stretches the mind can make. What is seldom appreciated is that the laws of classical physics yield equally strange (or arguably even stranger) results if the observer happens to be in a very high velocity reference frame. This article addresses two questions: In Part I we examine what the world would look like if relativity was not in effect and you happened to be in a reference frame traveling at a high percentage of the speed of light or faster than light (perfectly allowable in this model), a conceptual world that existed on a foundation of Newtonian physics and the aether. It turns out that this is a weirder place than is generally realized. In Part II we see that classical physics in these frames is self-contradictory. Neither the consideration of Maxwell's equations nor the Michelson-Morley experiment is necessary to see these contradictions; they are implicit in the logic of the physics itself.

  11. Atmospheric neutrinos can make beauty strange

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Larson, Daniel T.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierce, Aaron

    2002-12-01

    The large observed mixing angle in atmospheric neutrinos, coupled with Grand Unification, motivates the search for a large mixing between right-handed strange and bottom squarks. Such mixing does not appear in the standard CKM phenomenology, but may induce significant b {yields} s transitions through gluino diagrams. Working in the mass eigenbasis, we show quantitatively that an order one effect on CP violation in B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}K{sub S} is possible due to a large mixing between right-handed b and s squarks, while still satisfying constraints from b {yields} s {gamma}. We also include the effect of right- and left-handed bottom squark mixing proportional to m{sub b}{mu} tan{beta}. For small {mu}tan{beta} there may also be a large effect in B{sub s} mixing correlated with a large effect in B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sub S}, typically yielding an unambiguous signal of new physics at Tevatron Run II.

  12. Excited-State Electronic Structure with Configuration Interaction Singles and Tamm–Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory on Graphical Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Excited-state calculations are implemented in a development version of the GPU-based TeraChem software package using the configuration interaction singles (CIS) and adiabatic linear response Tamm–Dancoff time-dependent density functional theory (TDA-TDDFT) methods. The speedup of the CIS and TDDFT methods using GPU-based electron repulsion integrals and density functional quadrature integration allows full ab initio excited-state calculations on molecules of unprecedented size. CIS/6-31G and TD-BLYP/6-31G benchmark timings are presented for a range of systems, including four generations of oligothiophene dendrimers, photoactive yellow protein (PYP), and the PYP chromophore solvated with 900 quantum mechanical water molecules. The effects of double and single precision integration are discussed, and mixed precision GPU integration is shown to give extremely good numerical accuracy for both CIS and TDDFT excitation energies (excitation energies within 0.0005 eV of extended double precision CPU results). PMID:21687784

  13. Modeling laser induced molecule excitation using real-time time-dependent density functional theory: application to 5- and 6-benzyluracil.

    PubMed

    Bende, Attila; Toşa, Valer

    2015-02-28

    The fully propagated real time-dependent density functional theory method has been applied to study the laser-molecule interaction in 5- and 6-benzyluracil (5BU and 6BU). The molecular geometry optimization and the time-dependent electronic dynamics propagation were carried out using the M11-L local meta-NGA (nonseparable gradient approximations) exchange-correlation functional together with the def2-TZVP basis set. Different laser field parameters like direction, strength, and wavelength have been varied in order to estimate the conditions for an efficient excitation of the molecules. The results show that the two molecules respond differently to the applied laser field and therefore specific laser field parameters have to be chosen for each of them in order to get efficient and selective excitation behavior. It was also found that from the molecular excitation point of view not only the magnitude of the transition dipoles between the involved orbitals but also their orientation with respect to the laser field is important. On the other hand, it was shown that the molecular excitation is a very complex overlapping of different one-electron orbital depopulation-population processes of the occupied and virtual orbitals.

  14. Numerical simulation of the transient photoconductivity in a-Si:H as a function of excitation density

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, H.; Kunst, M.

    1997-07-01

    The dependence of the transient photoconductivity induced by pulsed excitation (TPC) on the excitation density is discussed with the help of numerical simulations. It is shown that recombination between excess mobile electrons and all excess holes (mainly localized) can explain the excitation density dependence of the TPC amplitude of standard a-Si:H at room temperature using a rate parameter k{sub BB} of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 3}/s. This model leads to a decay faster than experimentally observed in the time range from 40 ns to 1 {micro}s. A variation of the recombination model is presented that gives short time range. Moreover comparison of the simulations with experimental data yields limits for the parameters of the conduction band tail. In particular, the time necessary to establish a dynamic equilibrium of excess electrons between delocalized states in the conduction band and localized states in the tail appears to be very informative.

  15. Lowest excited states and optical absorption spectra of donor-acceptor copolymers for organic photovoltaics: a new picture emerging from tuned long-range corrected density functionals.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Laxman; Doiron, Curtis; Sears, John S; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2012-11-01

    Polymers with low optical gaps are of importance to the organic photovoltaics community due to their potential for harnessing a large portion of the solar energy spectrum. The combination along their backbones of electron-rich and electron-deficient fragments contributes to the presence of low-lying excited states that are expected to display significant charge-transfer character. While conventional hybrid functionals are known to provide unsatisfactory results for charge-transfer excitations at the time-dependent DFT level, long-range corrected (LRC) functionals have been reported to give improved descriptions in a number of systems. Here, we use such LRC functionals, considering both tuned and default range-separation parameters, to characterize the absorption spectra of low-optical-gap systems of interest. Our results indicate that tuned LRC functionals lead to simulated optical-absorption properties in good agreement with experimental data. Importantly, the lowest-lying excited states (excitons) are shown to present a much more localized nature than initially anticipated.

  16. Effect of Peruvosid (CD412) on excitability and functional refractory period of atrial and ventricular tissues in cardiomyopathy caused by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Moleiro, Frederico; Anselmi, Alfonso; Suárez, Régulo; Suárez, José Angel; Drayer, Alberto

    1970-01-01

    Attempts were made to produce myocarditis by Trypanosoma cruzi inoculation in healthy dog puppies 6 to 8 weeks old. Significant electrocardiographic abnormalities were produced, coinciding with interstitial inflammatory processes in the cardiac tissue and with degenerative changes in the myocardial fibres. In puppies showing these changes, profound changes in the excitability and the functional refractory period of the atrial and ventricular muscular tissue were observed. The administration of Peruvosid in doses of 0·0240 to 0·0647 mg./kg. tended to diminish the excitability, previously increased by the inflammatory process, at the same time increasing the functional refractory period duration which had previously been shortened. The fact that Peruvosid corrects these fundamental factors in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias suggests that the drug may be useful in the treatment of cardiac insufficiency produced by Chagas' myocardiopathy, in which arrhythmias are one of the basic characteristics. Images PMID:4985863

  17. Measurements and analyses of principal dynamic parameters of building structures as a function of type of vibration excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmański, Cezary; Bochenek, Wojciech; Passia, Henryk; Szade, Adam

    2006-06-01

    The methods of direct measurement and analysis of the dynamic response of a building structure through real-time recording of the amplitude of low-frequency vibration (tilt) have been presented. Subject to analyses was the reaction induced either by kinematic excitation (road traffic and mining-induced vibration) or controlled action of solid-fuel rocket micro-engines installed on the building. The forces were analysed by means of a set of transducers installed both in the ground and on the structure. After the action of excitation forces has been stopped, the system (structure) makes damped vibration around the static equilibrium position. It has been shown that the type of excitation affects the accuracy of evaluation of principal dynamic parameters of the structure. In the authors opinion these are the decrement of damping and natural vibration frequency. Positive results of tests with the use of excitation by means of short-action (0.6 second) rocket micro-engines give a chance to develop a reliable method for periodical assessment of acceptable loss of usability characteristics of building structures heavily influenced by environmental effects.

  18. The Strange (Hi)story of Particles and Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, H. Dieter

    2016-03-01

    This is an attempt of a non-technical but conceptually consistent presentation of quantum theory in a historical context. While the first part is written for a general readership, Section 5 may appear a bit provocative to some quantum physicists. I argue that the single-particle wave functions of quantum mechanics have to be correctly interpreted as field modes that are "occupied once" (i.e. first excited states of the corresponding quantum oscillators in the case of boson fields). Multiple excitations lead to apparent many-particle wave functions, while the quantum states proper are defined by wave function(al)s on the "configuration" space of fundamental fields, or on another, as yet elusive, fundamental local basis.

  19. Time-dependent density functional theory study on the electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding of the chromophore coumarin 153 in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Hao, Ce; Wang, Se; Dong, Hong; Qiu, Jieshan

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, in order to investigate the electronic excited-state intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the chromophore coumarin 153 (C153) and the room-temperature ionic liquid N,N-dimethylethanolammonium formate (DAF), both the geometric structures and the infrared spectra of the hydrogen-bonded complex C153-DAF(+) in the excited state were studied by a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. We theoretically demonstrated that the intermolecular hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) in the hydrogen-bonded C153-DAF(+) complex is significantly strengthened in the S(1) state by monitoring the spectral shifts of the C=O group and O-H group involved in the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3). Moreover, the length of the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom decreased from 1.693 Å to 1.633 Å upon photoexcitation. This was also confirmed by the increase in the hydrogen-bond binding energy from 69.92 kJ mol(-1) in the ground state to 90.17 kJ mol(-1) in the excited state. Thus, the excited-state hydrogen-bond strengthening of the coumarin chromophore in an ionic liquid has been demonstrated theoretically for the first time.

  20. R-mode Instability of Low-mass Bare Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-mei, Pi; Shu-hua, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The r-mode instability window of low-mass strange stars is studied using the modified bag model of strange quark matter and reasonable sets of parameters. The results show that the ultimate spin frequency of strange stars increases with the decreasing stellar mass, and the highest spin frequency (716 Hz) of pulsars observed sofar can be explained by the bare strange stars with a mass lower than about 0.1∼0.2 M⊙, depending on the selected parameters.

  1. COALESCENCE OF STRANGE-QUARK PLANETS WITH STRANGE STARS: A NEW KIND OF SOURCE FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2015-05-01

    Strange-quark matter (SQM) may be the true ground state of hadronic matter, indicating that the observed pulsars may actually be strange stars (SSs), but not neutron stars. According to the SQM hypothesis, the existence of a hydrostatically stable sequence of SQM stars has been predicted, ranging from 1 to 2 solar mass SSs, to smaller strange dwarfs and even strange planets. While gravitational wave (GW) astronomy is expected to open a new window to the universe, it will shed light on the search for SQM stars. Here we show that due to their extreme compactness, strange planets can spiral very close to their host SSs without being tidally disrupted. Like inspiraling neutron stars or black holes, these systems would serve as new sources of GW bursts, producing strong GWs at the final stage. The events occurring in our local universe can be detected by upcoming GW detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope. This effect provides a unique probe to SQM objects and is hopefully a powerful tool for testing the SQM hypothesis.

  2. Coalescence of Strange-quark Planets with Strange Stars: a New Kind of Source for Gravitational Wave Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2015-05-01

    Strange-quark matter (SQM) may be the true ground state of hadronic matter, indicating that the observed pulsars may actually be strange stars (SSs), but not neutron stars. According to the SQM hypothesis, the existence of a hydrostatically stable sequence of SQM stars has been predicted, ranging from 1 to 2 solar mass SSs, to smaller strange dwarfs and even strange planets. While gravitational wave (GW) astronomy is expected to open a new window to the universe, it will shed light on the search for SQM stars. Here we show that due to their extreme compactness, strange planets can spiral very close to their host SSs without being tidally disrupted. Like inspiraling neutron stars or black holes, these systems would serve as new sources of GW bursts, producing strong GWs at the final stage. The events occurring in our local universe can be detected by upcoming GW detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope. This effect provides a unique probe to SQM objects and is hopefully a powerful tool for testing the SQM hypothesis.

  3. Highly efficient implementation of pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory for the calculation of excitation energies of large molecules.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yixiang; Hughes, Thomas; Giesen, Dave; Halls, Mathew D; Goldberg, Alexander; Vadicherla, Tati Reddy; Sastry, Madhavi; Patel, Bhargav; Sherman, Woody; Weisman, Andrew L; Friesner, Richard A

    2016-06-15

    We have developed and implemented pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the quantum mechanics package Jaguar to calculate restricted singlet and restricted triplet, as well as unrestricted excitation energies with either full linear response (FLR) or the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) with the pseudospectral length scales, pseudospectral atomic corrections, and pseudospectral multigrid strategy included in the implementations to improve the chemical accuracy and to speed the pseudospectral calculations. The calculations based on pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory with full linear response (PS-FLR-TDDFT) and within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (PS-TDA-TDDFT) for G2 set molecules using B3LYP/6-31G*(*) show mean and maximum absolute deviations of 0.0015 eV and 0.0081 eV, 0.0007 eV and 0.0064 eV, 0.0004 eV and 0.0022 eV for restricted singlet excitation energies, restricted triplet excitation energies, and unrestricted excitation energies, respectively; compared with the results calculated from the conventional spectral method. The application of PS-FLR-TDDFT to OLED molecules and organic dyes, as well as the comparisons for results calculated from PS-FLR-TDDFT and best estimations demonstrate that the accuracy of both PS-FLR-TDDFT and PS-TDA-TDDFT. Calculations for a set of medium-sized molecules, including Cn fullerenes and nanotubes, using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G(**) basis set show PS-TDA-TDDFT provides 19- to 34-fold speedups for Cn fullerenes with 450-1470 basis functions, 11- to 32-fold speedups for nanotubes with 660-3180 basis functions, and 9- to 16-fold speedups for organic molecules with 540-1340 basis functions compared to fully analytic calculations without sacrificing chemical accuracy. The calculations on a set of larger molecules, including the antibiotic drug Ramoplanin, the 46-residue crambin protein, fullerenes up to C540 and nanotubes up to 14×(6,6), using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G

  4. Highly efficient implementation of pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory for the calculation of excitation energies of large molecules.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yixiang; Hughes, Thomas; Giesen, Dave; Halls, Mathew D; Goldberg, Alexander; Vadicherla, Tati Reddy; Sastry, Madhavi; Patel, Bhargav; Sherman, Woody; Weisman, Andrew L; Friesner, Richard A

    2016-06-15

    We have developed and implemented pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the quantum mechanics package Jaguar to calculate restricted singlet and restricted triplet, as well as unrestricted excitation energies with either full linear response (FLR) or the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) with the pseudospectral length scales, pseudospectral atomic corrections, and pseudospectral multigrid strategy included in the implementations to improve the chemical accuracy and to speed the pseudospectral calculations. The calculations based on pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory with full linear response (PS-FLR-TDDFT) and within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (PS-TDA-TDDFT) for G2 set molecules using B3LYP/6-31G*(*) show mean and maximum absolute deviations of 0.0015 eV and 0.0081 eV, 0.0007 eV and 0.0064 eV, 0.0004 eV and 0.0022 eV for restricted singlet excitation energies, restricted triplet excitation energies, and unrestricted excitation energies, respectively; compared with the results calculated from the conventional spectral method. The application of PS-FLR-TDDFT to OLED molecules and organic dyes, as well as the comparisons for results calculated from PS-FLR-TDDFT and best estimations demonstrate that the accuracy of both PS-FLR-TDDFT and PS-TDA-TDDFT. Calculations for a set of medium-sized molecules, including Cn fullerenes and nanotubes, using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G(**) basis set show PS-TDA-TDDFT provides 19- to 34-fold speedups for Cn fullerenes with 450-1470 basis functions, 11- to 32-fold speedups for nanotubes with 660-3180 basis functions, and 9- to 16-fold speedups for organic molecules with 540-1340 basis functions compared to fully analytic calculations without sacrificing chemical accuracy. The calculations on a set of larger molecules, including the antibiotic drug Ramoplanin, the 46-residue crambin protein, fullerenes up to C540 and nanotubes up to 14×(6,6), using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G

  5. Critical Assessment of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited States of Open-Shell Systems: II. Doublet-Quartet Transitions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-06-14

    Compared with closed-shell systems, open-shell systems place three additional challenges to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for electronically excited states: (a) the spin-contamination problem is a serious issue; (b) the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel may be numerically instable; and (c) the single-determinant description of open-shell ground states readily becomes energetically instable. Confined to flip-up single excitations, the spin-contamination problem can largely be avoided by using the spin-flip TD-DFT (SF-TD-DFT) formalism, provided that a noncollinear XC kernel is employed. As for the numerical instabilities associated with such a kernel, only an ad hoc scheme has been proposed so far, viz., the ALDA0 kernel, which amounts to setting the divergent components (arising from density gradients and kinetic energy density) simply to zero. The ground-state instability problem can effectively be avoided by introducing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to TD-DFT. Therefore, on a general basis, the SF-TDA/ALDA0 Ansatz is so far the only promising means within the TD-DFT framework for flip-up single excitations of open-shell systems. To assess systematically the performance of SF-TDA/ALDA0, in total 61 low-lying quartet excited states of the benchmark set of 11 small radicals [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016, 12, 238] are investigated with various XC functionals. Taking the MRCISD+Q (multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus the Davidson correction) results as benchmark, it is found that the mean absolute errors of SF-TDA/ALDA0 with the SAOP (statistical averaging of model orbital potentials), global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals are in the range of 0.2-0.4 eV. This is in line not only with the typical accuracy of TD-DFT for singlet and triplet excited states of closed-shell systems but also with the gross accuracy of spin-adapted TD-DFT for spin-conserving excited states of open-shell systems. PMID

  6. Critical Assessment of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited States of Open-Shell Systems: II. Doublet-Quartet Transitions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-06-14

    Compared with closed-shell systems, open-shell systems place three additional challenges to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for electronically excited states: (a) the spin-contamination problem is a serious issue; (b) the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel may be numerically instable; and (c) the single-determinant description of open-shell ground states readily becomes energetically instable. Confined to flip-up single excitations, the spin-contamination problem can largely be avoided by using the spin-flip TD-DFT (SF-TD-DFT) formalism, provided that a noncollinear XC kernel is employed. As for the numerical instabilities associated with such a kernel, only an ad hoc scheme has been proposed so far, viz., the ALDA0 kernel, which amounts to setting the divergent components (arising from density gradients and kinetic energy density) simply to zero. The ground-state instability problem can effectively be avoided by introducing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to TD-DFT. Therefore, on a general basis, the SF-TDA/ALDA0 Ansatz is so far the only promising means within the TD-DFT framework for flip-up single excitations of open-shell systems. To assess systematically the performance of SF-TDA/ALDA0, in total 61 low-lying quartet excited states of the benchmark set of 11 small radicals [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016, 12, 238] are investigated with various XC functionals. Taking the MRCISD+Q (multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus the Davidson correction) results as benchmark, it is found that the mean absolute errors of SF-TDA/ALDA0 with the SAOP (statistical averaging of model orbital potentials), global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals are in the range of 0.2-0.4 eV. This is in line not only with the typical accuracy of TD-DFT for singlet and triplet excited states of closed-shell systems but also with the gross accuracy of spin-adapted TD-DFT for spin-conserving excited states of open-shell systems.

  7. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu3+, Bi3+:REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O.; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2016-06-01

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated.Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be

  8. High-pT azimuthal correlations of neutral strange baryons and mesons in STAR at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bielcikova, Jana

    2006-07-11

    We present results on two-particle azimuthal correlations of high-pT neutral strange baryons ({lambda},{lambda}-bar) and mesons (K{sub S}{sup 0}) associated with non-identified charged particles in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. In particular, we discuss properties of the near-side yield of associated charged particles as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and zT, as well as possible baryon/meson and particle/antiparticle differences. The results are compared to the proton and pion triggered correlations and to fragmentation and recombination models.

  9. Production of neutral strange particles in muon-nucleon scattering at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aderholz, M.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kadija, K.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H. J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, R.; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-12-01

    The production of K 0, Λ andbar Λ particles is studied in the E665 muon-nucleon experiment at Fermilab. The average multiplicities and squared transverse momenta are measured as a function of x F and W 2. Most features of the data can be well described by the Lund model. Within this model, the data on the K0/π± ratios and on the average K 0 multiplicity in the forward region favor a strangeness suppression factor s/u in the fragmentation process near 0.20. Clear evidence for QCD effects is seen in the average squared transverse momentum of K 0 and Λ particles.

  10. Dark matter, neutron stars, and strange quark matter.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, M Angeles; Silk, Joseph; Stone, Jirina R

    2010-10-01

    We show that self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter accreted onto neutron stars may provide a mechanism to seed compact objects with long-lived lumps of strange quark matter, or strangelets, for WIMP masses above a few GeV. This effect may trigger a conversion of most of the star into a strange star. We use an energy estimate for the long-lived strangelet based on the Fermi-gas model combined with the MIT bag model to set a new limit on the possible values of the WIMP mass that can be especially relevant for subdominant species of massive neutralinos.

  11. Using the Moon as a Strange Quark Nugget Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrin, Eugene T.; Rosenbaum, Doris C.; Teplitz, Vigdor L.

    2007-11-01

    We review the romance and mystery of strange quark matter (SQM), including: its basics, our recent work on bounds on the abundance of ton-range strange quark nuggets (SQNs) from Earth seismology, potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon, and our recent bounds on SQNs in the 10 kilogram to ton range from the data of Apollo-implanted seismometers. Finally, we speculate a bit on using the sun or the solar system to detect passage of SQNs of much greater mass than the aforementioned.

  12. Statistical properties of chaotic dynamical systems which exhibit strange attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.V.; Oberman, C.R.

    1981-07-01

    A path integral method is developed for the calculation of the statistical properties of turbulent dynamical systems. The method is applicable to conservative systems which exhibit a transition to stochasticity as well as dissipative systems which exhibit strange attractors. A specific dissipative mapping is considered in detail which models the dynamics of a Brownian particle in a wave field with a broad frequency spectrum. Results are presented for the low order statistical moments for three turbulent regimes which exhibit strange attractors corresponding to strong, intermediate, and weak collisional damping.

  13. A strange horn between Paolo Mantegazza and Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Garbarino, Carla; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    During the preparation of an exhibition in Pavia dedicated to the centennial anniversary of the death of the Italian Pathologist Paolo Mantegazza, a strange cheratinic horn was found at the Museum for the History of the University of Pavia labelled as 'spur of a cock transplanted into an ear of a cow.' After some historical investigation, we found this strange object was at the centre of a scientific correspondence between Mantegazza and Charles Darwin, who made reference to it in his book The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication.

  14. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C.; Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  15. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 40/Ca and /sup 48/Ca ions with /sup 248/Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Fowler, M.M.; Daniels, W.R.; von Gunten, H.R.; Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Gregorich, K.; Welch, R.; Seaborg, G.T.; Bruechle, W.

    1985-05-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 234- to 294-MeV /sup 40/Ca ions and with 239- to 318-MeV /sup 48/Ca ions. The maxima of the isotopic distributions for these elements occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions. The shapes of the distributions and the half-widths of about 2.5 mass numbers are quite similar to those observed previously for reactions of /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 22/Ne with /sup 248/Cm. In general, the excitation functions for /sup 40/Ca show maxima near the Coulomb barrier while those for /sup 48/Ca are about 20 MeV above the barrier. The cross sections decrease rather slowly with increasing projectile energy over the energy range studied, indicating that the additional projectile energy is not manifested as excitation energy of these actinide products.

  16. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, SiH{sub 4}, PH{sub 3}, SH{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  17. In Vitro Assessment Reveals Parameters-Dependent Modulation on Excitability and Functional Connectivity of Cerebellar Slice by Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongyu; Zhang, Guanghao; Weng, Xiechuan; Han, Yao; Lang, Yiran; Zhao, Yuwei; Zhao, Xiaobo; Wang, Kun; Lin, Qiuxia; Wang, Changyong

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an increasingly common technique used to selectively modify neural excitability and plasticity. There is still controversy concerning the cortical response to rTMS of different frequencies. In this study, a novel in vitro paradigm utilizing the Multi-Electrodes Array (MEA) system and acute cerebellar slicing is described. In a controllable environment that comprises perfusion, incubation, recording and stimulation modules, the spontaneous single-unit spiking activity in response to rTMS of different frequencies and powers was directly measured and analyzed. Investigation using this in vitro paradigm revealed frequency-dependent modulation upon the excitability and functional connectivity of cerebellar slices. The 1-Hz rTMS sessions induced short-term inhibition or lagged inhibition, whereas 20-Hz sessions induced excitation. The level of modulation is influenced by the value of power. However the long-term response fluctuated without persistent direction. The choice of evaluation method may also interfere with the interpretation of modulation direction. Furthermore, both short-term and long-term functional connectivity was strengthened by 1-Hz rTMS and weakened by 20-Hz rTMS. PMID:27000527

  18. Excited protein states of human tear lipocalin for low- and high-affinity ligand binding revealed by functional AB loop motion.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2010-06-01

    Human tear lipocalin (TL), a prominent member of lipocalin family, exhibits functional and structural promiscuity. The plasticity of loop regions modulates entry to the ligand pocket at the "open" end of the eight-stranded beta-barrel. Site-directed multi-distance measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between functional loops register two excited protein states for low- and high-affinity ligand binding. At low pH, the longest loop AB adopts the conformation of the low-affinity excited protein state that matches the crystal structure of holo-TL at pH 8. A "crankshaft" like movement is detected for the loop AB in a low pH transition. At pH 7.3 the holo-protein assumes a high-affinity excited protein state, in which the loop AB is more compact (RMS=3.1A). In the apo-holo transition, the reporter Trp 28 moves about 4.5A that reflects a decrease in distance between Glu27 and Lys108. This interaction fixes the loop AB conformation for the high-affinity mode. No such movement is detected at low pH, where Glu27 is protonated. Data strongly indicate that the protonation state of Glu27 modulates the conformation of the loop AB for high- and low-affinity binding. PMID:20439130

  19. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Zarycz, M Natalia C; Provasi, Patricio F; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  20. Hydrological excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.; Kolaczek, B.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrological excitation of the polar motion (HAM) were computed from the available recently hydrological data series (NCEP, ECMWF, CPC water storage and LaD World simulations of global continental water) and compared. Time variable seasonal spectra of these hydrological excitation functions and of the geodetic excitation function of polar motion computed from the polar motion COMB03 data were compared showing big differences in their temporal characteristics and the necessity of the further improvement of the HAM models. Seasonal oscillations of the global geophysical excitation functions (AAM + OAM + HAM) and their time variations were compared also. These hydrological excitation functions do not close the budget of the global geophysical excitation function of polar motion.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of the dielectric functions of ZnO and BaTiO{sub 3} thin films after intense femtosecond laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, S.; Seifert, G.; Chouthe, S.; Graener, H.; Böntgen, T.; Sturm, C.; Schmidt-Grund, R.; Grundmann, M.

    2014-02-07

    The ultrafast carrier dynamics of epitaxial ZnO and BaTiO{sub 3} thin films after intense excitation at 3.10 eV and 4.66 eV photon energy has been studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy. Modelling the transient transmission changes on the basis of spectroscopic ellipsometry data and pertinent equilibrium model dielectric functions extended by additional terms for the effects at high carrier density (P-band luminescence and stimulated emission from electron-hole-plasma), a self-consistent parameterized description was obtained for both materials. Excited carrier lifetimes in the range of ≈2 to ≈60 ps and long-lived thermal effects after several hundred ps have been identified in both materials. These findings form a reliable basis to quantitatively describe future femtosecond studies on ZnO/BaTiO{sub 3} heterolayer systems.

  2. Source mechanism of long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, inferred from waveform inversion of the effective excitation functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the source mechanism of long-period (LP) events observed at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, based on waveform inversions of their effective excitation functions. The effective excitation function, which represents the apparent excitation observed at individual receivers, is estimated by applying an autoregressive filter to the LP waveform. Assuming a point source, we apply this method to seven LP events the waveforms of which are characterized by simple decaying and nearly monochromatic oscillations with frequency in the range 1-3 Hz. The results of the waveform inversions show dominant volumetric change components accompanied by single force components, common to all the events analyzed, and suggesting a repeated activation of a sub-horizontal crack located 300 m beneath the summit crater lakes. Based on these results, we propose a model of the source process of LP seismicity, in which a gradual buildup of steam pressure in a hydrothermal crack in response to magmatic heat causes repeated discharges of steam from the crack. The rapid discharge of fluid causes the collapse of the fluid-filled crack and excites acoustic oscillations of the crack, which produce the characteristic waveforms observed in the LP events. The presence of a single force synchronous with the collapse of the crack is interpreted as the release of gravitational energy that occurs as the slug of steam ejected from the crack ascends toward the surface and is replaced by cooler water flowing downward in a fluid-filled conduit linking the crack and the base of the crater lake. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of recent double-hybrid density functionals to low-lying singlet-singlet excitation energies of large organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, F. Di; Trouillas, P.; Adamo, C.; Sancho-García, J. C.

    2013-10-01

    The present work assesses some recently developed double-hybrid density functionals (B2π-PLYP, PBE0-DH, and PBE0-2) using linear-response Tamm-Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory. This assessment is achieved against experimentally derived low-lying excitation energies of large organic dyes of recent interest, including some excitations dominated by charge-transfer transitions. Comparisons are made with some of the best-performing methods established from the literature, such as PBE0 or B3LYP hybrid or the recently proposed B2-PLYP and B2GP-PLYP double-hybrid models, to ascertain their quality and robustness on equal footing. The accuracy of parameter-free or empirical forms of double-hybrid functionals is also briefly discussed. Generally speaking, it turns out that double-hybrid expressions always provide more accurate estimates than corresponding hybrid methods. Double-hybrid functionals actually reach averaged accuracies of 0.2 eV, that can be admittedly considered close to any intended accuracy limit within the present theoretical framework.

  4. Familiar-Strange: Teaching the Scripture as John Would Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Tung-Chiew

    2014-01-01

    The Gospel of John teaches through telling the story of Jesus in light of the familiar Hebrew faith stories. It is an interpretive task that presents Jesus to his audience and teaches them adequate faith. John the Teacher skillfully uses narrative skills to create the familiar-strange effect in his storytelling. Each story is followed by a…

  5. Strange particle production in neutrino-neon charged current interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Plano, R.; Baker, N.J.; Connolly, P.L.; Kahn, S.A.; Murtagh, M.J.; Palmer, R.B.; Samios, N.P.; Tanaka, M.; Baltay, C.; Bregman, M.

    1986-01-01

    Neutral strange particle production in charged-current muon-neutrino interactions have been studied in the Fermilab 15-foot neon bubble chamber. Associated production is expected to be the major source of strange particles in charged-current neutrino interactions. sigma-neutral and xi-minus production by neutrinos was observed. The dependence on various leptonic and hadronic variables is investigated. A fit to single and associated production of s, s/anti-s, and c quarks is described based on the number of single and double strange particle production events. Inclusive neutral strange particle decays (V/sup 0/) production rates as a fraction of all charged-current events are measured and are tabulated. The lambda/K ratio is found to be 0.39 +- 0.04 and the fraction of lambda coming from sigma-neutral is (16 +- 5)%. The single- and double V/sup 0/ production was used to determine the associated s anti-s production rate and single s-quark production rate. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs. (LEW)

  6. Strangeness Production in Jets with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chrismond; Harton, Austin; Garcia, Edmundo; Alice Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The study of strange particle production is an important tool for understanding the properties of the hot and dense QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. The study of strange particles in these collisions provides information on parton fragmentation, a fundamental QCD process. While measurements at low and intermediate pT, are already in progress at the LHC, the study of high momentum observables is equally important for a complete understanding of the QCD matter, this can be achieved by studying jet interactions. We propose the measurement of the characteristics of the jets containing strange particles. Starting with proton-proton collisions, we have calculated the inclusive pTJet spectra and the spectra for jets containing strange particles (K-short or lambda), and we are extending this analysis to lead-lead collisions. In this talk the ALICE experiment will be described, the methodology used for the data analysis and the available results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1305280 and PHY-1407051.

  7. Study of doubly strange systems using stored antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B.; Erni, W.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Walford, N.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Erlen, T.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Jasper, S.; Keshk, I.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kümmel, M.; Leiber, S.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Ball, M.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Patel, B.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Filo, G.; Jaworowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Michałek, M.; Poznański, P.; Płażek, J.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Szczurek, A.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Biernat, J.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Psyzniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wronska, A.; Augustin, I.; Böhm, R.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus Marinescu, D.; Schmitt, L.; Varentsov, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Belias, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Gromliuk, A.; Gruber, L.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Krebs, M.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Löchner, S.; Lühning, J.; Lynen, U.; Orth, H.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Täschner, A.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Galoyan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Y. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Olshevskiy, A.; Perevalova, E.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V.; Rogov, Y.; Salmin, R.; Samartsev, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M.; Teshev, R.; Tokmenin, V.; Uzhinsky, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Böhm, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kozlov, G.; Pugach, M.; Zyzak, M.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Biguenko, K.; Brinkmann, K.; Di Pietro, V.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Galuska, M.; Gutz, E.; Hahn, C.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kesselkaul, M.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nazarenko, S.; Novotny, R.; Quagli, T.; Reiter, S.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schmidt, M.; Schnell, R.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wagner, M. N.; Wasem, T.; Wohlfarth, B.; Zaunick, H.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; Tiemens, M.; van der Weele, J. C.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sohlbach, H.; Bai, M.; Bianchi, L.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Dosdall, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Pütz, J.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Zambanini, A.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Isaksson, L.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Hoek, M.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Liu, Z.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ahmadi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Bleser, S.; Capozza, L.; Cardinali, M.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deiseroth, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Fröhlich, B.; Jasinski, P.; Kang, D.; Khaneft, D.; Klasen, R.; Leithoff, H. H.; Lin, D.; Maas, F.; Maldaner, S.; Martìnez Rojo, M.; Marta, M.; Michel, M.; Mora Espì, M. C.; Morales Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Nerling, F.; Noll, O.; Pflüger, S.; Pitka, A.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Steinen, M.; Valente, R.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Zimmermann, I.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Balanutsa, P.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Chandratre, V.; Datar, V.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumawat, H.; Mohanty, A. K.; Parmar, A.; Roy, B.; Sonika, G.; Fritzsch, C.; Grieser, S.; Hergemöller, A. K.; Hetz, B.; Hüsken, N.; Khoukaz, A.; Wessels, J. P.; Khosonthongkee, K.; Kobdaj, C.; Limphirat, A.; Srisawad, P.; Yan, Y.; Barnyakov, M.; Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Beloborodov, K.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Kononov, S.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Martin, K.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S.; Sokolov, A.; Tikhonov, Y.; Atomssa, E.; Kunne, R.; Marchand, D.; Ramstein, B.; Van de Wiele, J.; Wang, Y.; Boca, G.; Costanza, S.; Genova, P.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Abramov, V.; Belikov, N.; Bukreeva, S.; Davidenko, A.; Derevschikov, A.; Goncharenko, Y.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Kormilitsin, V.; Levin, A.; Melnik, Y.; Minaev, N.; Mochalov, V.; Morozov, D.; Nogach, L.; Poslavskiy, S.; Ryazantsev, A.; Ryzhikov, S.; Semenov, P.; Shein, I.; Uzunian, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Yakutin, A.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Roy, U.; Yabsley, B.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Izotov, A.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Veretennikov, D.; Zhdanov, A.; Makonyi, K.; Preston, M.; Tegner, P.; Wölbing, D.; Bäck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Rai, A. K.; Godre, S.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Lusso, S.; Mazza, G.; Mignone, M.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R.; Balestra, F.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lavagno, A.; Olave, J.; Amoroso, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Hu, J.; Lavezzi, L.; Maggiora, M.; Maniscalco, G.; Marcello, S.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Calen, H.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Papenbrock, M.; Pettersson, J.; Schönning, K.; Wolke, M.; Galnander, B.; Diaz, J.; Pothodi Chackara, V.; Chlopik, A.; Kesik, G.; Melnychuk, D.; Slowinski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Wojciechowski, M.; Wronka, S.; Zwieglinski, B.; Bühler, P.; Marton, J.; Steinschaden, D.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Gerl, Jürgen; Kojouharov, Ivan; Kojouharova, Jasmina

    2016-10-01

    Bound nuclear systems with two units of strangeness are still poorly known despite their importance for many strong interaction phenomena. Stored antiprotons beams in the GeV range represent an unparalleled factory for various hyperon-antihyperon pairs. Their outstanding large production probability in antiproton collisions will open the floodgates for a series of new studies of systems which contain two or even more units of strangeness at the P ‾ ANDA experiment at FAIR. For the first time, high resolution γ-spectroscopy of doubly strange ΛΛ-hypernuclei will be performed, thus complementing measurements of ground state decays of ΛΛ-hypernuclei at J-PARC or possible decays of particle unstable hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions. High resolution spectroscopy of multistrange Ξ--atoms will be feasible and even the production of Ω--atoms will be within reach. The latter might open the door to the | S | = 3 world in strangeness nuclear physics, by the study of the hadronic Ω--nucleus interaction. For the first time it will be possible to study the behavior of Ξ‾+ in nuclear systems under well controlled conditions.

  8. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S.; Frederico, T.; Krein,; Williams, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  9. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S. ); Frederico, T. , Sao Jose dos Campos, SP . Inst. de Estudos Avancados); Krein, . Inst. de Fisica Teorica); Williams, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  10. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  11. Electronic Excitations in Push-Pull Oligomers and Their Complexes with Fullerene from Many-Body Green's Functions Theory with Polarizable Embedding.

    PubMed

    Baumeier, Björn; Rohlfing, Michael; Andrienko, Denis

    2014-08-12

    We present a comparative study of excited states in push-pull oligomers of PCPDTBT and PSBTBT and prototypical complexes with a C60 acceptor using many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We analyze excitations in oligomers up to a length of 5 nm and find that for both materials the absorption energy practically saturates for structures larger than two repeat units due to the localized nature of the excitation. In the bimolecular complexes with C60, the transition from Frenkel to charge transfer excitons is generally exothermic and strongly influenced by the acceptor's position and orientation. The high CT binding energy of the order of 2 eV results from the lack of an explicit molecular environment. External polarization effects are then modeled in a GW-BSE based QM/MM approach by embedding the donor-acceptor complex into a polarizable lattice. The lowest charge transfer exciton is energetically stabilized by about 0.5 eV, while its binding energy is reduced to about 0.3 eV. We also identify a globally unbound charge transfer state with a more delocalized hole at higher energy while still within the absorption spectrum, which opens another potential pathway for charge separation. For both PCPDTBT and PSBTBT, the energetics are largely similar with respect to absorption and the driving force to form intermediate charge transfer excitations for free charge generation. These results support that the higher power conversion efficiency observed for solar cells using PSBTBT as donor material is a result of molecular packing rather than of the electronic structure of the polymer.

  12. Making the Familiar Strange and Making the Strange Familiar: Understanding Korean Children's Experiences of Living with an Autistic Sibling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Se Kwang; Charnley, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Based on the findings of a small-scale study using visual ethnographic techniques with nine South Korean children, this article explores the role of culture in understanding autism. While autism is embedded within the "strange" and "unfamiliar", linked to exclusion and discrimination in Korean society, the children focussed on reframing their…

  13. Solvent effects on optical excitations of poly para phenylene ethynylene studied by QM/MM simulations based on many-body Green's functions theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, B.; Karttunen, M.; Baumeier, B.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic excitations in dilute solutions of poly para phenylene ethynylene (poly-PPE) are studied using a QM/MM approach combining many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation with polarizable force field models. Oligomers up to a length of 7.5 nm (10 repeat units) functionalized with nonyl side chains are solvated in toluene and water, respectively. After equilibration using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), the system is partitioned into a quantum region (backbone) embedded into a classical (side chains and solvent) environment. Optical absorption properties are calculated solving the coupled QM/MM system self-consistently and special attention is paid to the effects of solvents. The model allows to differentiate the influence of oligomer conformation induced by the solvation from electronic effects related to local electric fields and polarization. It is found that the electronic environment contributions are negligible compared to the conformational dynamics of the conjugated PPE. An analysis of the electron-hole wave function reveals a sensitivity of energy and localization characteristics of the excited states to bends in the global conformation of the oligomer rather than to the relative of phenyl rings along the backbone.

  14. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  15. Measuring theory of mind across middle childhood: Reliability and validity of the Silent Films and Strange Stories tasks.

    PubMed

    Devine, Rory T; Hughes, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Recent years have seen a growth of research on the development of children's ability to reason about others' mental states (or "theory of mind") beyond the narrow confines of the preschool period. The overall aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a task battery composed of items from Happé's Strange Stories task and Devine and Hughes' Silent Film task. A sample of 460 ethnically and socially diverse children (211 boys) between 7 and 13years of age completed the task battery at two time points separated by 1month. The Strange Stories and Silent Film tasks were strongly correlated even when verbal ability and narrative comprehension were taken into account, and all items loaded onto a single theory-of-mind latent factor. The theory-of-mind latent factor provided reliable estimates of performance across a wide range of theory-of-mind ability and showed no evidence of differential item functioning across gender, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. The theory-of-mind latent factor also exhibited strong 1-month test-retest reliability, and this stability did not vary as a function of child characteristics. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the validity and reliability of the Strange Stories and Silent Film task battery as a measure of individual differences in theory of mind suitable for use across middle childhood. We consider the methodological and conceptual implications of these findings for research on theory of mind beyond the preschool years.

  16. The discrepant kinematics of recombination and collisionally excited lines in NGC 7009 as a function of ionization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.; Richer, M. R.; Georgiev, L.; Arrieta, A.

    2014-10-01

    We have analyzed the kinematics of emission of the planetary nebula NGC 7009 from long slit spectroscopy from the UVES spectrograph at the VLT of ESO. In particular we are interested in comparing lines excited by recombination and collisions with electrons to determine whether similarities or differences could be useful in elucidating the well-known abundance discrepancy derived from them. We construct position-velocity maps for recombination, fluorescence, charge transfer, and collisionally excited lines.We find a plasma component emitting in the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II recombination lines whose kinematics are discrepant: they are incompatible with the ionization structure derived from all other evidence and the kinematics derived from all of these lines are unexpectedly very similar. We found direct evidence for a recombination contribution to [N II] λ5755. Once taken into account, the electron temperatures from [N II], [O III], and [Ne III] agree at a given position and velocity. The electron densities derived from [O II] and [Ar IV] are consistent with direct imaging and the distribution of hydrogen emission. The kinematics of the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II lines does not coincide with the kinematics of the [O III] and [Ne III] forbidden emission, indicating that there is an additional plasma component to the recombination emission that arises from a different volume from that giving rise to the forbidden emission from the parent ions within NGC 7009. Thus, the chemical abundances derived from either type of line are correct only for the plasma component from which they arise. Apart from [N II] λ5755, we find no anomaly with the forbidden lines usually used to determine chemical abundances in ionized nebulae, so the abundances derived from them should be reliable for the medium from which they arise.

  17. Collective, stochastic and nonequilibrium behavior of highly excited hadronic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Carruthers, P.

    1983-01-01

    We discuss selected problems concerning the dynamic and stochasticc behavior of highly excited matter, particularly the QCD plasma. For the latter we consider the equation of state, kinetics, quasiparticles, flow properties and possible chaos and turbulence. The promise of phase space distribution functions for covariant transport and kinetic theory is stressed. The possibility and implications of a stochastic bag are spelled out. A simplified space-time model of hadronic collisions is pursued, with applications to A-A collisions and other matters. The domain wall between hadronic and plasma phase is of potential importance: its thickness and relation to surface tension are noticed. Finally we reviewed the recently developed stochastic cell model of multiparticle distributions and KNO scaling. This topic leads to the notion that fractal dimensions are involved in a rather general dynamical context. We speculate that various scaling phenomena are independent of the full dynamical structure, depending only on a general stochastic framework having to do with simple maps and strange attractors. 42 references.

  18. Description of electron transfer in the ground and excited states of organic donor–acceptor systems by single-reference and multi-reference density functional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Electron transfer in the ground and excited states of a model donor–acceptor (D–A) system is investigated using the single-reference and multi-reference density functional theory (DFT) methods. To analyze the results of the calculations, a simple two-site multi-reference model was derived that predicts a stepwise electron transfer in the S{sub 0} state and a wave-like dependence of the S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external stimulus. The standard single-reference Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT approach and the time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) method failed to describe the correct dependence of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external electric field applied along the donor–acceptor system. The multi-reference DFT approach, the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method, was able to successfully reproduce the correct behavior of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the applied field. The REKS method was benchmarked against experimentally measured gas phase charge transfer excitations in a series of organic donor–acceptor complexes and displayed its ability to describe this type of electronic transitions with a very high accuracy, mean absolute error of 0.05 eV with the use of the standard range separated density functionals. On the basis of the calculations undertaken in this work, it is suggested that the non-adiabatic coupling between the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} states may interfere with the electron transfer in a weakly coupled donor–acceptor system. It is also suggested that the electronic excitation of a D{sup +}–A{sup −} system may play a dual role by assisting the further electron transfer at certain magnitudes of the applied electric field and causing the backward transfer at lower electric field strengths.

  19. Excitation function for 63Cu(n,p)63Ni reaction in neutron energy range up to 15 MeV.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, K; Ota, Y; Akamine, M; Shibata, S; Shibata, T; Ito, Y; Imamura, M; Uwamino, Y; Nogawa, N; Baba, M; Iwasaki, S; Matsuyama, S

    2008-10-01

    The excitation function for the (63)Cu(n,p)(63)Ni reaction has been measured by activation method using the 4.5 MV Dynamitron accelerator of the Fast Neutron Laboratory of Tohoku University. Copper plates and hollow spherical copper shells were irradiated by neutrons of various energy up to 14.9 MeV produced by the T(p,n), D(d,n), and T(d,n) reactions. The (63)Ni produced in the irradiated copper target was chemically separated. The beta-rays emitted from the extracted (63)Ni were measured by a liquid scintillation method. The cross sections obtained were compared with the evaluated data files of JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI and FENDL/A-2.0. Consequently, it is found that FENDL/A-2.0 is consistent with our experimental data in the energy range studied in this work. The effect of proton shell appeared in the excitation function obtained is also discussed.

  20. Complete and incomplete fusion reactions in the {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm system: Excitation functions and recoil range distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Sharma, B.K.; Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K.S.

    2004-10-01

    With the view to study complete and incomplete fusion in heavy ion induced reactions, experiments have been carried out for measuring excitation functions for several reactions in the system {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm at energies near the Coulomb barrier to well above it, using an activation technique. The measured excitation functions have been compared with those calculated theoretically using three different computer codes viz., ALICE-91, CASCADE and PACE2. The enhancement of experimentally measured cross sections for alpha emission channels over their theoretical prediction has been attributed to the fact that these residues are formed not only by complete fusion but also through incomplete fusion. In order to separate out the relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion, the recoil range distributions of eight residues produced in the interaction of {sup 16}O with {sup 169}Tm at {approx_equal}87 MeV have been measured. The recoil range distributions indicate significant contributions from incomplete fusion at {approx_equal}87 MeV for some of the channels.

  1. Testing time-dependent density functional theory with depopulated molecular orbitals for predicting electronic excitation energies of valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer states and potential energies near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2014-09-14

    Kohn-Sham (KS) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with most exchange-correlation functionals is well known to systematically underestimate the excitation energies of Rydberg and charge-transfer excited states of atomic and molecular systems. To improve the description of Rydberg states within the KS TDDFT framework, Gaiduk et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 253005 (2012)] proposed a scheme that may be called HOMO depopulation. In this study, we tested this scheme on an extensive dataset of valence and Rydberg excitation energies of various atoms, ions, and molecules. It is also tested on a charge-transfer excitation of NH{sub 3}-F{sub 2} and on the potential energy curves of NH{sub 3} near a conical intersection. We found that the method can indeed significantly improve the accuracy of predicted Rydberg excitation energies while preserving reasonable accuracy for valence excitation energies. However, it does not appear to improve the description of charge-transfer excitations that are severely underestimated by standard KS TDDFT with conventional exchange-correlation functionals, nor does it perform appreciably better than standard TDDFT for the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  2. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  3. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  4. Strange attractors in weakly turbulent Couette-Taylor flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandstater, A.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is conducted on the transition from quasi-periodic to weakly turbulent flow of a fluid contained between concentric cylinders with the inner cylinder rotating and the outer cylinder at rest. Power spectra, phase-space portraits, and circle maps obtained from velocity time-series data indicate that the nonperiodic behavior observed is deterministic, that is, it is described by strange attractors. Various problems that arise in computing the dimension of strange attractors constructed from experimental data are discussed and it is shown that these problems impose severe requirements on the quantity and accuracy of data necessary for determining dimensions greater than about 5. In the present experiment the attractor dimension increases from 2 at the onset of turbulence to about 4 at a Reynolds number 50-percent above the onset of turbulence.

  5. Multi-strangeness production in hadron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitanos, T.; Moustakidis, Ch.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Lenske, H.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss in detail the formation and propagation of multi-strangeness particles in reactions induced by hadron beams relevant for the forthcoming experiments at FAIR. We focus the discussion on the production of the decuplet-particle Ω and study for the first time the production and propagation mechanism of this heavy hyperon inside hadronic environments. The transport calculations show the possibility of Ω-production in the forthcoming P ‾ANDA-experiment, which can be achieved with measurable probabilities using high-energy secondary Ξ-beams. We predict cross sections for Ω-production. The theoretical results are important in understanding the hyperon-nucleon and, in particular, the hyperon-hyperon interactions also in the high-strangeness sector. We emphasize the importance of our studies for the research plans at FAIR.

  6. Parity Violating Electron Scattering and Strangeness in the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, Frank E.

    2008-10-13

    A measurement of the weak form factor of the proton allows a flavor separation of the strangeness contribution to the electromagnetic form factors. The weak form factor is accessed experimentally by the measurement of a parity violating (PV) asymmetry in the scattering of polarized electrons on unpolarized protons. An extended experimental program to measure these parity violating asymmetries has been performed and is going on at different accelerators. After the first round of experiments allowing a separation of the strangeness form factors G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} at a Q{sup 2}-value of 0.1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, new, preliminary results have been achieved at 0.23 (GeV/c){sup 2}.

  7. Sigma term and strangeness content of octet baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, S.; Fodor, Z.; Hemmert, T.; Hoelbling, C.; Frison, J.; Katz, S. D.; Krieg, S.; Kurth, T.; Lellouch, L.; Lippert, T.; Portelli, A.; Ramos, A.; Schäfer, A.; Szabó, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    By using lattice QCD computations we determine the sigma terms and strangeness content of all octet baryons by means of an application of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. In addition to polynomial and rational expressions for the quark-mass dependence of octet members, we use SU(3) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory to perform the extrapolation to the physical up and down quark masses. Our Nf=2+1 lattice ensembles include pion masses down to about 190 MeV in large volumes (MπL≳4), and three values of the lattice spacing. Our main results are the nucleon sigma term σπN=39(4)(-7+18) and the strangeness content yN=0.20(7)(-17+13). Under the assumption of validity of covariant baryon χPT in our range of masses one finds yN=0.276(77)(-62+90).

  8. The discrepant kinematics of recombination and collisionally-excited in NGC7009 as a function of ionization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, A.; Richer, M.; Georgiev, L. N.; Torres-Peimbert, S.

    2014-04-01

    We present spatially- and velocity-resolved echelle spectroscopy for NGC 7009 obtained with the UVES spectrograph at the ESO VLT. We construct position-velocity maps for recombination, fluorescence, charge transfer, and collisionally excited lines. We find a plasma component emitting in the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II recombination lines whose kinematics are discrepant: They are incompatible with the ionization structure derived from all other evidence and the kinematics derived from all of these lines are unexpectedly very similar. We find direct evidence for a recombination contribution to [N II] 5755. Once taken into account, the electron temperatures from [N II], [O III], and [Ne III] agree at a given position and velocity, even though both the [N II] and [O III] temperatures clearly vary. The electron densities derived from [O II] and [Ar IV] are consistent with direct imaging and the distribution of hydrogen emission. The kinematics of the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II lines does not coincide with the kinematics of the [O III] and [Ne III] forbidden emission, indicating that there is an additional plasma component to the recombination emission that arises from a different volume from that giving rise to the forbidden emission from the parent ions within NGC 7009. Thus, the chemical abundances derived from either type of line are correct only for the plasma component from which they arise. Apart from [N II] 5755, we find no anomaly with the forbidden lines usually used to determine chemical abundances in ionized nebulae, so the abundances derived from them should be reliable for the medium from which they arise.

  9. Bulk viscosity of strange quark matter: Urca versus nonleptonic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sa'd, Basil A.; Shovkovy, Igor A.; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2007-06-15

    A general formalism for calculating the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter is developed. Contrary to the common belief that the nonleptonic processes alone give the dominant contribution to the bulk viscosity, the inclusion of the Urca processes is shown to play an important role at intermediate densities when the characteristic r-mode oscillation frequencies are not too high. The interplay of nonleptonic and Urca processes is analyzed in detail.

  10. A useful approximate isospin equality for charmless strange B decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Aviv Univ.

    1999-01-01

    A useful inequality is obtained if charmless strange B decays are assumed to be dominated by a {Delta}l=0 transition like that from the gluonic penguin diagram and the contributions of all other diagrams including the tree, electroweak penguin and annihilation diagrams are small but not negligible. The interference contributions which are linear in these other amplitudes are included but the direct contributions which are quadratic are neglected.

  11. Strangeness Photoproduction at the BGO-OD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jude, T. C.; Alef, S.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Boese, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.; Zimmermann, T.

    BGO-OD is a newly commissioned experiment to investigate the internal structure of the nucleon, using an energy tagged bremsstrahlung photon beam at the ELSA electron facility. The setup consists of a highly segmented BGO calorimeter surrounding the target, with a particle tracking magnetic spectrometer at forward angles. BGO-OD is ideal for investigating meson photoproduction. The extensive physics programme for open strangeness photoproduction is introduced, and preliminary analysis presented.

  12. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  13. Reduced L-type Ca2+ current and compromised excitability induce loss of skeletal muscle function during acute cooling in locust.

    PubMed

    Findsen, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Pedersen, Thomas Holm

    2016-08-01

    Low temperature causes most insects to enter a state of neuromuscular paralysis, termed chill coma. The susceptibility of insect species to chill coma is tightly correlated to their distribution limits and for this reason it is important to understand the cellular processes that underlie chill coma. It is known that muscle function is markedly depressed at low temperature and this suggests that chill coma is partly caused by impairment in the muscle per se. To find the cellular mechanism(s) underlying muscle dysfunction at low temperature, we examined the effect of low temperature (5°C) on several events in excitation-contraction coupling in the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria). Intracellular membrane potential recordings during single nerve stimulations showed that 70% of fibers at 20°C produced an action potential (AP), while only 55% of fibers were able to fire an AP at 5°C. Reduced excitability at low temperature was caused by an ∼80% drop in L-type Ca(2+) current and a depolarizing shift in its activation of around 20 mV, which means that a larger endplate potential would be needed to activate the muscle AP at low temperature. In accordance, we showed that intracellular Ca(2+) transients were largely absent at low temperature following nerve stimulation. In contrast, maximum contractile force was unaffected by low temperature in chemically skinned muscle bundles, which demonstrates that the function of the contractile filaments is preserved at low temperature. These findings demonstrate that reduced L-type Ca(2+) current is likely to be the most important factor contributing to loss of muscle function at low temperature in locust. PMID:27247315

  14. Dibaryons with two strange quarks and one heavy flavor in a constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Aaron; Park, Woosung; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the symmetry property and the stability of dibaryons containing two strange quarks and one heavy flavor with isospin I =1/2 . We construct the wave function of the dibaryon in two ways. First, we directly construct the color and spin state of the dibaryon starting from the four possible S U (3 ) flavor states. Second, we consider the states composed of five light quarks and then construct the wave function of the dibaryon by adding one heavy quark. The stability of the dibaryon against the strong decay into two baryons is discussed by using the variational method in a constituent quark model with a confining and hyperfine potential. We find that, for all configurations with spin S =0 , 1, 2, the ground states of the dibaryons are the sum of two baryons, and there is no compact bound state that is stable against the strong decay.

  15. Nonadiabatic coupling vectors for excited states within time-dependent density functional theory in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Laktionov, Andrey; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-11-01

    Recently, we have proposed a scheme for the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings and nonadiabatic coupling vectors within linear response time-dependent density functional theory using a set of auxiliary many-electron wavefunctions [I. Tavernelli, E. Tapavicza, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124107 (2009)]. As demonstrated in a later work [I. Tavernelli, B. F. E. Curchod, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 196101 (2009)], this approach is rigorous in the case of the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings between the ground state and any excited state. In this work, we extend this formalism to the case of coupling between pairs of singly excited states with the same spin multiplicity. After proving the correctness of our formalism using the electronic oscillator approach by Mukamel and co-workers [S. Tretiak and S. Mukamel, Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 102, 3171 (2002)], we tested the method on a model system, namely, protonated formaldimine, for which we computed S1/S2 nonadiabatic coupling vectors and compared them with results from high level (MR-CISD) electronic structure calculations.

  16. Nonadiabatic coupling vectors for excited states within time-dependent density functional theory in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Curchod, Basile F E; Laktionov, Andrey; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-11-21

    Recently, we have proposed a scheme for the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings and nonadiabatic coupling vectors within linear response time-dependent density functional theory using a set of auxiliary many-electron wavefunctions [I. Tavernelli, E. Tapavicza, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124107 (2009)]. As demonstrated in a later work [I. Tavernelli, B. F. E. Curchod, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 196101 (2009)], this approach is rigorous in the case of the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings between the ground state and any excited state. In this work, we extend this formalism to the case of coupling between pairs of singly excited states with the same spin multiplicity. After proving the correctness of our formalism using the electronic oscillator approach by Mukamel and co-workers [S. Tretiak and S. Mukamel, Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 102, 3171 (2002)], we tested the method on a model system, namely, protonated formaldimine, for which we computed S(1)/S(2) nonadiabatic coupling vectors and compared them with results from high level (MR-CISD) electronic structure calculations. PMID:21090851

  17. Intersystem Crossing Pathway in Quinoline-Pyrazole Isomerism: A Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Study on Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Lan, Sheng-Cheng; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Lin, Sheng-Hsien

    2015-06-18

    The dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction of quinoline-pyrazole (QP) isomers, designated as QP-I and QP-II, has been investigated by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). A lower barrier has been found in the potential energy curve for the lowest singlet excited state (S1) along the proton-transfer coordinate of QP-II compared with that of QP-I; however, this is at variance with a recent experimental report [J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 7886-7891], in which the authors proposed that the ESIPT reaction would only proceed in QP-I due to the absence of a PT emission for QP-II. Therefore, several deactivating pathways have been investigated to determine whether fluorescence quenching occurs in the PT form of QP-II (PT-II). The S1 state of PT-II has nπ* character, which is a well-known dark state. Moreover, the energy gap between the S1 and T2 states is only 0.29 eV, implying that an intersystem crossing (ISC) process would occur rapidly following the ESIPT reaction. Therefore, it is demonstrated that the ESIPT could successfully proceed in QP-II and that the PT emission would be quenched by the ISC process.

  18. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  19. Subsystem density-functional theory as an effective tool for modeling ground and excited states, their dynamics and many-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Sinha, Debalina; Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-05-01

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is an emerging technique for calculating the electronic structure of complex molecular and condensed phase systems. In this topical review, we focus on some recent advances in this field related to the computation of condensed phase systems, their excited states, and the evaluation of many-body interactions between the subsystems. As subsystem DFT is in principle an exact theory, any advance in this field can have a dual role. One is the possible applicability of a resulting method in practical calculations. The other is the possibility of shedding light on some quantum-mechanical phenomenon which is more easily treated by subdividing a supersystem into subsystems. An example of the latter is many-body interactions. In the discussion, we present some recent work from our research group as well as some new results, casting them in the current state-of-the-art in this review as comprehensively as possible.

  20. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 18/O with /sup 248/Cm and /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Nurmia, M.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; von Gunten, H.R.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1983-06-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 97- to 122-MeV /sup 18/O ions and of isotopes of Bk through No in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 91- to 150-MeV /sup 18/O ions. The cross sections and widths of the mass distributions for the actinides produced in these reactions are very similar for transfer of the same numbers of nucleons. A semiquantitative comparison of the experimental results with calculations based on a simple model shows that calculations of this type are helpful in selection of projectile-target systems and optimum energies for production of specific actinide isotopes and for synthesis of as yet unknown heavy isotopes and elements. Comparisons of experimental results with calculations show that, in general, about half of the kinetic energy of the projectile is transferred to the actinide product.

  1. Total Reaction Cross Section Excitation Function Studies for 6He Interaction with 181Ta, 59Co, natSi, 9Be Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Yu. G.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Borcea, C.; Demekhina, N. A.; Eshanov, A. G.; Ivanov, M. P.; Kabdrakhimova, G. D.; Kabyshev, A. M.; Kugler, A.; Kuterbekov, K. A.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Maj, A.; Maslov, V. A.; Negret, A.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Voskobojnik, E. I.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    Total reaction cross section excitation functions σR(E) were measured for 6He secondary beam particles on 181Ta, 59Co, natSi and 9Be targets in a wide energy range by direct and model-independent method. This experimental method was based on prompt n-γ 4π-technique applied in event-by event mode. A high efficiency CsI(Tl) γ-spectrometer was used for the detection of reaction products (prompt γ-quanta and neutrons) accompanying each reaction event. Using the ACCULINNA fragment-separator 6He fragments (produced by 11B primary beam with 9Be target) are separated and transported to n-γ shielded experimental cave at FLNR JINR. The measured total reaction cross section data σR(E) for the above mentioned reactions are compared with a theoretical calculation based on the optical potential with the real part having the double-folding form.

  2. Excitation functions for 7Be, 22,24Na production in Mg and Al by deuteron irradiations up to 50 MeV.

    PubMed

    Hermanne, A; Takács, S; Tárkányi, F; Adam-Rebeles, R; Ignatyuk, A

    2012-12-01

    New experimental data for production of (7)Be and (22,24)Na in deuteron irradiation of (nat)Mg and Al up to 50 MeV are presented. The induced activity, measured with HPGe spectroscopy, allows us to determine excitation functions of (nat)Mg(d,x) and (27)Al(d,x) reactions involved in the activation process with reference to (nat)Ti(d,x)(48)V monitor cross sections. A comparison with experimental literature values and results from updated theoretical codes is discussed. Thick target yields were derived from fits to our cross-sections and integrated personnel dose was calculated for different irradiation cycles and exposure scenarios around high power deuteron accelerator facilities. PMID:23044286

  3. Extension of excitation functions up to 50 MeV for activation products in deuteron irradiations of Pr and Tm targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2016-09-01

    Extension up to 50 MeV incident deuteron energy is presented for excitation functions of activation products formed in monoisotopic Tm (169Tm) and Pr (141Pr). By stacked foil irradiations direct and/or cumulative production of 140,139m,138Nd, 138mPr, 141,139,137m,135Ce on Pr and 166,169Yb, 166,167,168Tm on Tm targets were measured. Confirmation of earlier experimental results for all investigated radionuclides is found and the influence of the higher energy on thick target yields and batch production of medically relevant radionuclides (140Nd, 139Pr (as decay product of 139mNd), 166,169Yb, 167Tm) is discussed. A comparison of experimental values with TALYS1.6 code results (predicted values from TENDL-2015 on-line library) shows a better description of the (d,pxn) reactions than older ones.

  4. Excitation function for deuteron induced nuclear reactions on natural ytterbium for production of high specific activity 177g Lu in no-carrier-added form for metabolic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Groppi, Flavia; Gandini, Andrea; Gini, Luigi; Abbas, Kamel; Holzwarth, Uwe; Simonelli, Federica; Bonardi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for generation of no-carrier-added Lu radionuclides were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on natural Yb targets at energies up to E(d)=18.18 MeV. Excitation functions of the reactions (nat)Yb(d,xn)(169,170,171,172,173,174g,174m,176m,177g)Lu and (nat)Yb(d,pxn)(169,175,177)Yb have been measured, among them three ((169)Lu, (174m)Lu and (176m)Lu) are reported for the first time. The upper limit of the contamination from the long-lived metastable level (177m)Lu was evaluated too. Thick-target yields for all investigated radionuclides are calculated.

  5. Measurements of Excitation Functions and Line Polarizations for Electron Impact Excitation of the n = 2, 3 States of Atomic Hydrogen in the Energy Range 11 - 2000 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Kanik, I.; Slevin, J.; Franklin, B.; Shemansky, D.

    1993-01-01

    The electron-atomic hydrogen scattering system is an important testing ground for theoretical models and has received a great deal of attention from experimentalists and theoreticians alike over the years. A complete description of the excitation process requires a knowledge of many different parameters, and experimental measurements of these parameters have been performed in various laboratories around the world. As far as total cross section data are concerned it has been noted that the discrepancy between the data of Long et al. and Williams for n = 2 excitations needs to be resolved in the interests of any further refinement of theory. We report new measurements of total cross sections and atomic line polarizations for both n=2 and n=3 excitations at energies from threshold to 2000 eV...

  6. High-School Student Discovers Strange Astronomical Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    A West Virginia high-school student analyzing data from a giant radio telescope has discovered a new astronomical object -- a strange type of neutron star called a rotating radio transient. Lucas Bolyard, a sophomore at South Harrison High School in Clarksburg, WV, made the discovery while participating in a project in which students are trained to scrutinize data from the National Science Foundation's giant Robert C. Byrd Green The project, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU), funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Bolyard made the discovery in March, after he already had studied more than 2,000 data plots from the GBT and found nothing. "I was home on a weekend and had nothing to do, so I decided to look at some more plots from the GBT," he said. "I saw a plot with a pulse, but there was a lot of radio interference, too. The pulse almost got dismissed as interference," he added. Nonetheless, he reported it, and it went on a list of candidates for West Virginia University astronomers Maura McLaughlin and Duncan Lorimer to re-examine, scheduling new observations of the region of sky from which the pulse came. Disappointingly, the follow-up observations showed nothing, indicating that the object was not a normal pulsar. However, the astronomers explained to Bolyard that his pulse still might have come from a rotating radio transient. Confirmation didn't come until July. Bolyard was at the NRAO's Green Bank Observatory with fellow PSC students. The night before, the group had been observing with the GBT in the wee hours, and all were very tired. Then Lorimer showed Bolyard a new plot of his pulse, reprocessed from raw data, indicating that it is real, not interference, and that Bolyard is likely the discoverer of one of only about 30 rotating radio transients known. Suddenly, Bolyard said, he wasn't tired anymore. "That news made me full

  7. Investigating strangeness in the proton by studying the effects of Light Cone parton distributions in the Meson Cloud Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuppan, Sam; Budnik, Garrett; Fox, Jordan

    2014-09-01

    The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. This research has been supported in part by the

  8. Pion- and strangeness-baryon σ terms in the extended chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, C. S.; Saghai, B.

    2015-07-01

    Within an extended chiral constituent quark formalism, we investigate contributions from all possible five-quark components in the octet baryons to the pion-baryon (σπ B) and strangeness-baryon (σs B) sigma terms: B ≡N ,Λ ,Σ ,Ξ . The probabilities of the quark-antiquark components in the ground-state baryon octet wave functions are calculated by taking the baryons to be admixtures of three- and five-quark components, with the relevant transitions handled via the 3P0 mechanism. Predictions for σπ B and σs B obtained by using input parameters taken from the literature are reported. Our results turn out to be, in general, consistent with the findings via lattice QCD and chiral perturbation theory.

  9. Centrality Dependent Strange Baryon Production in P-A and its Implications for Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R.

    2000-09-22

    BNL E910 has measured strange baryon production as a function of collision centrality for 17.5 GeV/c p-Au collisions. Collision centrality is defined by v{sub 1} the mean number projectile-nucleon interactions estimated from the ''grey'' track multiplicity. The measured {Lambda} yield increases faster than the participant scaling expectation for v {le} 3 and then saturates. A simple parameterization of this dependence applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions reproduces the measured E866 km. and WA97 {Lambda} centrality dependent yields. The increase in {Lambda} production to v {le} 3 is also evident for {Lambda}s which are leading baryons, in disagreement with predictions from RQMD.

  10. Synchronization of strange non-chaotic attractors via unidirectional coupling of quasiperiodically-forced systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaganesh, G.; Daniel Sweetlin, M.; Arulgnanam, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical investigation on the robust synchronization phenomenon observed in a unidirectionally-coupled quasiperiodically-forced simple nonlinear electronic circuit system exhibiting strange non-chaotic attractors (SNAs) in its dynamics. The SNA obtained in the simple quasiperiodic system is characterized for its SNA behavior. Then, we studied the nature of the synchronized state in unidirectionally coupled SNAs by using the Master-Slave approach. The stability of the synchronized state is studied through the master stability functions (MSF) obtained for coupling different state variables of the drive and response system. The property of robust synchronization is analyzed for one type of coupling of the state variables through phase portraits, conditional lyapunov exponents and the Kaplan-Yorke dimension. The phenomenon of complete synchronization of SNAs via a unidirectional coupling scheme is reported for the first time.

  11. Multi-strange baryon production in psbnd Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasar, C.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-07-01

    The multi-strange baryon yields in Pbsbnd Pb collisions have been shown to exhibit an enhancement relative to pp reactions. In this work, Ξ and Ω production rates have been measured with the ALICE experiment as a function of transverse momentum, pT, in psbnd Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV. The results cover the kinematic ranges 0.6 GeV / c strange baryons have been identified by reconstructing their weak decays into charged particles. The pT spectra are analysed as a function of event charged-particle multiplicity, which in psbnd Pb collisions ranges over one order of magnitude and lies between those observed in pp and Pbsbnd Pb collisions. The measured pT distributions are compared to the expectations from a Blast-Wave model. The parameters which describe the production of lighter hadron species also describe the hyperon spectra in high multiplicity psbnd Pb collisions. The yield of hyperons relative to charged pions is studied and compared with results from pp and Pbsbnd Pb collisions. A continuous increase in the yield ratios as a function of multiplicity is observed in psbnd Pb data, the values of which range from those measured in minimum bias pp to the ones in Pbsbnd Pb collisions. A statistical model qualitatively describes this multiplicity dependence using a canonical suppression mechanism, in which the small volume causes a relative reduction of hadron production dependent on the strangeness content of the hyperon.

  12. Embeddings of a strange attractor into R3.

    PubMed

    Tsankov, Tsvetelin D; Nishtala, Arunasri; Gilmore, Robert

    2004-05-01

    The algorithm for determining a global Poincaré section is applied to a previously studied dynamical system on R2 x S1 and a one-parameter family of embeddings of the strange attractor it generates into R3. We find that the topological properties of the attractor are embedding dependent to a limited extent. These embeddings rigidly preserve mechanism, which is a simple stretch and fold. The embeddings studied show three discrete topological degrees of freedom: parity, global torsion, and braid type of the genus-one torus bounding the embedded attractor. PMID:15244912

  13. Weak production of strange particles off the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Rafi; Athar, M. Sajjad; Simo, I. Ruiz; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2015-05-15

    The strange particle production off the nucleon induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos is investigated at low and intermediate energies. We develop a microscopic model based on the SU(3) chiral Lagrangian. The studied mechanisms are the main source of single kaon production for (anti)neutrino energies up to 1.5 GeV. Using this model we have also studied the associated production of kaons and hyperons. The cross sections are large enough to be measured by experiments such as MINERνA, T2K and NOνA.

  14. Precise Determination of the Strangeness Magnetic Moment of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, D B; Boinepalli, S; Cloet, I C; Thomas, A W; Williams, A G; Young, R D; Zanotti, J M; Zhang, J B

    2005-06-01

    By combining the constraints of charge symmetry with new chiral extrapolation techniques and recent low mass lattice QCD simulations of the individual quark contributions to the magnetic moments of the nucleon octet, we obtain a precise determination of the strange magnetic moment of the proton. The result, namely G{sub M}{sup s} = -0.051 +/- 0.021 mu{sub N}, is consistent with the latest experimental measurements but an order of magnitude more precise. This poses a tremendous challenge for future experiments.

  15. Strangeness suppression of qq creation observed in exclusive reactions.

    PubMed

    Mestayer, M D; Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Pereira, S Anefalos; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Garillon, B; Garçon, M; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Simonyan, A; Sokhan, D; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tang, W; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2014-10-10

    We measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK(+), pπ(0), and nπ(+), with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  16. Strangeness suppression of qq creation observed in exclusive reactions.

    PubMed

    Mestayer, M D; Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Pereira, S Anefalos; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Garillon, B; Garçon, M; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Simonyan, A; Sokhan, D; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tang, W; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2014-10-10

    We measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK(+), pπ(0), and nπ(+), with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production. PMID:25375706

  17. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Shuji; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2013-02-28

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{l_brace}5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl{r_brace}benzene (AC5-CF{sub 3}), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF{sub 3}, we confirm that CF{sub 3} substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF{sub 3}, and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  18. Using the Moon As A Low-Noise Seismic Detector For Strange Quark Nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Chui, Talso; Griggs, Cornelius E.; Herrin, Eugene T.; Nakamura, Yosio; Paik, Ho Jung; Penanen, Konstantin; Rosenbaum, Doris; Teplitz, Vigdor L.; Young, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Strange quark matter made of up, down and strange quarks has been postulated by Witten [1]. Strange quark matter would be nearly charge neutral and would have density of nuclear matter (10(exp 14) gm/cu cm). Witten also suggested that nuggets of strange quark matter, or strange quark nuggets (SQNs), could have formed shortly after the Big Bang, and that they would be viable candidates for cold dark matter. As suggested by de Rujula and Glashow [2], an SQN may pass through a celestial body releasing detectable seismic energy along a straight line. The Moon, being much quieter seismically than the Earth, would be a favorable place to search for such events. We review previous searches for SQNs to illustrate the parameter space explored by using the Moon as a low-noise detector of SQNs. We also discuss possible detection schemes using a single seismometer, and using an International Lunar Seismic Network.

  19. Measurement of strange particle production in the NICA fixed-target programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Volker

    2016-08-01

    Strange particles provide a sensitive tool to study the dense and hot matter created in relativistic nuclear collisions. Although strangeness production in such collisions has been a topic of experimental and theoretical research for many years, its understanding is far from being complete. This holds in particular for multi-strange hyperons and for lower collision energies as relevant for NICA and FAIR. Multi-strange particles, being sensitive to both the mechanism of strangeness production and the net-baryon density, are expected to shed light on the state of the created matter and to indicate possible transitions to new phases of strongly interacting matter. We thus advocate the measurement of hyperons and φ mesons in a fixed-target experiment at NICA (BM@N), which can be achieved by a relatively compact detector system.

  20. Speech neglect: A strange educational blind spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Katherine Safford

    2005-09-01

    Speaking is universally acknowledged as an important human talent, yet as a topic of educated common knowledge, it is peculiarly neglected. Partly, this is a consequence of the relatively recent growth of research on speech perception, production, and development, but also a function of the way that information is sliced up by undergraduate colleges. Although the basic acoustic mechanism of vowel production was known to Helmholtz, the ability to view speech production as a physiological event is evolving even now with such techniques as fMRI. Intensive research on speech perception emerged only in the early 1930s as Fletcher and the engineers at Bell Telephone Laboratories developed the transmission of speech over telephone lines. The study of speech development was revolutionized by the papers of Eimas and his colleagues on speech perception in infants in the 1970s. Dissemination of knowledge in these fields is the responsibility of no single academic discipline. It forms a center for two departments, Linguistics, and Speech and Hearing, but in the former, there is a heavy emphasis on other aspects of language than speech and, in the latter, a focus on clinical practice. For psychologists, it is a rather minor component of a very diverse assembly of topics. I will focus on these three fields in proposing possible remedies.

  1. Strange Particle Production in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-05-01

    The spectra of strange hadrons are measured in proton-proton collisions, recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 7 TeV. The K0_s, Lambda, and Xi^- particles and their antiparticles are reconstructed from their decay topologies and the production rates are measured as functions of rapidity and transverse momentum. The results are compared to other experiments and to predictions of the PYTHIA Monte Carlo program. The transverse momentum distributions are found to differ substantially from the PYTHIA results and the production rates exceed the predictions by up to a factor of three.

  2. An almost symmetric Strang splitting scheme for nonlinear evolution equations☆

    PubMed Central

    Einkemmer, Lukas; Ostermann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider splitting methods for the time integration of parabolic and certain classes of hyperbolic partial differential equations, where one partial flow cannot be computed exactly. Instead, we use a numerical approximation based on the linearization of the vector field. This is of interest in applications as it allows us to apply splitting methods to a wider class of problems from the sciences. However, in the situation described, the classic Strang splitting scheme, while still being a method of second order, is not longer symmetric. This, in turn, implies that the construction of higher order methods by composition is limited to order three only. To remedy this situation, based on previous work in the context of ordinary differential equations, we construct a class of Strang splitting schemes that are symmetric up to a desired order. We show rigorously that, under suitable assumptions on the nonlinearity, these methods are of second order and can then be used to construct higher order methods by composition. In addition, we illustrate the theoretical results by conducting numerical experiments for the Brusselator system and the KdV equation. PMID:25844017

  3. Electroproduction of baryon-meson states and strangeness suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santopinto, E.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Bijker, R.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the electroproduction ratios of baryon-meson states from nucleon, inferring from the sea quarks in the nucleon using an extension of the quark model that takes into account the sea. As a result we provide, with no adjustable parameters, the predictions of ratios of exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK+, Σ* K, ΣK, pπ0, and nπ+. These predictions are in agreement with the new JLab experimental data showing that sea quarks play an important role in the electroproduction. We also predicted further ratios of exclusive reactions that can be measured and tested in future experiments. In particular, we suggested new experiments on deuterium and tritium. Such measurements can provide crucial tests of different predictions concerning the structure of nucleon and its sea quarks helping to solve an outstanding problem. Finally, we compute the so called strangeness suppression factor, λs, that is the suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, and we found that our finding with this simple extension of the quark model is in good agreement with the results of JLab and CERN experiments.

  4. Zero sound in strange metals with hyperscaling violation from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Parijat; Roy, Shibaji

    2013-08-01

    Hyperscaling violating “strange metal” phase of heavy fermion compounds can be described holographically by probe D-branes in the background of a Lifshitz space-time (dynamical exponent z and spatial dimensions d) with hyperscaling violation (corresponding exponent θ). Without the hyperscaling violation, strange metals are known to exhibit zero sound mode for z<2 analogous to the Fermi liquids. In this paper, we study its fate in the presence of hyperscaling violation and find that in this case, the zero sound mode exists for z<2(1+|θ|/d), where the positivity of the specific heat and the null energy condition of the background dictate that θ<0 and z≥1. However, for z≥2(1+|θ|/d), there is no well-defined quasiparticle for the zero sound. The systems behave like Fermi liquid for 2|θ|=dz and like Bose liquid for 2|θ|=qdz (where q is the number of spatial dimensions along which D-branes are extended in the background space), but in general they behave as a new kind of quantum liquid. We also compute the ac conductivity of the systems and briefly comment on the results.

  5. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) study on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in 2-hydroxybenzoyl compounds: Significance of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xin; Yang, Dapeng; Sui, Xiao; Wang, Dandan

    2013-02-01

    The excited-state properties of intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in methyl salicylate (MS) and its effects on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) have been investigated using theoretical methods. From the geometric optimization and IR spectra in the ground and excited states calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods respectively, the IMHB is demonstrated to be significantly strengthened upon excitation to excited state S1. Thereby, the ESIPT is facilitated by the excited-state IMHB strengthening since ESIPT takes place through IMHB. In addition, the absorption and fluorescence peaks of the S1 state are also calculated using the TD-DFT method. It is noted that the calculated spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results, which has confirmed the ESIPT mechanism of MS first proposed by Weller. Moreover, other four 2-hydroxybenzoyl compounds forming strong IMHB are investigated to understand the effect of substituent R on the ESIPT process. We find that the hydrogen bond strength can be controlled by the inductive field effect of the substituent. Thus it is inferred that the ESIPT reaction can be facilitated by the inductive effect of electron-donating substituent.

  6. Experimental and calculated excitation functions for discrete-line gamma-ray production due to 1-40 MeV neutron interactions with sup 56 Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.; Fu, C.Y.; Hetrick, D.M.; Larson, D.C.; Todd, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Measuring cross sections for gamma-ray production from tertiary reactions is one of the ways to gain experimental information about these reactions. To this end, inelastic and other nonelastic neutron interactions with {sup 56}Fe have been studied for incident neutron energies between 0.8 and 41 MeV. An iron sample isotopically enriched in the mass 56 isotope was used. Gamma rays representing 70 transitions among levels in residual nuclei were identified, and production cross sections were deduced. The reactions studies were {sup 56}Fe(n,n{prime}){sup 56}Fe, {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n,2n){sup 55}Fe, {sup 56}Fe(n,d + n,np){sup 55}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n, t + n, nd + n,2np){sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n,{alpha}){sup 53}Cr, {sup 56}Fe(n,n{alpha}){sup 52}Cr, and {sup 56}Fe(n,3n){sup 54}Fe. Experimental excitation functions have been compared with cross sections calculated using the nuclear reaction model code TNG, with generally favorable results. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Excitation function for the production of {sup 262}Bh (Z=107) in the odd-Z-projectile reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 55}Mn, n)

    SciTech Connect

    Folden, C.M. III; Nelson, S.L.; Duellmann, Ch.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Zielinski, P.M.; Nitsche, H.; Hoffman, D.C.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K.E.

    2006-01-15

    The excitation function for production of {sup 262}Bh in the odd-Z-projectile reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 55}Mn, n) has been measured at three projectile energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, 33 decay chains originating from {sup 262}Bh and 2 decay chains originating from {sup 261}Bh were observed. The measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. The maximum cross section of 540{sub -150}{sup +180} pb is observed at a lab-frame center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV and is more than five times larger than that expected based on previously reported results for production of {sup 262}Bh in the analogous even-Z-projectile reaction {sup 209}Bi({sup 54}Cr, n). Our results indicate that the optimum beam energy in one-neutron-out heavy-ion fusion reactions can be estimated simply using the optimum energy rule proposed by SwiaPtecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski.

  8. Excitation function for the production of 262Bh (Z = 107) in theodd-Z projectile reaction 208Pb(55Mn, n)

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Sudowe, R.; Zielinski, P.M.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nitsche, H.; Hoffman, D.C.

    2005-05-16

    The excitation function for production of 262Bh in the odd-Z-projectile reaction 208Pb(55Mn,n) has been measured at three projectile energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, 33 decay chains originating from 262Bh and 2 decay chains originating from 261Bh were observed. The measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. The maximum cross section of 540 +180 - 150 pb is observed at a lab-frame center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV and is more than fives times larger than that expected based on previously reported results for production of 262Bh in the analogous even-Z-projectile reaction 209Bi(54Cr,n). Our results indicate that the optimum beam energy in one-neutron-out heavy-ion fusion reactions can be estimated simply using the ''Optimum Energy Rule'' proposed by Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski.

  9. Molecular orbital studies (hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity, and first electron excitation), vibrational investigation and theoretical NBO analysis of 2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzaldehyde by density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataraj, A.; Balachandran, V.; Karthick, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out using Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the range 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively, for the 2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzaldehyde (HBB). The experimental spectra were recorded in the solid phase. The fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of vibrational bands were evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) with the standard B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) method and basis set. Normal co-ordinate calculations were performed with the DFT force field corrected by a recommended set of scaling factors yielding fairly good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Simulation of infrared and Raman spectra utilizing the results of these calculations led to excellent overall agreement with the observed spectral patterns. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. The optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were compared with experimental values of related compound. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and the charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The directly calculated ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), electrophilicity index (ω), hardness (η), chemical potential (μ), and first electron excitation (τ) are all correlated with the HOMO and LUMO energies with their molecular properties. These show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Furthermore, molecular electrostatic potential maps (MESP) of the molecule have been calculated.

  10. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Tino; Summers, Jeffery J.; Hinder, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE) and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group) or the vertex (SHAM group). Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning. PMID:26167305

  11. Description of excited states in [Re(Imidazole)(CO)3 (Phen)](+) including solvent and spin-orbit coupling effects: Density functional theory versus multiconfigurational wavefunction approach.

    PubMed

    Fumanal, Maria; Daniel, Chantal

    2016-10-15

    The low-lying electronic excited states of [Re(imidazole)(CO)3 (phen)](+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) ranging between 420 nm and 330 nm have been calculated by means of relativistic spin-orbit time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and wavefunction approaches (state-average-CASSCF/CASPT2). A direct comparison between the theoretical absorption spectra obtained with different methods including SOC and solvent corrections for water points to the difficulties at describing on the same footing the bands generated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT), intraligand (IL) transition, and ligand-to-Ligand- charge transfer (LLCT). While TD-DFT and three-roots-state-average CASSCF (10,10) reproduce rather well the lowest broad MLCT band observed in the experimental spectrum between 420 nm and 330 nm, more flexible wavefunctions enlarged either by the number of roots or by the number of active orbitals and electrons destabilize the MLCT states by introducing IL and LLCT character in the lowest part of the absorption spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27510636

  12. Linker mutations dissociate the function of synaptotagmin I during evoked and spontaneous release and reveal membrane penetration as a step during excitation-secretion coupling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huisheng; Bai, Hua; Xue, Renhao; Takahashi, Hirohide; Edwardson, J. Michael; Chapman, Edwin R.

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+ sensor for rapid synaptic vesicle exocytosis, synaptotagmin I (syt), is largely composed of two Ca2+-sensing C2-domains, C2A and C2B. We have investigated the apparent synergy between the tandem C2 domains by altering the length and rigidity of the linker that connects them. The behavior of the linker mutants revealed a correlation between the ability of the C2-domains to penetrate membranes in response to Ca2+ and to drive evoked neurotransmitter release in cultured mouse neurons, uncovering a step in excitation-secretion coupling. Atomic force microscopy experiments indicate that the synergy between these C2-domains involves intra-molecular interactions between them. Thus, syt function is profoundly affected by changes in the physical nature of the linker that connects its tandem C2-domains. Moreover, the linker mutations uncoupled syt-mediated regulation of evoked and spontaneous release, revealing that syt also acts as a fusion clamp prior to the Ca2+ trigger. PMID:24657966

  13. Reaction mechanism in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system: Measurements and analysis of excitation functions and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H. D.

    2007-06-15

    To study the dynamics of heavy ion fusion reactions in the lower mass region, experiments were carried out to measure the cross sections of radioactive residues produced in the interaction of the {sup 16}O ion with {sup 27}Al target nucleus at 19 different energies in very close intervals covering the energy range from {approx_equal}58 to 94 MeV, using the well-known recoil catcher off-line {gamma}-ray spectroscopy technique. The simulation of experimental data was performed using statistical-model-based computer codes, viz., CASCADE, PACE2, and ALICE-91. The analysis of measured excitation functions indicates that these residues are likely to be produced by complete fusion, incomplete fusion, and direct reaction processes. Furthermore, to confirm the contribution of different reaction channels, a complementary experiment was performed that measured the angular distributions of the residues produced in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system at 85 MeV beam energy. The analysis of the results of both experiments indicates that at these energies, the direct reactions compete with complete fusion and incomplete fusion reaction processes.

  14. Excitation function of the alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on enriched 116Cd, production of the theranostic isotope 117mSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Szűcs, Z.; Saito, M.

    2016-10-01

    117mSn is one of the radioisotopes can be beneficially produced through alpha particle irradiation. The targets were prepared by deposition of 116Cd metal onto high purity 12 μm thick Cu backing. The average deposited thickness was 21.9 μm. The beam energy was thoroughly measured by Time of Flight (TOF) methods and proved to be 51.2 MeV. For the experiment the well-established stacked foil technique was used. In addition to the Cd targets, Ti foils were also inserted into the stacks for energy and intensity monitoring. The Cu backings were also used for monitoring and as recoil catcher of the reaction products from the cadmium layer. The activities of the irradiated foils were measured with HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry and cross section values were determined. As a result excitation functions for the formation of 117mSn, 117m,gIn, 116mIn, 115mIn and 115m,gCd from enriched 116Cd were deduced and compared with the available literature data and with the results of the nuclear reaction model code calculations EMPIRE 3.2 and TALYS 1.8. Yield curves were also deduced for the measured nuclear reactions and compared with the literature.

  15. Description of excited states in [Re(Imidazole)(CO)3 (Phen)](+) including solvent and spin-orbit coupling effects: Density functional theory versus multiconfigurational wavefunction approach.

    PubMed

    Fumanal, Maria; Daniel, Chantal

    2016-10-15

    The low-lying electronic excited states of [Re(imidazole)(CO)3 (phen)](+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) ranging between 420 nm and 330 nm have been calculated by means of relativistic spin-orbit time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and wavefunction approaches (state-average-CASSCF/CASPT2). A direct comparison between the theoretical absorption spectra obtained with different methods including SOC and solvent corrections for water points to the difficulties at describing on the same footing the bands generated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT), intraligand (IL) transition, and ligand-to-Ligand- charge transfer (LLCT). While TD-DFT and three-roots-state-average CASSCF (10,10) reproduce rather well the lowest broad MLCT band observed in the experimental spectrum between 420 nm and 330 nm, more flexible wavefunctions enlarged either by the number of roots or by the number of active orbitals and electrons destabilize the MLCT states by introducing IL and LLCT character in the lowest part of the absorption spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Theoretical studies of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, Nicholas A.

    2014-10-06

    Time-dependent density functional theory is the most widely used quantum chemical method for studying molecules in electronically excited states. However, excited states can also be computed within Kohn-Sham density functional theory by exploiting methods that converge the self-consistent field equations to give excited state solutions. The usefulness of single reference self-consistent field based approaches for studying excited states is demonstrated by considering the calculation of several types of spectroscopy including the infrared spectroscopy of molecules in an electronically excited state, the rovibrational spectrum of the NO-Ar complex, core electron binding energies and the emission spectroscopy of BODIPY in water.

  17. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  18. Raptor ablation in skeletal muscle decreases Cav1.1 expression and affects the function of the excitation-contraction coupling supramolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rubén J; Mosca, Barbara; Treves, Susan; Maj, Marcin; Bergamelli, Leda; Calderon, Juan C; Bentzinger, C Florian; Romanino, Klaas; Hall, Michael N; Rüegg, Markus A; Delbono, Osvaldo; Caputo, Carlo; Zorzato, Francesco

    2015-02-15

    The protein mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulating a number of biochemical pathways controlling cell growth. mTOR exists in two complexes termed mTORC1 and mTORC2. Regulatory associated protein of mTOR (raptor) is associated with mTORC1 and is essential for its function. Ablation of raptor in skeletal muscle results in several phenotypic changes including decreased life expectancy, increased glycogen deposits and alterations of the twitch kinetics of slow fibres. In the present paper, we show that in muscle-specific raptor knockout (RamKO), the bulk of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is mainly associated in its cAMP-non-stimulated form with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. In addition, 3[H]-ryanodine and 3[H]-PN200-110 equilibrium binding show a ryanodine to dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) ratio of 0.79 and 1.35 for wild-type (WT) and raptor KO skeletal muscle membranes respectively. Peak amplitude and time to peak of the global calcium transients evoked by supramaximal field stimulation were not different between WT and raptor KO. However, the increase in the voltage sensor-uncoupled RyRs leads to an increase of both frequency and mass of elementary calcium release events (ECRE) induced by hyper-osmotic shock in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibres from raptor KO. The present study shows that the protein composition and function of the molecular machinery involved in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is affected by mTORC1 signalling.

  19. A new form of strange matter and new hope for finding it

    SciTech Connect

    Flam, F.

    1993-10-08

    Deep in the dense cores of collapsed stars even atoms don't survive. The force of gravity crushes them into particle mushes weighing megatons per teaspoon. But even these alien forms of matter don't hold a candle to another possible end product of a collapsing star: something physicists justifiably call strange matter. This strangeness comes from an exotic particle not associated with ordinary matter: the strange quark. It belongs to a six-member quark family, along with up, down, charm, top, and bottom, each of which carries a different combination of charge and mass. The only ones that make up matter as we know it are up and down quarks, but in theory, matter could form out of strange quarks as well. In nature, it would turn up most probably in interiors of collapsed stars. Scientists originally imagined strange matter as a sort of disorganized mixed bag of strange quarks, but this summer a group proposed that the quarks could form a sort of mutant atomic nucleus that could conceivably grow to the size of a star. For the moment this is speculation, but it may not be theoretical musing for long. Physicists are preparing to try making strange matter here on Earth, in experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York and Switzerland's CERN, next summer.

  20. Generation and Distribution of a Magnetic Field in Superconducting Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, D. M.; Hayrapetyan, M. V.; Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Generation of a magnetic field and its distribution are considered within a rotating strange quark star with a crust. It is shown how, over time, a differential rotation is established between the superfluid and superconducting quark core and normal electron plasma, which leads to the generation of magnetic field. The magnetic field at the surface of a strange star may attain values of 1011-1015 G, depending on the star model. It is suggested that magnetars may be manifestations of strange stars, the cores of which rotate much faster than the observable part, i.e., the crust.

  1. Detection of symmetry-protected topological order in AKLT states by exact evaluation of the strange correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierschem, K.; Beach, K. S. D.

    2016-06-01

    The strange correlator [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247202 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.247202] has been proposed as a measure of symmetry protected topological order in one- and two-dimensional systems. It takes the form of a spin-spin correlation function, computed as a mixed overlap between the state of interest and a trivial local product state. We demonstrate that it can be computed exactly (asymptotically, in the Monte Carlo sense) for various Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states by direct evaluation of the wave function within the valence bond loop gas framework. We present results for lattices with chain, square, honeycomb, cube, diamond, and hyperhoneycomb geometries. In each case, the spin quantum number S is varied such that 2 S (the number of valence bonds emerging from each site) achieves various integer multiples of the lattice coordination number. We introduce the concept of strange correlator loop winding number and point to its utility in testing for the presence of symmetry protected topological order.

  2. Observation of the doubly strange b baryon Omegab-.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; DeVaughan, K; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Komissarov, E V; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-12-01

    We report the observation of the doubly strange b baryon Omegab- in the decay channel Omegab(-)-->J/psiOmega-, with J/psi-->mu+mu(-) and Omega(-)-->LambdaK(-)-->(ppi-)K-, in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we observe 17.8+/-4.9(stat)+/-0.8(syst) Omegab- signal events at a mass of 6.165+/-0.010(stat)+/-0.013(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.4sigma, corresponding to a probability of 6.7 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation. PMID:19113541

  3. Probing Proton Strangeness with Time-Like Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Cotanch; Robert A. Williams

    2002-05-01

    We document that p(gamma,e+e-)p measurements will yield new, important information about the off-shell time-like nucleon form factors, especially in the phi meson region (q{sup 2} = M{sup 2}{sub {phi}}) governing the phi N couplings g{sup V,T}{sub {phi}NN}. Calculations for p(gamma,e+e-)p, utilizing vector meson dominance, predict measurable phi enhancements at high |t| compared to the expected phi background production from pi, eta and Pomeron exchange. The phi form factor contribution generates a novel experimental signature for OZI violation and the proton strangeness content. The phi N couplings are determined independently from a combined analysis of the neutron electric form factor and recent high |t| phi photoproduction. The pi, eta and Pomeron transition form factors are also predicted and the observed pi and eta transition moments are reproduced.

  4. Applicability of 0-1 test for strange nonchaotic attractors.

    PubMed

    Gopal, R; Venkatesan, A; Lakshmanan, M

    2013-06-01

    We show that the recently introduced 0-1 test can successfully distinguish between strange nonchaotic attractors (SNAs) and periodic/quasiperiodic/chaotic attractors, by suitably choosing the arbitrary parameter associated with the translation variables in terms of the golden mean number which avoids resonance with the quasiperiodic force. We further characterize the transition from quasiperiodic to chaotic motion via SNAs in terms of the 0-1 test. We demonstrate that the test helps to detect different dynamical transitions to SNAs from quasiperiodic attractor or the transitions from SNAs to chaos. We illustrate the performance of the 0-1 test in detecting transitions to SNAs in quasiperiodically forced logistic map, cubic map, and Duffing oscillator. PMID:23822488

  5. (Anti-)strangeness in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, P.; Cassing, W.; Palmese, A.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    We study the production of hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach that is extended to incorporate essentials aspects of chiral symmetry restoration (CSR) in the hadronic sector (via the Schwinger mechanism) on top of the deconfinement phase transition as implemented in PHSD before. The essential impact of CSR is found in the Schwinger mechanism (for string decay) which fixes the ratio of strange to light quark production in the hadronic medium. Our studies suggest a microscopic explanation for the maximum in the K + /π + and (Ʌ + Σ0)/π - ratios at about 30 A GeV which only shows up if in addition to CSR a deconfinement transition to partonic degrees-of-freedom is incorporated in the reaction dynamics.

  6. Strange quarks in the nucleon sea: Results from HAPPEX II

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Aniol; HAPPEX Collaboration

    2007-03-01

    The HAPPEX Collaboration measured parity-violating electron scattering from 4He(e, e) and H(e, e) in 2004 and 2005 for Q2 ≤ 0.11 GeV2. Results for the strange-quark contributions to the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon from the 2004 data will be reviewed. Preliminary results from the 2005 data, which have significantly greater statistical precision, are GsE = 0.004 0.014stat 0.013syst for Q2 = 0.0772 GeV2 from the helium data and GsE + 0.088 GsM = 0.004 0.011stat 0.005syst 0.004FF for Q2 = 0.1089 GeV2 from the hydrogen data.

  7. Recent Studies of the Strangeness Physics at MAMI-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Kyo; Achenbach, Patrick; Arai, Naoki; Ayerbe Gayoso, Carlos; Böhm, Ralph; Borodina, Olga; Bosnar, Damir; Bozkurt, Vakkas; Debenjak, Luka; Distler, Michael O.; Esser, Anselm; Friščić, Ivica; Fujii, Yuu; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Gómez Rodríguez, Mar; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hirose, Satoshi; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, Masashi; Kim, Eunhee; Kusaka, Junichiro; Maeda, Kazushige; Margaryan, Amur; Merkel, Harald; Müller, Ulrich; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Pochodzalla, Josef; Rappold, Christophe; Reinhold, Joerg; Saito, Takehiko R.; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Sánchez Majos, Salvador; Sören Schlimme, Björn; Schoth, Matthias; Schulz, Florian; Sfienti, Concettina; Širca, Simon; Tang, Liguang; Thiel, Michaela

    We have performed measurements of strangeness production off the proton and light nuclear targets to study the elementary production mechanism and the mass of light hypernuclei, respectively. These studies have been carried out at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C, with the elementary kaon electro-production data having been collected over several run periods in 2008, 2009 and 2011. The last experiment was aimed at measuring the beam helicity asymmetry for the first time in the Q2 ˜ 0.05 (GeV/c)2 region with the highly polarized electron beam of MAMI. In 2011 and 2012, we also took data for pion spectroscopy of the hypernuclear weak-decay to measure the absolute mass of the hypernuclear ground state. The present status of the analysis is reported.

  8. Covariant calculation of strange decays of baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sengl, B.; Melde, T.; Plessas, W.

    2007-09-01

    We present results for kaon decay widths of baryon resonances from a relativistic study with constituent quark models. The calculations are done in the point form of Poincare-invariant quantum mechanics with a spectator-model decay operator. We obtain covariant predictions of the Goldstone-boson-exchange and a variant of the one-gluon-exchange constituent quark models for all kaon decay widths of established baryon resonances. They are generally characterized by underestimating the available experimental data. In particular, the widths of kaon decays with decreasing strangeness in the baryon turn out to be extremely small. We also consider the nonrelativistic limit, leading to the familiar elementary emission model, and demonstrate the importance of relativistic effects. It is found that the nonrelativistic approach evidently misses sensible influences from Lorentz boosts and some essential spin-coupling terms.

  9. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M. W.; Yiu, Y. M. Sham, T. K.; Ward, M. J.; Liu, L.; Hu, Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Liu, Yingkai

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  10. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  11. Functional Network Overlap as Revealed by fMRI Using sICA and Its Potential Relationships with Functional Heterogeneity, Balanced Excitation and Inhibition, and Sparseness of Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation. PMID:25714362

  12. Calculation of the total electron excitation cross section in the Born approximation using Slater wave functions for the Li (2s yields 2p), Li (2s yields 3p), Na (3s yields 4p), Mg (3p yields 4s), Ca (4s yields 4p) and K (4s yields 4p) excitations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simsic, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Excitation of neutral atoms by inelastic scattering of incident electrons in gaseous nebulae were investigated using Slater Wave functions to describe the initial and final states of the atom. Total cross sections using the Born Approximation are calculated for: Li(2s yields 2p), Na(3s yields 4p), k(4s yields 4p). The intensity of emitted radiation from gaseous nebulae is also calculated, and Maxwell distribution is employed to average the kinetic energy of electrons.

  13. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  14. Nucleon, Delta and Omega excited state spectra at three pion mass values

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava, Robert G. Edwards, Balint Joo, David G. Richards, Eric Engelson, Huey-Wen Lin, Colin Morningstar, Stephen J. Wallace

    2010-06-01

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon, Delta and Omega are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculations are performed at three values of the pion mass: 392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a basis of about ten interpolating operators enabling six energies to be distinguished clearly in each irreducible representation of the octahedral group. We compare our calculations of nucleon excited states with the low-lying experimental spectrum. There is reasonable agreement for the pattern of states.

  15. Systematic uncertainties in the precise determination of the strangeness magnetic moment of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    D.B. Leinweber; S. Boinepalli; A.W. Thomas; A.G. Williams; R.D. Young; J.B. Zhang; J.M. Zanotti

    2004-06-01

    Systematic uncertainties in the recent precise determination of the strangeness magnetic moment of the nucleon are identified and quantified. In summary, G{sub M}{sup s} = -0.046 {+-} 0.019 {micro}{sub N}.

  16. (Multi-)strange hadron and light (anti-)nuclei production with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to its excellent tracking performance and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the identification of light (anti-)(hyper)nuclei and for the measurement of (multi-)strange particles over a wide range of transverse momentum. Deuterons, 3He and 4He and their corresponding anti-nuclei are identified via their specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement provided by the Time-Of-Flight detector. Strange and multi-strange baryons and mesons as well as (anti-)hypertritons are reconstructed via their topological decays. Detailed measurements of (multi-)strange hadron production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collision and of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypertritons in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC are presented. The experimental results will be compared with the predictions of both statistical hadronization and coalescence models.

  17. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identifiedmore » as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.« less

  18. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.

  19. Semileptonic B and Bs decays into orbitally excited charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, J.; Albertus, C.; Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.; Hernández, E.; Pérez-García, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    The BABAR Collaboration has recently reported products of branching fractions that include B meson semileptonic decays into final states with charged and neutral D1(2420) and D2*(2460), two narrow orbitally excited charmed mesons. We evaluate these branching fractions, together with those concerning D0*(2400) and D1'(2430) mesons, within the framework of a constituent quark model. The calculation is performed in two steps, one of which involves a semileptonic decay and the other is mediated by a strong process. Our results are in agreement with the experimental data. We also extend the study to semileptonic decays of Bs into orbitally excited charmed-strange mesons, providing predictions to the possible measurements to be carried out at LHC.

  20. Spin down of rotating compact magnetized strange stars in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    We find that in general relativity slow down of the pulsar rotation due to the magnetodipolar radiation is more faster for the strange star with comparison to that for the ordinary neutron star of the same mass. Comparison with astrophysical observations on pulsars spindown data may provide an evidence for the strange star existence and, thus, serve as a test for distinguishing it from the neutron star.

  1. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  2. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  3. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-06-24

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation.

  4. New upper limit on strange quark matter abundance in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space experiment.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-09-11

    In this work we present results of a direct search for strange quark matter (SQM) in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space spectrometer. If this state of matter exists it may be present in cosmic rays as particles, called strangelets, having a high density and an anomalously high mass-to-charge (A/Z) ratio. A direct search in space is complementary to those from ground-based spectrometers. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being potentially capable of directly identifying these particles, without any assumption on their interaction model with Earth's atmosphere and the long-term stability in terrestrial and lunar rocks. In the rigidity range from 1.0 to ∼1.0×10^{3}  GV, no such particles were found in the data collected by PAMELA between 2006 and 2009. An upper limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays was therefore set for particles with charge 1≤Z≤8 and mass 4≤A≤1.2×10^{5}. This limit as a function of mass and as a function of magnetic rigidity allows us to constrain models of SQM production and propagation in the Galaxy. PMID:26406816

  5. New Upper Limit on Strange Quark Matter Abundance in Cosmic Rays with the PAMELA Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; de Donato, C.; de Santis, C.; de Simone, N.; di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergè, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Pamela Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present results of a direct search for strange quark matter (SQM) in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space spectrometer. If this state of matter exists it may be present in cosmic rays as particles, called strangelets, having a high density and an anomalously high mass-to-charge (A /Z ) ratio. A direct search in space is complementary to those from ground-based spectrometers. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being potentially capable of directly identifying these particles, without any assumption on their interaction model with Earth's atmosphere and the long-term stability in terrestrial and lunar rocks. In the rigidity range from 1.0 to ˜1.0 ×103 GV , no such particles were found in the data collected by PAMELA between 2006 and 2009. An upper limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays was therefore set for particles with charge 1 ≤Z ≤8 and mass 4 ≤A ≤1.2 ×105 . This limit as a function of mass and as a function of magnetic rigidity allows us to constrain models of SQM production and propagation in the Galaxy.

  6. New upper limit on strange quark matter abundance in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space experiment.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-09-11

    In this work we present results of a direct search for strange quark matter (SQM) in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space spectrometer. If this state of matter exists it may be present in cosmic rays as particles, called strangelets, having a high density and an anomalously high mass-to-charge (A/Z) ratio. A direct search in space is complementary to those from ground-based spectrometers. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being potentially capable of directly identifying these particles, without any assumption on their interaction model with Earth's atmosphere and the long-term stability in terrestrial and lunar rocks. In the rigidity range from 1.0 to ∼1.0×10^{3}  GV, no such particles were found in the data collected by PAMELA between 2006 and 2009. An upper limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays was therefore set for particles with charge 1≤Z≤8 and mass 4≤A≤1.2×10^{5}. This limit as a function of mass and as a function of magnetic rigidity allows us to constrain models of SQM production and propagation in the Galaxy.

  7. PREFACE: SQM2007 International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafařík, Karel; Šándor, Ladislav; Tomášik, Boris

    2008-04-01

    The International Conference on `Strangeness in Quark Matter' (SQM) was held from 24-29 June 2007 at the Congress Hall of the city cultural centre in the charming mediaeval town of Levoča in north-eastern Slovakia. The Institute of Experimental Physics of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Faculty of Science of the P J Šafárik University in Košice shared the duties of main organizers of the conference. SQM2007 was attended by more than 100 participants from about 20 countries. The natural beauty and the rich cultural and historical monuments of the surrounding Spiš (Scepusium) region created an inspiring setting for the scientific, social and cultural framework of the conference. Continuing the trend started at the SQM2006 conference, heavy flavour physics in heavy-ion collisions was a topic given equal importance in the SQM2007 programme alongside strange quark physics. The Symposium for Students, from Students, organized by Christian Klein-Boesing and Boris Tomášik on the basis of the contributed abstracts, was again an integral and successful part of the conference. The jury, drawn from the organizers, awarded William A Horowitz (Columbia University) the title of best student contribution. The good news is that many students and younger researchers attended the conference. This could not have happened without generous support from our sponsors whom we would like to thank for valuable financial support: CERN, Journal of Physics G, the Prešov self-governing region authorities and the Slovak Physical Society. The kind assistance of the mayor of the town of Levoča is also warmly acknowledged. We would like to extend our gratitude to our colleagues and students from the organizing institutions for their diligent work prior to and during the conference, which ensured that everything worked smoothly. Our special thanks go to our secretaries, Adri Chomičová and Mery Šemš'aková, as well as to the management of the SATEL Hotel in Levoča for their highly

  8. Pair Excitations in Fermi Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Helga M.; Krotscheck, Eckhard; Schörkhuber, Karl; Springer, Josef

    2006-09-01

    We present a theory of multi-pair excitations in strongly interacting Fermi systems. Based on an equations-of-motion approach for time-dependent pair correlations it leads to a qualitatively new structure of the density-density response function. Our theory reduces to both, i) the "correlated" random-phase approximation (RPA) for fermions if the two-pair excitations are ignored, and ii) the correlated Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory for bosons in the appropriate limit. The theory preserves the two first energy-weighted sum rules. A familiar problem of the standard RPA is that its zero-sound mode is energetically much higher than found in experiments. The popular cure of introducing an average effective mass in the Lindhard function violates sum rules and describes the physics incorrectly. We demonstrate that the inclusion of correlated pair excitations gives the correct dispersion. As in 4He, a modification of the effective mass is unnecessary also in 3He.

  9. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: Formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiao; Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-05-01

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift.

  10. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao; Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-05-14

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift. PMID:24832314

  11. The Strange-Antistrange Asymmetry, The NuTeV Measurement and a Peek at Future Prospects.

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.

    2007-12-21

    The strange asymmetry measurement from NuTeV is discussed, followed by a brief look at measurement prospects from other current and future neutrino DIS experiments. The NuTeV measurement of the difference between the strange and antistrange quark distributions from dimuon events utilizes the first complete NLO QCD description of the process. Dimuon events, resulting from the semi-muonic decay of charmed particles produced in charged current neutrino interactions, allow direct study of the strange quark content of the nucleon. NuTeV's sign selected beam produced uniquely pure samples of neutrino and antineutrino initiated dimuon events, allowing independent measurement of the strange and antistrange quark distributions.

  12. Direct observation of the strange b baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panov, G; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-08-01

    We report the first direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi(b)- (Xi(b)+). We reconstruct the decay Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, with J/psi-->mu+mu-, and Xi--->Lambdapi--->ppi-pi- in pp collisions at square root of s =1.96 TeV. Using 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector, we observe 15.2 +/- 4.4(stat)(-0.4)(+1.9)(syst) Xi(b)- candidates at a mass of 5.774 +/- 0.011(stat) +/- 0.015(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.5 sigma, equivalent to a probability of 3.3 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation. Normalizing to the decay Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda, we measure the relative rate sigma(Xi(b-) x B(Xi)b})- -->J/psiXi-)/sigma(Lambda(b)) x B(Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda) = 0.28+/-0.09(stat)(-0.08)(+0.09)(syst). PMID:17930744

  13. The Art of Reflection: Turning the Strange into the Familiar.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Kaethe

    2016-06-01

    There are a great many useful articles on the dynamics and pragmatics of reflecting teams but few articles address what constitutes a good or inept reflection and why. I provide a conceptual model for thinking about what a good reflection does, distinguishing it from a nice reflection. With some further refinements in place, I then illustrate how reflections can be part of any relationship, not just clinical ones. We have opportunities to make them and to recognize when others make them to us. By using examples from my personal life-as a grandmother, daughter, radio listener, cancer survivor, and client-I attempt to ease the personal/professional binary, a project of mine for the last 35 years. In the second part of the article, I address how writing can serve reflection. Although best offered at the moment one is called for, it is never too late for a reflection. Writing allows people to offer reflections after the fact to those who have shared their stories. Sometimes, it is to ourselves we offer those reflections, when the reflector has long since dropped the thread of obligation or interest. I provide an example of working with iconic imagery to unpack meaning so that reflection can eventually take place, allowing integration to proceed, facilitating the strange becoming the familiar. PMID:26118842

  14. HADRON-QUARK CROSSOVER AND MASSIVE HYBRID STARS WITH STRANGENESS

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2013-02-10

    Using the idea of smooth crossover from hadronic matter with hyperons to quark matter with strangeness, we show that the maximum mass (M {sub max}) of neutron stars with quark matter cores can be larger than those without quark matter cores. This is in contrast to the conventional softening of the equation of state due to exotic components at high density. The essential conditions for reaching our conclusion are that (1) the crossover takes place at relatively low densities, around three times the normal nuclear density and (2) the quark matter is strongly interacting in the crossover region. From these, the pressure of the system can be greater than that of purely hadronic matter at a given baryon density in the crossover density region and leads to M {sub max} greater than 2 solar mass. This conclusion is insensitive to the different choice of the hadronic equation of state with hyperons. We remark upon several implications of this result to the nuclear incompressibility, the hyperon mixing, and the neutrino cooling.

  15. Strange Quark Stars as a Probe of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that the observation of old strange quark stars (SQSs) can set important limits on the scattering cross-sections {σ }q between light quarks and non-interacting scalar dark matter (DM). By analyzing a set of 1403 solitary pulsar-like compact stars in the Milky Way, we find that the old solitary pulsar PSR J1801-0857D can set the most stringent upper limits on {σ }q or the cross-sections {σ }p between DM and protons. By converting {σ }q into {σ }p based on effective operator analyses, we show that the resulting {σ }p limit, by assuming PSR J1801-0857D is an SQS, is comparable with that of the current direct detection experiments in terrestrial labs but weaker by several orders of magnitude than that obtained by assuming PSR J1801-0857D is a neutron star (NS), which requires an extremely small {σ }p far beyond the limits of direct detection experiments. Our findings imply that old pulsars are more likely to be identified as SQSs than as NSs in future terrestrial experiments observing scalar DM.

  16. Strange particle production in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, K.G. III

    1996-04-01

    A study has been made of neutral strange baryons and pseudoscalar mesons produced in hadronic decays of the weak gauge boson V. The experiment was performed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, which has the unique capability of colliding highly polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons. Overall production rates and spectra of the K{sup 0} and the {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) were measured and compared with other experiments as well as with Quantum Chromodynamics calculations. The combination of the small, stable beam spots produced by the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) and the precision vertexing capabilities of the SLC Large Detector (SLD) permitted the separation of the hadronic events into three quark flavor-enriched samples. An unfolding was performed to obtain flavor-pure samples, and for the first time measurements were made of K{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) production rates and spectra in uds, c, and b quark events at the Z{sup 0} pole. This measurement revealed significant production differences. Utilizing the large quark production asymmetry due to the polarized electron beam, high-purity quark and antiquark jet samples were obtained. The first measurement of production differences of the {Lambda}{sup 0} baryon in quark and antiquark jets was performed, which provided clear evidence for a leading particle effect at high momenta.

  17. The Art of Reflection: Turning the Strange into the Familiar.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Kaethe

    2016-06-01

    There are a great many useful articles on the dynamics and pragmatics of reflecting teams but few articles address what constitutes a good or inept reflection and why. I provide a conceptual model for thinking about what a good reflection does, distinguishing it from a nice reflection. With some further refinements in place, I then illustrate how reflections can be part of any relationship, not just clinical ones. We have opportunities to make them and to recognize when others make them to us. By using examples from my personal life-as a grandmother, daughter, radio listener, cancer survivor, and client-I attempt to ease the personal/professional binary, a project of mine for the last 35 years. In the second part of the article, I address how writing can serve reflection. Although best offered at the moment one is called for, it is never too late for a reflection. Writing allows people to offer reflections after the fact to those who have shared their stories. Sometimes, it is to ourselves we offer those reflections, when the reflector has long since dropped the thread of obligation or interest. I provide an example of working with iconic imagery to unpack meaning so that reflection can eventually take place, allowing integration to proceed, facilitating the strange becoming the familiar.

  18. PREFACE: SQM2008-International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter SQM2008-International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Xiao, Zhigang; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2009-06-01

    The International Conference on `Strangeness in Quark Matter' (SQM2008) was held from 5-10 October 2008 at the Tsinghua University campus, Beijing, China. The Department of Physics, Tsinghua University and the School of Physics, Central China Normal University (CCNU) shared the organizational duties of this conference. SQM2008 was attended by more than 200 participants from approximately 20 countries. The SQM2008 scientific programme comprised 49 plenary talks in 14 sessions and 36 parallel talks in 4 sessions. Continuing the tradition of the previous conferences, the talks were mainly dedicated to the most recent progress in strangeness, heavy flavour, collective phenomena and particle productions in relativistic nuclear collisions. In addition, the recent status of various projects on SPS, LHC, FAIR and HIRFL-CSR was also reported. Particularly, with their enjoyable presentations, many young students and junior physicists shared their research with the audience. Thirty posts were presented during the five day conference. We would like to express our gratitude to the sponsors for their generous financial support, which allowed many young researchers to attend the conference: Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics, STAR Collaboration, Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), CCNU, Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), China Center of Advanced Science and Technology (CCAST), Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Sandong University (SDU), University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), The Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (TPCSF-CAS). The support from Tsinghua University was especially appreciated. We would also like to extend our gratitude to our colleagues and students from the organizing institutions for their diligent work prior to and during the conference that made everything run smoothly. We thank all the speakers for their inspiring

  19. FFLO strange metal and quantum criticality in two dimensions: Theory and application to organic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Francesco; Zwerger, Wilhelm; Strack, Philipp

    2016-02-01

    Increasing the spin imbalance in superconductors can spatially modulate the gap by forming Cooper pairs with finite momentum. For large imbalances compared to the Fermi energy, the inhomogeneous FFLO superconductor ultimately becomes a normal metal. There is mounting experimental evidence for this scenario in two-dimensional (2D) organic superconductors in large in-plane magnetic fields; this is complemented by ongoing efforts to realize this scenario in coupled tubes of atomic Fermi gases with spin imbalance. Yet, a theory for the phase transition from a metal to an FFLO superconductor has not been developed so far and the universality class has remained unknown. Here we propose and analyze a spin imbalance driven quantum critical point between a 2D metal and an FFLO phase in anisotropic electron systems. We derive the effective action for electrons and bosonic FFLO pairs at this quantum phase transition. Using this action, we predict non-Fermi-liquid behavior and the absence of quasiparticles at a discrete set of hot spots on the Fermi surfaces. This results in strange power laws in thermodynamics and response functions, which are testable with existing experimental setups on 2D organic superconductors and may also serve as signatures of the elusive FFLO phase itself. The proposed universality class is distinct from previously known quantum critical metals and, because its critical fluctuations appear already in the pairing channel, a promising candidate for naked metallic quantum criticality over extended temperature ranges.

  20. Coincidences in analysis: Sigmund Freud and the strange case of Dr Forsyth and Herr von Vorsicht.

    PubMed

    Pierri, Maria

    2010-08-01

    Freud's interest in thought transference opens the possibility for psychoanalytic research on the primary preverbal language and the maternal function, which the emphasis on verbal and paternal communication had hidden in the background of the setting. The author advances a new interpretation of coincidences in analysis and of the psychopathology of everyday life of the setting. Starting from a strange coincidence, new hypotheses are submitted following additional readings of the unpublished manuscript of the 'Forsyth case', recovered by the author, in regard to a significant moment of transformation, both in Freud and in psychoanalysis, at the end of the war. This phase corresponds first to a change of language, from German to English, as well as to the foundation of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis by Ernest Jones. In particular, the roots of the metapsychological turn of the 1920s are explored, together with the opening of private and productive thoughts in the area of 'telepathy' that joined Freud, Ferenczi, and Anna Freud in a true 'dialogue of unconsciouses'. The free association between A Child Is Being Beaten, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, and the clinical experience with 'Herr B.' is outlined in order to understand Freud's heroic self-analysis at the time when he was treating his daughter Anna and grieving the death of his beloved Sophie. PMID:20840637

  1. Coincidences in analysis: Sigmund Freud and the strange case of Dr Forsyth and Herr von Vorsicht.

    PubMed

    Pierri, Maria

    2010-08-01

    Freud's interest in thought transference opens the possibility for psychoanalytic research on the primary preverbal language and the maternal function, which the emphasis on verbal and paternal communication had hidden in the background of the setting. The author advances a new interpretation of coincidences in analysis and of the psychopathology of everyday life of the setting. Starting from a strange coincidence, new hypotheses are submitted following additional readings of the unpublished manuscript of the 'Forsyth case', recovered by the author, in regard to a significant moment of transformation, both in Freud and in psychoanalysis, at the end of the war. This phase corresponds first to a change of language, from German to English, as well as to the foundation of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis by Ernest Jones. In particular, the roots of the metapsychological turn of the 1920s are explored, together with the opening of private and productive thoughts in the area of 'telepathy' that joined Freud, Ferenczi, and Anna Freud in a true 'dialogue of unconsciouses'. The free association between A Child Is Being Beaten, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, and the clinical experience with 'Herr B.' is outlined in order to understand Freud's heroic self-analysis at the time when he was treating his daughter Anna and grieving the death of his beloved Sophie.

  2. Fully Coupled Channel Approach to Doubly Strange s-Shell Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, H.; Shinmura, S.; Akaishi, Y.; Myint, Khin Swe

    2005-05-27

    We describe ab initio calculations of doubly strange, S=-2, s-shell hypernuclei ({sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H, {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He, and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He) as a first attempt to explore the few-body problem of the full-coupled channel scheme for these systems. The wave function includes {lambda}{lambda}, {lambda}{sigma}, N{xi}, and {sigma}{sigma} channels. Minnesota NN, D2{sup '} YN, and simulated YY potentials based on the Nijmegen hard-core model are used. Bound-state solutions of these systems are obtained. We find that a set of phenomenological B{sub 8}B{sub 8} interactions among the octet baryons in S=0,-1, and -2 sectors, which is consistent with all of the available experimental binding energies of S=0,-1, and -2 s-shell (hyper)nuclei, can predict a particle stable bound state of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H. For {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He, {lambda}N-{sigma}N and {xi}N-{lambda}{sigma} potentials significantly affect the net {lambda}{lambda}-N{xi} coupling, and a large {xi} probability is obtained even for a weaker {lambda}{lambda}-N{xi} potential.

  3. A STRANGE STAR SCENARIO FOR THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSAR/HELIUM WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Long; Li, Xiang-Dong; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2015-07-01

    According to the recycling scenario, millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Their orbits are expected to be circular due to tidal interactions during binary evolution, as observed in most binary MSPs. There are some peculiar systems that do not fit this picture. Three recent examples are the PSRs J2234+06, J1946+3417, and J1950+2414, all of which are MSPs in eccentric orbits but with mass functions compatible with expected He white dwarf (WD) companions. It has been suggested these MSPs may have formed from delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive WDs, or the eccentricity may be induced by dynamical interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk. Assuming that the core density of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in LMXBs may reach the density of quark deconfinement, which can lead to phase transition from NSs to strange quark stars, we show that the resultant MSPs are likely to have an eccentric orbit, due to the sudden loss of the gravitational mass of the NS during the transition. The eccentricities can be reproduced with a reasonable estimate of the mass loss. This scenario might also account for the formation of the youngest known X-ray binary Cir X–1, which also possesses a low-field compact star in an eccentric orbit.

  4. Father and son. The origins of Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

    PubMed

    Beattie, H J

    2001-01-01

    In Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson created, out of one of his own dreams, the most famous pre-Freudian case study of the divided self. The present essay explores the roots of that work in Stevenson's lifelong difficulty in separating from his moody, conflicted, and passionately possessive father. Out of a matrix of religious guilt and social conformity, Stevenson struggled to create and define his own identity as a writer, a struggle that ran counter to many of his beloved father's deepest needs and led to sharp clashes, accompanied by periods of severe depressive and physical illness in both. Stevenson's creative block during his father's final depression and dementia was broken only by the nightmare that became Jekyll and Hyde, which enabled him to give enduring literary expression to the disavowed rage, guilt, and sense of deformity and fractured identity endemic to their internalized relationship. It may also have functioned as an act of exorcism and expiation that helped him recover rapidly from his father's death and exploit more productively the few years that were left to him. PMID:12102020

  5. Direct non-Born-Oppenheimer variational calculations of all bound vibrational states corresponding to the first rotational excitation of D{sub 2} performed with explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Kirnosov, Nikita; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-05-07

    Direct variational calculations where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not assumed are done for all rovibrational states of the D{sub 2} molecule corresponding to first excited rotational level (the N = 1 states). All-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions are used in the calculations. The exponential parameters of the Gaussians are optimized with the aid of analytically calculated energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results allow to determine the ortho-para spin isomerization energies as a function of the vibrational quantum number.

  6. Application of unfolded principal component analysis-radial basis function neural network for determination of celecoxib in human serum by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Bahrami, Gholamreza; Abdolmaleki, Sajjad; Sadrjavadi, Komail; Majnooni, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-03-01

    This study describes a simple and rapid approach of monitoring celecoxib (CLX). Unfolded principal component analysis-radial basis function neural network (UPCA-RBFNN) and excitation-emission spectra were combined to develop new model in the determination of CLX in human serum samples. Fluorescence landscapes with excitation wavelengths from 250 to 310 nm and emission wavelengths in the range 280-450 nm were obtained. The figures of merit for the developed model were evaluated. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique was also used as a standard method. Accuracy of the method was investigated by analysis of the serum samples spiked with various concentration of CLX and a recovery of 103.63% was obtained. The results indicated that the proposed method is an interesting alternative to the traditional techniques normally used for determining CLX such as HPLC.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo study of strange correlator in interacting topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Qing; He, Yuan-Yao; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2015-10-01

    Distinguishing the nontrivial symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase from the trivial insulator phase in the presence of electron-electron interaction is an urgent question to the study of topological insulators, due to the fact that most of the topological indices defined for free electron systems are very likely unsuitable for interacting cases. In this work, we demonstrate that the strange correlator is a sensitive diagnosis to detect SPT states in interacting systems. Employing large-scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, we investigate the interaction-driven quantum phase transition in the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model. The transition from the quantum spin Hall insulator at weak interaction to an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator at strong interaction can be readily detected by the momentum space behavior of the strange correlator in single-particle, spin, and pairing sectors. The interaction effects on the symmetry-protected edge states in various sectors, i.e., the helical Luttinger liquid behavior, are well captured in the QMC measurements of strange correlators. Moreover, we demonstrate that the strange correlator is technically easier to implement in QMC and more robust in performance than other proposed numerical diagnoses for interacting topological states, as only static correlations are needed. The attempt in this work paves the way for using the strange correlator to study interaction-driven topological phase transitions in fermionic as well as bosonic systems.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo study of strange correlator in interacting topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Qing; He, Yuan-Yao; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    Distinguishing the nontrivial symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase from the trivial insulator phase in the presence of electron-electron interaction is an urgent question to the study of topological insulators. In this work, we demonstrate that the strange correlator is a sensitive diagnosis to detect SPT states in interacting systems. Employing large-scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, we investigate the interaction-driven quantum phase transition in the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model. The transition from the quantum spin Hall insulator at weak interaction to an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator at strong interaction can be readily detected by the momentum space behavior of the strange correlator in single-particle, spin, and pairing sectors. The interaction e?ects on the symmetry-protected edge states in various sectors are well captured in the QMC measurements of strange correlators. Moreover, we demonstrate that the strange correlator is technically easier to implement in QMC and more robust in performance than other proposed numerical diagnoses for interacting topological states, as only static correlations are needed. The attempt in this work paves the way for using the strange correlator to study interaction-driven topological phase transitions.

  9. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  10. The strange case of the botulinum neurotoxin: using chemistry and biology to modulate the most deadly poison.

    PubMed

    Willis, Bert; Eubanks, Lisa M; Dickerson, Tobin J; Janda, Kim D

    2008-01-01

    In the classic novella "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde", Robert Louis Stevenson paints a stark picture of the duality of good and evil within a single man. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent known toxin, possesses an analogous dichotomous nature: It shows a pronounced morbidity and mortality, but it is used with great effect in much lower doses in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Recently, tremendous strides have been made in the basic understanding of the structure and function of BoNT, which have translated into widespread efforts towards the discovery of biomacromolecules and small molecules that specifically modulate BoNT activity. Particular emphasis has been placed on the identification of inhibitors that can counteract BoNT exposure in the event of a bioterrorist attack. This Review summarizes the current advances in the development of therapeutics, including vaccines, peptides, and small-molecule inhibitors, for the prevention and treatment of botulism. PMID:18844202

  11. Valence excitation energies of alkenes, carbonyl compounds, and azabenzenes by time-dependent density functional theory: Linear response of the ground state compared to collinear and noncollinear spin-flip TDDFT with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isegawa, Miho; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-04-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) holds great promise for studying photochemistry because of its affordable cost for large systems and for repeated calculations as required for direct dynamics. The chief obstacle is uncertain accuracy. There have been many validation studies, but there are also many formulations, and there have been few studies where several formulations were applied systematically to the same problems. Another issue, when TDDFT is applied with only a single exchange-correlation functional, is that errors in the functional may mask successes or failures of the formulation. Here, to try to sort out some of the issues, we apply eight formulations of adiabatic TDDFT to the first valence excitations of ten molecules with 18 density functionals of diverse types. The formulations examined are linear response from the ground state (LR-TDDFT), linear response from the ground state with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDDFT-TDA), the original collinear spin-flip approximation with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation (SF1-TDDFT-TDA), the original noncollinear spin-flip approximation with the TDA approximation (SF1-NC-TDDFT-TDA), combined self-consistent-field (SCF) and collinear spin-flip calculations in the original spin-projected form (SF2-TDDFT-TDA) or non-spin-projected (NSF2-TDDFT-TDA), and combined SCF and noncollinear spin-flip calculations (SF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA and NSF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA). Comparing LR-TDDFT to TDDFT-TDA, we observed that the excitation energy is raised by the TDA; this brings the excitation energies underestimated by full linear response closer to experiment, but sometimes it makes the results worse. For ethylene and butadiene, the excitation energies are underestimated by LR-TDDFT, and the error becomes smaller making the TDA. Neither SF1-TDDFT-TDA nor SF2-TDDFT-TDA provides a lower mean unsigned error than LR-TDDFT or TDDFT-TDA. The comparison between collinear and noncollinear kernels shows that the noncollinear kernel

  12. Strange heterogeneous photoluminescence in the Kokchetav metamorphic diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, S.; Ogasawara, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In the laser Raman spectroscopy of the Kokchetav metamorphic diamonds using an Ar+ laser, the bands at 1400 to 1500 cm-1 were reported as "mysterious" Raman bands because those have strange peak positions as Raman shifts and their distributions measuring 1-3 micrometer space in a diamond were so heterogeneous (Igarashi et al., 2011, Ogasawara et al., 2011a, Ogasawara et al., 2011b, Harada et al., 2011). However, in our later examinations, these 'mysterious' bands at 1400-1500 cm-1 by an Ar+ laser (514.5 nm) were confirmed as photoluminescence (PL) bands at ca. 555-557 nm (we named these 'X-bands') because the spectroscopy using a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) did not show the same bands at the same analyzed positions (Harada and Ogasawara, 2012). These bands were occasionally confirmed in T-type, S-type (core and rim), R-type diamonds in dolomite marble and the diamonds in garnet-biotite gneiss, but not in all grains. In order to understand the detailed characters of these strange PL bands of the Kokchetav diamonds, we conducted laser Raman spectroscopy using both Ar+ and He-Ne lasers with 2D mappings at different depths in a single diamond grain for the same samples and some new samples. The judgment of Raman shift or PL was carried out by comparing two spectra by Ar+ and He-Ne lasers. The laser spot diameter is about 1 μm. In the 2D mappings, diamond grains were scanned with 1 μm X- and Y-intervals at several depths with 2 μm Z-interval. In the Ar+ laser experiments, the PL bands at 637 nm (NV- center) were detected in all types of diamonds in dolomite marble and diamonds in garnet-biotite gneiss. Some grains in dolomite marble showed the PL at 575 nm (NV0 center). These PL were observed throughout whole diamond grains. All intensity maps of PL bands at 637 nm and 575 nm were consistent with the maps of diamond Raman shift at 1332 cm-1. In the 2D maps, however, the 'X-bands' were limited to small domains measuring 1-3 micrometer space in a single diamond grain. In

  13. Silas Weir Mitchell and "The Strange Case of George Dedlow".

    PubMed

    Kline, David G

    2016-07-01

    It has been said of Silas Weir Mitchell (1829-1914) that as a young man he was first among the physiologists of his day, in middle age first among physicians, and as an older man, one of the most noted novelists of his country. Mitchell's novels were written in his later life as a means to avoid boredom during lengthy summer vacations that were the norm for that time among the affluent members of Philadelphia society. These novels were criticized by some because of poor plots, which in some instances failed to move along, or for text that offered a stereotyped depiction of genteel society and the effects that war or personal disaster had on the characters' behavior The criticism came despite the fact that all critics agreed that Mitchell's portrayals of psychopathology in his fictional characters was unique and accurate. However, in his 30s, Mitchell had written and by chance had published a fictional short story that not only transcended such criticisms but became immensely popular. "The Strange Case of George Dedlow" portrays a union officer who was not a physician but who had some medical background and who sustained a series of war wounds leading to severe nerve pain, the author's first description of causalgia, multiple amputations, and the psychological as well as physical symptoms of phantom limb syndrome. The protagonist tells of his torments in the first person in a very engaging fashion. Thus, long before he began writing his, at that time, acclaimed novels in the 1880s, Mitchell wrote a piece of fiction that combines accurate and very important medical observations with fiction of great historical interest. The following rendering of this now classic short story includes selected quotes and some interpretation and is perhaps appropriate for this year, 2 years after the centenary year of his death in 1914.

  14. Strange history: the fall of Rome explained in Hereditas.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Bengt O

    2014-12-01

    In 1921 Hereditas published an article on the fall of Rome written by the famous classical scholar Martin P:son Nilsson. Why was a paper on this unexpected topic printed in the newly founded journal? To Nilsson, the demise of the Roman Empire was explained by the "bastardization" occurring between "races" from different parts of the realm. Offspring from mixed couples were of a less stable "type" than their parents, due to the breaking up by recombination of the original hereditary dispositions, which led to a general loss of competence to rule and govern. Thus, the "hardness" of human genes, together with their recombination, was - according to Nilsson - the main cause of the fall of Rome. Nilsson's argument is not particularly convincingly presented. Human "races" are taken to have the same genetic structure as inbred crop strains, and Nilsson believes in a metaphysical unity between the individual and the race to which it belongs. However, in my view, Martin P:son Nilsson and his friend Herman Nilsson-Ehle had wider aims with the article than to explain a historical event. The article can be read as indicating strong support from the classical human sciences to the ambitious new science of genetics. Support is also transferred from genetics to the conservative worldview, where the immutability and inflexibility of the Mendelian genes are used to strengthen the wish for greater stability in politics and life. The strange article in Hereditas can, thus, be read as an early instance in the - still ongoing - tug-of-war between the conservative and the liberal ideological poles over how genetic results best are socially interpreted.

  15. Strange Latitudinal Variations of the Ammonia Absorption on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejfel, V. G.; Karimov, A. M.; Vdovichenko, V. D.

    2005-08-01

    The ammonia absorption bands at near infrared spectrum of Jupiter are blended with stronger methane absorption and it is hard to study their variations on planetary disk. To extract the ammonia absorption we have used the ratio of Jupiter's spectra to the spectrum of Saturn where the ammonia absorption is very small or absent. Thus we could measure the profile and equivalent widths (W) of the NH3 band at 787 nm as well as the weaker band at 643 nm . More than 200 spectra of Jupiter were recorded in March-May 2004 with spectrograph SGS and CCD-camera ST-7XE at the slit oriented along central meridian or equator. All spectra were processed by this mean. Equatorial spectra show more or less uniform decrease of the NH3 absorption towards both limbs from the disk center. But most of spectra of CM show strange and clearly expressed wide depression of the NH3 band at 787 nm in the temperate latitudes of Northern hemisphere with minimal equivalent widths about 15 A or less when W in Southern hemisphere reach of 20 A or more. We have analyzed all probable artificial reasons of this effect but did not find any influence of instrumental factors. Then we processed a number of Jupiter's spectra recorded in 1997-1998 with other spectrograph and CCD ST-6V and detected the same peculiarity. Finally there were measured 100 zonal spectra ( with slit oriented parallel to equator) scanned all Jupiter's disk from North pole to South pole and recorded 3 May 2005 near upper culmination of the planet. The result is the same: the significant depression of the ammonia absorption in the N-hemisphere of Jupiter is confirmed. We shall continue the study and analysis of this effect to be sure that it is real peculiarity of the gaseous ammonia distribution and behavior on Jupiter.

  16. Silas Weir Mitchell and "The Strange Case of George Dedlow".

    PubMed

    Kline, David G

    2016-07-01

    It has been said of Silas Weir Mitchell (1829-1914) that as a young man he was first among the physiologists of his day, in middle age first among physicians, and as an older man, one of the most noted novelists of his country. Mitchell's novels were written in his later life as a means to avoid boredom during lengthy summer vacations that were the norm for that time among the affluent members of Philadelphia society. These novels were criticized by some because of poor plots, which in some instances failed to move along, or for text that offered a stereotyped depiction of genteel society and the effects that war or personal disaster had on the characters' behavior The criticism came despite the fact that all critics agreed that Mitchell's portrayals of psychopathology in his fictional characters was unique and accurate. However, in his 30s, Mitchell had written and by chance had published a fictional short story that not only transcended such criticisms but became immensely popular. "The Strange Case of George Dedlow" portrays a union officer who was not a physician but who had some medical background and who sustained a series of war wounds leading to severe nerve pain, the author's first description of causalgia, multiple amputations, and the psychological as well as physical symptoms of phantom limb syndrome. The protagonist tells of his torments in the first person in a very engaging fashion. Thus, long before he began writing his, at that time, acclaimed novels in the 1880s, Mitchell wrote a piece of fiction that combines accurate and very important medical observations with fiction of great historical interest. The following rendering of this now classic short story includes selected quotes and some interpretation and is perhaps appropriate for this year, 2 years after the centenary year of his death in 1914. PMID:27364258

  17. Spin-orbit inversion of excited heavy quark mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1997-06-01

    The mesonic heavy quark spin multiplets with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sub l}}=(1/2){sup +} and (3/2){sup +} are expected to be the lowest-lying excitations about the pseudoscalar and vector ground states with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sub l}}=(1/2){sup {minus}}. The author shows that for charm and bottom these multiplets are probably inverted, with the 2{sup +} and 1{sup +} states with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sup l}}=(3/2){sup +} about 150 MeV below the 1{sup +} and 0{sup +} states with s{sub l}{sup {pi}{sub l}}=(1/2){sup +}. If verified, such an inversion would both support the expectation that confinement has no dynamical spin-dependence and indicate that heavy and light quark systems may be characterized by the same effective low-energy degrees of freedom. As an important byproduct, this work establishes the dynamics of the strange quark as a critical link between heavy- and light-quark hadrons, justifying efforts toward a much more complete experimental and theoretical understanding of strange mesons and baryons and of strangeonia.

  18. An Examination of Changes in Emotion Co-Regulation among Mother and Child Dyads during the Strange Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Yuqing; Leu, Szu-Yun; Barnard, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Elaine A.; Spieker, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study applied state-space grid analysis to describe how preschooler-mother dyads co-regulate emotion in the Strange Situation. Second-to-second mother and child affect during pre-separation play (baseline) and the final reunion (post perturbation) episodes of the Strange Situation were coded for 80 dyads. Change in emotion…

  19. Strange nonchaotic oscillations in the quasiperiodically forced Hodgkin-Huxley neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Woochang; Kim, Sang-Yoon

    2009-07-01

    We numerically study dynamical behaviors of the quasiperiodically forced Hodgkin-Huxley neuron and compare the dynamical responses with those for the case of periodic stimulus. In the periodically forced case, a transition from a periodic to a chaotic oscillation was found to occur via period doublings in previous numerical and experimental works. We investigate the effect of the quasiperiodic forcing on this period-doubling route to chaotic oscillation. In contrast to the case of periodic forcing, a new type of strange nonchaotic (SN) oscillating states (that are geometrically strange but have no positive Lyapunov exponents) is found to exist between the regular and chaotic oscillating states as intermediate ones. Their strange fractal geometry leads to aperiodic 'complex' spikings. Various dynamical routes to SN oscillations are identified, as in the quasiperiodically forced logistic map. These SN spikings are expected to be observed in experiments of the quasiperiodically forced squid giant axon.

  20. Strangeness in the Nucleon, Cold Dark Matter in the Universe, and Neutrino Scattering off Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Papavassiliou, V.

    2010-03-30

    The strangeness content of the nucleon and the contribution of strange quarks to various nucleon quantum numbers, besides being of fundamental interest, also affects calculations of cross sections of processes that are important in searches for new physics. Here we focus on direct searches for cold dark matter, in the scenario in which the lightest supersymmetric neutral particle dominates the CDM density in the universe and point out that interpretation of searches, as well as the choice of optimal materials for future experiments, are hobbled by uncertainties in the contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon spin. We show how a future low-energy neutrino experiment using a liquid-Ar TPC can make important contributions in determining this quantity with much better precision and reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  1. Strange star admitting Chaplygin equation of state in Finch-Skea spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali

    2015-10-01

    In the present paper we propose a new model of an anisotropic strange star which admits the Chaplygin equation of state. The exterior spacetime is described by a Schwarzschild line element. The model is developed by assuming the Finch-Skea ansatz (Finch and Skea in Class. Quantum Gravity 6:467, 1989. We obtain the model parameters in closed form. Our model is free from a central singularity. Choosing some particular values for the parameter we show that our model corroborates the observational data of the strange star PSR J1614-2230 (Gangopadhyay et al. in Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 431:3216, 2013.

  2. Nucleon sigma term and strange quark content from lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ohki, H.; Fukaya, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Yamada, N.; Matsufuru, H.; Noaki, J.; Shintani, E.; Onogi, T.

    2008-09-01

    We calculate the nucleon sigma term in two-flavor lattice QCD utilizing the Feynman-Hellman theorem. Both sea and valence quarks are described by the overlap fermion formulation, which preserves exact chiral and flavor symmetries on the lattice. We analyze the lattice data for the nucleon mass using the analytical formulae derived from the baryon chiral perturbation theory. From the data at valence quark mass set different from sea quark mass, we may extract the sea quark contribution to the sigma term, which corresponds to the strange quark content. We find that the strange quark content is much smaller than the previous lattice calculations and phenomenological estimates.

  3. Rank One Strange Attractors in Periodically Kicked Predator-Prey System with Time-Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjie; Lin, Yiping; Dai, Yunxian; Zhao, Huitao

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the problem of rank one strange attractor in a periodically kicked predator-prey system with time-delay. Our discussion is based on the theory of rank one maps formulated by Wang and Young. Firstly, we develop the rank one chaotic theory to delayed systems. It is shown that strange attractors occur when the delayed system undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and encounters an external periodic force. Then we use the theory to the periodically kicked predator-prey system with delay, deriving the conditions for Hopf bifurcation and rank one chaos along with the results of numerical simulations.

  4. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering and the Electric and Magnetic Strange Form Factors of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David S.; McKeown, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Measurement of the neutral weak vector form factors of the nucleon provides unique access to the strange quark content of the nucleon. These form factors can be studied using parity-violating electron scattering. A comprehensive program of experiments has been performed at three accelerator laboratories to determine the role of strange quarks in the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon. This article reviews the remarkable technical progress associated with this program, describes the various methods used in the different experiments, and summarizes the physics results along with recent theoretical calculations.

  5. Determination of strange sea quark distributions from fixed-target and collider data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Caminada, L.; Lipka, K.; Lohwasser, K.; Moch, S.; Petti, R.; PlačakytÄ--, R.

    2015-05-01

    We present an improved determination of the strange sea distribution in the nucleon with constraints coming from the recent charm production data in neutrino-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering by the NOMAD and CHORUS experiments and from charged current inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at HERA. We demonstrate that the results are consistent with the data from the ATLAS and the CMS experiments on the associated production of W± -bosons with c -quarks. We also discuss issues related to the recent strange sea determination by the ATLAS experiment using LHC collider data.

  6. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Awamleh, L; Pun, H; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2015-04-01

    Acute inflammatory dental pain is a prevalent condition often associated with limited jaw movements. Mustard oil (MO, a small-fiber excitant/inflammatory irritant) application to the rat molar tooth pulp induces increased excitability (i.e., central sensitization) of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons that can be modulated by MDH application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO). The objectives of the study were to determine whether MO application to the rat right maxillary first molar tooth pulp affects left face-M1 excitability manifested as altered intracortical microstimulation thresholds for evoking electromyographic activity in the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle), and whether MSO application to face-M1 can modulate this MO effect. Under Ketamine general anesthesia, Sprague-Dawley male rats had a microelectrode positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) face-M1 site. Then MO (n = 16) or control solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed tooth pulp, and RAD threshold was monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or saline (n = 8) was then applied to the face-M1, and RAD thresholds were monitored every 15 min for 120 min. ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni was used to analyze data (p < 0.05). Within 15 min of MO (but not control) pulp application, RAD thresholds increased significantly (p < 0.001) as compared to baseline. One hour following MSO (but not saline) application to the face-M1, RAD thresholds decreased significantly (p = 0.005) toward baseline. These novel findings suggest that acute inflammatory dental pain is associated with decreased face-M1 excitability that may be dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes and related to mechanisms underlying limited jaw movements in acute orofacial pain conditions. PMID:25618005

  7. Does anodal transcranial direct current stimulation enhance excitability of the motor cortex and motor function in healthy individuals and subjects with stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bastani, A; Jaberzadeh, S

    2012-04-01

    The primary aim of this review is to evaluate the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) on corticomotor excitability and motor function in healthy individuals and subjects with stroke. The secondary aim is to find a-tDCS optimal parameters for its maximal effects. Electronic databases were searched for studies into the effect of a-tDCS when compared to no stimulation. Studies which met the inclusion criteria were assessed and methodological quality was examined using PEDro and Downs and Black (D&B) assessment tools. Data from seven studies revealed increase in corticomotor excitability with a small but significant effect size (0.31 [0.14, 0.48], p=0.0003) in healthy subjects and data from two studies in subjects with stroke indicated significant results with moderate effect size (0.59 [0.24, 0.93], p=0.001) in favor of a-tDCS. Likewise, studies examining motor function demonstrated a small and non-significant effect (0.39 [-0.17, 0.94], p=0.17) in subjects with stroke and a large but non-significant effect (0.92 [-1.02, 2.87], p=0.35) in healthy subjects in favor of improvement in motor function. The results also indicate that efficacy of a-tDCS is dependent on current density and duration of application. A-tDCS increases corticomotor excitability in both healthy individuals and subjects with stroke. The results also show a trend in favor of motor function improvement following a-tDCS. A-tDCS is a non-invasive, cheap and easy-to-apply modality which could be used as a stand-alone technique or as an adds-on technique to enhance corticomotor excitability and the efficacy of motor training approaches. However, the small sample size of the included studies reduces the strength of the presented evidences and any conclusion in this regard should be considered cautiously.

  8. Nuclear model analysis of excitation functions of proton induced reactions on ⁸⁶Sr, ⁸⁸Sr and natZr: Evaluation of production routes of ⁸⁶Y.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjed, N; Qaim, S M

    2015-10-01

    The proton induced nuclear reactions on (86)Sr, (88)Sr and (nat)Zr were investigated for the production of (86)Y. The literature data were compared with the results of nuclear model calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2. The thick target yields of (86)Y were calculated from the recommended excitation functions. Analysis of radioyttrium impurities was also performed. A comparison of the various production routes showed that for medical applications of (86)Y, the reaction (86)Sr(p,n)(86)Y is the method of choice, which gives efficient yield with minimum impurities. PMID:26210800

  9. Does anodal transcranial direct current stimulation enhance excitability of the motor cortex and motor function in healthy individuals and subjects with stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bastani, A; Jaberzadeh, S

    2012-04-01

    The primary aim of this review is to evaluate the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) on corticomotor excitability and motor function in healthy individuals and subjects with stroke. The secondary aim is to find a-tDCS optimal parameters for its maximal effects. Electronic databases were searched for studies into the effect of a-tDCS when compared to no stimulation. Studies which met the inclusion criteria were assessed and methodological quality was examined using PEDro and Downs and Black (D&B) assessment tools. Data from seven studies revealed increase in corticomotor excitability with a small but significant effect size (0.31 [0.14, 0.48], p=0.0003) in healthy subjects and data from two studies in subjects with stroke indicated significant results with moderate effect size (0.59 [0.24, 0.93], p=0.001) in favor of a-tDCS. Likewise, studies examining motor function demonstrated a small and non-significant effect (0.39 [-0.17, 0.94], p=0.17) in subjects with stroke and a large but non-significant effect (0.92 [-1.02, 2.87], p=0.35) in healthy subjects in favor of improvement in motor function. The results also indicate that efficacy of a-tDCS is dependent on current density and duration of application. A-tDCS increases corticomotor excitability in both healthy individuals and subjects with stroke. The results also show a trend in favor of motor function improvement following a-tDCS. A-tDCS is a non-invasive, cheap and easy-to-apply modality which could be used as a stand-alone technique or as an adds-on technique to enhance corticomotor excitability and the efficacy of motor training approaches. However, the small sample size of the included studies reduces the strength of the presented evidences and any conclusion in this regard should be considered cautiously. PMID:21978654

  10. Impedimetric Sensing Proprieties of ITO Electrodes Functionalized with PEDOT:PSS/Azo-Calix[4]Arene for the Detection of Al3+ Ions Under Light Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echabaane, M.; Rouis, A.; Mahjoub, M. A.; Bonnamour, I.; Ben Ouada, H.

    2016-08-01

    This study describes an investigation of the sensitivity of the azo-calix[4]arene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly-(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin film deposited on the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface toward aluminum ions (Al3+) under light excitation. Thin films were deposited by the spin-coating technique. Adhesion of these films to the ITO surface was highlighted by performing contact angle measurements. Then, interfaces of the azo-calix[4]arene/PEDOT:PSS thin film were characterized by impedance measurements using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Obtained impedance spectra were fitted using an equivalent circuit. Finally, evolutions of the different components of this circuit were studied. These evolutions show that the sensitivity of the azo-calix[4]arene/PEDOT:PSS/ITO electrode is remarkably improved under illumination.

  11. Experimental study of excitation functions for the deuteron induced reactions 64Zn(d,2p)64Cu and 64Zn(d,alphan)61Cu using the stacked-foil technique.

    PubMed

    Daraban, L; Abbas, K; Simonelli, F; Adam-Rebeles, R; Gibson, N

    2008-02-01

    There is considerable, and growing, interest in the 64Cu radioisotope for application in Nuclear Medicine for PET imaging and targeted radiotherapy of tumours. We are investigating the cyclotron production of this isotope by way of deuteron bombardment of enriched 64Zn target material. In this study, experimental excitation functions for both the 64Zn(d,2p)64Cu and 64Zn(d,alphan)61Cu reactions up to 18.2 MeV deuteron energy have been measured using the stacked-foil technique. The deuteron energies in the various foils were calculated with the SRIM 2003 code and gamma-ray spectrometry was used to measure the activities of the various radioisotopes produced. Monitor foils were used to determine the deuteron beam current on the target stack. Theoretical excitation functions, calculated both with the Empire II code and with an updated version of the Alice code, were compared with the experimental results and a reasonable agreement was found. The experimental work was performed at the MC40 Cyclotron at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre at Ispra, Italy.

  12. Aspects of excited baryon phenomenology in the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2010-11-12

    We report on the application of the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD to the description of the properties of non-strange excited baryons belonging to the [70, 1{sup -}]-plet. In particular, we present the results of an improved determination of the corresponding mixing angles obtained by performing a simultaneous fit of masses and strong decay widths. We find {theta}{sub 1} 0.47{+-}0.06 and {theta}{sub 3} = 2.74{+-}0.07. These values are within the range of those determined in previous non-global analyses but have smaller uncertainties.

  13. Using the Moon and Mars as Giant Detectors for Strange Quark Nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin; Strayer, Don; Banerdt, Bruce; Tepliz, Vigdor; Herrin, Eugene

    2004-01-01

    On the Earth, the detectability of small seismic signals is limited by pervasive seismic background noise, caused primarily by interactions of the atmosphere and oceans with the solid surface. Mars, with a very thin atmosphere and no ocean is expected to have a noise level at least an order of magnitude lower than the Earth, and the airless Moon is even quieter still. These pristine low-vibration environments are ideal for searching for nuggets of "strange quark matter." Strange quark matter was postulated by Edward Witten [Phys. Rev. D30, 272, 1984] as the lowest possible energy state of matter. It would be made of up, down, and strange quarks, instead of protons and neutrons made only of up and down quarks. It would have nuclear densities, and hence be difficult to detect. Micron-sized nuggets would weigh in the ton range. As suggested by de Rujula and Glashow [Nature 312 (5996): 734, 1984], a massive strange quark nugget can generate a trail of seismic waves, as it traverses a celestial body. We discuss the mission concept for deploying a network of sensitive seismometers on Mars and on the Moon for such a search.

  14. Making the Familiar Strange: Creative Cultural Storytelling within the Communication Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinne, Kristen C.

    2012-01-01

    In this activity, students employ mock campfire storytelling to "make the familiar strange" in the same spirit as Horace Miner's (1956) classic tale of the "Nacirema." Students work individually, in pairs, or as small groups (around three) to create a whimsical story that deconstructs a mundane, everyday ritual (event, activity, practice) into a…

  15. Search for S = - 1 strange dibaryons by means of the reaction pp → K+X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frascaria, R.

    An experimental search for strange S = - 1 dibaryons, performed at Saturne National Laboratory by means of pp → K+X is described. The experimental status and the theoretical previsions are presented first. A presentation of our preliminary results is then given , with a discussion on further developments.

  16. Learning Science in an Era of Globalization: A Phenomenology of the Foreign/Strange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, SungWon; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we propose a set of concepts for conceptualizing issues of learning science related to globalization, the encounter with the (radically) foreign/strange--as this occurs as part of migration and even as part of the encounter of a learner with the unknown content that science lessons are to impart--from the perspective of the…

  17. Curvature energy effects on strange quark matter nucleation at finite density

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Department of Space Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251 )

    1994-05-15

    We consider the effects of the curvature energy term on thermal strange quark matter nucleation in dense neutron matter. Lower bounds on the temperature at which this process can take place are given and compared to those without the curvature term.

  18. Impact of strange quark matter nuggets on pycnonuclear reaction rates in the crusts of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Golf, B.; Hellmers, J.; Weber, F.

    2009-07-15

    This article presents an investigation into the pycnonuclear reaction rates in dense crustal matter of neutron stars contaminated with strange quark matter nuggets. The presence of such nuggets in the crustal matter of neutron stars would be a natural consequence if Witten's strange quark matter hypothesis is correct. The methodology presented in this article is a recreation of a recent representation of nuclear force interactions embedded within pycnonuclear reaction processes. The study then extends the methodology to incorporate distinctive theoretical characteristics of strange quark matter nuggets, like their low charge-per-baryon ratio, and then assesses their effects on the pycnonuclear reaction rates. Particular emphasis is put on the impact of color superconductivity on the reaction rates. Depending on whether quark nuggets are in this novel state of matter, their electric charge properties vary drastically, which turns out to have a dramatic effect on the pycnonuclear reaction rates. Future nuclear fusion network calculations may thus have the potential to shed light on the existence of strange quark matter nuggets and on whether they are in a color superconducting state, as suggested by QCD.

  19. Silent Films and Strange Stories: Theory of Mind, Gender, and Social Experiences in Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Rory T.; Hughes, Claire

    2013-01-01

    In this study of two hundred and thirty 8- to 13-year-olds, a new "Silent Films" task is introduced, designed to address the dearth of research on theory of mind in older children by providing a film-based analogue of F. G. E. Happe's (1994) Strange Stories task. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that all items from both tasks loaded onto a…

  20. Learning the Spelling of Strange Words in Dutch Benefits from Regularized Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosman, Anna M. T.; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2006-01-01

    In two experiments, the authors tested the effect of two types of reading on the spelling memory of strange or sound-spelling inconsistent words in Dutch students with and without learning disabilities: standard reading and regularized reading. Standard reading refers to reading the word the way it has to be read. Regularized reading refers to…

  1. Effect of strangeness for neutrino (antineutrino) scattering in the quasi-elastic region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Yu, Byung Geel; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2008-05-15

    We present the neutral- and charged-current reactions by incident neutrino (antineutrino) scattering on the nucleon and on the {sup 12}C target in the quasi-elastic region within the framework of a relativistic single-particle model. The incident energies at 500 MeV and 1 GeV are used for the scattering. Effects of strangeness are studied thoroughly on the cross sections, the ratios between the neutral- and charged-current reactions, and the asymmetries by incident neutrino and antineutrino. We find that there exists some cancellation of the strange quark contributions between the knocked-out protons and neutrons in the neutrino (antineutrino)-nucleus scattering. The effect of strangeness is exhibited more strongly on the asymmetry than on the ratio or cross section. On a difference of the asymmetry, the effect of strangeness appears strongly, but on a summation of the asymmetry, the effect almost disappears in the low and middle kinetic energies of the knocked-out nucleon.

  2. On Mature Reflection: "Strange Objects" and the Cultivation of Reflective Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyde, Emma

    2000-01-01

    Examines Gary Crew's novel written for a young adult audience, called "Strange Objects," a story containing verifiable historical fact interwoven with elements of fiction and the supernatural. Shows how the numerous genres and viewpoints in the book challenge and contradict one another, forcing young readers to perform resistant readings and to…

  3. Are We Losing the Next Generation? A Strange Experience on a Poetry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, David

    1981-01-01

    Examining the attitudes and behaviors of his adolescent students in rural Yorkshire, the author finds in them a strange lack of respect for adults, which he attributes to disruptions of consciousness caused by the constant bombardment of pop music and television. Two other authors comment on pp128-30. (SJL)

  4. Multidimensional first and second order symmetric strang splitting for hyperbolic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharik, Milan; Wendroff, Burton

    2008-01-01

    We propose an algebraic basis for symmetric Strang splitting for first and second order accurate schemes for hyperbolic systems in N dimensions. Examples are given for two and three dimensions. Optimal stability is shown for symmetric systems. Lack of strong stability is shown for a non-symmetric example. Some numerical examples are presented for some Euler-like constant coefficient problems.

  5. Beyond Capital High: On Dual Citizenship and the Strange Career of "Acting White"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordham, Signithia

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I reflect on the strange career of the "burden of "acting White"" since it attracted widespread popular and academic attention over 20 years ago. I begin by noting that my original definition of "the burden of "acting White"" should not be confused with a prominent misconception of the problem as the "fear" of "acting White." I…

  6. Strange Bedfellows: The Contradictory Goals of the Coalition Making War on Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the contradictory goals of several groups and individuals that are waging war against social studies and the historians' attitudes in response to this war. He stresses that he is not claiming that these "strange bedfellows," as he comes to call them, that are attacking social studies are working in collusion…

  7. Experimental studies of the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction including decay properties and excitation function for isotopes of element 117, and discovery of the new isotope 277Mt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Alexander, C.; Binder, J.; Boll, R. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Ezold, J.; Felker, K.; Gostic, J. M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Henderson, R. A.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Moody, K. J.; Polyakov, A. N.; Ramayya, A. V.; Roberto, J. B.; Ryabinin, M. A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Stoyer, M. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Voinov, A. A.; Vostokin, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    Studies of superheavy nuclei produced in the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction were performed using the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator. The cross section for the production of 293117 and 294117 isotopes was measured at five excitation energies of the 297117 compound nucleus ranging from 30 to 48 MeV and yielding maximum values of 1.1-0.6+1.2 pb for the 3n and 2.4-1.4+3.3 pb for the 4n reaction channels. Alpha emission from 281Rg competing with spontaneous fission (α/SF decay probability 1:9) was observed for the first time leading to the identification of the new isotope 277Mt (TSF≈5 ms). The measured decay properties are in good agreement with those expected based on the properties of neighboring even-Z and odd-Z nuclei. The α energies and half-lives of odd-Z isotopes observed in the 293117 and 294117 decay chains together with results obtained for lower-Z superheavy nuclei demonstrate enhanced stability with increasing neutron number toward the predicted new magic number N=184.

  8. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  9. A Strange Supernova with a Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-10-01

    Important Observations with La Silla Telescopes Several articles appear today in the scientific journal Nature about the strange supernova SN 1998bw that exploded earlier this year in the spiral galaxy ESO184-G82 . These studies indicate that this event was linked to a Gamma-Ray Burst and may thus provide new insights into this elusive phenomenon. Important observations of SN 1998bw have been made with several astronomical telescopes at the ESO La Silla Observatory by some of the co-authors of the Nature articles [1]. The measurements at ESO will continue during the next years. The early observations On April 25, the BeppoSAX satellite detected a Gamma-Ray Burst from the direction of the constellation Telescopium, deep in the southern sky. Although there is now general consensus that they originate in very distant galaxies, the underlying physical causes of these events that release great amounts of energy within seconds are still puzzling astronomers. Immediately after reports about the April 25 Burst had been received, astronomers at La Silla took some images of the sky region where the gamma-rays were observed as a "Target of Opportunity" (ToO) programme. The aim was to check if the visual light of one of the objects in the field had perhaps brightened when compared to exposures made earlier. This would then provide a strong indication of the location of the Gamma-Ray Burst. The digital exposures were transferred to the Italian/Dutch group around BeppoSax that had requested these ToO observations. Astronomers of this group quickly noticed a new, comparatively bright star, right on the arm of a small spiral galaxy. This galaxy was first catalogued in the 1970's during the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the Southern Sky and received the designation ESO184-G82 . It is located at a distance of about 140 million light-years. SN 1998bw ESO PR Photo 39a/98 ESO PR Photo 39a/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 963 pix - 592k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3612 pix - 4.1Mb] ESO PR Photo 39b/98

  10. Operant conditioning to increase ankle control or decrease reflex excitability improves reflex modulation and walking function in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Manella, Kathleen J; Roach, Kathryn E; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2013-06-01

    Ankle clonus is common after spinal cord injury (SCI) and is attributed to loss of supraspinally mediated inhibition of soleus stretch reflexes and maladaptive reorganization of spinal reflex pathways. The maladaptive reorganization underlying ankle clonus is associated with other abnormalities, such as coactivation and reciprocal facilitation of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL), which contribute to impaired walking ability in individuals with motor-incomplete SCI. Operant conditioning can increase muscle activation and decrease stretch reflexes in individuals with SCI. We compared two operant conditioning-based interventions in individuals with ankle clonus and impaired walking ability due to SCI. Training included either voluntary TA activation (TA↑) to enhance supraspinal drive or SOL H-reflex suppression (SOL↓) to modulate reflex pathways at the spinal cord level. We measured clonus duration, plantar flexor reflex threshold angle, timed toe tapping, dorsiflexion (DF) active range of motion, lower extremity motor scores (LEMS), walking foot clearance, speed and distance, SOL H-reflex amplitude modulation as an index of reciprocal inhibition, presynaptic inhibition, low-frequency depression, and SOL-to-TA clonus coactivation ratio. TA↑ decreased plantar flexor reflex threshold angle (-4.33°) and DF active range-of-motion angle (-4.32°) and increased LEMS of DF (+0.8 points), total LEMS of the training leg (+2.2 points), and nontraining leg (+0.8 points), and increased walking foot clearance (+ 4.8 mm) and distance (+12.09 m). SOL↓ decreased SOL-to-TA coactivation ratio (-0.21), increased nontraining leg LEMS (+1.8 points), walking speed (+0.02 m/s), and distance (+6.25 m). In sum, we found increased voluntary control associated with TA↑ outcomes and decreased reflex excitability associated with SOL↓ outcomes.

  11. 16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER AT REAR; UNUSED WATER-DRIVEN EXCITER IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. Excitation energies from ensemble DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgoo, Alex; Teale, Andy M.; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-12-01

    We study the evaluation of the Gross-Oliveira-Kohn expression for excitation energies E1-E0=ɛ1-ɛ0+∂E/xc,w[ρ] ∂w | ρ =ρ0. This expression gives the difference between an excitation energy E1 - E0 and the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbital energy difference ɛ1 - ɛ0 as a partial derivative of the exchange-correlation energy of an ensemble of states Exc,w[ρ]. Through Lieb maximisation, on input full-CI density functions, the exchange-correlation energy is evaluated accurately and the partial derivative is evaluated numerically using finite difference. The equality is studied numerically for different geometries of the H2 molecule and different ensemble weights. We explore the adiabatic connection for the ensemble exchange-correlation energy. The latter may prove useful when modelling the unknown weight dependence of the exchange-correlation energy.

  13. Faraday Waves under Time-Reversed Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)PLEEE81539-3755]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  14. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  15. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  16. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism. PMID:23635123

  17. Bulk viscosity of strange quark matter in a density-dependent quark mass model and dissipation of the r mode in strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Xiaoping; Liu Xuewen; Kang Miao; Yang Shuhua

    2004-07-01

    We study the bulk viscosity of the strange quark matter in the density-dependent quark mass model (DDQM) under the background of self-consistent thermodynamics. The correct formula of the viscosity is derived. We also find that the viscosity in the DDQM is larger by two to three orders of magnitude than that in MIT bag model. We calculate the damping time scale due to the coupling of the viscosity and r mode. The numerical results show that the time scale cannot be shorter than 10{sup -1} s.

  18. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  19. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  20. Comparing modern measurements of the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C excitation function with previous values

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Kevin W.; Massey, Thomas N.; Ingram, David C.

    2013-04-19

    A possible means of active interrogation of special nuclear materials is detection of signature emissions following induced photofission. This method requires a probe gamma-ray beam to induce the photofission. The {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction is a candidate for the source of this probe beam. The reaction is prolific and the produced 15.1 MeV gamma-ray is close to a photofission cross-section peak for {sup 235,238}U and {sup 238,239}Pu. In order to model an active interrogation system using the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction as a source probe an accurate value for its differential crosssection must be included in data libraries. Measurements of the differential cross-section for the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction have been carried out with a BGO detector and found to differ from previous measurements reported by Kavanagh (1958) and Kuan (1964). The discrepancy in the measurements may be explained by examining the detector response function used by Kavanagh and presumably Kuan to that modeled with MCNP5. A comparison of the MCNP5 and Kavanagh detector response functions normalized to the 15.1 MeV gamma-ray peak pulse height shows a factor of approximately 1.7 difference in integrated counts. Applying this correction to the differential cross-section previously reported by Kuan brings the values into agreement, within uncertainties, to the more recent measurements. The evaluation of the detector response function for the 15.1 MeV gamma-ray signal in the NaI detector reported by Kavanagh to that modeled by MCNP5 is shown. This result is applied to the comparison of recent measurements on the {sup 11}B(d,n{gamma}{sub 15.1}){sup 12}C reaction differential cross-section to those previously reported.