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Sample records for stratigraphy sedimentology age

  1. Reading and Abstracting Journal Articles in Sedimentology and Stratigraphy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Susan Howes

    1991-01-01

    An assignment centered on reading journal articles and writing abstracts is an effective way to improve student reading and writing skills in sedimentology and stratigraphy laboratories. Each student reads two articles and writes informative abstracts from the author's point of view. (PR)

  2. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Sturgeon Lake field, Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Mederos, S.M.; Moslow, T.F.

    1996-08-01

    This study examines the sedimentology, sequence stratigraphy and reservoir characterization of the Lower Triassic Montney Formation in the Sturgeon Lake field located in west-central Alberta. The Montney Formation is grouped into two facies associations. Facies Association 1 is a siliciclastic upward-coarsening sequence deposited by storm, current and wave processes and is interpreted as a low energy progradational lower shoreface. Facies Association 2 is a carbonate shallowing upward sequence deposited in a wave dominated progradational shoreface. The contact between Facies Association 1 and 2 is marked by a major change in lithology and is erosive. Palynological analyses reveal two missing palynologic subzones between Facies Association 1 and Facies Association 2 suggesting a period of erosion and/or nondeposition. The boundary between the two facies association is defined as a sequence boundary which stratigraphically divides the Montney Formation into two sequences in the study area. The Lower Montney sequence is composed of eight retrogradational, aggradational and progradational parasequences and represent the Transgressive and the High-stand System Tract. The Upper Montney sequence is composed only of one parasequence and represents the Transgressive System Tract. The Sturgeon Lake Field has two types of reservoir with respect to lithology, porosity, permeability and geometry. The best reservoir facies is a brachiopod wackestone-packstone with permeabilities up to 8 Darcys. Siliciclastic reservoirs consist of very fine grained sandstones with permeabilities of 132 md when fractured.

  3. The Jurassic of Svalbard, Sedimentology, Stratigraphy and Paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koevoets, Maayke; Hammer, Øyvind

    2014-05-01

    During the Mesozoic the landmass now known as Svalbard drifted from 45oN to 65oN. The average global temperature was significantly higher, disabling the formation of icecaps at the poles, resulting in a higher sea-level. At the time the location now known as Svalbard was covered by a shallow ocean and mostly marine, organic rich, black shales, interrupted by possibly deltaic sediments were deposited. These sediments are rich in invertebrate fossils. A general description of the Agardhfjellet formation, spanning the middle to upper Jurassic, was made by Dypvik in 1991. Wierzbowski (1989) described some ammonites in detail from the Kimmeridgian. It is not known if the fauna extends further up or down in the formation. Since 2004 the Museum of Natural History of Oslo has been active in Spitsbergen Svalbard. Extensive and detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic research was never conducted as the focus lay on vertebrate fossils. A detailed sedimentological analysis, description and correlation to other Jurassic Formations (such as the Kimmeridge Shales, Hekkingen Formation and draupne Formation) is essential to better understand the circumstances where the black organic-rich shales (a highly potential source rock) were deposited in and to be able to predict their occurrences. Included in this description is taxonomy, taphonomy and the stratigraphic development of invertebrate fauna to pinpoint the age of the sediments.

  4. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the upper Proterozoic Kingston Peak Formation, Panamint Range, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M. G.

    The Kingston Peak Formation was deposited under glacial conditions with contemporaneous volcanism and tectonic activity. Sedimentation in the Panamint Range was on the continental shelf and locally terrestrial. Two ice advances are recorded with associated sea level fluctuations. Striated stones and dropstones in the formation east of Death Valley support this interpretation. Data were collected during mapping of parts of the Manly Peak and Telescope Peak quadrangles; eight stratigraphic sections between Goler Wash and Wildrose Canyon were measured and sedimentologic observations were made in intervening areas and east of Death Valley. Interbedded pillow basalt demonstrates subaqueous volcanism. Overlying laminated limestone marks a transgression. Succeeding interbedded limestone, graded graywacke and siltstone double in thickness over a few kilometers demonstrates local subsidence and renewed terrigenous input. Trough cross laminated arkosic sandstone overlain by diamicite, with a locally erosive base, represent glaciofluvial deposits and lodgement till recording the second ice advance. The stratigraphy and thickness of the formation are variable across the Death Valley region and alternative correlation schemes exist. A coherent stratigraphy among ranges southeast of Death Valley supports severe Cenozoic extension, but elsewhere constraints on palinspastic reconstructions are restricted by stratigraphic variation. Deposition was in local basins with nearby source areas during incipient continental rifting.

  5. Sedimentology and carbon-isotope stratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous Chalk Group in the Höllviken-1 core (SW Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøttger, Dorthe; Thibault, Nicolas; Anderskouv, Kresten

    2016-04-01

    The Höllviken-1 borehole is situated on the Skåne peninsula (SW Sweden) which was part of the Danish Basin in the Late Cretaceous. 1415 meters have been cored among which ca. 1100 meters cover the complete Upper Cretaceous to lower Danian Chalk Group. Besides the publication of a synthetic log and detailed foraminifer biozonation, supplemented by a number of rare macrofossil findings and description of a number of foraminifer holotypes (Brötzen, 1944), very few studies of the core have actually been performed, since the mid 1940s. A new project has thus been undertaken aiming at improving the stratigraphy of the Chalk Group in the Höllviken-1 core. The data presented here comprise the description of the interval 837-489 m covering a large part of the Campanian and the lower Maastrichtian. Two intervals with the presence of sand are noted in the Campanian and two intervals showing possibly progradational sequences of arenaceous marls to sand are present in the Maastrichtian. The purpose of this new study is to revise the foraminifer biostratigraphy of Brötzen and complement it with high-resolution carbon-isotope stratigraphy in order to establish a new age-model for the core and better constrain the timing of siliciclastic input into the Danish Basin. In addition, high-resolution sedimentological data will be used as a preliminary test for cyclostratigraphy of the chalk-marl intervals.

  6. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and eruptive mechanisms in the tuff cone of El Golfo (Lanzarote, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Martí, Joan; Geyer, Adelina

    2013-07-01

    The tuff cone of El Golfo on the western coast of Lanzarote (Canary Islands) is a typical hydrovolcanic edifice. Along with other edifices of the same age, it was constructed along a fracture oriented NEE-SWW that coincides with the main structural trend of recent volcanism in this part of the island. We conducted a detailed stratigraphic study of the succession of deposits present in this tuff cone and here interpret them in light of the depositional processes and eruptive dynamics that we were able to infer. The eruptive sequence is represented by a succession of pyroclastic deposits, most of which were emplaced by flow, plus a number of air-fall deposits and ballistic blocks and bombs. We distinguished five different eruptive/depositional stages on the basis of differences in inferred current flow regimes and fragmentation efficiencies represented by the resulting deposits; the different stages may be related to variations in the explosive energy. Eight lithofacies were identified based on sedimentary discontinuities, grain size, components, variations in primary laminations and bedforms. The volcanic edifice was constructed very rapidly around the vent, and this is inferred to have controlled the amount of water that was able to enter the eruption conduit. The sedimentological characteristics of the deposits and the nature and distribution of palagonitic alteration suggest that most of the pyroclastic succession in El Golfo was deposited in a subaerial environment. This type of hydrovolcanic explosive activity is common in the coastal zones of Lanzarote and the other Canary Islands and is one of the main potential hazards that could threaten the human population of this archipelago. Detailed studies of these hydrovolcanic eruptions such as the one we present here can help volcanologists understand the hazards that this type of eruption can generate and provide essential information for undertaking risk assessment in similar volcanic environments.

  7. Evolution of the Lower Cretaceous Coqen basin in northern Lhasa, central Tibet Plateau: stratigraphy, sedimentology, and detrital zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gaoyuan; Hu, Xiumian; Sinclair, Hugh; BouDagher-Fadel, Marcelle

    2016-04-01

    Early Cretaceous is a critical time for understanding the evolution of the Lhasa block, the main part of the Tibet Plateau, as the Lhasa terrane collided with the Qiangtang terrane in its north, while the Neo-tethyan oceanic lithosphere started a new subduction in its south forming a new arc-trench-basin. The Coqen basin is the ideal place to document the Early Cretaceous evolution of the Lhasa terrane. This study present stratigraphy, sedimentology, and detrital zircon geochronology in the Coqen basin with the objective to analyze the tectonic evolution in space and time for the Tibetan Plateau prior to the India-Asia collision. The Lower Cretaceous in the Coqen basin include Zelong Group, Duoni Formation and Langshan Formation. The Zelong Group consists of intermediate to felsic lavas with minor mafic and volcaniclastic rocks erupted during 143-102 Ma. The Duoni Formation compries conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone and mudstone in the south, deposited in fluvial-deltal environments, whereas the quartzose and lithic sandstone, siltstone and mudstone in the north, deposited in a coastal environment. The interbeded volcanic rocks from the lower part of the Duoni Formation yield zircon U-Pb ages at ~122.5 Ma. The overlying Langshan Formation is characterized by abundant foraminiferal Orbitolinas and rudist-bearing wackestones and packstones, deposited in a low-energy carbonate lagoon environment. The Langshan Formation deposited between ~119-115 Ma and ~98 Ma according to the study on Orbitolinas, which is consistant with the volcanic rocks found in the middle part of the Langshan Formation with the ages of 112.5 and 110.3 Ma, respectively. Sandstone detrital modal compositions of the Duoni Formation plotted into the fields of "magmatic arc" and "recycled orogen". The detrital zircons yield the age populations between 110 and 150 Ma, with the peak at ~130 Ma. Additional ages range in 500-600 Ma, 900-1000 Ma, 1050-1250, 1700-2000 Ma and ~2500 Ma. Compared to the

  8. Sedimentology, stratigraphy, and extinctions during the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition at Bug Creek, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Fastovsky, D.E.; Dott, R.H. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    Bug Creek Valley, the source of an unusual and controversial Cretaceous-Paleogene coincidence of mammals, dinosaurs, pollen, and iridium, exemplifies the importance of depositional process in the reconstruction of evolutionary events. Five sedimentary facies are recognized at Bug Creek: a cross-stratified sandstone, a green and purple siltstone, a lateral accretionary sandstone, a coal, and a variegated siltstone. Repeated fluvial channeling restricts the accuracy of lateral correlations, and the relationship of the fossil assemblage to the presumed Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary cannot be established. Sedimentologically, the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition is represented here by Cretaceous meandering channels that gave way initially to Paleogene swamp deposition. 13 references, 4 figures.

  9. Basin Evolution and Exhumation of the Xigaze Forearc, Southern Tibet: Insight from Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Geo-Thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, D. A.; Carrapa, B.; Abbey, A. L.; Kapp, P. A.; Ding, L.

    2012-12-01

    Forearc basins are important data archives for understanding continental dynamics because they preserve the tectono-erosional record of continental margins before collision. This study focuses on the Cretaceous-Eocene Xigaze forearc basin in southern Tibet, which is exposed along ~600 km of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone between the Indian craton to the south and the Asian Lhasa terrane to the north. From late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time, subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the southern margin of Asia accommodated the northward motion of the Indian craton and formed the Xigaze forearc basin. Following collision with India in the early Cenozoic, the basin transitioned from predominantly marine to non-marine sedimentation and was subsequently uplifted to a mean elevation of 5000 m. How this transition occurred remains unresolved. This study's overall objective is to decipher forearc-basin and Indo-Asia continental-margin development from field sedimentology and stratigraphy, and detrital geo-thermochronology. We present new stratigraphic sections, totaling 8 km thick, from a previously unexplored ~60 km segment of the Xigaze forearc, ~50 km north-northwest of Saga. These sections are quite different from those known farther east. Sedimentary facies of mid-Cretaceous to early Eocene deposits indicate a shoaling-upward trend consistent with other ancient forearc basins (e.g., Great Valley forearc, California). Middle to late Cretaceous deposits indicate a variety of facies and depositional environments along strike in the study area. Facies include distal marine turbidites, shelf limestones, estuarine siliciclastics, and brown paleosols. In contrast, Eocene depositional environments are transitional from nearshore marine to pericontinental. Facies consist of dirty limestones, packstones, and wackestones, interbedded with terrigenous conglomerates and red-green paleosols. Eocene fauna include abundant foraminifera such as Nummulites-Discocyclina and

  10. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the K/T boundary deposit in Haiti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.; Dhondt, S.; Espindola, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The K/T boundary sequence is exposed in uplifted carbonate sediments of the southwest peninsula of Haiti. It is found at 15 localities within the Beloc formation, a sequence of limestone and marls interpreted as a monoclinal nappe structure thrust to the north. This tectonic deformation has affected the K/T boundary deposit to varying degrees. In some cases the less competent K/T deposit has acted as a slip plane leading to extensive shearing of the boundary layer, as well as duplication of the section. The presence of glassy tektites, shocked quartz, and an Ir anomaly directly link the deposit to a bolide impact. Stratigraphic and sedimentological features of the tripartite sequence indicate that it was formed by deposition from ballistic fallout of coarse tektites, emplacement of particle gravity flows and fine grained fallout of widely dispersed impact ejecta.

  11. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the K/T boundary deposit in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.; Dhondt, S.; Espindola, J. M.

    1993-03-01

    The K/T boundary sequence is exposed in uplifted carbonate sediments of the southwest peninsula of Haiti. It is found at 15 localities within the Beloc formation, a sequence of limestone and marls interpreted as a monoclinal nappe structure thrust to the north. This tectonic deformation has affected the K/T boundary deposit to varying degrees. In some cases the less competent K/T deposit has acted as a slip plane leading to extensive shearing of the boundary layer, as well as duplication of the section. The presence of glassy tektites, shocked quartz, and an Ir anomaly directly link the deposit to a bolide impact. Stratigraphic and sedimentological features of the tripartite sequence indicate that it was formed by deposition from ballistic fallout of coarse tektites, emplacement of particle gravity flows and fine grained fallout of widely dispersed impact ejecta.

  12. The Mud Hills, Mojave Desert, California: Structure, stratigraphy and sedimentology of a rapidly extended terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, R.V.; Devaney, K.A.; Geslin, J.K.; Cavazza, W.; Diamond, D.S.; Jagiello, K.J.; Marsaglia, K.M.; Paylor, E.D. II; Short, P.F. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Mud Hills exposes synorogenic breccia (Mud Hills Fm.) deposited during the final stages of crustal extension of the upper plate above the Waterman Hills detachment (20--18 Ma). Previous workers have misinterpreted fault contacts as stratigraphic contacts, and have developed intricate pseudostratigraphy to explain their observations. The authors' detailed mapping, combined with stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, documents that the volcaniclastic Pickhandle Fm. is conformably overlain by the plutoniclastic Mud Hills Fm., with no interfingering. Repetition of these south-dipping lithologic units is due to imbricate, north-dipping listric faults. These relations are demonstrated by the systematic northward v''ing of fault contacts and southward v''ing of stratigraphic contacts. Stratigraphic dip decreases upsection, which is consistent with incremental rotation of basinal strata simultaneously with deposition. Most of the Mud Hills Fm. consists of rock-avalanche breccia and megabreccia derived from granodiorite, which is identical to basement exposed beneath the Pickhandle and Jackhammer Fms. to the north. The Mud Hills Fm. was derived from now-buried granodiorite of a stranded upper-plate block to the south, as demonstrated by northward paleocurrents, facies relations and the presence of fine-grained units close to the presumed master fault (as is typical of half-graben sedimentation). Unconformably overlying the Mud Hills Fm. is the Owl Conglomerate (Barstow Fm.), which has mixed provenance with southward paleocurrents; the Owl Conglomerate was derived from residual highlands after extension ceased. Integration of structural, stratigraphic and sedimentologic information is essential for correct reconstruction of highly extended terranes.

  13. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, paleontology, and paleomagnetism of Pliocene-early Pleistocene lacustrine deposits in two cores from western Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.S.; Oviatt, Charles G.; Roberts, A.P.; Buchner, J.; Kelsey, R.; Bracht, C.J.; Forester, R.M.; Bradbury, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The paleoclimatic history of western Utah is being investigated as part of the USGS Global Change and Climate History Program studies of long-term climatic changes in the western United States. The initial objective of the study is to document the environmental conditions during the mid-Pliocene period of warmer-than-modern global climates (the focus of the USGS Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping [PRISM] project). The investigation also seeks to determine how and when these conditions gave way to the late Quaternary pattern of climatic variations (in which short periods of very moist climates have been separated by long periods of arid conditions). This is a collaborative project involving specialists from the USGS, Kansas State University, and the University of California-Davis in paleontology (Thompson, Buchner, Forester, Bradbury), stratigraphy and sedimentology (Oviatt, Kelsey, Bracht), and paleomagnetism and environmental magnetism (Roberts). The data presented herein represent preliminary findings of the analyses of two cores of Pliocene and early Pleistocene sediments from the eastern Great Basin.

  14. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and paleontology of lower Eocene San Jose formation, central San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G.; Smith, L.N. )

    1989-09-01

    The lower Eocene San Jose Formation in the central portion of the San Juan basin (Gobernador-Vigas Canyon area) consists of the Cuba Mesa, Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members. Well log data indicate that, from its 100-m thickness, the Cuba Mesa Member thins toward the basin center and pinches out to the northeast by lat. 36{degree}40'N, long. 107{degree}19'W. The Regina Member has the most extensive outcrops in the central basin, and it decreases in sandstone/mud rock ratio to the north. The Llaves and Tapicitos Members occur only at the highest elevations, are thin due to erosion, and are not mappable as separate units. Well log data and 1,275 m of measured stratigraphic section in the Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members indicate these strata are composed of approximately 35% medium to coarse-grained sandstone and 65% fine-grained sandstone and mud rock. Sedimentology and sediment-dispersal patterns indicate deposition by generally south-flowing streams that had sources to the northwest, northeast, and east. Low-sinuosity, sand-bedded, braided( ) streams shifted laterally across about 1 km-wide channel belts to produce sheet sandstones that are prominent throughout the San Jose Formation. Subtle levees separated channel environments from floodplain and local lacustrine areas. Avulsion relocated channels periodically to areas on the floodplain, resulting in the typically disconnected sheet sandstones within muddy overbank deposits of the Regina Member.

  15. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and tectonic evolution of the Upper Cretaceous/Paleogene succession in north Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ayyat, Abdalla M.; Obaidalla, Nageh A.

    2013-05-01

    The stratigraphy, sedimentology and syn-depositional tectonic events (SdTEs) of the Upper Cretaceous/Paleogene (K-P) succession at four localities in north Eastern Desert (NED) of Egypt have been studied. These localities are distributed from south-southwest to north-northeast at Gebel Millaha, at North Wadi Qena, at Wadi El Dakhal, and at Saint Paul Monastery. Lithostratigraphically, four rock units have been recorded: Sudr Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian); Dakhla Formation (Danian-Selandian); Tarawan Formation (Selandian-Thanetian) and Esna Formation (Thanetian-Ypresian). These rock units are not completely represented all over the study area because some of them are absent at certain sites and others have variable thicknesses. Biostratigrapgically, 18 planktonic foraminiferal zones have been recorded. These are in stratigraphic order: Globotruncana ventricosa Zone (Campanian); Gansserina gansseri, Contusotruncana contusa, Recimguembelina fructicosa, Pseudohastigerina hariaensis, Pseudohastigerina palpebra and Plummerita hantkenenoides zones (Maastrichtian); Praemurica incostans, Praemurica uncinata, Morozovella angulata and Praemurica carinata/Igorina albeari zones (Danian); Igorina albeari, Globanomanlina pseudomenradii/Parasubbotina variospira, Acarinina subsphaerica, Acarinina soldadoensis/Globanomanlina pseudomenardii and Morozovella velascoensis zones (Selandian/Thantian); and Acarinina sibaiyaensis, Pseudohastigerina wilcoxensis/Morozovella velascoensis zones (earliest Ypresian). Sedimentologically, four sedimentary facies belts forming southwest gently-dipping slope to basin transect have been detected. They include tidal flats, outer shelf, slumped continental slope and open marine hemipelagic facies. This transect can be subdivided into a stable basin plain plus outer shelf in the extreme southwestern parts; and an unstable slope shelf platform in the northeastern parts. The unstable slope shelf platform is characterized by open marine hemipelagic

  16. The Grayling Fingers region of Michigan: soils, sedimentology, stratigraphy and geomorphic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzl, Randall J.; Weisenborn, Beth N.

    2004-08-01

    This paper provides data on the landforms, soils, and sediments within a unique northern Michigan landscape known as the Grayling Fingers, and evaluates these data to develop various scenarios for the geomorphic development of this region. Composed of several large, flat-topped ridges that trend N-S, the physiography of the "Fingers" resembles a hand. Previously interpreted as "remnant moraines", the Grayling Fingers are actually a Pleistocene constructional landscape that was later deeply incised by glacial meltwater. The sediments that comprise the Fingers form a generally planar assemblage, with thick (>100 m), sandy glacial outwash forming the lowest unit. Above the outwash are several meters of till that is remarkably similar in texture to the outwash below; thus, the region is best described as an incised ground moraine. Finally, a thin silty "cap" is preserved on the flattest, most stable uplands. This sediment package and the physiography of the Fingers are suggestive of geomorphic processes not previously envisioned for Michigan. Although precise dates are lacking, we nonetheless present possible sequences of geomorphic/sedimentologic processes for the Fingers. This area was probably a topographic high prior to the advance of marine isotope stage 2 (Woodfordian) ice. Much of the glacial outwash in the Fingers is probably associated with a stagnant, early Woodfordian ice margin, implying that this interlobate area remained ice-free and ice-marginal for long periods during stage 2. Woodfordian ice eventually covered the region and deposited 5-10 m of sandy basal till over the proglacial outwash plain. Small stream valleys on the outwash surface were palimpsested onto the till surface as the ice retreated, as kettle chains and as dry, upland valleys. The larger of these valleys were so deeply incised by meltwater that they formed the large, through-flowing Finger valleys. The silt cap that occupies stable uplands was probably imported into the region, while

  17. Stratigraphy and surface ages on Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmedemann, N.; Denk, T.; Wagner, R.; Neukum, G.

    2007-08-01

    Introduction: The examination of the geologic history of Iapetus is a major goal of the Cassini imaging experiment (ISS). Crater counting for the determination of model ages is a powerful tool to understand stratigraphic relationships between different terrain units (e.g., Neukum 1983, Neukum et al. 1998). In the case of Iapetus (Porco et al. 2005), the situation is unusual because this moon has a very large semi-major axis, resulting in unusually low relative velocities of planetocentric impactors. Nevertheless, the surface of Iapetus is heavily cratered, indicating a rather old surface. The shapes of the measured crater-size frequency distributions follow very closely the distribution of Earth's moon (after correction for the different impact conditions) (Neukum et al. 2006), justifying its usage here for model age determinations. Castillo-Rogez et al. (2007) suggest that the formation of Iapetus has occurred very precisely between 4.5622 and 4.5647 Ga ago. Assuming it took roughly 100 Ma for formation of a rigid surface which is able to hold the cratering record, absolute surface (model) ages can be calibrated to these boundary conditions. Stratigraphy: At the time of this writing, four different surface areas were investigated so far for stratigraphic comparison: 1. A small part of the ridge near 96°W longitude; 2. an "average" dark terrain sample north of the ridge; 3. the "landslide" crater (diameter ˜ 120 km; 6°N/36°W) in the south western part of a huge basin, and its surroundings; 4. a large, 420 km diameter basin on the leading side of Iapetus (34°N, 80°W). Following the models of Castillo-Rogez and Neukum, an age of 4.4 Ga is expected for the oldest parts of Iapetus' surface, which is actually found at the equatorial ridge and on the "average" terrain north of the ridge. The "landslide crater" and the landslide partly covering the crater and a neighboring area in the northwest are a few hundred million years younger (˜4.1 Ga). Thus, the idea that

  18. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Anacacho Limestone, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, C.S.; Sullivan, E.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Anacacho Limestone is exposed in outcrops between the cities of San Antonio and Del Rio, Texas. A detailed study of four outcrops (Blanco Creek section, Sabinal River section, Seco Creek section, Hondo Creek section) shows that the Anacacho Limestone rests on the Upson Clay (which contains fauna of early Campanian age) and is overlain by the Corsicana Marl (which contains fauna of early Maastrichtian age). An unconformity within the Anacacho Limestone is used herein to separate the limestone into a lower member and an upper member. The lower Anacacho member contains fauna of early Campanian age, whereas the upper Anacacho member contains fauna of middle Campanian age. The lower Anacacho member consists predominantly of wackestones to packstones, which are overlain by packstones to grainstones capped by the unconformity. This unconformity is interpreted as a marine flooding surface, delineating a transition from carbonate grainstones deposited in shallow water (<30 m depth) to a chalk deposited in deeper water. Above the unconformity, the upper Anacacho member is characterized by a chalk, overlain by wackestones and packstones. The uppermost section of the Anacacho Limestone consists of packstones and grainstones with abundant and diverse fossils. Most of the Anacacho Limestone developed in relatively shallow water (<50 m depth) leeward of a large carbonate build-up (possibly a rudistid reef) that now comprises the Anacacho Mountains. The environment, however, was open to marine water throughout deposition of the Anacacho Limestone. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and eruptive mechanism of the El Golfo phreatomagmatic edifice (Lanzarote, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzi, D.; Marti, J.; Geyer, A.

    2012-04-01

    The El Golfo tuff cone is an example of phreatomagmatic edifice, developed in the western coast of Lanzarote (Canary Islands). El Golfo, together with other edifices of the same age, is aligned along a fracture oriented NEE-SWW coinciding with the main lineation of the historic volcanism in this part of the island. In this contribution we present a detailed stratigraphic study of the succession of deposits and we interpret them in terms of depositional processes and eruptive dynamics. The eruptive sequence is exclusively represented by a succession of pyroclastic deposits, and we infer it according to variations in flow regime and the magma-water interaction. Several pyroclastic units were identified according to facies variations based on sedimentary discontinuities, grain size, components, variations in primary laminations and bedforms following the facies model proposed by Chough and Sohn (1990). The growth of the El Golfo tuff cone involved several stages based on variations in depositional processes. The edifice was constructed very rapidly around the vent controlling the amount of water that got access to the eruption conduit. Although the invariable phreatomagmatic character of most of the pyroclastic sequence, it is possible to deduce variations in the explosive energy, with a general increment upwards, according to the increase in the degree of fragmentation of pyroclasts, The absence of hyaloclastites, the nature of the palagonite alteration and the observed sedimentary structures, demonstrate the subaereal character of most of the deposits

  20. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochemistry of an underfilled lake basin in the Puna (north-west Argentina)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlue, Michael M.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Kowler, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Depositional models of ancient lakes in thin-skinned retroarc foreland basins rarely benefit from appropriate Quaternary analogues. To address this, we present new stratigraphic, sedimentological and geochemical analyses of four radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from the Pozuelos Basin (PB; northwest Argentina) that capture the evolution of this low-accommodation Puna basin over the past ca. 43 cal kyr. Strata from the PB are interpreted as accumulations of a highly variable, underfilled lake system represented by lake-plain/littoral, profundal, palustrine, saline lake and playa facies associations. The vertical stacking of facies is asymmetric, with transgressive and thin organic-rich highstand deposits underlying thicker, organic-poor regressive deposits. The major controls on depositional architecture and basin palaeogeography are tectonics and climate. Accommodation space was derived from piggyback basin-forming flexural subsidence and Miocene-Quaternary normal faulting associated with incorporation of the basin into the Andean hinterland. Sediment and water supply was modulated by variability in the South American summer monsoon, and perennial lake deposits correlate in time with several well-known late Pleistocene wet periods on the Altiplano/Puna plateau. Our results shed new light on lake expansion–contraction dynamics in the PB in particular and provide a deeper understanding of Puna basin lakes in general.

  1. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of pre-late Wisconsin catastrophic glacial flood sediments, western Walla Walla Valley, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.L.; Spencer, P.K. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The Cummins Bridge site in the western Walla Walla Valley exhibits clear evidence for pre-late Wisconsin catastrophic glacial flooding. The section consists of an unstratified, poorly sorted diamict with angular basaltic clasts in a matrix of sand and silt, and a large number of well-rounded clasts of exotic lithology in the coarse fraction, gradationally overlain by a coarse, angular gravel that is matrix poor and exotic-free; this unit grades upward into a matrix-rich diamict with a well-developed caliche in the upper portion. Above this is a sand and silt unit showing vague cross-stratification, lamination, and graded beds; this unit may represent local temporary ponding of the ancestral drainage. Overlying this on a pronounced erosional surface are rhythmically stratified sand-to-salt beds assigned to the late Wisconsin Toughet Beds. The section is capped by a thin bed of Holocene loess. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic criteria suggest that the lowermost units represent an indirect record of catastrophic glacial flooding. Flood sediments were deposited on an adjacent topographic high and subsequently mass-wasted via mudflow into their present position. Normal fluvial processes alternated with mass-wasting events to concentrate the angular, matrix-poor basaltic gravel. The lower diamict shows characteristics similar to documented pre-late Wisconsin catastrophic flood sediments at a nearby site, including rounded exotic clasts, angular basaltic clasts, lack of stratification, and poor sorting. The two sites may represent the same pre-late Wisconsin flood event.

  2. Origin and paleoclimatic significance of late Quaternary loess in Nebraska: Evidence from stratigraphy, chronology, sedimentology, and geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Bettis, E. Arthur; Aleinikoff, John N.; McGeehin, John P.; Beann, Jossh; Skipp, Gary; Marshall, Brian D.; Roberts, Helen M.; Johnson, William C.; Benton, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Loess is one of the most extensive surficial geologic deposits in midcontinental North America, particularly in the central Great Plains region of Nebraska. Last-glacial-age loess (Peoria Loess) reaches its greatest known thickness in the world in this area. New stratigraphic, geochronologic, mineralogic, and geochemical data yield information about the age and provenance of Peoria Loess, as well as evaluation of recent climate models. Sixteen new radiocarbon ages and recently acquired optically stimulated luminescence ages indicate that Peoria Loess deposition in Nebraska occurred between ca. 25,000 cal yr B.P. and ca. 13,000 cal yr B.P. After ca. 13,000 cal yr B.P. a period of pedogenesis began, represented by the dark, prominent Brady Soil. At some localities, further loess deposition was minimal. At other localities, sometime after ca. 11,000 cal yr B.P., there were additional episodes of loess deposition (Bignell Loess) intermittently throughout the Holocene. The spatial variability of particle size abundances in Peoria Loess shows a northwest-to-southeast fining in Nebraska, consistent with maps of previous workers that show a northwest-to-southeast thinning of loess. These observations indicate that paleowinds that deposited the loess were from the west or northwest and that the source or sources of Peoria Loess lay to the west or northwest. New mineralogical and geochemical data indicate that the most important sources of loess were likely Tertiary siltstones of the White River and Arikaree Groups, silt facies of Pliocene eolian sediments, and small contributions from Pierre Shale. It is likely that fine-grained silts were transported episodically through the Nebraska Sand Hills from Tertiary and Cretaceous bedrock sources to the north, in agreement with a model presented recently. The identification of Tertiary siltstones and silts as the primary sources of loess is consistent with isotopic data presented in a companion paper. Contributions of glaciogenic

  3. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of Cenozoic deposits in the Kağızman-Tuzluca Basin, northeastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varol, Baki; Şen, Şevket; Ayyıldız, Turhan; Sözeri, Koray; Karakaş, Zehra; Métais, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    The Kağızman-Tuzluca Basin is located in the northeastern Anatolia, to the east of the intersection point (near Karlıova) of the major North and East Anatolian Fault systems. This intermontane basin displays a thick sequence (over 2000 m) of mostly terrestrial deposits represented by repetitive alternations of the lake and fluvial environments ranging from ?Late Eocene/Oligocene to Middle/? Late Miocene. A marine incursion only mappable in the southeastern margin of the basin deposited limestones and sandy limestones rich in marine mollusks and nummulites, in particular N. fichteli that constrain an Early Oligocene age for this marine unit (Kağan Fm). The terrestrial basin-fill deposits show different thicknesses throughout the basin due to irregular bottom topography and tectonic configuration of the basin margins. The thickest deposits were accumulated along the different margins of the basin, which received high quantities of siliciclastics from meandering river, alluvial and coastal fans, fan delta/Gilbert-type delta and wave-worked fluvial delta. Climate changes have also driven the development of lake environments during distinct depositional periods. Siliciclastic-dominated overfilled lakes (Halıkışlak and Kızılkaya formations) and chemical-dominated underfilled lakes (Turabi and Tuzluca formations) were formed. They have been also classified as "Newark-type" and "Fundy-type" lakes, respectively. Fluvial systems evolved from high-energy meandering rivers deposited under humid climate (Güngören Formation) to low-energy meandering rivers resulted from arid and semiarid climates (Çincavat Formation). The transitional intervals from ephemeral river-dry mudflat (Çincavat Formation) to saline pan/lake (Tuzluca Formation) indicate wadi-sand flat-playa fluvial systems. The chronostratigraphic constrains of the entire sequence remain poor and so far solely based on vertebrate fossil assemblages. The evaporitic Tuzluca Formation would be Middle Miocene in

  4. Applied Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Spencer G.

    Stratigraphy is a cornerstone of the Earth sciences. The study of layered rocks, especially their age determination and correlation, which are integral parts of stratigraphy, are key to fields as diverse as geoarchaeology and tectonics. In the Anglophile history of geology, in the early 1800s, the untutored English surveyor William Smith was the first practical stratigrapher, constructing a geological map of England based on his own applied stratigraphy. Smith has, thus, been seen as the first “industrial stratigrapher,” and practical applications of stratigraphy have since been essential to most of the extractive industries from mining to petroleum. Indeed, gasoline is in your automobile because of a tremendous use of applied stratigraphy in oil exploration, especially during the latter half of the twentieth century. Applied stratigraphy, thus, is a subject of broad interest to Earth scientists.

  5. Late Eocene impact microspherules - Stratigraphy, age and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Orth, C. J.; Gilmore, J. S.; Oliver, P. Q.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Molina, E.

    1987-03-01

    The stratigraphy, faunal changes, and geochemistry of deep-sea sediments associated with late Eocene microtektite and microspherule layers are reported. Microprobe analyses of major element compositions of microspherules show that, although there is some compositional overlap in all three late Eocene layers as well as with the Pleistocene Australasian and Ivory Coast microtektites, each microspherule population has characteristic compositional features. All three microspherule layers are associated with decreased carbonate, possibly due to a sudden productivity change, increased dissolution as a result of sea-level and climate fluctuations, or impact events. A discovery of microtektites in the Gl. cerroazulensis Zone off the New Jersey coast extends the North American strewn field from the Caribbean to the northwest Atlantic.

  6. Mars north polar deposits: stratigraphy, age, and geodynamical response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.J.; Zuber, M.T.; Smrekar, S.E.; Mellon, M.T.; Head, J.W.; Tanaka, K.L.; Putzig, N.E.; Milkovich, S.M.; Campbell, B.A.; Plaut, J.J.; Safaeinili, A.; Seu, R.; Biccari, D.; Carter, L.M.; Picardi, G.; Orosei, R.; Surdas, Mohit P.; Heggy, E.; Zurek, R.W.; Egan, A.F.; Giacomoni, E.; Russo, F.; Cutigni, M.; Pettinelli, E.; Holt, J.W.; Leuschen, C.J.; Marinangeli, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Shallow Radar (SHARAD) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has imaged the internal stratigraphy of the north polar layered deposits of Mars. Radar reflections within the deposits reveal a laterally continuous deposition of layers, which typically consist of four packets of finely spaced reflectors separated by homogeneous interpacket regions of nearly pure ice. The packet/interpacket structure can be explained by approximately million-year periodicities in Mars' obliquity or orbital eccentricity. The observed ???100-meter maximum deflection of the underlying substrate in response to the ice load implies that the present-day thickness of an equilibrium elastic lithosphere is greater than 300 kilometers. Alternatively, the response to the load may be in a transient state controlled by mantle viscosity. Both scenarios probably require that Mars has a subchondritic abundance of heat-producing elements.

  7. Sedimentology, geochronology, oxygen isotope and grain size stratigraphy of a core from Pretty Lake, Indiana: Exploring Midwestern hydroclimate during the last 2000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, A.; Bird, B. W.; Gilhooly, W., III; Stamps, L. G.; Rudloff, O. M.; Steinman, B. A.; Lowell, T. V.

    2015-12-01

    Isotope-based hydroclimate records and grain size records from the mid-continental United States that span the late Holocene with sub-decadal resolution are rare, making the relationship between temperature and hydroclimate for this region not well constrained. Pollen-based temperature reconstructions from North America suggest that the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 650 to 1050 CE) was warmer than the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1550 to 1850 CE). It has further been suggested that much of the mid-continental US experienced drought during the MCA and pluvial conditions during the LIA. This is supported by modern correlations between seasonal temperatures and precipitation, which are anti-correlated for much of the Midwest; however, for portions of the continental core the opposite relationship exists between temperature and precipitation (i.e., warmer is wetter and colder is drier). Within this context and previous paleoclimate work in the Midwest we present geochronology, sedimentology oxygen isotopes and grain size results from a 12 m composite core from Pretty Lake, a 25 m deep kettle lake in LaGrange County, northeastern Indiana. Here we focus on the last 2,000 years of the 16,000-year record in order to explore hydroclimate variability in response to temperature anomalies during the MCA and LIA. Pretty Lake is well suited for this type of investigation because the closed surface hydrology of the lake basin renders it sensitive to evaporation. This is reflected in oxygen isotope (δ18O) measurements of surface waters from the lake, which show that it is approximately 4‰ higher than meteoric precipitation. High-resolution down core δ18O measurements hold tremendous potential for reconstructing regional hydroclimate during the last 2,000 years, particularly when combined with both the grain size record and the present surface water oxygen isotope measurements. Integrated, the three records from Pretty Lake reveal synoptic hydroclimate responses at unique spatial and

  8. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  9. Evaporite sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to introduce the sedimentology of evaporites and to demonstrate how sedimentological principles can be applied to ancient evaporites. It includes chapter on: Sabkhas; marine and continental; Shallow water evaporites: lakes, salinas and platforms; and deep water evaporites.

  10. Sedimentology and Sequence Stratigraphy of the Lower Cretaceous Fortress Mountain and Torok Formations Exposed Along the Siksikpuk River, North-Central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Wartes, Marwan A.

    2007-01-01

    An exposure of the Lower Cretaceous Fortress Mountain and Torok Formations along the Siksikpuk River in north-central Alaska provides a rare opportunity to observe the stratigraphic contact between these two formations and to interpret the depositional facies and sequence stratigraphy of the exposed strata. The Fortress Mountain Formation at the base of the measured section includes braided-fluvial and coastal-plain facies deposited in a lowstand-systems tract, and an overlying succession of mostly shallow marine facies deposited in the basal part of a transgressive-systems tract. The overlying Torok Formation includes a thick, upward-deepening succession of marine-shelf to marine-slope facies deposited in the upper part of the transgressive-systems tract. The upper part of the section includes marine-slope and incised-slope-channel turbidite deposits of the Torok Formation, interpreted as a highstand-systems tract. Consideration of the balance between accommodation and sediment flux inferred from the sequence-stratigraphic analysis suggests that both tectonics and eustasy may have influenced deposition of the lowstand-systems and transgressive-systems tracts. In contrast, the highstand-systems tract may have been primarily influenced by progradation of a regional sediment-dispersal system and by subsidence induced by sediment loading.

  11. A re-evaluation of the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Day Point Formation (Chazy Group): A new look at old reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Falkenberg, J.; Mehrtens, C.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Day Point Formation (Chazy Group, Middle Ordovician) outcrops in the Champlain Valley of New York and Vermont. The stratigraphy of the Day Point Formation is complex, containing lithologic sequences that are unique at different localities around the Champlain Valley. The formation exhibits complex lateral interfingering of seven lithofacies: (1) Highly bioturbated sandstone with symmetrical and bifurcating ripples. (2) Bioturbated, brachiopod rich, wackestone facies. (3) Planar cross-bedded, interlayered sand and sandy packstone. (4) Interlayered sand and shale grading into sand and limestone layers. (5) Grainstone which, at some localities, contains mound-shaped bryozoan reefs, at other localities thin non-reefal sheet-like layers are present. The grainstone also has planar laminated and cross stratified beds. (6) Fine-grained, calcareous sandstone with planar and herringbone cross bedding, which in places contains small bryozoan reefs and thin sheet-reefs. (7) Planar cross bedded packstone containing bryozoan reefs and thin sheet-like non-reefal layers. The thin reefal layers are found where the mound-shaped reefs are absent. The sand units are found only in the lower portion of the Day Point Formation. The bryozoan reefs and non-reefal layers are associated with the sand beds in the lower portion of the Day Point Formation, and either live within the sand or on top of it. The bryozoans that form the non-reefal layers, found in the limestones, are contained within thin layers of sand. In contrast, no sand is found in the upper section of the Day Point Formation, yet the bryozoan reefs flourish.

  12. Kandik basin stratigraphy, sedimentology, and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, T.J.; Howell, D.G.; Kauffman-Linam, L.; Boundy-Sanders, S.; Murray, R.W.; Jones, D.L.

    1987-05-01

    East-central Alaska's Kandik basin is a structural remnant of a larger Permian to Cretaceous basin. Permian shallow-water Tahkandit Limestone and Step Conglomerate at the base of the sequence rest unconformably on Paleozoic chert-pebble conglomerate, siliceous shale, and limestone. These Permian rocks are overlain by Triassic to Lower Cretaceous open-ocean Glenn Shale, which grades upward into Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian) hummocky cross-bedded (outer shelf to upper slope) Keenan Quartzite. The quartzite grades upward into fine-grained north-northeast-flowing turbidites of the Biederman Argillite (undated). East-northeast-flowing pebbly turbidites of the Kathul Graywacke (undated) overlie Biederman strata. Locally, Cretaceous (Albian and younger) through Paleogene nonmarine rocks unconformably overlie the Kandik basin sequence. The Mesozoic part of the sequence is similar to that of Manley basin, northwest Yukon Territory, and much of the North Slope. East-directed flow for Kandik basin strata may require paleogeographic reconstructions involving local to large-scale palinspastic rotations or a western source of chert detritus. Deformation of the Mesozoic sequence in Kandik basin west of the US-Canada border shows northwest-southeast shortening. Shaly units are tightly folded with well-developed cleavage striking northeast. Strikes of beds swing from northeast to east in the extreme southwestern part of the basin, suggesting clockwise rotation. Thrust faults, reverse faults, and fold axes trend east to northeast; normal faults trend northwest. These relations are all consistent with, and probably are closely related to, right slip on the west-northwest-trending Tintina fault.

  13. Sedimentological and micromorphological investigation on the fill of the Bronze age wooden pool at Noceto La Torretta (northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerboni, Andrea; Cremaschi, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    A recent excavation at Noceto La Torretta (Parma, northern Italy) revealed an exceptional archaeological structure, composed of a wooden pool, quadrangular in shape, about 12 x 6 m, up to 4 m deep. Since the beginning the pool appears as an unicum in the Prehistory of Europe (Bernabò Brea and Cremaschi, 2009); furthermore, it represents an important naturalistic and environmental archive and the sedimentary infilling undergone to sedimentological and micromorphological analyses. The Noceto La Torretta site is placed on the hydrographic left side of the Taro river, on the northernmost fringe of the Pleistocene Apennine terraces. On the basis of pottery type it is possible to attribute the structure to the Terramare culture (beginning of the advanced phase of the Middle Bronze Age, second half of XV century a.C.). Six radiocarbon dates are available up to now, and, once calibrated, they put the building and activity of the wooden pool between 1420 and 1320 cal. years BP. On the basis of sedimentological and micromorphological analyses (Cremaschi et al., 2009) the stratigraphic sequence could be divided into four groups of units. A) Upper deposits, silty and sandy sediments deposited by colluviation in shallow water, interlayered by charcoal and diatom rich layers. B) Organic deposits, formed in deeper and anoxic water. C) Gyttja in a sandy-silty matrix; three main facies are present: pair of organic and inorganic laminae (O/I), poorly laminated gyttja, anoxic and clastic layers. D) basal deposits. Considering the short time of the deposition inside the pool and the recurrent sedimentary facies, a seasonal control in sedimentation should be inferred. The gyttja-rich laminae should indicate the summer season, with intense biological activity inside and outside the pool, promoting a strong production of organics, while the anoxic and clastic layers are possibly related to the winter season (without production of organic matter). Finally, the O/I laminae represent the

  14. The Cambrian to Devonian odyssey of the Brabant Massif within Avalonia: A review with new zircon ages, geochemistry, Sm-Nd isotopes, stratigraphy and palaeogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnemann, Ulf; Herbosch, Alain; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Pin, Christian; Gärtner, Andreas; Hofmann, Mandy

    2012-05-01

    This study provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the Early Palaeozoic evolution of the Brabant Massif belonging to the Anglo-Brabant Deformation Belt. Situated at the southeastern side of Avalonia microplate, it is the only well-known part of the northern passive margin of the Rheic Ocean. The Cambrian-Silurian sedimentary pile is > 13 km thick, with > 9 km for the Cambrian only. The unraveling of this continuous registration reflects the successive rifting and drifting of Avalonia from the Gondwana mainland, followed by soft-collisional processes with Baltica and finally the formation of Laurussia. Based on recently established detailed stratigraphy, sedimentology and basin development, on U-Pb LA-ICP-MS analyses of igneous and detrital zircon grains along with geochemical data including Sm-Nd isotopes, a new geodynamic and palaeogeographic evolution is proposed. Brabant Megasequence 1 (lower Cambrian to lowermost Ordovician, > 9 km thick) represents an embayment of the peri-Gondwanan rift from which the Rheic Ocean has evolved. Detrital zircon ages demonstrate that the Brabant is a typical peri-Gondwanan terrane with a major Pan-African (Neoproterozoic age) and a mixed West African and Amazonian source (Palaeoproterozoic, Archaean and some Mesoproterozoic age). The transition towards the Avalonia drifting is marked by an unconformity and a short volcanic episode. The northward drift of Avalonia towards Baltica is recorded by the Megasequence 2 (Middle to Upper Ordovician, 1.3 km thick). The source for Mesoproterozoic zircons vanished, as the result of the Rheic Ocean opening and the isolation from Amazonian sources. The transition to Megasequence 3 is marked by a drastic change in palaeobathymetry and an important (sub)volcanic episode during a tectonic instability period (460-430 Ma), reflecting the Avalonia-Baltica soft docking as also shown by the reappearance of Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons, typical of Baltica. Unradiogenic Nd isotope

  15. Mars Stratigraphy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budney, C. J.; Miller, S. L.; Cutts, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Stratigraphy Mission lands a rover on the surface of Mars which descends down a cliff in Valles Marineris to study the stratigraphy. The rover carries a unique complement of instruments to analyze and age-date materials encountered during descent past 2 km of strata. The science objective for the Mars Stratigraphy Mission is to identify the geologic history of the layered deposits in the Valles Marineris region of Mars. This includes constraining the time interval for formation of these deposits by measuring the ages of various layers and determining the origin of the deposits (volcanic or sedimentary) by measuring their composition and imaging their morphology.

  16. Ninth international congress on Carboniferous stratigraphy and geology. Proceedings, volume 3. Neuvieme congres international de stratigraphie et de geologie du Carbonifere. Compte rendu, volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Geldsetzer, H.H.J.; Nassichuk, W.W.; Belt, E.S.; Macqueen, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Papers were presented on the Carboniferous stratigraphy of the Atlantic Coast basins, on paleogeography and paleotectonics and on sedimentology and geochemistry. A total of 14 papers concerning coal have been abstracted separately. Papers are in English or in French.

  17. Fracture and mechanical stratigraphy for Mississippian-Pennsylvanian age carbonates, Ozark Dome, NW Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppers, M.; Burberry, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying natural fracture patterns in an area gives a detailed look into the local tectonic history. Comparing those fractures to the mechanical properties of the rocks provides key insights into predicting fractures in the subsurface. The Ozark Dome is an ideal study area for fracture research due to multiple fracturing events resulting from the multi-stage deformation Ouachita Orogeny during the late Paleozoic. This study used field observations of lithology and fracture attributes over ~10 outcrops in the Mississppian-Pennsylvanian (360-298 ma) carbonate sequence of the Ozark Plateau. Outcrops were chosen having excellent lithological exposure up the sequence from the Boone to Atoka formations and with 3D representations of the fracture patterns. In all, the area investigated covered nearly 60 square miles. Fracture attributes collected included fracture intensity, length, and abutting relationships; and rock hardness data collected from a Schmidt Hammer. Data was analyzed using programs such as Stereonet and MOVE structural software that generated rose diagrams, structural cross sections, and products. Initial results indicate 4 main fracture orientations that resulted from at least 3 discrete phases of deformation during the Miss-Penn. Initial results also indicate that the present-day mechanical stratigraphy is not the same one that existed during the deformation phases. Work done at the Tiger Blvd. outcrops showed at least 2 distinct mechanical units. Fractures observed at the outcrop did not respect mechanical bed boundaries, and showed no relationship to the differences in mechanical properties observed. This study will aid in the interpretation of fractures in regards to mechanical stratigraphy, which allows for a better understanding of subsurface fracture prediction in carbonate sequences worldwide. Finally, the fracture work here will also help in elucidating the tectonic history of the field area during the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian.

  18. Carbon isotope stratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, and 40Ar/39Ar age of the Cretaceous South Atlantic coast, Namibe Basin, Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strganac, Christopher; Salminen, Johanna; Jacobs, Louis L.; Polcyn, Michael J.; Ferguson, Kurt M.; Mateus, Octávio; Schulp, Anne S.; Morais, Maria Luísa; Tavares, Tatiana da Silva; Gonçalves, António Olímpio

    2014-11-01

    We present the δ13C and paleomagnetic stratigraphy for marine strata at the coast of southern Angola, anchored by an intercalated basalt with a whole rock 40Ar/39Ar radiometric age of 84.6 ± 1.5 Ma, being consistent with both invertebrate and vertebrate biostratigraphy. This is the first African stable carbon isotope record correlated to significant events in the global carbon record spanning the Late Cenomanian to Early Maastrichtian. A positive ∼3‰ excursion seen in bivalve shells below the basalt indicates the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event at 93.9 Ma, during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2. Additional excursions above the basalt are correlated to patterns globally, including a negative ∼3‰ excursion near the top of the section interpreted as part of the Campanian-Maastrichtian Boundary Events. The age of the basalt ties the studied Bentiaba section to a pulse of Late Cretaceous magmatic activity around the South Atlantic and significant tectonic activity, including rotation, of the African continent.

  19. Integrated stratigraphy and isotopic ages at the Berriasian-Valanginian boundary at Tlatlauquitepec (Puebla, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Martínez, Rafael; Barragán, Ricardo; Bernal, Juan Pablo; Reháková, Daniela; Gómez-Tuena, Arturo; Martini, Michelangelo; Ortega, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    The integration of calpionellid biostratigraphy, microfacies analysis, Usbnd Pb geochronology, and strontium chemostratigraphy improves the definition of the Berriasian-Valanginian boundary in the Tlatlauquitepec area and validates the age of calpionellid zones from eastern Mexico in this interval. An age of 139.85 Ma derived from 87Sr/86Sr ratio within the base of Calpionellites Zone defines the Berriasian-Valanginian boundary. Additionally, the 134.0 ± 0.5 Ma Usbnd Pb age returned by zircon grains from a tuff level exposed at the top of the succession confirms the Valanginian age of the whole analyzed section. Microfacies analysis reveals sea level variations that can be coincident with the KVa1-KVa4 eustatic cycles. These new data suggest that calpionellid biostratigraphy represents the most useful tool for the definition of the Berriasian-Valanginian time boundary in central Mexico and its correlation with the rest of the Tethyan domain.

  20. Ochoan (upper Permian) stratigraphy and age determinations, southeastern New Mexico and west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G. ); Anderson, O.R. )

    1994-03-01

    Upper Permian strata, which are the stratotype of the Ochoan State (Series), have an extensive subsurface distribution and limited outcrop area in southeastern New Mexico and west Texas. The oldest strata are alternating laminae of anhydrite and calcite of the Castile Formation and are as much as 700 m thick. The closely related and overlying Salado Formation is a much as 600 m thick and is mostly halite and argillaceous halite with minor anhydrite. The overlying Rustler Formation is as much as 150 m thick and consists of anhydrite, red silty shale and magnesian limestone. Overlying red beds are the Quartermaster Formation (Dewey Lake Formation is a synonym, as is the term Pierce Canyon red beds), which is as much as 106 m thick and consist of fine sandstones, siltstones, and minor gypsum. The Castile rests disconformably on the Capitanian (middle Permian) Lamar Limestone Member of the Bell Canyon Formation and its equivalent, the Tansill Formation of the Artesia Group. Counting of Castile-Salado laminae and their posited relationship to astronomical cycles suggests that Castile-Salado deposition took only 200,000-300,000 yr. Limited assemblages of brachiopods and conodonts from the Rustler Formation indicate a Late Permian age, but are no more precise age indicators. A small assemblage of bivalves, K-Ar ages and magnetostratigraphy indicate a late Permian age for the Quartermaster Formation. There is no evidence to support a Triassic age assignment for the Quarter-master; it is disconformably overlain by the Upper Triassic (Carnian) Chinle group. Most workers us the Ochoan as a Late Permian Stage-Age, although its typical strata generally lack good age indicators and may represent relatively short and sporadic intervals of the Late Permian. We prefer recognition of the Ochoan as a lithostratigraphic unit (group) without regional or global geochronologial significance.

  1. Nonmarine stratigraphy of latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary age, southwestern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, T.F.; Mack, G.H.; Lucas, S.G.; Kietzke, K.K. )

    1989-09-01

    Recent fossil collections from nonmarine strata at localities in southwestern New Mexico indicate that the Ringbone formation, as originally defined, comprises units separated by a major hiatus that is represented in the field by an angular unconformity. The lower unit has yielded (NMMNH locality 298) two anterior caudal vertebral centra, morphologically and metrically indistinguishable from those of the Late Cretaceous tyrannosaurids Albertosaurus and Daspletosaurus. These dinosaur fossils establish a late Campanian or Maastrichtian age for the unit, indicating its equivalence with the McRae Formation of south-central New Mexico and the Fort Crittenden Formation of southeastern Arizona. The unit is composed of approximately 1,000 m of sedimentary-clast conglomerate, arkose, volcanic litharenite, and gray shale; it thus appears to contain detritus from several different source areas. The younger unit has yielded a low-diversity ostracod fauna of Paleocene to early Eocene age. Diagnostic taxa from the assemblage include Pseudoeocypris pagei and Cypridea arvadensis. The age of this fauna suggests equivalence with the Love Ranch and Lobo Formations of southern New Mexico. The unit consists of approximately 350 m of interbedded red siltstone and boulder conglomerate derived from Lower Cretaceous strata overlain by a sequence of laminated shale and subordinate sandstone with a preserved thickness of 150 m.

  2. Cosmic-ray exposure ages of the ordinary chondrites and their significance for parent body stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabb, J.; Schultz, L.

    1981-01-01

    Improved exposure ages are derived for 201 H, 203 L, and 38 LL chondrites in an effort to understand the characteristics of the chondrite parent body. The Ne-21 exposure ages were calculated from literature values taking into account shielding differences, a trapped component and radiogenic He. The exposure age distributions show clear peaks at 4.5 and 20 million years for the H chondrites, while the Ls and LLs appear more as a continuous series of intermediate peaks which may be modeled by at least six peaks between 1 and 35 million years in the case of L chondrites. The observations that every petrological type occurs in each large peak and contain solar wind gases suggest that the parent bodies have been fragmented and reassembled into a megabreccia. The H meteorites are proposed to represent the surface layer of a body with a substantial, active regolith as indicated by the relatively high abundances of solar gases. The L chondrites, on the other hand, are attributed to a parent body that was fragmented by collision about 500 million years ago.

  3. The little ice age as recorded in the stratigraphy of the tropical quelccaya ice cap.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L G; Mosley-Thompson, E; Dansgaard, W; Grootes, P M

    1986-10-17

    The analyses of two ice cores from a southern tropical ice cap provide a record of climatic conditions over 1000 years for a region where other proxy records are nearly absent. Annual variations in visible dust layers, oxygen isotopes, microparticle concentrations, conductivity, and identification of the historical (A.D. 1600) Huaynaputina ash permit accurate dating and time-scale verification. The fact that the Little Ice Age (about A.D. 1500 to 1900) stands out as a significant climatic event in the oxygen isotope and electrical conductivity records confirms the worldwide character of this event.

  4. Late Quaternary sedimentological and climate changes at Lake Bosumtwi Ghana: new constraints from laminae analysis and radiocarbon age modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanahan, Timothy M.; Beck, J. Warren; Overpeck, Jonathan T.; McKay, Nicholas P.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Peck, John A.; Scholz, Christopher A.; Heil, Clifford W.; King, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The Lake Bosumtwi sediment record represents one of the longest and highest-resolution terrestrial records of paleoclimate change available from sub-Saharan Africa. Here we report a new sediment age model framework for the last ~ 45 cal kyr of sedimentation using a combination of high-resolution radiocarbon dating, Bayesian age-depth modeling and lamination counting. Our results highlight the practical limits of these methods for reducing age model uncertainties and suggest that even with very high sampling densities, radiocarbon uncertainties of at least a few hundred years are unavoidable. Age model uncertainties are smallest during the Holocene (205 yr) and the glacial (360 yr) but are large at the base of the record (1660 yr), due to a combination of decreasing sample density, larger calibration uncertainties and increases in radiocarbon age scatter. For portions of the chronology older than ~ 35 cal kyr, additional considerations, such as the use of a low-blank graphitization system and more rigorous sample pretreatment were necessary to generate a reliable age depth model because of the incorporation of small amounts of younger carbon. A comparison of radiocarbon age model results and lamination counts over the time interval ~ 15–30 cal kyr agree with an overall discrepancy of ~ 10% and display similar changes in sedimentation rate, supporting the annual nature of sediment laminations in the early part of the record. Changes in sedimentation rates reconstructed from the age-depth model indicate that intervals of enhanced sediment delivery occurred at 16–19, 24 and 29–31 cal kyr, broadly synchronous with reconstructed drought episodes elsewhere in northern West Africa and potentially, with changes in Atlantic meridional heat transport during North Atlantic Heinrich events. These data suggest that millennial-scale drought events in the West African monsoon region were latitudinally extensive, reaching within several hundred kilometers of the Guinea coast

  5. Age, Stratigraphy, and Correlations of the Late Neogene Purisima Formation, Central California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Charles L.; Barron, John A.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Clark, Joseph C.; Perry, Frank A.; Brabb, Earl E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    The Purisima Formation is an important upper Miocene and Pliocene stratigraphic unit in central California, cropping out from the coast at Point Reyes north of San Francisco to more extensive exposures in the Santa Cruz Mountains to the south. The fine-grained rocks in the lower parts of the Purisima Formation record a latest Miocene transgressive event, whereas the middle and upper parts of the formation consist of increasingly clastic-rich siltstones and sandstones resulting from uplift of adjacent coastal regions and the Sierra Nevada during Pliocene transgressive and regressive sea-level events. Exposures of the Purisima occur in three different, fault-bounded, structural blocks - the Santa Cruz, Pigeon Point, and Point Reyes tectonic blocks - that complicate correlations and regional age assignments. We summarize and compare published and new biostratigraphic and geochronologic data for various exposures of the Purisima Formation on the basis of mollusks, diatoms, radiometric dating, magnetostratigraphy, tephrochronology, and strontium isotope dating. On the basis of these data, we conclude that the Purisima Formation ranges in age from the latest Miocene (about 7 Ma) to the late Pliocene (about 2.6 Ma). The Purisima Formation of Santa Cruz County, exposed in the sea cliffs from Santa Cruz to Rio del Mar, is here designated a supplementary reference section because it is the most complete and well studied Purisima section in central California.

  6. Constraints on the age of the Great Sand Dunes, Colorado, from subsurface stratigraphy and OSL dates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madole, Richard F.; Mahan, Shannon; Romig, Joseph H.; Havens, Jeremy C.

    2013-01-01

    The age of the Great Sand Dunes has been debated for nearly 150 yr. Seven ages ranging from Miocene to late Holocene have been proposed for them. This paper presents new information—chiefly subsurface stratigraphic data, OSL dates, and geomorphic evidence—that indicates that the Great Sand Dunes began to form in the latter part of the middle Pleistocene. The dunes overlie a thick wedge of piedmont-slope deposits, which in turn overlies sediment of Lake Alamosa, a paleolake that began to drain about 440 ka. The wedge of piedmont-slope deposits extends westward for at least 23 km and is as much as 60 m thick at a distance of 10 km from the Sangre de Cristo Range. Ostracodes from one well indicate that the eastern shoreline of Lake Alamosa extended to within 4.3 km of where the Great Sand Dunes eventually formed. The time represented by the wedge of piedmont-slope deposits is not known exactly, but the wedge post-dates 440 ka and was in place prior to 130 ka because by then the dunes overlying it were sufficiently close and tall enough to obstruct streams draining from the Sangre de Cristo Range.

  7. Lunar Impact Basins: Stratigraphy, Sequence and Ages from Superposed Impact Crater Populations Measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D = 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  8. Lunar impact basins: Stratigraphy, sequence and ages from superposed impact crater populations measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-02-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D ≥ 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  9. OSL age and stratigraphy of the Strauss sand sheet in New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Stephen A.; Goble, Ronald J.

    2015-07-01

    The Strauss sand sheet occurs in south-central New Mexico, USA, and northern Chihuahua, Mexico, covering an area of about 4740 km2. Its chronology is determined by 19 OSL ages. The sand sheet formed primarily during three phases of eolian deflation and deposition, each phase with a separate sand source and under different climatic and environmental circumstances. The first phase of eolian sedimentation occurred 45 to 15 ka with the deposition of unit 1. The sand source for the first phase was beach-related features along the eastern shoreline of pluvial Lake Palomas in Mexico. The glacial-age climate was cool, wet, and windy because of the southern path of the jet stream at that time. After 15 ka, with the onset of warmer conditions of the Bølling-Allerød, the shutting down of the Palomas sand source, and wet conditions of the Younger Dryas, the sand sheet stabilized with weak soil development in unit 1. By 11 ka, the climate shifted to Holocene drying conditions and the second phase of sand accumulation began, forming unit 2; the sand source was the local deflation of the previously deposited unit 1 sand. The sand sheet stabilized again by 1.9 ka with slightly wetter late Holocene climate; a weak soil formed in unit 2 sand. About A.D. 1500 and extending to about A.D. 1850 or later, an A horizon formed on the sand sheet, probably in response to a desert grassland vegetation during the period of wet climate of the Little Ice Age. In an anthropogenic third phase of eolian activity, after A.D. 1850, the vegetation was likely disturbed by overgrazing; and the unit 2 and A horizon (unit 3) sands were deflated, resulting in the deposition of a thin layer of massive eolian sand (unit 4) across the sand sheet. By about A.D. 1900 mesquite shrubs had increased in abundance; and deflated sand, largely from unit 2, began to accumulate around the shrubs, forming coppice dunes (unit 5). Mesquite coppice dunes continued to increase in number and volume during the twentieth

  10. Stratigraphy, age and environments of the late Miocene Mpesida Beds, Tugen Hills, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kingston, John D; Fine Jacobs, Bonnie; Hill, Andrew; Deino, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Interpretations of faunal assemblages from the late Miocene Mpesida Beds in the Tugen Hills of the Central Kenyan Rift Valley have figured prominently in discussions of faunal turnover and establishment of the modern East African communities. These faunal changes have important implications for the divergence of the human lineage from the African apes ca. 8-5 Ma. While fossil material recovered from the Mpesida Beds has traditionally been analyzed collectively, accumulating evidence indicates that Mpesida facies span the 7-6 Ma interval and are scattered more than 25 km along the eastern flanks of the Tugen Hills. Stratigraphic distinctions between Mpesida facies and younger sediments in the sequence, such as the Lukeino Formation, are not yet fully resolved, further complicating temporal assessments and stratigraphic context of Mpesida facies. These issues are discussed with specific reference to exposures of Mpesida facies at Rurmoch, where large fossil tree fragments were swept up in an ancient ash flow. Preserved anatomical features of the fossil wood as well as estimated tree heights suggest a wet, lowland rainforest in this portion of the rift valley. Stable isotopic analyses of fossil enamel and paleosol components indicate the presence of more open habitats locally. Overlying air-fall tuffs and epiclastic debris, possibly associated with the ash flow, have yielded an assemblage of vertebrate fossils including two teeth belonging to one of the earliest colombines of typical body size known from Africa, after the rather small Microcolobus. Single-crystal, laser-fusion,(40)Ar/(39)Ar dates from a capping trachyte flow as well as tuffs just below the lava contact indicate an age of greater than 6.37 Ma for the fossil material.

  11. Subsurface stratigraphy and geochemistry of late Quaternary evaporites, Searles Lake, California, with a section on radiocarbon ages of stratigraphic units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, George I.; Stuiver, Minze

    1979-01-01

    Searles Lake is a dry salt pan, about 100 km 2 in area, that lies on the floor of Searles Valley, in the desert of southeast California. Several salt bodies of late Quaternary age lie beneath the surface, mostly composed of sodium and potassium carbonate, sulfate, chloride, and borate minerals. Mud layers separate the salt bodies, which contain interstitial brine that is the source of large quantities of industrial chemicals. The value of annual production from the deposit exceeds $30 million; total production to date exceeds $1 billion. The salts and muds were deposited during Pleistocene and Holocene times by a series of large lakes (200 m maximum depth, 1,000 km 2 maximum area) that fluctuated in size in response to climatic change. Salts were deposited during major dry (interpluvial) episodes, muds during wet (pluvial) episodes that correlate with glacial advances in other parts of North America and the world. Data based on cores from the deposit are used in this paper to establish the stratigraphy of the deposit, the chemical and mineral compositions of successive units, and the total quantities of components contained by them. These parameters are then used to determine the geochemical evolution of the sedimentary layers. The results provide a refined basis for reconstructing the limnology of Searles Lake and the regional climate during late Quaternary time. Six main stratigraphic units were distinguished and informally named earlier on the basis of their dominant composition: Unit Typical thickness 14C age, uncorrected (in meters) (years B.P.) Overburden Mud 7 0 to >3,500 Upper Salt 15 >3,500 to 10,500 Parting Mud 4 10,500 to 24,000 Lower Salt 12 24,000 to 32,500 Bottom Mud 30 32,500 to 130,000 Mixed Layer 200+ > 130,000 (The age of 130,000 years for the Mixed Layer is based on extrapolated sedimentation rates.) The Lower Salt is subdivided into seven salt units (S-l to S-7) and six mud units (M-2 to M-7), the Mixed Layer into six units (A to F). For each

  12. Lithofacies, Age, and Sequence Stratigraphy of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group in the Skimo Creek Area, Central Brooks Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumoulin, Julie A.; Whalen, Michael T.; Harris, Anita G.

    2008-01-01

    The Lisburne Group, a mainly Carboniferous carbonate succession that is widely distributed across northern Alaska, contains notable amounts of oil and gas at Prudhoe Bay. Detailed studies of the Lisburne in the Skimo Creek area, central Brooks Range, delineate its lithofacies, age, conodont biofacies, depositional environments, and sequence stratigraphy and provide new data on its hydrocarbon source-rock and reservoir potential, as well as its thermal history, in this area. We have studied the Lisburne Group in two thrust sheets of the Endicott Mountains allochthon, herein called the Skimo and Tiglukpuk thrust sheets. The southern, Skimo Creek section, which is >900 m thick, is composed largely of even-bedded to nodular lime mudstone and wackestone intercalated with intervals of thin- to thick-bedded bioclastic packstone and grainstone. Some parts of the section are partially to completely dolomitized and (or) replaced by chert. A distinctive, 30-m-thick zone of black, organic-rich shale, lime mudstone, and phosphorite is exposed 170 m below the top of the Lisburne. The uppermost 40 m of section is also distinctive and made up of dark shale, lime mudstone, spiculite, and glauconitic grainstone. The northern, Tiglukpuk Creek section, which is similar to the Skimo Creek section but only ~760 m thick, includes more packstone and grainstone and less organic-rich shale. Analyses of conodonts and foraminifers indicate that both sections range in age from late Early Mississippian (Osagean) through Early Pennsylvanian (early Morrowan) and document a hiatus of at least 15 m.y. at the contact between the Lisburne and the overlying Siksikpuk Formation. No evidence of subaerial exposure was observed along this contact, which may represent a submarine erosional surface. Lithofacies and biofacies imply that the Lisburne Group in the study area was deposited mainly in midramp to outer-ramp settings. Deepest water strata are mud rich and formed below storm or fair-weather wave

  13. Sedimentology of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Strathearn Formation, Northern Carlin Trend, Nevada; with a section on microfossil controls on the age of the Strathearn Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.; Theodore, Ted G.; Harris, Anita G.; Stevens, Calvin H.

    2001-01-01

    recognized in the Strathearn Formation, as well as similarly-aged dolomitic siltstone, onlap directly onto quartzarenite that comprises the allochthon of the Coyote thrust. The conglomerate units thus represent submarine fanglomerates whose quartz grains and quartzarenite fragments of variable roundness and shape were derived from a sedimentologically restored largely southeastward advancing late Paleozoic allochthonous lobe of mostly quartzarenite of the Ordovician Vinini Formation. Chert fragments in the conglomerates probably were derived mostly from Devonian Slaven Chert, including a widespread thick melange unit of the Slaven in the footwall of the Coyote thrust. Some chert pebbles may have been derived from the Ordovician Vinini Formation.

  14. Stratigraphy of small shield volcanoes on Venus: Criteria for determining stratigraphic relationships and assessment of relative age and temporal abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2004-10-01

    Small volcanic edifices, shields with a diameter less than about 20 km, are common and sometimes very abundant features on the plains of Venus. Typically, they form tight or loose clusters of features known as shield fields. Small shields are interpreted to be formed due to small-scale eruptions through numerous and distinct sources, a mode of formation apparently significantly different from the mechanism thought to be responsible for the emplacement of the vast regional plains of Venus. Did the eruption style of small shields occur repeatedly throughout the visible part of the geologic record of Venus? Or was this style more concentrated in a specific epoch or epochs of geologic history? Do the clusters of shields represent localized development of sources over a thermal anomaly such as a plume, or do they represent exposures or kipukas of a more regional unit or units? A major step toward answering these questions is an understanding of small shield stratigraphy. Multiple criteria have been developed to assess the stratigraphic relationships of individual small shields and that of shield fields with the adjacent units. In our analysis, we expanded and developed the previous criteria and added detailed criteria to describe specific patterns of deformation within shield fields, cross-cutting, and embayment relationships between shield fields and surrounding units. We also used secondary characteristics of shield fields such as radar albedo difference, changes in shield density and size, etc. In our study, we applied these criteria and analyzed in detail stratigraphic relationships of shield fields in a random sample of features (64 fields) and in the global geotraverse along 30°N (77 fields). The total number of analyzed shield fields (141) represents about 22% of the general population of these features catalogued by Crumpler and Aubele [2000]. The majority of the fields (98, or ~69%) predate emplacement of material of vast regional plains with wrinkle ridges

  15. Recent Trends and Advances in Sedimentology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suttner, Lee J.

    1979-01-01

    Briefly surveys recent trends and developments in sedimentology. Includes Clastic sedimentary petrology, petrology of argillaceous rocks, terrigenous depositional environments, and chemical sedimentology. (MA)

  16. Stratigraphy and structure of coalbed methane reservoirs in the United States: an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pashin, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Stratigraphy and geologic structure determine the shape, continuity and permeability of coal and are therefore critical considerations for designing exploration and production strategies for coalbed methane. Coal in the United states is dominantly of Pennsylvanian, Cretaceous and Tertiary age, and to date, more than 90% of the coalbed methane produced is from Pennsylvanian and cretaceous strata of the Black Warrior and San Juan Basins. Investigations of these basins establish that sequence stratigraphy is a promising approach for regional characterization of coalbed methane reservoirs. Local stratigraphic variation within these strata is the product of sedimentologic and tectonic processes and is a consideration for selecting completion zones. Coalbed methane production in the United States is mainly from foreland and intermontane basins containing diverse compression and extensional structures. Balanced structural models can be used to construct and validate cross sections as well as to quantify layer-parallel strain and predict the distribution of fractures. Folds and faults influence gas and water production in diverse ways. However, interwell heterogeneity related to fractures and shear structures makes the performance of individual wells difficult to predict.Stratigraphy and geologic structure determine the shape, continuity and permeability of coal and are therefore critical considerations for designing exploration and production strategies for coalbed methane. Coal in the United States is dominantly of Pennsylvanian, Cretaceous and Tertiary age, and to date, more than 90% of the coalbed methane produced is from Pennsylvanian and Cretaceous strata of the Black Warrior and San Juan Basins. Investigations of these basins establish that sequence stratigraphy is a promising approach for regional characterization of coalbed methane reservoirs. Local stratigraphic variation within these strata is the product of sedimentologic and tectonic processes and is a

  17. First Clarkforkian Equivalent Land Mammal Age in the Latest Paleocene Basal Sparnacian Facies of Europe: Fauna, Flora, Paleoenvironment and (Bio)stratigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thierry; Quesnel, Florence; De Plöeg, Gaël; De Franceschi, Dario; Métais, Grégoire; De Bast, Eric; Solé, Floréal; Folie, Annelise; Boura, Anaïs; Claude, Julien; Dupuis, Christian; Gagnaison, Cyril; Iakovleva, Alina; Martin, Jeremy; Maubert, François; Prieur, Judicaël; Roche, Emile; Storme, Jean-Yves; Thomas, Romain; Tong, Haiyan; Yans, Johan; Buffetaut, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is correlated with the first occurrences of earliest modern mammals in the Northern Hemisphere. The latest Paleocene Clarkforkian North American Land Mammal Age, that has yielded rodents and carnivorans, is the only exception to this rule. However, until now no pre-PETM localities have yielded modern mammals in Europe or Asia. We report the first Clarkforkian equivalent Land Mammal Age in the latest Paleocene deposits of the basal Sparnacian facies at Rivecourt, in the north-central part of the Paris Basin. The new terrestrial vertebrate and macroflora assemblages are analyzed through a multidisciplinary study including sedimentologic, stratigraphic, isotopic, and palynological aspects in order to reconstruct the paleoenvironment and to evaluate biochronologic and paleogeographic implications. The mammals are moderately diverse and not abundant, contrary to turtles and champsosaurs. The macroflora is exceptional in preservation and diversity with numerous angiosperms represented by flowers, fruits, seeds and wood preserved as lignite material, revealing an abundance of Arecaceae, Betulaceae, Icacinaceae, Menispermaceae, Vitaceae and probably Cornaceae. Results indicate a Late Paleocene age based on carbon isotope data, palynology and vertebrate occurrences such as the choristoderan Champsosaurus, the arctocyonid Arctocyon, and the plesiadapid Plesiadapis tricuspidens. However, several mammal species compare better with the earliest Eocene. Among these, the particular louisinid Teilhardimys musculus, also recorded from the latest Paleocene of the Spanish Pyrenees, suggests a younger age than the typical MP6 reference level. Nevertheless, the most important aspect of the Rivecourt fauna is the presence of dental remains of a rodent and a “miacid” carnivoran, attesting to the presence of two modern mammalian orders in the latest Paleocene of Europe. Interestingly, these two groups are also the only modern groups recorded

  18. First Clarkforkian equivalent Land Mammal Age in the latest Paleocene basal Sparnacian facies of Europe: fauna, flora, paleoenvironment and (bio)stratigraphy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thierry; Quesnel, Florence; De Plöeg, Gaël; De Franceschi, Dario; Métais, Grégoire; De Bast, Eric; Solé, Floréal; Folie, Annelise; Boura, Anaïs; Claude, Julien; Dupuis, Christian; Gagnaison, Cyril; Iakovleva, Alina; Martin, Jeremy; Maubert, François; Prieur, Judicaël; Roche, Emile; Storme, Jean-Yves; Thomas, Romain; Tong, Haiyan; Yans, Johan; Buffetaut, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is correlated with the first occurrences of earliest modern mammals in the Northern Hemisphere. The latest Paleocene Clarkforkian North American Land Mammal Age, that has yielded rodents and carnivorans, is the only exception to this rule. However, until now no pre-PETM localities have yielded modern mammals in Europe or Asia. We report the first Clarkforkian equivalent Land Mammal Age in the latest Paleocene deposits of the basal Sparnacian facies at Rivecourt, in the north-central part of the Paris Basin. The new terrestrial vertebrate and macroflora assemblages are analyzed through a multidisciplinary study including sedimentologic, stratigraphic, isotopic, and palynological aspects in order to reconstruct the paleoenvironment and to evaluate biochronologic and paleogeographic implications. The mammals are moderately diverse and not abundant, contrary to turtles and champsosaurs. The macroflora is exceptional in preservation and diversity with numerous angiosperms represented by flowers, fruits, seeds and wood preserved as lignite material, revealing an abundance of Arecaceae, Betulaceae, Icacinaceae, Menispermaceae, Vitaceae and probably Cornaceae. Results indicate a Late Paleocene age based on carbon isotope data, palynology and vertebrate occurrences such as the choristoderan Champsosaurus, the arctocyonid Arctocyon, and the plesiadapid Plesiadapis tricuspidens. However, several mammal species compare better with the earliest Eocene. Among these, the particular louisinid Teilhardimys musculus, also recorded from the latest Paleocene of the Spanish Pyrenees, suggests a younger age than the typical MP6 reference level. Nevertheless, the most important aspect of the Rivecourt fauna is the presence of dental remains of a rodent and a "miacid" carnivoran, attesting to the presence of two modern mammalian orders in the latest Paleocene of Europe. Interestingly, these two groups are also the only modern groups recorded

  19. Volcanic Event Recurrence Rate Model (VERRM): Incorporating Radiometric Ages, Volcanic Stratigraphy and Paleomagnetic Data into a Monte Carlo Simulation to Estimate Uncertainty in Recurrence Rate through Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. A.; Richardson, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional methods used to calculate recurrence rate of volcanism, such as linear regression, maximum likelihood and Weibull-Poisson distributions, are effective at estimating recurrence rate and confidence level, but these methods are unable to estimate uncertainty in recurrence rate through time. We propose a new model for estimating recurrence rate and uncertainty, Volcanic Event Recurrence Rate Model. VERRM is an algorithm that incorporates radiometric ages, volcanic stratigraphy and paleomagnetic data into a Monte Carlo simulation, generating acceptable ages for each event. Each model run is used to calculate recurrence rate using a moving average window. These rates are binned into discrete time intervals and plotted using the 5th, 50th and 95th percentiles. We present recurrence rates from Cima Volcanic Field (CA), Yucca Mountain (NV) and Arsia Mons (Mars). Results from Cima Volcanic Field illustrate how several K-Ar ages with large uncertainties obscure three well documented volcanic episodes. Yucca Mountain results are similar to published rates and illustrate the use of using the same radiometric age for multiple events in a spatially defined cluster. Arsia Mons results show a clear waxing/waning of volcanism through time. VERRM output may be used for a spatio-temporal model or to plot uncertainty in quantifiable parameters such as eruption volume or geochemistry. Alternatively, the algorithm may be reworked to constrain geomagnetic chrons. VERRM is implemented in Python 2.7 and takes advantage of NumPy, SciPy and matplotlib libraries for optimization and quality plotting presentation. A typical Monte Carlo simulation of 40 volcanic events takes a few minutes to couple hours to complete, depending on the bin size used to assign ages.

  20. Age modelling of late Quaternary marine sequences in the Adriatic: Towards improved precision and accuracy using volcanic event stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, J. J.; Blockley, S.; Trincardi, F.; Asioli, A.; Cattaneo, A.; Matthews, I. P.; Pollard, M.; Wulf, S.

    2007-02-01

    The first part of this paper presents a review of the problems that constrain the reliability of radiocarbon-based age models with particular focus on those used to underpin marine records. The reasons why radiocarbon data-sets need to be much more comprehensive than has been the norm hitherto, and why age models should be based on calibrated data only, are outlined. The complexity of the probability structure of calibrated radiocarbon data and the advantages of a Bayesian statistical approach for constructing calibrated age models are illustrated. The second part of the paper tests the potential for reducing the uncertainties that constrain radiocarbon-based age models using tephrostratigraphy. Fine (distal) ash layers of Holocene age preserved in Adriatic prodelta sediments are analysed geochemically and compared to tephras preserved in the Lago Grande di Monticchio site in southern Italy. The Monticchio tephras have been dated both by radiocarbon and varve chronology. The importance of basing such comparisons on standardised geochemical and robust statistical procedures is stressed. In this instance, both the Adriatic and Monticchio geochemical measurements are based on wavelength dispersive spectrometry, while discriminant function analysis is employed for statistical comparisons. Using this approach, the ages of some of the Adriatic marine ash layers could be estimated in Monticchio varve years, circumventing some of the uncertainty of radiocarbon-based age models introduced by marine reservoir effects. Fine (distal) ash layers are more widespread and better preserved in Mediterranean marine sequences than realised hitherto and may offer much wider potential for refining the dating and correlation of Mediterranean marine sequences as well as marine-land correlations.

  1. Sequence stratigraphy, structural style, and age of deformation of the Malaita accretionary prism (Solomon arc-Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, Eric J.; Mann, Paul; Coffin, Millard F.; Shipley, Thomas H.

    2004-10-01

    Possibilities for the fate of oceanic plateaus at subduction zones range from complete subduction of the plateau beneath the arc to complete plateau-arc accretion and resulting collisional orogenesis. Deep penetration, multi-channel seismic reflection (MCS) data from the northern flank of the Solomon Islands reveal the sequence stratigraphy, structural style, and age of deformation of an accretionary prism formed during late Neogene (5-0 Ma) convergence between the ˜33-km-thick crust of the Ontong Java oceanic plateau and the ˜15-km-thick Solomon island arc. Correlation of MCS data with the satellite-derived, free-air gravity field defines the tectonic boundaries and internal structure of the 800-km-long, 140-km-wide accretionary prism. We name this prism the "Malaita accretionary prism" or "MAP" after Malaita, the largest and best-studied island exposure of the accretionary prism in the Solomon Islands. MCS data, gravity data, and stratigraphic correlations to islands and ODP sites on the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) reveal that the offshore MAP is composed of folded and thrust faulted sedimentary rocks and upper crystalline crust offscraped from the Solomon the subducting Ontong Java Plateau (Pacific plate) and transferred to the Solomon arc. With the exception of an upper, sequence of Quaternary? island-derived terrigenous sediments, the deformed stratigraphy of the MAP is identical to that of the incoming Ontong Java Plateau in the North Solomon trench. We divide the MAP into four distinct, folded and thrust fault-bounded structural domains interpreted to have formed by diachronous, southeast-to-northwest, and highly oblique entry of the Ontong Java Plateau into a former trench now marked by the Kia-Kaipito-Korigole (KKK) left-lateral strike-slip fault zone along the suture between the Solomon arc and the MAP. The structural style within each of the four structural domains consists of a parallel series of three to four fault propagation folds formed by the

  2. Stratigraphy, age, and depositional setting of the Miocene Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, central Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leslie, Shannon R.; Miller, David M.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    New detailed geologic mapping and geochronology of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, 30 km east of Barstow, CA, help to constrain Miocene paleogeography and tectonics of the central Mojave Desert. A northern strand of the Quaternary ENE-striking, sinistral Manix fault divides the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill into two distinct lithologic assemblages. Strata north of the fault consist of: a green rhyolitic tuff, informally named the Shamrock tuff; lacustrine sandstone; partially silicified thin-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone to pebble conglomerate. Strata south of the fault consist of: lacustrine siltstone and sandstone; a rhyolitic tuff dated at 19.1 Ma (U-Pb); rock-avalanche breccia deposits; partially silicified well-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone and conglomerate. Our U-Pb zircon dating of the Shamrock tuff by SHRIMP-RG yields a peak probability age of 18.7 ± 0.1 Ma. Distinctive outcrop characteristics, mineralogy, remanent magnetization, and zircon geochemistry (Th/U) suggest that the Shamrock tuff represents a lacustrine facies of the regionally extensive Peach Spring Tuff (PST). Here we compare zircon age and geochemical analyses from the Shamrock tuff with those of the PST at Stoddard Wash and provide new insight into the age of zircon crystallization in the PST rhyolite. Results of our field studies show that Miocene strata at Harvard Hill mostly accumulated in a lacustrine environment, although depositional environments varied from a relatively deep lake to a very shallow lake or even onshore setting. Rock-avalanche breccias and alluvial deposits near the base of the exposed section indicate proximity to a steep basin margin and detrital studies suggest a southern source for coarse-grained deposits; therefore, we may infer a southern basin-margin setting at Harvard Hill during the early Miocene. Our geochronology demonstrates that deposition of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill extended from before

  3. Volcanic stratigraphy and geochemical variations in Miocene-age rocks in western and southeastern Fort Irwin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesch, D.

    2015-12-01

    Lava flows and tuffaceous deposits ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite, including basaltic trachyandesite to trachyte, are exposed in 800 km2 of western Fort Irwin area, California, and form the eastern edge of the Eagle Crags volcanic field (ECVF). The main ECVF has 40Ar/39Ar ages from ~18.7-12.4 Ma (mostly 18.7-18.5 Ma; Sabin et al. 1994), and on Fort Irwin, the ages are from 21.0-15.8 Ma (mostly 18.6-15.8 Ma; Schermer et al. 1996). 68 samples (56 lava flow, 4 dome-collapse breccia, 3 ignimbrite, and 5 fallout tephra) were analyzed for major, minor, and trace elements. Typically, stratigraphic sequences dip <30° (mostly <15°) except near faults, with local buttress unconfomities and no large unconfomities. Compositions are moderate-to-high-K type, and similar to Na2O+K2O from Sabin et al. (1994) but with slightly smaller ranges. The generalized stratigraphic sequence is rhyolite (R), dacite (D), or trachyte (T) that form domes, lava flows (up to 3.5 km long), dome-collapse deposits, or pyroclastic deposits, overlain by andesite (A), trachyandesite (TA), basaltic andesite (BA), basaltic trachyandesite (BT), or basalt (B) lava flows (up to 7 km long), and minor cinder cones. A general upward felsic to mafic compositional sequence occurs throughout the area, but is not continuous as B is locally in a R-D sequence and B is at the base of and interstratified with a BA-A sequence. Also, there are compositional variations at different locations along the edges of the field. In the Goldstone Mesa, Pink Canyon, and Stone Ridge areas (~70 km2), B-BA forms the youngest lava flows, but ~21 km to the north in the Garry Owen area (~25 km2), BTA forms the youngest lava flows. Compared to the Stone Ridge area with a D-A-TA-BA trend, ~6 km west in the Pioneer Plateau area is R-TA-D, ~3 km south in the Pink Canyon area is R-B-BA-A, and ~8 km east at Dacite Dome is D only (all areas have slightly different Na2O+K2O in each rock type). A non-ECVF, 5.6 Ma BA flow in SE

  4. K/Ar ages, magnetic stratigraphy and morphological evolution of La Gomera: implications for the Canary Islands hotspot evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, R.; Guillou, H.; Carracedo, J. C.; Pérez Torrado, F. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Canary Islands are a group of seven volcanic islands, 100-700 km west of the Sahara continental margin. The spatial and chronological evolution of the canarian volcanism, from east to west, is due to the progression of the slow-moving african plate on a hotspot. La Gomera is located between the western shield-growing stage islands (La Palma, 1,7 Ma and El Hierro, 1,1 Ma) and the central "rejuvaneted stage" islands (Tenerife, 11,9 Ma and Gran Canaria, 14,5 Ma). After 23 K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism datas, we determine the main volcanic phases of La Gomera : (1) the submarine shield volcano (> 9,5 Ma), (2) the first subaeriel shield volcano (9,43-7,36 Ma), (3) the Vallehermoso stratovolcan, (4) the peripheral "planèzes" and domes forming series (6,67-1,94 Ma) and the Garajonay horizontal series (5,42-4,25 Ma). The stratovolcano and the horizontal series fill a 10 km wide depression that is supposed to be a giant landslide embayment. The scarps of this landslide correspond to the main discontinuity in the island structure. After 4 M.y. of very scarce volcanism, the whole structure of La Gomera is in relief inversion, with a radial pattern of deep barrancos. The erosion rates are lower during the hiatus (< 0,2 m/ka) than during the shield stage (0,2-0,9 m/ka), pointing out the fact that the volcanic construction rates and the erosion rates are strongly correlated. La Gomera is one of the best example of a hiatus stage of hotspot evolution. The volcanic load La Gomera and Tenerife may have delayed the western islands volcanism, favouring a dual-line.

  5. Workshop on the Martian Northern Plains: Sedimentological, Periglacial, and Paleoclimatic Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S. (Editor); Moore, Jeffrey (Editor); Parker, Timothy (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on the Martian Northern Plains: Sedimentological, Periglacial, and Paleoclimatic Evolution, on 12-14 Aug. 1993 in Fairbanks, Alaska are included. Topics covered include: hydrological consequences of ponded water on Mars; morphological and morphometric studies of impact craters in the Northern Plains of Mars; a wet-geology and cold-climate Mars model: punctuation of a slow dynamics approach to equilibrium; the distribution of ground ice on Mars; and stratigraphy of the Martian Northern Plains.

  6. Mechanical stratigraphy and normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Hill, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stratigraphy encompasses the mechanical properties, thicknesses, and interface properties of rock units. Although mechanical stratigraphy often relates directly to lithostratigraphy, lithologic description alone does not adequately describe mechanical behavior. Analyses of normal faults with displacements of millimeters to 10's of kilometers in mechanically layered rocks reveal that mechanical stratigraphy influences nucleation, failure mode, fault geometry, displacement gradient, displacement distribution, fault core and damage zone characteristics, and fault zone deformation processes. The relationship between normal faulting and mechanical stratigraphy can be used either to predict structural style using knowledge of mechanical stratigraphy, or conversely to interpret mechanical stratigraphy based on characterization of the structural style. This review paper explores a range of mechanical stratigraphic controls on normal faulting illustrated by natural and modeled examples.

  7. Tectonic sequence stratigraphy, Early Permian Dry Mountain trough, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.S.; Gallegos, D.M.; Spinosa, C. ); Schwarz, D.L. )

    1991-06-01

    The Early Permian Dry Mountain trough (DMT) of east-central Nevada is one of several tectonic basins and associated uplifts that developed along the continenetal margin during the latest Pennsylvanian-Early Permian Dry Mountain tectonic phase. The sequence stratigraphy reflects a combination of eustatic sea level changes and tectonic uplift or subsidence. Fewer than one to only a few million years separate the development of sequence boundaries within the DMT. At this scale, differences among published eustasy curves preclude their use as definitive tools to identify eustatically controlled sequence boundaries. Nevertheless, available data indicate several pulses of tectonism affected sedimentation within the DMT. The authors are attempting to develop criteria to distinguish tectonic from eustatic sequence boundaries. Detailed biostratigraphic data are required to provide an independent check on the correlation of sequence boundaries between measured sections. For example, the same age boundary may reflect tectonic uplift in one part of the basin and subsidence in another. The uplift may or may not result in subaerial exposure and erosion. For those boundaries that do not result from subaerial exposure, lithofacies and biofacies analyses are required to infer relative uplift (water depth decrease) or subsidence (water depth increase). There are inherent resolution limitations in both the paleontologic and sedimentologic methodologies. These limitations, combined with those of eustasy curves, dictate the preliminary nature of their results.

  8. Volcanic stratigraphy of a high-altitude Mammuthus columbi (Tlacotenco, Sierra Chichinautzin), Central México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbaud, Marie-Noelle; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Siebe, Claus; Barba-Pingarrón, Luis Alberto; Ortiz, Agustín

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of a near complete skeleton of Mammuthus columbi in a cornfield located on the northern slopes of the Sierra Chichinautzin volcanic field south of Mexico City sparked the interest of the scientific and public community. Although remains of this species of mammoth are frequently discovered in central Mexico, this new find is at the southernmost and highest (ca. 2770 m asl) location yet within the Mexico Basin. In addition, the bones were found embedded in dark volcanic ash, raising the possibility of a relationship between the death of the animal and explosive activity at a neighboring scoria cone, as the site is located <10 km from several young volcanoes. Stratigraphic, sedimentological, geochemical, and geochronological studies were conducted at the discovery site and within a 5-km radius to determine the tephra stratigraphy in the area and constrain the source of the " mammoth ash" and the age and taphonomy of the fossil remains. Results show that the mammoth was buried after death by stream-flows (dilute lahars) that were triggered by torrential rain that remobilized loose scoriaceous ash ejected by the San Miguel cone some time after its eruption ca. 17,000 BP.

  9. Mineralogical Stratigraphy of Ganges Chasma, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull-Hearth, Selby; Clark, M. Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Mars’ Valles Marineris canyon system reveals a several-kilometer deep stratigraphies sequence that extends thousands of kilometers; this sequence thus represents a unique opportunity to explore millions of years of volcanic and aqueous activity in this region of Mars. Of particular interest to the study of both volcanic and aqueous processes is Ganges Chasma, which lies on the northeastern boundary of the Valles Marineris canyon system on Mars. The canyon likely opened during the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian, modifying previously emplaced Noachian-aged volcanic plains. During formation, volcanic activity from the nearby Tharsis shield complex emplaced olivine-rich dikes throughout the region. After formation, sulfate-bearing Interior Layered Deposits (ILDs) were emplaced in Ganges and many other chasmata throughout the Valles Marineris system. Today, Ganges reveals a complex stratigraphy, including wide-spread olivine-rich sands, hydrated minerals on the plateaus surrounding the canyon, and a central sulfate-rich ILD. Here, we present updated stratigraphies of Ganges Chasma, using new data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), and synthesizing it with previous data sets. Olivine sands are traced back to source outcrops on the canyon floor, and new outcrops of hydrated minerals on the surrounding plateau are identified and mapped. Recently reported spectroscopic signatures of ankerite and smectite in the chasm are assessed, and new olivine-rich outcrops identified and mapped. Understanding the stratigraphy of Ganges Chasma will help us compare stratigraphies among the chasmata of the Valles Marineris, further building our understanding of the geologic history of this large region of Mars.

  10. Stratigraphy of the Martian northern plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The northern plains of Mars are roughly defined as the large continuous region of lowlands that lies below Martian datum, plus higher areas within the region that were built up by volcanism, sedimentation, tectonism, and impacts. These northern lowlands span about 50 x 10(exp 6) km(sup 2) or 35 percent of the planet's surface. The age and origin of the lowlands continue to be debated by proponents of impact and tectonic explanations. Geologic mapping and topical studies indicate that volcanic, fluvial, and eolian deposition have played major roles in the infilling of this vast depression. Periglacial, glacial, fluvial, eolian, tectonic, and impact processes have locally modified the surface. Because of the northern plains' complex history of sedimentation and modification, much of their stratigraphy was obscured. Thus the stratigraphy developed is necessarily vague and provisional: it is based on various clues from within the lowlands as well as from highland areas within and bordering the plains. The results are summarized.

  11. A luminescence dating study of the sediment stratigraphy of the Lajia Ruins in the upper Yellow River valley, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzhu; Huang, Chun Chang; Pang, Jiangli; Zhou, Yali; Zha, Xiaochun; Wang, Longsheng; Zhou, Liang; Guo, Yongqiang; Wang, Leibin

    2014-06-01

    Pedo-sedimentological fieldwork were carried out in the Lajia Ruins within the Guanting Basin along the upper Yellow River valley. In the eolian loess-soil sections on the second river terrace in the Lajia Ruins, we find that the land of the Qijia Culture (4.20-3.95 ka BP) are fractured by several sets of earthquake fissures. A conglomerated red clay covers the ground of the Qijia Culture and also fills in the earthquake fissures. The clay was deposited by enormous mudflows in association with catastrophic earthquakes and rainstorms. The aim of this study is to provide a luminescence chronology of the sediment stratigraphy of the Lajia Ruins. Eight samples were taken from an eolian loess-soil section (Xialajia section) in the ruins for optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. The OSL ages are in stratigraphic order and range from (31.94 ± 1.99) ka to (0.76 ± 0.02) ka. Combined OSL and 14C ages with additional stratigraphic correlations, a chronological framework is established. We conclude that: (1) the second terrace of the upper part of Yellow River formed 35.00 ka ago, which was followed by the accumulation of the eolian loess-soil section; and (2) the eolian loess-soil section is composed of the Malan Loess of the late last glacial (MIS-2) and Holocene loess-soil sequences.

  12. Constraining coastal change: A morpho-sedimentological concept to infer sea-level oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauz, Barbara; Shen, Zhixiong

    2016-04-01

    One of the responders to Milankovitch-scale climate changes is sea level which, in turn, is a driver of coastal change. In literature, the sedimentary sequences representing the coastal change are often linked to high sea-level stands, to intermediate sea-level positions or to regressive shorelines. We note apparent contradictions that indicate a lack of concept and inconsistent usage of sea level-related terms. To overcome this, we combine an integrated morpho-sedimentological concept for microtidal, mid-latitudinal coasts with chronologies based on Bayesian statistics. The concept regards the coastal sedimentary system as a depositional complex consisting of shallow-marine, aeolian and alluvial facies. These facies are in juxtaposition and respond simultaneously to external forcing. Bayesian statistics constrains the timing of the sequence based on optical or radiocarbon ages. Here, we present the site Hergla located on the North African coast of the central Mediterranean Sea as a case study to illustrate how the approach helps eliminating contradictions. The site has been cited frequently for confirming the hypothesis of a global two peak sea-level highstand during the last interglacial (MIS 5e). The ~2 km cliff exposure at Hergla was surveyed, mapped, logged and sampled for further describing the sediments and their depositional environment through thin section and Bayesian modelling of optical ages. Using our concept based on sequence stratigraphy tools, the section is interpreted as representing a coastal barrier with two bounding surfaces in the succession. Both surfaces mark the falling sea level of, first, MIS 5e and, second, MIS 5a and hence bound the falling stage system tract of a forced regression. Part of the deposits between the two surfaces are pulled up onto the shoulder of a small rising horst and the associated tectonic event coincided with the MIS 5a sea-level rise enhancing locally the accommodation space for a second foreshore environment. Our

  13. Sedimentology of polar carbonate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; James, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    The key attributes, processes, and products associated with carbonate accumulation and diagenesis at tropical and temperate latitudes are well known. Comparatively little work has concentrated on carbonate deposition at the coldest end of the depositional spectrum, the polar shelves. Such deposits are not abundant, but they have the potential to provide unique insights into paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic conditions in regions of the planet that are arguably the most sensitive to global change. We examined skeletal assemblages, facies, stratigraphy, petrography, geochemistry, and diagenesis of Quaternary deposits from the Ross Sea, Antarctica and Permian counterparts from Gondwana (now eastern Australia). These modern and ancient polar carbonate factories possess several unique characteristics that set them apart from better-known systems of the temperate and tropical latitudes. All production is biogenic and there are no significant calcareous phototrophs. Carbonate communities are not capable of building rigid frameworks, and thus their deposits are prone to winnowing and reworking by waves and bottom currents. The seawater, although frigid, is isothermal, and thus deep-water benthic communities can exist near the surface. Carbonate saturation, which is at or below solubility for both aragonite and high-Mg calcite, plays a key role in determining the dominant mineralogy of benthos as well as the preservation potential of skeletal debris. As many taxa precipitate low-Mg calcite in isotopic equilibrium, deposits have potential to provide geochemical proxy information for use in paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic reconstructions. More than any other type of carbonate system, the slow biogenic carbonate production and accumulation in cold waters is achieved firstly by arresting siliciclastic sedimentation and secondly by increasing nutrient availability. Thus, carbonate deposition may occur during the coldest of times, such as during glacial advance when

  14. Sedimentological Evidence of the 1812 Santa Barbara Tsunami in Carpinteria Marsh, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, L.; Simms, A.; King, B. L.; Rockwell, T. K.; Ejarque, A.; Anderson, R.; Peters, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Santa Barbara coast is at risk for tsunamis generated from tectonic movement in areas of compression and extension associated with the San Andreas Fault, as well as from submarine landslide movement in the Santa Barbara channel. Historical documents and other records indicate Santa Barbara has experienced approximately sixteen historical tsunamis, the largest of which may have occurred on Dec 21, 1812, following a magnitude ~7.1 earthquake. We propose that an anomalous sand deposit, Sand Facies One (SF1), which is found within the first meter of sediment throughout Carpinteria Marsh in Carpinteria, CA, may represent deposition related to this event. We have collected 23 vibracores, up to 4.1 m in length, and three Geoprobe cores to ~14 m depth in Carpinteria Marsh. SF1 occurs in 20 of the 23 vibracores and exhibits sedimentological characteristics associated with a tsunami genesis such as: fining upward grain size, sharp or erosional basal contact, and thinning of the deposit landward. Mineralogy, deposit geometry, and X-Ray Florescence (XRF) data are used to determine a marine versus terrestrial origin for the layer. It is difficult, however, to differentiate between storm and tsunami deposits based purely on the sedimentary characteristics of a deposit. We show that an improved age chronology which includes exotic pollen stratigraphy and radiocarbon data indicates an age range appropriate for the 1812 event but does not exclude regional flooding events documented in the 1860s. We use the characteristics of SF1 to determine if similar layers occur at other depths in the Geoprobe cores. Preliminary core descriptions indicate that there is at least one layer which exhibits characteristics similar to SF1and may indicate the occurrence of a similar inundation event. We conclude that tsunami deposition related to the 1812 event is a possible explanation for SF1, but additional analyses are needed to rule out other flooding events. Whether storm or tsunami, the

  15. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  16. Ages and stratigraphy of lunar mare basalts in Mare Frigoris and other nearside maria based on crater size-frequency distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Head, J. W.; Wolf, U.; Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.

    2010-03-01

    We report on ages derived from impact crater counts for exposed mare basalt units in the northern part of the lunar nearside hemisphere (Mare Frigoris), the eastern and northeastern part of the nearside hemisphere (Lacus Temporis, Joliot, Hubble, Goddard, Mare Marginis, and Mare Smythii), the central part of the nearside hemisphere (Palus Putredinis, Mare Vaporum, and Sinus Medii), and the southwestern part of the nearside hemisphere (Grimaldi, Crüger, Rocca A, Lacus Aestatis, and Schickard). In Mare Frigoris, we dated 37 basalt units, showing ages from 2.61 to 3.77 Gyr, with most units being formed in the late Imbrian period between 3.4 and 3.8 Gyr ago. In Mare Vaporum we dated six spectrally homogeneous units that show model ages of 3.10 to 3.61 Gyr. Our model ages of basalts in Mare Marginis range from 3.38 to 3.88 Gyr and are mostly older than basalts in Mare Smythii (3.14-3.48 Gyr). The model ages of four units in Sinus Medii indicate that the basalts in this region formed 3.63 to 3.79 Gyr ago. We find an excellent agreement of our crater size-frequency model ages of the Palus Putredinis area, which contains the Apollo 15 landing site, with the radiometric ages of Apollo 15 samples. According to our crater counts, basalts in Palus Putredinis are 3.34 Gyr old and this compares favorably with the radiometric ages of 3.30-3.35 Gyr of the olivine-normative and quartz-normative basalts of the Apollo 15 landing site. Lacus Aestatis is a small irregular-shaped mare patch in the southwestern nearside and shows an Imbrian age of 3.50 Gyr; basalts in Lacus Temporis in the northeastern nearside formed between 3.62 and 3.74 Gyr ago and are, therefore, older than the basalts in Lacus Aestatis. We found that basalts in craters of the southwestern nearside (Schickard, Grimaldi, Crüger, and Rocca A) are also mostly younger than basalts in craters of the northeastern nearside (Hubble, Joliot, and Goddard). While basalt ages vary between 3.16 and 3.75 Gyr in the southwest

  17. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and petrology of Upper Cretaceous Horsethief and St. Mary River formations, western Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Fairhurst, W.

    1983-03-01

    The Horsethief and St. Mary River formations were deposited along the Late Cretaceous epicontinental seaway, which then covered much of the western interior. The Horsethief, lower of the two formations, is divided into two facies sequences. Facies sequence A consist of coarsening-upward sequences of sandstones and interbedded shales. These facies comprise a barrier island system consisting of shoreface, dune, tidal channel, and lagoonal environments. Facies sequence B, deposited along the depositional strike, consists of a coarsening-upward sequence of vertically stacked distributary channels that thicken and become more abundant upsection. The St. Mary River Formation is divided into a lower and upper member. The lower member consists of shales, sandstones, limestones, and coals deposited in a lagoon landward of the barrier island system. The upper member contains trough cross-bedded, channel sandstones, overbank sandstones, shales, and carbonate-nodule horizons indicative of fluvial plain sedimentation. Petrographic analysis indicates the detritus of these formations was derived from a magmatic are provenance. Statistically significant correlations document a decrease in grain size as the distance of sediment transport increases within the entire section and within distinct environments, including middle shoreface, upper shoreface, and dune facies. The high percentage of volcanic constituents decreases as the distance of sediment transport increases and the grain size decreases. The recognition of these facies is significant because of the potentially important application associated with hydrocarbon source and reservoir conditions, as well as heavy mineral assemblages.

  18. Oligocene Hackberry Formation of southwest Louisiana: Sequence stratigraphy, sedimentology, and hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cossey, S.P.J.; Jacobs, R.E. )

    1992-05-01

    The Oligocene Hackberry sequence was deposited in a slope environment consisting of an irregular, updip slide scar, a rotational slide zone up to 4 mi (6.5 km) wide, and a downdip region more than 20 mi (32 km) wide where meandering submarine channels deposited thick turbiditic sands. The shelf margin slides probably began during the late stage of a relative fall in sea level and prior to a maximum flood event in the middle Oligocene. The slides probably were caused by a combination of salt withdrawal and an unstable shelf edge. The play has produced more than 374 million bbl of oil equivalent (BOE) up to December 1988. The first fields were discovered in structural/stratigraphic traps on the updip flanks of the salt domes, where channels were forced to meander around paleobathymetric highs. Other fields are located in the paleobathymetric lows many miles downdip of the salt domes. Statistical analysis of field data shows that 41 fields with more than 1 million BOE each and with a total estimated ultimate recovery of 117 million BOE remain to be discovered in the play. Interpretation in southwestern Louisiana has shown that new reserves could be discovered in three potential reservoir sands: (1) lower Frio shelf-edge sands preserved in large slide blocks, (2) onlapping, sandy 'fill sequences' restricted to the lows between slide blocks, and (3) meandering, dip-oriented, sandy channel complexes less than 4,500 ft (1,400 m) wide. These three sandstones cannot be distinguished unless dipmeter, seismic, and paleontologic data are used in combination.

  19. Seismic stratigraphy, sedimentology, and reservoir potential of a late pleistocene shelf-edge delta

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.H. ); Sydow, J.; Bouma, A.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Evaluation of a 92-m continuous boring through a shelf-edge delta sequence in Main Pass lease area, Block 303 (MP303), and 4500 line-km of high-resolution seismic profiles on the outer Mississippi-Alabama shelf have led to a better understanding of the internal architecture of fluvio-deltaic systems during falling to low sea level periods. The resulting stratigraphic mapping supplies valuable knowledge about the lithologic character, stratigraphic position, distribution, and compartmentalization of reservoir facies in an outer shelf setting. The clinoforms of the landward-thinning delta wedge have prograded onto a shelf-wide, high-amplitude reflector. The deltaic clinoform wedge appears to be sand rich. Steep clinoforms at the boring site correspond to the top half of the deltaic sequence, consisting of silty to clean, upper delta front fine sands. Mapping of steep clinoforms indicate that delta sands are volumetrically the most significant reservoir facies on the outer shelf. The broad evacuation created by fluvial scour is a northeast to southwest trending feature, which is filled with mainly medium to coarse sands and gravel, and minor estuarine sand silts at the boring site. The clean fluvial sands form the best quality reservoir facies. Delta reservoir facies have been removed where overridden by widespread fluvial scour on the middle shelf. Fluvial reworking during sea level lowering thus results in poor preservation potential of preceding highstand-delta deposits on the middle and inner shelf. This reworking provides remobilized sand-rich sediment for shelf-edge delta construction. The fluvial deposits in the boring are capped by the bayline flooding surface, which is in turn overlain by estuarine deposits, the transgressive ravinement surface, and finally, submarine shoal and thin sheet deposits. Submarine shoals are sandy, but contain abundant shell material. Shoals are of the poorest quality and volumetrically least important reservoir facies.

  20. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and structural style of the Wilson Island Group, Northwest Territories

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The lower Proterozoic Wilson Island Group is exposed in a NE-trending belt in the East Arm of Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories. The lower part of the 6 km thick succession outcrops on Wilson Island and adjacent islands, south of the McDonald-Wilson fault. Deposition of intercalated basalt flows, felsic flows and related intrusions, volcaniclastics, and braided alluvial arkose and conglomerate occurred in a tectonically active basin, probably a continental rift. Overlying the volcanic assemblage is a debris flow paraconglomerate, which grades vertically into fluvial to marginal marine or lacustrine arkose and dolostone. Several km further east, and north of the McDonald-Wilson fault, similar arkoses and dolostones are overlain by fine-grained subarkose, argillaceous siltstone, quartz granulestone, and concretionary dolomitic ironstone. These lithologies represent mixed fluvial, tidal flat, and shallow water facies. The remainder of the section consists of arkosic arenite/mudstone cycles (turbidites.), gradational upward into laminated mudstone with minor intercalated basalt. Rocks of the Wilson Island Group have been metamorphosed in greenschist to lower amphibolite facies, and deformed into eastward- to northeastward-plunging folds. Folds in the lower part of the section are open, whereas the finer-grained sediments of the upper part are isoclinally folded. These structures have been dissected by dextral transcurrent faults of the McDonald fault system.

  1. The morphology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Carstairs esker, Scotland, U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. S. P.; Montague, E.

    The series of ridges, mounds and basins around Carstairs have been variously interpreted as recessional moraines, kames, sub- or en-glacial eskers or as landforms developed in response to supraglacial outwash fan sediments deposited on stagnant ice. This paper argues that the ridges are eskers. They formed in an interlobate sediment sink between the uncoupling margins of Highland and Southern Upland ice during Devensian deglaciation. This conclusion is based on geomorphological mapping, lithofacies and palaeocurrent analysis, and borehole interpretation. An extensive lake system developed between the two ice margins and was fed by a major sub-glacial conduit flowing towards the NE. This conduit initially exited into the lake subaqueously to form a prominent single esker ridge across the lake floor. On downwasting, the feeding conduit emerged onto the surface of the ice to form a complex supraglacial outwash sandur. During periods of catastrophic flow, large channels cut through the sandur surface into underlying ice. These channels filled with coarse gravel which, on abandonment and further downwasting, were topographically inverted to form a series of sub-parallel, slightly sinuous ridges giving the appearance of braiding. During lower flow extensive finer-grained supraglacial sandur sedimentation took place on the periphery of these ridges and this passed down-current across the ice margin into fan-deltas feeding into the expanding ice-front lake.

  2. Seismo-turbidite Sedimentology: Implications for Active Tectonic Margin Stratigraphy and Sediment Facies Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C. H.; Goldfinger, C.; Gutierrez Pastor, J.; Polonia, A.; Van Daele, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes generate mass transport deposits (MTDs); megaturbidites (MTD overlain by coeval turbidite); multi-pulsed, stacked, and mud homogenite seismo-turbidites; tsunamites; and seiche deposits. The strongest (Mw 9) earthquake shaking signatures appear to create multi-pulsed individual turbidites, where the number and character of multiple coarse-grained pulses for correlative turbidites generally remain constant both upstream and downstream in different channel systems. Multiple turbidite pulses, that correlate with multiple ruptures shown in seismograms of historic earthquakes (e.g. Chile 1960, Sumatra 2004 and Japan 2011), support this hypothesis. The weaker (Mw = or < 8) (e.g. northern California San Andreas) earthquakes generate dominantly upstream simple fining-up (uni-pulsed) turbidites in single tributary canyons and channels; however, downstream stacked turbidites result from synchronously triggered multiple turbidity currents that deposit in channels below confluences of the tributaries. Proven tsunamites, which result from tsunami waves sweeping onshore and shallow water debris into deeper water, are a fine-grained turbidite cap over other seismo-turbidites. In contrast, MTDs and seismo-turbidites result from slope failures. Multiple great earthquakes cause seismic strengthening of slope sediment, which results in minor MTDs in basin floor turbidite system deposits (e.g. maximum run-out distances of MTDs across basin floors along active margins are up to an order of magnitude less than on passive margins). In contrast, the MTDs and turbidites are equally intermixed in turbidite systems of passive margins (e.g. Gulf of Mexico). In confined basin settings, earthquake triggering results in a common facies pattern of coeval megaturbidites in proximal settings, thick stacked turbidites downstream, and ponded muddy homogenite turbidites in basin or sub-basin centers, sometimes with a cap of seiche deposits showing bi-directional flow patterns.

  3. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Kanayut Conglomerate, central Brooks Range, Alaska; report of 1980 field season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.; Moore, T.E.; Balin, D.F.; Johnson, S.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The Upper Devonian Kanayut Conglomerate crops out along the crest of the Brooks Range of northern Alaska for a distance of almost 1000 km. It ranges in thickness from 2600 m in the Atigun River area to 700 m south of Anaktuvuk Pass and has been subdivided into four regionally persistent members: (a) the basal sandstone member, consisting of marine sandstone and shale with some conglomerate; (b) the lower shale member, consisting of nonmarine quartzite, conglomerate and shale; (c) the middle conglomerate member, consisting of nonmarine pebble and cobble conglomerate and quartzite; and (d) the Stuver Member, consisting of nonmarine sandstone and shale. The Kanayut conformably overlies the Upper Devonian marine Hunt Fork Shale and is conformably overlain by the Mississippian marine Kayak Shale. The Kanayut is wholly allochthonous and has probably been transported northward on a series of thrust plates. The basal sandstone member of the Kanayut Conglomerate, which overlies prodelta turbidites of the Hunt Fork Shale, contains marginal-marine coarsening-upward channel-mouth bar sequences. It is conformably overlain by the lower shale member. Measured sections of the nonmarine members of the Kanayut show that the lower shale member ranges in thickness from 120 m to 1115 m and consists of fining-upward cycles interpreted to have been deposited by meandering streams on a broad floodplain. These cycles contain, in ascending order, channelized basal conglomerate, trough cross-stratified sandstone, and ripple-marked siltstone. The cycles are interpreted to be channel and point-bar deposits. Individual cycles average about 10 m in thickness and are separated by intervals of black, brown or maroon floodplain shale deposits. These typically contain thin coarsening-upward units that probably represent prograding levee sequences and irregular and ungraded sandstone bodies interpreted to be crevasse-splay deposits. In the Okokmilaga River area, the lower shale member contains a distinctive coarse-grained unit which is burrowed and interpreted to represent a widespread marine incursion. The middle conglomerate member, which ranges in thickness from 155 m to 525 m, consists of braidplain deposits. It contains fining-upward couplets of conglomerate and parallel-stratified or cross-stratified sandstone that average 2-7 m in thickness. The couplets record deposition in channels and on bars of braided streams. The middle conglomerate member contains the largest clasts, little or no shale, and represents the maximum progradation of nonmarine sedimentation in the Kanayut depositional system. The Stuver Member consists of fining-upward cycles that resemble those of the lower shale member. It ranges in thickness from 160 m to 1400 m and grades upward into tidal and marginal-marine deposits of the Kayak Shale. Conglomerate in the Kanayut is compositionally very mature, averaging 82 percent white, gray, black or red chert clasts, 14 percent vein quartz clasts, 3 percent quartzite clasts, and less than I percent other lithologies, mainly argillite. Although red chert is locally abundant in the Shainin Lake-Galbraith Lake area, there is little variation in conglomerate composition in the Kanayut, suggesting derivation from a single major source terrane.

  4. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of upper Pleistocene carbonates of southeastern Barbardos, West Indies

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N. )

    1990-11-01

    Upper Pleistocene reef-associated carbonates of southeastern Barbados have been studied in outcrop and core. Reef terraces, formed during glacio-eustatic sea level highstands and subsequently uplifted, are characterized by thick and areally extensive sequences of allochthonous and autochthonous fore-reef calcarenites. Depositional textures are primarily packstones, and grainstones, wackestones, and coral floatstones are volumetrically less significant. Sediments are coarse- to fine-grained reef-derived allochems and micrite, and autochthonous benthic foraminifera and coralline red algae. Rates of sediment accumulation of fore-reef calcarenites range from about 1 to 4 m/1,000 yr. Although of relatively small scale, the carbonate terraces of southeastern Barbados provide excellent analogs for sequence stratigraphic concepts in carbonate settings. The terraces are primarily highstand systems tract deposits separated by type 1 unconformities. These highstand deposits are characterized by reef development and the progradation of fore-reef calcarenites. Extensive fore-reef deposits resulted from mechanical erosion of the reef framework on this high-energy, windward coastline. Type 1 unconformities are characterized by thin caliche layers developed during lowstand subaerial exposure. Thin basal transgressive systems tract deposits are characterized by incorporation of extraformational clasts derived from the underlying sequence during sea level rise. Slope-front erosion, vertical shift in the position of freshwater lens, and shift in the position of coastal onlap are all consequences of the interplay between eustasy and tectonics. These effects and the development of facies geometries on Barbados are primarily controlled by the glacio-eustatic component, inasmuch as rates of eustatic changes of sea level are at least two orders of magnitude greater than the maximum average rates of tectonic uplift. 12 figs.

  5. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of ledge sandstone in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Cloft, H.S.

    1983-03-01

    Data collected from four measured sections of the Ledge Sandstone member of the Ivishak Formation are presented. These sections are located in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska. The Ledge Sandstone is the time equivalent of the Ivishak sandstones that form the reservoir in the Prudhoe Bay field, east of the study area. The ANWR region is of interest for oil and gas exploration owing to the numerous oil seeps on the coastal plain and surficial expression of possible subsurface antiforms. The Ledge Sandstone in ANWR consists primarily of a massive, thickly bedded, very fine to fine-grained, well-sorted quartz sandstone. The thick sandstones are separated by thin siltstone intervals ranging from less than an inch to several feet in thickness. Although the thicker siltstones appear laterally continuous, the thinner beds generally are lenticular over short distances (10 to 20 ft; 3 to 6 m). Cementation of the siltstone appears sporadic, varying laterally and vertically within the unit. Burrowing is extensive in the siltstone intervals. Typically, burrowing cannot be detected in the sandstones because of the obliteration by lithification and diagenetic processes. Fossils are sparse throughout the unit, even in the poorly lithified silts. These data are consistent with a shallow marine environment, within wave base. This contrasts with the nonmarine conglomerates and sandstones of Prudhoe Bay. Time-equivalent units to the south and west consist primarily of cherts and shales of probable deep marine origin, with some arkosic sandstones dolomites occuring in NPRA. Thus a paloshoreline is probably located somewha north of the measured sections.

  6. Sedimentology, stratigraphy, and depositional environment of the Crystal Geyser Dinosaur Quarry, east-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez, M.B.; Suarez, C.A.; Kirkland, J.I.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Grandstaff, D.E.; Terry, D.O.

    2007-01-01

    The Crystal Geyser Dinosaur Quarry, near Green River, Utah, is located at the base of the Lower Cretaceous (Barremian) Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation. The quarry preserves a nearly monospecific accumulation of a new basal therizinosauroid, Falcarius utahensis. We used field descriptions and petrographic analysis to determine the depositional environment and development of the quarry strata. Results of these analyses suggest that the quarry represents multiple episodes of bone accumulation buried by spring and overbank flood deposits. Evidence for these previously undescribed spring deposits includes calcite macroscopic structures within the quarry strata - such as pisolites and travertine fragments - and calcite micromorphologies - including radial-fibrous, feather, and scandulitic dendrite morphologies and tufa clasts. At least two episodes of bone incorporation are preserved in the quarry based on their stratigraphic position and lithologic associations. The unique depositional setting in and around the Crystal Geyser Dinosaur Quarry appears to have been favorable for the preservation of vertebrate fossils and provides insight into early Cretaceous environments in North America. Copyright ?? 2007, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  7. Sedimentology and genetic stratigraphy of Dean and Spraberry Formations (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.

    1981-09-01

    The Spraberry trend of west Texas, once known as the world's largest uneconomic oil field, will undoubtedly become an increasingly important objective for the development of enhanced oil recovery techniques in fine-grained, low-permeability, low-pressure reservoirs. As the trend expands, facies and stratigraphic data should be integrated into exploration strategies. The Spraberry and Dean Formations may be divided into three genetic sequences, each consisting of several hundred feet of interbedded shale and carbonate overlain by a roughly equal amount of sandstone and siltstone. These sequences record episodes of shelf-margin progradation, deep-water resedimentation of shelf-derived carbonate debris, followed by influxes of terrigenous clastics into the basin by way of feeder channels or submarine canyons, and suspension settling of fine-grained sediment from the water column. Four lithofacies comprise the terrigenous clastics of the Spraberry and Dean Fomations: (1) cross-laminated, massive, and parallel-laminated sandstone, (2) laminated siltstone, (3) bioturbated siltstone, and (4) black, organic-rich shale. Carbonate lithofacies occur mostly in the form of thin-bedded turbidites, slump, and debris-flow deposits. Terrigenous clastic rocks display facies sequences, isopach patterns, and sedimentary structures suggestive of deposition from turbidity currents, and long-lived saline density underflow and interflow currents. Clastic isopach patterns reflect an overall southward thinning of clastics in the Midland basin. Channelized flow and suspension settling were responsible for the formation of elongate fan-shaped accumulations of clastic sediments.

  8. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of a dry to wet eolian depositional system, Burns formation, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, J. P.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F.; Calvin, W.; Clark, B. C.; Fike, D. A.; Golombek, M.; Greeley, R.; Haldemann, A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Knoll, A. H.; Malin, M.; McLennan, S. M.; Parker, T.; Soderblom, L.; Sohl-Dickstein, J. N.; Squyres, S. W.; Tosca, N. J.; Watters, W. A.

    2005-11-01

    Outcrop exposures of sedimentary rocks at the Opportunity landing site (Meridiani Planum) form a set of genetically related strata defined here informally as the Burns formation. This formation can be subdivided into lower, middle, and upper units which, respectively, represent eolian dune, eolian sand sheet, and mixed eolian sand sheet and interdune facies associations. Collectively, these three units are at least 7 m thick and define a "wetting-upward" succession which records a progressive increase in the influence of groundwater and, ultimately, surface water in controlling primary depositional processes. The Burns lower unit is interpreted as a dry dune field (though grain composition indicates an evaporitic source), whose preserved record of large-scale cross-bedded sandstones indicates either superimposed bedforms of variable size or reactivation of lee-side slip faces by episodic (possibly seasonal) changes in wind direction. The boundary between the lower and middle units is a significant eolian deflation surface. This surface is interpreted to record eolian erosion down to the capillary fringe of the water table, where increased resistance to wind-induced erosion was promoted by increased sediment cohesiveness in the capillary fringe. The overlying Burns middle unit is characterized by fine-scale planar-laminated to low-angle-stratified sandstones. These sandstones accumulated during lateral migration of eolian impact ripples over the flat to gently undulating sand sheet surface. In terrestrial settings, sand sheets may form an intermediate environment between dune fields and interdune or playa surfaces. The contact between the middle and upper units of the Burns formation is interpreted as a diagenetic front, where recrystallization in the phreatic or capillary zones may have occurred. The upper unit of the Burns formation contains a mixture of sand sheet facies and interdune facies. Interdune facies include wavy bedding, irregular lamination with convolute bedding and possible small tepee or salt-ridge structures, and cm-scale festoon cross-lamination indicative of shallow subaqueous flows marked by current velocities of a few tens of cm/s. Most likely, these currents were gravity-driven, possibly unchannelized flows resulting from the flooding of interdune/playa surfaces. However, evidence for lacustrine sedimentation, including mudstones or in situ bottom-growth evaporites, has not been observed so far at Eagle and Endurance craters. Mineralogical and elemental data indicate that the eolian sandstones of the lower and middle units, as well as the subaqueous and eolian deposits of the Burns upper unit, were derived from an evaporitic source. This indirectly points to a temporally equivalent playa where lacustrine evaporites or ground-water-generated efflorescent crusts were deflated to provide a source of sand-sized particles that were entrained to form eolian dunes and sand sheets. This process is responsible for the development of sulfate eolianites at White Sands, New Mexico, and could have provided a prolific flux of sulfate sediment at Meridiani. Though evidence for surface water in the Burns formation is mostly limited to the upper unit, the associated sulfate eolianites provide strong evidence for the critical role of groundwater in controlling sediment production and stratigraphic architecture throughout the formation.

  9. Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

  10. Illite authigenesis in sandstones of the Guaritas Allogroup (Early Paleozoic): Implications for the depositional age, stratigraphy and evolution of the Camaquã Basin (Southern Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraschin, Anderson José; Mizusaki, Ana Maria; Zwingmann, Horst; de Borba, André Weissheimer; Sbrissa, Gesiane Fraga

    2010-03-01

    Several analytical studies performed on alluvial-eolian sandstones of the Early Paleozoic Guaritas Allogroup (Camaquã Basin, southern Brazil) indicate illite to be abundant, showing different morphologies as authigenic grain rims and pore-bridging filaments. Authigenic illite separates of variable grain sizes from distinct stratigraphic intervals of the Guaritas Allogroup yielded 40K- 40Ar ages from 521.7 ± 10.3 to 473.7 ± 9.4 Ma. These ages, interpreted to record the timing of illite authigenesis, are coincident with the age of emplacement of the Rodeio Velho andesites (470 ± 19 Ma). Moreover, field structures suggest interaction between hot, andesite lava flows and wet, poorly consolidated sediments of the Pedra Pintada Alloformation (lower strata of the Guaritas Allogroup). This set of data indicates that the Rodeio Velho volcanism could have been responsible for a widespread remobilization of interstitial fluids and consequent authigenic illite precipitation in the sandstones of the Guaritas Allogroup.

  11. New high precision U-Pb ages for the Vinchina Formation: Implications for the stratigraphy of the Bermejo Andean foreland basin (La Rioja province, western Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccioli, P. L.; Limarino, C. O.; Friedman, R.; Marenssi, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Vinchina Formation is one of the thickest Cenozoic units related to the Andean orogeny in Argentina totaling more than 5100 m in thickness. Different ages, from Eocene to latest Miocene, have been postulated for this red-bed succession based on fission track, magnetostratigraphy and whole rock isotopic analyses. Two new high precision U-Pb zircon ages are reported herein for this unit. A maximum U-Pb age of 15.6 ± 0.4 Ma was obtained from detritic zircons collected from a thick tuffaceous interval of the Lower Member of the Vinchina Formation at La Cueva (Precordillera), while a depositional U-Pb age of 9.24 ± 0.034 Ma was derived from volcanic zircons collected from a thin tuff bed in the Upper Member at Quebrada de Los Pozuelos (Northwestern Sierras Pampeanas). At La Cueva, the Vinchina Formation unconformably overlies eolian sandstones of the Vallecito Formation and was divided into four units representing 1) deposits of high-sinuosity ephemeral rivers associated with 2) a playa-lake passing upwards to 3) low-sinuosity sandy ephemeral rivers and finally, 4) a gravelly-sandy braided plain. The tuffaceous level corresponding to unit 1 is located 280 m above the base of the formation. At Quebrada de Los Pozuelos, the Vinchina Formation unconformably overlies the Vallecito Formation and is covered by a deeply incised surface at the base of the Toro Negro Formation. We divided the Vinchina Formation into four units. Unit 1 represents sedimentation in shallow fluvial channels with sandy to muddy floodplains. Units 2 and 3 record sedimentation in braided, meandering and anastomosing rivers. Finally unit 4 represents deposition in braided and wandering fluvial systems. The sampled tuff is located within unit 4 at ˜3470 m above the base of the formation. The new ages indicate that the bulk of the Vinchina Formation is Miocene in age but they do not preclude a longer time span for the sedimentation of the whole unit. Ages of the sampled volcanic zircons match an

  12. Investigation on corrosion stratigraphy and morphology in some Iron Age bronze alloys vessels by OM, XRD and SEM-EDS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudbashi, Omid; Hasanpour, Ata; Davami, Parviz

    2016-04-01

    The recently study of the corrosion in some bronze artefacts from the Sangtarashan Iron Age site, western Iran, was established to identify corrosion morphology and mechanism in these objects. The corrosion layers in 22 samples were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. The results showed that a thin corrosion crust has formed on the surface of bronzes with a triple-layer structure, including two internal and one external corrosion layers. The formation of these layers is due to copper leaching from the bronze surface. The internal corrosion part has been a compact, tin-rich corrosion/oxidation product (noble patina) with some evidences from original metallurgical aspects of the bronze as well as a very thin layer beneath the tin-rich layer. External corrosion products have been identified as basic copper carbonates, malachite and azurite. Based on the results, the corrosion morphology in the Sangtarashan Iron Age bronzes is due to long-term burial in an appropriate environment in a moderately corrosive soil. Although it is the first time to investigate Iron Age bronzes from Iran, this corrosion morphology is partially similar to type I corrosion morphology observed in archaeological bronze objects; nevertheless, some deviations are visible in comparison with previously established patterns.

  13. Across the Gap: Geochronological and Sedimentological Analyses from the Late Pleistocene-Holocene Sequence of Goda Buticha, Southeastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tribolo, Chantal; Asrat, Asfawossen; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Chapon, Cécile; Douville, Eric; Fragnol, Carole; Hernandez, Marion; Hovers, Erella; Leplongeon, Alice; Martin, Loïc; Pleurdeau, David; Pearson, Osbjorn; Puaud, Simon; Assefa, Zelalem

    2017-01-01

    Goda Buticha is a cave site near Dire Dawa in southeastern Ethiopia that contains an archaeological sequence sampling the late Pleistocene and Holocene of the region. The sedimentary sequence displays complex cultural, chronological and sedimentological histories that seem incongruent with one another. A first set of radiocarbon ages suggested a long sedimentological gap from the end of Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 3 to the mid-Holocene. Macroscopic observations suggest that the main sedimentological change does not coincide with the chronostratigraphic hiatus. The cultural sequence shows technological continuity with a late persistence of artifacts that are usually attributed to the Middle Stone Age into the younger parts of the stratigraphic sequence, yet become increasingly associated with lithic artifacts typically related to the Later Stone Age. While not a unique case, this combination of features is unusual in the Horn of Africa. In order to evaluate the possible implications of these observations, sedimentological analyses combined with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were conducted. The OSL data now extend the radiocarbon chronology up to 63 ± 7 ka; they also confirm the existence of the chronological gap between 24.8 ± 2.6 ka and 7.5 ± 0.3 ka. The sedimentological analyses suggest that the origin and mode of deposition were largely similar throughout the whole sequence, although the anthropic and faunal activities increased in the younger levels. Regional climatic records are used to support the sedimentological observations and interpretations. We discuss the implications of the sedimentological and dating analyses for understanding cultural processes in the region.

  14. Across the Gap: Geochronological and Sedimentological Analyses from the Late Pleistocene-Holocene Sequence of Goda Buticha, Southeastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Asrat, Asfawossen; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Chapon, Cécile; Douville, Eric; Fragnol, Carole; Hernandez, Marion; Hovers, Erella; Leplongeon, Alice; Martin, Loïc; Pleurdeau, David; Pearson, Osbjorn; Puaud, Simon; Assefa, Zelalem

    2017-01-01

    Goda Buticha is a cave site near Dire Dawa in southeastern Ethiopia that contains an archaeological sequence sampling the late Pleistocene and Holocene of the region. The sedimentary sequence displays complex cultural, chronological and sedimentological histories that seem incongruent with one another. A first set of radiocarbon ages suggested a long sedimentological gap from the end of Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 3 to the mid-Holocene. Macroscopic observations suggest that the main sedimentological change does not coincide with the chronostratigraphic hiatus. The cultural sequence shows technological continuity with a late persistence of artifacts that are usually attributed to the Middle Stone Age into the younger parts of the stratigraphic sequence, yet become increasingly associated with lithic artifacts typically related to the Later Stone Age. While not a unique case, this combination of features is unusual in the Horn of Africa. In order to evaluate the possible implications of these observations, sedimentological analyses combined with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were conducted. The OSL data now extend the radiocarbon chronology up to 63 ± 7 ka; they also confirm the existence of the chronological gap between 24.8 ± 2.6 ka and 7.5 ± 0.3 ka. The sedimentological analyses suggest that the origin and mode of deposition were largely similar throughout the whole sequence, although the anthropic and faunal activities increased in the younger levels. Regional climatic records are used to support the sedimentological observations and interpretations. We discuss the implications of the sedimentological and dating analyses for understanding cultural processes in the region. PMID:28125597

  15. Workshop on quantitative dynamic stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.

    1988-04-01

    This document discusses the development of quantitative simulation models for the investigation of geologic systems. The selection of variables, model verification, evaluation, and future directions in quantitative dynamic stratigraphy (QDS) models are detailed. Interdisciplinary applications, integration, implementation, and transfer of QDS are also discussed. (FI)

  16. New magnetic Polarity Stratigraphy of the Mae Moh Basin in northern Thailand, and Implications for the Age of the First Miocene Hominoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benammi, M.; Coster, P.; Jaeger, J.; Chaimanee, Y.

    2007-05-01

    This magnetostratigraphic study has been conducted on the Miocene Mae Moh basin, in the Lampang province, Northern Thailand. 194 paleomagnetic samples were collected from 65 stratigraphics levels from Na Khaem and Huai Luang formations. The studied sections are mainly composed of clay, sandstone and lignite. Rock magnetic experiments revealed that titanomagnetite, magnetite and hematite are the mains carriers of magnetisation. Samples subjected to progressive thermal or alternating field demagnetization procedures exhibit a low stability and a high stability component, with either normal and reversed polarities. The reversal test is positive and indicates that the characteristic remnant magnetization directions correspond to the primary magnetization directions (McFadden and Mc Elhinny, 1990). The mean direction calculated for section 1 are: incl : 23.24 and decl. : 5.01 and incl. : 31.22 et decl. : 7.01 for section 2. These results don't document any rotation with respect to previous study (Benammi et al., 2002). In total, nine polarity zones (four normal and five reverse), that can be reliably be correlated the geomagnetic polarity time scale developed by Gradstein et al, 2004, are recognized from the studied sections. Based on the biochronological constraints, the magnetostartigraphic column of the Mae Moh formations correlates best with chron C5ACr-C5r.3r, between 14.1and 12 Ma. This correlaton revealed a mean sedimentation rate of approximately 21 cm/ky, and a age of 12.7 et 13.2 for for the fossilferous levels (J5, K1, K2) where the mammals remains were found. The analysis of the elements traces spectrum of two ash levels coming from the basins of Mae Moh and Chiang Muan made it possible to establish a new correlation of the Chiang Muan sequence with the GPTS. This correlation prove that the age of the Chiang Muan sequence would be between 13.1 and 12 Ma, and the fossiliferous levels with hominoid (Khoratpithecus Chiangmuanensis) would be dated between 12

  17. Sedimentological characterization of braided and meandering fluvial reservoirs: Prediction of size and heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.K. ); Vargas, J. )

    1993-02-01

    Fluvial reservoirs host significant volumes of hydrocarbons. They comprise a significant reserve base in areas and formations as diverse as the San Jorge Basin, Argentina, the Lagunillas Formation, Venezuela, and Cano Limon Field, Colombia. Effective development and reservoir management required detailed sedimentological characterization because fluvial reservoirs, irrespective of age and geographic location, are characterized by considerable variability in geometry and internal heterogeneity. This paper presents models of braided and meandering reservoirs in selected Tertiary and Cretaceous fields of South and North America, based on sedimentological characterization using conventional cores and wireline logs. Fieldwide (macro-scale) and inter-well (meso-scale) heterogeneity is determined through detailed evaluation of facies distribution, particularly the distribution and maturity of paleosol horizons (e.g. calcretes). Within a given reservoir, micro-scale variations in porosity, permeability and saturation are fundamentally related to depositional environment. Effective permeability to hydrocarbons varies with environment and bedding style. The size of meandering and braided channel reservoirs is predicted using empirical geological equations. Predicted dimensions are compared with the independent results of reservoir simulation analysis for the same sand bodies. Engineering and sedimentological predictions of reservoir size and heterogeneity are similar, particularly in reservoirs where median permeability to hydrocarbons is > 1 md. The size and heterogeneity of productive channel reservoirs can be predicted at an early stage in field development is channel style and channel depth are known. Determination of these two fundamental parameters required sedimentological characterization at the macro-, meso-, and micro-scale using wireline logs and cores.

  18. Lithostratigraphy, petrography, biostratigraphy, and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of the surficial aquifer system of western Collier County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.; Weedman, S.D.; Simmons, R.; Scott, T.M.; Brewster-Wingard, G. L.; Ishman, S.E.; Carlin, N.M.

    1998-01-01

    overlie the Pliocene limestones in two cores in the southern part of the study area. Artificial fill occurs at the top of most of the cores. The hydrologic confining units penetrated by these cores are different in different parts of the study area. To the west, a hard tightly cemented dolostone forms the first major confining unit below the water table. In the eastern part of the study area, confinement is more difficult to determine. A tightly cemented sandstone, much younger than the dolostones to the west and probably not laterally connected to them, forms a slight confining unit in one core. Thick zones of poorly sorted muddy unconsolidated sands form a slight confining unit in other cores; these probably are not correlative to either the sandstone or the dolostones to the west. The age and sedimentologic observations suggest a complex compartmentalization of the surficial aquifer system in southwestern Florida. The calibrations of dinocyst and molluscan occurrences with strontium-isotope stratigraphy allows us to expand and document the reported ranges of many taxa. This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards or with the North American Stratigraphic Code. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  19. The stratigraphy of mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Steven

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of the end-Cretaceous bolide impact and the recognition of mass extinctions through taxonomic compendia triggered keen interest in the stratigraphic pattern of species extinctions. A principal question has been whether patterns of fossil occurrence indicate gradual, stepwise, pulsed, or instantaneous extinction. Based on principles of sequence stratigraphy, marine ecology, and evolution, numerical models of fossil occurrences in stratigraphic sections indicate that the last occurrence of fossils does not generally indicate the time of extinction but is instead controlled by stratigraphic architecture. These models have been confirmed in multiple field studies from different sedimentary basins of different ages. These models identify several distinct processes controlling the last occurrence of fossils. Anything that lowers the probability of collection of a species, such as peak abundance or environmental tolerance, causes the last occurrence to be shifted backward in time relative to the time of extinction. Sequence-bounding subaerial unconformities generally also force the last occurrence backward in time, except in the case of reworking, which may place fossil remains in rocks younger than the time of extinction. Unconformities also cause last occurrences of multiple species to be clustered as a result of the hiatus. Surfaces of abrupt facies change, such as flooding surfaces and surfaces of forced regression, also cause last occurrences to be clustered, with such clustering reflecting the environmental preferences of species. Stratigraphic condensation can also cause clustering of last occurrences. All of these surfaces - subaerial unconformities, flooding surfaces, surfaces of forced regression, and condensed horizons - have highly predictable positions with depositional sequences. Thus, it is the normal expectation that last occurrences should be clustered in the fossil record, that these clusters should occur in stratigraphically predictable

  20. Stratigraphy and palaeoclimate of Spitsbergen, Svalbard, during the Early Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Madeleine; Price, Gregory; Watkinson, Matthew; FitzPatrick, Meriel; Jerrett, Rhodri

    2016-04-01

    During the Early Cretaceous, Spitsbergen was located at a palaeolatitude of ~60°N. Abundant fossil wood derived from conifer forests, dinosaur trackways, enigmatic deposits such as glendonites, and stable isotope data from the Early Cretaceous formations of Spitsbergen suggest that the climate at that time was much more dynamic than the traditional view of "invariant greenhouse" conditions on Earth. The Early Cretaceous succession in central Spitsbergen comprises a regressive-transgressive mega-cycle. This is made up of the deep water to wave-dominated, Berriasian-Hauterivian Rurikfjellet Formation; the deltaic, Barremian Helvetiafjellet Formation; and the coastal to deep water, Aptian-Albian Carolinefjellet Formation. An erosion surface marks the base of the Helvetiafjellet Formation. Two regions with excellently exposed Early Cretaceous strata were chosen for study in this project: the Festningen section, on the north-western side of Isfjorden; and outcrops found along Adventdalen, near Longyearbyen, ~40km northeast of Festningen. We present the data collected in July 2015 from the Adventdalen area, and compare and correlate it with sedimentological and geochemical data collected from the Festningen succession in 2014. The Festningen section records a full sequence from the Berriasian to the Aptian, whereas the Longyearbyen sections record Aptian-Albian deposition. We use carbon isotope stratigraphy to constrain the Barremian-Aptian boundary in the previously only indirectly-dated Helvetiafjellet Formation, and to identify other major global climatic and carbon cycle perturbations in the Early Cretaceous. We are thus able to correlate this succession with other successions globally. We combine this δ13C(terrestrial) data with sedimentological and petrological data to elucidate the origins of enigmatic glendonites found in both regions. Glendonites are thought to be associated with cold-water (and therefore also cold-climate) conditions, although their mode of

  1. Relative paleointensity (RPI) and oxygen isotope stratigraphy at IODP Site U1308: North Atlantic RPI stack for 1.2-2.2 Ma (NARPI-2200) and age of the Olduvai Subchron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Hodell, D. A.; Curtis, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1308 (49°53‧N, 24°14‧W; water depth 3871 m) provides a record of relative paleointensity (RPI) and benthic stable isotope stratigraphy back to 3.2 Ma. The record since 1.5 Ma was published previously, and here we present the interval from 1.5 Ma to 3.2 Ma (Early Pleistocene-Late Pliocene). The benthic oxygen isotope record in this interval is correlated to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 51 to KM2, with an apparent hiatus that removed part of the interval spanning MIS 104-G2 (2.6-2.65 Ma), at the Gauss-Matuyama boundary. The mean sedimentation rate for the 1.5-3.2 Ma period is 8.5 cm/kyr. The age model was built by correlation of the benthic oxygen isotope record to a global stack (LR04). Apart from the expected polarity reversals, three magnetic excursions are recorded: Punaruu in MIS 31/32 at 1092 ka, Gilsa in MIS 54/55 at 1584 ka, and a newly recognized excursion labeled Porcupine (after the nearby Porcupine Abyssal Plain) in MIS G6/G7 at 2737 ka. The ages of polarity reversals at Site U1308, on the LR04 time scale, are consistent with the current geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) with the exception of the base of the Olduvai Subchron that occurred in MIS 73, corresponding to 1925 ka on the LR04 time scale, 25 kyr younger than in the current GPTS. The RPI record at Site U1308 is calibrated using the oxygen isotope age model, and combined with four other North Atlantic records to obtain a North Atlantic RPI stack for 1.2-2.2 Ma (NARPI-2200) that is compared with published RPI stacks: Epapis, Sint-2000 and PADM2M. For 2.2-3.2 Ma, the Site U1308 RPI record is compared with a RPI record from North Atlantic IODP Site U1314, and with the Pacific Epapis stack. The mean sedimentation rates of the North Atlantic sites in NARPI-2200 are greater (by about an order of magnitude) than most of the records incorporated in other stacks. The comparison of Epapis and NARPI-2200 yields an apparent lag for NARPI-2200 relative to

  2. Age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus determined with (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanjun; Gao, Xing; Gao, Bin; Granger, Darryl E

    2009-03-12

    The age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus, commonly known as 'Peking Man', has long been pursued, but has remained problematic owing to the lack of suitable dating methods. Here we report cosmogenic (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating of quartz sediments and artefacts from the lower strata of Locality 1 in the southwestern suburb of Beijing, China, where early representatives of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus were discovered. This study marks the first radioisotopic dating of any early hominin site in China beyond the range of mass spectrometric U-series dating. The weighted mean of six meaningful age measurements, 0.77 +/- 0.08 million years (Myr, mean +/- s.e.m.), provides the best age estimate for lower cultural layers 7-10. Together with previously reported U-series dating of speleothem calcite and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy, as well as sedimentological considerations, these layers may be further correlated to S6-S7 in Chinese loess stratigraphy or marine isotope stages (MIS) 17-19, in the range of approximately 0.68 to 0.78 Myr ago. These ages are substantially older than previously supposed and may imply early hominin's presence at the site in northern China through a relatively mild glacial period corresponding to MIS 18.

  3. Amino acid racemization analysis (AAR) as a successful tool for dating Holocene coastal sediments: Stratigraphy of a barrier island spit (Southern Sylt/North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Tanja; Ziehe, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Dating of Holocene sediments in shallow coastal areas of the German North Sea by conventional techniques is commonly problematic. In particular the marine reservoir effect of radiocarbon means that radiocarbon dating cannot be applied to sediments younger than about 400 years. Amino acid racemization dating (AAR) is a viable alternative for dating young sediments. The method is based on the determination of ratios of D and L amino acid enantiomers in organic matrices of biogenic carbonates. In this study we use AAR as a tool for dating Holocene barrier islands sediments. Based on an AAR derived chronological framework we develop a model of barrier spit accretion which describes the interaction between extreme events, fair weather coastal processes and sedimentary development that constrains the major episodes of barrier island evolution. The stratigraphy was defined using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys complemented by sedimentological coring data. The stratigraphy is then conceptualised in a AAR chronostratigraphic framework to define a chronological order and allow the development of a stratigraphic model of the evolution of Southern Sylt. The AAR data provide high temporal resolution and have been used for dating stages of barrier spit accretion. The time lines are marked as storm surge generated erosion unconformities in the stratigraphic profile. Individual shells and shell fragments of Cerastoderma edule, Mya arenaria, Mytilus edulis and Scrobicularia plana have been accumulated by short-term storm events as shell layers associated with the erosion unconformities and have been dated by AAR. Time lines reveal that the barrier spit accretion occurred episodically, and is dependant on the provided rate of sand delivery. The general trend is that sequences young to the. South. The AAR derived time lines have been verified and correlated by historic maps and sea charts. It is apparent that spit enlargement at this site increased significantly during the

  4. Chicxulub Impact and the Stratigraphy, Nature and Origin of Near-K-T Breccia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adatte, T.; Keller, G.; Berner, Z.; Stüben, D.

    2007-05-01

    Breccias with altered impact glass and located at or near the K-T boundary in Texas (USA), northern and southern Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Haiti and Brazil are investigated to determine their age, stratigraphy and origin. Ages are variable. The oldest breccia deposit is within the uppermost Maastrichtian in the southern USA (Brazos, Texas), NE Mexico (e.g., Loma Cerca, El Penon) and in the Chicxulub impact crater cores on Yucatan (e.g., cores Yaxcopoil-1, Y6, C1). In all these sections, the geochemistry of glass within the breccias is identical and consistent with Chicxulub impact ejecta. The K-T boundary, Ir anomaly and mass extinction is located well above these impact breccia layers. This strongly supports a pre-K-T age for the Chicxulub impact, as also determined based on sedimentology, stratigraphy and paleontology. In NE Mexico and Texas the oldest Chicxulub impact spherule ejecta layer is interbedded in normal marine sedimentation in the upper Maastrichtian (base of CF1 Zone), about 300'000 year prior to the K-T boundary. All stratigraphically younger spherule ejecta layers represent repeated episodes of reworking and transport of the original layer during a sea-level regression and re- deposition in incised valleys in shallow environments (e.g., Brazos, Texas, La Popa Basin NE Mexico) and submarine canyons in deeper environments via mass flows and turbidites (e.g. Mimbral, Penon, Loma Cerca and many other section throughout NE Mexico). In southern Mexico, Belize and eastern Guatemala, the widespread thick microspherule and larger spheroid deposits are interbedded with breccia, microbreccias and conglomerates in the early Danian as a result of erosion in shallow carbonate platform sediments. The presence of early Danian planktic foraminifera in the matrix of the breccia, as well as within spherule clasts, indicate that redeposition occurred during the early Danian Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina (P1a) zone. In Haiti (Beloc sections), spherule deposits and

  5. Sedimentological techniques applied to the hydrology of the Atlantic coastal plain in South Carolina and Georgia near the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Falls, F.W. ); Baum, J.S. ); Edwards, L.E. )

    1994-03-01

    Potential for migration of contaminants in ground water under the Savannah River from South Carolina into Georgia near the US Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is located in the inner Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina and is underlain by 200 to more than 300 meters of permeable, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated sediments of Cretaceous and Tertiary age. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, is evaluating ground-water flow through the Coastal Plain sediments in the area. Preliminary hydrologic studies conducted to provide the data needed for digital modeling of the ground-water flow system identified the need for more extensive investigation into the influence of the geologic complexities on that flow system. The Coastal Plain physiographic province in South Carolina and Georgia is comprised of a complex wedge of fluvial, deltaic, and marine sedimentary deposits locally modified by faulting. Several techniques commonly used in petroleum basin analysis (sequence stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, detailed core description, and geophysical well log analysis), were used together with water-level measurements, aquifer-test data, and geochemical data to identify six regional aquifers. Hydraulic conductivity distribution maps within each of these aquifers were constructed using textural analysis of core materials, aquifer test data, and depositional system reconstruction. Sedimentological techniques were used to improve understanding of the depositional system and the ground-water flow system dynamics, and to help focus research in areas where additional hydrologic, geologic, and aquifer-test data are needed.

  6. Ediacaran sedimentology and paleoecology of Newfoundland reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retallack, Gregory J.

    2016-03-01

    Ediacaran fossils of Mistaken Point and other localities in Newfoundland have been reconstructed as denizens of a deep, dark ocean, based on a turbidite interpretation of their sedimentary context. Objections to this view include geochemical indications of fresh water and volcanological and sedimentological evidence that they lived in soils of coastal plains and tidal flats. Two distinct assemblages of these fossils are recognized: a low-diversity Aspidella-Heimalora community on sulfidic grey paleosols (Sulfaquent) and a high diversity Fractofusus-Charniodiscus community on red ferruginous paleosols (Fluvent and Udept). These two assemblages and their paleosols were comparable in habitat with Phanerozoic intertidal salt marsh and coastal woodlands, respectively. Paleosol chemical composition is also evidence that Ediacaran communities of Newfoundland lived in humid, cool temperate paleoclimates, unlike arid paleoclimates of the classical Ediacaran biota of South Australia.

  7. Beach ridge sedimentology: field observation and palaeoenvironmental interpretation for Anegada Island, British Virgin Islands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescon, Anna Lisa; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.

    2014-05-01

    Beach ridge landforms have been observed in different environments and in settings that range from polar to tropical. Their stratigraphy and sedimentology has received a limited amount of discussion in the literature (Tamura, 2012). In coastal geomorphology a beach ridge can be seen as a transitional deposit between onshore and offshore environments. They are regarded as representing high level wave action along a coastline. In the Caribbean the origin of beach ridges has been variously attributed to one of three extreme wave events: extreme swell, extreme storm or tsunami waves. Beach ridges are arranged in beach ridge plains where there is succession of the landforms and can be several kilometres long. Beach ridge accumulation is not continuous and the coast shows alternating accretion and erosion periods. The use of beach ridges as palaeostorm archives is therefore not straightforward. The temporal continuity of beach ridge formation is being assessed on the beach ridge plains of Anegada, British Virgin Islands (Lesser Antilles). This carbonate platform surrounded by a fringing reef contains two beach ridge plains. There are more than 30 ridges in the Atlantic facing- coast and around 10 in the south, Caribbean- facing coast. The sediments of the modern beaches are dominated by the sand fraction and are 100% biogenic origin due to the isolation of Anegada from terrestrial sediment sources. The beach ridge sections have been studied in different area of Anegada beach ridge plains and present low angle seaward-dipping bedding. The sand fraction is dominant in the stratigraphy with a few intact shells. At only one site were coral pebbles deposited in association with the sand fraction. Aeolian deposits represent the upper part of the beach ridges and reflect the stabilization of the beach ridges with ongoing accretion. The sedimentology of the contemporary beach and dunes will be discussed in terms of their implications for understanding beach ridge genesis and its

  8. Mesozoic-Cenozoic sequence stratigraphy of European basins

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, P.R. ); Jacquin, T. )

    1993-09-01

    The preliminary results of the project, [open quotes]Mesozoic-Cenozoic Sequence Stratigraphy of European Basins[close quotes] (introduced at a seminar in Dijon, France, on May 18-20, 1992), show that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic stratigraphic succession of western Europe can be subdivided into a series of transgressive-regressive facies cycles (second order, 3-50 m.y.) and related to tectonic events by subsidence analysis and regional geology. The distribution of the second-order cycles are shown on a series of transects that extend from the Mediterranean to the North Sea. Where possible, each transgressive-regressive phase has been subdivided into a series of higher frequency sequence cycles (third order, 0.5-3 m.y.). These sequence cycles are identified in regions with good outcrops and biostratigraphic control. The sequence stratigraphy interpretation of these outcrop sections provides documentation for the age and distribution of the second- and third-order stratigraphic cycles of western Europe. Subsurface seismic and well data from the North Sea Basin, Paris basin, and the Mediterranean area are interpreted in terms of sequence stratigraphy and correlated to the outcrop reference sections. Chronobiostratigraphy and numerical ages are based on a series of new charts made especially for this project that show the latest correlation of the biostratigraphic zones for both microfossils and macrofossils across Europe. The charts also include a numerical time scale that reconciles the differences between existing time scales.

  9. Lithostratigraphy, geophysics, biostratigraphy, and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of the surficial aquifer system of eastern Collier County and northern Monroe County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weedman, S.D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Edwards, L.E.; Simmons, K.R.; Scott, T.M.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Reese, R.S.; Blair, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, ten cores were drilled in eastern Collier County and northern Monroe County, within the limits of the Big Cypress National Preserve. These cores represent a continuation of the study of seven cores in western Collier County begun in 1996 and reported in Weedman and others (1997) and Edwards and others (1998). This joint U.S. Geological Survey and Florida Geological Survey project is designed to acquire subsurface geologic and hydrologic data in southwest Florida to extend current ground-water models, thereby expanding the utility of these models for land and water management. In this report we describe the lithostratigraphy, geophysical logging, sedimentological analysis, dinocyst biostratigraphy, and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of these ten cores. The three geophysical logs (natural gamma-ray, induction conductivity, and neutron porosity) assumed to be related to formation lithology and water quality show that a number of clay-rich zones are present in all of the boreholes, and that pore-water conductivity increases with depth. The clay-rich zones are confirmed by visual examination of core material and sedimentological analysis. The relative transmissivity calculated at 10-foot-thick intervals shows that in six of the boreholes, high values are associated with the shallow aquifer in the 0-40 ft interval. Two of the boreholes (the most northerly and the most easterly) showed relatively higher values of transmissivity in permeable zones at or somewhat below 100 ft in depth. Core geology and logs indicate that the deeper aquifers are not more permeable than similar deeper zones in the other boreholes, but rather that the shallow aquifer appears to be less permeable in these two coreholes. The Arcadia (?) Formation was only penetrated in the deepest core where it is late Miocene in age. The Peace River Formation was penetrated in all but the two westernmost cores. It yields a late Miocene age, based on both dinocysts and strontium-isotope stratigraphy

  10. Seismic stratigraphy in high resolution shallow marine seismic data of the Gemlik Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtulus, C. . Dept. of Geophysical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Seismic stratigraphy and sedimentological studies of the Gemlik Gulf in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey, have been carried out. For this purpose, 19 lines totaling 189 km of excellent quality, high-resolution seismic data were recorded. Four major acoustic units were identified in the seismic profiles. Three were sedimentary units: irregular layered, cross-layered and well-layered; and the fourth was an acoustic basement which is probably composed of crystalline volcanic rocks. Some local areas in the Neogene formation contain gas accumulations. The formation of faults in E--W and N--S directions can be explained by the existence of shear stresses in the Gulf. The bathymetric map shows good accommodation with the shore line as does the tectonic map.

  11. Applications of sequence stratigraphy to Pennsylvanian strata in the Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weibel, C.P.; ,

    1996-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy concepts have been applied previously to the interpretation of Pennsylvanian strata in the Illinois Basin with the use of the 'cycle' by J.A. Udden in 1912 and the cyclothem by H. Wanless and J. Weller in 1932. The unconformity-bounded cyclothem was recognized in Pennsylvanian strata throughout the basin and is a small-scale version of the cratonic sequence of L.L. Sloss. Recent applications indicate that the transgressive-regressive unit, a genetic succession bounded by marine-flooding surfaces, is a more practical stratigraphic unit that has applications for stratigraphic control, structural control, sedimentology, and hydrostratigraphy. Transgressive-regressive units conveniently fit within a sequence stratigraphic framework.

  12. Upper Neogene stratigraphy and tectonics of Death Valley - A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.R.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Machette, M.N.; Klinger, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    New tephrochronologic, soil-stratigraphic and radiometric-dating studies over the last 10 years have generated a robust numerical stratigraphy for Upper Neogene sedimentary deposits throughout Death Valley. Critical to this improved stratigraphy are correlated or radiometrically-dated tephra beds and tuffs that range in age from > 3.58 Ma to < 1.1 ka. These tephra beds and tuffs establish relations among the Upper Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene sedimentary deposits at Furnace Creek basin, Nova basin, Ubehebe-Lake Rogers basin, Copper Canyon, Artists Drive, Kit Fox Hills, and Confidence Hills. New geologic formations have been described in the Confidence Hills and at Mormon Point. This new geochronology also establishes maximum and minimum ages for Quaternary alluvial fans and Lake Manly deposits. Facies associated with the tephra beds show that ???3.3 Ma the Furnace Creek basin was a northwest-southeast-trending lake flanked by alluvial fans. This paleolake extended from the Furnace Creek to Ubehebe. Based on the new stratigraphy, the Death Valley fault system can be divided into four main fault zones: the dextral, Quaternary-age Northern Death Valley fault zone; the dextral, pre-Quaternary Furnace Creek fault zone; the oblique-normal Black Mountains fault zone; and the dextral Southern Death Valley fault zone. Post -3.3 Ma geometric, structural, and kinematic changes in the Black Mountains and Towne Pass fault zones led to the break up of Furnace Creek basin and uplift of the Copper Canyon and Nova basins. Internal kinematics of northern Death Valley are interpreted as either rotation of blocks or normal slip along the northeast-southwest-trending Towne Pass and Tin Mountain fault zones within the Eastern California shear zone. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Stratigraphy, artefact industries and hominid associations for Sterkfontein, member 5.

    PubMed

    Kuman, K; Clarke, R J

    2000-06-01

    A revised stratigraphy for the early hominid site of Sterkfontein (Gauteng Province, South Africa) reveals a complex distribution of infills in the main excavation area between 2.8 and 1.4 m.y.a, as well as deposits dating to the mid to late Pleistocene. New research now shows that the Member 4 australopithecine breccia (2.8-2.6 Ma) extends further west than was previously thought, while a late phase of Member 4 is recognized in a southern area. The artefact-bearing breccias were defined sedimentologically as Member 5, but one supposed part of these younger breccias, the StW 53 infill, lacks in situ stone tools, although it does appear to post-date 2.6 Ma when artefacts first appear in the archaeological record. The StW 53 hominid, previously referred to Homo habilis, is here argued to be Australopithecus. The first artefact-bearing breccia of Member 5 is the Oldowan Infill, estimated at 2-1.7 Ma. It occupies a restricted distribution in Member 5 east and contains an expedient, flake-based tool industry associated with a few fossils of Paranthropos robustus. An enlarged cave opening subsequently admitted one or more Early Acheulean infills associated in Member 5 west with Homo ergaster. The artefacts attest to a larger site accumulation between ca. 1.7 and 1.4 Ma, with more intensive use of quartzite over quartz and a subtle but important shift to large flakes and heavier-duty tools. The available information on palaeoenvironments is summarized, showing an overall change from tropical to sub-tropical gallery forest, forest fringe and woodland conditions in Member 4 to more open woodland and grassland habitats in the later units, but with suggestions of a wet localized topography in the Paranthropus -bearing Oldowan Infill.

  14. Sequence stratigraphy, paleoclimate, and tectonics of coal-bearing strata

    SciTech Connect

    Jack C. Pashin; Robert A. Gastaldo

    2004-07-15

    The origin of coal-bearing strata has been debated vigorously for more than a century, and with the emergence of coalbed methane as a major energy resource and the possibility of sequestering greenhouse gas in coal, this debate has never been more relevant. This volume contains 10 chapters on coal-bearing strata of Carboniferous through Tertiary age and is based on a special session that was held at an AAPG Annual Meeting in New Orleans. Contributors have employed a multitude of approaches ranging from basin analysis to plant taphonomy to support a variety of views on the sequence stratigraphy, paleoclimate, and tectonics of coal-bearing strata.

  15. Fluvial-deltaic sedimentation and stratigraphy of the ferron sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, P.B.; Chidsey, T.C.; Ryer, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    East-central Utah has world-class outcrops of dominantly fluvial-deltaic Turonian to Coniacian aged strata deposited in the Cretaceous foreland basin. The Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale records the influences of both tidal and wave energy on fluvial-dominated deltas on the western margin of the Cretaceous western interior seaway. Revisions of the stratigraphy are proposed for the Ferron Sandstone. Facies representing a variety of environments of deposition are well exposed, including delta-front, strandline, marginal marine, and coastal-plain. Some of these facies are described in detail for use in petroleum reservoir characterization and include permeability structure.

  16. Seismic stratigraphy of the Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, J.W.; Sheridan, R.E.

    1987-06-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from the Straits of Florida, Northwest Providence Channel, Tongue of the Ocean, and Exuma Sound reveal a seismic stratigraphy characterized by a series of prograding Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary seismic sequences with seismic velocities generally less than 4 km/sec overlying a Lower Cretaceous section of low-amplitude reflections which are more nearly horizontal than the overlying prograding clinoforms and have seismic velocities greater than 5 km/sec. The prograding units are detrital shallow-water carbonates shed from nearby carbonate banks into deep intrabank basins that were established in the Late Cretaceous. The Lower Cretaceous units are probably shallow-water carbonate banks that were drowned in the middle Cretaceous but which, during the Early Cretaceous, extended from Florida throughout the Bahamas region. The seismic reflection profiles reveal a sharp angular unconformity at 5-sec two-way traveltime in northwest Tongue of the Ocean, suggesting a rift-drift unconformity and deposition on thinned continental crust. No such unconformity is seen in central and southeast Tongue of the Ocean or in Exuma Sound, suggesting that these areas are built on oceanic crust.

  17. Sedimentology of coastal chevron deposits - tsunamigenic versus aeolian origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Garcia, A.; Spiske, M.; Tsukamoto, S.; Schmidt, V.

    2012-12-01

    The genesis of v-shaped coastal chevrons is currently controversially discussed. So far, chevrons are only described regarding their morphology, but not in terms of their origin. Two possible origins of chevrons are proposed: both aeolian transport and tsunami inundation are discussed as depositing processes. We present initial results of a detailed sedimentological survey of Holocene coastal chevrons from the American and Australian west coasts. The chevrons were measured and levelled using a differential GPS system. Large scale internal structures were recorded by ground penetrating radar imaging. Trenches were dug for sampling and analyzing small scale internal structures. The sediment samples were used for the analysis of grain-size distributions, mineral composition and content of marine microorganisms. Additional samples were taken for optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon dating. Furthermore, we took reference samples from beaches, cliffs and rivers, which could act as potential sediment sources for the surveyed chevrons. Tsunami deposits are commonly polymodal, exhibit a grain-size decrease and tend to show better sorting in landward direction. Such trends are not present in the surveyed chevrons. Most samples are well to moderately well sorted and unimodal. The OSL ages decrease in transport direction and indicate a long term generation process, such as dune migration, rather than a short term event like a tsunami. This fact is additionally underlined by land snails found in different stratigraphic levels within the Australian chevrons. Furthermore, the occurrence of intercalated soil horizons implies a change of stable and active migration phases. The initial results of this study point out to an aoelian origin of coastal chevrons and do not support the previously supposed thesis of a tsunamigenic origin.

  18. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Palisades, Lower Comanche, and Arroyo Grande areas of the Colorado River Corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Rubin, David M.; Dierker, Jennifer L.; Fairley, Helen C.; Griffiths, Ronald E.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Hunter, Ralph E.; Kohl, Keith; Leap, Lisa M.; Nials, Fred L.; Topping, David J.; Yeatts, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This report analyzes various depositional environments in three archaeologically significant areas of the Colorado River corridor in Grand Canyon. Archaeological features are built on and buried by fluvial, aeolian, and locally derived sediment, representing a complex interaction between geologic and cultural history. These analyses provide a basis for determining the potential influence of Glen Canyon Dam operations on selected archaeological sites and thus for guiding dam operations in order to facilitate preservation of cultural resources. This report presents initial results of a joint effort between geologists and archaeologists to evaluate the significance of various depositional processes and environments in the prehistoric formation and modern preservation of archaeological sites along the Colorado River corridor in Grand Canyon National Park. Stratigraphic investigations of the Palisades, Lower Comanche, and Arroyo Grande areas of Grand Canyon yield detailed information regarding the sedimentary history at these locations. Reconstruction of past depositional settings is critical to a thorough understanding of the geomorphic and stratigraphic evolution of these three archaeologically significant areas. This examination of past sedimentary environments allows the relative significance of fluvial, aeolian, debris-fan, and slope-wash sedimentary deposits to be identified at each site. In general the proportion of fluvial sediment (number and thickness of flood deposits) is shown to decrease away from the river, and locally derived sediment becomes more significant. Flood sequences often occur as 'couplets' that contain a fluvial deposit overlain by an interflood unit that reflects reworking of fluvial sediment at the land surface by wind and local runoff. Archaeological features are built on and buried by sediment of various depositional environments, implying a complex interaction between geologic and cultural history. Such field analysis, which combines geological and archaeological information and techniques, can provide a basis for future determination of the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on selected areas of the river corridor. This knowledge is essential to the development of preservation strategies for cultural resources in Grand Canyon.

  19. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Cretaceous Nanushuk, Seabee, and Tuluvak formations exposed on Umiat Mountain, north-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata of the upper part of the Nanushuk Formation, the Seabee Formation, and the lower part of the Tuluvak Formation are exposed along the Colville River on the east flank of Umiat Mountain in north-central Alaska. The Ninuluk sandstone, which is the uppermost unit of the Nanushuk Formation, displays a vertical succession of facies indicative of deposition in an upward-deepening estuarine through shoreface setting. A marine-flooding surface lies between the Ninuluk sandstone and organic-rich shale of the basal part of the Seabee Formation. The Ninuluk sandstone and the lower part of the Seabee Formation are interpreted as components of a transgressive-systems tract. The lowest, well-exposed strata in the Seabee Formation are a succession of shoreface sandstone beds in the middle of the formation. Integration of outcrop information and the Umiat No. 11 well log suggests that this sandstone succession rests on a sequence boundary and is capped by a marine-flooding surface. The sandstone succession is interpreted as a lowstand-systems tract. The upper part of the Seabee Formation includes a thick interval of organic-rich shale deposited in a dysaerobic offshore environment, and the gradational Seabee-Tuluvak contact is a coarsening-upward shale-to-sandstone succession deposited in a prodelta/delta-front environment. The observation that the upper part of the Seabee Formation correlates with seismic clinoforms suggests that dysaerobic conditions extended well up onto the prodelta slope during intervals of transgression and highstand. Correlation of the Umiat Mountain outcrop section with well logs and seismic data suggests that sequence boundaries and lowstand shoreface deposits may be common in the Seabee Formation and that wave action may have been important in transporting sand to the paleoshelf margin. These conclusions may contribute to an enhanced understanding of sand distribution in prospective lowstand turbidite deposits in the subsurface of the central North Slope of Alaska.

  20. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Kanayut Conglomerate, central and western Brooks Range, Alaska; report of 1981 field season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.; Moore, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian(?) Kanayut Conglomerate forms a major stratigraphic unit along the crest of the Brooks Range of northern Alaska. It crops out for an east-west distance of about 900 km and a north-south distance of about 65 km. The Kanayut is wholly allochthonous and has probably been transported northward on a series of thrust plates. The Kanayut is as thick as 2,600 m in the east-central Brooks Range. It thins and fines to the south and west. The Kanayut forms the middle part of the allochthonous sequence of the Endicott Group, an Upper Devonian and Mississippian clastic sequence underlain by platform limestones of the Baird Group and overlain by platform limestone, carbonaceous shale, and black chert of the Lisburne Group. The Kanayut overlies the marine Upper Devonian Noatak Sandstone or, where it is missing, the marine Upper Devonian Hunt Fork Shale. It is overlain by the marine Mississippian Kayak Shale. The Kanayut Conglomerate forms the fluvial part of a large, coarse-grained delta that prograded to the southwest in Late Devonian time and retreated in Early Mississippian time. Four sections of the Kanayut Conglomerate in the central Brooks Range and five in the western Brooks Range were measured in 1981. The sections from the western Brooks Range document the presence of fluvial cycles in the Kanayut as far west as the shores of the Chukchi Sea. The Kanayut in this area is generally finer grained than it is in the central and eastern Brooks Range, having a maximum clast size of 3 cm. It is probably about 300 m thick. The upper and lower contacts of the Kanayut are gradational. The lower Kanayut contains calcareous, marine-influenced sandstone within channel deposits, and the upper Kanayut contains probable marine interdistributary-bay shale sequences. The members of the Kanayut Conglomerate cannot be differentiated in this region. In the central Brooks Range, sections of the Kanayut Conglomerate at Siavlat Mountain and Kakivilak Creek are typically organized into fining-upward fluvial cycles. The maximum clast size is about 3 cm in this area. The Kanayut in this region is 200-500 m thick and can be divided into the Ear Peak, Shainin Lake, and Stuver Members. The upper contact of the Kanayut with the Kayak Shale is very gradational at Kakivilak Creek and very abrupt at Siavlat Mountain. Paleocurrents from fluvial strata of the Kanayut indicate sediment transport toward the west and south in both the western and central Brooks Range. The maximum clast size distribution generally indicates westward fining from the Shainin Lake region.

  1. Integration Of Digital Methodologies (Field, Processing, and Presentation) In A Combined Sedimentology/Stratigraphy and Structure Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinconico, L. L., Jr.; Sunderlin, D.; Liew, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Over the course of the last three years we have designed, developed and refined two Apps for the iPad. GeoFieldBook and StratLogger allow for the real-time display of spatial (structural) and temporal (stratigraphic) field data as well as very easy in-field navigation. Field techniques and methods for data acquisition and mapping in the field have dramatically advanced and simplified how we collect and analyze data while in the field. The Apps are not geologic mapping programs, but rather a way of bypassing the analog field book step to acquire digital data directly that can then be used in various analysis programs (GIS, Google Earth, Stereonet, spreadsheet and drawing programs). We now complete all of our fieldwork digitally. GeoFieldBook can be used to collect structural and other field observations. Each record includes location/date/time information, orientation measurements, formation names, text observations and photos taken with the tablet camera. Records are customizable, so users can add fields of their own choosing. Data are displayed on an image base in real time with oriented structural symbols. The image base is also used for in-field navigation. In StratLogger, the user records bed thickness, lithofacies, biofacies, and contact data in preset and modifiable fields. Each bed/unit record may also be photographed and geo-referenced. As each record is collected, a column diagram of the stratigraphic sequence is built in real time, complete with lithology color, lithology texture, and fossil symbols. The recorded data from any measured stratigraphic sequence can be exported as both the live-drawn column image and as a .csv formatted file for use in spreadsheet or other applications. Common to both Apps is the ability to export the data (via .csv files), photographs and maps or stratigraphic columns (images). Since the data are digital they are easily imported into various processing programs (for example for stereoplot analysis). Requiring that all maps, stratigraphic columns and cross-sections be produced digitally continues our integration on the use of digital technologies throughout the curriculum. Initial evaluation suggests that students using the Apps more quickly progress towards synthesis and interpretation of the data as well as a deeper understanding of complex 4D field relationships.

  2. The orbital record in stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Alfred G.

    1992-01-01

    , and (2) presence of abundant microfossils yields close ties to geochronology. A tantalizing possibility that stratigraphy may yield a record of orbital signals unrelated to climate has turned up in magnetic studies of our Cretaceous core. Magnetic secular variations here carry a strong 39 ka periodicity, corresponding to the theoretical obliquity period of that time - Does the obliquity cycle perhaps have some direct influence on the magnetic field?

  3. Sedimentological and Stratigraphic Controls on Natural Fracture Distribution in Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Hariri, Mustafa; Abdullatif, Osman; Makkawi, Mohammed; Korvin, Gabor

    2016-04-01

    The Cambro-Permian Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia, is the main groundwater aquifer in Wadi Al-Dawasir and Najran areas. In addition, it has a reservoir potentiality for oil and natural gas in Rub' Al-Khali Basin. Wajid Group divided into four formations, ascending Dibsiyah, Sanamah, Khussyayan and Juwayl. They are mainly sandstone and exposed in an area extend from Wadi Al-Dawasir southward to Najran city and deposited within fluvial, shallow marine and glacial environments. This study aims to investigate the sedimentological and stratigraphic controls on the distribution of natural fractures within Wajid Group outcrops. A scanline sampling method was used to study the natural fracture network within Wajid Group outcrops, where the natural fractures were measured and characterized in 12 locations. Four regional natural fracture sets were observed with mean strikes of 050o, 075o, 345o, and 320o. Seven lithofacies characterized the Wajid Group at these locations and include fine-grained sandstone, coarse to pebbly sandstone, cross-bedded sandstone, massive sandstone, bioturbated sandstone, conglomerate sandstone, and conglomerate lithofacies. We found that the fine-grained and small scale cross-bedded sandstones lithofacies are characterized by high fracture intensity. In contrast, the coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate lithofacies have low fracture intensity. Therefore, the relative fracture intensity and spacing of natural fractures within Wajid Group in the subsurface can be predicted by using the lithofacies and their depositional environments. In terms of stratigraphy, we found that the bed thickness and the stratigraphic architecture are the main controls on fractures intensity. The outcomes of this study can help to understand and predict the natural fracture distribution within the subsurface fractured sandstone hosting groundwater and hydrocarbon in Wajid and Rub' Al-Khali Basins. Hence, the finding of this study might help to explore and develop the

  4. Sedimentological study of sandy and shaly deposits (Beglia Formation) in Cap Bon area

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjoub, M.N.; Khessibi, M.

    1988-08-01

    Sedimentological study of sandy and shaly deposits of the Beglia formation has been made in Cap Bon (northeast of Tunisia) to define a sedimentological and paleogeographical model which could be extrapolated into the Gulf of Hammamet. The main results follow. (1) The Beglia formation is serravalian in age and has a migratory deltaic complex facies which includes river and marine affinities (flood plain and tidal). (2) Three intervals within the Beglia have been studied in detail and indicate a northwest-southeast depositional trend which the authors consider the main direction of the middle Miocene detrital deposits in northeastern Tunisia. (3) The fine and well-sorted sandstones which extend up to hectometric and kilometric size, observed in outcrop, are the distal zones of the migratory fans and bars. (4) These sandstone bodies, because of their relative small size within their deltaic model, do not extend to the Gulf of Hammamet. The sandstones offshore have produced hydrocarbons in several areas. They are the distal equivalent of the poorly sorted and coarse channel deposits studied in the outcrops.

  5. Morphology, sedimentology and stratigraphic implication of debris-covered glacier deposits from the LGM and Lateglacial (Eastern Alps, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitner, Jürgen M.; Seidl, Sabrina; Wagreich, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the genesis of Quaternary sediments is crucial for establishing a climato-stratigraphy and, further on, to infer paleoclimatic conditions, if possible. Especially diamictons in the high-mountain environment may be formed by variety of processes, i.e. glacial, periglacial and gravitational. On the other hand, the interpretation of morphological features might be ambiguous as for example ridges may document latero-frontal dump moraines, flow of a rock avalanche event or constituents of a rock-glacier. In addition, equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) of paleo-glaciers are mostly based on calculations using the reconstructed glacier size and applying a more or less fixed accumulation area ration (e.g. AAR - method). However, such ELAs are of no use for stratigraphic correlations and climatic considerations, if the former glacial system was strongly influenced by supraglacial debris deriving from steep back walls of cirques. We present two examples of reconstructed debris-covered or more specifically debris-mantled paleo-glaciers, their geological and morphological setting as well as their documented sedimentology and morphology. The first example is from the easternmost part of the European Alps (Northern Calcareous Alps / Schneeberg mountains / Puchberg) where an up to 60 m high moraine systems of LGM age shows some striking morphological similarities with relict rock glacier. However, based especially on lithofacies analyses as well as on the lithology of the matrix a glacial genesis could be proven. Lateglacial glacier deposits from the interior of the Alps (Lienz Dolomites / area of Karlsbader Hütte) display a quite similar glacial system. The geometry of the deposits in relation to proglacial sturzstrom sediments, showing typical indications of dynamic fragmentation, and the amount of angular, passively transported clasts in the till point to a rock avalanche event which had hit the glacier surface during a glacier advance. As the glacial system shows

  6. The Permian of Timor: stratigraphy, palaeontology and palaeogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, T. R.; Barber, A. J.; Harris, R. A.; Barkham, S. T.; Bird, P. R.; Archbold, N. W.; Morris, N. J.; Nicoll, R. S.; Owen, H. G.; Owens, R. M.; Sorauf, J. E.; Taylor, P. D.; Webster, G. D.; Whittaker, J. E.

    2002-08-01

    The Permian of Timor in the Lesser Sunda Islands has attracted the attention of palaeontologists since the middle of the nineteenth century because of the richness, diversity and excellent state of preservation of its fauna. These abundant fossil data have been compiled and updated for the present account. The Permian rocks of Timor were deposited on the northern margin of Australia. At the present time the northern margin of Australia, in the region of Timor, is involved in a continent-arc collision, where Australia is colliding with the Banda Arcs. As a result of this collision, Permian rocks of the Australian margin have been disrupted by folding and faulting with the generation of mud-matrix mélange, and uplifted to form part of the island of Timor. Due to this tectonic disruption, it has proved difficult to establish a reliable stratigraphy for the Permian units on Timor, especially as the classic fossil collections were obtained largely from the mélange or purchased from the local people, and do not have adequate stratigraphic control. Detailed systematic, structural, stratigraphic and sedimentological studies since the 1960s have provided a firmer stratigraphic and palaeogeographic background for reconsideration of the significance of the classic fossil collections. Permian rocks on Timor belong either to a volcanic-carbonate sequence (Maubisse Formation), or to a clastic sequence (Atahoc and Cribas formations) in which volcanics are less prominent. The Permian sequences were deposited on Australian continental basement which was undergoing extension with spasmodic volcanic activity. Carbonates of the Maubisse Formation were deposited on horst blocks and volcanic edifices, while clastic sediments of the Atahoc and Cribas formations were deposited in grabens. The clastic sediments are predominantly fine-grained, derived from a distant siliciclastic source, and are interbedded with sediments derived from the volcanics and carbonates of adjacent horst blocks

  7. Studying and Dating Indian Ocean Tsunamis by Using Benthic Foraminifera in the Sediment Stratigraphy of South Andaman Islands, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the foraminifera and dated them to identify the sea level fluctuations in the coastal sediment stratigraphy of Andaman Islands. Our recent paleotsunami investigations are specially focused on unusual large magnitude earthquake and tsunamis in the south coast of Andaman. Our detailed study on the foraminifers preserved in the near sub surface stratigraphy and AMS ages show a strong signature of the tsunami event very much similar to the modern tsunami of December 2004. We found that foraminifer is an ideal geological key to bracket paleotsunami events. The AMS ages of these foraminifers supports the ages given by corals of Sumatra with a small error bar. The recent research approach to identify the ruptures and tsunami based on the corals of south Sumatra suggests a large time span of 1000 years for such mega events. Our foraminiferal archives obtained from 10g soil samples from the 2.5m deep Holocene stratigraphy suggests four seismic predecessors similar to the 2004 event with ~Mw9 with huge rupture. Huge foraminiferal population in the sedimentary stratigraphy is an indicative of sea level changes and the signatures of abrasion in the foraminifer's test (180µm) indicate strong wave surges and bead load transport during tsunami events. Spontaneous death of organisms due to tsunami waves gives an exact time frame with a narrow age limit than the charcoal. Sediment stratigraphy of south Andaman had such changes in each millennium. Sediment stratigraphy sections shows the huge population and assemblages and the AMS dates of this foraminifera in south Andaman shows four mega events. This kind of fossil assemblages are commonly associated with the sea regression and transgressions in the geological time scale. Tamil 'Sangam literatures' one of the oldest literature available in Indian main land and the corals ages from Sumatra are also emphasizes the predecessors of such unusual large magnitude earthquakes and tsunamis in the Indian Ocean. All these

  8. Sedimentology: general introduction and definitions : fluvial sediment and channel morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolff, Roger G.; Benedict, Paul C.

    1964-01-01

    Sedimentology, the study of sedimentary rocks and the processes by which they are formed, includes and is related to a large number of phenomena. Sedimentology includes the five fundamental processes defined by the term sediaentation --weathering, erosion, transportation, deposition and diagenesis. Sedimentology shares with geomorphology the study of the surface features of the earth. Sedimentology also shares with hydrology the study of river.--channels. River channels are formed in part or in total as a result of flowing water and sediment transport, commonly called the "work of the rivers." This survey of published literature was made to aid in arriving at definitions which would be acceptable to, and representative of, a majority of professional personnel actively engaged in laboratory and field investigations related to the "work of the river." The definitions in this list are intended to explain the terms used in studies of fluvial sediment and channel morphology. No set of definitions can expect universal acceptance, however, i t is hoped that this compilation will be considered a summary and synthesis of present and past usage and that it will serve as a starting point for future usage. Multiple references are cited from textbooks, glossaries and dictionaries, scientific journals and u.s. Government publications. To obtain a mutual understanding and enhance precision, many of the proposed definitions are a composite of those selected from papers or reports covering research studies and field investigations. A draft of this glossary has been reviewed by a group of interested personnel. The results of this review have been carefully considered and the originally-suggested definitions have been revised accordingly, resulting in the present compilation. R. G. Wolff, with the help of Mrs. v. Blatcher, carried out the literature search and compilation of terms and the review results. Paul c. Benedict approved or composed the definitions as presented in this

  9. Modelling approaches in sedimentology: Introduction to the thematic issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Philippe; Teles, Vanessa; Weill, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    As an introduction to this thematic issue on "Modelling approaches in sedimentology", this paper gives an overview of the workshop held in Paris on 7 November 2013 during the 14th Congress of the French Association of Sedimentologists. A synthesis of the workshop in terms of concepts, spatial and temporal scales, constraining data, and scientific challenges is first presented, then a discussion on the possibility of coupling different models, the industrial needs, and the new potential domains of research is exposed.

  10. Loess stratigraphy of the Lower Mississippi Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, E.M.; Guccione, M.J.; Markewich, H.W.; Wysocki, D.A.; Ward, L.B.

    1996-01-01

    . Clark et al. (1989) agreed on Crowley's Ridge, but suggested the Loveland/Sicily Island loess on Sicily Island was older. Mirecki and Miller (1994) and Millard and Maat (1994) suggested an Illinoian age for the Loveland/Sicily Island loess. Miller and co-workers suggested, as did Pye and Johnson (1988), an Illinoian age for the Crowley's Ridge loess. McKay and Follmer (1985) suggested it correlated with a loess under "Kansan" till. Stratigraphy indicates the Marianna is the older of the five loesses. Researchers identified loess on both the east and west side of the LMV as well as on higher terraces within the valley. Many researchers assumed unaltered loesses were commonly yellowish brown, and silts or silt loams (West et al., 1980; Miller et al., 1986). The nonclay fraction of unweathered LMV loesses was dominated by quartz followed by carbonates, mainly dolomites, followed by feldspars, and micas. Clays were dominated by montmorillonite followed by micaceous minerals, kaolinite and vermiculite (Miller et al., 1986). Soils in the Crowley's Ridge loess are most developed, followed by the soils in the Loveland/Sicily Island which are more developed than the modern soils in the Peoria Loess. Soils in the Roxana and Marianna loesses are least developed and the Farmdale Soil of the Roxana is the weaker of the two (Miller et al., 1986). There is certainly overlapping range in the degree of soil development in the various loesses.

  11. Application of sequence stratigraphy to modern sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Boyd, R.; Penland, S.

    1988-02-01

    The concept of sequence stratigraphy provides a genetically linked depositional history of sea level and sedimentary processes which has been effectively used to interpret ancient deposits. Few efforts have been made to apply sequence stratigraphy to modern sediments, primarily due to differences in scale and the million(s)-year time span required to develop the lower-order depositional sequences upon which the concept is based. An extensive high-resolution seismic and vibracore database compiled over the last six years on the Louisiana continental shelf, coupled with published information, allows an application of sequence stratigraphy to the Mississippi River delta (MRD) system. Each of the major elements of the model has a counterpart in the MRD sequence. Eustatic fall beginning some 27,000 years ago resulted in fluvial downcutting and subaerial exposure of the continental shelf, creating incised valleys, a Type 1 unconformity, and a lowstand wedge. The incised valleys filled as sea level began rising some 18,000 years ago, until a series of backstepping shelf-phase deltas were deposited during relative stillstands, onlapping the Type 1 unconformity as a transgressive systems tract. Once sea level reached its current position about 3000 years ago, continuing deltaic deposition initiated the highstand systems tracts, which has reached the shelf margin in the form of the Balize delta complex. Major depocenters like the MRD are able to form deposits analogous to lower-order sequences in time spans several orders of magnitude less than thought necessary, raising questions regarding the driving mechanism and time scale of the sequence stratigraphy approach.

  12. Application of sequence stratigraphy to modern sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Boyd, R.; Penland, S.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of sequence stratigraphy provides a genetically linked depositional history of sea level and sedimentary processes which has been effectively used to interpret ancient deposits. Few efforts have been made to apply sequence stratigraphy to modern sediments, primarily due to differences in scale and the million(s)-year time span required to develop the lower-order depositional sequences upon which the concept is based. An extensive high-resolution seismic and vibracore database compiled over the last six years on the Louisiana continental shelf, coupled with published information, allows an application of sequence stratigraphy to the Mississippi River delta (MRD) system. Each of the major elements of the model has a counterpart in the MRD sequence. Eustatic fall beginning some 27,000 years ago resulted in fluvial downcutting and subaerial exposure of the continental shelf, creating incised valley, a Type 1 unconformity, and a lowstand wedge. The incised valleys filled as sea level began rising some 18,000 years ago, until a series of backstepping shelf-phase deltas were deposited during relative stillstands, onlapping the Type 1 unconformity as a transgressive systems tract. Once sea level reached its current position about 3,000 years ago, continuing deltaic deposition initiated the highstand systems tract, which has reached the shelf margin in the form of the Balize delta complex.

  13. Seismo and sequence stratigraphy of Cenozoic units of the Morondava Basin, offshore western Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Dirk; Stollhofen, Harald; Klimke, Jennifer; Franke, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The N-S trending Morondava Basin extends in width from western onshore Madagascar over about 350 km westwards to the offshore Davie Ridge in the Mozambique Channel. Although basin formation was initiated during Karoo times, the main basin evolution took place during Jurassic rifting and subsequent drifting until middle Cretaceous as a result of Gondwana breakup (Geiger et al., 2004). Contemporaneous to the separation of India and Madagascar widespread flood basalts were emplaced during the late Cretaceous (Storey et al., 1995). Present knowledge of the Morondava Basin is mainly based on outcrop studies, seismic surveys and borehole information (e.g. Geiger et al., 2004), gathered in western onshore Madagascar, although the fast majority of the basin, including its depocenter is located offshore in the Mozambique Channel, now at up to 3,500 m water depth. Almost all of the recent offshore studies of the Morondava Basin rely on industrial data but up to date publications of exploration results are generally rare and mostly anonymized. Our study aims to extend knowledge, particularly on the offshore seismic and sequence stratigraphy of the Morondava Basin. A key question is also to test the proposed tectonic stability of the Davie Ridge over the last 40 Ma. For this purpose 12 seismic profiles and bathymetric data, acquired in early 2014 by RV SONNE, are interpreted. Most of the profiles cover the distal deep marine areas of the northern Morondava Basin between the Davie Ridge and the shelf break of Madagascar. Top Cretaceous, Top Eocene, Top Oligocene, the Middle Miocene Unconformity and the Base Pliocene, are mapped as major seismic marker horizons. Especially shelf and slope sedimentary units are important resources to reconstruct the tectonostratigraphic basin evolution. At the continental slope diffuse to chaotic seismic pattern of Miocene and younger age are identified which are subdivided by laterally continuous, high frequency reflectors with a higher

  14. Magnetic stratigraphy of Peralkaline Volcanism in Sierra Libre, Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguin-Villa, A. E.; Stock, J. M.; Vidal-Solano, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Middle Miocene (~12 Ma) magmatism in NW Mexico was dominated by the appearance of anorogenic liquids associated with the Proto-Gulf of California. These correspond to a few occurrences of mafic volcanic rocks with transitional signatures (geochemically) and to a larger silicic volcanic event of peralkaline affinity. The silicic event is primarily composed of a large ignimbritic deposit widely recognized in Baja California as the Tuff of San Felipe (TSF), and in Sonora as the Hermosillo Ignimbrite. These are correlated by a number of characteristics including a unique low-inclination, reversed magnetization, probably associated with a field transition or a geomagnetic excursion within a reversed polarity subchron at 11.531-11.935 Ma (base of C5r.3r; Cande and Kent, 1995). Thick sections of deposits of this peralkaline volcanism crop out at Sierra Libre, geographically located ~45 km south of Hermosillo, Sonora. In this locality, a ~180m thick stack of middle Miocene volcanic units (both pyroclastic and lavas) were sampled for paleomagnetic studies focusing on the magnetic stratigraphy of a set of 9 units (7 to 12 cores per unit) from El Galindro Canyon, which represents the thickest volcanic pile genetically related to Tuff of San Felipe and Hermosillo ignimbrite. Previous studies indicated that the anomalous magnetization from TSF could be either an excursion or a reversal transition - its age is unconstrained except by direct radiological isotopes and relative stratigraphy. But most excursions recorded in high-deposition rate lakebeds, and less often in volcanic piles, trace simple "there-and-back" paths away from and returning to the ordinary geomagnetic secular variation locus for an age. By contrast, the Sierra Libre magnetizations wander erratically in declination and inclination, without following a simple sequential ''Path''. Polarity reversal transitions recorded in high-deposition rate lakebeds do behave that way. We therefore interpret TSF (and remarkably

  15. Reconstructing habitats in central Amazonia using megafauna, sedimentology, radiocarbon, and isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fátima Rossetti, Dilce; de Toledo, Peter Mann; Moraes-Santos, Heloísa Maria; de Araújo Santos, Antônio Emídio

    2004-05-01

    A paleomegafauna site from central Amazonia with exceptional preservation of mastodons and ground sloths allows for the first time a precise age control based on 14C analysis, which, together with sedimentological and δ 13C isotope data, provided the basis to discuss habitat evolution within the context of climate change during the past 15,000 yr. The fossil-bearing deposits, trapped within a depression in the Paleozoic basement, record three episodes of sedimentation formed on floodplains, with an intermediate unit recording a catastrophic deposition through debris flows, probably favored during fast floodings. The integrated approach presented herein supports a change in humidity in central Amazonia through the past 15,000 yr, with a shift from drier to arboreal savanna at 11,340 (±50) 14C yr B.P. and then to a dense forest like we see today at 4620 (±60) 14C yr B.P.

  16. Sr isotope stratigraphy and lithogenic grain-size distributions of the Pleistocene Turkana Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbe, J. V. D.; Sier, M.; Feibel, C. S.; Beck, C.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Vonhof, H.; Joordens, J. J.; Cohen, A.; Prins, M. A.; Olago, D.

    2015-12-01

    the lithogenic sediments are noted. The Sr isotope stratigraphy, especially when combined with sedimentological data, provides a useful tool for stratigraphic correlation, as well as studies of climate and environmental change in Lake Loreyang and comparable lakes.

  17. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems of the Lower Silurian Medina Group, northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Detailed sedimentological analysis of 3500 ft of continuous core from 44 wells in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Ontario, New York, and West Virginia, combined with regional study of geophysical logs, results in new interpretations of sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems in Lower Silurian siliciclastic rocks of the northern Appalachian basin. Above a type-1 sequence boundary at the base of the Medina Group are a lowstand systems tract and a transgressive systems tract that are represented, respectively, by the Whirlpool Sandstone and by the overlying Cabot Head Shale. The thickest sandstones in the Medina Group occur in the Grimsby Sandstone, which is interpreted as a highstand systems tract with basinward-prograding parasequences. Sea level rise after Grimsby parasequence deposition is represented by marine-shelf shale in the uppermost part of the Medina Group. Based on facies successions in the cores, four mappable depositional systems are interpreted for the Grimsby Sandstone and correlative sandstone units; (1) wave-dominated middle shelf, (2) wave- and tide-influenced inner shelf, (3) tide dominated shoreline, and (4) fluvial. The wave-dominated middle-shelf system, which includes very fine-grained shelf-ridge sandstones encased in marine shale, is the most basinward system, occurring from Ontario through parts of eastern Ohio. Shoreward, across the northern Appalachian basin, the influence of tidal processes relative to wave processes generally increased, which may have been related to distance across the shelf, water depth, and shoreline configuration. The shoreline may have been deltaic in some areas and straight in other areas.

  18. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain: Applications to hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Based on regional stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, three unconformity-bounded depositional sequences associated with cycles of relative sea-level change and coastal onlap are recognized for Jurassic strata in the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain area. These sequences are designated, in ascending order, the LZAGC (Lower Zuni A Gulf Coast)-3.1, the LZAGC-4.1, and the LZAGC-4.2 sequences and include Callovian through Kimmeridgian Stage strata. An understanding of the relationship of Jurassic reservoirs to sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to hydrocarbon exploration in the eastern gulf area. The most extensive and productive Jurassic hydrocarbon reservoirs in the study area occur within the progradational, regressive highstand deposits of the LZAGC-3.1 and LZAGC-4.1 depositional sequences. For example, the majority of Norphlet sandstone reservoirs in the onshore and offshore Alabama area are interpreted to have accumulated in eolian dune, interdune, and wadi (fluvial) depositional environments, which occurred in association with the highstand regressive system of the LZAGC-3.1 sequence. The most important Smackover reservoirs generally consist of partially to completely dolomitized ooid and peloid packstones and grainstones in the upper portion of the unit. These reservoirs occur in subtidal to supratidal, shoaling-upward carbonate mudstone to grainstone cycles in the highstand regressive system of the LZAGC-4.1 sequence. In addition, minor reservoirs that are discontinuous and not well developed are associated with the shelf margin and transgressive systems of the LZAGC-4.1.

  19. Sequence Stratigraphy and Frequency Analysis of the Zhada Basin, SW Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, J. E.; Decelles, P. G.; Quade, J.

    2008-12-01

    Zhada basin is a large late Miocene - Pleistocene extensional sag basin in the Tethyan Himalaya of southwestern Tibet. Sequence stratigraphy in the basin reveals a long-term tectonic signal in the formation and filling of Zhada basin. The sedimentological record of the Zhada Formation also archives higher frequency cyclical expansion and contraction of a large paleolake. Expansion and contraction of lakes and wetlands has been linked to variability in the strength of the Asian monsoon and thought to be modulated by orbital cyclicity. In order to determine the forcing mechanism for Zhada paleolake expansion and contraction we created a wave form by assigning numerical values to the various depositional environments and applied spectral analysis to this record. Depositional environments in the South Zhada measured section were identified at 0.5 m increments or where the depositional environment changed. The result is a clipped waveform with uneven sample spacing and temporal resolution better than 4,000 yrs. In addition to a peak at 91.7 kyr (95% confidence level), spectral analysis reveals a peak at 22 kyr (85% confidence level). These are within 1/2 bandwidth (6 dB bandwidth = 2.4) of the eccentricity and precession frequencies. The record of Milankovitch cycles in Zhada basin implies that global climate drove lake and wetland expansion and contraction in the southern Tibetan Plateau from the late Miocene to the Pleistocene.

  20. Stratigraphie relations of australites in the Port Campbell Embayment, Victoria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemakeri, E.M.; Ralph, Uhlherr H.

    1999-01-01

    In the Port Campbell Embayment of Victoria, australites have been found in situ in channel deposits of the Hanson Plain Sand of Pliocene and Pleistocene age. The large majority of the australites, however, occur as a lag deposit at the basal contact of the Sturgess Sand of late Pleistocene and Holocene age and are spatially correlated with ferruginous sandstone clasts that are derived from the Hanson Plain Sand. Some of the tektites are imbedded in or bonded to the ferruginous sandstone clasts, but most are found as individual tektite fragments. A few percent of the tektites have nearly perfectly preserved, complete aerodynamically shaped forms. The sandstone clasts and associated tektites have been reworked from the much older underlying Hanson Plain and have been locally concentrated in the lag deposit. Some tektites also occur at higher levels in the Sturgess Sand, almost invariably in association with stone flakes, exotic stones transported by the aborigines and, locally, with middens of mollusc shells. Circumstantial evidence indicates that the aborigines transported the tektites found in the upper part of the Sturgess, particularly at Stanhope Bay. As Port Campbell australites unequivocally occur in strata much older than the late Pleistocene and Holocene Sturgess, there is no longer any conflict between the apparent stratigraphie age of the tektites and the middle Pleistocene ages obtained by various Chronometrie methods. ?? Meteoritical Society, 1999.

  1. Near coast sedimentary stratigraphy as a proxy for climatic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLivenny, J.

    2009-04-01

    collectively the results are consistent with some known episodes of climatic instability which occurred during the mid Holocene with instability phases occurring in Dunnet from approximately 6300- 4250 yrs BP, associated with climatic deterioration between 6000 - 5,200 Yrs BP (Lamb 1995) and dune instability between 2560 - 3900 Yrs BP, associated with an abrupt change of climate (Anderson 1995) In addition to the luminescence dates, 31 luminescence profiling dates were acquired in order to look at the continuity of the age vs. depth profile. Luminescence profile dates are small samples that require less preparation prior to luminescence measurement than full luminescence dating. Although larger errors are associated with luminescence profiling, it offered means of identifying at lesser cost the possible occurrence of mixing between eroded layers. The stratigraphic chronology was compared to other local and regional dune studies and periods of climatic deterioration found in other proxies. The GISP2 ice core (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) was found to provide chemical proxies for North Atlantic storminess which partially explained our observed stratigraphy (O`brien et al 1995). It is concluded that changes in dune stability at a regional scale are also influenced by local variables, so that one should be careful when attempting to draw stratigraphy to climate change. Key References: Issar, A. (2003) Climate changes during the Holocene and their impact on hydrological systems. Published by the Cambridge University Press 2003. Wilson, P. (2002) Holocene coastal dune development on the South Erridale peninsula, Wester Ross, Scotland. Scottish Journal of Geology, 38, 1, 5-13. Dawson, S., smith, D., Jordan, J., and Dawson D. G. (2004) Late Holocene coastal sand movements in the outer Hebrides N. W. Scotland. Marine Geology 210, 281-306 O`Brien, S. M. Mayewski, P.A. Meeker, L. D., Meese, D. A., Twickler, M. S. & Whitlow, S. I. (1995) Complexity of the Holocene Climate as reconstructed

  2. The Utility of Proximal-Accretion Stratigraphy in Lateral Moraines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolczyk, M. A.; Osborn, G.

    2010-12-01

    Lateral-moraine stratigraphy is a valuable tool that can be used to constrain the timing and magnitude of alpine glacier fluctuations. Numerous lateral moraines, conventionally thought to have been constructed during the Little Ice Age (LIA), have been shown to be composite landforms that contain multiple till layers deposited by successively larger glacier advances. Organic matter and/or tephra sandwiched between the till layers constrain times of advance and retreat; wood fragments within till may provide the age of the till. Observation of contemporary lateral moraines has lead to the recognition of two means of lateral moraine construction: (1) accretion of tills onto the distal flank of the pre-existing lateral moraine, and (2) accretion or plastering of tills onto the proximal flank of the pre-existing moraine. In composite lateral moraines, distal and proximal accretion result in paleosurfaces that trend parallel to the current distal and proximal slope, respectively. Published work using lateral-moraine stratigraphy, for example at Bugaboo and Stutfield glaciers in the Canadian Rockies, has used evidence only from distal-accretion moraines. However, proximal-accretion moraines that provide chronological information have been found at Nisqually Glacier on Mount Rainier in Washington State, USA, and Columbia Glacier, an outlet of the Columbia Icefield in the Canadian Rockies. A gully cut into the left-lateral moraine at Nisqually Glacier exposes a sandy seam, with associated wood fragments, that runs parallel to the proximal moraine flank for ~20 m. Wood collected from different elevations along the seam have radiocarbon ages of 1715±15, 1700±15, and 1670±50 14C yr BP, indicating that the seam is similar in age along its extent and likely marks a paleosurface separating older till below and till of the First Millennium advance above. At Columbia Glacier, some till exposures in the prominent right-lateral moraine show a fissility dipping variably 40 to 50

  3. Sedimentological evidence for debris-flow formation of Martian gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Hauber, Ernst; Ventra, Dario; Conway, Susan; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Gullies are among the youngest landforms formed by liquid water on Mars, and therefore of critical importance in resolving the planet's recent hydrologic and climatic history. The key to estimating the amount of liquid water involved in gully formation is their formative mechanism. Water-free sediment flows, debris flows and fluvial flows, which all require very different amounts of liquid water, contributed to gully formation but their abundance and effectiveness differs greatly between sites. We show that many gullies dominantly formed by debris flows, based on sedimentological analysis of outcrops in gully-fans rather than surficial debris-flow features, which are often degraded beyond recognition by weathering and wind erosion or masked by ice-dust mantling. This resolves the controversy between previously published morphometric analyses implying debris-flow formation and observations of modified fan surfaces often interpreted to have formed by fluvial flows. Furthermore, it shows that deriving formative processes on gullies from surface characteristics can be highly misleading, which should therefore be inferred from multiple approaches, including sedimentological outcrop and morphometric analyses.

  4. Atoll stratigraphy as a record of sea level change: Problems and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, Jonathan M.; Schlanger, Seymour O.

    1991-04-01

    Stratigraphic hiatuses and solution unconformities in the subsurface of Enewetak Atoll, northern Marshall Islands, record periods of atoll emergence during low stands of sea level. Changes in sea level are also recorded in the atoll subsurface by variations in the rate of sediment accumulation relative to the subsidence rate of the underlying volcanic edifice. Past sea levels can be derived from atoll stratigraphy by correcting the present depth of dated subsurface horizons for thermal subsidence and lithospheric flexure since the time of deposition. A correction for depositional paleodepth may also be necessary. As a result of erosion and nondeposition during periods of emergence, the history of sea level derived in this manner is discontinuous. Past sea levels derived from atoll stratigraphy can only be estimated to within ±50 m relative to present sea level owing to uncertainties in the corrections for subsidence and flexure; however, the minimum magnitude of sea level falls estimated from stratigraphic hiatuses can be estimated to within ±10 m. Owing to limited fossil-based age resolution, only long-term sea level trends can be deduced from sediments dated by means of biostratigraphy. Based on the biostratigraphic ages of subsurface horizons at Enewetak, we can discern very little long-term change in sea level from late Eocene through late Oligocene, a rise to ˜110 m above present sea level in the early Miocene, a long-term fall of ˜170 m through middle and late Miocene time, and a long-term rise of ˜60 m from the end of the Miocene to present. Resolution of the sea level history recorded beneath mid-ocean atolls may be improved by determining the age of shallow-marine carbonates by means of strontium isotope stratigraphy. Our interpretation of past sea levels based on 87Sr/86Sr chronostratigraphy from Enewetak confirms the long-term sea level trends inferred from biostratigraphic subsurface ages. In addition, we interpret three Oligocene sea level falls

  5. Chicxulub Post-Impact Sedimentary Sequence: Integrated Borehole Paleogene Carbonate Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Escobar-Sanchez, E.; Ortega-Nieto, A.; Velasco-Villarreal, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Chicxulub crater was formed by a bolide impact on the southern Gulf of Mexico at ~66 Ma ago that marked the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, represented worldwide by the ejecta layer. The K/Pg boundary layer with its global distribution provides a high resolution marker, allowing high precision stratigraphic analyses in marine and continental sequences. Following crater formation, sedimentation re-established in the carbonate platform, filling the basin. Crater is located half on-land and half offshore, with the crater floor covered by sediments with variable thickness up to about 1 km. The target, impact and post-impact sequences have been drilled and cored, providing samples for stratigraphic, petrographic and physical-chemical laboratory studies. The post-impact stratigraphy has been analyzed in several studies at proximal, intermediate and distal outcrops and in the crater boreholes, using e.g., radiometric dating, micropaleontology, paleomagnetism, and strontium and stable isotope geochemistry. Emphasis has been given on the impact breccias-carbonates contact and the basal Paleocene sequence. Here we re-analyze the available data, revisiting the stratigraphy for the Santa Elena, Tekax, Peto and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes using newly constructed detailed lithostratigraphic columns in the continuously cored boreholes. Additionally we extend the study to the Paleogene sequence in the Santa Elena and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes using bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes, magnetic polarity, XRF core geochemistry and magnetic susceptibility stratigraphy. Results spanning chrons c29 to c24 constrain the K/Pg boundary, c29r-c29n polarity reversal and the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum, providing high resolution records. The basal Paleocene gap and age differences in an integrated stratigraphy are discussed and correlated to the GPTS scale and IODP marine isotope records. The extent and characteristics of crater structure and target/cover sediments have been imaged with

  6. Strontium isotopic stratigraphy utilizing authigenic dolomites in hemipelagic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.A. ); Kastner, M. ); Elderfield, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Authigenic dolomites commonly occur in organic-rich, continental margin marine sediments. These dolomites play a key role in the age dating of stratigraphic sections. The dolomites often are the only lithology amenable to paleomagnetic stratigraphy; they preserve siliceous microfossils against diagenetic; recrystallization, and provide useful strontium isotopic stratigraphic ages. Several potential sources of error frequently are unique to the use of authigenic dolomites in the strontium isotope methods. (1) The dolomites occur as cements of the host lithology, hence, they are not a pure phase. Potentially important contaminants during analysis include gypsum clay minerals, feldspars, and iron and manganese oxides. Strontium may occur as a structural substituent ion in these minerals or as a surface-adsorbed ion. Various leaching techniques have been tested to isolate dolomitic strontium. Purer dolomites and strontium-enriched dolomites often can be selected to ease these problems. (2) The dolomites form after the deposition of the host sediment, therefore, they record the diagenetic age not the depositional age. The stable isotopic composition of the dolomites can aid in selection of early formed samples. (3) The dolomites record pore-water strontium isotope compositions, not seawater isotopic compositions. This problem is also minimized by choosing dolomites formed near the sediment-water interface. (4) The dolomites formed near the sediment-water interface originated as rotodolomites and undergo subsequent burial diagenesis, creating a potential for later strontium isotope exchange. This problem is minimized by selecting fresh samples from the interior of nearly impermeable beds and nodules. Results from the Miocene Monterey Formation of California and from the Eocene through Pliocene Pisco basin of Peru show that authigenic dolomites can provide useful strontium isotopic age estimates.

  7. Origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of the Late Quaternary deposits in Wadi Feiran, Sinai Peninsula: Geomorphologic, geochronologic, and isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, A. Z. A.; Sultan, M.; Forman, S. L.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    There is considerable debate on the origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of Late Quaternary deposits within the basement complex of the Sinai Peninsula. Our research in Wadi Feiran focused on documenting the sedimentology, stratigraphy, geochemistry and chronology of Late Quaternary deposits in the Feiran (lat. 28.706 N; long. 33.665; elevation: 715 to 772 m a.m.s.l) and Tarfa (lat. 28.692 N; long. 33.933 E; elevation: 1160 to 1244 m a.m.s.l) oases. Sequence stratigraphy, analysis of remote sensed images, and groundwater levels in these two areas indicate that the investigated deposits are structurally-controlled as they are found in areas with anomalously elevated groundwater levels and upstream from shear zone/wadi intersections. Sediments are largely arenaceous upstream and transition downstream to marly successions. We infer that these sediments were not deposited in lake settings because of the absence of shorelines and associated littoral, sublittoral and deeper water facies, and the presence of rhizoliths, secondary calcite veins and gastropods, all of which suggest deposition in a spring or wetland environment. A short hydrologic residence time and/or deposition in an open water system is supported by the lack of correlation (R = 0.08) between δ18O and δ13C values in carbonate deposits. Our findings are consistent with deposition of sediments by alluvial, fluvial and paludal processes under variable hydrologic conditions and higher water table conditions. Quartz extracts from these sediments yielded optically stimulated luminescence ages between ca. 27 and 11 ka and place these wetter conditions during the last glacial period and extend the "greening" of North Africa further eastward. Our findings are consistent with models which identify the wet periods in the Late Quaternary in the Sinai Peninsula and in North Africa as being glacial periods.

  8. Upper Jurassic of east Texas, a stratigraphic sedimentologic reevaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H.; McGillis, K.; Stewart, S.; Wilkinson, S.; Harwood, G.

    1985-02-01

    The Smackover-Haynesville of east Texas has long been modeled as a simple progradational carbonate-evaporite ramp. Recent data indicate that the conventional ramp model for this sequence should be abandoned in favor of an evolving rimmed shelf to platform model, forming in response to changes in rate of relative sea level rise during the Late Jurassic. Evidence for Smackover-Haynesville shelves include: (1) thick high-energy carbonates along the basin margin in the Smackover and throughout the Haynesville, (2) low-energy pellet-dominated lagoonal carbonates, evaporites, and evaporitic siliciclastics occurring landward of, and interfingering with, the Smackover and Haynesville basin-margin carbonate barriers, (3) deeper water, open-marine low-energy limestones with black shales seaward of the basin-margin barriers (Smackover-Gilmer undifferentiated), and (4) the Gilmer shale forms a siliciclastic wedge seaward of the Haynesville basin margin and its zero isopach defines the Kimmeridgian shelf margin. The Smackover and Haynesville seem to represent 2 distinct sedimentologic cycles, with each cycle reflecting an initial relative sea level rise during which a rimmed shelf and lagoon are developed, and a terminal sea level standstill during which the shelf evolved into a high-energy platform. Although these sedimentologic patterns seem compatible with accepted Jurassic sea level curves, they may also reflect differential basin-margin subsidence combined with variable carbonate production rates. Finally, the shelf-platform model more clearly defines future exploration strategies for Smackover-Haynesville targets in east Texas and perhaps across the Gulf of Mexico, if eustatic sea level changes were the dominant causative factor for shelf development in the Late Jurassic.

  9. Rootless tephra stratigraphy and emplacement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Fitch, Erin P.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic rootless cones are the products of thermohydraulic explosions involving rapid heat transfer from active lava (fuel) to external sources of water (coolant). Rootless eruptions are attributed to molten fuel-coolant interactions (MFCIs), but previous studies have not performed systematic investigations of rootless tephrostratigraphy and grain-size distributions to establish a baseline for evaluating relationships between environmental factors, MFCI efficiency, fragmentation, and patterns of tephra dispersal. This study examines a 13.55-m-thick vertical section through an archetypal rootless tephra sequence, which includes a rhythmic succession of 28 bed pairs. Each bed pair is interpreted to be the result of a discrete explosion cycle, with fine-grained basal material emplaced dominantly as tephra fall during an energetic opening phase, followed by the deposition of coarser-grained material mainly as ballistic ejecta during a weaker coda phase. Nine additional layers are interleaved throughout the stratigraphy and are interpreted to be dilute pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits. Overall, the stratigraphy divides into four units: unit 1 contains the largest number of sediment-rich PDC deposits, units 2 and 3 are dominated by a rhythmic succession of bed pairs, and unit 4 includes welded layers. This pattern is consistent with a general decrease in MFCI efficiency due to the depletion of locally available coolant (i.e., groundwater or wet sediments). Changing conduit/vent geometries, mixing conditions, coolant and melt temperatures, and/or coolant impurities may also have affected MFCI efficiency, but the rhythmic nature of the bed pairs implies a periodic explosion process, which can be explained by temporary increases in the water-to-lava mass ratio during cycles of groundwater recharge.

  10. Probable age of Autolycus and calibration of lunar stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, G. ); Bogard, D. ); Garrison, D. )

    1991-02-01

    {sup 39}Ar-{sup 40}Ar analyses of three petrographically distinct, shocked Apollo 15 KREEP (i.e., high K, rare earth element, P, and other trace element contents) basalt samples demonstrate that a major impact event affected all three samples at about 2.1 Ga. The Copernican System craters Aristillus and Autolycus are to the north; a ray from one of them crosses the landing site and had been suggested prior to the Apollo 15 mission as a source of material that could be used to date these craters. Autolycus, the older of the two, is in a particularly appropriate terrain and is the most likely source of the 2.1 Ga heating and delivery event. With this calibration point, and if Autolycus really is a Copernican crater, the Copernican System lasted twice as long as has previously been suggested. Furthermore, the Moon was not subjected to a constant cratering rate over the past 3 b.y.; the average rate in the preceding Eratosthenian must have been twice that in the Copernican.

  11. Sedimentology, eruptive mechanism and facies architecture of basaltic scoria cones from the Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-09-01

    Scoria cones are a common type of basaltic to andesitic small-volume volcanoes (e.g. 10- 1-10- 5 km3) that results from gas-bubble driven explosive eruptive styles. Although they are small in volume, they can produce complex eruptions, involving multiple eruptive styles. Eight scoria cones from the Quaternary Auckland Volcanic Field in New Zealand were selected to define the eruptive style variability from their volcanic facies architecture. The reconstruction of their eruptive and pyroclastic transport mechanisms was established on the basis of study of their volcanic sedimentology, stratigraphy, and measurement of their pyroclast density, porosity, Scanning Electron Microscopy, 2D particle morphology analysis and Visible and Near Visible Infrared Spectroscopy. Collection of these data allowed defining three end-member types of scoria cones inferred to be constructed from lava-fountaining, transitional fountaining and Strombolian type, and explosive Strombolian type. Using the physical and field-based characteristics of scoriaceous samples a simple generalised facies model of basaltic scoria cones for the AVF is developed that can be extended to other scoria cones elsewhere. The typical AVF scoria cone has an initial phreatomagmatic phases that might reduce the volume of magma available for subsequent scoria cone forming eruptions. This inferred to have the main reason to have decreased cone volumes recognised from Auckland in comparison to other volcanic fields evolved dominantly in dry eruptive condition (e.g. no external water influence). It suggests that such subtle eruptive style variations through a scoria cone evolution need to be integrated into the hazard assessment of a potentially active volcanic field such as that in Auckland.

  12. Geomorphic and sedimentologic evidence for the separation of Lake Superior from Lake Michigan and Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, J.W.; Thompson, T.A.; Wilcox, D.A.; Baedke, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    A common break was recognized in four Lake Superior strandplain sequences using geomorphic and sedimentologic characteristics. Strandplains were divided into lakeward and landward sets of beach ridges using aerial photographs and topographic surveys to identify similar surficial features and core data to identify similar subsurface features. Cross-strandplain, elevation-trend changes from a lowering towards the lake in the landward set of beach ridges to a rise or reduction of slope towards the lake in the lakeward set of beach ridges indicates that the break is associated with an outlet change for Lake Superior. Correlation of this break between study sites and age model results for the strandplain sequences suggest that the outlet change occurred sometime after about 2,400 calendar years ago (after the Algoma phase). Age model results from one site (Grand Traverse Bay) suggest an alternate age closer to about 1,200 calendar years ago but age models need to be investigated further. The landward part of the strandplain was deposited when water levels were common in all three upper Great Lakes basins (Superior, Huron, and Michigan) and drained through the Port Huron/Sarnia outlet. The lakeward part was deposited after the Sault outlet started to help regulate water levels in the Lake Superior basin. The landward beach ridges are commonly better defined and continuous across the embayments, more numerous, larger in relief, wider, have greater vegetation density, and intervening swales contain more standing water and peat than the lakeward set. Changes in drainage patterns, foreshore sediment thickness and grain size help in identifying the break between sets in the strandplain sequences. Investigation of these breaks may help identify possible gaps in the record or missing ridges in strandplain sequences that may not be apparent when viewing age distributions and may justify the need for multiple age and glacial isostatic adjustment models. ?? 2006 Springer Science

  13. Late Pleistocene-Holocene alluvial stratigraphy of southern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinao, José Luis; McDonald, Eric; Rhodes, Edward J.; Brown, Nathan; Barrera, Wendy; Gosse, John C.; Zimmermann, Susan

    2016-08-01

    A late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial stratigraphy has been established for the basins of La Paz and San José del Cabo, in the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. Six discrete alluvial units (Qt1 through Qt6) were differentiated across the region using a combination of geomorphologic mapping, sedimentological analysis, and soil development. These criteria were supported using radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence and cosmogenic depth-profile geochronology. Major aggradation started shortly after ∼70 ka (Qt2), and buildup of the main depositional units ended at ∼10 ka (Qt4). After deposition of Qt4, increasing regional incision of older units and the progressive development of a channelized alluvial landscape coincide with deposition of Qt5 and Qt6 units in a second, incisional phase. All units consist of multiple 1-3 m thick alluvial packages deposited as upper-flow stage beds that represent individual storms. Main aggradational units (Qt2-Qt4) occurred across broad (>2 km) channels in the form of sheetflood deposition while incisional stage deposits are confined to channels of ∼0.5-2 km width. Continuous deposition inside the thicker (>10 m) pre-Qt5 units is demonstrated by closely spaced dates in vertical profiles. In a few places, disconformities between these major units are nevertheless evident and indicated by partly eroded buried soils. The described units feature sedimentological traits similar to historical deposits formed by large tropical cyclone events, but also include characteristics of upper-regime flow sedimentation not shown by historical sediments, like long (>10 m) wavelength antidunes and transverse ribs. We interpret the whole sequence as indicating discrete periods during the late Pleistocene and Holocene when climatic conditions allowed larger and more frequent tropical cyclone events than those observed historically. These discrete periods are associated with times when insolation at the tropics was

  14. Ichnological analysis in high-resolution sequence stratigraphy: The Glossifungites ichnofacies in Triassic successions from the Betic Cordillera (southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tovar, Francisco J.; Pérez-Valera, Fernando; Pérez-López, Alberto

    2007-06-01

    This study integrates ichnological and sedimentological data in order to refine sequence stratigraphy and interpretations of sea-level dynamics for the Ladinian (Middle Triassic), Muschelkalk succession (Siles Formation) in the Betic Cordillera (southern Spain). Facies analysis was integrated with a detailed ichnological study, focused on the middle part of the lower member of the Muschelkalk succession (transgressive systems tract), which is characterized by an abundant and conspicuous trace fossil assemblage. Seven lithofacies were recognized, recording sediment accumulation in tidal flat, and inner to outer marine carbonate ramp, depositional environments. Thin-bedded marly limestones with bioclastic shelly beds (Facies E: middle ramp, with storm influence), are characterized by Diplocraterion and Rhizocorallium. Diplocraterion is protrusive, usually eroded on top, and mainly recorded in the marly limestone intervals. Rhizocorallium preserves well defined scratch-marks, and is commonly emplaced in bioclastic, shelly beds. The assemblage represents the Glossifungites ichnofacies. Sedimentological and ichnological data are interpreted to record a complex transgressive context, associated with high-frequency sea-level dynamics that allowed formation of transgressive surfaces of erosion (TSE, i.e., ravinement surfaces) of different orders. Major TSE, associated with continuous bioclastic shelly beds, delimit parasequences; the absence of the Glossifungites suite reveals that there was little time between erosion and deposition. Intermediate TSE, associated with discontinuous shell beds, are related to comparatively less significant sea-level rises and occur within parasequences. The Glossifungites suite reveals colonization of firmgrounds during relatively prolonged times between erosion and deposition related to intermediate TSE. Minor order TSE, recorded between the intermediate TSE, are related to punctuated, highest frequency sea-level changes; phases of

  15. New insights into Wellington Harbours' tectonic settings from marine geophysical and sedimentological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woelz, Susi; Nodder, Scott; Barnes, Philip; Orpin, Alan

    2015-04-01

    After the experience of several damaging coastal earthquakes in New Zealand in the last three years, the importance of locating and characterising the earthquake potential of active faults close to urban areas has become more obvious, especially when cities lie in complex tectonic settings as it is the case for Wellington. To assess the earthquake and tsunami potential and the associated hazard posed by such faults, it is necessary to characterise fault geometry, slip rate, earthquake history and earthquake potential. In the marine environment, we have the advantage that faults can be assessed cross-sectionally through the application of high-resolution geophysical data without having to excavate trenches across the active fault trace. We present new marine data from Wellington Harbour that helps to characterise three faults; the Wellington Fault at Kaiwharawhara, the Evans Bay Fault, and a newly discovered fault off Oriental Bay, informally referred to as the Mount Victoria Fault. New marine geophysical data has better delineated the location and characteristics of these faults. High-resolution multi-beam bathymetric data (50 cm grid-cell size), covering the entire Wellington Harbour, were also used to determine the occurrence of seafloor scarps associated with surface ruptures on the faults. Sediment cores from either side of the Wellington Fault off Kaiwharawhara Stream, in about 17.5 m water depth, provide insight into the late Quaternary-Holocene stratigraphy and age of sediments that have been deformed by activity on the faults delineated in Wellington Harbour. The stratigraphy reveals details of the post-glacial marine flooding of the harbour that occurred about 10,000 years ago.

  16. Stratigraphy and Evolution of Delta Channel Deposits, Jezero Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudge, T. A.; Mohrig, D.; Cardenas, B. T.; Hughes, C. M.; Fassett, C. I.

    2017-01-01

    The Jezero impact crater hosted an open-basin lake that was active during the valley network forming era on early Mars. This basin contains a well exposed delta deposit at the mouth of the western inlet valley. The fluvial stratigraphy of this deposit provides a record of the channels that built the delta over time. Here we describe observations of the stratigraphy of the channel deposits of the Jezero western delta to help reconstruct its evolution.

  17. Osmium isotope stratigraphy of a marine ferromanganese crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klemm, V.; Levasseur, S.; Frank, M.; Hein, J.R.; Halliday, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    Ferromanganese crusts provide records of long term change in ocean circulation and continental weathering. However, calibrating their age prior to 10 Ma has been entirely based on empirical growth rate models using Co concentrations, which have inherently large uncertainties and fail to detect hiatuses and erosional events. We present a new method for dating these crusts by measuring their osmium (Os) isotope record and matching it to the well-known marine Os isotope evolution of the past 80 Ma. The well-characterised crust CD29-2 from the central Pacific, was believed to define a record of paleooceanographic change from 50 Ma. Previous growth rate estimates based on the Co method are consistent with the new Os isotope stratigraphy but the dating was grossly inaccurate due to long hiatuses that are now detectable. The new chronology shows that it in fact started growing prior to 70 Ma in the late Cretaceous and stopped growing or was eroded between 13.5 and 47 Ma. With this new technique it is now possible to exploit the full potential of the oceanographic and climatic records stored in Fe-Mn crusts. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Late tertiary structure and stratigraphy of north Sinai continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Mart, Y.

    1981-06-01

    New seismic data provide information on the structural development and late Tertiary stratigraphy of the continental slope and rise off northern Sinai. The upper continental slope is characterized by a marginal plateau composed of a series of platforms or steps. The lower continental slope is smooth, except for a low ridge paralleling the western part. Numerous diapiric structures along the continental margin north of the Sinai Peninsula emerge from an evaporitic layer of late Tertiary age. The diapirs usually are aligned along west-northwest-trending faults. A salt ridge 90 km long produces a submarine ridge in the lower continental rise. Two main fault trends have been mapped. In the western part of the continental margin they trend west-northwest and, in the eastern part, northeast. These trends parallel the continental slopes of northern Sinai and southern Israel, respectively. The structural grain of the Sinai margin appears to be controlled by two main tectonic elements: (1) rejuvenated basement faults of the continent-ocean transition zone; and (2) salt diapirism due to loading of Messinian evaporites with Nile-derived upper Tertiary clastics.

  19. Mesozoic stratigraphy of northwestern Australian and northern Himalayan margins

    SciTech Connect

    Ogg, J.; Kopaskamerkel, D.C.

    1989-03-01

    The Mesozoic stratigraphies of the Himalayan margin, the Argo abyssal plain, and the Exmouth Plateau exhibit marked contrasts in their sedimentation histories. The sedimentary sequence on the northeastern Exmouth Plateau off Australia includes a Carnian to Rhaetian sequence of fluviodeltaic and marine clastics and carbonates, capped by a shallowing-upward sequence of platform carbonates overlain, with a major unconformity, by marine Aptian sediments deposited during rapid subsidence of the plateau. Argo abyssal plain basement is overlain by red-brown, bioturbated, inoceramid-rich quartzose claystones, bentonites, and quartz siltstones, dated by radiolarians and benthic foraminifera as lowest Cretaceous. This is overlain by red and green claystones and nannofossil chalks. The basal age indicates that sea-floor spreading began in the earliest Cretaceous, not Oxfordian as had been thought. In the Thakkola region of Nepal, uppermost Triassic through Lower Jurassic shelf and carbonate platform facies are capped by a ferruginous oolite deposit of latest Bathonian to earliest Callovian age. Sedimentation resumed in the middle Oxfordian with deposition of Berriasian( ) deep-water black organic-rich mud. Following a valanginian regression and progradation of terrigenous clastics, Aptian black shales were deposited. In geological studies of the northwestern Australian margin, the ubiquitous hiatus within the Callovian-Oxfordian has been termed the breakup unconformity. Existence of a similar-aged hiatus in the Himalayas on a margin which formed during the late Paleozoic, absence of any Jurassic on the Exmouth Plateau, and the apparent initiation of spreading in the Argo basin during the earliest Cretaceous suggest that this widespread unconformity is not associated with a continental breakup in these regions.

  20. 50 years of snow stratigraphy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C.; Pohjola, V.; Jonasson, C.; Challagan, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    With start in autumn 1961 the Abisko Scientific Research Station (ASRS) located in the Swedish sub Arctic has performed snow stratigraphy observations, resulting in a unique 50 year long time series of data. The data set contains grain size, snow layer hardness, grain compactness and snow layer dryness, observed every second week during the winter season. In general snow and snow cover are important factors for the global radiation budget, and the earth's climate. On a more local scale the layered snowpack creates a relatively mild microclimate for Arctic plants and animals, and it also determines the water content of the snowpack (snow water equivalent) important for e.g. hydrological applications. Analysis of the snow stratigraphy data, divided into three consecutive time periods, show that there has been a change in the last time period. The variable most affected is the snow layer hardness, which shows an increase in hardness of the snowpack. The number of observations with a very hard snow layer/ice at ground level increased three-fold between the first two time periods and the last time period. The thickness of the bottom layer in the snowpack is also highly affected. There has been a 60% increase in layers thinner than 10 cm in the last time period, resulting in a mean reduction in the thickness of the bottom layer from 14 cm to 11 cm. Hence the living conditions for plants and animals at the ground surface have been highly changed. The changes in the snowpack are correlated to an increased mean winter air temperature. Thus, continued increasing, or temperatures within the same ranges as in the last time period, is likely to create harder snow condition in the future. These changes are likely to affect animals that live under the snow such as lemmings and voles or animals that graze sub-Arctic vegetation in winter (e.g. reindeer that would potentially require increased supplementary feeding that incurs financial costs to Sami reindeer herders). Any decrease

  1. Soil stratigraphy of charcoal kiln remains (CKR) in the Litchfield Hills, CT, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Thomas; Hirsch, Florian; Ouimet, Will; Dethier, David

    2016-04-01

    Charcoal kiln relicts (CKRs) are small anthropogenic landforms that are often found in historic mining areas. CKRs have not been a big research topic yet but mainly were studied as by-products of archaeological excavations. In the last years newly available and very accurate Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) based on high-resolution Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data have been used to identify these archaeological remains. In addition, findings of several thousands CKRs in the North German Lowland have increased the awareness that historical charcoal production may significantly contribute to Late Holocene landscape change. Besides the archaeological aspect of CKRs, potential impacts of charcoal burning on the ecology of modern soil landscapes and ecosystem processes must be considered. A relatively high density of CKRs is found in the Litchfield Hills nearby the town of West Cornwall, Litchfield County, CT, USA. The CKRs are especially well preserved on slopes of the tributary valleys of the Housatonic River and form little, circular ramparts with diameters normally less than ten meters. First, rough field surveys in Litchfield County in spring 2015 have suggested differences between soils inside and outside the CKR. Soils on the CKR seem to have relatively deep humus-rich and charcoal containing topsoils whereas the topsoils outside the CKR appear typically thinner and less rich in humus. More thorough investigations have been started in autumn 2015 to prove the hypothesis that properties, distribution and development of soils are controlled by archaeological remains of historical charcoal burning. We present preliminary results from our field studies conducted in October 2015. The stratigraphy and the extent of the 26 CKRs were studied using a sedimentological-pedological approach by coring and trenching. Our results indicate that in Litchfield County the CKRs were used twice and in quick succession. Before the second reuse, the rim of the platform was stabilized

  2. Jurassic stratigraphy of the Wiggins Arch, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.; Maxwell, G.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Mobil and Shell jointly explored the Wiggins arch area in southern Mississippi from 1985 to 1991. The effort concentrated on the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations. Two wells were drilled into Paleozoic crystalline rocks and one well into the Pine Hill formation. Two of these wells were located on the southern side of the Wiggins arch and provide significant data for interpreting Jurassic stratigraphy. The Mobil No. 1 U.S.A. well encountered a complete Jurassic section, but with some significantly different facies than those encountered by wells to the north. A granite wash section is the equivalent to the Frisco City formation previously only found 100 mi to the north-northeast. All 300 ft of Smackover is crystalline dolomite. The Norphlet section is entirely granite wash. The Pine Hill anhydrite is unusually thick and interpreted to be equivalent to the Louann Salt. Correlations to other wells on the Wiggins arch, particularly the Conoco No. 1 Higgins, indicate that the Jurassic can be divided into three transgressive events separated by the Norphlet/Pine Hill and Frisco City/Buckner regressive events.

  3. Cement stratigraphy of the Lisburne Group, northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.C.; Goldstein, R.H. . Geology Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Cement stratigraphy serves as a descriptive framework for the interpretation of the diagenetic history of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group, northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska. The Lisburne is a sequence of shallow-water, marine carbonate rocks that have experienced a wide spectrum of diagenetic events: early marine diagenesis, early subaerial exposure, significant erosion and karstification following final Lisburne deposition, deep burial of at least 3,000 meters, compressional tectonism, and final uplift into modern mountain ranges. Compositional zones in the calcite cements were identified by using stains for ferroan calcite and cathodoluminescence microscopy. The cements are, from oldest to youngest: A1-nonferroan, nonluminescent or multibanded calcite; B1-nonferroan to low-ferroan, dull luminescent calcite; C1-ferroan, very-dull luminescent calcite; B2-nonferroan, dull luminescent calcite; A2-nonferroan calcite with 1 or 2 sets of nonluminescent and bright zones; C2-ferroan, very-dull luminescent calcite; Be-nonferroan, dull luminescent calcite. Petrographic studies of cross-cutting relationships show that A1 cements predate or are synchronous with surfaces of subaerial exposure within the Lisburne Group. The cross-cutting relationships include truncation of cements by early fractures, non-marine fissure fills, and at clast margins of autoclastic breccias. Similarly, B1 and C1 cements predate the major unconformity at the top of the Lisburne Group, hence, these cements are pre-Permian in age and may well have precipitated from fresh groundwaters introduced during development of the sub-Permian unconformity. B2 and C2 cements are present in the Permian Echooka formation overlying the Lisburne Group and, thus, can be dated as post-Pennsylvanian. B3 cements are Cretaceous or younger in age.

  4. Geomorphological and sedimentological evidences in the Western Massif of Picos de Europa since the Last Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Jesus; Oliva, Marc; Cruces, Anabela; Lopes, Vera; Conceição Freitas, Maria; García-Hernández, Cristina; Nieuwendam, Alexandre; López-Sáez, José Antonio; Gallinar, David; Geraldes, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    The Western Massif of Picos de Europa includes some of the highest peaks of the Cantabrian Mountains. However, the environmental evolution in this massif since the Last Glaciation is still poorly understood. This research provides a new geochronological approach to the sequence of environmental events occurred here since the maximum expansion of glaciers during the last Pleistocene glaciation. The distribution of the glacial landforms suggests four main stages regarding the environmental evolution in the massif: maximum glacial advance, phase of second maximum glacial expansion, Late Glacial and Little Ice Age. A 5.4-m long sedimentological section retrieved from the kame terrace of Belbín, in a mid-height area of the massif, complements the geomorphological interpretation and provides a continuous paleoenvironmental sequence from this area since the Last Glaciation until nowadays. This section suggests that the maximum glacial expansion occurred at a minimum age of 37.2 ka cal BP, significantly prior to the global Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequently, a new glacial expansion occurred around 18.7-22.5 ka cal BP. The melting of the glaciers after this phase generated a shallow lake in the Belbín depression. Lake sediments do not reveal the occurrence of a cold stage during the Late Glacial, whilst, at higher locations, moraine complexes were formed suggesting a glacier readvance. The terrestrification of this lake started at 8 ka cal BP, when Belbín changed to a peaty environment. At 5 ka cal BP human occupation started at the high lands of the massif according to the existence of charcoal particles in the section. The presence of moraines in the highest northern cirques evidences the last phase with formation of small glaciers in the Western Massif of Picos de Europa, corresponding to the Little Ice Age cold event. Since then, the warming climate has led to the melting of these glaciers.

  5. Sequential stratigraphy of Jurassic and Cretaceous in the central Saudi Arabian platform

    SciTech Connect

    Le Nindre, Y.M.; Manivit, J.; Vaslet, D. ); Manivit, H. Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris )

    1991-08-01

    Depositional sequences and system tracts in the Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Central Saudi Arabian platform have been established on the basis of precise lithofacies analysis, detailed sedimentologic interpretation, and accurate age determination by ammonites, nautoli, brachipods, echinoids, and nannoflora. A eustatic depositional model integrated with accepted worldwide sequential stratigraphic data is proposed, and appears to correlate fairly well with the 1988 global sea level chart by Haq and others, particularly for the Lower and Middle Jurassic and the Middle and Upper Cretaceous. Ages determined by accurate biostratigraphic data enable time correlations to be made with third-order eustatic cycles from Vail's 1988 global chart. Eustatic changes therefore appear to be the main factors of sedimentary control during the Jurassic and Cretaceous on the Arabian platform.

  6. Sediment transport processes and their resulting stratigraphy: informing science and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment transport physically shapes planetary surfaces by producing patterns of erosion and deposition, with the relative magnitudes of geomorphic actions varying according to environmental conditions. Where sediment fills accommodation space and generates accumulation, a stratigraphic archive develops that potentially harbors a trove of information documenting dynamic conditions during the periods of sediment production, transport and deposition. By investigating the stratigraphic record, it is possible to describe changes in surface environments, as well as hypothesize about the development of regional tectonic and climate regimes. Ultimately, information contained within the stratigraphic record is critical for evaluating the geological history of terrestrial planets. The enigma of stratigraphy, however, is that sediment deposition is finicky, there is no uninterrupted record, and while deposits may reflect only a brief temporal window, they may still be used to infer about conditions that encompass much longer periods of time. Consider a case where meter-scale dune foresets, deposited in a matter of minutes to hours, are in contact with sediments above and below that reflect entirely different depositional circumstances and are separated in time by a hiatus of thousands or perhaps millions of years. To effectively unlock the scientific trove bound in stratigraphy, it is first necessary to identify where such unconformities exist and the conditions that lead to their development. This challenge is made much simpler through scientific advances in understanding sediment transport processes -- the examination of how fluid and solids interact under modern conditions -- because this is precisely where sediment patterns first emerge to produce accumulation that builds a stratigraphic record. By advancing an understanding of process-based sedimentology, it is possible to enhance diagnostic evaluations of the stratigraphic record. Fortunately, over the past several

  7. Sedimentology of Martian Gravels from Mardi Twilight Imaging: Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Malin, Michael C.; Minitti, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative sedimentologic analysis of gravel surfaces dominated by pebble-sized clasts has been employed in an effort to untangle aspects of the provenance of surface sediments on Mars using Curiosity's MARDI nadir-viewing camera operated at twilight Images have been systematically acquired since sol 310 providing a representative sample of gravel-covered surfaces since the rover departed the Shaler region. The MARDI Twilight imaging dataset offers approximately 1 millimeter spatial resolution (slightly out of focus) for patches beneath the rover that cover just under 1 m2 in area, under illumination that makes clast size and inter-clast spacing analysis relatively straightforward using semi- automated codes developed for use with nadir images. Twilight images are utilized for these analyses in order to reduce light scattering off dust deposited on the front MARDI lens element during the terminal stages of Curiosity's entry, descent and landing. Such scattering is worse when imaging bright, directly-illuminated surfaces; twilight imaging times yield diffusely-illuminated surfaces that improve the clarity of the resulting MARDI product. Twilight images are obtained between 10-30 minutes after local sunset, governed by the timing of the end of the no-heat window for the camera. Techniques were also utilized to examine data terrestrial locations (the Kau Desert in Hawaii and near Askja Caldera in Iceland). Methods employed include log hyperbolic size distribution (LHD) analysis and Delauney Triangulation (DT) inter-clast spacing analysis. This work extends the initial results reported in Yingst et al., that covered the initial landing zone, to the Rapid-Transit Route (RTR) towards Mount Sharp.

  8. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  9. Hydrated mineral stratigraphy of Ius Chasma, Valles Marineris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roach, L.H.; Mustard, J.F.; Swayze, G.; Milliken, R.E.; Bishop, J.L.; Murchie, S.L.; Lichtenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    New high-resolution spectral and morphologic imaging of deposits on walls and floor of Ius Chasma extend previous geomorphic mapping, and permit a new interpretation of aqueous processes that occurred during the development of Valles Marineris. We identify hydrated mineralogy based on visible-near infrared (VNIR) absorptions. We map the extents of these units with CRISM spectral data as well as morphologies in CTX and HiRISE imagery. Three cross-sections across Ius Chasma illustrate the interpreted mineral stratigraphy. Multiple episodes formed and transported hydrated minerals within Ius Chasma. Polyhydrated sulfate and kieserite are found within a closed basin at the lowest elevations in the chasma. They may have been precipitates in a closed basin or diagenetically altered after deposition. Fluvial or aeolian processes then deposited layered Fe/Mg smectite and hydrated silicate on the chasma floor, postdating the sulfates. The smectite apparently was weathered out of Noachian-age wallrock and transported to the depositional sites. The overlying hydrated silicate is interpreted to be an acid-leached phyllosilicate transformed from the underlying smectite unit, or a smectite/jarosite mixture. The finely layered smectite and massive hydrated silicate units have an erosional unconformity between them, that marks a change in surface water chemistry. Landslides transported large blocks of wallrock, some altered to contain Fe/Mg smectite, to the chasma floor. After the last episode of normal faulting and subsequent landslides, opal was transported short distances into the chasma from a few m-thick light-toned layer near the top of the wallrock, by sapping channels in Louros Valles. Alternatively, the material was transported into the chasma and then altered to opal. The superposition of different types of hydrated minerals and the different fluvial morphologies of the units containing them indicate sequential, distinct aqueous environments, characterized by alkaline

  10. Geomorphology, facies architecture, and high-resolution, non-marine sequence stratigraphy in avulsion deposits, Cumberland Marshes, Saskatchewan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper demonstrates field relationships between landforms, facies, and high-resolution sequences in avulsion deposits. It defines the building blocks of a prograding avulsion sequence from a high-resolution sequence stratigraphy perspective, proposes concepts in non-marine sequence stratigraphy and flood basin evolution, and defines the continental equivalent to a parasequence. The geomorphic features investigated include a distributary channel and its levee, the Stage I crevasse splay of Smith et al. (Sedimentology, vol. 36 (1989) 1), and the local backswamp. Levees and splays have been poorly studied in the past, and three-dimensional (3D) studies are rare. In this study, stratigraphy is defined from the finest scale upward and facies are mapped in 3D. Genetically related successions are identified by defining a hierarchy of bounding surfaces. The genesis, architecture, geometry, and connectivity of facies are explored in 3D. The approach used here reveals that avulsion deposits are comparable in process, landform, facies, bounding surfaces, and scale to interdistributary bayfill, i.e. delta lobe deposits. Even a simple Stage I splay is a complex landform, composed of several geomorphic components, several facies and many depositional events. As in bayfill, an alluvial ridge forms as the feeder crevasse and its levees advance basinward through their own distributary mouth bar deposits to form a Stage I splay. This produces a shoestring-shaped concentration of disconnected sandbodies that is flanked by wings of heterolithic strata, that join beneath the terminal mouth bar. The proposed results challenge current paradigms. Defining a crevasse splay as a discrete sandbody potentially ignores 70% of the landform's volume. An individual sandbody is likely only a small part of a crevasse splay complex. The thickest sandbody is a terminal, channel associated feature, not a sheet that thins in the direction of propagation. The three stage model of splay evolution

  11. Spatiotemporal variability of sedimentology and morphology in the East Frisian barrier island system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Gerald; Winter, Christian

    2016-08-01

    The highly dynamic East Frisian barrier island system (southern North Sea) is characterized by a complex morphology of tidal inlets, ebb-tidal deltas and foreshore beaches that reacts to storms and fair-weather conditions with characteristic patterns of sediment grain-size distributions. The morphological and sedimentological response to varying hydrodynamic conditions yet occurs in short time spans that are not covered by common monitoring strategies with measuring intervals typically of years. This study applies process-based numerical modelling with multiple sediment fractions to interpolate morphological states in time between bathymetrical surveys conducted in the summer months of 2004 and 2006. Morphodynamic simulations driven by real-time boundary conditions of tides, wind and waves are carried out for a representative period of 2 years. The spatiotemporal variability of the nearshore sedimentology and morphology is assessed by graded ranges of bed dynamics (i.e. bed elevation range) and the definition of sediment grain-size variability (i.e. mean diameter range). The effect of storm events and timescales of the sedimentological adaptation after storms to typical fair-weather conditions are exemplified at an ebb-tidal delta lobe where the morphological and sedimentological variability is found to be largest in the study area. The proposed method may serve to identify areas of high sedimentological and morphological activity for system understanding or in the framework of coastal monitoring strategies.

  12. Spatiotemporal variability of sedimentology and morphology in the East Frisian barrier island system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Gerald; Winter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The highly dynamic East Frisian barrier island system (southern North Sea) is characterized by a complex morphology of tidal inlets, ebb-tidal deltas and foreshore beaches that reacts to storms and fair-weather conditions with characteristic patterns of sediment grain-size distributions. The morphological and sedimentological response to varying hydrodynamic conditions yet occurs in short time spans that are not covered by common monitoring strategies with measuring intervals typically of years. This study applies process-based numerical modelling with multiple sediment fractions to interpolate morphological states in time between bathymetrical surveys conducted in the summer months of 2004 and 2006. Morphodynamic simulations driven by real-time boundary conditions of tides, wind and waves are carried out for a representative period of 2 years. The spatiotemporal variability of the nearshore sedimentology and morphology is assessed by graded ranges of bed dynamics (i.e. bed elevation range) and the definition of sediment grain-size variability (i.e. mean diameter range). The effect of storm events and timescales of the sedimentological adaptation after storms to typical fair-weather conditions are exemplified at an ebb-tidal delta lobe where the morphological and sedimentological variability is found to be largest in the study area. The proposed method may serve to identify areas of high sedimentological and morphological activity for system understanding or in the framework of coastal monitoring strategies.

  13. Mapping the Stratigraphy of Booming Sand Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vriend, N. M.; Hunt, M. L.; Clayton, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    Booming dunes emit a loud rumbling sound after a man-made or natural sand avalanche is generated on the slip face of a large desert dune. The sound consist of one dominant frequency (70 - 105 Hz) with several higher harmonics. A recent publication (Vriend et al., 2007) presented a model of an internal, natural waveguide that propagates the booming emission, amplifies the sound, and sets the booming frequency. The mapping of the subsurface layering, which is necessary for the existence of a waveguide, prompted additional work on the dune structure and stratigraphy. The current work highlights geophysical measurements at Eureka Dunes in Death Valley National Park, CA and Dumont Dunes in the Mojave Desert, CA. Seismic refraction studies indicate strong layering with large velocity jumps across the interfaces. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) profiles, at frequencies of 100 MHz and 200 MHz, map out the stratigraphic structure of the dunes. Variations in the near surface layering are able to predict the seasonal variability in booming frequency both quantitatively and qualitatively. The Kirchhoff migrated GPR profiles are superimposed on the local topography obtained with a laser rangefinder. The complex dune structure is resolved to a depth of over 30 meters for the 100 MHz antenna. The GPR profiles of the longitudinal Eureka dune display complex internal structures from old dune crests. Both slopes have slip faces at 30 degrees with parallel layering (< 2m) at the near surface. At the transverse Dumont dune the GPR profile exhibits strong parallel layering on the booming leeward slipface only. The shallower windward face features a remarkable tilted repetitive layering that cuts through the surface. At Dumont Dunes the layering on the leeward face explains the change in booming frequency between 70 - 95 Hertz in the period 2005 - 2008. The tilted layering structure of the shallow windward face prevents the formation of a waveguide and is never able to sustain the

  14. New Isotopic and Sedimentological Measurements of the Thabaseek Deposits (South Africa) and the Dating of the Taung Hominid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Phillip V.; Vogel, John C.; Oschadleus, H. Dieter; Partridge, Timothy C.; McKee, Jeffrey K.

    1993-11-01

    Earlier attempts to date the Taung hominid type specimen of Australopithecus africanus Dart yielded conflicting results. Recent faunal studies pointed to an age of 2.3 myr. Radioisotopic results suggested 1.0 myr. New uranium studies reveal that the Thabaseek (the oldest Taung tufa) was not a closed system and that younger uranium entered the tufa after initial deposition, producing an apparent isotopic age younger than the age of deposition. The Thabaseek isotopic dates provide only a terminus ad quem and this technique is therefore not applicable to the older Taung tufas. Delson's dating (2.3 myr) of cercopithecoids from Hrdlicka's pinnacle ca. 50 m from the hominid site provides the best available approximation to the age of the hominid. In our new Taung excavation, stratigraphic analysis indicates that the hominid may somewhat predate most identified fauna. Sedimentologically the hominid matrix proves to be of fluvial deposition, and hence closely resembles one Hrdlicka deposit, both samples differing appreciably from all other Taung samples which bespeak eolian deposition. Thus, the conditions under which the hominid-bearing stratum was deposited were virtually identical to those pertaining to one of the Hrdlicka deposits. The newest results show that Taung was not the youngest South African australopithecine site and eliminate the discrepancy between the relative ages of the Taung A. africanus africanus and the Sterkfontein A. africanus transvaalensis.

  15. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and ichnology of the Late Pennsylvanian Glenshaw Formation (Lower Conemaugh Group), southern Dunkard basin, Ohio-Kentucky-West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, R.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    Facies analysis of outcrops of the Glenshaw Formation was carried out at 45 localities over a 761 sq. km area. The glenshaw Formation is 61--76 m thick in the study area. Four marine units (Lower Brush Creek, Upper Brush Creek, Cambridge , and Ames) occur which contain invertebrate body fossils and/or trace fossils including Teichichnus, Rhizocorallium, Aulichnites, Paleophycus, Lockeia, and Curvolithus. Alluvial channel-fills contain internal features that reflect deposition in high sinuosity suspended or mixed load rivers. Paleocurrent data (N = 77) are broadly dispersed with a mean azimuth of 335 degrees. Overbank facies have yielded trackways from giant arthropods and Eryopoid amphibians (Limnopus). There are fewer marine units in the glenshaw than toward the north and west which has made direct detailed correlation of much of the formation problematic. The coal beds and marine units used previous stratigraphic studies may be extended through the recognition of non-coal-bearing paleosols and marine-influenced intervals distinguished by facies relations, and sedimentary and biogenic structures. Nine laterally persistent, paleosol-bounded packages occur which are comparable to allocyclic T-R units reported by Busch and Rollins (1984) from Pennsylvania and Ohio. Alternating episodes of soil formation and alluvial aggradation may reflect updip coastal plain responses to low stand incision of drainage lines and sediment bypassing followed by aggradation of alluvial systems in response to rising sea level. Climate changes may also have played a role in sediment flux.

  16. Workshop on quantitative dynamic stratigraphy. Final conference report

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.

    1988-04-01

    This document discusses the development of quantitative simulation models for the investigation of geologic systems. The selection of variables, model verification, evaluation, and future directions in quantitative dynamic stratigraphy (QDS) models are detailed. Interdisciplinary applications, integration, implementation, and transfer of QDS are also discussed. (FI)

  17. New sedimentological, structural and paleo-thermicity data in the Boucheville Basin (eastern North Pyrenean Zone, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelalou, Roman; Nalpas, Thierry; Bousquet, Romain; Prevost, Maxime; Lahfid, Abdeltif; Poujol, Marc; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Ballard, Jean-François

    2016-03-01

    The Boucheville Basin is one of the easternmost Mesozoic basins of the North Pyrenean Zone (NPZ) that was opened during the Albian extension between the Iberian and European plates. During the extension, a HT/LP metamorphism event affected the Albian basins near the North Pyrenean Fault (NPF). Our aim is to better understand the evolution of the Boucheville Basin during the Albian-Cenomanian lithospheric thinning, which occurred under high thermal conditions. Sedimentological and structural data were collected in the basin and are used to produce synthetic stratigraphic columns of different portions of the basin and to restore selected cross-sections. North-south cross-sections show that the Boucheville Basin is a large and asymmetrical deformed syncline with inverted borders. Synthetic stratigraphic columns show that the sedimentation of the Boucheville Basin starts with carbonate platforms deposited under low bathymetric conditions showing slope deposits and evolves to deep bathymetric conditions of marls deposited without evidence of slopes. Raman spectroscopy on carbonaceous material (RSCM) was made on samples used to construct the sedimentological stratigraphic columns in order to obtain a temperature map of the Albian metamorphism. They reveal homogeneity in the temperatures between 500 and 600 °C. In situ LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating of titanite grains found in a syn-deformation located in the Albian calcschists provided an age of ca. 97 Ma that gives a time constraint for both the deformation and metamorphism. These data are used collectively to propose a model for the tectono-sedimentary and metamorphic evolution of the Boucheville Basin during the Albian extension.

  18. Sedimentologic Expression of the Cretaceous OAEs in a Tropical Epicontinental Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Tamayo, J. C.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2015-12-01

    The acidification and deoxygention of modern oceans are major environmental concerns to the international community. The effects of ocean acidification and deoxigention in the biogeochemical cycles of modern tropical oceans are poorly constrained mainly due to the lack of empirical and quantitative data. The Cretaceous World witnessed several period of potential ocean acidification and deoxygenation, which resulted from the rapid additions of volcanic derived CO2 to the atmosphere. The effects of ocean acidification and deoxygenation on the Cretaceous biogeochemical cycles are evidenced mainly by major global C-isotope anomalies. These anomalies parallel the occurrence of organic rich black shales as well as major decreases in the deposition of shallow marine carbonates worldwide. Here we use detailed C- and Sr- chemostratigraphy as well as published bioestratigraphic information and volcanic zircon U-Pb ages to precisely constrain the geochemical and sedimentologic expression of the Cretaceous OAES along a tropical epicontinental sea, the La Luna Sea. Our multi-pronged approach allows identifying the occurrence of several of the Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) in carbonate units paleogeographically located along the northern most part of the La Luna Sea, i.e. Weissert-OAE-(Palanz and Rosablanca Formations), Faraoni-(Rosablanca Formation), AOE1a-(Paja and Fomeque Formations, Cogollo Group), OAE1c-(Cogollo Group), OAE2-(Cogollo Group), OAE3-(La Luna Formation). These events are preserved in highly euxinic - organic rich "black shales" successions deposited along the deepest part of the seaway at the Middle Magdalena Valley and Cundinamarca Basin; Weiser-OAE-(Lutitas de Macanal Formation), OAE1a-(Paja Formation, Fomeque Formation), OAE1C-(San Gil Formation). Regional changes in depositional settings and sedimentary facies preserving the different Cretaceous OAEs were likely the result of the combined action of regional changes in paleogeography and tectonic

  19. Integral Interpretation of Rock Magnetic, Sedimentological and Geochemical Data in Marine Sediment Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Dobeneck, T.; Funk, J.

    2002-12-01

    Rock magnetic data of marine sedimentary sequences can serve vastly different purposes: (1) identification of NRM carriers, (2) core correlation, (3) orbital age modeling, (4) source and transport tracking, (5) unmixing of terrigenous and biogenous fluxes, and (6) detection of diagenesis effects. Established methods suffice for aim (1) and are often applicable for aims (2-3). For the more ambitious paleoenvironmental aims (4-6), all existing magnetic parameters entail interpretational ambiguities. Magnetic granulometry, for instance, can be an expression of erosion intensity, source mixing, sea level, sorting, winnowing, coarsening by partial depletion or fining by authigenic enrichment. Magnetic concentration parameters and mineral ratios have similar problems. The reliability of paleoclimatic and -oceanographic reconstructions from rock magnetic records depends largely on the correctness of the adapted working hypothesis, which must be newly validated for every location and facies under study. As illustrated by South Atlantic case studies, some ambiguities can be clarified by co-interpreting temporal patterns, regional trends and accumulation rates of selective rock magnetic parameters (e.g. Mar, Mir, Mhir and \\kappafd). For analyzing depositional system, these 'raw' parameters tend to be more valuable than their more frequently published ratios. They can be internally recalibrated to model cumulative parameters such as \\kappa or Msir. Conditions for the applicability of this 'partial susceptibilities' method are frequently met in marine settings. An alternative is to calibrate or integrate rock magnetic with sedimentological and geochemical data. Using porosity, CaCO3, Fe data, an open ocean susceptibility signal can be decomposed into continental (source-mixing), marine (carbonate dilution) and diagenetic (depletion/enrichment) components. The magnetite dissolution index Fe/\\kappand quantifies reductive magnetite losses. The carbonate-free dry bulk version

  20. Sedimentologic and biostratigraphic implications for early Eocene lacustrine systems, eastern Great Basin, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.F.; Potter, C.J.; Snee, L.W. ); Good, S.C. )

    1993-04-01

    A multidisciplinary study integrating sedimentology, molluscan paleontology and paleoecology, structural and geologic mapping, and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of volcanic flows indicates the White Sage Formation north of the Deep Creek Range on the NV-UT border was deposited during the early Eocene in marginal-lacustrine, lacustrine, freshwater-marsh, and minor terrestrial settings. Sedimentary facies include wave-reworked, locally derived Paleozoic carbonate-clast basal conglomerates in contact with bedrock; carbonate tufa mounds; organic-rich mudstones; and laminated to medium-bedded carbonates. The wave-reworked conglomerate implies a broad lake with considerable fetch to generate large waves, but one with only small drainage basins with sharp relief to supply the locally-derived clasts. There is a striking lack of any fluvial, deltaic, or alluvial-fan deposits that would indicate development of substantial drainage areas. The large tufa mounds indicate a high-wave-energy shoaling environment with stable substrate and topography. The profusion of lacustrine carbonates indicates dominantly chemical- or biochemical-induced deposition in a carbonate-saturated lake. The aquatic molluscan fauna indicates shallow, quiet lacustrine conditions with emergent vegetation. The limpets inhabited areas of rooted aquatic vegetation, and the terrestrial gastropods indicate marshes adjacent to the lacustrine system. The molluscan assemblage constrains the age of the White Sage as early Eocene, indicating a lacustrine system equivalent to the Sheep Pass Formation and to outcrops near Illipah, NV that have similar facies and molluscan faunas and that also lack significant fluvial, deltaic, or alluvial fan deposits. The data are consistent with a model wherein the White Sage, Sheep Pass, and Illipah carbonates were deposited in a large lake superimposed on preexisting topography with low relief and little or no syndepositional extension.

  1. Geometric and sedimentologic characteristic of Mid-Miocene lowstand reservoir sandstones, offshore northwest Java, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, P.; Kusumanegara, Y.; Warman, S.

    1996-12-31

    Numerous reservoirs in the Upper Cibulakan Formation (Mid-Miocene) of the Offshore Northwest Java shelf occur in sharp-based sandbodies that range from less than 1 m up to 10 m in thickness. Well-log derived net-sand isopach and seismic amplitude maps of these sandbodies depict elongate features, that are 1-2 km wide and 5-8 km long. The orientation of the longest axis of these sandbodies is predominantly north-south. Conventional cores reveal that these sandbodies are burrowed to completely bioturbated sandstones. Common trace fossils associated with these sandbodies include Ophiomorpha, Teichichnus and Thalassinoides. The lower contact of these sands is typically sharp and is commonly associated with a Glossifungites surface and siderite mud clasts. Overlying and underlying mudstones are relatively devoid of burrowing. Benthonic foraminifera assemblages within these mudstones indicate inner to outer neritic conditions in a relatively restricted marine setting. The upper contact of these sandstones is gradational over a 0.5 to 1m interval. Sandbodies of the same age and similar facies were observed in outcrops in onshore west Java. Here, they can be observed to pinch out over a distance of 500 m. The lower bounding contact appears discordant with underlying interbedded sandstones and mudstones. Several of the sandstones contain abundant accumulations of the large, open marine, benthonic foraminifera Cycloclypeus and Lepidocyclina. Occasionally the concentration of these large foraminifera form limestones within the sharp-based sandbodies. These bioclastic deposits commonly exhibit planar-tabular and trough cross-stratification. The sandbodies are interpreted as having been emplaced during relative falls in sea-level within a large Mid-Miocene embayment. Our understanding of their geometry and sedimentologic characteristics is leading to a more effective exploitation strategy for these sandbodies in the Offshore Northwest Java area.

  2. A sedimentologic and 14C dating study of five eastern Australian upper continental slope submarine landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. L.; Hubble, T.; Webster, J.; Airey, D.; De Carli, E.; Ferraz, C.; Reimer, P. J.; Boyd, R.; Keene, J.

    2013-12-01

    Sedimentologic and AMS 14C age data are reported for calcareous hemipelagic mud samples taken from gravity cores collected at sites within, or adjacent to five submarine landslides identified with multibeam bathymetry data on the Nerrang Plateau segment and surrounding canyons of eastern Australia's continental slope (Bribie Bowl, Coolangatta-2, Coolangatta-1, Cudgen and Byron). Sediments are comprised of mixtures of calcareous and terrigenous clay (10-20%), silt (50-65%) and sand (15-40%) and are generally uniform in appearance. Their carbonate contents vary between and 17% and 22% by weight while organic carbon contents are less than 10% by weight. Dating of conformably deposited material identified in ten of the twelve cores indicates a range of sediment accumulation rates between 0.017mka-1 and 0.2 mka-1 which are consistent with previous estimates reported for this area. One slide-adjacent core, and four within-landslide cores present depositional hiatus surfaces located at depths of 0.8 to 2.2 meters below the present-day seafloor and identified by a sharp, colour-change boundary; discernable but small increases in sediment stiffness; and a slight increase in sediment bulk density of 0.1 gcm-3. Distinct gaps in AMS 14C age of at least 20ka are recorded across these boundary surfaces. Examination of sub-bottom profiler records of transects through three of the within-slide core-sites and their nearby landslide scarps available for the Coolangatta-1 and Cudgen slides indicate that: 1) the youngest identifiable sediment layer reflectors upslope of these slides, terminate on and are truncated by slide rupture surfaces; and 2) there is no obvious evidence in the sub-bottom profiles for a post-slide sediment layer draped over or otherwise burying slide ruptures or exposed slide detachment surfaces. This suggests that both these submarine landslides are geologically recent and suggests that the hiatus surfaces identified in Coolangatta-1's and Cudgen's within

  3. Sedimentation studies relevant to low level radioactive effluent dispersal in the Irish Sea. Part 2. Sea bed morphology, sediments and shallow sub-bottom stratigraphy of the eastern Irish Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.J.; Kirby, R.; Smith, T.J.; Parker, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed survey of the Eastern Irish Sea between the Isle of Man and the Cumbrian coast was carried out during 1979-80 using sidescan sonar, pinger and echo sounder seismic equipment supplemented by box cores, gravity cores and grab samples. The objective of the study was to provide a firm sedimentological basis for any further work concerning the horizontal and vertical distributions of radionuclides discharged from the Windscale nuclear fuel reprocessing plant within the sea bed sediments. The sidescan data were used to map the distribution of surface sediments and infer net sand transport paths, whilst the continous seismic profile records were used to study the sub-bottom stratigraphy and geological structures. The sediment samples were analyzed for faunal content and evidence of animal-sediment interaction.

  4. Coastal barrier stratigraphy for Holocene high-resolution sea-level reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Costas, Susana; Ferreira, Óscar; Plomaritis, Theocharis A.; Leorri, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The uncertainties surrounding present and future sea-level rise have revived the debate around sea-level changes through the deglaciation and mid- to late Holocene, from which arises a need for high-quality reconstructions of regional sea level. Here, we explore the stratigraphy of a sandy barrier to identify the best sea-level indicators and provide a new sea-level reconstruction for the central Portuguese coast over the past 6.5 ka. The selected indicators represent morphological features extracted from coastal barrier stratigraphy, beach berm and dune-beach contact. These features were mapped from high-resolution ground penetrating radar images of the subsurface and transformed into sea-level indicators through comparison with modern analogs and a chronology based on optically stimulated luminescence ages. Our reconstructions document a continuous but slow sea-level rise after 6.5 ka with an accumulated change in elevation of about 2 m. In the context of SW Europe, our results show good agreement with previous studies, including the Tagus isostatic model, with minor discrepancies that demand further improvement of regional models. This work reinforces the potential of barrier indicators to accurately reconstruct high-resolution mid- to late Holocene sea-level changes through simple approaches. PMID:27929122

  5. Coastal barrier stratigraphy for Holocene high-resolution sea-level reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costas, Susana; Ferreira, Óscar; Plomaritis, Theocharis A.; Leorri, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The uncertainties surrounding present and future sea-level rise have revived the debate around sea-level changes through the deglaciation and mid- to late Holocene, from which arises a need for high-quality reconstructions of regional sea level. Here, we explore the stratigraphy of a sandy barrier to identify the best sea-level indicators and provide a new sea-level reconstruction for the central Portuguese coast over the past 6.5 ka. The selected indicators represent morphological features extracted from coastal barrier stratigraphy, beach berm and dune-beach contact. These features were mapped from high-resolution ground penetrating radar images of the subsurface and transformed into sea-level indicators through comparison with modern analogs and a chronology based on optically stimulated luminescence ages. Our reconstructions document a continuous but slow sea-level rise after 6.5 ka with an accumulated change in elevation of about 2 m. In the context of SW Europe, our results show good agreement with previous studies, including the Tagus isostatic model, with minor discrepancies that demand further improvement of regional models. This work reinforces the potential of barrier indicators to accurately reconstruct high-resolution mid- to late Holocene sea-level changes through simple approaches.

  6. Coastal barrier stratigraphy for Holocene high-resolution sea-level reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Costas, Susana; Ferreira, Óscar; Plomaritis, Theocharis A; Leorri, Eduardo

    2016-12-08

    The uncertainties surrounding present and future sea-level rise have revived the debate around sea-level changes through the deglaciation and mid- to late Holocene, from which arises a need for high-quality reconstructions of regional sea level. Here, we explore the stratigraphy of a sandy barrier to identify the best sea-level indicators and provide a new sea-level reconstruction for the central Portuguese coast over the past 6.5 ka. The selected indicators represent morphological features extracted from coastal barrier stratigraphy, beach berm and dune-beach contact. These features were mapped from high-resolution ground penetrating radar images of the subsurface and transformed into sea-level indicators through comparison with modern analogs and a chronology based on optically stimulated luminescence ages. Our reconstructions document a continuous but slow sea-level rise after 6.5 ka with an accumulated change in elevation of about 2 m. In the context of SW Europe, our results show good agreement with previous studies, including the Tagus isostatic model, with minor discrepancies that demand further improvement of regional models. This work reinforces the potential of barrier indicators to accurately reconstruct high-resolution mid- to late Holocene sea-level changes through simple approaches.

  7. Mechanical stratigraphy of deep-water sandstones: insights from a multisciplinary field and laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Corradetti, Amerigo; Cantalamessa, Gino

    2010-05-01

    Turbidite sandstones found in deep-water fold-and-thrust belts are increasingly exploited as hydrocarbon reservoirs. Within these rocks, the fluid flow is profoundly affected by the complex interaction between primary sedimentological and stratigraphic attributes (i.e, facies, layering, reservoir quality, stacking patterns, bed connectivity and lateral extent) and fracture characteristics (i.e., length, spacing, distribution, orientation, connectivity). Unfortunately, most of these features are at, or below, the resolution of conventional seismic datasets and, for this reason, their identification and localization represent one of the fundamental challenges facing exploration, appraisal and production of the sandstone reservoirs. In this respect, whereas considerable effort has been afforded to a characterization of the sedimentological and stratigraphic aspects of sandstones, detailed analysis of fractures in this type of successions has received significantly less attention. In this work, we combine field and laboratory analyses to assess the possible mechanical control exerted by the rock properties (grain size, intergranualr porosity, and Young modulus), as well as the influence of bed thickness, on joint density in turbidite sandstones. Joints are mode-I fractures occurring parallel to the greatest principle stress axis, which solve opening displacement and do not show evidence of shearing and enhance the values of total porosity forming preferential hydraulic conduits for fluid flow. Within layered rocks, commonly, joints form perpendicular to bedding due to overburden or exhumation. The empirical relation between joint spacing and bed thickness, documented in the field by many authors, has been mechanically related to the stress perturbation taking place around joints during their formation. Furthermore, close correlations between joint density and rock properties have been already established. In this present contribution, we focus on the bed

  8. Stratigraphy and structure of the western Kentucky fluorspar district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trace, R.D.; Amos, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The western Kentucky fluorspar district is part of the larger Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district, the largest producer of fluorspar in the United States. This report is based largely on data gathered from 1960 to 1974 during the U.S. Geological Survey-Kentucky Geological Survey cooperative geologic mapping program of Kentucky. It deals chiefly with the stratigraphy and structure of the district and, to a lesser extent, with the fluorspar-zinc-lead-barite deposits. Sedimentary rocks exposed in the district range in age from Early Mississippian (Osagean) to Quaternary. Most rocks exposed at the surface are Mississippian in age; two-thirds are marine fossiliferous limestones, and the remainder are shales, siltstones, and sandstones. Osagean deep-water marine silty limestone and chert are present at the surface in the southwestern corner of the district. Meramecian marine limestone is exposed at the surface in about half the area. Chesterian marine and fluvial to fluviodeltaic clastic sedimentary rocks and marine limestone underlie about one-third of the area. The total sequence of Mississippian rocks is about 3,000 ft thick. Pennsylvanian rocks are dominantly fluvial clastic sedimentary rocks that change upward into younger fluviodeltaic strata. Pennsylvanian strata of Morrowan and Atokan age are locally thicker than 600 ft along the eastern and southeastern margin and in the major grabens of the district where they have been preserved from erosion. Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments of the Mississippi embayment truncate Paleozoic formations in and near the southwestern corner of the district and are preserved mostly as erosional outliers. The deposits are Gulfian nonmarine gravels, sands, and clays as much as 170 ft thick and upper Pliocene fluvial continental deposits as thick as 45 ft. Pleistocene loess deposits mantle the upland surface of the district, and Quaternary fluvial and fluviolacustrine deposits are common and widespread along the Ohio and Cumberland

  9. Fluvial landscapes - human societies interactions during the last 2000 years: the Middle Loire River and its embanking since the Middle Ages (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanet, Cyril; Carcaud, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    This research deals with the study of fluvial landscapes, heavily and precociously transformed by societies (fluvial anthroposystems). It aims to characterize i), fluvial responses to climate, environmental and anthropogenic changes ii), history of hydraulical constructions relative to rivers iii), history of fluvial origin risks and their management - (Program: AGES Ancient Geomorphological EvolutionS of the Loire River hydrosystem). The Middle Loire River valley in the Val d'Orléans was strongly and precociously occupied, particularly during historical periods. Hydrosedimentary flows are there irregular. The river dykes were built during the Middle Ages (dykes named turcies) and the Modern Period, but ages and localizations of the oldest dykes were not precisely known. A systemic and multi-scaled approach aimed to characterize i), palaeo-hydrographical, -hydrological and -hydraulical evolutions of the Loire River, fluvial risks (palaeo-hazards and -vulnerabilities) and their management. It is based on an integrated approach, in and out archaeological sites: morpho-stratigraphy, sedimentology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomatics, geochronology, archaeology. Spatio-temporal variability of fluvial hazards is characterized. A model of the Loire River fluvial activity is developed: multicentennial scale variability, with higher fluvial activity episodes during the Gallo-Roman period, IX-XIth centuries and LIA. Fluvial patterns changes are indentified. Settlement dynamics and hydraulical constructions of the valley are specified. We establish the ages and localizations of the oldest discovered dikes of the Middle Loire River: after the Late Antiquity and before the end of the Early Middle Ages (2 dated dykes), between Bou and Orléans cities. During historical periods, we suggest 2 main thresholds concerning socio-environmental interactions: the first one during the Early Middle Ages (turcies: small scattered dykes), the second during the Modern Period (levees: high

  10. Integrated stratigraphy of the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary interval: improving understanding of Oceanic Anoxic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (CTB) interval ~ 94 Ma represented a period of major global palaeoenvironmental change. Increasingly detailed multidisciplinary studies integrating sedimentological, palaeontological and geochemical data from multiple basins, are enabling the development of refined but complex models that aid understanding of the mechanisms driving changes in ocean productivity and climate. This paper reviews some of the exciting new developments in this field. Facies change characterizes the CTB interval in most areas. In the Chalk seas of northern Europe, a widespead hiatus was followed by the deposition of clay-rich organic-lean beds of the Plenus Marl and its equivalents, and then nodular chalks. In the North Sea basin and its onshore extension in eastern England and northern Germany, black shales of the Black Band (Blodøks Formation, Hasseltal Formation) occur. Similarly, in northern Tethys, a brief interval of black shale accumulation within a predominantly carbonate succession, is exemplified by the Niveau Thomel in the Vocontian Basin (SE France), and the Livello Bonarelli in Italy. Widespread deposition of organic-rich marine sediments during CTB times led to 12C depletion in surface carbon reservoirs (oceans, atmosphere, biosphere), and a large positive global δ13C excursion preserved in marine carbonates and both marine and terrestrial organic matter (Oceanic Anoxic Event 2). Significant biotic turnover characterises the boundary interval, and inter-regional correlation may be achieved at high resolution using integrated biostratigraphy employing macrofossils (ammonites, inoceramid bivalves), microfossils (planktonic foraminifera, dinoflagellate cysts) and calcareous nannofossils. Correlations can be tested against those based on comparison of δ13C profiles - carbon isotope chemostratigraphy, supplemented by oxygen isotope and elemental data. Interpretation of paired carbonate - organic matter δ13C data from multiple CTB sections

  11. An evaluation of the Early Cretaceous of Spitsbergen: new insights into stratigraphy and palaeoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Madeleine; Price, Gregory; FitzPatrick, Meriel; Watkinson, Matthew; Jerrett, Rhodri

    2015-04-01

    During the Early Cretaceous, Spitsbergen was located at a palaeolatitude of ~60°N. Abundant fossil wood derived from conifer forests, dinosaur trackways, enigmatic deposits such as glendonite horizons and rare outsized clasts, and stable isotope data from the Early Cretaceous formations of Spitsbergen suggest that the climate at that time was much more dynamic than the traditional view of "invariant greenhouse" conditions on Earth. The purpose of this study is to test the veracity of using such proxies as climate indicators, and to evaluate the climatic character of Arctic Svalbard during the Early Cretaceous. To these ends, the sedimentological and sequence stratigraphic context of glendonites and outsized clasts within the Rurikfjellet, Helvetiafjellet and Carolinefjellet formations are being documented. This is being achieved through high resolution sedimentary logging (bed-scale) of the Early Cretaceous succession at multiple locations, documentation of glendonites, outsized clasts, together with sampling (every < 0.5m) for stable isotope analysis, in order to constrain and elucidate the nature of environmental and possible climatic variations during this time. The Early Cretaceous succession at Festningen is 750m thick and is considered to have been deposited between the Berriasian and late Aptian/early Albian. The basal Rurikfjellet Formation comprises a normally regressive water to wave/storm dominated shoreface. A forced regression (expressed as a regional unconformity) marks the base of the overlying Helvetiafjellet Formation. The Helvetiafjellet and overlying Carolinefjellet Formation represent a strongly aggradational, weakly transgressive succession characterised by delta plain deposits, containing abundant terrestrial woody material and with ornithopod footprints, passing upward into deep water mudstones and rare storm beds. Abundant glendonites occur within the shoreface deposits of the upper Rurikfjellet Formation, and in the Carolinefjellet

  12. Aptian Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy in Sierra del Rosario, Northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragan-Manzo, R.; Moreno-Bedmar, J.; Nuñez, F.; Company, M.

    2013-05-01

    In most recent years Aptian carbon isotope stratigraphy has been widely studied in Europe where isotopic stages have been developed to correlate global events. Two negative excursions have been recorded in the Lower Aptian, the older is OAE 1a in the middle part, and a younger negative excursion labeled "Aparein level", which occurs in the uppermost part of the Lower Aptian. In Mexico previous works reported a carbon isotope negative excursion in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation that was assigned to the onset of Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a (=OAE 1a). In this work we study the isotopic record of the δ13Ccarb of 32 bulk rock samples of limestone from the uppermost part of the Cupido Formation and the lower part of the La Peña Formation at the Francisco Zarco Dam Section (=FZD), Durango State, northeastern Mexico. The isotopic data are calibrated using the latest ammonite biostratigraphic biozonation of the Aptian. This age calibration allows us to make a precise correlation between the carbon isotopic record of Mexico and several European sections (e.g. Spain and France). In the studied Francisco Zarco Dam section we recognize a negative carbon isotopic excursion in the Dufrenoyia justinae ammonite Zone that corresponds to the "Aparein level", which we correlate using the ammonite zonation of others European sections (Figure 1). This correlation allows us to see how the negative excursion that characterizes the "Aparein level" is consistent with the C7 segment. Thus, our recent stratigraphic study allows us to conclude that the ammonite record in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is regionally isochronous, and correlates with the Dufrenoyia justinae Zone and Lower Aptian isotope interval C7. In agreement to these biostratigraphic data, the supposed record of the OAE 1a in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is not correct, and the carbon isotope negative excursion must be assigned to the younger event "Aparein level". Taking this into

  13. Elemental geochemistry and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Cenomanian to Santonian neritic carbonates in the Zagros Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidtalab, Amin; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Huck, Stefan; Heimhofer, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    A Neo-Tethyan upper Cenomanian-Santonian neritic carbonate ramp succession (Sarvak and Ilam formations), drilled in the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, was investigated via detailed sedimentology, microfacies analysis, elemental geochemistry and Sr-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). The succession contains two exposure surfaces, which are known as the CT-ES and mT-ES (Cenomanian-Turonian and middle Turonian, respectively), and associated prominent negative carbon-isotope excursions that represent important regional stratigraphic marker horizons. Precise knowledge about the onset of platform exposure and the duration of the exposure-related hiatus, however, is currently lacking due to a rather low-resolved shallow-water biostratigraphic framework and a bulk carbonate carbon-isotope pattern that clearly differs from global Late Cretaceous reference curves. Therefore, the existing bio-chemostratigraphic framework was complemented by bulk carbonate strontium-isotope stratigraphy (SIS). As bulk carbonate material is in particular prone to diagenetic alteration, a careful selection of least altered samples has been carried out by means of elemental geochemistry and petrography. In contrast to what could be expected, the meteoric alteration of limestones beneath both exposure surfaces is not clearly expressed by increasing iron and manganese and coeval decreasing strontium contents. On the contrary, the impact of meteoric diagenesis is well illustrated via pronounced increases in Rb concentrations and concomitant prominent positive shifts to radiogenic strontium-isotope values, an observation that clearly reflects the decay of continentally derived 87Rb into 87Sr. Rubidium corrected strontium-isotope values place the CT-ES around the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary and point to an exposure duration of less than 0.4 Myr. This rather short-term CT-ES related hiatus is supported by petrographic evidence, which indicates a youth karstification stage of strata beneath the CT

  14. Sedimentology, petrography and early diagenesis of a travertine-colluvium succession from Chusang (southern Tibet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijun; Meyer, Michael C.; Hoffmann, Dirk L.

    2016-08-01

    The Chusang travertine is situated in southern Tibet at an altitude of ~ 4200 m asl. in a cold-arid, periglacial environment and is characterized by interbedding of hydrothermal carbonate with colluvium. Here we present sedimentological and petrographical data to elucidate the depositional environment and sedimentary processes responsible for hydrothermal carbonate precipitation and early diagenetic alteration as well as clastic sediment accumulation and provide initial 230Th/U ages to constrain the time-depth of this travertine-colluvium succession. Three main travertine lithofacies have been identified: 1) a dense laminated lithofacies, 2) a porous layered lithofacies and 3) an intraclastic lithofacies that results from erosion of pre-existing hot spring carbonate. The colluvium is composed of cohesive debris flow layers that derived from mass-wasting events from the adjacent hillslopes. Micro-fabric analyses suggest that dense laminated travertine forms via rapid calcite precipitation from hot spring water seasonally subjected to severe winter cooling, while porous layered travertine results from seasonal dilution of hot spring water with rain water during the summer monsoon months, which in turn stimulates biological productivity and gives rise to a porous summer layer. Early diagenesis in the form of recrystallization and extensive formation of pore cements is common in the Chusang travertine, but never eradicates the original crystal fabrics completely. The sedimentary architecture of the deposit is conditioned by (i) the gently dipping (~ 10°) pre-existing terrain on which hot spring water is discharged from multiple travertine mounds causing laterally extensive travertine sheets to precipitate, and (ii) the adjacent much steeper (up to 30°) periglacial hillslopes that are the source area of repeated debris flows that accumulate on the travertine surface. The resulting travertine-colluvium succession has a total thickness of ~ 24 m and 230Th/U dating

  15. The Late Pleistocene Duoi U'Oi cave in northern Vietnam: palaeontology, sedimentology, taphonomy and palaeoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Anne-Marie; Demeter, F.; Duringer, P.; Helm, C.; Bano, M.; Vu, The Long; Kim Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Antoine, P.-O.; Thi Mai, Bui; Huong, Nguyen Thi Mai; Dodo, Y.; Chabaux, F.; Rihs, S.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes new fossil materials recovered at the Duoi U'Oi site, in December 2003, by a Vietnamese-French-Japanese team. The Duoi U'Oi cave is located in Man Duc village, 25 km of Hoà Binh city in northern Vietnam. It belongs to a karstic network developed in a dark grey micritic marine limestone dated from the Lower to the Middle Triassic. The sedimentary fill produced a rich mammalian fauna, essentially composed of isolated teeth of middle- to large-sized mammals (Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, Proboscidea, Carnivora, Rodentia, Primates), and characteristic of Late Pleistocene. The results of the Duoi U'Oi fieldwork are of great interest for the following reasons: (1) the biochronological age of the fauna is consistent with 230Th/ 234U/ 238U dating from the calcitic floors (66±3 ka). The Duoi U'Oi fauna is thus the oldest well-dated modern fauna known for the Southeast Asian mainland; (2) in terms of sedimentology, the analysis of the formation of the fossiliferous breccia and that of the processes of deposits shows a close relation between the karstic deposits inside the cave and the deposits in the alluvial terraces. The observation of three levels of alluvial terraces associated with three caves situated at 62, 10 and 3 m above the present alluvial plain suggests that exokarstic and endokarstic sediments evolved together; (3) in terms of palaeobiogeography, Duoi U'Oi is the continental fauna showing the strongest resemblance with the Late Pleistocene faunas from Indonesian islands (Punung, Gunung Dawung, Lida Ajer, Sibrambang and Djambu caves); this implies that, at the time of Duoi U'Oi, ca 70 ka, the Sundaland was mainly characterised by faunas of modern aspect; (4) the analysis of major taphonomic factors that led to the mammal assemblage reveals a combination of selective agents (selective role of predators and porcupines, selective destruction of age classes for some species, selective preservation of fossils due to the deposition processes in

  16. The deglaciation in Picos de Europa (area of Enol Glacier) based on geomorphological and sedimentological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Jesus; Oliva, Marc; García, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    The chronology for the deglaciation in the Cantabrian Range is still poorly understood. Several papers have proposed a maximum advance well before the LGM (Jiménez and Farias, 2002; Moreno et al. 2010; Serrano et al. 2012). The Western massif of Picos de Europa held a ice field of 50 km2. In this communication we present two cores collected in two glacial depressions in the frontal area of Enol Glacier that allow reconstructing the environment since the deglaciation of the massif. The first core (5.6 m long) was collected in the kame terrace of Belbin. This terrace was dammed by a lateral moraine corresponding to the phase of maximum expansion of Enol Glacier. Three clear layers are observed: the basal 2.5 m consists of grey clay with small gravel limestones; the second is 2 m thick and is composed of grey clays; the upper 1.1 m shows several paleosoils with abundant organic matter and charcoals. The based was dated at 14,810 ± 70 yr BP. This age represents a minimum age for the maximum expansion of Enol Glacier. The second core was collected in the glaciokarst depression of Vega del Bricial, located within a moraine complex corresponding to LGM. The core is 8 m long and looks very homogeneous. It consists of a succession of organic layers and slope deposits. Two radiocarbon dates were performed on the sediments at 8 and 2.8 m depth, resulting in 9,690 ± 260 and 3,420 ± 95 yr BP, respectively. Based on sedimentological and geomorphological evidences, we propose a chronology for the environmental changes occurred in this massif since the last glacial period. References Jiménez, M. and Farias, P., 2002. New radiometric and geomorphologic evidences of a Last Glacial Maximum older than 18 ka in SW European mountains: the example of Redes Natural Park (Cantabrian Mountains, NW Spain). Geodinamica Acta, 15, 93-101. Moreno, A., Valero, B. L., Jiménez, M., Domínguez, M. J., Mata, M. P., Navas, A., González, P., Stoll, H., Farias, P., Morellón, M., Corella, J. P

  17. Archaeological sedimentology of overbank silt deposits on the floodplain of the Ohio river near Louisville, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The surface of the floodplain of the Ohio River about 20km southwest of Louisville, Kentucky, is a series of linear ridges and swales that are subparallel to the channel of the river, which here is relatively straight and flows southward. Numerous prehistoric occupational sites are located on these ridges. The sediments that underlie the ridges, which were examined in four archaeological excavations as deep as 8 m, are predominantly sandy silt and silty fine to very fine sand and appear to be mainly the product of overbank deposition from suspended load. Abundant cultural material and occupational sites dating as early as 10,000 years BP are found in the sediments at depths as great as 6??5 m. The fine sediments of the floodplain are underlain by sand and gravel. The context of the cultural materials and the stratigraphy and morphology of the deposits indicate that the ridged deposits began as linear riverside sand and gravel bars. These were succeeded upward by fine-grained overbank deposits in which the ridged morphology was maintained because the overbank silt and fine sand were deposited as prograding elongate bars at high water. As the floodplain ridge built upward, the sedimentation rate decreased and the sand content of the sediments diminished, and as the river channel occasionally shifted, the ridged deposits were built in successive subparallel sequences. Two archaeological consequences are implicit in this depositional model of orderly growth of the floodplain. First, available archaeological data from floodplain segments along other parts of the river should confirm the model; and second, the model should make it possible to search the floodplains of the Ohio River for stratified sites of any desired age. ?? 1984.

  18. Sedimentology, diagenesis, clay mineralogy and sequential analysis model of Upper Paleocene evaporite-carbonate ramp succession from Tamerza area (Gafsa Basin: Southern Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messadi, Abdel Majid; Mardassi, Besma; Ouali, Jamel Abdennaceur; Touir, Jamel

    2016-06-01

    Integrated sedimentological studies, diagenesis, sequential analysis and clay mineralogy on the Upper Paleocene rocks in Tamerza area provide important information on the reconstruction of the depositional basin, cyclicity, and paleoclimatic contexts. Facies analysis and petrographic studies have led to the recognition of nine facies that were deposited in three facies belts: Sebkha, inner ramp and outer ramp summarized in a carbonate ramp model: Homoclinal ramp under an arid climate. The upward and lateral changes in thickness and composition show a general regressive trend that records a transition from an outer ramp to Sebkha, creating different types of confinement. The facies stacking patterns constitute several kinds of meter-scale, shallowing-upward cycles. Nine different types of depositional cycles and several models of Sebkha sequences were defined. These different types of facies, characterized within the Thelja Formation, compose seven depositional sequences, mainly made of carbonates, marls and evaporates. Detailed multi approach analysis provides important information on evaporitic sequence stratigraphy. In carbonates beds, the diagenetic analysis provides an overview and chronology of diagenetic processes. A particular attention was paid to early stage cementation which enables us to characterize better the depositional environments. In addition to cementation, other features define the diagenetic history. X-ray diffraction reveals the presence of smectite suggesting an arid climate. Moreover, the clinoptilolite and the frequency of primary dolomite indicate different degrees of confinement. The seven depositional sequences showing a hierarchical organization of many cycles, as described above, suggested that eustatic sea level oscillations caused by cyclic perturbations of the Earth's orbit play a fundamental role in determining the formation of hierarchical cyclic rhythmicity.

  19. Stratigraphy and Tectonics of Southeastern Serenitatis. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results of investigations of returned Apollo 17 samples, and Apollo 15 and 17 photographs have provided a broad data base on which to interpret the southeastern Serenitatis region of the moon. Although many of the pre-Apollo 17 mission interpretations remain valid, detailed mapping of this region and correlation with earth-based and orbital remote-sensing data have resulted in a revision of the local mare stratigraphy.

  20. Ordered hierarchy versus scale invariance in sequence stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    Sequence stratigraphy has been applied in a wide range of scales of time and space, from decimeter-thick layers formed within hours to kilometer-thick basin fills formed during hundreds of millions of years. The traditional approach to practice sequence stratigraphy in this wide range of scales is to subdivide the sediment piles into an ordered hierarchy of sequence cycles of different duration and different architecture. An alternative are scale-invariant models with fractal characteristics. Published data confirm two predictions of the ordered-hierarchy model: sequences of very short duration (<1 × 103 years) are parasequences bounded by flooding surfaces, very long sequences (>200 × 106 years) are symmetrical transgressive-regressive cycles. However, the sequence record in the range of 1 × 104-200 × 106 years, the principal domain of sequence stratigraphy, shows a rather irregular succession of sequences with variable symmetry and bounded by flooding surfaces or exposure surfaces. For these time scales, scale-invariant models are a good first approximation, particularly because the evidence for scale-invariance and randomness in the stratigraphic record is strong: Frequency spectra of sea-level change as well as rates of sedimentation and rates of accommodation change plotted against length of observation span show basic trends indistinguishable from random walk. These trends, combined with scale-invariant sequence models may be the most efficient tools for across-the-board predictions on sequences and for locating islands of order in the sequence record.

  1. Volcaniclastic stratigraphy of Gede volcano in West Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.; Zaennudin, A.; Prambada, O.

    2012-12-01

    Gede volcano (2958 m a.s.l.) and the adjacent Pangrango volcano (3019 m a.s.l.) form large (base diameter 35 km) volcanic massif 60 km south of Jakarta. While Pangrango has no recorded eruptions, Gede is one of the most active volcanoes in Indonesia: eruptions were reported 26 times starting from 1747 (Petroeschevsky 1943; van Bemmelen 1949). Historic eruptions were mildly explosive (Vulcanian) with at least one lava flow. Modern activity of the volcano includes persistent solfataric activity in the summit crater and periodic seismic swarms - in 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2010, and 2012 (CVGHM). Lands around the Gede-Pangrango massif are densely populated with villages up to 1500-2000 m a.s.l. Higher, the volcano is covered by rain forest of the Gede-Pangrango Natural Park, which is visited every day by numerous tourists who camp in the summit area. We report the results of the detailed reinvestigation of volcaniclastic stratigraphy of Gede volcano. This work has allowed us to obtain 24 new radiocarbon dates for the area. As a result the timing and character of activity of Gede in Holocene has been revealed. The edifice of Gede volcano consists of main stratocone (Gumuruh) with 1.8 km-wide summit caldera; intra-caldera lava cone (Gede proper) with a 900 m wide summit crater, having 2 breaches toward N-NE; and intra-crater infill (lava dome/flow capped with 3 small craters surrounded by pyroclastic aprons). The Gumuruh edifice, composed mostly of lava flows, comprises more than 90% of the total volume of the volcano. Deep weathering of rocks and thick (2-4 m) red laterite soil covering Gumuruh indicates its very old age. Attempts to get 14C dates in 4 different locations of Gumuruh (including a large debris avalanche deposit on its SE foot) provided ages older than 45,000 years - beyond the limit for 14C dating. Outside the summit caldera, notable volumes of fresh, 14C datable volcaniclastic deposits were found only in the NNE sector of the volcano

  2. Acoustic stratigraphy and hydrothermal activity within Epi Submarine Caldera, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Exon, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geophysical surveys of active submarine volcanoes offshore and southeast of Epi Island, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc, have delineated details of the structure and acoustic stratigraphy of three volcanic cones. These submarine cones, named Epia, Epib, and Epic, are aligned east-west and spaced 3.5 km apart on the rim of a submerged caldera. At least three acoustic sequences, of presumed Quaternary age, can be identified on single-channel seismic-reflection profiles. Rocks dredged from these cones include basalt, dacite, and cognate gabbroic inclusions with magmatic affinities similar to those of the Karua (an active submarine volcano off the southeastern tip of Epi) lavas. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  3. Basalt stratigraphy of southern Mare Serenitatis. [based on Apollo 17 photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, K. A.; Carr, M. H.; Muehlberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The major features of the stratigraphic and structural sequence are summarized for Mare Serenitatis. The dark oldest basalts include flows coextensive with Mare Tranquillitatis and also flows and pyroclastic deposits (dark mantles) that erupted from the edge of the Serenitatis basin. The basin sagged, possibly isostatically, as basalts of intermediate age were emplaced. Sagging had nearly ceased by the time the youngest flows were deposited. Compressive movements including thrusting followed, and small extensional fissures formed in late Copernican time. The revised stratigraphic sequence that was elaborated has implications for lunar stratigraphy that transcend the boundaries of Mare Serenitatis. Dark mantle deposits and the darkest maria have commonly been assumed in geologic mapping to be relatively youthful. These assumptions must now be reevaluated and perhaps discarded.

  4. Geoarchaeological research on Bronze Age settlement mounds in the Kolkheti lowlands at the Black Sea coast of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laermanns, Hannes; Heisterkamp, Arne; Kirkitadze, Giorgi; Elashvili, Mikheil; Verheul, Jan; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Helmut, Brückner

    2016-04-01

    0.0.1 Situated between the Rivers Enguri in the north and Khobistsqali in the south, more than 20 settlement mounds (local name Dikhagudzuba), identified by field survey and remote sensing techniques, give evidence of a densely populated landscape in the coastal lowlands of eastern Georgia during the Bronze Age. While the existing chronology of these mounds is based on ceramic evidence obtained during a previous archaeological research, only limited information is available on their internal architecture and their palaeoenvironmental context, and the chronology of the different layers is as yet lacking. 0.0.2 Within the framework of a geoarchaeological research project, we carried out eleven vibracores on and in direct vicinity of three of the most prominent mounds, situated close to the villages of Orulu and Ergeta. Based on these sediment cores, our study aims at (i) establishing a chronostratigraphical framework for the settlements based on radiocarbon dating; (ii) reconstructing possible phases and gaps of occupation; and (iii) identifying the environmental conditions during the time of their existence. Geochemical and sedimentological analyses were carried out to decipher element contents (XRF), granulometry, and organic contents (LOI, C/N) of sediment samples, supporting the interpretation of the mounds' stratigraphical evolution and related human occupation. The three investigated settlement mounds are similar in dimension and stratigraphy, and different settlement layers could be identified in each of them. The 14C age estimates indicate that their formation occurred during the second half of the 3rd and the first half of the 2nd millennium BC, thus confirming the archaeological interpretation of their Bronze Age origin. Based on the granulometric and geochemical data, palaeoenvironmental conditions in the vicinity of the settlements were dominated by fluvial processes.

  5. Stratigraphy, petrology, and structure of the Pingston terrane, Mount Hayes C-5 and C-6 quadrangles, eastern Alaska Range, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokleberg, W. J.; Schwab, C. E.; Miyaoka, R. T.; Buhrmaster, C. L.

    Recent field, petrologic, and structural studies of the Pingston terrane in the Mount Hayes C-5 and C-6 quandrangles reveal that in this area the terrane: (1) has a highly distinctive stratigraphy, age, petrology (relict textures, relict minerals, and metamorphic facies), and structure; and (2) differs markedly from that described in previous studies. These more recent studies indicate that the major rock types, in order of decreasing abundance, are meta-andesite, metadacite and metarhyodacite flows and (or) tuff, metabasalt, metagabbro, metavolcanic graywacke, metagray-wacke, metasiltstone, metaquartzite or metachert, and very sparse marble. The general petrography of the major rock units in the Pingston terrane is given.

  6. Determining flow directions in turbidites: An integrated sedimentological and magnetic fabric study of the Miocene Marnoso Arenacea Formation (northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felletti, Fabrizio; Dall'Olio, Eleonora; Muttoni, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Depositional models of turbidity flows require estimating paleocurrent directions using sedimentological indicators such as flute and ripple marks, but these are not always present in outcrop sections or drill cores. In this study, we apply the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) as an alternative tool to estimate paleocurrent directions in a case-study turbiditic system: the Marnoso Arenacea foredeep turbidites of Miocene age exposed in the northern Apennines of Italy. Different depositional facies have been sampled for AMS and additional rock-magnetic analyses. We observed a good agreement between paleocurrent directions from flute casts at the base of turbidite beds and mean directions of maximum magnetic susceptibility axes in organized facies such as massive and laminated sandstones, even if a relatively small but apparently consistent offset of ~ 15-20° seems to be present. Highly dispersed AMS fabrics were instead observed in disordered facies such as convoluted and undulated sandstones as well as debrites. This strong correlation between hydrodynamic regimes of depositional facies and AMS data represents a novel contribution and confirms the validity of the AMS method to estimate flow directions in the absence of sedimentological indicators. Finally, paleomagnetic analyses from the literature were used to reconstruct the paleogeography of the Marnoso Arenacea basin and make inferences about the origin and direction of transport of the sediments at the basin scale.

  7. Structural geology and sedimentology of the Sermat Quartzites, Strandja Massif, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazıcı, Müge; Natal'in, Boris A.

    2015-04-01

    prevented the preservation of sedimentary structures such as flute casts and cross-beddings, which can be used to determine the sedimentary environments of the Şermat Basin. Nevertheless, all available relicts indicate the transportation of sediments from a source area in the south. If the Şermat Quartzites is Ordovician age, they can be correlated with the Ordovician rocks of the Istanbul Zone, which is interpreted as a south-facing passive continental margin. Sedimentological framework of the Şermat Quartzites contradicts this correlation. Further studies of the region are necessary in order to determine the connection between the Strandja Massif and the Istanbul Zone. Keywords: Hercynian orogeny, Cimmerides, Strandja Massif, İstanbul Zone, Sedimentary Basin, Turkey References Çağlayan, M. A. & Yurtsever, A., 1998, Geological map of Turkey at 1:100000 scale, no. 20, 21, 22, 23, Burgaz-A3, Edirne-B2 and -B3, Burgaz A4, and Kırklareli-B4-B5-B6 and -C6 sheets, Mineral Research and Exploration Institute (MTA) of Turkey publications (in Turkish with English abstract). Natal'in, B., Sunal, G., Zhiqing, Y. & Gün, E., 2012a, Late Paleozoic subduction-accretion orogeny in the eastern part of the Turkish Strandja Massif (Vize - Kıyıköy region), in Kocbay, A., Esat, K., and Hasancebi, N., eds., 65th Geological Congress of Turkey. Abstracts Book: Ankara, Chamber of Geological Engineers, p. 454-455 Natal'in, B., Sunal, G., Satır, M. & Toraman, E., 2012, Tectonics of the Strandja Massif, NW Turkey: History of a Long-Lived Arc at the Northern Margin of Palaeo-Tethys: Turkish Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 21, p. 755-798.

  8. Geology and Stratigraphy of Four Candidate Pyroclastic Deposits on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinauer, Julia; Hiesinger, Harald; Bauch, Karin; Preusker, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft [1] to Mercury revealed numerous new findings, including the discovery of potential pyroclastic deposits [2-9]. Besides impact cratering, volcanic processes, including the deposition of pyroclastic materials are among the most important processes to shape the surface of a planet. Volcanic processes allow us to study the thermal evolution of the planet, and impacts provide insights into the composition of the crust, and possible the mantle. In this study we focus on four specific examples of potential pyroclastic deposits: Lermontov NE (-48.15°E, 15.80°), Lermontov SE (-49.08°E, 15.04°), Glinka (-112.42°E, 15.01°), and Unnamed crater 7 (88.20°E, 32.40°). For our investigation we used data of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) [10]. In particular we studied narrow-angle Camera (NAC) images with a resolution of 25-100 m/pixel and wide-angle camera (WAC) images with a resolution of about 170-250 m/pixel. Our data set is complemented by Digital Terrain Models (DTM) based on photogrammetric analyses of stereo images [11]. The objectives of this study are to investigate the geologic context of the pyroclastic deposits, to map their morphological/compositional sub-units in detail, to derive volume estimates for these deposits, to study their eruption conditions, and to derive information on the timing of the emplacement of these units. In addition, absolute model ages are determined to develop a stratigraphy of the mapped units Several morphologic features were observed in association with the pyroclastic deposits, including lobate scarps, melt pools, and large irregular depressions, as well as small-scale irregularly shaped, shallow, rimless depressions, i.e., hollows [2]. In Lermontov, the large irregular depressions that can be plausibly interpreted as vent structures [6,7] occur within a roughly circular depression of about 50 km in diameter, located in the center of

  9. Sedimentological processes and environmental variability at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania) between 640 ka and present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, A.; Wagner, B.; Just, J.; Leicher, N.; Gromig, R.; Baumgarten, H.; Vogel, H.; Lacey, J. H.; Sadori, L.; Wonik, T.; Leng, M. J.; Zanchetta, G.; Sulpizio, R.; Giaccio, B.

    2015-09-01

    Lake Ohrid (FYROM, Albania) is thought to be more than 1.2 million years old and hosts more than 200 endemic species. As a target of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), a successful deep drilling campaign was carried out within the scope of the Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project in 2013. Here, we present lithological, sedimentological, and (bio-)geochemical data from the upper 247.8 m of the overall 569 m long DEEP site sediment succession from the central part of the lake. According to an age model, which is based on nine tephra layers (1st order tie points), and on tuning of biogeochemical proxy data to orbital parameters (2nd order tie points) and to the global benthic isotope stack LR04 (3rd order tie points), respectively, the analyzed sediment sequence covers the last 640 ka. The DEEP site sediment succession consists of hemipelagic sediments, which are interspersed by several tephra layers and infrequent, thin (< 5 cm) mass wasting deposits. The hemipelagic sediments can be classified into three different lithotypes. Lithotype 1 and 2 deposits comprise calcareous and slightly calcareous silty clay and are predominantly attributed to interglacial periods with high primary productivity in the lake during summer and reduced mixing during winter. The data suggest that high ion and nutrient concentrations in the lake water promoted calcite precipitation and diatom growth in the epilmnion in during MIS15, 13, and 5. Following a strong primary productivity, highest interglacial temperatures can be reported for MIS11 and 5, whereas MIS15, 13, 9, and 7 were comparable cooler. Lithotype 3 deposits consist of clastic, silty clayey material and predominantly represent glacial periods with low primary productivity during summer and longer and intensified mixing during winter. The data imply that most severe glacial conditions at Lake Ohrid persisted during MIS16, 12, 10, and 6 whereas

  10. Late Holocene record of sedimentologic and paleooceanographic events in western Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, M.; Paull, C. K.; Herguera, J. C.; Barron, J. A.; Gwiazda, R.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Edwards, B. D.; Caress, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Transects of ≤1.5 m-long vibracores obtained with MBARI's ROV Doc Ricketts reveal late Holocene sedimentologic and paleooceanographic events in western Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (GOC) (~26.87°N, 111.338°W). Cores were located where layered near-seafloor sediments and subtle bedforms occur in 1793 to 1863 m water depths on the SW flank of the basin using detailed bathymetry and chirp profiles. Color banding was observed in the cores and gamma-density, XRF, grain size, and stable isotope data show that most of the banding is attributed to distal deposition from two turbidities. Distinctive white bands ~4 cm thick are present in three cores dispersed across ~300 m. The white bands are diatom oozes composed primarily of Thalassiothrix longissima as well as lesser abundances of Fragilariopsis doliolus and are probably a result of aggregations of Thalassiothrix-dominated mats that settle through the water column and accumulate on the seafloor. An AMS14C date taken ~3 cm above the white band in one core suggests this event occurred shortly before cal AD 1290±30. The core sites were most likely located beneath an important oceanographic front between nutrient-rich and oligotrophic water masses, probably as the result of well-mixed upper intermediate and surface waters in the mid-GOC and better-stratified tropical waters to the south. This implies the existence of a deeper mixed layer to the N in the mid GOC region most likely controlled by equatorial La Niña events fueled by stronger and more persistent NW winds along the GOC. A substantial reduction in diatom abundance evident by low specimen counts and lack of white bands following this mat-forming event seem to correlate with an abrupt decline in biosiliceous productivity and increases in the abundance of tropical diatoms and silicoflagellates in core MD02-2517 (887 m water depth; western Guaymas Basin slope) at the end of the Medieval Climate Anomaly and transition to the Little Ice Age (~AD 1200-1300).

  11. Different sedimentological and thermal evolution of three north-pyrenean basins during their set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelalou, Roman; Nalpas, Thierry; Bousquet, Romain; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2015-04-01

    The Pyrenean belt is resulting in the inversion of several lower Cretaceous basins, separating the Iberia micro-plate from the Eurasia plate. The eat-west oriented basins are well known for their high-temperature metamorphism synchronous of the last deposits during Aptian-Albian times. For the first time, we present a combined sedimentological and thermal study of three north pyrenean basins (Boucheville, St Paul-de-Fenouillet and Bas-Agly). With the help of detailed stratigraphic logs of each basin, we propose restored cross-sections for the whole area. North-south sections across Boucheville and St Paul-de-Fenouillet basins show that theses basins have large asymmetrical structure. The Boucheville basin is a large anticline bordered by two isoclinal syncline highly skewed, while the St Paul-de-Fenouillet one is a unique syncline. Detailed sedimentalogical observations show common features for these basins: deposits of white limestones and breccias during the Jurassic time following by black sandstones with a calcareous matrix of lower Cretaceous age. On one hand, Jurassic limestones were deposited on a shelf environment and their thickness is homogeneous all over each basin. On the other hand, sandstones deposits seem to occur at greater depths during the Albian time and are displaying asymmetrical north-south variation of their thickness. The quantification of the temperature overprint occurred in the basin was done using the graphitisation of the carbonaceous material, and was measured by RAMAN spectroscopy (Lahfid et al. 2010). Despite their similar deposits, the mapping of the temperature-peak inside the three basins show contrasted thermal evolution. Then we document a lower temperature overprint around 150-200˚C in the northern basin {St Paul-de-Fenouillet) while the highest overprint up to 600˚C has been reached in the southern basin (Boucheville) in which diopside - scapolite and also probably olivine are occurring. These three north-pyrenean basin turn

  12. Sedimentological analysis and long term chronostratigraphy (> 30 ka) of turbidite record offshore the central Algerian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachir, Roza Si; Babonneau, Nathalie; Cattaneo, Antonio; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Déverchère, Jacques; Yelles, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The Algerian margin is a Cenozoic passive margin located at the diffuse plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa, presently reactivated in compression. It is among the most seismically active areas of the Western Mediterranean and it suffered from numerous devastating earthquakes, for example the El Asnam earthquake in 1980 (Ms = 7.3) and the Boumerdès earthquake in 2003 (Ms = 6.7). A consistent dataset of sediment cores was collected between 2003 and 2007 during the MARADJA and PRISME cruises. Previous work has focused on the Holocene and allowed to highlight a consistent paleosesimological record in the central area of the Algerian margin (Algiers area). The purpose of this work is to extend the sedimentary analysis of turbiditic deposits over longer periods of time (throughout the Last Glacial Maximum), in order to determine whether the record of seismic events is exploitable, or if the impact of climate-driven and eustatic variations is dominant in turbidite triggering and accumulation. A sedimentological and stratigraphic approach was performed on the three most distal sediment cores of the area: PSM-KS21, PSM-KS23 and PSM-KS27. The establishment of an age model is based on radiocarbon dating and measurements of oxygen stable isotopes on planktonic foraminifera collected from the pelagic intervals (hemipelagites) interfingered with the turbidites. A homogeneous clay bed identifiable by its grey colour is a marker to correlate the three cores and it is dated between 18 and 19 ka BP. The PSM-KS23 core has the longest sedimentary record, thus it was used as a reference. Preliminary results show a significant increase in the number and thickness of individual turbidites between 10 and 20 ka BP. The expected results of this work are: 1) to determine whether the number of turbidites is consistent and correlates among the three cores; 2) to assess if the paleo-earthquake signal related to turbidites can be extracted beyond the Holocene; 3) to identify the

  13. Clear Lake sediments: anthropogenic changes in physical sedimentology and magnetic response.

    PubMed

    Osleger, David A; Zierenberg, Robert A; Suchanek, Thomas H; Stoner, Joseph S; Morgan, Sally; Adam, David P

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed the sedimentological characteristics and magnetic properties of cores from the three basins of Clear Lake, California, USA, to assess the depositional response to a series of land use changes that occurred in the watershed over the 20th century. Results indicate that distinct and abrupt shifts in particle size, magnetic concentration/mineralogy, and redox conditions occur concurrently with a variety of ecological and chemical changes in lake bed sediments. This coincidence of events occurred around 1927, a datum determined by an abrupt increase in total mercury (Hg) in Clear Lake cores and the known initiation of open-pit Hg mining at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, confirmed by 210Pb dating. Ages below the 1927 horizon were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry on 14C of coarse organic debris. Calculated sedimentation rates below the 1927 datum are approximately 1 mm/yr, whereas rates from 1927 to 2000 are up to an order of magnitude higher, with averages of approximately 3.5-19 mm/yr. In both the Oaks and Upper Arms, the post-1927 co-occurrence of abrupt shifts in magnetic signatures with color differences indicative of changing redox conditions is interpreted to reflect a more oxygenated diagenetic regime and rapid burial of sediment below the depth of sulfate diffusion. Post-1927 in the Oaks Arm, grain size exhibits a gradual coarsening-upward pattern that we attribute to the input of mechanically deposited waste rock related to open-pit mining activities at the mine. In contrast, grain size in the Upper Arm exhibits a gradational fining-upward after 1927 that we interpret as human-induced erosion of fine-grained soils and chemically weathered rocks of the Franciscan Assemblage by heavy earthmoving equipment associated with a road- and home-building boom, exacerbated by stream channel mining and wetlands destruction. The flux of fine-grained sediment into the Upper Arm increased the nutrient load to the lake, and that in turn catalyzed profuse

  14. Sedimentological processes and environmental variability at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania) between 637 ka and the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, Alexander; Wagner, Bernd; Just, Janna; Leicher, Niklas; Gromig, Raphael; Baumgarten, Henrike; Vogel, Hendrik; Lacey, Jack H.; Sadori, Laura; Wonik, Thomas; Leng, Melanie J.; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Sulpizio, Roberto; Giaccio, Biagio

    2016-02-01

    Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania) is thought to be more than 1.2 million years old and host more than 300 endemic species. As a target of the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), a successful deep drilling campaign was carried out within the scope of the Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project in 2013. Here, we present lithological, sedimentological, and (bio-)geochemical data from the upper 247.8 m composite depth of the overall 569 m long DEEP site sediment succession from the central part of the lake. According to an age model, which is based on 11 tephra layers (first-order tie points) and on tuning of bio-geochemical proxy data to orbital parameters (second-order tie points), the analyzed sediment sequence covers the last 637 kyr. The DEEP site sediment succession consists of hemipelagic sediments, which are interspersed by several tephra layers and infrequent, thin (< 5 cm) mass wasting deposits. The hemipelagic sediments can be classified into three different lithotypes. Lithotype 1 and 2 deposits comprise calcareous and slightly calcareous silty clay and are predominantly attributed to interglacial periods with high primary productivity in the lake during summer and reduced mixing during winter. The data suggest that high ion and nutrient concentrations in the lake water promoted calcite precipitation and diatom growth in the epilimnion during MIS15, 13, and 5. Following a strong primary productivity, highest interglacial temperatures can be reported for marine isotope stages (MIS) 11 and 5, whereas MIS15, 13, 9, and 7 were comparably cooler. Lithotype 3 deposits consist of clastic, silty clayey material and predominantly represent glacial periods with low primary productivity during summer and longer and intensified mixing during winter. The data imply that the most severe glacial conditions at Lake Ohrid persisted during MIS16, 12, 10, and 6, whereas somewhat warmer temperatures can be

  15. Sedimentological imprint on subseafloor microbial communities in Western Mediterranean Sea Quaternary sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, M.-C.; Rabineau, M.; Droz, L.; Révillon, S.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Dennielou, B.; Jorry, S.-J.; Kallmeyer, J.; Etoubleau, J.; Pignet, P.; Crassous, P.; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O.; Laugier, J.; Guégan, M.; Godfroy, A.; Alain, K.

    2012-09-01

    An interdisciplinary study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between geological and paleoenvironmental parameters and the bacterial and archaeal community structure of two contrasting subseafloor sites in the Western Mediterranean Sea (Ligurian Sea and Gulf of Lion). Both depositional environments in this area are well-documented from paleoclimatic and paleooceanographic point of views. Available data sets allowed us to calibrate the investigated cores with reference and dated cores previously collected in the same area, and notably correlated to Quaternary climate variations. DNA-based fingerprints showed that the archaeal diversity was composed by one group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (MCG), within the Gulf of Lion sediments and of nine different lineages (dominated by MCG, South African Gold Mine Euryarchaeotal Group (SAGMEG) and Halobacteria) within the Ligurian Sea sediments. Bacterial molecular diversity at both sites revealed mostly the presence of the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria within Proteobacteria phylum, and also members of Bacteroidetes phylum. The second most abundant lineages were Actinobacteria and Firmicutes at the Gulf of Lion site and Chloroflexi at the Ligurian Sea site. Various substrates and cultivation conditions allowed us to isolate 75 strains belonging to four lineages: Alpha-, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. In molecular surveys, the Betaproteobacteria group was consistently detected in the Ligurian Sea sediments, characterized by a heterolithic facies with numerous turbidites from a deep-sea levee. Analysis of relative betaproteobacterial abundances and turbidite frequency suggested that the microbial diversity was a result of main climatic changes occurring during the last 20 ka. Statistical direct multivariate canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) showed that the availability of electron acceptors and the quality of electron donors (indicated by age

  16. Sedimentology and cyclicity in the Lower Permian De Chelly Sandstone on the Defiance Plateau: eastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanesco, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Lower Permian (Leonardian) De Chelly Sandstone crops out along a north-south trend on the Defiance Plateau of eastern Arizona. It is divided into lower and upper members separated by a tongue of the Supai Formation that pinches out to the north. Stratigraphy, and lateral and vertical facies relations within the lower and upper members, are discussed. -from Author

  17. Late Cenozoic stratigraphy and structure of the western margin of the central San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lettis, William R.

    1982-01-01

    or from fans of the northeastern San Joaquin Valley. These deposits are locally well exposed in Interstate-5 roadcuts, primarily between Orestimba and Garzas Creeks. The geomorphic character of the alluvium laid down by streams draining the Diablo Range reflects late Cenozoic uplift of the foothills and subsidence of the valley. Within the foothills and near the foothill-valley margin, the deposits form a sequence of inset stream terraces and nested alluvial fans. Valleyward, however, each deposit forms a veneer over older alluvial-fan deposits. Based primarily on geomorphic and pedologic indicators of relative age (see Figure 19 and Table 10), and to a lesser extent on lithologic and absolute age criteria, the late Cenozoic deposits are divided into five stratigraphic units. In order of decreasing age, these include the formally recognized Tulare Formation (Watts, 1894; Anderson, 1905) of late Pliocene and Pleistocene age, and the informally named Los Banos alluvium of middle and late Pleistocene age, San Luis Ranch alluvium of late Pleistocene and early Holocene age, and Patterson alluvium and Dos Palos alluvium of Holocene age. The Los Banos and San Luis Ranch alluvium are further divided into three and two members, respectively. Each of these members ranges in thickness from less than I m up to 15 m and thus represents, at least in part, a distinct period of aggradation. The lithology age and distribution of these units is described in the 'Stratigraphie Divisions' section of this report and is summarized in Figure 25 and Table 11. Plates 1 through 23 show the local distribution of these units on 7.5-minute Quadrangles. Mapping criteria are diagrammatically illustrated in Figure 19 and described in the 'Mapping Criteria' section of this report. Indirect evidence suggests that deposition of these units resulted primarily from climatic change rather than intermittent uplift of the Diablo Range. The units are recognized throughout 1500 Km

  18. The "Continental Intercalaire" of southern Tunisia: Stratigraphy, paleontology, and paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, Federico; Contessi, Michela; Franchi, Fulvio

    2012-09-01

    The "Continental Intercalaire" deposits of southern Tunisia preserve one of the most diverse Early Cretaceous vertebrate fauna from Africa, consisting of elasmobranchs, actinopterygians, sarcopterygians, turtles, crocodyliforms, pterosaurs, and non-avian dinosaurs. Vertebrate remains representative of both marine and fluvial environments have been historically referred to a specific bonebed within the Chenini Member, which crops out extensively in the Tataouine region. A stratigraphic revision of the mainly siliciclastic deposits of the Douiret and the Aïn El Guettar formations in the area based on new sedimentological and paleontological data is presented. Data collected indicate the presence of multiple fossil-bearing strata encompassing the stratigraphic interval from the Berriasian to the Albian and document faunal variation through time as well as major environmental and climatic changes. Detailed sedimentological analysis combined with biostratigraphic correlation performed at a basin scale indicate lateral facies variability within each formation as a result of tectonically and climatically driven zonations within the Tataouine Basin in the Early Cretaceous. Furthermore, proposed stratigraphic correlations indicate that vertebrate remains previously referred to the fluvial Chenini Member (and in particular theropod and sauropod dinosaurs) are instead representative of a transgressive deposit which mark the base of the overlying Oum ed Diab Member.

  19. Hierarchy of sedimentary discontinuity surfaces and condensed beds from the middle Paleozoic of eastern North America: Implications for cratonic sequence stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, P.I.; Brett, Carlton E.; Wilson, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sedimentological analyses of middle Paleozoic epeiric sea successions in North America suggest a hierarchy of discontinuity surfaces and condensed beds of increasing complexity. Simple firmgrounds and hardgrounds, which are comparatively ephemeral features, form the base of the hierarchy. Composite hardgrounds, reworked concretions, authigenic mineral crusts and monomictic intraformational conglomerates indicate more complex histories. Polymictic intraformational conglomerates, ironstones and phosphorites form the most complex discontinuity surfaces and condensed beds. Complexity of discontinuities is closely linked to depositional environments duration of sediment starvation and degree of reworking which in turn show a relationship to stratigraphic cyclicity. A model of cratonic sequence stratigraphy is generated by combining data on the complexity and lateral distribution of discontinuities in the context of facies successions. Lowstand, early transgressive and late transgressive systems tracts are representative of sea-level rise. Early and late transgressive systems tracts are separated by the maximum starvation surface (typically a polymictic intraformational conglomerate or condensed phosphorite), deposited during the peak rate of sea-level rise. Conversely the maximum flooding surface, representing the highest stand of sea level, is marked by little to no break in sedimentation. The highstand and falling stage systems tracts are deposited during relative sea-level fall. They are separated by the forced-regression surface, a thin discontinuity surface or condensed bed developed during the most rapid rate of sea-level fall. The lowest stand of sea level is marked by the sequence boundary. In subaerially exposed areas it is occasionally modified as a rockground or composite hardground.

  20. Introduction to the special issue on aquifer-sedimentology: problems, perspectives and modern approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, Peter; Aigner, Tom

    1999-12-01

    Progress towards a better understanding of groundwater circulation and transport processes in aquifers demands a multidisciplinary approach to a host of unresolved problems. Although much progress has been made within recent years in interpreting the dynamic character of groundwater systems, many key issues remain to be addressed. In particular, several areas demand attention: the role of sedimentological information (heterogeneity) in groundwater and transport models, the scaling-up of observations from outcrop scale to larger scales and the integration of geological and geophysical information of different quality into the description of an aquifer structure. Still nowadays many of the heterogeneities cannot be recognized directly because of the limitation of measurement techniques. This is probably one of the reasons for the limited application of aquifer-sedimentology and geophysics in practical cases. In order to consolidate, expand, and make a larger number of people aware of the contribution of modern aquifer-sedimentology, including modelling and ultra-high resolution geophysical methods, several lines of intervention were identified: (1) a better collaboration of the different disciplines on site-specific applied problems; (2) development of new modelling techniques combining data of different quality; (3) development of optimizing tools (position and number of wells, additional geophysical methods, baysian techniques); (4) development of a `common language' among sedimentologists and hydrogeologists to overcome communication problems.

  1. Sedimentological evolution in an UASB treating SYNTHES, a new representative synthetic sewage, at low loading rates.

    PubMed

    Aiyuk, Sunny; Verstraete, Willy

    2004-07-01

    The changes in the sedimentological attributes of the sludge bed in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor fed with a low-strength wastewater mimicking raw domestic sewage were assessed in this study. The reactor was inoculated with 250 ml of granular sludge from a full-scale UASB reactor. The organic loading rate (OLR) varied from 1 to 2 g COD/ld. During the half-year long study, the reactor was operated at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 4.8 and 10 h, at 33 degrees C. Sludge sedimentology showed that the original granular sludge experienced serious instability and disintegration, leading to a much finer final grain assemblage, mainly due to substrate transfer limitation and cell starvation at the interior of larger granules. With time, the size uniformity tended to decrease, sphericity tended to increase, the skewness of the granule size distribution became negative, and the kurtosis became peaked and leptokurtic. In spite of the observed size reduction, reactor efficiency increased to a CODtotal removal of 96%. Biomass (sludge) yield was 0.012 g VS/g COD removed. The CH4 content of the biogas was high (up to 96%). This study thus highlights the treatment of a new type of wastewater with the deployment of the UASB reactor. It also reports the evolutionary trend of the biomass particle size distribution, making reference to a classic sedimentological appraisal.

  2. A martian case study of segmenting images automatically for granulometry and sedimentology, Part 2: Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunatillake, Suniti; McLennan, Scott M.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Husch, Jonathan M.; Hardgrove, Craig; Skok, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    In a companion work, we bridge the gap between mature segmentation software used in terrestrial sedimentology and emergent planetary segmentation with an original algorithm optimized to segment whole images from the Microscopic Imager (MI) of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER). In this work, we compare its semi-automated outcome with manual photoanalyses using unconsolidated sediment at Gusev and Meridiani Planum sites for geologic context. On average, our code and manual segmentation converge to within ∼10% in the number and total area of identified grains in a pseudo-random, single blind comparison of 50 samples. Unlike manual segmentation, it also locates finer grains in an image with internal consistency, enabling robust comparisons across geologic contexts. When implemented in Mathematica-8, the algorithm segments an entire MI image within minutes, surpassing the extent and speed possible with manual segmentation by about a factor of ten. These results indicate that our algorithm enables not only new sedimentological insight from the MER MI data, but also detailed sedimentology with the Mars Science Laboratory’s Mars Hand Lens Instrument.

  3. Constraining 3D Process Sedimentological Models to Geophysical Data Using Image Quilting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, P.; Da Pra, A.; Pontiggia, M.; Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    3D process geological models, whether for carbonate or sedimentological systems, have been proposed for modeling realistic subsurface heterogeneity. The problem with such forward process models is that they are not constrained to any subsurface data whether to wells or geophysical surveys. We propose a new method for realistic geological modeling of complex heterogeneity by hybridizing 3D process modeling of geological deposition with conditioning by means of a novel multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) technique termed image quilting (IQ). Image quilting is a pattern-based techniques that stiches together patterns extracted from training images to generate stochastic realizations that look like the training image. In this paper, we illustrate how 3D process model realizations can be used as training images in image quilting. To constrain the realization to seismic data we first interpret each facies in the geophysical data. These interpretation, while overly smooth and not reflecting finer scale variation are used as auxiliary variables in the generation of the image quilting realizations. To condition to well data, we first perform a kriging of the well data to generate a kriging map and kriging variance. The kriging map is used as additional auxiliary variable while the kriging variance is used as a weight given to the kriging derived auxiliary variable. We present an application to a giant offshore reservoir. Starting from seismic advanced attribute analysis and sedimentological interpretation, we build the 3D sedimentological process based model and use it as non-stationary training image for conditional image quilting.

  4. Quaternary stratigraphy and palaeogeography of Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Leszek; Dzierżek, Jan; Janiszewski, Robert; Kaczorowski, Jarosław; Lindner, Leszek; Majecka, Aleksandra; Makos, Michał; Szymanek, Marcin; Tołoczko-Pasek, Anna; Woronko, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Though the stratigraphical and palaeogeographical framework of the Quaternary in Poland is still to be completed, several crucial points have been confirmed recently. The preglacial series, accepted for years as belonging to the Lower Pleistocene, is undoubtedly of Early Pliocene age, with a huge hiatus above almost until the uppermost Lower Pleistocene. The earliest glaciation in Poland (Nidanian) occurred at about 900 ka BP when the ice sheet reached the mid-southern part of the country. The following Podlasian Interglacial embraced the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary in the middle, in a similar fashion to the corresponding Cromerian Complex in Western Europe. The late Early and early Middle Pleistocene interglacials in Poland comprised 2-3 optima each, whereas every one of the younger interglacials was characterised by a single optimum only. The Late Vistulian ice sheet was most extensive in the western part of Poland (Leszno Phase) whereas the younger Poznań Phase was more extensive in the central and eastern part of the country. This was due to the varied distance from the glaciation center in Scandinavia, making the ice sheet margin reach a terminal position in different times. Palaeoclimatological research in the Tatra Mountains has provided new evidence for the atmospheric circulation over Europe. During cold phases of the Pleistocene in Poland a continental climate extended further westwards, quite the opposite that occurring during warmer intervals.

  5. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Halley, Robert B.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Peterman, Zell E.

    1988-01-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios determined for samples from a 350 m core of Neogene lagoonal, shallow-water limestones from Enewetak Atoll display a remarkably informative trend. Like the recently published data for Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) carbonates, 87Sr/86Sr at Enewetak increases monotonically but not smoothly from the early Miocene to the Pleistocene. The data show intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr, punctuated by sharp transitions to lower values toward greater core depths. The sharp transitions correlate with observed solution disconformities caused by periods of subaerial erosion, whereas the intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr correspond to intervals of rapid accumulation of shallow-water carbonate sediments. When converted to numerical ages using the published DSDP 590B trend, the best-resolved time breaks are at 282 m (12.3 to 18.2 Ma missing) and 121.6 m (3.0 to 5.3 Ma missing) below the lagoon floor. At Enewetak, Sr isotopes offer a stratigraphic resolution for these shallow-marine Neogene carbonates comparable to that of nannofossil zonation in deep-sea carbonates (0.3-3 m.y.). In addition, the correlation of times of Sr-isotope breaks at Enewetak with times of rapid Sr-isotope change in the DSDP 590B samples confirms the importance off sea-level changes in the evolution of global-marine Sr isotopes and shows that the Sr-isotope response to sea-level falls is rapid.

  6. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Halley, R. B.; Simmons, K. R.; Peterman, Z. E.

    1988-02-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios determined for samples from a 350 m core of Neogene lagoonal, shallow-water limestones from Enewetak Atoll display a remarkably informative trend. Like the recently published data for Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) carbonates, 87Sr/86Sr at Enewetak increases monotonically but not smoothly from the early Miocene to the Pleistocene. The data show intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr, punctuated by sharp transitions to lower values toward greater core depths. The sharp transitions correlate with observed solution disconformities caused by periods of subaerial erosion, whereas the intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr correspond to intervals of rapid accumulation of shallow-water carbonate sediments. When converted to numerical ages using the published DSDP 590B trend, the best-resolved time breaks are at 282 m (12.3 to 18.2 Ma missing) and 121.6 m (3.0 to 5.3 Ma missing) below the lagoon floor. At Enewetak, Sr isotopes offer a stratigraphic resolution for these shallow-marine Neogene carbonates comparable to that of nannofossil zonation in deep-sea carbonates (0.3-3 m.y.). In addition, the correlation of times of Sr-isotope breaks at Enewetak with times of rapid Sr-isotope change in the DSDP 590B samples confirms the importance off sea-level changes in the evolution of global-marine Sr isotopes and shows that the Sr-isotope response to sea-level falls is rapid.

  7. Notes on the stratigraphy of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, George Ferdinand

    1885-01-01

     A complete examination of the Coast Ranges of California can hardly be undertaken by the Geological Survey for some years to come, consistently with the plans at present formed. The detailed study of certain small areas in these ranges, however, raised a number of questions as to the age and stratigraphical relations of the various series of beds, which it seemed necessary to answer as well as circumstances permitted. Having reached certain conclusions, for the most part on structural grounds, it became indispensable for me to obtain the co-operation of an expert paleontologist. At my solicitation, and with the approval of the director, Dr. C. A. White consented to visit the field with me. He passed several months of the summer of 1884 in studying my collections and the occurrence of fossils in place with reference to the points at issue. His results appear in Bulletin No. 15, that and this being complementary to one another. I had the great satisfaction of finding that Dr. White was led from a purely paleontological position to conclusions entirely accordant with those at which I had already arrived on structural grounds. His long experience as a general geologist also made his agreement with me as to the structural indications a welcome confirmation of my opinions. These studies, in conjunction with many observations made by earlier workers on the Pacific Coast, particularly those of the State Geological Survey of California, under Prof. J. D. Whitney, have led to some seemingly well established general conclusions of interest. The more purely geological results will be presented in the following pages, in the imperfect form in which alone it will be possible to give them until an immense amount of additional work shall have been done. 

  8. Geochemical Stratigraphy of Southern Parana' Lava Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoli, A.; De Min, A.; Marques, L. S.; Nardy, A.; Chiaradia, M.

    2015-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows of the Paranà Large Igneous Province exhibit significant regional and stratigraphic geochemical variations. While the most notable difference concerns the dominance of low-Ti (TiO2 < 2.0 wt.%) and high-Ti types in the southern and northern part of the province, respectively, detailed analyses of lava flow sequences sampled mostly in drill cores allowed definition of six main groups of chemically distinct flow units. The chemical and possible age differences among these units were then used to define the global time-related evolution of Paranà basaltic magmatism and involvement of distinct mantle-source components. Newly sampled outcropping lava flow sequences from the southern Paranà do however only partially support this picture. Our new major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data show that high- and low-Ti basaltic flows are interlayered. In particular, Pitanga type high-Ti basalts are interlayered with Gramado and Esmeralda low-Ti basalts (these latter being present both towards the base and the top of the sequence) in Paranà State, while in Santa Caterina State Gramado flows are interlayered with Urubici-type high-Ti basalts. The interlayering of distinct basaltic magma type requires near-synchronous eruption of chemically strongly different magma types generated from clearly heterogeneous mantle sources and erupted through separated magma plumbing systems, without apparent interaction (mixing) among the distinct basalts. In conclusion, the relative timing of low- and high-Ti magma types seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, as for example Esmeralda or Pitanga basalts, previously considered as quite late and postdating Gramado basalts, are indeed synchronous with them.

  9. Contributions to the stratigraphy of southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Whitman; Larsen, E.S.

    1915-01-01

    In the course of field work of the United States Geological Survey in the San Juan region of Colorado observations have been made in the last three seasons that considerably extend our knowledge of the great stratigraphic break below the La Plata sandstone, which is currently assumed to be of Jurassic age. The new data pertain partly to the relations existing in the Gunnison Valley, north of the San Juan Mountains, where the unconformity marking this break was already known at certain places, and partly to the conditions in the Piedra Valley, on the south side of the mountains, where the unconformity had not before been noted. The Piedra Valley is of special interest, and it seems well to call attention to the relations observed even though they were examined only in a reconnaissance. The first part of this paper is devoted to the evidence of the overlap of the La Plata sandstone; the second to the stratigraphic relations in the Piedra Valley. The section of sedimentary formations in Piedra Canyon is of much interest because none of the pre-La Plata formations are known east of this locality on the south side of the San Juan Mountains. Most of these formations exhibit a notably different facies where they reappear from beneath the overlying beds at their nearest exposures in New Mexico, southeast of the Piedra Valley. It is believed that the character of the formations in the Piedra section should be recorded for the benefit of geologists who may be studying the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks of New Mexico, and accordingly the second part of the paper presents details of the structure and the stratigraphic section of Piedra Valley.

  10. Sedimentologic and diagenetic controls on reservoir development at Rosevear gas field, Swan Hills Formation (upper Devonian), central Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, J.; Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1988-02-01

    Carbonate strata at the Rosevear gas field consist of three major sedimentological packages: (1) basal platform, (2) platform reef, and (3) capping platform. Gas production is localized within two narrow trends of porous, massive, replacive dolostone occurring in the platform-reef sequence; tight limestones updip form the reservoir seal. Porosity trends are primarily restricted to the margins of a marine channel developed through the platform reef, but not the basal platform. Channel-margin strata consist mostly of dolomitized branching-stromatoporoid floatstones and rudstones. Massive replacive dolostone is composed of inclusion-rich coarsely crystalline nonferroan euhedral to anhedral rhombs that show a red cathodoluminescence. This dolomite has selectively replaced the limemud matrix; fossils were replaced to a much lesser extent. Fossils not dolomitized were selectively leached, resulting in well-developed biomoldic and vuggy porosity that forms the reservoir. Dolomitization occurred after cementation by clear, equant calcite and after early pressure solution. Secondary porosity in the dolostone trends was only partially reduced during later diagenesis, which consisted of, in order of decreasing age, precipitation of saddle dolomite, anhydrite, and coarsely crystalline calcite. Hydrocarbon migration occurred after the saddle dolomites, but before some late-stage calcite cement.

  11. Elastic-Wavefield Seismic Stratigraphy: A New Seismic Imaging Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bob A. Hardage; Milo M. Backus; Michael V. DeAngelo; Sergey Fomel; Khaled Fouad; Robert J. Graebner; Paul E. Murray; Randy Remington; Diana Sava

    2006-07-31

    The purpose of our research has been to develop and demonstrate a seismic technology that will provide the oil and gas industry a better methodology for understanding reservoir and seal architectures and for improving interpretations of hydrocarbon systems. Our research goal was to expand the valuable science of seismic stratigraphy beyond the constraints of compressional (P-P) seismic data by using all modes (P-P, P-SV, SH-SH, SV-SV, SV-P) of a seismic elastic wavefield to define depositional sequences and facies. Our objective was to demonstrate that one or more modes of an elastic wavefield may image stratal surfaces across some stratigraphic intervals that are not seen by companion wave modes and thus provide different, but equally valid, information regarding depositional sequences and sedimentary facies within that interval. We use the term elastic wavefield stratigraphy to describe the methodology we use to integrate seismic sequences and seismic facies from all modes of an elastic wavefield into a seismic interpretation. We interpreted both onshore and marine multicomponent seismic surveys to select the data examples that we use to document the principles of elastic wavefield stratigraphy. We have also used examples from published papers that illustrate some concepts better than did the multicomponent seismic data that were available for our analysis. In each interpretation study, we used rock physics modeling to explain how and why certain geological conditions caused differences in P and S reflectivities that resulted in P-wave seismic sequences and facies being different from depth-equivalent S-wave sequences and facies across the targets we studied.

  12. Sequence stratigraphy: Fact, fantasy, or work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Leckie, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    Sequence stratigraphy has been hailed as a magic elixir to cure exploration problems in mature and frontier basins. Yet, like most cure-alls, analyses of modern depositional systems show that critical assumptions regarding sequence stratigraphy merit further review. An example from the modern Canterbury Plains, New Zealand, demonstrates some of the potential pit- falls of sequence stratigraphy and its application to hydrocarbon exploration. The Canterbury Plains, New Zealand, bounded by the Southern Alps and Pacific Ocean, are 60 km wide and 185 km long, and traversed by four large gravel rivers. The Canterbury basin is up to 750 m deep, filled primarily with gravel. The coastline is wave dominated and microtidal, with high rates of north-directed longshore drift. The southern coast is transgressive with 22 in wave-cut cliffs in Pleistocene gravel. Beaches are gravel and sand. Coastal erosion at approximately 1 m/yr steepens the fluvial gradient, causing the rivers to incise 1.5-4.2 mm/yr during the present highstand. River headwaters in the Southern Alps are uplifting, tectonically causing incision, which decreases seaward. Thus, fluvial incision takes place in the west due to mountain uplift and in the east due to the transgressing shoreline. A zone of null valley incision occurs 8-15 km from the coast. Existing sequence stratigraphic models suggest that downcutting should occur during falling sea level, not during transgression. The southern coastline is separated from the northern coast-line by Banks Peninsula, a resistant volcanic complex that acts as a large groyne to southerly waves. The northern coastline progrades approximately I m/yr and is largely sandy. Thus, the coastline within the same basin during the present sea level highstand is at one locale progradational and elsewhere transgressive. Gravel reaches the transgressive coast, where a steep gradient is maintained by downcutting.

  13. Geochronology and subsurface stratigraphy of Pukapuka and Rakahanga atolls, Cook Islands: Late Quaternary reef growth and sea level history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, S.C.; Hein, J.R.; Hausmann, R.; Radtke, U.

    1992-01-01

    Eustatic sea-level cycles superposed on thermal subsidence of an atoll produce layers of high sea-level reefs separated by erosional unconformities. Coral samples from these reefs from cores drilled to 50 m beneath the lagoons of Pukapuka and Rakahanga atolls, northern Cook Islands give electron spin resonance (ESR) and U-series ages ranging from the Holocene to 600,000 yr B.P. Subgroups of these ages and the stratigraphic position of their bounding unconformities define at least 5 periods of reef growth and high sea-level (0-9000 yr B.P., 125,000-180,000 yr B.P., 180,000-230,000 yr B.P., 300,000-460,000 yr B.P., 460,000-650,000 yr B.P.). Only two ages fall within error of the last interglacial high sea-level stand (???125,000-135,000 yr B.P.). This paucity of ages may result from extensive erosion of the last intergracial reef. In addition, post-depositional isotope exchange may have altered the time ages of three coral samples to apparent ages that fall within glacial stage 6. For the record to be preserved, vertical accretion during rising sea-level must compensate for surface lowering from erosion during sea-level lowstands and subsidence of the atoll; erosion rates (6-63 cm/1000 yr) can therefore be calculated from reef accretion rates (100-400 cm/1000 yr), subsidence rates (2-6 cm/1000 yr), and the duration of island submergence (8-15% of the last 600,000 yr). The stratigraphy of coral ages indicates island subsidence rates of 4.5 ?? 2.8 cm/1000 yr for both islands. A model of reef growth and erosion based on the stratigraphy of the Cook Islands atolls suggests average subsidence and erosion rates of between 3-6 and 15-20 cm/1000 yr, respectively. ?? 1992.

  14. Stratigraphy and Observations of Nepthys Mons Quadrangle (V54), Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.

    2001-01-01

    Initial mapping has begun in Venus' Nepthys Mons Quadrangle (V54, 300-330 deg. E, 25-50 deg. S). Major research areas addressed are how the styles of volcanism and tectonism have changed with time, the evolution of shield volcanoes, the evolution of coronae, the characteristics of plains volcanism, and what these observations tell us about the general geologic history of Venus. Reported here is a preliminary general stratigraphy and several intriguing findings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Hierarchal Genetic Stratigraphy: A Framework for Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, R. M.; West, R. R.

    1987-04-01

    A detailed, genetic stratigraphic framework for paleoceanographic studies can be derived by describing, correlating, interpreting, and predicting stratigraphic sequences relative to a hierarchy of their constituent time-stratigraphic transgressive-regressive units ("T-R units"). T-R unit hierarchies are defined and correlated using lithostratigraphic and paleoecologic data, but correlations can be enhanced or "checked" (tested to confirm or deny) with objective biostratigraphic, magnetostratigraphic, or chemostratigraphic data. Such chronostratigraphies can then be bracketed by radiometric ages, so that average periodicities for T-R units can be calculated and a hierarchal geochronology derived. T-R units are inferred to be the net depositional result of eustatic cycles of sea level change and can be differentiated from autocyclic deepening-shallowing units because the latter are noncorrelative intrabasinally. Boundaries between T-R units are conformable or unconformable "genetic surfaces" of two types: transgressive surfaces and "climate change surfaces". The latter are useful for correlating minor transgressive phases through nonmarine intervals, thereby deriving information linking paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic processes. Permo-Carboniferous sequences can be analyzed relative to a hierarchy of six scales of genetic T-R units having periodicities of 225-300 m.y. (first order), 20-90 m.y. (second order), 7-13 m.y. (third-order), 0.6-3.6 m.y. (fourth order), 300-500 × 10³ years (fifth order), and 50-130 × 10³ years or less (sixth-order). Paleogeographic maps for the time of maximum transgression ("transgressive apex") of successive fifth-order T-R units (5-25 m thick) in the Glenshaw Formation (Upper Pennsylvanian, Northern Appalachian Basin) delineate delta lobes, embayments, islands, and linear seaways. Relative extent of marine inundation on the fifth-order maps was used to delineate fourth-order T-R units, and the fourth-order T-R units constitute the

  16. Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Sahara, Northern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cenozoic stratigraphic record in the Sahara, and shows that the strata display some remarkably similar characteristics across much of the region. In fact, some lithologies of certain ages are exceptionally widespread and persistent, and many of the changes from one lithology to another appear to have been relatively synchronous across the Sahara. The general stratigraphic succession is that of a transition from early Cenozoic carbonate strata to late Cenozoic siliciclastic strata. This transition in lithology coincides with a long-term eustatic fall in sea level since the middle Cretaceous and with a global climate transition from a Late Cretaceous–Early Eocene “warm mode” to a Late Eocene–Quaternary “cool mode”. Much of the shorter-term stratigraphic variability in the Sahara (and even the regional unconformities) also can be correlated with specific changes in sea level, climate, and tectonic activity during the Cenozoic. Specifically, Paleocene and Eocene carbonate strata and phosphate are suggestive of a warm and humid climate, whereas latest Eocene evaporitic strata (and an end-Eocene regional unconformity) are correlated with a eustatic fall in sea level, the build-up of ice in Antarctica, and the appearance of relatively arid climates in the Sahara. The absence of Oligocene strata throughout much of the Sahara is attributed to the effects of generally low eustatic sea level during the Oligocene and tectonic uplift in certain areas during the Late Eocene and Oligocene. Miocene sandstone and conglomerate are attributed to the effects of continued tectonic uplift around the Sahara, generally low eustatic sea level, and enough rainfall to support the development of extensive fluvial systems. Middle–Upper Miocene carbonate strata accumulated in northern Libya in response to a eustatic rise in sea level, whereas Upper Miocene mudstone accumulated along the south side of the Atlas Mountains because uplift of the

  17. Plio-Pleistocene cliff-bound, wedge-shaped, warm-temperate carbonate deposits from Rhodes (Greece): Sedimentology and facies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titschack, Jürgen; Bromley, Richard G.; Freiwald, André

    2005-10-01

    The Pliocene to Pleistocene temperate carbonates of Rhodes were deposited in a tectonically active region, strongly influenced by a complicated and rapidly changing topography, provided by the highly tectonised late Cretaceous Lindos Limestone as basement rock. Deposition on this basement took place in accommodation loci restricted to micrograbens and their downslope extension, to the foot of steep submarine cliffs, to basement neptunian dykes and depressions in the basement rock. Consequently the sediments comprise a high degree of facies variability, and are typically thin and laterally discontinuous. The integration of several outcrops is necessary for the reconstruction of the stratigraphy and the relative sea-level changes. The sediments were deposited during a large-scale, tectonically driven transgressive-regressive cycle in water depths changing from zero to several hundreds of metres. At the studied Lindos-Pefkos Road cutting the Kolymbia Limestone, bound to the foot of Lindos Limestone cliffs, marks the onset of the marine deposition in the late Pliocene. Its fabric is a rudstone consisting of unsorted angular Lindos Limestone clasts (up to boulder-size) with a matrix dominated by molluscs and coralline algae. The overlying Plio-Pleistocene St. Paul's Bay Limestone consists of deep-water float- and rudstones containing the 'white coral community' dominated by the coral Lophelia pertusa. Its matrix shows a complex fabric of up to five sediment zones separated by differing states of lithification. In this maximum flooding phase, mineralised hardgrounds indicate depositional hiati. The subsequent shallowing phase is represented by the Cape Arkhangelos Calcarenite, a series of distinctive facies of very patchy distribution. They are characterised by the Bryozoan-Brachiopod Facies, overlain by a facies heavily dominated by the bivalve Mytilaster sp. ( Mytilaster Facies). Conspicuous for the Mytilaster Facies is the inverse, concave-up, stacking pattern of

  18. A carbon isotopic and sedimentological record of the latest Devonian (Famennian) from the Western U.S. and Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myrow, P.M.; Strauss, J.V.; Creveling, J.R.; Sicard, K.R.; Ripperdan, R.; Sandberg, C.A.; Hartenfels, S.

    2011-01-01

    New carbon isotopic data from upper Famennian deposits in the western United States reveal two previously unrecognized major positive isotopic excursions. The first is an abrupt ~. 3??? positive excursion, herein referred to as ALFIE (A Late Famennian Isotopic Excursion), recorded in two sections of the Pinyon Peak Limestone of north-central Utah. Integration of detailed chemostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data suggests that ALFIE is the Laurentian record of the Dasberg Event, which has been linked to transgression in Europe and Morocco. Sedimentological data from the Chaffee Group of western Colorado also record transgression at a similar biostratigraphic position, with a shift from restricted to open-marine lithofacies. ALFIE is not evident in chemostratigraphic data from age-equivalent strata in Germany studied herein and in southern Europe, either because it is a uniquely North American phenomenon, or because the German sections are too condensed relative to those in Laurentia. A second positive carbon isotopic excursion from the upper Chaffee Group of Colorado is recorded in transgressive strata deposited directly above a previously unrecognized paleokarst interval. The age of this excursion, and the duration of the associated paleokarst hiatus, are not well constrained, although the events occurred sometime after the Late Famennian Middle expansa Zone. The high positive values recorded in this excursion are consistent with those associated with the youngest Famennian Middle to Late praesulcata Hangenberg Isotopic Excursion in Europe, the isotopic expression of the Hangenberg Event, which included mass extinction, widespread black shale deposition, and a glacio-eustatic fall and rise. If correct, this would considerably revise the age of the Upper Chaffee Group strata of western Colorado. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Late Pleistocene Holocene stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of La Malinche volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Govea, Renato; Siebe, Claus

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies of La Malinche identified and radiocarbon dated several volcanic layers, the youngest of which yielded an age of ca. 7.5 ka. An additional ash fallout layer that crops out at high altitudes was considered the most recent deposit, with an estimated age of 6 ka. In the present work 38 new radiocarbon ages are presented. From these, several date the young ash fallout layer and lie around 3.1 ka. With the aid of these dates a new and comprehensive stratigraphy documenting the Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive history of La Malinche is presented. The stratigraphy indicates two main stages of volcanic activity: Pre-Malinche and Malinche. The first undoubtedly comprises the major part of the eruptive history, but its deposits are largely covered by the products of the latter stage, on which this study is focused. The Malinche stage was subdivided into three eruptive periods. Period 1 started with the emplacement of the Huamantla Pumice more than 45 ka ago. This deposit consists of a thick pumice fallout overlain by pyroclastic flow deposits. Subsequently, several episodes of construction and collapse of summit domes occurred. The oldest dome was dated at ca. 45 ka. Period 2 started 21.5 ka ago with the Malinche Pumice I, a widespread pumice fallout covering the entire slopes of the volcano. Pyroclastic flows and lahars related to this eruption were channeled along deep barrancas and reached considerable distances. Deposits produced by partial sector collapse and dated at ca. 20.9 ka, and a pumice-and-ash flow deposit dated at 15.9 ka were also generated during this period. The last period started with the eruption of the Malinche Pumice II, a distinctive fallout deposit overlain by ash flow deposits on the NE slope of the volcano. The age of this pumice layer is estimated between 12 and 9 ka. Formation of block-and-ash flows, lahars and pumice-and-ash flows followed during this period, and peaked in a most intensive episode that was dated at 7.5 ka

  20. A consistent magnetic polarity stratigraphy of Plio-Pleistocene fluvial sediments from the Heidelberg Basin (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, Stephanie; Hambach, Ulrich; Rolf, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Deep drillings in the Heidelberg Basins provide access to one of the thickest and most complete successions of Quaternary and Upper Pliocene continental sediments in Central-Europe [1]. In absence of any comprehensive chronostratigraphic model, these sediments are so far classified by lithological and hydrogeological criteria. Therefore the age of this sequence is still controversially discussed ([1], [2]). In spite of the fact that fluvial sediments are a fundamental challenge for the application of magnetic polarity stratigraphy we performed a thorough study on four drilling cores (from Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen and nearby Viernheim). Here, we present the results from the analyses of these cores, which yield to a consistent chronostratigraphic framework. The components of natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) were separated by alternating field and thermal demagnetisation techniques and the characteristic remanent magnetisations (ChRM) were isolated by principle component analysis [3]. Due to the coring technique solely inclination data of the ChRM is used for the determination of the magnetic polarity stratigraphy. Rock magnetic proxies were applied to identify the carriers of the remanent magnetisation. The investigations prove the NRM as a stable, largely primary magnetisation acquired shortly after deposition (PDRM). The Matuyama-Gauss boundary is clearly defined by a polarity change in each core, as suggested in previous work [4]. These findings are in good agreement with the biostratigraphic definition of the base of the Quaternary ([5], [6], [7]). The Brunhes-Matuyama boundary could be identified in core Heidelberg UniNord 1 and 2 only. Consequently, the position of the Jaramillo and Olduvai subchron can be inferred from the lithostratigraphy and the development of fluvial facies architecture in the Rhine system. The continuation of the magnetic polarity stratigraphy into the Gilbert chron (Upper Pliocene) allows alternative correlation schemes for the cores

  1. Episodic continental arc volcanism, tectonism and erosion recorded in stratigraphy and detrital zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W.; Paterson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Stratigraphic studies and detrital zircon geochronology of metamorphic host rock pendants of the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada arc in California show temporal correlations with episodic arc volcanism and tectonism, and have implications for our understanding of sources and sinks of recycled volcanic and sedimentary materials, as well as the paleo-geography and erosion history of an ancient continental arc. The Middle Triassic to Early Cretaceous stratigraphy of the metamorphic pendants shows alternating volcanic and sedimentary beds. The latter varies from rocks formed in high-energy terrestrial to low-energy shallow marine environments. Sedimentary textures also vary from poorly sorted volcanic-clast/breccia-rich to well-sorted fine-grained rocks and carbonates. We interpret these variations in stratigraphic records to reflect the waning and waxing of arc volcanism and tectonism, which controls erosion of source rocks, as well as elevation changes through isostastic balance. These in turn control the paleo-geography and depositional environments. Detrital zircon geochronology confirms our hypothesis. Detrital zircon ages of sedimentary rocks closely track the ages of volcanic/plutonic rocks formed immediately earlier and also include age signals of older igneous rocks and pre-arc basement, suggesting the erosion of igneous rocks of higher elevation during the magmatic flare-ups and deposition of these clasts afterwards. We conclude that episodic arc volcanism and tectonism play important roles on processes of surface erosion and sedimentation.

  2. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and luminescence geochronology of the northeastern Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, S.A.; Miller, D.M.; Menges, C.M.; Yount, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The chronology of the Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits of the northeastern Mojave Desert have been largely obtained using radiocarbon ages. Our study refines and extends this framework using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date deposits from Valjean Valley, Silurian Lake Playa, Red Pass, and California Valley. Of particular interest are eolian fine silts incorporated in ground-water discharge (GWD) deposits bracketed at 185-140 and 20-50 ka. Alluvial fan deposits proved amenable for OSL by dating both eolian sand lenses and reworked eolian sand in a matrix of gravel that occurs within the fan stratigraphy. Lacustrine sand in spits and bars also yielded acceptable OSL ages. These OSL ages fill gaps in the geochronology of desert deposits, which can provide data relevant to understanding the responses of several depositional systems to regional changes in climate. This study identifies the most promising deposits for future luminescence dating and suggests that for several regions of the Mojave Desert, sediments from previously undated landforms can be more accurately placed within correct geologic map units.

  3. Fluctuating Mesozoic and Cenozoic sea levels and implications for stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Haq, B.U. )

    1988-12-01

    Sequence stratigraphy encompasses depositional models of genetically related packages of sediments deposited during various phases of cycle of sea level change, i.e., from a lowstand to highstand to the subsequent lowstand. The application of these models to marine outcrops around the world and to subsurface data led to the construction of Mesozoic-Cenozoic sea level curves with greater event resolution than the earlier curves based on seismic data alone. Construction of these better resolution curves begins with an outline of the principles of sequence-stratigraphic analysis and the reconstruction of the history of sea level change from outcrop and subsurface data for the past 250 Ma. Examples of marine sections from North America, Europe, and Asia can be used to illustrate sequence analysis of outcrop data and the integration of chronostratigraphy with sea level history. Also important are the implications of sequence-stratigraphic methodology and the new cycle charts to various disciplines of stratigraphy, environmental reconstruction, and basin analysis. The relationship of unconformities along the continental margins to hiatuses and dissolution surfaces in the deep basins must also be explored, as well as the relevance of sequence-stratigraphic methodology to biofacies and source rock prediction.

  4. Preliminary Model Results of Beach Profile Dynamics with Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reniers, A. J.; Koktas, M.; Gallagher, E. L.; Wadman, H. M.; Brodie, K. L.; Johnson, B. D.; McNinch, J.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of spatial variation in grain size within the surf and swash zone is often ignored in numerical modeling whereas Upon closer inspection, a broad range of grain sizes is visible on a beach. This could potentially lead to a significant mismatch between predictions and observations of profile evolution given the strong sensitivity of sediment transport formulae to the grain size. To explore this in more detail, numerical simulations with XBeach have been performed to simulate the observations of changes in beach profile and stratigraphy within the swash zone at Duck, NC, under a range of wave and tidal conditions (see presentations by Wadman et al., and Gallagher et al. for complementary information on the observations at this conference). The research focus is to establish the morphodynamic response to the sediment dynamics at short and longer time scales in the presence of stratigraphy. A better understanding of the mechanisms and subsequently improved modeling will provide more accurate predictions of the morphodynamic response of the beach during moderate and extreme conditions. It will also help in the interpretation of sediment layering of the beach to relate to past extreme storms on geological time scales.

  5. Sequence stratigraphy on an early Cretaceous passive margin, Exmouth Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.; Gorur, N.; Ito, M.; O'Brien, D.; Wilkens, R.; Tang, C.

    1989-03-01

    Permian-Jurassic rifting of northwestern Australia resulted in the development of a passive continental margin flanking the northeastern Indian Ocean. On this margin the relatively thin synrift to postrift sedimentary sequence of southern Exmouth Plateau was drilled during ODP Leg 122. A sequence-stratigraphy analysis of the complete Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary succession at Sites 762 and 763 was derived from a synthesis of seismic stratigraphy, wireline logs, lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and magnetostratigraphy. Results indicate that during breakup, the southern Exmouth Plateau was a transform margin with an extensional component. Between the Tithonian and Valanginian, a thick clastic wedge prograded from the transform margin south of Site 763 northwestward toward Site 762 and onto subsiding continental crust. Southern clastic supply decreased into the Aptian-Cenomanian, and cyclic deposition of deep-water mudstones continued during subsidence of the earlier shelf margin wedge. Between the Albian and Cenomanian, deposition gradually became dominated by pelagic carbonates. Two regional unconformities mark the Cenomanian/Turonian and Cretaceous/Tertiary boundaries. Each was an erosional event, succeeded by renewed pelagic carbonate deposition that began in the distal northern basin and onlapped progressively toward the topographic high, which persisted into the Tertiary along the southern margin. The entire Jurassic to Holocene record at the southern Exmouth Plateau ODP sites is less than 1500 m thick and represents a classic rift to mature ocean passive-margin succession.

  6. Sequence stratigraphy analysis of Carapita E Lower Miocene; North of Monagas, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, B.; Salazar, A.; Sambrano, J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Carapita E sandstone is of lower Miocene age, and occurs in the maturin sub-basin within the active thrust belt of the eastern Venezuela tertiary foreland basin. This basin is a prolific hydrocarbon basin and the Carapita sandstones form an important reservoir system. This study is based on an integration of well logs and cores from 56 wells covering an area of more than 39.000 km[sup 2] the sediments were interpreted in terms of depositional environments and sequence stratigraphic patterns. The sandstone unit overlies a type I sequence boundary (25,5 m.y.) and in the central and western part of the study area it is interpreted as a lowstand systems tract, deposited within an incised valley on the shelf. Further east, the sediments were deposited in a coastal to shelf setting and the unconformable sequence boundary is interpreted to pass into a correlative conformity. These more distal shoreline sands from a shelf-perched lowstand prograding wedge which is coeval with the incised valley fill further landward they comprise coastal and nearshore deposits in the form of prograding coastal/deltaic bars and shoreline sands. This detailed sedimentological and sequence stratigraphic study has resulted in improved productivity and optimization of hydrocarbon recovery from the Carapita E sands.

  7. A new high-resolution Holocene tephra stratigraphy in eastern Iceland: Improving the Icelandic and North Atlantic tephrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsdóttir, Esther Ruth; Larsen, Gudrún; Björck, Svante; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Striberger, Johan

    2016-10-01

    A new and improved Holocene tephra stratigraphy and tephrochronological framework for eastern and northern Iceland is presented. Investigations of a sediment sequence from Lake Lögurinn have revealed a comprehensive tephra record spanning the last 10.200 years. A total of 157 tephra layers have been identified, whereof 149 tephra layers have been correlated to its source volcanic system using geochemistry, stratigraphy and age. Fifteen layers have chemical composition of two affinities that possibly represent two very closely spaced eruptions. Thus, these 157 tephra layers are believed to represent 172 explosive eruptions. Nineteen tephra marker layers have been identified in the Lake Lögurinn record (G1922, A1875, V1477, V1410, H1636, K1625, Ö1362, G1354, K1262, V874, Hrafnkatla, Sn-1, Grákolla, HY, H3, H4, HÖ, LL1755 and Reitsvík-8 tephra markers). New potential tephra markers are the silicic Askja L (∼9400 cal BP), the low titanium basalt layers, LL 1774 (∼10.150 cal BP) and LL 1755 (∼9990 cal BP), assigned to Veidivötn-Bárdarbunga and the tephra layers, LL 1527.8 (∼7850 cal BP), LL 911.2 (∼2370 cal BP), LL 908.4 (∼2350 cal BP), LL 781.9 (∼1930 cal BP), LL 644.4 (∼1480 cal BP), not yet correlated to a source volcanic system. A silicic tephra marker layer, Reitsvík 8, correlated to the Fosen tephra in Norway has been identified in Lake Lögurinn. The Lake Lögurinn tephra record has been connected and integrated with the Icelandic terrestrial tephrochronology and stratigraphy through 102 tephra layers, the marine tephra stratigraphy through 39 layers and overseas through 9 tephra layers. This record is the first high-resolution tephra stratigraphical and chronological framework for the Holocene in eastern Iceland as well as the most detailed and continuous record, and has considerable potential to serve as a key section or a stratotype for the Holocene in eastern Iceland and the North Atlantic.

  8. Sedimentological analyses of martian gullies: The subsurface as the key to the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Ventra, Dario; Hauber, Ernst; Conway, Susan J.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2015-09-01

    Gullies are among the youngest landforms formed by liquid water on Mars, and therefore of critical importance in resolving the planets most recent hydrologic and climatic history. Water-free sediment flows, debris flows and fluvial flows have all been identified in gullies. These processes require very different amounts of liquid water, and therefore their relative contribution to gully-formation is of key importance for climatic inferences. We show that many gullies dominantly formed by debris flows, based on sedimentological analysis of outcrops in gully-fans in 51 HiRISE images widely distributed over the southern midlatitudes. The great majority (96%) of outcrop exposures in gully-fans fed by catchments which mainly comprise bedrock and thus host boulders, contain sedimentological evidence for debris-flow formation. These exposures contain many randomly distributed large boulders (>1 m) suspended in a finer matrix and in some cases lens-shaped and truncated layering. Such diagnostic features are rare in gully-fan exposures mainly fed by catchments comprising abundant latitude dependent mantle deposits (LDM; a smooth, often meters-thick deposit consisting mainly of ice and dust), wherein boulders are largely absent. These LDM-fed gullies may have formed by fine-grained debris flows, but this cannot be determined from outcrop sedimentology alone because of the lack of boulders in these systems. The fan surface morphology, in contrast to the subsurface, is dominated by secondary, post-depositional, processes, mainly weathering, wind erosion, and ice-dust mantling. These processes have removed or severely reworked the original, primary, debris-flow morphology over time. This explains the controversy between previously published morphometric analyses implying debris-flow formation and observations of gully-fan surfaces, which are often interpreted as the product of fluvial flows because of the absence of surficial debris-flow morphology. The inferred debris

  9. Late Pleistocene Stratigraphy and Palaeobotany of the Isles of Scilly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scourse, J. D.

    1991-12-01

    A re-evaluation of the Pleistocene stratigraphy of the Isles of Scilly has enabled the formal definition of eight lithostratigraphic units of member status grouped into two formations. A chronology of events has been provided by radiocarbon (14C) determinations, optical and thermoluminescene (TL) dates. Intersite correlations have been strengthened by palynology, which has aided palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. The defined units have been incorporated into two lithostratigraphic models, one for the `northern' (glacial) Scillies and one for the `southern' (extra-glacial) Scillies. Raised beach sediments of the Watermill Sands and Gravel in the southern Scillies are overlain by the Porthloo Breccia, a unit of soliflucted material derived exclusively from the weathering of local granite. Organic sequences at Carn Morval, Watermill Cove, Porth Askin, Porth Seal and Bread and Cheese Cove occur within the Porthloo Breccia, and are interpreted as the infillings of ponds associated with active solifluction. Radiocarbon determinations from these organic sediments are critical because they pre-date units associated with a glacial event. The 14C determinations indicate deposition of the organic material between 34500-800+885 (Q-2410) and 21500-800+890 (Q-2358) years BP and provide a maximum age for the glacial event and the first radiometric dates for the coastal `head' sediments of southwest England. The pollen assemblages from these organic sites all record open grassland vegetation, and represent the earliest vegetational record for the Scillies. High Pinus values are interpreted as evidence of climatic deterioration. In the southern Scillies, the Porthloo Breccia is overlain by the Old Man Sandloess, a coarse aeolian silt with subdominant fine sand, TL-dated to 18600-3700+3700 years (QTL-ld and lf; Wintle 1981) and optically dated to 20000-7000+7000 and 26000-9000+10000 years (two samples; 738al and 741al; Smith et al. 1990). This material occurs in a variety of facies

  10. North polar region of Mars: Advances in stratigraphy, structure, and erosional modification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Skinner, J.A.; Bourke, M.C.; Fortezzo, C.M.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kolb, E.J.; Okubo, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    of deposition of evenly-bedded, light- and dark-toned layered materials and subsequent erosion of these materials persisted throughout the Late Amazonian. Sand saltation, including dune migration, is likely to account for much of the erosion of Planum Boreum, particularly at its margin, alluding to the lengthy sedimentological history of the circum-polar dune fields. Such erosion has been controlled largely by topographic effects on wind patterns and the variable resistance to erosion of materials (fresh and altered) and physiographic features. Some present-day dune fields may be hundreds of kilometers removed from possible sources along the margins of Planum Boreum, and dark materials, comprised of sand sheets, extend even farther downwind. These deposits also attest to the lengthy period of erosion following emplacement of the Planum Boreum 1 unit. We find no evidence for extensive glacial flow, topographic relaxation, or basal melting of Planum Boreum materials. However, minor development of normal faults and wrinkle ridges may suggest differential compaction of materials across buried scarps. Timing relations are poorly-defined mostly because resurfacing and other uncertainties prohibit precise determinations of surface impact crater densities. The majority of the stratigraphic record may predate the recent (<20 Ma) part of the orbitally-driven climate record that can be reliably calculated. Given the strong stratigraphic but loose temporal constraints of the north polar geologic record, a comparison of north and south polar stratigraphy permits a speculative scenario in which major Amazonian depositional and erosional episodes driven by global climate activity is plausible. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Deltaic Morphology and Sedimentology, with Special Reference to the Indus River Delta.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Shatt-al-Arab, and Chao submarine canyon restricts subaqueous delta Phraya (Fig. 10). The role of tides in the Indus development by funneling sediment...D -R I B S 1 9 8 D E L T I C M O R P H O L O G Y A N D S E D I E N T O L O G Y N I T H S P E C I LREFERENCE TO THE INDUS RIVER DELTA(U) LOUISIANA...424 DELTAIC MORPHOLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE INDUS RIVER DELTA J. T. Wells and J. M. Coleman 1985 Marine Geology

  12. Intrusive origin of the Sudbury Igneous Complex: Structural and sedimentological evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, E. J.; Schwerdtner, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, many geoscientists have come to believe that the Sudbury event was exogenic rather than endogenic. Critical to a recent exogenic hypothesis is the impact melt origin of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC). Such origin implies that the SIC was emplaced before deposition of the Whitewater Group, in contrast to origins in which the SIC postdates the lithification of the Onaping Formation. Structural and sedimentological evidence is summarized herein that supports an intrusion of the SIC after lithification of all Whitewater Group strata, and conflicts with the hypothesis advanced by other researchers.

  13. Sedimentologic and stratigraphic constraints on emplacement of the Star Kimberlite, east-central Saskatchewan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonneveld, John-Paul; Kjarsgaard, Bruce A.; Harvey, Shawn E.; Heaman, Larry M.; McNeil, David H.; Marcia, Kirsten Y.

    2004-09-01

    Diamond-bearing kimberlites in the Fort à la Corne region, east-central Saskatchewan, consist primarily of extra-crater pyroclastic deposits which are interstratified with Lower Cretaceous (Albian and Cenomanian) marine, marginal marine and continental sediments. Approximately 70 individual kimberlite occurrences have been documented. The Star Kimberlite, occurring at the southeastern end of the main Fort à la Corne trend, has been identified as being of economic interest, and is characterized by an excellent drill core database. Integration of multi-disciplinary data-sets has helped to refine and resolve models for emplacement of the Star Kimberlite. Detailed core logging has provided the foundation for sedimentological and volcanological studies and for construction of a regionally consistent stratigraphic and architectural framework for the kimberlite complex. Micropaleontologic and biostratigraphic analysis of selected sedimentary rocks, and U-Pb perovskite geochronology on kimberlite samples have been integrated to define periods of kimberlite emplacement. Radiometric age determination and micropaleontologic evidence support the hypothesis that multiple kimberlite eruptive phases occurred at Star. The oldest kimberlite in the Star body erupted during deposition of the predominantly continental strata of the lower Mannville Group (Cantuar Formation). Kimberlites within the Cantuar Formation include terrestrial airfall deposits as well as fluvially transported kimberlitic sandstone and conglomerate. Successive eruptive events occurred contemporaneous with deposition of the marginal marine upper Mannville Group (Pense Formation). Kimberlites within the Pense Formation consist primarily of terrestrial airfall deposits. Fine- to medium-grained cross-stratified kimberlitic (olivine-dominated) sandstone in this interval reflects reworking of airfall deposits during a regional marine transgression. The location of the source feeder vents of the Cantuar and Pense

  14. Palynology of some Cretaceous mudstones from southeast Aswan, Egypt: significance to regional stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdy S.; Essa, Mahmoud A.

    2007-01-01

    The basal mudstones from the El-Nom borehole in the Gebel Abraq area in southern Egypt have yielded a diverse and relatively well preserved terrestrial palynoflora that includes Balmeisporites holodictyus, Crybelosporites pannuceus, Foveotricolpites gigantoreticulatus, Nyssapollenites albertensis, Retimonocolpites variplicatus and Rousea delicipollis. These suggest an Albian-Cenomanian age and deposition in a fluvio-deltaic environment; no marine phytoplankton is reported. The fern-dominated palynoflora and the overwhelming presence of kaolinitic clays suggest a warm, humid palaeoclimate. According to available knowledge, the mudstones in the Gebel Abraq area, equivalents of the so-called "Timsah Formation", might be correlated with an older rock unit, the Maghrabi Formation, based on the new palynological age assessment. This new definition of local stratigraphy implies that the Bernice sheet of geological map of Egypt [Klitzsch, E., List, F., Pöhlmann, G., 1987. Geological map of Egypt, sheet NF 36 NE Bernice, 1: 500 000. Conoco and the Egyptian General Petroleum Corporation, Cairo] ought to be reconsidered.

  15. The Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition: dating, stratigraphy, and isochronous markers.

    PubMed

    Blockley, S P E; Ramsey, C Bronk; Higham, T F G

    2008-11-01

    Accurate and precise dating is vital to our understanding of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition. There are, however, a number of uncertainties in the chronologies currently available for this period. We attempt to examine these uncertainties by utilizing a number of recent developments in the field. These include: the precise dating of the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) tephra by 40Ar/39Ar; the tracing of this tephra to a number of deposits that are radiocarbon dated; the publication of revised radiocarbon calibration data for the period, showing a much better convergence with other available data than during the recent IntCal comparison; and a layer-counted ice-core chronology extending beyond 40,000cal BP. Our data comparisons suggest that a reasonable overall convergence between calibrated radiocarbon ages and calendar dates is possible using the new curves. Additionally, we suggest that charcoal-based radiocarbon ages, as well as bone-based radiocarbon determinations, require cautious interpretation in this period. Potentially, these issues extend far beyond the sites in this study and should be of serious concern to archaeologists studying the Middle to Upper Paleolithic. We conclude by outlining a strategy for moving the science forward by a closer integration of archaeology, chronology, and stratigraphy.

  16. Sequence stratigraphy and 3-D seismic imaging in low-accommodation basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Hamilton, D.S.; Simmons, J.L. Jr. )

    1996-01-01

    Pennsylvanian-age rocks in several areas of the Midcontinent of the United States were deposited in low-accommodation basinal settings. Many sequences in these low-accommodation environments exhibit severe lateral heterogeneity because they have been extensively reworked by repeated transgressions and regressions. Consequently, the distinctive geometries of relic depositional features tend to be distorted or totally destroyed, in contrast to such geometries in high-accommodation basins where depositional topography, once buried, is rarely exposed to erosional processes. Our objective is to show how these thin and obscure low-accommodation sequences can be identified in well control and interpreted in 3-D seismic data volumes. Numerous, deep-rooted karst-collapse zones affected the areal continuity of many sequences in some Midcontinent basins. We combine sequence stratigraphy with 3-D seismic imaging to document that many of these karst-collapse zones originate at deep Ellenburger ( ) levels and then extend vertically for a distance of 2,000 ft (600 m) or more into Pennsylvanian-age rocks. We also offer evidence that properly chosen seismic attributes, calculated in thin, accurately defined seismic time windows that correspond to log-defined sequences, show compartmented reservoir facies in low-accommodation basins.

  17. Sequence stratigraphy and 3-D seismic imaging in low-accommodation basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Hamilton, D.S.; Simmons, J.L. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Pennsylvanian-age rocks in several areas of the Midcontinent of the United States were deposited in low-accommodation basinal settings. Many sequences in these low-accommodation environments exhibit severe lateral heterogeneity because they have been extensively reworked by repeated transgressions and regressions. Consequently, the distinctive geometries of relic depositional features tend to be distorted or totally destroyed, in contrast to such geometries in high-accommodation basins where depositional topography, once buried, is rarely exposed to erosional processes. Our objective is to show how these thin and obscure low-accommodation sequences can be identified in well control and interpreted in 3-D seismic data volumes. Numerous, deep-rooted karst-collapse zones affected the areal continuity of many sequences in some Midcontinent basins. We combine sequence stratigraphy with 3-D seismic imaging to document that many of these karst-collapse zones originate at deep Ellenburger (?) levels and then extend vertically for a distance of 2,000 ft (600 m) or more into Pennsylvanian-age rocks. We also offer evidence that properly chosen seismic attributes, calculated in thin, accurately defined seismic time windows that correspond to log-defined sequences, show compartmented reservoir facies in low-accommodation basins.

  18. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy of the Permian and Carboniferous: The extension of the magnetic reversal record into the Paleozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Opdyke, N.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic polarity stratigraphy has revolutionized stratigraphic studies in Jurassic to Pleistocene sediments. These studies have been greatly facilitated by the reversal record that is recorded in rocks of the ocean floor. For times prior to the Jurassic, the reversal history of the magnetic field must be determined and eventually related through the type section concept. The magnetic reversal history of the late Paleozoic is dominated by the Permo-Carboniferous reversed superchron (PCRS), which extends from the late Permian to the Carboniferous (Westphalian). Recent studies by the author and his students in Middle Carboniferous sediments of eastern Canada, Pennsylvania, Arizona, and Nevada reveal that the magnetic field has reversed frequently in late Mississippian and early Pennsylvanian times (Meramecian through late Morrowan). The polarity of the magnetic field over this interval is approximately 50% normal and 50% reversed. The frequency of reversal appears to be about one reversal per m.y. The possibility, therefore, exists that this pattern may be used for continental and intercontinental correlation. Attempts are currently underway to correlate this magnetic stratigraphy to fossiliferous marine sections. The base of the PCRS is probably of Atokan age.

  19. Postglacial transgressive stratigraphy of the Durban continental shelf, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew; Salzmann, Leslee; Cooper, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the geomorphology and seismic stratigraphy of the high-energy KwaZulu-Natal shelf offshore Durban, South Africa. Particular attention is paid to a laterally persistent (30 km) Holocene submerged shoreline located at 60 m water depth. Five major seismic units are identified (Units 1-5). Unit 1 comprises a series of infilled incised valleys that formed during the sea level lowering towards the Last Glacial Maximum. Unit 2 comprises a calcarenite core that forms the -60 m postglacial barrier complex. Unit 3 comprises lake-lagoon depressions in the back-barrier that formed simultaneously with the barrier system. These are backed to landward by several relict parabolic dunes preserved in Unit 2. Several relict weathering features (Unit 4) are associated with the barrier and reflect similar processes observed in contemporary aeolianite/beachrock outcrops on the adjacent coastline. These are draped by a thin veneer of post-transgressive Holocene sediment that caps the shelf stratigraphy (Unit 5). The development of the barrier and associated features occurred during a period of stillstand or slowstand associated with the Younger Dryas Cold Period (~12.7-11.6 Ka BP). Shoreline preservation in such a high-energy environment is considered unlikely as a result of the intense ravinement processes experienced during shoreline translation, coupled with the relatively low gradient setting of the KwaZulu-Natal shelf. The preservation of both the 100 m and 60 m shorelines was fostered by overstepping of the paleo-landscape, whereby preservation was promoted by a particularly rapid phase of relative sea-level rise associated with meltwater pulse 1B. This was further aided by early subtropical diagenesis during stillstand.

  20. Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of Bolivia and adjacent regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sempere, T. )

    1993-02-01

    Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of the Pacific margin of western South America, particularly the Bolivian section, has been completed and new interpretations and hypotheses have been proposed as a result of data analyses of this information. The Paleozoic margin was initially passive (late Cambrian-Llanvirn, [open quotes]Puna aulacogen[close quotes]), but became active during a middle Ordovician compressional episode. Most of late Cambrian to early Triassic Bolivian rocks are of marine origin, with dark shale units recording sea level rises, whereas middle Triassic to Recent rocks were mainly deposited in continental environments (except six restricted-marine ingressions in the late Cretaceous-Danian, and one in the late Miocene, all with hydrocarbon potential). A noteworthy similarity exists between the Devonian to Jurassic stratigraphies of Bolivia and the Parana basin, suggesting that Bolivia behaved as part of the Brazilian craton from late Cambrian to late Jurassic, when it was captured into the Pacific margin geotectonic system. Organic-rich units correlate with Paleozoic highstand deposits and younger ingressions. The Bolivian Phanerozoic strata is characterized by thick layers, partly due to middle Ordovician-Carboniferous and late Cretaceous-Cenozoic foreland basins. Paleozoic foreland geometries include northeastern onlaps and, potentially, stratigraphic traps. Hydrocarbon generation, migration and trapping mainly depended on Cenozoic structural loading and burial and on propagation of Andean deformation which are comprised of Paleozoic shale decollements. Precise knowledge of the evolution of the Phanerozoic geodynamic contexts and basin geometries through sedimentation and subsequent deformations is crucial for hydrocarbon exploration strategies in these regions.

  1. Sedimentological and petryphysical characterization of the Cogollo Group, Cretaceous, Block IX, Maracaibo Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, P.; Verenzuela, X. ); Franssen, R.; Vahrenramp, V. )

    1993-02-01

    The present study contains the most important results from the sedimentological and petrophysical analysis of two Cretaceous cores (SVS-225/229) located in the Block IX of Lake maracaibo, northwestern Venezuela. In order to better define and locate sites for exploratory drilling, a study was undertaken to describe calcareous facies and their relationship to matrix porosity, open fractures, sedimentary and flow units. The sedimentary units were grouped on the basis similar characteristics and vertical and horizontal extrapolation potential. They also serve as indicators to determine the major sedimentary environments and help define the sedimentological model for the section under study. The most promising calcareous facies are composed of dolomites, wackestones, packstones and grainstones. They are all related to the open fractures, their orientation and density. The flow units were determined using these characteristics together with the oil impregnation observed in the cores. Also they were found to be mainly related to the coarsening upper sedimentary sequences. The identification of these units and their correlation to neighboring areas is useful for in the effectively managing processes for the Cretaceous oil reservoirs.

  2. Sedimentology and paleoecology of an Eocene Oligocene alluvial lacustrine arid system, Southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldi-Campesi, Hugo; Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R. S.; Centeno-García, Elena; Arenas-Abad, Concepción; Fernández, Luis Pedro

    2006-10-01

    A depositional model of the Eocene-Oligocene Coatzingo Formation in Tepexi de Rodríguez (Puebla, Mexico) is proposed, based on facies analysis of one of the best-preserved sections, the Axamilpa Section. The sedimentary evolution is interpreted as the retrogradation of an alluvial system, followed by the progressive expansion of an alkaline lake system, with deltaic, palustrine, and evaporitic environments. The analysis suggests a change towards more arid conditions with time. Fossils from this region, such as fossil tracks of artiodactyls, aquatic birds and cat-like mammals, suggest that these animals traversed the area, ostracods populated the lake waters, and plants grew on incipient soils and riparian environments many times throughout the history of the basin. The inferred habitat for some fossil plants coincides with the sedimentological interpretation of an arid to semiarid climate for that epoch. This combined sedimentological-paleontological study of the Axamilpa Section provides an environmental context in which fossils can be placed and brings into attention important biotic episodes, like bird and camelid migrations or the origin of endemic but extinct plants in this area.

  3. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy of the Miocene Rio Azul section, Precordillera thrust belt, San Juan Province, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, T.E.; Beer, J.A. ); Rutty, P.M. Stanford Univ., CA ); McRae, L.E.; Tabbutt, K. ); Damanti, J.F. )

    1990-07-01

    The chronostratigraphy of synorogenic strata of Rio Azul in the Bermejo foreland basin, Argentine Andes, reveals details of Miocene tectonic activity and deposition. Chronostratigraphic interpretations are based on magnetic polarity stratigraphy and zircon fission-track dates of interbedded volcanic ashes. The Rio Azul section is located within the Precordillera thrust belt, uplifted and rotated by motion on subjacent faults. The 3,200 m thick section coarsens upward, from sandstone and mudstone (Cuculi Formation) to conglomerate (El Corral Formation). The radiometric ages indicate the entire section is of middle to late Miocene age, and the authors correlate the magnetic polarity pattern of each fault block to the magnetic polarity time scale. The lower 500 m of the section apparently ranges from approximately 16 to 12 Ma, although the age of the lowest 100 m is quite uncertain. The fault-bounded block from 500 to 1,000 m probably correlates to approximately 13.5-12.5 Ma. The block from 1,000 to 2,000 m correlates to approximately 12.5-10 Ma. Given the lack of unconformities in the coarse uppermost 1,200 m of section and a zircon fission track age within the conglomerates, the authors speculate that the upper part of the section was deposited very rapidly; the top of the section is probably no younger than about 8 to 9 Ma. These correlations and similarities of facies, paleocurrents, and provenance imply that the Cuculi Formation represents the proximal facies correlative to the Jarillal Formation of Sierra de Huaco, and that the El Corral conglomerates are the up-dip equivalent of the Huachipampa Formation of Huaco. These results are consistent with a paleogeographic model of a major drainage reorganization in the Bermejo foreland basin at about 10 Ma. It is clear, however, that thrusting in the Precordillera began more than 2 m.y. prior to the drainage reorganization.

  4. Reappraisal of the Jianchuan Cenozoic basin stratigraphy and its implications on the SE Tibetan plateau evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourbet, Loraine; Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Sorrel, Philippe; Maheo, Gweltaz; Wang, GuoCan; Yadong, Xu; Cao, Kai; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Eymard, Inès; Liu, Wei; Lu, Haijian; Replumaz, Anne; Chevalier, Marie-Luce; Kexin, Zhang; Jing, Wu; Shen, Tianyi

    2017-03-01

    We present a new stratigraphy of the Jianchuan basin, one of the largest Cenozoic sedimentary basins in southeastern Tibet. This basin was regarded as recording sedimentation from the Eocene up to the Pliocene, and as such has been the focus of several studies aiming at constraining the environmental, tectonic and topographic evolution of the area. Within the Shuanghe and Jianchuan formations thirteen new zircon U/Pb ages and one biotite 40Ar/39Ar age of interbedded and cross-cutting ultrapotassic magmatic rocks show that a brief magmatic event occurred from 35.7 to 34.5 Ma (35.2 ± 0.4 Ma on average). The uppermost formation (Jianchuan Fm), supposedly Pliocene in age, is related to this magmatic event and is 35.4 ± 0.8 Ma old. All sedimentary formations are thus Eocene in age, with neither Oligocene nor Miocene sediments. The coal-bearing Shuanghe Formation yields a fossil of a large amynodontid typical of the Upper Eocene Ergilian interval (37.2 to 33.9 Ma). Sedimentation of the Shuanghe Formation took place in a short time interval at 35.9 ± 0.9 Ma, after a large-scale drainage reorganization that induced the abandonment of a large braided-river system. This reorganization was possibly linked with the initiation of the left-lateral Ailao-Shan Red River fault and/or to widespread magmatism in the Jianchuan basin. Previous high paleoaltitude estimates for the Jianchuan basin are thoroughly re-evaluated and yield a value of 1200 ± 1200 m.a.s.l. for the Upper Eocene.

  5. Volcanic stratigraphy of the Barrel Springs--Wild Cherry Formations, Davis Mountains, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.F. . Dept. Geology); Henry, C.D. . Bureau of Economic Geology); Kunk, M.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Detailed mapping, stratigraphy, [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages, and geochemistry allow, for the first time, a coherent volcanic history of the Barrel Springs--Wild Cherry (BS-WC) units, the most widespread of the Davis Mountains volcanic field (DMVF). These units erupted dominantly from the [approximately] 20 km-diameter Paradise Mountain caldera (PMC), in the west-central DMVF, where thick, locally silicified and kaolinized intracaldera tuffs and interbedded lavas were resurgently domed by an 8 x 5-km-diameter syenitic intrusion. BS-WC units, all rhyolites, consist dominantly of a lower, moderately porphyritic ash-flow tuff; a petrographically similar, middle ash-flow tuff; and an upper group of voluminous, abundantly porphyritic lavas. The lower ash-flow tuff is strongly rheomorphic throughout its occurrence. The middle ash-flow is also rheomorphic in thick outcrops near the PMC but not in thin ([<=]10m), distal outcrops. These three units are interbedded with lavas lithologically similar to the tuffs near the PMC and with volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks in more distal area. The two ash-flow tuffs are separated by strongly porphyritic trachyte lavas of the Mount Locke Formation in the vicinity of the PMC. Sources and extents of individual flows of the upper lavas have not been positively identified. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of alkali feldspar phenocrysts from thirteen samples constrain most BS-WC to a 300 ka span. The lower tuff erupted about 35.6 Ma. The middle tuff and part of the voluminous lava package erupted at 35.3 Ma. Ages of two lavas are 35.1 Ma, which suggests prolonged eruption. Correlations based on lithology and age relations are supplemented by trace element and mineral studies that confirm close geochemical affinities.

  6. Sedimentology and diagenesis of windward-facing fore-reef calcarenites, Late Pleistocene of Barbados, West Indies

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    Late Pleistocene reef terraces in southeastern Barbardos developed extensive fore-reef sand facies during deposition in response to high-energy windward-facing conditions. Sedimentology and diagenesis of these deposits illustrate significant contrasts with previous studies from the leeward west coast. These calcarenites are dominantly skeletal packstones with less common grainstones and wackestones present. The fore-reef sand facies occurs within progradational reef sequences, being conformably overlain by deep-water head coral facies. Medium-bedded, laterally continuous sand sheets retain original depositional slopes, dipping seaward at 10/degrees/-15/degrees/. These fore-reef deposits, in places, are over 30 m thick (average 20 m) and developed rapidly during late Pleistocene glacio-eustatic sea level highstands. Sedimentation rate ranges from 2 to 5 m/1000 years. Areal extent of fore-reef calcarenites in southeastern Barbados is estimated to be 8-10 km/sup 2/. Lithologically, the packstones are composed of an abundance of coralline red algae and the benthic foraminifer Amphistegina sp. Other volumetrically significant allochems include echinoids, mollusks, rhodoliths, peloids, and micritized grains. Micrite in the wackestone and packstone lithologies is likely derived from intense physical/mechanical abrasion of shoal-water reef facies. Diagenesis of these lithologies reflects a complex interplay of meteoric, mixing zone, and marine environments as a result of glacio-eustasy. Differences in diagenetic character are derived from differences in terrace ages, terrace geometry, a paleotopographic control on meteoric ground-water distribution, and high-energy coastal conditions. Diagenetic fabrics include equant, blocky meteoric phreatic calcite; limpid dolomite of mixing zone origin: and peloidal and isopachous fibrous cements from marine precipitation.

  7. Morphodynamics and Stratigraphy of Essex River EBB-Tidal Delta: Massachusetts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    AD-A241 424 TECHNICAL REPORT CERC-91 -11 --- "MORPHODYNAMICS AND STRATIGRAPHY OF ESSEX RIVER EBB-TIDAL DELTA: MASSACHUSETTS by J. Bailey Smith...COVERED I August 1991 Final report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Morphodynamics and Stratigraphy of Essex River Ebb-Tidal Delta...12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The Essex River Inlet ebb-tidal delta

  8. Sequence stratigraphy of the Maturin sub-basin (Eastern Venezuela)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, G.; Mata, S.; Santiago, N.

    1996-08-01

    The prolific Eastern Venezuela Basin has an area of about 160,000 km{sup 2} and is bounded by the Pilar Fault to the North, the Guayana Shield to the South, the Baul Arch to the West and beyond the Orinoco Delta to the East. Sequence analysis of three N-S and one W-E regional transects covered by over one thousand km of seismic lines and sedimentological, biostratigraphic and electrofacies studies of 80 wells allowed the definition of the sequence stratigraphic column of the basin. Seven major unconformity bounded depositional sequences were defined from Barremian to Recent, three in the Cretaceous and four in the Tertiary. Twenty-one third-order cycles were recognized in the Tejas B supercycle (Upper Oligocene-Recent). This cycle correlates very well with the Gulf of Mexico and Global chronostratigraphic charts. In the proximal, southern area, each sequence shows transgressive sandstones in its lower section and regressive ones in the upper part, separated by claystones that include a maximum flooding surface. In the distal area, fine marine sediments predominate with local turbidities. Some electrical markers and planktonic fossils are traceable over long distances. Regional transacts show two distinct structural zones: tensional to the South and compressional to the North. The best petroleum reservoirs occur in Tertiary and to a lesser extent in Cretaceous sequences. In this basin occurs the largest oil accumulation of the world (Orinoco), as well as several giant oil fields.

  9. Stratigraphy and paleogeography of the Cretaceous in Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharhan, A.S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1986-05-01

    The Cretaceous of the Arabian Peninsula is divided into three major units by regional unconformities: Lower Cretaceous Thamama Group (Berriasian-middle Aptian), middle Cretaceous Wasia Group (Albian-Turonian), and Upper Cretaceous Aruma Group (Coniacian-Maestrichtian). The profusion of named stratigraphic units in the area reflects not only the lithologic variation resulting from facies changes, but also terminologies adopted by different companies. The authors provide a stratigraphic nomenclature defining standard type sections and indicate synonymies, which follow the recommendation of 10th Geological Liaison Meeting and hence are acceptable to operators in the area. The sedimentologic history of the area was presented in a series of paleogeographic maps, which they relate to the regional tectonic framework. The maps show a predominantly carbonate shelf ramp bordering a land area to the north and west. The principal change in depositional environment occurs during the Upper Cretaceous, as a result of tectonic activity. Less significant changes are attributed to eustatic sea level fluctuations, on which tilting caused by tectonic movement may be superposed during the Lower and middle Cretaceous. The major producing horizons lie below the regional unconformities; secondary porosity in the shelf reefal buildups was developed during subaerial exposure in the Shuaiba Formation (early-middle Aptian), in the Mishrif Formation (late Cenomanian), and in the Simsima Formation (Maestrichtian).

  10. A review of magnetic stratigraphy investigations in Cretaceous pelagic carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, W.; Channell, J. E. T.; Alvarez, W.

    1980-07-01

    Pelagic carbonate rocks possess many suitable characteristics for paleomagnetic and magnetostratigraphic studies. Paleomagnetic results are summarized for seven lengthy sections of pelagic limestones and marls from Umbria and the southern Alps in Italy. Differences in apparent polar wander paths from these two regions are interpreted in terms of tectonic rotation of allochthonous Umbria. The magnetic stratigraphies of the paleontologically dated sections are independent of their tectonic differences and are combined to form a continuous record of geomagnetic polarity for the Barremian through Maastrichtian stages of the Cretaceous. All but one of the reversals in these sections are confirmed by duplication in at least one other section. Additional Cretaceous reversals have been reported in other land sections and in DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) and IPOD (International Program of Ocean Drilling) cores. Some of these reversals are not defined well magnetically, and confirmation of others is clouded by imprecise paleontological dates. If real, they are probably of short duration. The confirmed reversal sequence correlates well with the Cretaceous oceanic magnetic anomaly sequence. The ages of certain key anomalies are altered: Late Cretaceous anomalies 29-34 are younger, and Early Cretaceous anomalies M0 and M1 are older than previously thought. The longer duration of the Cretaceous magnetic quiet interval of normal polarity results in a reduction of corresponding sea floor spreading rates to about 70% of earlier values, but they are still appreciably higher than during formation of the preceding M sequence anomalies.

  11. Knob fields in the Terra Cimmeria/Terra Sirenum region of Mars: Stratigraphy, mineralogy and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Lorenz; Bishop, Janice L.; Neukum, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the stratigraphy, morphology and mineralogy of five major knob fields in the region between Terra Cimmeria and Terra Sirenum on Mars based on HRSC, CTX, MOC and HiRISE imagery together with hyperspectral data from CRISM. The knob fields comprise Ariadnes Colles, Atlantis Chaos and Gorgonum Chaos and further, unnamed fields of mounds. They have been mapped in previous studies as Hesperian or Amazonian units and are located within the shoreline of the proposed "Eridania lake", the putative source of Ma'adim Vallis. The mounds contain Mg/Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and locally Al-rich phyllosilicates. Our geological mapping shows that the knob fields have a late Noachian age, which indicates later phyllosilicate formation than typically observed on Mars. The knob fields formed by alteration of the "Electris deposit", an airfall deposit possibly rich in basaltic glass (Grant, J.A., Schultz, P.H. [1990]. Icarus 84, 166-195), in local depressions, possibly in the Eridania lake. The spectroscopic detection of phyllosilicates here may indicate that liquid water persisted longer in this region than elsewhere on Mars. The knob fields are embayed by the Hesperian ridged plains. Numerous valleys carve into the ridged plains and document that the aqueous history of this region continued into the Hesperian and Amazonian. The study area is traversed by the Sirenum Fossae. These graben appear to post-date the aqueous activity in the study area except in the Gorgonum basin, where a lake developed after their formation.

  12. Cambrian/Early Ordovician sequence stratigraphy and Mt. Simon sandstone petrology - Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cottingham, J.T.

    1990-05-01

    Rocks of Cambrian and Early Ordovician age are well known in Wisconsin and otber areas surrounding the Michigan basin but because of burial depth ranging from 3,000 to 16,000 ft relatively little is known about these rocks in Michigan. Core and cuttings examination demonstrate that similar stratigraphic sequences exist between the central Michigan basin and surrounding regions. Basinal lithofacies are similar to their outcrop counterparts in Wisconsin and are correlated on the basis of sediment types, sedimentary structures, and the concept of sequence stratigraphy. The Mount Simon Sandstone in Michigan correlates with that observed in Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Iowa. Isopach data throughout the Midwest indicates a single depocenter in northeastern Illinois, with an arm extending into the central Michigan basin. Sedimentary structures and lithology indicate a subtidal marine environment that may be a transition to a shoreward nonmarine fluvial to eolian environment. Observed diagenetic facies are influenced primarily by depth of burial. The deep facies (below 14,250 ft) exhibits extreme physical and chemical compaction of quartz grains. Quartz cement is predominant with less than 1% porosity present. The shallow facies (above 8,900 ft) exhibits pervasive dolomite and quartz cements and authigenic clays, Secondary porosity developed from dissolution of carbonate, quartz, and K-feldspar.

  13. The aeolian sedimentary system in the northern Qilian Shan and Hexi Corridor (N-China) - geomorphologic, sedimentologic and climatic drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottebaum, Veit; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Stauch, Georg

    2015-04-01

    The formation of aeolian deposits depends on the influence of climatic factors but also on non-climatic controls, such as local geomorphological setting and tectonic activity. Unravelling the environmental history needs a careful consideration of a set of sections to capture spatial variability and a detailed investigation of depositing processes and chronology. Along the northern margin of the Qilian Shan mountain range 22 OSL-dated loess and aeolian sand sections and additional surface samples reveal the interactions between climatic, geomorphologic and sedimentologic factors. Thin loess covers (~1-2 m) occur in elevations of 2000 to 3800 m asl, which were mainly accumulated during the Holocene. End-member modelling of loess grain size data exhibits three dominant aeolian transport pathways representing local transport from fluvial storages, dust storm contribution and background dust deposition. Their relative contributions show a clear dependence on geomorphological setting, and additionally, synchronous trends throughout the Holocene. Their relative changes allow conclusions about Holocene environmental conditions. Discontinuous archives (aeolian sand, lacustrine, and alluvial deposition) in the lower forelands of the Qilian Shan show a distinct spatial pattern contrasting western and eastern forelands. The comparison of OSL ages exhibits high sediment accumulation (~2 m/ka) in the drier western part during the Late Glacial, while the lack of Holocene ages indicates sediment discharge / deflation. In contrast, moister areas in the eastern foreland yield scattered Holocene ages. This indicates high sediment dynamics, benefiting from fluvial reworking and thus provided sediment availability. Fluvial sediment supply plays an important role in sediment recycling. Meanwhile, western forelands lack efficient sand sources and fluvial reworking agents. The study exemplifies the complex sedimentary systems acting along mountain to foreland transects which often host

  14. Missing evidence for the LGM-asynchronity in the Central Spanish Pyrenees in geomorphological, sedimentological and pedological archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Florian; Raab, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    According to the state of knowledge, the glacial advances in the Eastern Pyrenees were synchronous with the global LGM during the Late Pleistocene (MIS 2), but the glacial advances in the Central Spanish Pyrenees at MIS 3 were asynchron with the global LGM. Whereas in the Eastern Pyrenees the glacial advances are dated in several well agreeing studies by surface exposure dating of boulders from lateral or terminal moraines, the asynchronity of the Central Spanish Pyrenees was postulated mainly by OSL dating on glacial and fluvial sediments and on radiocarbon dating of pollen from lacustrine deposits. The time difference of about 15 ka raises the question if this is a result of (local) climate factors or owed to failures caused by using several dating techniques on different archives. Anyway, if this time lag is correct, post-LGM formation of soils and sediments from the Late Pleistocene should be different between the Eastern Pyrenees and the Central Spanish Pyrenees. We therefore applied a combined approach of geomorphological, sedimentological and pedological investigations to reconstruct the Late Quaternary landscape development in the Aragon- and Gallego Valley of the Central Spanish Pyrenees. Our study reveals that in both valleys the Pre-Holocene geomorphodynamics on the lateglacial deposits show clear analogies with findings from Pleistocene periglacial landscapes in Central Europe. For MIS 4 and early MIS 3 periglacial processes are proven by loess deposition and formation of solifluction sediments. The glacial sediments, which were dated in earlier studies into mid MIS 3 and counted so far as prove for the asynchronous LGM of the Central Spanish Pyrenees, are covered by periglacial deposits of lateglacial age (14 ka to 11 ka). Surprisingly neither the glacial sediments have pedogenic features that indicate lateglacial soil development, nor do the periglacial deposits show indications for lateglacial soil erosion. Therefore we conclude that soil formation

  15. Late Quaternary Provenance and Flow Regime Reconstruction through Sedimentologic and Geochemical Evidence from the Bering/Chukchi Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelto, B. M.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Kocis, J. J.; Petsch, S.

    2013-12-01

    Chukchi Seas. Elemental, isotopic, and grain size shifts correspond to changes in sediment routing, identifying changes in the magnitude and direction of throughflow in the BS. Major and trace element geochemistry spanning the past ~30 kyr was derived using an ITRAX XRF core scanner. Age control is well established by previous studies for a majority of the cores, primarily radiocarbon dates on diatoms. Elemental XRF data indicate significant change during the Bølling-Allerød warming around 15 kyr, and the opening of the BS at 11 kyr. During both of these periods there is a drop in Ti, Fe, K, and Ba with a corresponding rise in Cl, Ca, and Br. These data, in concert with the other sedimentologic data, infer shifts in paleo-flow conditions and sediment provenance during this time period. A key goal is the identification of how variations in geochemical properties correspond to bulk biogeochemical or biomarker variability, in comparison to sea ice proxies. The data being collected will add to a growing understanding of the Arctic as a dynamic system and answer questions concerning the post-glacial and Holocene evolution of changes that took place across the marine portion of the Bering Land Bridge.

  16. Stratigraphy and geochronology of pitfall accumulations in caves and fissures, Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, Paul J.; Olson, Storrs L.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai

    2004-05-01

    Deep fractures ("fissures") and avens ("skylights") in limestone cave roofs create natural traps for sediments and biota. Fissures fill quickly with surface sediment and organisms soon after opening. Debris cones are formed as materials fall, wash, or drift on air through openings in cave skylights. Such deposits in Admiral's and Grand Canyon Cave, Bermuda contain distinct beds and are composed of mixtures of sediment and charcoal, together with fossils of land snails, crabs, birds, reptiles, and bats. The "pitfall" accumulations were periodically sealed over by calcite flowstone. A stratigraphic record of surface activity and fauna through both glacial and interglacial periods has been preserved. The succession also provides an ideal setting in which to compare several geochronological methods. Calibrated 14C ages on charcoal and shells provide dated horizons at 1600, 12,800, and about 35,000 14C yr BP. Thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) ages on several flowstone layers constrain the entire sequence in the Admiral's Cave sequence between 126,300±900 yr (Termination II) and historical times. A continuous relative-age record generated by amino acid epimerization (AAE) geochronology ( D-alloisoleucine/ L-isoleucine or aIle/Ile) on the pulmonate land gastropod Poecilozonites verifies the biostratigraphy, reveals a minimal degree of mixing between stratigraphic units, and establishes an independent temporal link between the subterranean and subaerial deposits of Bermuda. This convergence between stratigraphy and geochronology yields a precisely dated succession from the oceanic island of Bermuda, and thus presents a unique opportunity to assess the rates and processes of evolutionary and climate change during that interval.

  17. Integrated stratigraphy and astronomical tuning of Smirra cores, lower Eocene, Umbria-Marche basin, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauretano, Vittoria; Turtù, Antonio; Hilgen, Frits; Galeotti, Simone; Catanzariti, Rita; Reichart, Gert Jan; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2016-04-01

    The early Eocene represents an ideal case study to analyse the impact of increase global warming on the ocean-atmosphere system. During this time interval, the Earth's surface experienced a long-term warming trend that culminated in a period of sustained high temperatures called the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). These perturbations of the ocean-atmosphere system involved the global carbon cycle and global temperatures and have been linked to orbital forcing. Unravelling this complex climatic system strictly depends on the availability of high-quality suitable geological records and accurate age models. However, discrepancies between the astrochronological and radioisotopic dating techniques complicate the development of a robust time scale for the early Eocene (49-54 Ma). Here we present the first magneto-, bio-, chemo- and cyclostratigraphic results of the drilling of the land-based Smirra section, in the Umbria Marche Basin. The sediments recovered at Smirra provide a remarkably well-preserved and undisturbed succession of the early Palaeogene pelagic stratigraphy. Bulk stable carbon isotope and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning records are employed in the construction of an astronomically tuned age model for the time interval between ~49 and ~54 Ma based on the tuning to long-eccentricity. These results are then compared to the astronomical tuning of the benthic carbon isotope record of ODP Site 1263 to evaluate the different age model options and improve the time scale of the early Eocene by assessing the precise number of eccentricity-related cycles comprised in this critical interval.

  18. Implications of sedimentological and hydrological processes on the distribution of radionuclides in a salt marsh near Sellafield, Cumbria

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, A.P.; Blackley, M.W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The report examines sedimentological and hydrological processes affecting a salt marsh in the Ravenglass estuary, which is situated south of the Sellafield nuclear-fuel-reprocessing plant. The results are discussed in the context of the distribution of low-level radioactive effluent at the site.

  19. The INTIMATE event stratigraphy and recommendations for its use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Sune O.

    2014-05-01

    The North Atlantic INTIMATE (INtegration of Ice-core, MArine and TErrestrial records) group has previously recommended an Event Stratigraphy approach for the synchronisation of records of the Last Termination using the Greenland ice core records as the regional stratotypes. A key element of these protocols has been the formal definition of numbered Greenland Stadials (GS) and Greenland Interstadials (GI) within the past glacial period as the Greenland expressions of the characteristic Dansgaard-Oeschger events that represent cold and warm phases of the North Atlantic region, respectively. Using a recent synchronization of the NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 ice cores that allows the parallel analysis of all three records on a common time scale, we here present an extension of the GS/GI stratigraphic template to the entire glacial period. In addition to the well-known sequence of Dansgaard-Oeschger events that were first defined and numbered in the ice core records more than two decades ago, a number of short-lived climatic oscillations have been identified in the three synchronized records. Some of these events have been observed in other studies, but we here propose a consistent scheme for discriminating and naming all the significant climatic events of the last glacial period that are represented in the Greenland ice cores. In addition to presenting the updated event stratigraphy, we make a series of recommendations on how to refer to these periods in a way that promotes unambiguous comparison and correlation between different proxy records, providing a more secure basis for investigating the dynamics and fundamental causes of these climatic perturbations. The work presented is a part of a manuscript under review for publication in Quaternary Science Reviews. Author team: S.O. Rasmussen, M. Bigler, S.P.E. Blockley, T. Blunier, S.L. Buchardt, H.B. Clausen, I. Cvijanovic, D. Dahl-Jensen, S.J. Johnsen, H. Fischer, V. Gkinis, M. Guillevic, W.Z. Hoek, J.J. Lowe, J. Pedro, T

  20. Using CT to Image Storm-Generated Stratigraphy in Sandy Sediment Off Fort Walton Beach, Florida, USA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    01-07-2005 Proceeding 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ba. CONTRACT NUMBER USING CT TO IMAGE STORM-GENERATED STRATIGRAPHY IN 5b. GRANT NUMBER SANDY SEDIMENT... STRATIGRAPHY IN SANDY SEDIMENT OFF FORT WALTON BEACH, FLORIDA, USA Kevin B. Briggsa and Allen H. Reeda aSeafloor Sciences Branch, Naval Research Laboratory...dimensional image, with no documentation of bedding slopes without destruction of the sample and/or multiple cores. Investigating stratigraphy of the

  1. Integrated sequence stratigraphy of the postimpact sediments from the Eyreville core holes, Chesapeake Bay impact structure inner basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, J.V.; Miller, K.G.; McLaughlin, P.P.; Edwards, L.E.; Kulpecz, A.A.; Powars, D.S.; Wade, B.S.; Feigenson, M.D.; Wright, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The Eyreville core holes provide the first continuously cored record of postimpact sequences from within the deepest part of the central Chesapeake Bay impact crater. We analyzed the upper Eocene to Pliocene postimpact sediments from the Eyreville A and C core holes for lithology (semiquantitative measurements of grain size and composition), sequence stratigraphy, and chronostratigraphy. Age is based primarily on Sr isotope stratigraphy supplemented by biostratigraphy (dinocysts, nannofossils, and planktonic foraminifers); age resolution is approximately ??0.5 Ma for early Miocene sequences and approximately ??1.0 Ma for younger and older sequences. Eocene-lower Miocene sequences are subtle, upper middle to lower upper Miocene sequences are more clearly distinguished, and upper Miocene- Pliocene sequences display a distinct facies pattern within sequences. We recognize two upper Eocene, two Oligocene, nine Miocene, three Pliocene, and one Pleistocene sequence and correlate them with those in New Jersey and Delaware. The upper Eocene through Pleistocene strata at Eyreville record changes from: (1) rapidly deposited, extremely fi ne-grained Eocene strata that probably represent two sequences deposited in a deep (>200 m) basin; to (2) highly dissected Oligocene (two very thin sequences) to lower Miocene (three thin sequences) with a long hiatus; to (3) a thick, rapidly deposited (43-73 m/Ma), very fi ne-grained, biosiliceous middle Miocene (16.5-14 Ma) section divided into three sequences (V5-V3) deposited in middle neritic paleoenvironments; to (4) a 4.5-Ma-long hiatus (12.8-8.3 Ma); to (5) sandy, shelly upper Miocene to Pliocene strata (8.3-2.0 Ma) divided into six sequences deposited in shelf and shoreface environments; and, last, to (6) a sandy middle Pleistocene paralic sequence (~400 ka). The Eyreville cores thus record the fi lling of a deep impact-generated basin where the timing of sequence boundaries is heavily infl uenced by eustasy. ?? 2009 The Geological

  2. The February 27, 2010 Chile Tsunami - Sedimentology of runup and backflow deposits at Isla Mocha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Spiske, M.

    2010-12-01

    On February 27, 2010, at 3:34 am local time, an earthquake with Mw 8.8 occurred off the town of Constitución in Central Chile and caused a major tsunami beween Valaparaiso (c. 33°S) and Tirua (c. 38°S). Maximum runup heights of up to 10 m were measured on coastal plains. The cliff coast at Tirua recorded a runup height between 30 m and 40 m. Considering past tsunami events, respective deposits may be the only observable evidence, even though their preservation potential is limited. To understand how tsunami deposits form and how they can be identified in the geological record, it is of paramount importance to undertake detailed studies in the wake of such events. Here we report initial field data of a sedimentological post-tsunami field survey undertaken in Central Chile between March 31 and April 18, 2010. At selected localities we measured detailed topographic profiles including runup heights and inundation distances, and recorded the thickness, distribution and sedimentological features of the respective tsunami deposits, as well as erosional features caused by the tsunami. We found the most instructive and complete sedimentological record of the February 27, 2010 tsunami at the northern tip of Isla Mocha, a small island off the Chilean coast at c. 28.15°S. Runup distances vary between 400 m and 600 m, the flow depth exceeded 3 m at ca. 100 m from the coast. Runup heights reached up to 21 m above sea level. In a rare sedimentological case, deposits of tsunami runup and backwash could be distinguished. The runup phase was mainly documented by fields of boulders extending c. 360 m inland. Boulders had maximum weights of 12 t. They were oriented with their long axis parallel to the coast and the wave front. Algal veneers and barnacles on the boulder faces give evidence of entrainment in intertidal water depths. The boulders are now embedded in mostly structureless coarse shelly sand. These sands were originally entrained during near shore supratidal erosion of

  3. Sedimentological data indicate greater range of water depths for Costistricklandia lirata in the Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, J.C. )

    1990-08-01

    Two distinct horizons of the pentamerid brachiopod Costistricklandia lirata occur in the upper part of the Red Mountain Formation (Lower Silurian) in northern Alabama. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic characteristics of the rocks associated with the brachiopods suggest water depths of 15-150 m during times of low rates of terrigenous influx. Costistricklandid assemblages from the lower horizon are composed of extremely large individuals in association with a diverse population of large corals. They are interpreted to have lived in a protected environment. In an overlying horizon, costistricklandids occur in growth position at the base of a thick siliciclastic interval. These brachiopods lived in a storm-dominated environment and were buried in situ by the rapid influx of sediment associated with a passing storm.

  4. Sedimentology of the Sbaa oil reservoir in the Timimoun basin (S. Algeria)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehadi, Z. )

    1990-05-01

    In 1980 oil was discovered in the Timimoun portion of the Sbaa depression in Southern Algeria. Until that time this basin had produced only dry gas. Since the 1980 oil discovery, several wells have been drilled. Data acquired from these wells were analyzed and are presented in this study. The oil reservoir is located within a sandstone interval of the Sbaa formation which has an average thickness of 75 m. The Sbaa lies between the Tournaisian (Lower Carboniferous) silts and the Strunian (uppermost Devonian) shales and sandstones. The sedimentological study reveals that the Sbaa formation contains bimodal facies consisting of coarse siltstones and fine sandstones. The sequence has been attributed to a deltaic environment developed in the central part of the Ahnet basin. The sources of the associated fluvial system are from the surrounding In-Semmen, Tinessourine, and Arak-Foum-Belrem paleohighs. Thermoluminescence indicates the provenance for the Sbaa sands was the crystalline basement Cambrian and Ordovician sections.

  5. Sedimentology models from activity concentration measurements: application to the "Bay of Cadiz" Natural Park (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Ligero, R A; Vidal, J; Meléndez, M J; Hamani, M; Casas-Ruiz, M

    2009-03-01

    A previous study on seabed sediments of the Bay of Cadiz (SW of Spain) enabled us to identify several relations between sedimentological variables and activity concentrations of environmental radionuclides such as (137)Cs, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. In this paper the study has been extended to a large neighbouring inter-tidal area in order to establish if the above mentioned models can be generalized. As a result we have determined that the measured activity concentrations are closely to the values predicted by the theoretical models (correlation coefficient range=0.85-0.93). Furthermore, the proposal model for granulometric facies as a function of activity concentrations of the abovementioned radionuclides provides for the sediments distribution a representation which agrees with the values of the tidal energy distribution obtained using numeric models calibrated with experimental data from current meters and water level recorders.

  6. Soil sedimentology at Gusev Crater from Columbia Memorial Station to Winter Haven

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabrol, N.A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Greeley, R.; Grin, E.A.; Schroder, C.; d'Uston, C.; Weitz, C.; Yingst, R.A.; Cohen, B. A.; Moore, J.; Knudson, A.; Franklin, B.; Anderson, R.C.; Li, R.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 3140 individual particles were examined in 31 soils along Spirit's traverse. Their size, shape, and texture were quantified and classified. They represent a unique record of 3 years of sedimentologic exploration from landing to sol 1085 covering the Plains Unit to Winter Haven where Spirit spent the Martian winter of 2006. Samples in the Plains Unit and Columbia Hills appear as reflecting contrasting textural domains. One is heterogeneous, with a continuum of angular-to-round particles of fine sand to pebble sizes that are generally dust covered and locally cemented in place. The second shows the effect of a dominant and ongoing dynamic aeolian process that redistributes a uniform population of medium-size sand. The texture of particles observed in the samples at Gusev Crater results from volcanic, aeolian, impact, and water-related processes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. A martian case study of segmenting images automatically for granulometry and sedimentology, Part 1: Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunatillake, Suniti; McLennan, Scott M.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Husch, Jonathan M.; Hardgrove, Craig; Skok, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    In planetary exploration, delineating individual grains in images via segmentation is a key path to sedimentological comparisons with the extensive terrestrial literature. Samples that contain a substantial fine grain component, common at Meridiani and Gusev at Mars, would involve prohibitive effort if attempted manually. Unavailability of physical samples also precludes standard terrestrial methods such as sieving. Furthermore, planetary scientists have been thwarted by the dearth of segmentation algorithms customized for planetary applications, including Mars, and often rely on sub-optimal solutions adapted from medical software. We address this with an original algorithm optimized to segment whole images from the Microscopic Imager of the Mars Exploration Rovers. While our code operates with minimal human guidance, its default parameters can be modified easily for different geologic settings and imagers on Earth and other planets, such as the Curiosity Rover’s Mars Hand Lens Instrument. We assess the algorithm’s robustness in a companion work.

  8. First ERTS-1 results in southeastern France: Geology, sedimentology, pollution at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontanel, A.; Guillemot, J.; Guy, M.

    1973-01-01

    Results obtained by four ERTS projects in southeastern France are summarized. With regard to geology, ERTS photos of Western Alps are very useful for tectonic interpretation because large features are clearly visible on these photographs even though they are often hidden by small complicated structures if studied on large scale documents. The 18-day repetition coverage was not obtained, and time-varying sedimentological surveys were impossible. Nevertheless, it was possible to delineate the variations of the shorelines in the Rhone Delta for a period covering the least 8,000 years. Some instances of industries discharging pollutant products at sea were detected, as well as very large anomalies of unknown origin. Some examples of coherent optical processing have been made in order to bring out tectonic features in the Alps mountains.

  9. Sedimentological reservoir characteristics of the Paleocene fluvial/lacustrine Yabus Sandstone, Melut Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahgoub, M. I.; Padmanabhan, E.; Abdullatif, O. M.

    2016-11-01

    Melut Basin in Sudan is regionally linked to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Central and Western African Rift System (CWARS). The Paleocene Yabus Formation is the main oil producing reservoir in the basin. It is dominated by channel sandstone and shales deposited in fluvial/lacustrine environment during the third phase of rifting in the basin. Different scales of sedimentological heterogeneities influenced reservoir quality and architecture. The cores and well logs analyses revealed seven lithofacies representing fluvial, deltaic and lacustrine depositional environments. The sandstone is medium to coarse-grained, poorly to moderately-sorted and sub-angular to sub-rounded, arkosic-subarkosic to sublitharenite. On the basin scale, the Yabus Formation showed variation in sandstone bodies, thickness, geometry and architecture. On macro-scale, reservoir quality varies vertically and laterally within Yabus Sandstone where it shows progressive fining upward tendencies with different degrees of connectivity. The lower part of the reservoir showed well-connected and amalgamated sandstone bodies, the middle to the upper parts, however, have moderate to low sandstone bodies' connectivity and amalgamation. On micro-scale, sandstone reservoir quality is directly affected by textures and diagenetic changes such as compaction, cementation, alteration, dissolution and kaolinite clays pore fill and coat all have significantly reduced the reservoir porosity and permeability. The estimated porosity in Yabus Formation ranges from 2 to 20% with an average of 12%; while permeability varies from 200 to 500 mD and up to 1 Darcy. The understanding of different scales of sedimentological reservoir heterogeneities might contribute to better reservoir quality prediction, architecture, consequently enhancing development and productivity.

  10. Sedimentological, Geochemical and Magnetic Properties of Colima Beach Sands, Mexico - Influence of Climate and Coastal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Guillen, L.; Carranza-Edwards, A.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2011-12-01

    Studies of sediments on beaches contribute to understanding of sedimentological processes and source, transport and dynamics of sandy coastlines. Results of a geological and geophysical study of sandy beaches on the coast of Colima, Mexico employing sedimentological, geochemical and magnetic methods are presented and used to investigate on climate and coastal processes. Colima is part of the active subduction margin in southern Mexico. We studied thirteen different beaches distributed along the coast. The coastal transect investigated crosses three river drainage basins of the Cihuatlan, Armeria and Coahuayana rivers. Along the coastline there are abundant medium to fine sands moderately sorted to well-sorted. Towards the southeast, sediments are fine-grained, darker colors and better classified compared with sediments at the northwest sector. Towards the southeast there is greater abundance of heavy minerals of volcanic origin with high-rank, higher values of natural remnant magnetization and high magnetic susceptibilities associated with the abundance of iron and titanium oxides. The magnetic hysteresis loops are characterized by saturation in low fields, suggesting titanomagnetites and magnetite as major minerals. In the plot of hysteresis ratio parameters, samples plot in the pseudo-single domain field, suggesting mixtures of single and multiple domain states. Silica is the main constituent and shows a trend to decrease towards the southeast. Results show that sediments are primarly derived from the volcanic and plutonic rocks in the margin. There is an attenuation of one order of magnitude in magnetic susceptibility in magnetic concentrates. It is inferred that there is more wave action on sands of beaches at the southeastern sector generated primarily by waves, wind and tides in volcanic rocks that outcrop in the region. Backshore area in Santiago Bay is identified as an area of protected beach off the coast where the processes of weathering of the sands seem

  11. Biotic and Sedimentologic Signals Associated with Tempestite Deposition from Baffin Bay, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nieuwenhuise, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    In efforts to determine hurricane frequency prior to historical records, the often used model of counting presumed washover fans as coarse-grained hurricane deposits that interfinger with fine-grained, quiet, lagoon sediments may be oversimplified. The complexities of hurricane depositional events versus the usual dynamic sedimentological processes of barrier island complexes often makes it difficult to distinguish between expected and typical migrating coarse-grained facies from true hurricane deposits. To avoid some of this potential confusion and to better recognize the frequency of strong hurricane events, it is suggested that studies be focused further inland than the washover fans and that in addition to sedimentological indicators, they include biotic and chemical discriminators as well. These results are part of a broader study examining hurricane deposition along the Texas coast. The focus of this study is on slowly accumulating algal mats near Baffin Bay, Texas, that are punctuated by known hurricane deposits. This marginal lagoonal setting is more than 16 miles away from the Padre Island shorefront. Two cores were taken in 1974 that captured sediments from Hurricane Carla (1970) and Hurricane Beulah (1967). Algal mat depositional rates are on the order of 1.25 cm per year whereas the hurricane sediments are on the order of 45 cm per event. Sediments display flood and ebb surge stages for each event. Additional cores in other parts of the coast have similar sediment accumulation rates. In general, periods of relatively quiet deposition are dominated by Cyprideis ovata and Ammonia becarrii which can tolerate the conditions of these euryhaline and algal-floored ponds. In contrast, hurricane deposits show clear evidence of additional bay and shallow marine assemblages along with coarse-grained sediments, shell and shell fragments, and significant amounts of mud settling after the retreat of the storm surge.

  12. Sedimentology and ichnology of Neogene Coastal Swamp deposits in the Niger Delta Basin, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezeh, Sunny C.; Mode, Wilfred A.; Ozumba, Berti M.; Yelwa, Nura A.

    2016-09-01

    Often analyses of depositional environments from sparse data result in poor interpretation, especially in multipartite depositional settings such as the Niger Delta. For instance, differentiating channel sandstones, heteroliths and mudstones within proximal environments from those of distal facies is difficult if interpretations rely solely on well log signatures. Therefore, in order to achieve an effective and efficient interpretation of the depositional conditions of a given unit, integrated tools must be applied such as matching core descriptions with wireline log signature. In the present paper cores of three wells from the Coastal Swamp depositional belt of the Niger Delta are examined in order to achieve full understanding of the depositional environments. The well sections comprise cross-bedded sandstones, heteroliths (coastal and lower shoreface) and mudstones that were laid down in wave, river and tidal processes. Interpretations were made from each data set comprising gamma ray logs, described sedimentological cores showing sedimentary features and ichnological characteristics; these were integrated to define the depositional settings. Some portions from one of the well sections reveal a blocky gamma ray well log signature instead of a coarsening-upward trend that characterises a shoreface setting while in other wells the signatures for heteroliths at some sections are bell blocky in shaped rather than serrated. Besides, heteroliths and mudstones within the proximal facies and those of distal facies were difficult to distinguish solely on well log signatures. However, interpretation based on sedimentology and ichnology of cores from these facies was used to correct these inconsistencies. It follows that depositional environment interpretation (especially in multifarious depositional environments such as the Niger Delta) should ideally be made together with other raw data for accuracy and those based solely on well log signatures should be treated with

  13. Ferron sandstone - stratigraphy and reservoir analogs, East-Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.B.; Ryer, T.A.; Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Ferron Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous) crops out along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell of east-central Utah. Exposures were described on photomosaics to better define the stratigraphy, to enhance facies prediction, and establish rules for reservoir modeling within fluvial-deltaic rocks. Major regressive cycles are recognized as parasequence sets composed of several to many parasequences. Each of the seaward-stepping parasequence sets recognized in the Ferron begins with a rapidly thickening and stratigraphically climbing, wave-modified shoreface. In later stages of progradation, deposition is dominated by river influences. Continued regression of the seaway is recorded in outcrop and shows a complex history of delta lobe progradation, switching, and abandonment. Onlapping and stacking of parasequences creates a collage of potential reservoir sweet spots, baffles, and barriers within a parasequence set. Shoreface and delta-front deposits of the older parasequences are commonly eroded by younger distributary and meanderbelt systems that fed younger parasequences of the parasequence sets. The result is numerous and locally thick channel sandstone bodies incised into shoreface and delta-front deposits. Published studies and recently completed work show that upper shoreface, stream mouth-bar, and channel sandstones constitute the best potential reservoir rocks within the Ferron Sandstone.

  14. Influence of mechanical stratigraphy and kinematics on fault scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Michael R.; G´rrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Bai, Taixu; Wacker, Michael A.; Collinsworth, Kevin B.; Behl, Richard J.

    1997-02-01

    In order to document effects of mechanical anisotropy, fault geometry, and structural style on displacement-length ( D-L) scaling relations, we investigated fault dimensions in the lithologically heterogeneous Monterey Formation exposed along Arroyo Burro Beach, California. The faults, which range in length from several centimeters to several meters, group into two populations: small faults confined to individual mudstone beds, and larger faults that displace multiple beds and often merge into bedding plane detachments. Whereas a linear correlation exists between displacement and length for small faults, displacement across large faults is independent of length. We attribute this deviation from scale-invariance to a combination of geologic factors that influence fault growth once faults extend beyond the confines of mudstone beds. Propagation of large faults across higher moduli opal-CT porcellanite leads to a reduction in DL, as does the development of drag folds. Further scatter in DL occurs when fault tips splay as they approach detachments. Large faults eventually merge into bedding plane detachments, which originally formed due to flexural slip folding. Extremely high DL ratios are recorded for these merged faults as they accommodate block rotation within a simple shear zone. Thus, both mechanical stratigraphy and the temporal evolution of fault systems can lead to a breakdown in fault scaling relations thought to characterize isolated fault growth in a homogeneous medium.

  15. Stratigraphy of the Jurassic system in northern Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, M.L.; Shaw, D.; Forbes, G.A.

    1988-08-01

    A regional synthesis is presented of the stratigraphy of Jurassic strata in Egypt north of 30/degree/N, based on the study of about 80 wells and outcrops from northeastern Egypt. Almost all fossil groups have been investigated for biostratigraphic control. Published work on ammonite faunas from Gebel el Maghara (north Sinai) is integrated with extensive original work on palynofloras (and, to a lesser extent, ostracod/foraminiferal faunas) recovered from marine rocks in the subsurface. The recovery of rich dinocyst assemblages enables the recognition of a ten-fold zonation scheme, largely within the Middle-Late Jurassic sedimentary package. The upper limit of this package is marked by the Cimmerian erosional event; strata younger than Oxfordian are rarely preserved. Only east of 30/degree/E is significant sedimentation known to have occurred immediately prior to the major early Bajocian transgressive event. Thereafter mean sea level rose steadily. The Lower Triassic-Lower Jurassic sedimentary package is poorly understood, largely the result of scanty and ambiguous stratigraphic evidence. However, regional correlations suggest that only very thin earliest Jurassic (Hettangian ) clastic deposition succeeded a sequence of Upper Triassic carbonates and evaporites (Wadi en Natrun Formation) in the north. Arising from these studies is a standard lithostratigraphical scheme. The upper sedimentary package, the Gebel el Maghara Group, comprises three formations (Masajid, Khatatba, and Inmar) and seven members; new units are defined and old units redefined.

  16. Stratigraphy of snow profiles using near-infrared photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzl, M.; Schneebeli, M.

    2002-12-01

    The detailed representation of the layers in snow profiles is extremly time consuming. Translucent profiles are used to reveal layer boundaries, however no method is known to relate the transmitted light intensity to morphologic parameters. We use digital near-infrared photography (NIP), centered at a wavelength of 890 nm, to determine optical grainsize on snow profiles. The reflectivity was calibrated with snow samples of different grain size and shape. The digital image of a snow profile is optically and geometrically corrected and the intensities are then converted to optical grainsize. The measured snow profiles on different slopes are compared to planar sections and classical snow profiles. In several cases the NIP image revealed thin layers, layer transitions and disturbances which are also visible in the planar section, but were not recorded in the snow profile. NIP profiles could be as large as 1 m high and 3 m long at very high spatial resolution by assembling several images. NIP of snow profiles is well suited to document and analyse snow stratigraphy and to determine optical diameter .

  17. Cenozoic seismic stratigraphy of the SW Bermuda Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, G.S.; Driscoll, N.W.; Miller, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    The seismic Horizon A-Complex (Tucholke, 1979) readily explains reflector patterns observed along the western third of the Bermuda Rise; farther east, basement is much more rugged and gravity flows shed from local topographic highs complicate the stratigraphy. Distal turbidites on the southwestern Bermuda Rise onlap reflector A* from the west, suggesting early Paleocene mass wasting of the North American margin. Locally erosive bottom currents cut into the middle Eocene section of the SW Bermuda Rise; these northward flowing currents preceded those that formed reflector Au along the North American margin near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Southward flowing currents swift enough to erode the sea floor and to form reflector Au did not reach as far east as the SW Bermuda Rise. Instead, the main effect of these Au currents was to pirate sediment into contour-following geostrophic flows along the North American margin and to deprive the deep basin and the Bermuda Rise of sediment transported down-slope. Consequently, post-Eocene sediments away from the margin are fine-grained muds. Deposition of these muds on the SW Bermuda Rise was controlled by northward flowing bottom currents. The modern Hatteras Abyssal Plain developed in the late Neogene as turbidites once again onlapped the SW Bermuda Rise. Today, these deposits extend farthest east in fracture zone valleys and in the swales between sediment waves. Northward flowing currents continue at present to affect sediment distribution patterns along the western edge of the Bermuda Rise.

  18. Carbonate fracture stratigraphy: An integrated outcrop and 2D discrete element modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Guy; Finch, Emma

    2013-04-01

    Constraining fracture stratigraphy is important as natural fractures control primary fluid flow in low matrix permeability naturally fractured carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. Away from the influence of folds and faults, stratigraphic controls are known to be the major control on fracture networks. The fracture stratigraphy of carbonate nodular-chert rhythmite successions are investigated using a Discrete Element Modelling (DEM) technique and validated against observations from outcrops. Comparisons are made to the naturally fractured carbonates of the Eocene Thebes Formation exposed in the west central Sinai of Egypt, which form reservoir rocks in the nearby East Ras Budran Field. DEM allows mechanical stratigraphy to be defined as the starting conditions from which forward numerical modelling can generate fracture stratigraphy. DEM can incorporate both stratigraphic and lateral heterogeneity, and enable mechanical and fracture stratigraphy to be characterised separately. Stratally bound stratified chert nodules below bedding surfaces generate closely spaced lateral heterogeneity in physical properties at stratigraphic mechanical interfaces. This generates extra complexity in natural fracture networks in addition to that caused by bed thickness and lithological physical properties. A series of representative geologically appropriate synthetic mechanical stratigraphic models were tested. Fracture networks generated in 15 DEM experiments designed to isolate and constrain the effects of nodular chert rhythmites on carbonate fracture stratigraphy are presented. The discrete element media used to model the elastic strengths of rocks contain 72,866 individual elements. Mechanical stratigraphies and the fracture networks generated are placed in a sequence stratigraphic framework. Nodular chert rhythmite successions are shown to be a distinct type of naturally fractured carbonate reservoir. Qualitative stratigraphic rules for predicting the distribution, lengths, spacing

  19. Correlation of sea level falls interpreted from atoll stratigraphy with turbidites in adjacent basins

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, J.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Past sea levels can be derived from any atoll subsurface sediments deposited at or near sea level by determining the ages of deposition and correcting the present depths to the sediments for subsidence of the underlying edifice since the times of deposition. A sea level curve constructed by this method consists of discontinuous segments, each corresponding to a period of rising relative sea level and deposition of a discrete sedimentary package. Discontinuities in the sea level curve derived by this method correspond to relative sea level falls and stratigraphic hiatuses in the atoll subsurface. During intervals of relative sea level fall an atoll emerges to become a high limestone island. Sea level may fluctuate several times during a period of atoll emergence to become a high limestone island. Sea level may fluctuate several times during a period of atoll emergence without depositing sediments on top of the atoll. Furthermore, subaerial erosion may remove a substantial part of the depositional record of previous sea level fluctuations. For these reasons the authors must look to the adjacent basins to complement the incomplete record of sea level change recorded beneath atolls. During lowstands of sea level, faunas originally deposited near sea level on an atoll may be eroded and redeposited as turbidites in deep adjacent basins. Three such turbidites penetrated during deep-sea drilling at Sites 462 and 315 in the central Pacific correlate well with a late Tertiary sea level curve based on biostratigraphic ages and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr chronostratigraphy for core from Enewetak Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands. Further drilling of the archipelagic aprons adjacent to atolls will improve the sea level history that may be inferred from atoll stratigraphy.

  20. Investigating the stratigraphy of Mare Imbrium flow emplacement with Earth-based radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, G. A.; Campbell, B. A.; Campbell, D. B.; Hawke, B. R.

    2016-08-01

    The lunar maria are the product of extensive basaltic volcanism that flooded widespread portions of the Moon's surface. Constraining mare volcanic history therefore provides a window into the endogenic processes responsible for shaping the Moon. Due to the low magma viscosity and the associated thin nature of lava units, the majority of mare surface structures are masked and subdued by impact regolith. Subtle individual mare flow morphologies, coupled with spatial limitations in the use of crater size distributions to distinguish surface units close in age, restrict our understanding of mare stratigraphy. Earth-based 70 cm wavelength (P band) radar can reveal features beneath the regolith and highlight very subtle changes in the ilmenite content of the flows, providing a unique means to map mare units. Here we map volcanic units in Mare Imbrium using high-resolution (200 m/pixel), Earth-based P band data. Situated within the heat-producing potassium, rare earth element, and phosphorus terrane, Mare Imbrium experienced some of the most long-lived (and recent) lunar volcanism, and its surface exhibits a significant diversity of basaltic chemistry. Our investigation identifies at least four distinct stages of volcanic activity, originating from multiple sources within Imbrium. The most recent of these stages comprises extensive, yet relatively thin volcanic flow units that left remnant kipukas of older mare material distributed across much of the basin. From a future mission perspective, it may be possible to collect samples expressing a wide range in age from small areas of Mare Imbrium. Our map also places important constraints on the interpretation of the Chang'e-3 Lunar Penetrating Radar measurements.

  1. Lithofacies, depositional environments, and regional stratigraphy of the lower Eocene Ghazij Formation, Balochistan, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Edward A.; Warwick, P.D.; Roberts, S.B.; Khan, I.H.

    1999-01-01

    A regional stratigraphic investigation of one of the most important coal-bearing lithostratigraphic units in Pakistan, the report includes sedimentologic observations taken from outcrops and measured sections, information derived from petrographic and paleontologic analyses, depositional interpretations, and descriptions of regional trends.

  2. Investigations on alluvial deposits through borehole stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating and passive seismic technique (Carnic Alps, NE Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Alessia; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Fontana, Alessandro; Mozzi, Paolo; Venturini, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    Alluvial sediment investigations provide fundamental tools to infer the processes that control geomorphological evolution of mountain environments. By analyzing sediment stratigraphy in depth, it is possible to retrieve the source, the geology, the time of deposition, the relative distance travelled by material as well as to distinguish among different type of transport (i.e., gravitational, fluvial or glacial). In this work, we present a combination of log stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating and geophysical surveys carried out on the valley floor of the But River (Carnic Alps, North East Italy). The But River basin drains an area of 326 km2 with a range in elevation from 2769 to 323 m a.s.l.; the bedrock mainly consists of carbonates and quartz arenites with minor inclusions of effusive rocks. After Pleistocene the gravitational deposits from mountain slopes have impounded the But River several times. In particular, we analyzed a sector of the upper portion of the But valley close to the confluence of the Moscardo Torrent, frequently affected by debris flows. A borehole was drilled in the But River floodplain, at the intersection with the Moscardo Torrent alluvial fan, down to a depth of 80 m. The analysis of the core samples allowed discerning three sedimentary levels rich in clay and organic materials, which testify the presence of small dam lakes, originated from the Moscardo debris-flow deposits. Three samples of wood and plant debris were collected from 13, 14 and 23 m of depth, respectively. They were analyzed through radiocarbon dating in order to determine the age of the lakes and, thus, to infer the activity of the debris flows building the Moscardo cone. The calibrated ages of the 3 samples are close to the younger limit of the radiocarbon method indicating a fast aggradation of the valley floor, starting from a period ranging between 1450 - 1632 AD. Historical maps and documents confirm the presence of the lakes until 19th century and they permit to assess

  3. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

  4. Late Quaternary stratigraphy of the eastern Gulf of Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchus, T.S. . Oceanography Dept.); Belknap, D.F. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Five distinct seismic facies describe the glacial, glacial-marine and postglacial sediments in the eastern Gulf of Maine. Regional cross-sections clearly document differences in the glacial-marine and postglacial stratigraphy between basins south of Truxton Swell, and Jordan basin to its north. Till occurs throughout the region as a thin veneer within basins, but thickens significantly over the ridges and swells separating basins. The ubiquitous presence of till suggests grounded ice occupied this area some time in the recent past. Ice-proximal glacial-marine (PGM) facies sediments of varying thickness mantle the entire area, occurring as a draped unit over pre-existing topography. Transitional glacial-marine (TGM) facies also occur as a draped unit, but they show onlap onto basin margins. Sediments of the TGM facies are restricted to areas south of Truxton Swell. Ice-distal glacial-marine (DGM) facies sediments also mantle the entire area, but they occur primarily as a ponded, infilling unit. The nature and distribution of these glacial-marine facies within the eastern Gulf of Maine documents changes in the environment of deposition during deglaciation. In the authors model PGM facies sediments are considered to represent settling through the water column of coarse material from the base of an ice shelf. TGM facies sediments indicate retreat of this ice margin coupled with calving of large icebergs with significant amounts of coarse debris, DGM facies sediments indicate further retreat of the ice margin and a lessening of the influence of icebergs. Stepwise ice-margin retreat from south to north through a series of grounding lines and associated pinning points is evident by these time transgressive sedimentary facies that can be correlated across the region.

  5. Phyllosilicate Stratigraphy near Mawrth Vallis, Mars: New Insights from Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James; Squyres, S. W.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Kirk, R. L.

    2007-10-01

    Phyllosilicate minerals were first identified on Mars by the OMEGA spectrometer on board Mars Express [1,2]. On Earth, these minerals form most commonly through prolonged interactions between rock and water, so their presence on Mars may have significant implications for the planet's aqueous history. In finely layered outcrops surrounding the ancient outflow channel Mawrth Vallis, OMEGA found two compositionally distinct types of phyllosilicates. With the higher-resolution view afforded by CRISM and HiRISE on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we find that these different minerals occur in distinct stratigraphic horizons, implying changing environmental conditions and/or a variable source of sediment for this location during the Noachian era. A layered unit containing Al-rich phyllosilicates overlies the most extensive of at least two units rich in Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates; in places, these are separated by another unit containing hydrated material of unknown mineralogy. All units are fractured into blocks ranging from decimeters to over a hundred meters across, and the morphology and scale of fractures correlates with the compositional stratigraphy. The lateral continuity of these stratigraphic units over scales exceeding 100 km and the uniformity (at CRISM resolution) of hydrated mineral signatures within each unit suggest that alteration occurred prior to sedimentary emplacement at this site. We use topographic data from HiRISE and the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Mars Express to aid in regional stratigraphic correlations and improve our understanding of the three-dimensional geometries of the phyllosilicate-rich layers. The layer geometries provide constraints on the timing of sedimentary deposition in Mawrth Vallis. [1] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2005) Science 307, 1576-1581. [2] Poulet, F. et al. (2005) Nature 438, 623-627.

  6. Deterministic and stochastic modeling of aquifer stratigraphy, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.B.; Castle, J.W.; Temples, T.J.

    2000-04-01

    Deterministic and stochastic methods of three-dimensional hydrogeologic modeling are applied to characterization of contaminated Eocene aquifers at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina. The results address several important issues, including the use of multiple types of data in creating high-resolution aquifer models and the application of sequence-stratigraphic constraints. Specific procedures used include defining grid architecture stratigraphically, upscaling, modeling lithologic properties, and creating multiple equiprobable realizations of aquifer stratigraphy. An important question answered by the study is how to incorporate gamma-ray borehole-geophysical data in areas of anomalous log response, which occurs commonly in aquifers and confining units of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and other areas. To overcome this problem, gamma-ray models were conditioned to grain-size and lithofacies realizations. The investigation contributes to identifying potential pathways for downward migration of contaminants, which have been detected in confined aquifers at the modeling site. The approach followed in this investigation produces quantitative, stratigraphically constrained, geocellular models that incorporate multiple types of data from borehole-geophysical logs and continuous cores. The use of core-based stochastic realizations in conditioning deterministic models provides the advantage of incorporating lithologic information based on direct observations of cores rather than using only indirect measurements from geophysical logs. The high resolution of the models is demonstrated by the representation of thin, discontinuous clay beds that act as local barriers to flow. The models are effective in depicting the contrasts in geometry and heterogeneity between sheet-like nearshore-transgressive sands and laterally discontinuous sands of complex shoreline environments.

  7. Evaluating process origins of sand-dominated fluvial stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, E.; Hajek, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sand-dominated fluvial stratigraphy is often interpreted as indicating times of relatively slow subsidence because of the assumption that fine sediment (silt and clay) is reworked or bypassed during periods of low accommodation. However, sand-dominated successions may instead represent proximal, coarse-grained reaches of paleo-river basins and/or fluvial systems with a sandy sediment supply. Differentiating between these cases is critical for accurately interpreting mass-extraction profiles, basin-subsidence rates, and paleo-river avulsion and migration behavior from ancient fluvial deposits. We explore the degree to which sand-rich accumulations reflect supply-driven progradation or accommodation-limited reworking, by re-evaluating the Castlegate Sandstone (Utah, USA) and the upper Williams Fork Formation (Colorado, USA) - two Upper Cretaceous sandy fluvial deposits previously interpreted as having formed during periods of relatively low accommodation. Both units comprise amalgamated channel and bar deposits with minor intra-channel and overbank mudstones. To constrain relative reworking, we quantify the preservation of bar deposits in each unit using detailed facies and channel-deposit mapping, and compare bar-deposit preservation to expected preservation statistics generated with object-based models spanning a range of boundary conditions. To estimate the grain-size distribution of paleo-sediment input, we leverage results of experimental work that shows both bed-material deposits and accumulations on the downstream side of bars ("interbar fines") sample suspended and wash loads of active flows. We measure grain-size distributions of bar deposits and interbar fines to reconstruct the relative sandiness of paleo-sediment supplies for both systems. By using these novel approaches to test whether sand-rich fluvial deposits reflect river systems with accommodation-limited reworking and/or particularly sand-rich sediment loads, we can gain insight into large

  8. Seismic Stratigraphy of Detroit Seamount: Observations From ODP Leg 197

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, B. C.; Scholl, D. W.

    2002-12-01

    In July-August of 2001, ODP Leg 197 drilled Detroit Seamount of the Emperor seamount chain to obtain cores of basaltic lava flows. Prior to drilling, the JOIDES Resolution, performed high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys in the vicinity of preliminary site locations to help confirm suitability for drilling, and to collect digital seismic data. At least two seismic lines (about 10 km in length) cross directly over each of the two drill sites. On Detroit Seamount, a significant west-northwest-striking normal fault occurs in the basement with the hanging wall to the northeast. The apparent offset in the basement increases to the northwest from approximately 160 m to nearly 450 m. Normal faults with offsets on the order of tens of meters occur to the north east of the primary basement escarpment. Upward termination of sediment reflections near the escarpment suggests concurrent faulting and deposition. The lower section of the Meiji sediment drift sequence appears to have been blown over the basement topography, suggesting the faulted basement could have been channeling flow of the Meiji current. A channel in sea floor topography coincides with the faulted basement. The topography of the sediment bedforms also exhibit large amplitudes deep in the section, which decrease in amplitude higher up in section, indicating that the sediment is not simply settling to the ocean floor, but is being transported and deposited along the sea floor. Currently, we are generating synthetic seismograms using physical properties and logging tool measurements from ODP Sites 883, 1203, and 1204. The synthetic seismograms will help correlate reflections from sedimentary and volcanic units with the stratigraphy observed at the drill sites.

  9. A reappraisal of the stratigraphy and chronology of Early Pliocene palaeontological sites from Lanzarote Island containing fossil terrestrial animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomoschitz, Alejandro; Sánchez Marco, Antonio; Huertas, María José; Betancort, Juan F.; Isern, Arnau; Sanz, Elena; Meco, Joaquín

    2016-11-01

    The Famara massif, in the north of Lanzarote Island, constitutes the remains of a former island inhabited by the oldest known vertebrate fauna of the Canary archipelago off the coast of Africa. In this study, new ages are offered for the underlying and overlying basaltic lava flows of two paleontological sites. The island's three major palaeontological sites, which contain remains of this ancient fauna (Valle Grande, Valle Chico and Fuente de Gusa), are intercorrelated according to their lithologies, sedimentology, palaeontological content and geochronology. The new K/Ar age interval for the fossiliferous sedimentary deposits ranges between 4.3 ± 0.7 and 3.78 ± 0.71 Ma, within the Early Pliocene, and shows that the first known terrestrial animals in Lanzarote were present on the island for about 500 ka. The principal component of the deposits is a bioclastic calcarenite of aeolian origin (sand sheet deposits), which is present in all three sites and constitutes 65% of the beds. The remaining 35% is of fluvial-aeolian origin (mainly stream deposits). All the beds contain the same fossils (insect egg pods, land snails, avian eggshells and tortoise eggshells). The local palaeogeography and the formation of the deposits were conditioned by a flat plain, larger than 16 km2, over which aeolian sands moved freely with a prevailing NNE-WSW wind direction. In agreement with previous investigations, the palaeoclimate in this interval (ca. 4.3 to 3.8 Ma) must have been mainly dry with some rainy episodes.

  10. Sedimentological and Geophysical Signatures of a Relict Tidal Inlet along a Wave-Dominated Barrier, Assateague Island, Maryland, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seminack, C. T.; Buynevich, I. V.; Grimes, Z. T.; Griffis, N.; Goble, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Assateague Island is a classic example of a retrograding barrier island, with its recent geological history punctuated by episodes of overwash and breaching. However, in addition to a number of historical inlets, parts of the island may owe their origin to relict (pre-historic) channels. The present study was conducted north of the Virginia-Maryland border, focusing on a narrow segment of the island fronting the Green Run Bay. The site lies north of the historical Green Run Inlet that was active until 1880, however, there is no geological evidence that it migrated southward from the Green Run Bay. More than 4 km of high-resolution ground-penetrating radar (GPR) images, complemented with sediment cores and multi-dating techniques, were used to reconstruct the geological legacy of this older barrier segment. Our findings suggest that a backbarrier paleo-channel still visible within the Green Run Bay corresponds to a large (>380 m wide, 3.0-3.5 m thick) channel cut-and-fill structure revealed in GPR images. The channel fill consists of tangential- to sigmoidal-oblique, southward-dipping reflections downlapping onto channel lag facies, which overlie subhorizontal bay-fill strata. Hummocky reflections in a shore-normal channel transect suggest partial preservation of inlet-related bedforms, believed to be associated with the channel closure. Radiocarbon samples of Mollusk shells from the bay fill yield radiocarbon ages of 4630-2400 cal BP (calibrated years before 1950). The paleo-channel facies overlying the bay deposits exhibits a fining-upward sequence, with a mean grain size range of 0.44-2.43 φ. The first set of optical dates indicates that the inlet fill is 660±70 cal BP (AD 1220-1360). The paleo-channel fill does not extend to the south and therefore is a separate relict feature that predates the historical Green Run Inlet. Based on geophysical and core data, the paleo-tidal prism of the relict channel is 17x106 m3. Following the closure of the inlet, a series

  11. Sedimentology, Petrography and Microfacies of the Paleogene Carbonate Sequence - Yaxcopoil-1 Borehole (Chicxulub, Yucatan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Sanchez, E.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-05-01

    Chicxulub crater is one the three largest known impact craters on Earth, formed 66 Ma-old, with multi-ring basin morphology. Crater is located in northwestern Yucatan, southern Gulf of Mexico, with rim diameter of 200 km and crater center at Chicxulub Perto in the coastline. It is buried beneath the carbonate and evaporitic Cenozoic sequence. Study of the structure requires geophysics and drilling, with several boreholes drilled in the peninsula. The Yaxcopoil-1 borehole was drilled south of Merida, about 62 km from center, as part of the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Program. One of the main objectives was to determine the role of the Chicxulub impact event in the K/Pg mass extinction and boundary events. We present a sedimentological and petrological study of the carbonate sequence in the interval from 404 m to 792 m overlying the K/Pg boundary. The well reached a depth of 1510.6 m. In this interval, we identified twelve units marked by different lithological and sedimentological changes, and supplemented by thin section analysis. Facies are composed mainly of marls, argillaceous, limestones, dolomitized limestones, calcareous breccias and calcarenites with shales thin beds. From the microfacies study we observed several major changes in the microfacies. From bottom of the sequence several textural changes cyclic from mudstone to bioclastic planktic foraminiferal wackestone, bioclastic packstone and some bioclastic grainstone. Two textures dominated in the calcareous sequence: bioclastic wackestone and packstone microfacies. From the microfacies study, we derived inferences on stable environmental conditions. We observed benthic and planktic foraminiferal layers. The benthic foraminifera strongly depend on environmental parameters, such as nutrient supply or oxygenation of the sea bottom water in the Paleocene and Eocene. Changes suggest occurrence of a progradational event, with a relative increase in sea level very slowly, with the sediment enough to overcome

  12. Preliminary Investigation of Linkages Between Arctic Pingos and Subsurface Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casavant, R.; Skirvin, S.; Patel, C.; Burr, D.

    2008-12-01

    This NASA-SETI supported study investigates the distribution of pingos (elliptically-shaped ice-rich topographic mounds) across 2300 square kilometers of the central coastal plain of Arctic Alaska in relation to the shallow geological framework that exists immediately beneath them. Pingos in the central North Slope of Alaska are classified as being of the closed or hydrostatic type. Their genesis is often assigned to freezing and cryogenic uplift of near-surface saturated thaw lake sediments that are exposed as lakes are drained and/or become choked with sediments. Although thaw lakes appear rather ubiquitous across the study area, pingos do not. Pingo distributions can be categorized as either clusters of elements or as relatively dispersed. Spatial statistical analysis reveals that pingo distribution is non-random and clustered. The analysis also took into account that pingo distribution is a function of preferential preservation between modern rivers channels that cross the study area. Pingo distributions and frequency were tested in relation to the location and type of stratigraphic and sedimentological features that characterized the shallow subsurface across the study area. Subsurface interpretation was derived mostly from oil well wireline logs. Gamma ray logs for more than 160 wells were used to define, correlate and assess the connectivity and conductivity of shallow and near-surface stratigraphic units between wells. Assessed also were major facies changes and the type and locations of subsurface structures such as major basement-to-surface faults and folds. The surface and near-surface truncation and subcropping of tilted, alternating units of permeable coarse-grained and confining fine- grained units were also mapped in relation to pingo locations. Preliminary and intriguing findings will be presented which contribute to the hypothesis that pingo genesis, location, and variations in morphology could be, in part, linked to a well-documented and active

  13. Sedimentology of a Tidally-Influenced Fluvial Zone (TIFZ): Columbia River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Prokocki, E.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Nicholas, A. P.; Sandbach, S.; Simpson, C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper quantifies, for the first time, the surface morphology and subsurface structure of deposits in the tidally-influenced fluvial zone (TIFZ) of the Columbia River, NW USA. Channel and bed morphology are quantified using multi-beam echosounding, with the subsurface sedimentology revealed using Ground Penetrating Radar and a Parametric Echosounder, combined with shallow (< 5m) cores. Data from the landward, fluvially-dominated, tidally-altered region is characterised by medium-scale dune deposits that are indistinguishable from those of purely fluvial origin. The central minimum "energy flux divergence" (EFD) region displays a highly complex structure. This comprises classic signatures associated with the turbidity maximum that occur away from the main channel in distributaries, backwater bays, tidal creeks and bar remnants (e.g. increased proportion of silt, and prevalence of long, low-angle lateral accretion surfaces associated with fine deposition on point bars; Inclined Heterolithic Stratification). However, closer to the main channel in the landward section of the minimum EFD region an anabranching planform dominates and bar vertical grain size trends display a coarse-fine-coarse succession. These bars are characterised by coarser-grained dune deposits at their base, pervasive sand-silt in the central part of the bar with smaller sand dunes on the surface or steep bar margin sets in the bartails. The finer-grained part of this succession is interpreted as a subtle tidal influence on relatively stable bars with vertical accretion that undergoes reworking by wave action. In the seaward part of the minimum EFD region, close to the main channel, long, low-angle surfaces predominate, although some steep bar margin and dune deposits are still present. Silts are found as laminae within sand deposits, and dunes in this zone are small, more symmetrical, or absent entirely. Overall, the sedimentology of the Columbia River TIFZ does not correspond well to other

  14. Sedimentological characteristics of the surficial deposits of the Jal Az-Zor area, Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bakri, D.; Kittaneh, W.; Shublaq, W.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the nature and characteristics of the surface geology of the Jal Az-Zor escarpment and the adjacent area, to better understand the sedimentology of desert landforms, and the main factors controlling depositional and diagenetic processes active in this environment. The oldest outcrops along the face of the escarpment are the sand and sandstone sequences of the Mutla and Jal Az-Zor Formations of the Kuwait Group (Neogene). Gravelly deposits of the upper member of the Kuwait Group, Dibdibba Formation (Pleistocene) are restricted to a few hillocks and ridges in the summit area of the escarpment. The Neogene deposits in most of the study area are overlain by a veneer of unconsolidated Holocene sediments. These were classified, according to their morphological setting and field occurrence, into: coastal deposits (intertidal mud, sabkha deposits, and sand dunes) and inland deposits (sand drifts, slope deposits, wadi fills, residual deposits and playa deposits). Wind-born quartzitic sand is the most common Holocene sediment in the study area indicating the dominance of the aeolian processes. Gypsum and carbonate present as cementing materials or in the form of gypcrete and calcrete, respectively, are characteristic sedimentological features of the pre-Holocene deposits. Gypcrete and gypsum cement are abundant in the upper section of the escarpment and decreases downward, whereas the carbonate (calcrete) shows a reverse pattern, i.e., it becomes more dominant in the lower section of the escarpment. The source of sulphate ions in the groundwater that is responsible for the development of gypcrete is believed to be the evaporites in the lower section of the Neogene sequence. The source of ions for the formation of calcrete and calcite cement is less understood due to the lack of significant primary carbonates in the near-surface deposits. It is believed that the nature and distribution of the chemically precipitated material (gypsum

  15. Fire and Fish: Using Radiocarbon And Stratigraphy To Discern The Impact Of Wildfire On Fish Metapopulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffrath, K. R.; Finch, C.; Belmont, P.; Budy, P.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires have profound and variable impacts on erosion, channel morphology, and aquatic habitat. Previous research has quantified post-fire geomorphic response on event and millennial timescales. While these studies have informed our understanding of post-fire geomorphic response during the Holocene, we have yet to fully understand the variability of post-wildfire geomorphic response and how it might change in response to changing climate. Response of aquatic biota is just as variable as post-wildfire response yet we know very little about effects on metapopulations and how management decisions affect aquatic populations. Barriers to movement are installed to isolate native fish populations and prescribed fire and thinning are used to try to reduce future wildfire severity and extent. In order to improve understanding of the implications of management decisions, we evaluated geomorphic response and synchronicity of wildfires over the Holocene relative to the impact to the metapopulation of Bonneville cutthroat trout from a recent wildfire. The Twitchell Canyon fire burned 45,000 acres near Beaver, UT in July 2010. Over 30% of the area burned at high severity, which included two major headwater streams that sustained a trout population. In summer 2011, monsoonal thunderstorms caused massive debris flows and sheetflow erosion that altered channel morphology and aquatic habitat in the burned area. A previously robust, non-native trout fishery was nearly extirpated as a result of the geomorphic response to the wildfire. We used radiocarbon dating of burned material to determine how often headwater streams burned synchronously over the Holocene. Radiocarbon dates are associated with field observations of stratigraphy in order to infer geomorphic response to historic wildfires. Thirty samples were collected from sediment layers in 10 alluvial fans distributed among three watersheds (two burned and one unburned in the 2010 fire). Preliminary results suggest that we

  16. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentation patterns in the western Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polyak, L.; Bischof, J.; Ortiz, J.D.; Darby, D.A.; Channell, J.E.T.; Xuan, C.; Kaufman, D.S.; Lovlie, R.; Schneider, D.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Adler, R.E.; Council, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean obtained on the 2005 HOTRAX and some earlier expeditions have been analyzed to develop a stratigraphic correlation from the Alaskan Chukchi margin to the Northwind and Mendeleev-Alpha ridges. The correlation was primarily based on terrigenous sediment composition that is not affected by diagenetic processes as strongly as the biogenic component, and paleomagnetic inclination records. Chronostratigraphic control was provided by 14C dating and amino-acid racemization ages, as well as correlation to earlier established Arctic Ocean stratigraphies. Distribution of sedimentary units across the western Arctic indicates that sedimentation rates decrease from tens of centimeters per kyr on the Alaskan margin to a few centimeters on the southern ends of Northwind and Mendeleev ridges and just a few millimeters on the ridges in the interior of the Amerasia basin. This sedimentation pattern suggests that Late Quaternary sediment transport and deposition, except for turbidites at the basin bottom, were generally controlled by ice concentration (and thus melt-out rate) and transportation distance from sources, with local variances related to subsurface currents. In the long term, most sediment was probably delivered to the core sites by icebergs during glacial periods, with a significant contribution from sea ice. During glacial maxima very fine-grained sediment was deposited with sedimentation rates greatly reduced away from the margins to a hiatus of several kyr duration as shown for the Last Glacial Maximum. This sedimentary environment was possibly related to a very solid ice cover and reduced melt-out over a large part of the western Arctic Ocean.

  17. Stratigraphy and formation of clays, sulfates, and hydrated silica within a depression in Coprates Catena, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, Catherine M.; Bishop, Janice L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the morphology, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of light-toned layered deposits within a trough of Coprates Catena, centered at -15°N, 300°E. One of the deposits in the eastern portion of the trough contains numerous hydrated minerals, including Al-phyllosilicates, Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates, hydrated silica, hydrated sulfates, jarosite and acid alteration products characterized by a spectral doublet between 2.2 and 2.3 µm, and weakly hydrated materials. The Al-phyllosilicates are observed both stratigraphically above and below the Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate unit, which is a rare and perhaps unique association on Mars. Most of the western light-toned layered deposit underlies a terraced fan. This deposit contains hydrated materials, including Al-phyllosilicates and Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates. Dip measurements indicate that both the eastern and western deposits dip toward the center of the trough, indicating that they postdate formation of the trough and are consequently Late Hesperian or younger in age. Volcanic ash, most likely erupted during formation of the pit crater in the eastern portion of the trough, seems to best explain our observations for several of the units. Valleys sourced from water along the plateau may have flowed into the trough and altered the sediments, with changing aqueous chemistries over time resulting in the diverse range of mineralogies now observed in the eastern light-toned deposit. Our results reveal a complex sedimentary and aqueous history within the Coprates Catena trough, indicating that localized habitable conditions were possible relatively late in Martian history at a time when colder, drier conditions likely dominated the majority of the planet.

  18. Sedimentological, archeological and historical evidences of paleoclimatic changes during the holocene in the lagoon of Venice (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonardi, M.; Canal, E.; Cavazzoni, S.

    1997-12-31

    Sedimentological investigations and archeological and historical information have allowed to correlate paleoenvironmental and coastline variations, in the Lagoon of Venice, to climatic changes during the Holocene. In particular, we report the results of a detailed study of Holocene sediments, from salt marshes and small islands, taken above and below a level with well dated archeological findings that gave a good indication of the mean sea level.

  19. Sedimentological and radiochemical characteristics of marsh deposits from Assateague Island and the adjacent vicinity, Maryland and Virginia, following Hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Christopher G.; Marot, Marci E.; Ellis, Alisha M.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.; Bernier, Julie C.; Adams, C. Scott

    2015-09-15

    This report serves as an archive for sedimentological and radiochemical data derived from the surface sediments and marsh cores collected March 26–April 4, 2014. Select surficial data are available for the additional sampling periods October 21–30, 2014. Downloadable data are available as Excel spreadsheets and as JPEG files. Additional files include: Field documentation, x-radiographs, photographs, detailed results of sediment grain size analyses, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata (data downloads).

  20. Sequence stratigraphy as a tool for interpretation of Cockfield and Yegua Formations in southwestern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, B.E.; Voorhies, S.L.

    1988-09-01

    Sequence stratigraphy, which consists largely of old well-established concepts recently given new validity by the advances made in seismic stratigraphic interpretation, involves grouping strata into genetically and chronostratigraphically constrained units. Peter R. Vail and his coworkers have demonstrated that these units (depositional sequences and systems tracts) comprise predictable depositional and lithologic facies. The Cockfield and Yegua Formations of southwestern Louisiana provide some very clear examples of features predicted by the Vail model. Sequence stratigraphy is shown to be applicable to the Gulf Coast subsurface and to have important predictive capabilities that represent a significant advance in their understanding of sedimentary basins.

  1. Acoustic stratigraphy of Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho: late Quaternary sedimentation patterns in a simple half-graben

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    A 277-km network of high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, supplemented with a sidescan-sonar mosaic of the lake floor, was collected in Bear Lake, Utah–Idaho, in order to explore the sedimentary framework of the lake's paleoclimate record. The acoustic stratigraphy is tied to a 120 m deep, continuously cored drill hole in the lake. Based on the age model for the drill core, the oldest continuously mapped acoustic reflector in the data set has an age of about 100 ka, although older sediments were locally imaged. The acoustic stratigraphy of the sediments below the lake indicates that the basin developed primarily as a simple half-graben, with a steep normal-fault margin on the east and a flexural margin on the west. As expected for a basin controlled by a listric master fault, seismic reflections steepen and diverge toward the fault, bounding eastward-thickening sediment wedges. Secondary normal faults west of the master fault were imaged beneath the lake and many of these faults show progressively increasing offset with depth and age. Several faults cut the youngest sediments in the lake as well as the modern lake floor. The relative simplicity of the sedimentary sequence is interrupted in the northwestern part of the basin by a unit that is interpreted as a large (4 × 10 km) paleodelta of the Bear River. The delta overlies a horizon with an age of about 97 ka, outcrops at the lake floor and is onlapped by much of the uppermost sequence of lake sediments. A feature interpreted as a wave-cut bench occurs in many places on the western side of the lake. The base of this bench occurs at a depth (22–24 m) similar to that (20–25 m) of the distal surface of the paleodelta. Pinch-outs of sedimentary units are common in relatively shallow water on the gentle western margin of the basin and little Holocene sediment has accumulated in water depths of less than 30 m. On the steep eastern margin of the basin, sediments commonly onlap the hanging wall of the East

  2. Sedimentology and diagenesis of misoa C-2 reservoir, VLE-305/326 area, block V, Lamar Field, Maracaibe Lake, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera de Casas, L.; Chacartegui, F. )

    1993-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to characterize the Upper Eocene C-2 reservoir using sedimentological, petrophysical and biostratigraphic parameters. The reservoir quality was evaluated by defining its physical attributes, geometry, areal distribution and orientation, from facies analysis of sedimentary units identified in core samples. In evaluating the sedimentary features of the Misoa C-2 reservoir in VLE 305/326 area, Block V, Lamar Field, Maracaibo Lake, 2,000' of cores from five wells (named VLe-339, VLE-720, VLE -723, VLe-754, LPG-1211) were analyzed. The sedimentary sequence studied represents upper-middle deltaic plain deposits with no marine influence. These deposits were identified as interdistributary channels, crevasse splays and interdistributary bays deposited in a northward prograding system. Seven sedimentary facies were defined from the physical, chemical and biological features observed in all cores. These facies were petrophysically and petrographically characterized then grouped in six sedimentary units which were then correlated over the entire area. One hundred well logs were correlated using sedimentological criteria. Finally, four flow units were identified in the reservoir using the sedimentological parameters, petrophysical data and production behavior. A surface trend analysis program utilizing thickness values resulted in contours, trends, residuals and isometry maps of each unit with a generalized southwest-northeast trend orientation. It was determined that facies distribution in the units controls the reservoir quality. These results are the main input into reservoir simulation. An accurate reservoir modeling is needed to prepare for optimizing secondary oil recovery.

  3. The sedimentology of a palaeo ice stream bed: an in-depth analysis of the Wielkopolska (Poland) MSGL field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, Matteo; Phillips, Emrys; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Rea, Brice; Carr, Simon; Ely, Jeremy; Ribolini, Adriano; Szuman, Izabela

    2015-04-01

    Ice streams are fast flowing (up to 1000s m per year) corridors of ice within ice sheets. They are the main arteries through which ice sheets lose mass, accounting for up to 90% of Antarctic discharge. Ice streams are also dynamic and can widen, migrate or shut down on decadal timescales. One of the key controlling factors on ice stream behaviour is the interaction with a soft sedimentary bed, but the exact mechanism of this interaction is far from known or well understood. Studies on the sedimentology of ice stream bed are challenging in present-day glaciated regions or in offshore palaeo-settings. However, some good examples of onshore and 'relatively' easy-to-access palaeo ice stream beds do exist. In Europe, one of these settings is in Poland, near the town of Poznan, in the Wielkopolska region. Mega-Scale Glacial Lineations (MSGLs), the characterising landform signature of ice stream beds, have been investigated using state of the art sedimentological techniques. These include, extensive investigation of multiple trenches excavated along the crests and flanks of MSGL and ground penetrating radar profiling of large sections of the MSGL field. Micro-sedimentological characterisation via thin sections, AMS and CT scans, as well as various lab analyses, including granulometry and mineralogy were also undertaken. Results indicate a homogeneous facies (to >3m), across all depths and locations within the palaeo ice stream bed. This has profound implications on the formation of MSGLs and the dynamics of ice stream flow.

  4. The mid-Holocene to present large-scale morphodynamic and coupled fluvial-tidal sedimentologic evolution of the Lower Columbia River, WA/OR, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokocki, E.; Best, J.; Ashworth, P. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Nicholas, A. P.; Simpson, C.; Wang, H.; Sandbach, S.; Keevil, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of four deep sediment cores (≤ 20m depth), in conjunction with shallow vibracores (≤ 6m depth), obtained from mid-channel bars in the lower Columbia River (LCR), USA, provides new insights into the mid-Holocene to present geomorphic and coupled sedimentological evolution of the LCR fluvial-tidal zone. These data reveal that the relatively coarse-grained basal sediments of mid-channel bars positioned across the LCR tidal-fluvial hydraulic regime were deposited at c. 2.5 to 2.0 ka, and not at c. 8.0 ka as previously reported. Thus, these younger depositional ages of basal sediments relative to previous studies coupled with the overall sedimentary architecture of these bars, and the absence of a temporal lag in the timing of basal sedimentation between bars located from river kilometer 51.1 to 29.3, challenges existing models that these bars represent: (a) estuarine tidal-bars, or (b) bay-head deltaic deposits. Within the context of post glacial Holocene sea-level rise, our results suggest these bars represent vertical construction of a LCR fluvial top-set from c. 2.5- 2.0 ka to the present, as the regional rate of sea-level rise slowed to ≤ 1.4 mmyr-1. Within this geomorphic context, two tidal-fluvial sedimentological signatures can be identified: (i) in the downstream direction, basal bar deposits incorporate a larger percentage of finer-grained interbeds, and (ii) vertically stacked silt/very-fine sand draped current ripple cross-laminae become prevalent from approximately 5 m in depth to the bar surfaces. The preservation of finer-grained interbeds within basal bar deposits is reasoned to be caused by the flocculation and settling of suspended sediment enhanced by the turbidity maximum. The stacked draped current ripple cross-laminae are interpreted to result from tidal-currents generating asymmetric current ripples that were draped by fine-sediment entrained by wind-waves, which fell-out of suspension during

  5. Variable scale channel avulsion history using fan architecture and stratigraphy, and sediment provenance of Sutlej-Yamuna fans in northwest Gangetic plains during Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit; Gupta, Sanjeev; Sinha, Rajiv; Densmore, Alexander; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Carter, Andrew; Van-Dijk, Wout M.; Joshi, Suneel; Nayak, Nibedita; Mason, Philippa J.; Kumar, Dewashish; Mondal, Setbandhu; Murray, Andrew; Rai, Shiv P.; Shekhar, Shashank

    2016-04-01

    Channel avulsion during fan development controls distribution and deposition of channel sandbodies and hence alluvial architecture of a fan system. Variable scale spatio-temporal information of fluvial responses to past climate changes is stored in these channel sandbodies. Further these channel sandbodies form fluvial aquifers in alluvial fans and therefore understanding of alluvial architecture and stratigraphy of a fan is crucial for development of groundwater management strategies. In this study we used multiple approaches to map subsurface fluvial aquifer architecture and alluvial stratigraphy, and to estimate sediment provenance using U-Pb dating of detrital zircon grains of Sutlej-Yamuna fan system in northwest India. Satellite imagery based geomorphic mapping shows two large fan system with interfan area. The fan surfaces show presence of major and minor paleochannels. 2D resistivity tomography along several transects across fan surfaces shows distinct layers with contrasting resistivity values. These geo-electric facies corresponds to presence of channel sandbodies beneath surface signature of paleochannels and finer floodplain deposits useful to demarcate lateral extent of subsurface channel sandbodies. A more detailed subsurface stratigraphy using ~50m deep sediment cores and their luminescence ages from across fan surface shows presence of multi-storey sandbodies (MSB) separated by floodplain fines. Within the MSB, individual channel deposits are identified by presence of channel scour surfaces located at coarse sand overlying fine sand layer. Depositional ages of MSB's ranges from ~81 ka (late MIS5) to ~15 ka (MIS2) with major depositional break during MIS3 in parts of the fans. Sediment aggradation rate varies laterally across fan surface as well as vertically down the depth with an average rate of 0.54 mm/year. Fluvial channel persistence for studied time interval (about last 81 ka BP) shows major depositional breaks (and possible incision) at ~41 ka

  6. Tomographic Stratigraphy: a Possible New Framework for Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, B. A.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Stratification of the Earth's interior into spherically symmetric shells with boundaries that correspond to changes in composition or mineralogical phase is well established and represents a static view. The analysis of long wavelength features of recent 3-D mantle seismic velocity models suggests a somewhat different dynamic stratification, with rheological boundaries that do not always coincide with the known mineralogical transitions. This is reflected in different patterns of the power spectrum, radial correlation functions and overall distribution of degree 2 and 3 anomalies, which dominate the mantle below 300 km depth. The outermost shell (Moho to ~250km depth), i.e. "heterosphere", contains surface tectonics, with cooling plates and cratons, and is characterized by strongest lateral heterogeneity. Its lower boundary is defined by a decrease in power by an order of magnitude.The next shell ( 300 ~ 1000 km depth), i.e. "extended transition zone" (ETZ), includes the 400 and 660 km discontinuities. Many slabs stagnate above 660 km, but some flatten above 1000 km. While there is no sharp global seismic discontinuity at this depth, the long wavelength structure in the ETZ is strongly decorrelated from that in the rest of the lower mantle.Striking features in the bulk of the lower mantle below the ETZ are: 1) long wavelength structure dominated by harmonic degrees 2 and 3 whose expression is strongest at the base of the mantle (the so-called LLSVPs); 2) embedded within them, about 20 broad low velocity plumes, whose vertical orientation indicates the absence of mantle "wind". Notably, some of them are deflected horizontally around 1000 km depth or give rise to thinner conduits in the ETZ, suggesting contrasting rheology above and below that depth. The steep heterogeneity gradient in the last 500 km of the mantle indicates the presence of a boundary layer with possibly distinct chemical composition. The "tomographic stratigraphy" presented here may be a useful

  7. High-resolution palaeoecological and sedimentological records as a tool for understanding pre- and protohistoric settlement and land-use systems in Sandy Flanders (NW Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court-Picon, Mona; Polfliet, Tim; Serbruyns, Lynn; de Smedt, Phillippe; Zwertvaegher, Ann; Bats, Machteld; de Reu, Jeroen; Werbrouck, Ilke; Verniers, Jacques; Crombe, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    aims at analyzing the settlement dynamics of the area of Sandy Flanders in terms of environmental potentials (theory of "wandering farmsteads") and the human impact ("enculturation") on the landscape. Likewise, we seek to investigate the reasons why other areas, which were inhabited in previous periods (e.g. the Moervaart area) were apparently not attractive anymore from the Metal Ages onwards. Indeed, to determine the suitability of a certain land type for a certain activity, it is necessary to understand the different types of land use (hunting-gathering, farming, …), the soil characteristics and the environment at different time intervals. During a large field campaign, a 70m long trench was dug through the deepest part of the former Moervaart lake, revealing alternating layers of (organic) lake marl and peat(y clay) indicating warmer/colder and drier/wetter phases. In addition, 15 mechanical corings have been made at four different locations within the depression, in large palaeochannels that cross the palaeolake, and on its borders. Both trench and corings were extensively sampled for palaeoenvironmental and sedimentological analyses and for OSL and 14C-dating. We present here the first results of the palaeoecological (mainly palynology, but also plant macroremains, charcoal, diatoms, ostracods, mollusks, beetles and Chironomideae) and sedimentological (water content, LOI, magnetic susceptibility, gamma-density) approaches, which provide new insights in the palaeolandscape evolution of this area during the Late Glacial and the early Holocene, in order to evaluate in detail how and to which degree this evolution determined the pre- and protohistoric occupation and exploitation within Sandy Flanders. Furthermore, significant emphasis is placed on the impact of prehistoric populations on both regional and local landscapes.

  8. Mineralogical and sedimentological study of gypsiferous sands from the Saharian Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Roberta; Bella, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    A mineralogical and sedimentological study was carried out in Quaternary aeolian sands from the Sahara Desert (Tunisia and Libya). Gypsum resulted to be the dominant mineral (65%), whereas quartz resulted to be in significant amount (25%) in all samples. Aragonite and calcite, related to marine organisms, was found especially in the Libyan sands. Gypsum grains appear in euhedral crystals or as polycrystalline twinned crystals. Crystal habitus is pseudo-octahedric or tabular. Due to the euhedral habitus, the forms of the grains is discoid or bladed but with a low roundness. Quartz grains are mostly ialin or orange as the grain surfaces are coated with thin hematite films. Quartz grains dominantly appear as subhedral crystals. Habitus is prismatic or hexagonal. Due to the subhedral habitus, quartz grain forms can be classified as bladed with a low roundness. A minor amount of quartz grains is formed by well rounded and spherical grains showing frosted and pitted surfaces. The particle size analysis indicated that the studied sediments consist of well sorted very fine sands. The studied Quaternary aeolian sands can be classified as gypsiferous sands. Notwithstanding sands are well sorted, they are immature under a mineralogical and textural point of view. Particularly, gypsum formed in present or past sabkha and the amount of marine bioclasts should suggest that the source area of the Lybian gypsum grains could be a sabkha near the sea.

  9. Biostratigraphy, sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the northern Danube Basin: Ratkovce 1 well case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybár, Samuel; Halásová, Eva; Hudáčková, Natália; Kováč, Michal; Kováčová, Marianna; Šarinová, Katarína; Šujan, Michal

    2015-02-01

    The Ratkovce 1 well, drilled in the Blatné depocenter of the northern Danube Basin penetrated the Miocene sedimentary record with a total thickness of 2000 m. Biostratigraphically, the NN4, NN5 and NN6 Zones of calcareous nannoplankton were documented; CPN7 and CPN8 foraminifer Zones (N9, 10, 11 of the global foraminiferal zonation; and MMi4a; MMi5 and MMi6 of the Mediterranean foraminiferal zonation were recognized. Sedimentology was based on description of well core material, and together with SP and RT logs, used to characterize paleoenvironmental conditions of the deposition. Five sedimentary facies were reconstructed: (1) fan-delta to onshore environment which developed during the Lower Badenian; (2) followed by the Lower Badenian proximal slope gravity currents sediments; (3) distal slope turbidites were deposited in the Lower and Upper Badenian; (4) at the very end of the Upper Badenian and during the Sarmatian a coastal plain of normal marine to brackish environment developed; (5) sedimentation finished with the Pannonian-Pliocene shallow lacustrine to alluvial plain deposits. The provenance analysis records that the sediment of the well-cores was derived from crystalline basement granitoides and gneisses and from the Permian to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary cover and nappe units of the Western Carpathians and the Eastern Alps. Moreover, the Lower Badenian volcanism was an important source of sediments in the lower part of the sequence.

  10. Mineralogical, geochemical, and sedimentological characteristics of clay deposits from central Uganda and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyakairu, George W. A.; Kurzweil, Hans; Koeberl, Christian

    2002-07-01

    In Uganda, Precambrian rocks have undergone extensive weathering and erosion, and are locally altered to form considerable clay deposits. We have studied the geochemical, mineralogical, and sedimentological characteristics of clay deposits from central Uganda to determine their composition, source rocks, deposition, and possible use in local industry. Samples were collected from the Kajjansi, Kitiko, Masooli, and Ntawo deposits (near Kampala), all of which are currently used for both industrial and traditional brick, tile, and pottery manufacture. The deposits are widely scattered individual basins, with clays deposited under lacustrine and alluvial environmental conditions, and were all found to belong to the sedimentary group. The clays are composed of silt-sand fractions and predominantly consist of kaolinite and have a relatively high Fe 2O 3 content. The studied deposits are chemically homogeneous, except for the samples richer in sand fraction, which have higher SiO 2 and K 2O values. The chemistry of the studied samples, compared to European clays, shows that they need elaborate treatment to render them suitable for ceramics production. An analysis of the chemical and mineralogical composition of the clays has demonstrated that, taken as a whole, they possess characteristics satisfactory for brick production.

  11. Workshop on the Martian Northern Plains: Sedimentological, periglacial, and paleoclimatic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S. (Editor); Parker, T. J. (Editor); Moore, J. M. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The penultimate meeting in the Mars Surface and Atmosphere Through Time (MSATT) series of workshops was held on the campus of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, Alaska, 12-13 Aug. 1993. This meeting, entitled 'The Martian Northern Plains: Sedimentological, Periglacial, and Paleoclimatic Evolution,' hosted by the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, was designed to help foster an exchange of ideas among researchers of the Mars science community and the terrestrial glacial and periglacial science community. The technical sessions of the workshop were complemented by field trips to the Alaska Range and to the Fairbanks area and a low-altitude chartered overflight to the Arctic Costal Plain, so that, including these trips, the meeting lasted from 9-14 Aug. 1993. The meeting, field trips, and overflight were organized and partially funded by the Lunar and Planetary Institute and the MSATT Study Group. The major share of logistical support was provided by the Publications and Program Services Department of the Lunar and Planetary Institute. The workshop site was selected to allow easy access to field exposures of active glaciers and glacial and periglacial landforms. In all, 25 scientists attended the workshop, 24 scientists (plus 4 guests and the meeting coordinator) participated in the field trips, and 18 took part in the overflight. This meeting reaffirmed the value of expertly led geologic field trips conducted in association with topical workshops.

  12. Sedimentology and reservoir characteristics of tight gas sandstones, Frontier formation, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F.; Tillman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    The lower Frontier Formation, Moxa arch area, southwestern Wyoming, is one of the most prolific gas-producing formations in the Rocky Mountain region. Lowr Frontier sediments were deposited as strandplains and coalescing wave-dominated deltas that prograding into the western margin of the Cretaceous interior seaway during the Cenomanian. In this study, sedimentologic, petrologic, and stratigraphic analyses were conducted on cores and logs of Frontier wells from the Whiskey Buttes and Moxa fields. Twelve sedimentary facies have been identified. The most common sequence consists of burrowed to cross-bedded near shore marine (delta-front and inner-shelf) sandstones disconformably overlain by crossbedded (active) to deformed (abandoned) distributary-channel sandstones and conglomerates. The sequence is capped by delta-plain mudstones and silty sandstones. Tight-gas sandstone reservoir facies are nonhomogenous and include crevasse splay, abandoned and active distributary channel, shoreface, foreshore, and inner shelf sandstones. Distributary-channel facies represent 80% of perforated intervals in wells in the southern part of the Moxa area, but only 50% to the north. Channel sandstone bodies are occasionally stacked, occur on the same stratigraphic horizon, and are laterally discontinuous with numerous permeability barriers. Percentage of perforated intervals in upper shoreface and foreshore facies increases from 20% in the south to 50% in the north.

  13. Sedimentology and reservoir characteristics of tight gas sandstones, Frontier formation, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F.; Tillman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    The lower Frontier Formation, Moxa arch area, southwestern Wyoming, is one of the most prolific gas-producing formations in the Rocky Mountain region. Lower Frontier sediments were deposited as strandplains and coalescing wave-dominated deltas that prograding into the western margin of the Cretaceous interior seaway during the Cenomanian. In this study, sedimentologic, petrologic, and stratigraphic analyses were conducted on cores and logs of Frontier wells from the Whiskey Buttes and Moxa fields. Twelve sedimentary facies have been identified. The most common sequence consists of burrowed to cross-bedded near shore marine (delta-front and inner-shelf) sandstones disconformably overlain by cross-bedded (active) to deformed (abandoned) distributary-channel sandstones and conglomerates. The sequence is capped by delta-plain mudstones and silty sandstones. Tight-gas sandstone reservoir facies are non-homogenous and include crevasse splay, abandoned and active distributary channel, shoreface, foreshore, and inner shelf sandstones. Distributary-channel facies represent 80% of perforated intervals in wells in the southern part of the Moxa area, but only 50% to the north. Channel sandstone bodies are occasionally stacked, occur on the same stratigraphic horizon, and are laterally discontinuous with numerous permeability barriers. Percentage of perforated intervals in upper shoreface and foreshore facies increases from 20% in the south to 50% in the north.

  14. Depositional environments and regional sedimentological control of Caseyville Formation, southern Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.J.; Pius Weibel, C. )

    1989-08-01

    During the Morrowan Epoch (earliest Pennsylvanian), the Eastern Interior basins of the US were characterized by a fluviatile system draining generally southwestward from central Pennsylvanian to the Arkoma basin of northern Arkansas. In the southern Illinois basin, the system deposited the Casevylle Formation, consisting of two prominent cliff-forming quartzose sandstones with common quartz gravel, separated and succeeded by finer-grained, clastic intervals. Outcrop mapping in southernmost Illinois indicates that these cliff formers, the Battery Rock and Pounds Sandstone members, are laterally widespread and generally continuous, but variable in thickness. The underlying Wayside Sandstone Member, the intervening Drury Shale Member, and strata immediately succeeding the Caseyville consist of variable sequences of shales, siltstones, thin-bedded sandstones, and local ledge-forming sandstones. Rare lenticular coals are scattered through the Caseyville. The authors interpret the sandstone members to be dominantly of fluviatile-deltaic origin and the intervening, finger-grained intervals to be of deltaic and, at least in part, marginal-marine origin. Marine strata within the Drury Shale Member and the strata immediately overlying the Caseyville Formation contain scattered body fossils and trace fossils suggesting marine deposition. The Wayside/Battery Rock and Drury/Pounds cycles are tentatively correlated with similar cycles in the Appalachian and Arkoma basins. This correlation suggests regional sedimentological control.

  15. New interpretation of the Gran Dolina-TD6 bearing Homo antecessor deposits through sedimentological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Campaña, I.; Pérez-González, A.; Benito-Calvo, A.; Rosell, J.; Blasco, R.; de Castro, J. M. Bermúdez; Carbonell, E.; Arsuaga, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Gran Dolina is a cavity infilled by at least 25 m of Pleistocene sediments. This sequence contains the TD6 stratigraphic unit, whose records include around 170 hominin bones that have allowed the definition of a new species, Homo antecessor. This fossil accumulation was studied as a single assemblage and interpreted as a succession of several human home bases. We propose a complete stratigraphic context and sedimentological interpretation for TD6, analyzing the relationships between the sedimentary facies, the clasts and archaeo-palaeontological remains. The TD6 unit has been divided into three sub-units and 13 layers. Nine sedimentary facies have been defined. Hominin remains appear related to three different sedimentary facies: debris flow facies, channel facies and floodplain facies. They show three kinds of distribution: first a group of scattered fossils, then a group with layers of fossils in fluvial facies, and third a group with a layer of fossils in mixed fluvial and gravity flow facies. The results of this work suggest that some of these hominin remains accumulated in the cave by geological processes, coming from the adjacent slope above the cave or the cave entry, as the palaeogeography and sedimentary characteristics of these allochthonous facies suggest. PMID:27713562

  16. New interpretation of the Gran Dolina-TD6 bearing Homo antecessor deposits through sedimentological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campaña, I.; Pérez-González, A.; Benito-Calvo, A.; Rosell, J.; Blasco, R.; de Castro, J. M. Bermúdez; Carbonell, E.; Arsuaga, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    Gran Dolina is a cavity infilled by at least 25 m of Pleistocene sediments. This sequence contains the TD6 stratigraphic unit, whose records include around 170 hominin bones that have allowed the definition of a new species, Homo antecessor. This fossil accumulation was studied as a single assemblage and interpreted as a succession of several human home bases. We propose a complete stratigraphic context and sedimentological interpretation for TD6, analyzing the relationships between the sedimentary facies, the clasts and archaeo-palaeontological remains. The TD6 unit has been divided into three sub-units and 13 layers. Nine sedimentary facies have been defined. Hominin remains appear related to three different sedimentary facies: debris flow facies, channel facies and floodplain facies. They show three kinds of distribution: first a group of scattered fossils, then a group with layers of fossils in fluvial facies, and third a group with a layer of fossils in mixed fluvial and gravity flow facies. The results of this work suggest that some of these hominin remains accumulated in the cave by geological processes, coming from the adjacent slope above the cave or the cave entry, as the palaeogeography and sedimentary characteristics of these allochthonous facies suggest.

  17. Critical zone study in Korea: integration of hydrogeology, mineralogy, sedimentology and molecular biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Jo, K. N.; Lee, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Critical Zone (CZ) is the topmost layer of the Earth ranging from the vegetation canopy down to the soil, groundwater, and bedrock that sustains our ecosystem including human life. This CZ is being greatly influenced by the climate change and anthropogenic forces. We introduce the Critical Zone Frontier Research Laboratory (CFRL), a critical zone research lab recently funded by the Korean government for 2015-2020. The objective of CFRL is to unravel the relationships between climate and CZ changes to propose a prediction model for future responses of CZ to climate change. For this ultimate goal, we establish multiple CZ observatories in Kangwon areas and investigate soil, groundwater, and cave environments by integration of hydrogeology, mineralogy, sedimentology and molecular biogeochemistry. This study will enhance our understanding about CZ and local resolution of a climate change model. This research is financially supported by the Basic Research Laboratory Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

  18. Reservoir sedimentology of the M. Triassic Halfway Fm. , Wembley field, Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, A.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The Middle Triassic Halfway Formation of west-central Alberta is interpreted as a prograding barrier island shoreline deposit. A detailed sedimentological study based on 130 cored sequences and 300 well logs in the Wembley area (Townships 72-73, Ranges 7-9, West of Sixth Meridian) has enabled the author to delineate the geometry of reservoir units, interpreted as tidal inlet fill, upper shoreface, and flood-tidal delta sandstones. Complete shoreface sequences average 15 m in thickness and form mappable trends tens of kilometers along depositional strike, but are only continuous for a few kilometers across dip, with the intervening areas having been reworked by one or more migrating tidal inlets. The strike-elongate inlet-fill sequences cover more than 50% of the field area. They are typically 10 m thick and exhibit the best porosities due to leaching of bioclastic material in the lower part of the fill, but the down-cutting of successive inlets makes the reservoir sands laterally discontinuous. Inlet sands extend up-dip into flood-tidal delta sandbodies that average 4 m in thickness and pinch out in lagoonal muds. Although showing much greater lateral continuity than the other reservoir units, the upper shoreface sandstones do not exhibit biomoldic porosity and are a less productive unit. Such an understanding of the architecture of the various reservoir components present in a barrier island shoreline system is essential when planning a secondary recovery program.

  19. Variation in sedimentology and architecture of Eocene alluvial strata, Wind River and Washakie basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, P.E.; Larson, E.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Eocene continental, alluvial strata of the Wind River Formation (Wind River Basin) and the Cathedral Bluffs Member of the Wasatch Formation (Washakie basin) provide two examples of Laramide intermontane basin aggradation. These alluvial sediments primarily represent overbank flood deposits marginal to channel complexes. Their sedimentology and architecture, although grossly similar, appear to vary somewhat with proximity to Laramide uplifts. In both cases, repetitive sedimentation on the floodplain produced a succession of depositional couplets, each composed of a light-gray sand overlain by a red clay-rich silt or sand. The lower sands are tabular bodies that, near their distal margins, taper discernibly. They commonly display planar and ripple-drift laminations. Upper clay-rich layers, which are laminated, are also generally tabular. Those floodplain strata depositional proximal to Laramide uplifts show little evidence of scouring prior to deposition of the next, overlying couplet. Most of these sedimentary layers, therefore, are laterally continuous (up to 2 km). This alluvial architecture results in relatively uniform porosity laterally within depositional units but variable porosity stratigraphically through the sequence. In contrast, alluvial sediments deposited farther from the Laramide uplifts have undergone sporadic incision (either during rising flood stage or subsequently) followed by aggradation. As a result, many of these floodplain couplets are discontinuous laterally and, hence, exhibit large-scale lateral variability in porosity. Both alluvial sequences have undergone similar types and extents of burial diagenesis.

  20. High-resolution sedimentological and subsidence analysis of the Late Neogene, Pannonian Basin, Hungary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juhasz, E.; Muller, P.; Toth-Makk, A.; Hamor, T.; Farkas-Bulla, J.; Suto-Szentai, M.; Phillips, R.L.; Ricketts, B.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed sedimentological and paleontological analyses were carried out on more than 13,000 m of core from ten boreholes in the Late Neogene sediments of the Pannonian Basin, Hungary. These data provide the basis for determining the character of high-order depositional cycles and their stacking patterns. In the Late Neogene sediments of the Pannonian Basin there are two third-order sequences: the Late Miocene and the Pliocene ones. The Miocene sequence shows a regressive, upward-coarsening trend. There are four distinguishable sedimentary units in this sequence: the basal transgressive, the lower aggradational, the progradational and the upper aggradational units. The Pliocene sequence is also of aggradational character. The progradation does not coincide in time in the wells within the basin. The character of the relative water-level curves is similar throughout the basin but shows only very faint similarity to the sea-level curve. Therefore, it is unlikely that eustasy played any significant role in the pattern of basin filling. Rather, the dominant controls were the rapidly changing basin subsidence and high sedimentation rates, together with possible climatic factors.

  1. Chronology and stratigraphy for the MIS 2 damming of glacial Lake Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, E. C.; Attig, J. W.; Rawling, J. E., III

    2015-12-01

    Glacial Lake Wisconsin formed during the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 glaciation when the Green Bay Lobe (GBL) of the Laurentide Ice Sheet dammed the Wisconsin River at the Baraboo Hills in south-central Wisconsin. Despite nearly a century of research, the precise chronology for the Green Bay Lobe's advance to and retreat from its maximum position, and the resulting damming and subsequent drainage of glacial Lake Wisconsin, remains unsettled (e.g., Colgan, 1992; Attig et al., 2011; Ullman et al., 2014). Age estimates from core collected in ice-proximal lacustrine sediment beyond the glacial margin provide chronologic constraint for ice margin fluctuations that controlled glacial Lake Wisconsin's formation and drainage. Additional cores collected in glacial sediment at and behind the MIS 2 ice margin provide stratigraphic evidence for the dynamics of the GBL during the end of advance to, and the start of retreat from, the MIS 2 maximum. The combined data from these cores suggest that glacial Lake Wisconsin may have filled only once to its highest stage during the MIS 2 maximum, after ice blocked both the east end of the Baraboo Hills and the south end of the Devils Lake gorge. When the ice reached its maximum position and blocked the north end of the gorge, Devils Lake was isolated from glacial Lake Wisconsin and rose to a higher level. Radiocarbon and OSL ages from the Devils Lake gorge indicate that the GBL advanced to the MIS 2 maximum position by 24.6 ka, and remained at or near that location through 19.2 ± 3.2 ka. Radiocarbon ages from lacustrine sediment in a sub-basin of glacial Lake Wisconsin indicate that ice continued to block the Wisconsin River between 21.6 ka and 17.4 ka. The stratigraphy evident in cores at the Devils Lake gorge and south of the Baraboo Hills indicates that ice thinned and advanced immediately prior to retreat, likely in response to reduced basal shear stress as the bed of the glacier thawed.

  2. Stratigraphy and paleontology of Lower Permian rocks north of Cananea, northern Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, R.B.; Moore, T.E.; Gray, F.

    2002-01-01

    Lower Permian carbonate and overlying red bed clastic rocks are present in a 2 km2 stratigraphic window in the vicinity of Rancho La Cueva, Santa Cruz sheet (scale 1:50,000), northern Sonora, Mexico. This exposure lies unconformably beneath predominantly intermediate Upper Cretaceous volcanics yielding 40Ar/39Ar ages of 73.4?? 0.18 and 71.1 ?? 0.35 Ma. The lower part of the Permian succession consists of light- to medium-gray colored limestones of the Colina Limestone, with a minimum thickness of 235 m. Sedimentary features suggest shallow water, slightly restricted depositional environments. Although lacking observable fossils for the most part, two intervals of richly fossiliferous, silicified shell beds are present near the base and top of the Colina Limestone. The lower fauna consist mostly of gastropods and bivalves. The presence of a new microdomatid gastropod species. Glyptospira sonorensis n. sp., close to Glytospira arelela Plas, suggests a late Wolfcampian age for this horizon. The upper fauna are predominantly molluscan dominated (gastropods and bivalves), but some brachiopods (productids and the rhynchonellid genus Pontisia) are also present. Gastropod genera include Bellerophon, Warthia, Euomphalus (represented by the species, Euomphalus kaibabensis Chronic), Baylea, Worthenia, Naticopsis, Goniasma, Kinishbia, Cibecuia, and Glyptospira. The gastropods suggest a Leonardian (late Early Permian) age for this horizon, and many of the species have previously been recorded from the Supai Group and Kaibab Formation of northern and central Arizona. The Colina Limestone is conformably overlain by 11.2 m of light-gray lime mudstone and dolostone, assigned here to the Epitaph Dolomite, which in turn is succeeded by 58.8 m of red-colored sandstone and gray lime mudstone, assigned here to the Scherrer Formation. This Lower Permian succession is significant because it further strengthens the stratigraphic ties of southeastern Arizona rocks with those of northern

  3. Chemostratigraphic and sedimentologic evolution of Wajid Group (Wajid Sandstone): An outcrop analog study from the Cambrian to Permian, SW Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassin, Mohamed A.; Abdullatif, Osman M.

    2017-02-01

    The Paleozoic age succession in Saudi Arabia represents one of the most prolific petroleum producing systems in the Arabian Peninsula. This succession is also considered important for unconventional tight gas and shale gas reservoirs. The Wajid Group (Wajid Sandstone) in SW Saudi Arabia consists of four formations, namely, Dibsiyah (Lower and Upper), Sanamah, Khusayyayn and Juwayl from bottom to top. This study investigates the major oxides, trace and rare earth elements for the Wajid Group formations in southwestern Saudi Arabia. We characterize and compare the sandstone types, provenance, tectonic setting, and climate. Moreover, we applied the chemostratigraphic technique for stratigraphic differentiation. Concentrations of certain elements indicate that Wajid Group was deposited in a passive continental margin. The geochemical analysis reveals that Wajid Group sediments were likely derived from the upper and bulk continental crust and mafic igneous provenance. The elemental geochemical data has been applied in this study to improve the stratigraphic subdivision and correlation. Using selected elements, geochemical vertical profiles, binary, and ternary diagrams allow clearly distinguishing between Wajid Group formations. Thus supports the established formation boundaries that constructed using lithostratigraphy and sedimentology. The geochemical elements variation between formations can be related to differences in rock-forming minerals, facies change, climate, and provenance. The results of this study may help in constraining and correlating complex facies strata and can be used as a guide for stratigraphic correlations in the subsurface within the Wajid basin and other equivalent stratigraphic successions within Saudi Arabia.

  4. Stratigraphy of the Tethys Himalaya and the Age of the India/Asia Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, E.; Hu, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Tethys Himalayan stratigraphic record (Sciunnach and Garzanti 2012 Earth Sci.Rev.) excludes any postulated orogenic event associated with ophiolite obduction, arc-continent, or continent-continent collision in the Late Cretaceous, when multifold increase in terrigenous supply indicates dynamic upwelling heralding the Deccan megaeruptions (Garzanti and Hu 2014 Gondwana Res.). In the Paleocene, quartzarenites deposited at subequatorial latitudes were followed by widespread carbonate-ramp deposits. Passive-margin carbonate sedimentation lasted until the earliest Ypresian in Zanskar (SBZ 7/8; 55-54 Ma; Nicora et al. 1987 Riv. It. Pal. Strat.; Jenks et al. 2009 EGU Abs.) and until the early Lutetian in south Tibet (SBZ 10 to SBZ 13a; 53-51 to 49-47 Ma). The unconformably overlying volcaniclastic to ophioliticlastic sediments document progradation of a shallow-marine to subaerial delta fed from the Asian margin in the north. These units seal Neotethyan history and testify that the India/Asia collision was well underway by the middle Ypresian in the Zanskar traverse (SBZ 9/10; 53-51 Ma; Green et al. 2008 J. Geol.; Jenks et al. 2009) and by the middle Lutetian in the Tibetan traverse (P11/early P12; 43 Ma), when even shallow seas finally withdrew from above the nascent proto-Himalaya. The India/Asia collision has long been dated at around the Paleocene/Eocene boundary (~56 Ma; Garzanti et al. 1987 Geodin. Acta) by the major unconformity identified within carbonate-platform sediments and ascribed to flexural uplift shortly following the arrival of the edge of continental India at the Transhimalayan trench (Zhang et al., 2012; DeCelles et al. 2014 Tectonics). Collision onset can be dated directly in deep-water successions of the distal Indian margin by radiolarian biostratigraphy coupled with zircon chronostratigraphy, but due to the uncertainties of both methods estimates range from ≥50 Ma (Wang et al. 2011 J. Geol.) to 60/58.5 Ma (DeCelles et al. 2014; Wu et al., 2014 Am. J. Sci.).

  5. Stratigraphic/sedimentological analysis of a Lower Cretaceous carbonate succession in the Actopan Platform, Hidalgo State, Mexico: documentation on an Early Albian deepening event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León-Francisco, J. M.; Murillo-Muñeton, G.; Franco-Navarrete, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    The Actopan Platform, exposed near the town of Actopan, in the State of Hidalgo, is part of the system of carbonate platforms developed extensively in Mexico during the Early Cretaceous. However, despite the excellent outcrops and easy access this platform is still poorly studied. A sedimentologic and biostratigraphic analyisis of a 345 m-thick stratigraphic section located in the southwestern region of this platform was conducted. The collected information allowed, for the first time, to document the presence of deep-water calcareous facies of Lower Albian age. The results of the analysis of depositional textures, sedimentary structures, fossil content, and diagenetic attributes were used to identify facies and their depositional environments, and to define facies associations. The lower part of the section consists of the following facies: skeletal-peloidal mudstone/wackestone, peloidal-skeletal packstone/grainstone, oncoid packstone, boundstone of Chondrodonta sp. and requinids, and cryptalgal laminites. The depositional environments of the facies vary from shallow subtidal (lagoonal) to supratidal. These facies stack forming subtidal and peritidal cycles. The Choffatella decipiens benthic foraminifer is common in this facies and indicates an Aptian age. This shallow-water sedimentary package is normally overlain by a succession of pelagic facies with intercalations of gravity-induced, coarse-grained carbonate deposits including turbidites and debris flows. Colomiella recta, Favusella sp. and Microcalamoides diversus are typical planktic microfossils in this calcareous unit indicating a Lower Albian age. The large-scale trend of this Lower Cretaceous facies succession allowed documenting a deepening event that took place in the Early Albian and that had not been previously reported in this platform.

  6. Regional Stratigraphy and Petroleum Systems of the Michigan Basin, North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    Although more than 100 years of research have gone into deciphering the stratigraphy of the Michigan basin of North America, it remains a challenge to visualize the basin stratigraphy on a regional scale and to describe stratigraphic relations within the basin. Similar difficulties exist for visualizing and describing the regional distribution of petroleum source rocks and reservoir rocks. This publication addresses these difficulties by combining data on Paleozoic and Mesozoic stratigraphy and petroleum geology of the Michigan basin. The areal extent of this structural basin is presented along with data in eight schematic chronostratigraphic sections arranged from north to south, with time denoted in equal increments along the sections. The stratigraphic data are modified from American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) (1984), Johnson and others (1992), Sanford (1993), and Cross (1998), and the time scale is taken from Harland and others (1990). Informal North American chronostratigraphic terms from AAPG (1984) are shown in parentheses. Stratigraphic sequences as defined by Sloss (1963, 1988) and Wheeler (1963) also are included, as well as the locations of major petroleum source rocks and major petroleum plays. The stratigraphic units are colored according to predominant lithology, in order to emphasize general lithologic patterns and to provide a broad overview of the Michigan basin. For purposes of comparison, schematic depictions of stratigraphy and interpreted events in the Michigan basin and adjacent Appalachian basin are shown. The paper version of this map is available for purchase from the USGS Store.

  7. Morphology and stratigraphy of small barrier-lagoon systems in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, W.; Belknap, D.F.; Kelley, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The coast of Maine contains over 200 individual barrier-lagoon systems, most quite small, with an aggregate length of nearly 100 km. Although they represent less than 5% of the tidally influenced coastline of Maine, they are widely distributed and occur in a variety of dynamic regimes and physiographic regions. Their morphology and backbarrier stratigraphy are different from better studied coastal plain systems, and provide important clues to the Holocene evolution of the Maine coast. In a study of geomorphic form and backbarrier stratigraphy, inlet processes and Holocene sea-level rise have been identified as the principal controls on coarse-grained barrier stratigraphy. Barriers in Maine are found in five distinct geomorphic forms, identified herein as: barrier spits, pocket barriers, double tombolos, cuspate barriers and looped barriers. The few long sandy beaches in southwestern Maine are mostly barrier spits. The remainder of the barrier types is composed primarily of gravel or mixed sand and gravel. The barriers protect a variety of backbarrier environments: fresh and brackish ponds, lagoons and fresh- and saltwater marshes. The barriers may or may not have inlets. Normal wave action, coarse-grain size and a deeply embayed coast result in barriers with steep, reflective profiles several meters above MHW. Occasional storm events completely wash over the barriers, building steep, lobate gravel fans along their landward margin. Few, if any, extensive storm layers are recognized as extending into the distal backbarrier environments, however. During sea-level rise and landward barrier retreat, this abrupt, storm-generated transition zone inters the backbarrier sediments. Statistical comparisons of barrier morphology, location and backbarrier environment type with backbarrier stratigraphy show that Holocene backbarrier stratigraphy is best predicted by the modern backbarrier environment type. This, in turn, is influenced most by the absence or presence, and long

  8. Stratigraphy and paleontology of Mid-Cretaceous rocks in Minnesota and contiguous areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, William Aubrey; Merewether, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    glacial drift and alluvium of Quaternary age. In Minnesota and adjoining areas, formations of mid-Cretaceous age commonly overlap the dissected surface of Precambrian rocks. The thickness of the lower Upper Cretaceous sequence ranges from about 223 m in eastern North Dakota and about 200 m in northeastern Nebraska to a featheredge in Minnesota and Iowa. These lower Upper Cretaceous formations are composed mainly of shale, siltstone, sandstone, and limestone units of marine and nonmarine origin and were deposited near the eastern shore of a transgressing and regressing epicontinental sea in Cenomanian Turonian Coniacian. and Santonian time. During the late Cenoanian, the strandline was in Minnesota and was oriented generally northnortheast. Interpretations of the depositional environments of the strata and of fossils from outcrops and from clasts in glacial drift indicate that the Cretaceous seaway extended from this region northeastward across Canada to Greenland in the Turonian Coniacian, and Santonian. The Cretaceous formations are deformed into broad, shallow synclines in eastern North and South Dakota and in northeastern Nebraska. A west-trending anticline, the Sioux uplift, separates the synclines in southeastern South Dakota. Sparse evidence of minor faulting in the formations exists in northeastern South Dakota, along the strike of a major southwest-trending zone of tectonism in the Precambrian basement rocks. The structural relief in the region, on the top of the Greenhorn Formation, is at least 250 m between eastern North Dakota and northeastern Minnesota, and at least 200 m between northeastern Nebraska and northwestern Iowa. A comparison of the Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Minnesota region and of areas in Wyoming indicates that some marine transgressions and regressions were synchronous in the two regions. The transgression during Greenhorn time, the regression during early Carlile time, and the transgression dur

  9. Stratigraphy of a proposed wind farm site southeast of Block Island: Utilization of borehole samples, downhole logging, and seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Dane P. H.

    Seismic stratigraphy, sedimentology, lithostratigraphy, downhole geophysical logging, mineralogy, and palynology were used to study and interpret the upper 70 meters of the inner continental shelf sediments within a proposed wind farm site located approximately two to three nautical miles to the southeast of Block Island, Rhode Island. Core samples and downhole logging collected from borings drilled for geotechnical purposes at proposed wind turbine sites along with seismic surveys in the surrounding area provide the data for this study. Cretaceous coastal plain sediments that consist of non-marine to marine sand, silt, and clay are found overlying bedrock at a contact depth beyond the sampling depth of this study. The upper Cretaceous sediments sampled in borings are correlated with the Magothy/Matawan formations described regionally from New Jersey to Nantucket. An unconformity formed through sub-aerial, fluvial, marine, and glacial erosion marks the upper strata of the Cretaceous sediments separating them from the overlying deposits. The majority of Quaternary deposits overlying the unconformity represent the advance, pulsing, and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet that reached its southern terminus in the area of Block Island approximately 25,000 to 21,000 years before present. The sequence consists of a basal glacial till overlain by sediments deposited by meltwater environments ranging from deltaic to proglacial lakefloor. A late Pleistocene to early Holocene unconformity marks the top of the glacial sequence and was formed after glacial retreat through fluvial and subaerial erosion/deposition. Overlying the glacial sequence are sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene and Holocene consisting of interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Sampling of these sediments was limited and surficial reflectors in seismic profiles were masked due to a hard bottom return. However, two depositional periods are interpreted as representing fluvial and estuarine

  10. After a century-Revised Paleogene coal stratigraphy, correlation, and deposition, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Spear, Brianne D.; Kinney, Scott A.; Purchase, Peter A.; Gallagher, Craig M.

    2010-01-01

    The stratigraphy, correlation, mapping, and depositional history of coal-bearing strata in the Paleogene Fort Union and Wasatch Formations in the Powder River Basin were mainly based on measurement and description of outcrops during the early 20th century. Subsequently, the quality and quantity of data improved with (1) exploration and development of oil, gas, and coal during the middle 20th century and (2) the onset of coalbed methane (CBM) development during the late 20th and early 21st centuries that resulted in the drilling of more than 26,000 closely spaced wells with accompanying geophysical logs. The closeness of the data control points, which average 0.5 mi (805 m) apart, made for better accuracy in the subsurface delineation and correlation of coal beds that greatly facilitated the construction of regional stratigraphic cross sections and the assessment of resources. The drillhole data show that coal beds previously mapped as merged coal zones, such as the Wyodak coal zone in the Wyoming part of the Powder River Basin, gradually thinned into several discontinuous beds and sequentially split into as many as 7 hierarchical orders westward and northward. The thinning and splitting of coal beds in these directions were accompanied by as much as a ten-fold increase in the thicknesses of sandstone-dominated intervals within the Wyodak coal zone. This probably resulted from thrust loading by the eastern front of the Bighorn uplift accompanied by vertical displacement along lineaments that caused subsidence of the western axial part of the Powder River Basin during Laramide deformation in Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary time. Accommodation space was thereby created for synsedimentary alluvial infilling that controlled thickening, thinning, splitting, pinching out, and areal distribution of coal beds. Equally important was differential subsidence between this main accommodation space and adjoining areas, which influenced the overlapping, for example, of the

  11. Stratigraphy and multi-phase tectonic history of the Chukchi Borderland from MCS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, I.; Coakley, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Chukchi Edges project was designed to establish the relationship between the Chukchi Shelf and Borderland and indirectly test theories of opening for the Canada Basin. During this cruise, ~5300 km of 2D multi-channel seismic profiles and other geophysical measurements (swath bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sonobuoy refraction seismic) were collected from the RV Marcus G. Langseth across the transition between the Chukchi Shelf and Chukchi Borderland. These profiles reveal extended basins separated by faulted high-standing blocks. Basin stratigraphy can be subdivided on the basis of gross stratal geometry, reflection terminations and inferred unconformities. The wedge-shaped synrift sequences terminate against the basement highs and/or major faults, burying the basement topography. The inferred postrift seismic units are more nearly tabular, but thicken locally due to compaction of underlying synrift sediments. Reflection character is dominated by alternating high and low amplitude continuous reflectors which may be consistent with pelagic or turbidite sediments. Chaotic units are also observed, which may indicate mass-flow deposits. The truncated sediments over the basement highs of the Chukchi Shelf, Chukchi Plateau and Northwind Ridge suggest major erosion due both to glacial planation and earlier erosional events perhaps associated with basement uplift prior to or during rifting and extension. It is believed that the bulk of the synrift sediments are Mesozoic in age. Certainly Cenozoic sediments are also preserved in these basins, but the position of the boundary is uncertain. Locally, continuous reflectors are observed underlying the rift basin fill. These older units, of very uncertain age, would, if sampled, provide constraint on the history and affinities of the Chukchi Borderland. In addition to the extensional basins, a number of small symmetric basins are observed on the flanks of the Chukchi Plateau. These basins may be transtensional and argue for a

  12. An overview of the Cretaceous stratigraphy and facies development of the Yazd Block, western Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsen, Markus; Fürsich, Franz Theodor; Majidifard, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-04-01

    The Cretaceous successions of the Yazd Block, the western of three structural blocks of the Central-East Iranian Microcontinent (CEIM), have been studied using an integrated approach of litho-, bio- and sequence stratigraphy associated with litho-, bio- and microfacies analyses. The Cretaceous System of that area is in excess of 5 km thick and a generalized relative sea-level curve can be inferred from the facies and thickness development. This curve can be subdivided into two transgressive-regressive megacycles (TRMs), separated by a major tectonic unconformity in the Upper Turonian. TRM 1 comprises the Early Cretaceous to Middle Turonian, TRM 2 the Coniacian to Maastrichtian. TRM 1 starts with up to 1500-m-thick conglomerates and sandstones covering Palaeozoic-Triassic basement rocks, metasediments, or Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous granites. The basal tectonic unconformity, related to the Late Cimmerian event (Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary interval), shows a pronounced palaeo-relief that is levelled by the basal siliciclastic formations. Sparse biostratigraphic data from calcareous intercalations in the upper part of these strata indicate a Hauterivian to Barremian age. The Aptian facies development is marked by the onlap of thick-bedded, micritic carbonates with abundant orbitolinid foraminifera and rudists representing a large-scale shallow-marine carbonate platform system that fringed the Yazd Block in the north and west. These platforms are up to 1000 m thick and drowned during the middle to Late Aptian, followed by up to 1500-m-thick basinal marly sediments of Late Aptian to mid-Late Albian ages, representing the maximum relative sea-level during TRM 1. During the latest Albian-Middle Turonian, a gradual shallowing is indicated by progradation of shallow-water skeletal limestones separated by marl tongues, representing a carbonate ramp system. Strata of TRM 2 overlie older units along a regional angular unconformity and indicate tectonic stability and

  13. Reconstruction of the sedimentological environment and paleo-tsunami events offshore Jisr Az-Zarka (central Israel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyuleneva, Natalia; Braun, Yael; Suchkov, Igor; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Goodman-Tchernov, Beverly

    2015-04-01

    Previous research shows that cores retrieved offshore central Israel (Caesarea) have anomalous sedimentary sequences that correspond to at least three tsunami events. Identification of the tsunami horizons was carried out by quantifying the presence of a wide range of characteristics described in modern and paleotsunami analogs. In this study, a sediment core (219cm) was obtained from 15.3 m water depth, some 1.5 km to the south-west of the Crocodile River mouth, offshore the village of Jisr Az-Zarka, and ~4 km north of Caesarea. The core was sampled at 1 cm intervals for grain size and micropaleontological analyses. XRD and XRF analyses were also performed at coarser resolution. The aim of the study was to correlate anomalous layers in the core with previously identified tsunami layers off Caesarea and to test whether their expression differs, given the impact of the river runoff and land material input. An additional aim was to study the inter-event sediments to determine broader environmental changes. This is uniquely possible here because the maximum age of the deposits (<6yBP) and depth of the collection area negate the presence of sea-level change influence; and this portion of the coastline is considered tectonically quiet for at least 2000 years; thereby negating two possible effects on the sedimentological signatures. In this new core two tsunami horizons corresponding with known Caesarea events (~1200 yBP, perhaps 749 AD earthquake; and ~3500 yBP 'Santorini eruption') were recognized, and, one previously unidentified event, dated by 14C to 5.6-6 ka, was discerned as well. The Nile River has been the dominant and most stable source of terrigenous components in the study area, such as siliciclastic quartz for the sand fraction and smectite - for the clays. Thus, the prevailing marine settings are dominated by these two mineralogical components. XRD analysis of nine intervals in the core determined the following clay minerals: smectite, hydromica (illite

  14. The International Subcommission on Stratigraphic Classification of the International Commission on Stratigraphy: The Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The International Subcommission on Stratigraphic Classification (ISSC) was born in 1955 as an effort to promote awareness of stratigraphic principles and encourage worldwide standardization of stratigraphic approaches and terminology. The first major achievement of ISSC was the 1976 publication of the International Stratigraphic Guide. It was revised in 1994, with an abridged version appearing in 1999. These documents achieved their goals magnificently: cited innumerable times and forming the core of many national stratigraphic codes. As the discipline has evolved, particularly from technological advances and ocean drilling, new tools and methodologies have been developed and these have led to ever finer resolution of geological time and ever more exact correlation of stratigraphic units and events, thereby enhancing the understanding of the genesis of the geological record. Under the leadership of M. B. Cita, ISSC embarked in 2002 on a renewed initiative to disseminate to the global geological community these newer developments, and ultimately incorporate them into a third edition of the Guide. To this aim, traditional and new branches of stratigraphy are being treated: chemostratigraphy, cyclostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, lithostratigraphy, sequence stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and chronostratigraphy. An open-access review paper is dedicated to each and published in Newsletters on Stratigraphy. The next edition of the Guide will be inclusive of all branches of stratigraphy and also embrace igneous and metamorphic rocks. It is envisaged that a textbook on stratigraphy based on these papers and the revised Guide could prove a timely contribution, especially to younger generations of practitioners, and aid global communication and understanding of stratigraphic principles and methods.

  15. Bathymetry and seismic stratigraphy of East Greenland fjords and sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, Matthias; Sverre Laberg, Jan; Husum, Katrine; Olsen, Ingrid L.

    2014-05-01

    from post-glacial tectonic activity. Up to 180 ms two-way travel time thick acoustically stratified sequences dominate the fjord-fill and sound-fill stratigraphies. These deposits are suggested to reflect repeatedly changing physical conditions in a glacimarine environment where deposition occurred from suspension fall-out, ice rafting from icebergs and sea ice, as well as smaller-scale mass wasting. An acoustically transparent drape overlies these deposits rarely (e.g. in Rudis Bugt). Multiple acoustically transparent bodies with irregular geometries intercalated within the stratified deposits are suggested to reflect repeated larger-scale mass wasting, either from slope failures along fjord sides or related to glacier advances (e.g. in Nordfjord). Occasional distortions and blanking of reflections (e.g. in Nordfjord and Kong Oscar Fjord) might be related to relatively recent tectonic activity and fluid flow/gas expansion.

  16. MOSAIC: An organic geochemical and sedimentological database for marine surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavagna, Maria Luisa; Usman, Muhammed; De Avelar, Silvania; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Modern ocean sediments serve as the interface between the biosphere and the geosphere, play a key role in biogeochemical cycles and provide a window on how contemporary processes are written into the sedimentary record. Research over past decades has resulted in a wealth of information on the content and composition of organic matter in marine sediments, with ever-more sophisticated techniques continuing to yield information of greater detail and as an accelerating pace. However, there has been no attempt to synthesize this wealth of information. We are establishing a new database that incorporates information relevant to local, regional and global-scale assessment of the content, source and fate of organic materials accumulating in contemporary marine sediments. In the MOSAIC (Modern Ocean Sediment Archive and Inventory of Carbon) database, particular emphasis is placed on molecular and isotopic information, coupled with relevant contextual information (e.g., sedimentological properties) relevant to elucidating factors that influence the efficiency and nature of organic matter burial. The main features of MOSAIC include: (i) Emphasis on continental margin sediments as major loci of carbon burial, and as the interface between terrestrial and oceanic realms; (ii) Bulk to molecular-level organic geochemical properties and parameters, including concentration and isotopic compositions; (iii) Inclusion of extensive contextual data regarding the depositional setting, in particular with respect to sedimentological and redox characteristics. The ultimate goal is to create an open-access instrument, available on the web, to be utilized for research and education by the international community who can both contribute to, and interrogate the database. The submission will be accomplished by means of a pre-configured table available on the MOSAIC webpage. The information on the filled tables will be checked and eventually imported, via the Structural Query Language (SQL), into

  17. Sedimentological features of the surge emitted during the August, 2006 pyroclastic eruption at Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, G.; Goldstein, F.; Lavallee, Y.; Hanson, J. B.; Kueppers, U.; Robin, C.; Ramon, P.

    2009-12-01

    Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, is a stratovolcano, which began a new eruptive phase in 1999. Notable pyroclastic Density Currents (PDC) were generated in July (VEI 2) and August (VEI 3) 2006 and covered its N and W flanks. PDCs and associated lahars represent a major hazard for 20,000 inhabitants and an hydrological dam. The volcano has been monitored by the Instituto Geofisico of the Escuela Politécnica Nacional of Quito, since 1988. Field work carried out in 2009 provide information on the behavior of the fine-grained fraction of the PDC (i.e., surge) during transport and deposition. We mapped out the sedimentological characteristics of the deposits and distinguished three depositional environments: 1- The core of the deposit, up to several m in thickness, is confined to valleys and consists of poorly-sorted lapilli scoria and blocks (cm to m scale) and a small fraction of ash matrix. Ongoing analysis of the ash matrix will help to understand the link between the main PDC and the associated surge. 2- On ridges and outer margins of valleys, the deposits total a thickness of 10s to 100s cm and consist of fine- to coarse-grain ashes organized in cm-scale beds. Horizontal to cross bed laminations with 10-cm long wavelength prevail. They are typical of deposition under sustained high-energy current, which we associate with the flow of a surge. 3- In the distal part of surge deposits, we observe fine grained surge deposits with a thickness up to ca. 5 m. The characteristic structures are curved crested dunes, 10s of cm high and up to 10s of m long, with dip angles ranging from 15 to 35° and a strongly asymmetric shape. The steepest side tends to be the upslope face. Dunes show mainly a climbing structure, with beds cm in thickness, but some are more complicated, containing cut and fill structures, interpreted as late-stage pulses of energetic turbulence. No displacement dunes were observed in this area. Using the flow direction given by 100s of dunes, we provide

  18. The Ardross reservoir gridblock analogue: Sedimentology, statistical representivity, and flow upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ringrose, P.; Pickup, G.; Jensen, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have used a reservoir gridblock-sized outcrop (10m by 100m) of fluvio-deltaic sandstones to evaluate the importance of internal heterogeneity for a hypothetical waterflood displacement process. Using a dataset based on probe permeameter measurements taken from two vertical transacts representing {open_quotes}wells{close_quotes} (5cm sampling) and one {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} sample (exhaustive 1mm-spaced sampling), we evaluate the permeability variability at different lengthscales, the correlation characteristics (structure of the variogram, function), and larger-scale trends. We then relate these statistical measures to the sedimentology. We show how the sediment architecture influences the effective tensor permeability at the lamina and bed scale, and then calculate the effective relative permeability functions for a waterflood. We compare the degree of oil recovery from the formation: (a) using averaged borehole data and no geological structure, and (b) modelling the sediment architecture of the interwell volume using mixed stochastic/deterministic methods. We find that the sediment architecture has an important effect on flow performance, mainly due to bedscale capillary trapping and a consequent reduction in the effective oil mobility. The predicted oil recovery differs by 18% when these small-scale effects are included in the model. Traditional reservoir engineering methods, using averages permeability values, only prove acceptable in high-permeability and low-heterogeneity zones. The main outstanding challenge, represented by this illustration of sub-gridblock scale heterogeneity, is how to capture the relevant geological structure along with the inherent geo-statistical variability. An approach to this problem is proposed.

  19. A geochemical and sedimentological perspective of the life cycle of Neapolis harbor (Naples, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delile, H.; Goiran, J.-P.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Arnaud-Godet, F.; Romano, P.; Bravard, J.-P.

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ancient harbor of Naples in 2004 during construction work on an underground railway, geoarchaeological studies undertaken on the archaeological excavation have revealed the main stratigraphic and paleo-environmental levels of the harbor site near the Piazza Municipio. However, knowledge of the dynamics and paleo-environmental changes in the water column of the harbor, as well as the processes of transport and deposition of sediments that led to siltation and infilling of the harbor basin, has been lacking due to the absence of high-resolution data. To fill these gaps, we have undertaken a three-dimensional study (longitudinal, transverse and vertical) of the harbor deposits by carrying out geochemical and sedimentological analyses of four stratigraphic sections of the archaeological excavation. The results show that after a phase of relative calm during the first half of the 1st c. AD, siltation of the harbor progressed exponentially up to the 5th c. AD, when dredging operations were carried out to obtain a water level sufficient for the development of maritime and harbor activities. We attribute this acceleration of siltation to a combination of climatic, anthropic and volcanic factors. Volcanic activity was responsible for a high-energy, tsunami-type event during the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. From the 5th c. AD onwards, the harbor basin of Neapolis does not appear to have been functional as evidenced by its transformation into a lagoon following coastal progradation. The last stage of infilling was the development of a flood-dominated fan delta under the combined influences of climatic cooling in the Early Medieval Cool Period and agro-pastoral activities in the catchment area of the harbor. Several generations of paleo-channels, containing flash flood deposits, as well as sheet wash from sheet floods, are indicative of high environmental instability in this period.

  20. Hydrological and sedimentological variability of the peri-fluvial wetlands of the middle Loire river (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, E.; Kunesch, S.; Negrel, P.; Petelet-Giraud, E.

    2003-04-01

    With a catchment basin of 112,120 km^2 and a length of 1012 km, the Loire River is one of the most important fluvial hydrosystems in France. Notwithstanding numerous modifications (dikes, dams, nuclear power plants, gravel extractions), the Loire River hydrology has been saved from a total regularisation. Therefore, the spatial diversity of fluvial landforms creates a patchwork of wetlands: ox-bow lakes, dewatered channels... As one aim of this work was to determine the hydrological and sedimentological processes in the various wetlands, in a context of spatial variability of the fluvial landforms, we used a pluridisciplinarity approach: geomorphology, hydrology, geochemistry. The present study has targeted the functioning between the various hydro-geomorphologic units of the floodplain (main and secondary active channels, abandoned branches and the riverbank [alluvial] and perched aquifers), with regard to the spatial heterogeneity of the different fluxes and the temporal variations of bottom water level, full-bank stage and overflow discharge. In the upper part of the study area, mobile meanders prevail. The meanders migration results in oxbow lakes and the connection between the lakes and the other water reservoirs (e.g. river- and groundwaters) induce a strong lateral variability and a time delayed water input by the river as evidenced by the different geochemical and isotopic signatures. Downstream, the Loire River develops a multiple-channels pattern, of which numerous are abandoned. They are often dewatered along the year, only reconnected to the main channel during the periods of overflow discharges and the influence of the Loire riverwater is progressively substituted by the input of groundwaters (alluvial and perched aquifers). It appears that the submersion duration and the type of connection between the wetlands and the various reservoirs (inlet or outlet connection with the river, connection with the aquifers.) strongly influence the sedimentation rate

  1. Sedimentological control on Mn, and other trace elements, in groundwater of the Bengal delta.

    PubMed

    McArthur, J M; Sikdar, P K; Nath, B; Grassineau, N; Marshall, J D; Banerjee, D M

    2012-01-17

    To reveal what controls the concentration and distribution of possibly hazardous (Mn, U, Se, Cd, Bi, Pb) and nonhazardous (Fe, V, Mo, PO(4)) trace elements in groundwater of the Bengal delta, we mapped their concentrations in shallow groundwater (<60 mbgl) across 102 km(2) of West Bengal. Only Mn is a potential threat to health, with 55% of well water exceeding 0.3 mg/L, the current Indian limit for drinking water in the absence of an alternate source, and 75% exceeding the desirable limit of 0.1 mg/L. Concentrations of V are <3 μg/L. Concentrations of U, Se, Pb, Ni, Bi, and Cd, are below WHO guideline values. The distributions of Fe, Mn, As, V, Mo, U, PO(4), and δ(18)O in groundwater reflect subsurface sedimentology and sources of water. Areas of less negative δ(18)O reveal recharge by sources of evaporated water. Concentrations of Fe, As, Mo, and PO(4) are high in palaeo-channel groundwaters and low in palaeo-interfluvial groundwaters. Concentrations of U, V, and Mn, are low in palaeo-channel groundwaters and high in palaeo-interfluvial groundwaters. Concentrations of Fe and Mn are highest (18 and 6 mg/L respectively) at dual reduction-fronts that form strip interfaces at depth around the edges of palaeo-interfluvial aquifers. The fronts form as focused recharge carries dissolved organic carbon into the aquifer margins, which comprise brown, iron-oxide bearing, sand. At the Mn-reduction front, concentrations of V and Mo reach peak concentrations of 3 μg/L. At the Fe-reduction front, concentrations of PO(4) and As reach concentrations 3 mg/L and 150 μg/L respectively. Many groundwaters contain >10 mg/L of Cl, showing that they are contaminated by Cl of anthropogenic origin and that organic matter from in situ sanitation may contribute to driving reduction.

  2. Sedimentological effects of tsunamis, with particular reference to impact-generated and volcanogenic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Joanne; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    1988-01-01

    Impulse-generated waves (tsunamis) may be produced, at varying scales and global recurrence intervals (RI), by several processes. Meteorite-water impacts will produce tsunamis, and asteroid-scale impacts with associated mega-tsunamis may occur. A bolide-water impact would undoubtedly produce a major tsunami, whose sedimentological effects should be recognizable. Even a bolide-land impact might trigger major submarine landslides and thus tsunamis. In all posulated scenarios for the K/T boundary event, then, tsunamis are expected, and where to look for them must be determined, and how to distinguish deposits from different tsunamis. Also, because tsunamis decrease in height as they move away from their source, the proximal effects will differ by perhaps orders of magnitude from distal effects. Data on the characteristics of tsunamis at their origin are scarce. Some observations exist for tsunamis generated by thermonuclear explosions and for seismogenic tsunamis, and experimental work was conducted on impact-generated tsunamis. All tsunamis of interest have wave-lengths of 0(100) km and thus behave as shallow-water waves in all ocean depths. Typical wave periods are 0(10 to 100) minutes. The effect of these tsunamis can be estimated in the marine and coastal realm by calculating boundary shear stresses (expressed as U*, the shear velocity). An event layer at the K/T boundary in Texas occurs in mid-shelf muds. Only a large, long-period wave with a wave height of 0(50) m, is deemed sufficient to have produced this layer. Such wave heights imply a nearby volcanic explosion on the scale of Krakatau or larger, or a nearby submarine landslide also of great size, or a bolide-water impact in the ocean.

  3. Sedimentology, diagenesis, and oil habitat of Lower Cretaceous Qamchuqa Group, Northern Iraq

    SciTech Connect

    Al Shdidi, S.; Thomas, G.; Delfaud, J.

    1995-05-01

    The Zagros basin (Iraq) constitutes a rich petroleum province. The Lower Cretaceous Qamchuqa Group comprises on of its major reservoirs. Data from about 30 wells, drilled in a limited sector corresponding to a northwest-southeast anticlinal structure situated in the Kirkuk region, permit analysis of serveral sedimentological and diagenetic events that led to the formation of this reservoir. Facies changes took place and divided the structure into three parts: the northwestern part in which neritic facies dominate, the central part in which basinal influence is considerable, and the southeastern part that shows basinal mudstone type facies. The Lower Cretaceous carbonate platform in the northwestern part of the study area displays good primary porosity. During the course of burial, high secondary porosity related to dolomitization appeared. However, a major part of the porosity was produced when the reservoir was fractured during the Priabonian after the collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. Lopatin`s method suggests that organic matter maturation started during the Turonian (around 90 MA), whereas most of the maturation developed during the Miocene due to the rapid accumulation of foreland basin sediments containing evaporite facies (lower Fars Formation) followed by the accumulation of thick upper molasse-type sediments from the erosion of the Zagros Mountains. The accumulation of sediments enhanced the total tectonic subsidence. During this period, the relatively brief time spent by the source rock in a given temperature interval was compensated for by a rapid rise in temperature. This late thermal maturation period controlled most of the transformation of the organic matter into hydrocarbons.

  4. Sedimentologic succession of uplifted coral community, Urvina Bay, Isabela Island, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, M.W.; Hollander, D.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1954, along the west-central coast of Isabela Island, an upward movement of magma suddenly raised Urvina Bay over 6 m and exposed several square kilometers of carbonate deposits covering a young aa lava flow (around 1000 years old). Results from 6 transect lines across the uplift, 30 cores, and 10 trenches describe the sedimentologic and ecologic transition from barren basalt to diverse carbonate sediments with small coral reefs. Along horizontal transects spanning from 0 to 7 m paleowater depth, there is a seaward progression from beaches, mangroves, and basalt to thick deposits (> 1.6 m) of carbonate sands and small coral reefs. Variation in water depth, degree of wave exposure, and irregularity of the aa lava topography provided many microhabitats where coral, calcareous algae, and mollusks settled and grew. Eight hermatypic coral species are found throughout the shelf, and three species (i.e., Pavona clavus, Pocillopora damicornis, and Porites lobata) produced five small, isolated, monospecific, coral-reef frameworks. The vertical section seen in cores and trenches shows that calcium carbonate increased upward, whereas volcanic sediments decreased; however, episodic layers occur with high concentrations of basaltic sands. In vertical samples from the central portion of the shelf, the coral population changed from small, isolated colonies of Psammocora (Plesioseris) superficalis near the basalt basement to large reef-forming colonies of Pocillopora damicornis farther upsection. Reefs of the Galapagos Islands are small and less diverse than most Pacific reefs. Nonetheless, understanding their temporal successional development should throw light on the origin and history of larger oceanic reefs in the Pacific.

  5. Sedimentology of a Permian playa lake: the Boda Claystone Formation, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrád, Gyula; Sebe, Krisztina; Halász, Amadé; Babinszki, Edit

    2010-04-01

    The Upper Permian Boda Claystone Formation (BCF) in SW Hungary has been previously been identified as a saline lake deposit. A country-wide screening found this 800-1000 m thick succession the most suitable for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Hungary, and research into this formation has consequently been intensified since. The investigations included a detailed study of the sedimentological characteristics. Data obtained by mapping of the 25 km2 outcrop area of the formation and from more than 40 boreholes were processed. The sedimentary structures were investigated on outcrop to microscopic scales, and cycles in the succession were interpreted. The main lithofacies, sedimentary structures and ichnofossils are presented. They indicate that the major part of the succession was deposited in a playa mudflat and is not of lacustrine origin in a strict sense. The lake sediments are represented by laminated and ripple-marked/flaser-type cross-laminated claystones and siltstones and by massive dolomites; trace fossils include crawling traces and burrows. Partial or complete drying out of the lake commonly occurred after the formation of carbonate mud by evaporation. Periodic fluvial influx is recorded by cross-bedded sandstones and unsorted gravelly sandstones of up to pebble-sized angular grains. Fenestral and stromatolitic structures reflect the repeated appearance of playa mudflat conditions. The silty claystones, which compose the major part of the succession, lost their primary structures due to pedogenic processes and indicate prolonged subaerial intervals with soil formation and only ephemeral inundations. The presence of pedogenic carbonate concretions supports the interpretation of an arid climate and a relatively shallow groundwater table. Drying-out events shown by desiccation cracks and authigenic breccias can be traced all over the succession. The various facies form small-scale sedimentary cycles showing a shallowing-upward trend and the

  6. GEOELECTRICAL STRATIGRAPHY AND ANALYSIS OF A HYDROCARBON IMPACTED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently proposed geoelectrical model for hydrocarbon impacted sites predicts anomalously high conductivities coincident with aged contaminated zones. These high conductivities are attributed to an enhancement of mineral weathering resulting from byproducts of microbial redox p...

  7. Micropaleontology and sedimentology across the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary at La Ceiba (Mexico): impact-generated sediment gravity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arz, J. A.; Arenillas, I.; Soria, A. R.; Alegret, L.; Grajales-Nishimura, J. M.; Liesa, C. L.; Meléndez, A.; Molina, E.; Rosales, M. C.

    2001-10-01

    A micropaleontological and sedimentological study across the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary-officially Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/P) boundary from the La Ceiba section (Mexico) was performed to examine the K/P planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, the sedimentology of a controversial K/P clastic unit, and the benthic and planktic foraminiferal assemblages turnover across this boundary. The clastic unit is stratigraphically placed between two pelagic marly units (Méndez and Velasco Formations) and displays a fining-upward gradation similar to a turbidite sequence. This K/P clastic unit contains a basal subunit consisting of calcareous marls rich in millimeter-sized spherules (microtektites) altered to clay minerals, abundant detrital quartz, mica minerals, and shocked quartz. According to the K/P stratotype definition from El Kef (Tunisia), the K/P boundary at La Ceiba must be placed at the base of the clastic (microspherules) unit since it is equivalent to the base of the boundary clay at El Kef. A short hiatus affects the lower part of the Danian, including the Guembelitria cretacea and Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina biozones and the lower part of the Parasubbotina pseudobulloides biozone. Nearly all commonly recorded Maastrichtian planktic foraminiferal species were found in the uppermost Maastrichtian interval, and there was no support for a gradual mass extinction pattern in the terminal Cretaceous. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages suggest that the La Ceiba section was deposited at lower bathyal depths. Oscillating megatsunami waves and/or a sea-level lowstand cannot explain the nature of the clastic deposits because of the observed deposition paleodepth (more than 1000 m). There is also evidence that the clastic unit was deposited under a high-sedimentation rate in upper flow regimes and that was emplaced as a single-pulse event as turbidites. This datum and other sedimentological features support a sediment gravity flow genesis for the clastic unit. All these

  8. A review of Arbuckle Group strata in Kansas from a sedimentologic perspective: Insights for future research from past and recent studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.

    2000-01-01

    Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks (Cambrian and Lower Ordovician) represent an important record of sediment deposition in the history of the North American continent and they contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons (oil and gas) and base metal deposits. This is true for Kansas as well where Arbuckle strata account for approximately 40% of the volume of produced petroleum and known reserves. However, in comparison to their counterparts in other areas, such as the Ellenburger and Knox, Arbuckle rocks in Kansas remain relatively understudied, especially with respect to sedimentology and diagenesis. The Arbuckle is present in the subsurface in most of Kansas and is absent only in areas of northeastern and northwestern Kansas, and over ancient uplifts and buried Precambrian highs. Arbuckle rocks thicken from north to south and are up to 1,390 feet in the southeastern corner of Kansas. Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks from Kansas and surrounding areas are similar, consisting of platform deposits dominated by ramp-type subtidal to peritidal carbonates (mostly dolomitized) which can be subdivided into cycles, less than 0.5 m to 40 m thick, based on facies type and depositional patterns. Recent studies from central Kansas show that major depositional facies consist of coarse-grained packstones/ grainstones, fine-grained packstones/wackestones/mudstones, stromatolites-thrombolites, intraclastic conglomerate and breccia, and shale. In addition, secondary features include dolomitization, breccia, fracture, and conglomerate related to early subaerial exposure and later karst, burial or structural processes, silicification, and local mineralization. Arbuckle and equivalent strata in the Midcontinent were affected by prolonged subaerial exposure that began immediately after Arbuckle deposition, forming the sub-Tippecanoe to sub-Absaroka unconformity. Favorable reservoir qualities generally are thought to be related directly to basement structural elements and

  9. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1994-12-01

    Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestone result from complex interactions among paleotopography (deposition, concurrent structural deformation), sea level, and diagenesis. Analysis of reservoirs and surface and near-surface analogs has led to developing a {open_quotes}strandline grainstone model{close_quotes} in which relative sea-level stabilized during regressions, resulting in accumulation of multiple grainstone buildups along depositional strike. Resulting stratigraphy in these carbonate units are generally predictable correlating to inferred topographic elevation along the shelf. This model is a valuable predictive tool for (1) locating favorable reservoirs for exploration, and (2) anticipating internal properties of the reservoir for field development. Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestones are developed in both oolitic and bioclastic grainstones, however, re-analysis of oomoldic reservoirs provides the greatest opportunity for developing bypassed oil. A new technique, the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett crossplot (formation resistivity vs. porosity) and its use in an integrated petrophysical characterization, has been developed to evaluate extractable oil remaining in these reservoirs. The manual method in combination with 3-D visualization and modeling can help to target production limiting heterogeneities in these complex reservoirs and moreover compute critical parameters for the field such as bulk volume water. Application of this technique indicates that from 6-9 million barrels of Lansing-Kansas City oil remain behind pipe in the Victory-Northeast Lemon Fields. Petroleum geologists are challenged to quantify inferred processes to aid in developing rationale geologically consistent models of sedimentation so that acceptable levels of prediction can be obtained.

  10. Stratigraphy of the Arriaga Palaeolithic sites. Implications for the geomorphological evolution recorded by thickened fluvial sequences within the Manzanares River valley (Madrid Neogene Basin, Central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. G.; López-Recio, M.; Tapias, F.; Roquero, E.; Morín, J.; Rus, I.; Carrasco-García, P.; Giner-Robles, J. L.; Rodríguez-Pascua, M. A.; Pérez-López, R.

    2013-08-01

    The Arriaga Palaeolithic sites, located within the Middle-Late Pleistocene thickened terrace (TCMZ: + 18-22 m) of the Manzanares River valley (Madrid, Central Spain), were subject to intensive archaeological and palaeontological prospecting during the 1980s. Compilation of documents from these old excavations, together with new geoarchaeological, sedimentological, pedological and geophysical data, allow us to locate the morpho-stratigraphic position of the analysed sites within the overall stratigraphy of the TCMZ. This thickened terrace comprises two main fluvial sequences (Lower and Upper) topped by a thick (2.5-5 m) alluvial-colluvial formation. The fluvial sequences are stacked in the study site located in the lowermost reach of the valley, but display complex inset relationships upstream, where they are individualized in two different terrace levels at + 18-22 and + 12-15 m. Terrace thickening was primarily controlled by synsedimentary subsidence caused by dissolution of the evaporitic substratum and locally influenced and backfed by tectonic activity. The regional analysis of the dated (TL and OSL) fluvial sequences containing Palaeolithic sites within the TCMZ, together with new TL dates provided in this study, indicate that the three sedimentary sequences in the TCMZ are time-transgressive valley-fill bodies. Terrace thickening started before the Last Interglacial Period (MIS 6 or older) and continued during whole MIS 5 (lower fluvial sequence) and MIS 4 (upper fluvial sequence) reaching the MIS 3 (top alluvial formation), the latter characterized by the accumulation of alluvial-colluvial sequences derived from the main tributaries and valley slopes. The TCMZ records the Middle-Late Pleistocene boundary, but also the transition between the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic periods during the Late MIS 5 (ca. 96 to 74 ka). The studied Arriaga sites contain evolved Lower Palaeolithic industry (evolved Acheulean techno-complexes) and warm faunal assemblages located

  11. Insights into the October-November 2010 Gunung Merapi eruption (Central Java, Indonesia) from the stratigraphy, volume and characteristics of its pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Shane J.; Lube, Gert; Dayudi, Devi S.; Sumarti, Sri; Subrandiyo, S.; Surono

    2013-07-01

    The 2010 eruption of Merapi was the second most deadly in the historic record of this volcano, claiming over 380 lives. By relating the observations of this eruption with detailed examination of deposit distribution, stratigraphy and sedimentology, a reconstruction of the properties of the pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is presented, including the valley controlled block-and-ash flows (BAFs) and widespread, energetic pyroclastic surges. The distribution, volume and mobility characteristics of all types of PDC during the eruption sequence show evidence for levels of intensity unseen since the large-scale 1872 and 1930 eruption phases, especially during the climactic events of October 26 and November 5. Many tephra falls interbedded with PDC units show that most dome-collapse events occurred along with and between explosive vulcanian eruptions. The 2010 eruption produced very long-runout BAFs, reaching 16.1 km in the Kali Gendol on November 5. This runout could be explained by its large-volume (20 million m3), around 10 times that of previous Merapi BAFs during the last 130 years. Major avulsion of these dense BAFs to form overbank deposits became more common through the eruptive sequence as the valley was progressively filled with successive PDC deposits. Spreading avulsed BAFs were a particular hazard downstream of ~ 10 km where the landscape is less dissected. Less clear, however, is why pyroclastic surges extended up to 10 km from the vent on November 5 and > 6.4 km on October 26. These expanded much farther from BAF margins (~ 2 km) than ever seen before at Merapi. In one location they were decoupled from valley-centered BAFs with high momentum, traveling initially laterally across steep valley systems, before draining downslope. At this site, on the western side of the upper Gendol at around 3 km from source, surge decoupling was apparently exacerbated by upstream collision and deflection of high-flux, hot and gas-rich BAFs against the cliffs of Gunung

  12. Refined stratigraphy and its paleogeographic implication of the Mungyeong Group (Cambrian-Ordovician), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Inhye; Kwon, Yoojin; Kwon, Yikyun

    2016-04-01

    The Mungyeong Group is a typical lower Paleozoic carbonate-dominated succession regarded as a lithologic subunit of the Joseon Supergroup in the mid-eastern part of the Korean peninsula. This succession was strongly affected by a series of diagenetic processes and tectonic deformation, so it is not easy to realize its sedimentary fabric and structure on outcrops. In addition, due to rare occurrence of fossils, its biostratigraphic information has been restricted. As a result, this group has exposed a lot of debates on its stratigraphy and consequently has failed to establish stratigraphy until now. Through the detailed outcrop description and geologic mapping, this study recognized two lithologically-distinct basin fills (western Gaeun and eastern Hogye basins) suggesting a refined lithostratigraphic framework on the group. The Gaeun basin is filled by the mixed carbonate-siliciclastic succession (Gaeun Subgroup) of the Mungyeong Group, comprising six lithologic formations: Gurangri, Maseong, Hanaeri, Seokgyori, Jeongri and Dotan formation in ascending order. The basal Gurangri Formation is the siliciclastic-dominated unit, containing abundant lower Paleozoic trilobite fossils, conformably overlain by other carbonate-dominated successions characterized by repetitions of limestone and marlstone with intercalations of dolostone beds. On the other hand, the Hogye Subgroup occurs in the eastern basin, divided into five lithostatigraphic units: Gadori, Seonamri, Urori, Yugok and Byeolamri formations in ascending order. This subgroup consists mainly of severely deformed limestone and dolostone successions, intercalated with shale beds. In the Hogye Subgroup, the basal siliciclastic-dominated succession (like as the Gurangri Formation in the Gaeun Subgroup) is not present. This study reveals that the Gaeun and Hogye subgroups in the Mungyeong Group have a distinctive lithology and stratigraphy with each other and compared with the adjacent Yeongweol and Taebaek groups

  13. Volcaniclastic stratigraphy of Gede Volcano, West Java, Indonesia: How it erupted and when

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.; Krimer, D.; Costa, F.; Prambada, O.; Zaennudin, A.

    2015-08-01

    Gede Volcano, West Java (Indonesia), is located 60 km south of Jakarta within one of the regions with highest population density in the world. Therefore, knowledge of its eruption history is necessary for hazard evaluation, because even a small eruption would have major societal and economic consequences. Here we report the results of the investigation of the stratigraphy of Gede (with the focus on its volcaniclastic deposits of Holocene age) and include 23 new radiocarbon dates. We have found that a major part of the volcanic edifice was formed in the Pleistocene when effusions of lavas of high-silica basalt dominated. During this period the volcano experienced large-scale lateral gravitational failure followed by complete reconstruction of the edifice, formation of the summit subsidence caldera and its partial refilling. After a repose period of > 30,000 years the volcanic activity resumed at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary. In the Holocene the eruptions were dominantly explosive with magma compositions ranging from basaltic andesite to rhyodacite; many deposits show heterogeneity at the macroscopic hand specimen scale and also in the minerals, which indicates interactions between mafic (basaltic andesite) and silicic (rhyodacite) magmas. Significant eruptions of the volcano were relatively rare and of moderate violence (the highest VEI was 3-4; the largest volume of erupted pyroclasts 0.15 km3). There were 4 major Holocene eruptive episodes ca. 10,000, 4000, 1200, and 1000 yr BP. The volcanic plumes of these eruptions were not buoyant and most of the erupted products were transported in the form of highly concentrated valley-channelized pyroclastic flows. Voluminous lahars were common in the periods between the eruptions. The recent eruptive period of the volcano started approximately 800 years ago. It is characterized by frequent and weak VEI 1-2 explosive eruptions of Vulcanian type and rare small-volume extrusions of viscous lava. We estimate that during

  14. Biogeomorphological influence of slope processes and sedimentology on vascular talus vegetation in the southern Cascades, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Francisco L.

    2012-02-01

    The vascular vegetation of alpine talus slopes between 2035 and 3095 m altitude was studied at Lassen Volcanic National Park (California) in the Cascade Range. Taluses show a diverse flora, with 79 plant species; growth forms include coniferous trees, shrubs, suffrutices, herbs, graminoids, and ferns. Spatial patterns of plant distribution were studied along 40 point-intercept transects. Plant cover was low (0-32.7%) on all slopes, spatially variable, and showed no consistent trends. Sedimentological characteristics were determined by photosieving next to 1500 plants; this census indicated preferential plant growth on blocks and cobbles, with 43.2% and 23.3% of the plants growing on these stones, respectively; fewer specimens were rooted on pebbles (13%) or on stone-free gravel areas (20.5%). Growth forms displayed different substrate preferences: 92.5% of the shrubs and 83% of the suffrutices colonized blocks or cobbles, but only 57.2% of the herbs and 59.8% of the graminoids grew on large stones. Plants are associated with large clasts because (1) coarse talus is more stable than fine sediment areas, which are more frequently disturbed by various geomorphic processes, and (2) large stones help conserve substrate water beneath them while moisture quickly evaporates from fine debris. Root patterns were studied for 30 plant species; 10 specimens for each species were excavated and inspected, and several root growth ratios calculated. All species exhibited pronounced root asymmetry, as roots for most plants grew upslope from their shoot base. For 23 species, all specimens had 100% of their roots growing upslope; for the other 7 species, 92.2-99.3% of below-ground biomass extended uphill. This uneven root distribution is ascribed to continual substrate instability and resulting talus shift; as cascading debris progressively buries roots and stems, plants are gradually pushed and/or stretched downhill. Various disturbance events affect root development. Slope erosion

  15. Sedimentologic, Chemical, and Isotopic Constraints on the Anthropogenic Influence on Chilika Lake, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennemann, T. W.; Decrouy, L.; Ecuyer, M.; Delavy, K.; Lange, P.; Rastogi, G.; Pattnaik, A.; Suar, M.

    2014-12-01

    Chilika Lake, the largest Asian lagoon on the east coast of India, has a surface area of 1160 km2 or about 900 km2, respectively for the wet, monsoon vs. dry winter-spring season. The average depth is only about 1.2 m. It is separated from the Bay of Bengal by a 100 m to 1.5 km wide sand bar of about 30 km length, separating the outer channel that connects the lagoon naturally to the sea. Long-shore development of this sand bar as of the Late Holocene increasingly isolated the lagoon from the sea, until final closure in 1992. Given the population increase in the catchment and according changes in land use policies, agricultural practices, and water resource management, Chilika Lake has been subjected to increasing anthropogenic influence. As a consequence the unique biodiversity and also primary production within the lagoon decreased, while eutrophication and siltation increased. As a counter-initiative it was decided to artificially open the lagoon to the sea by dredging. To help trace and quantify the anthropologic effects on Chilika Lake, a combined sedimentologic, chemical, and isotopic study of the lagoon and its sediments was is in progress. First results from a campaign during the monsoon season suggest that the large gradients in salinity, sediment and nutrient input, as well as primary productivity within the lagoon are controlled by variable fluxes of water, sediment, and nutrients from the three separate catchments to the lagoon. Trends in changes of salinity, H- and O-isotope compositions of waters, but also of concentrations and C- and/or N-isotope compositions of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), particulate organic matter (POM), and aquatic plants indicate that mixing in the lagoon occurs between new freshwater inputs and evaporated water within the basin itself. Except for the outer channel, mixing with seawater is limited. In contrast, the C-isotope composition of the organic matter in the sediments either suggests a higher overall proportion

  16. Sedimentological, Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of Sand Dunes in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Abdullatif, Osman

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical, morphological and geochemical studies of sand dunes from ten locations in Saudi Arabia were conducted in order to determine the differences between them and to find out the provenance and tectonic setting of these sand dunes. Sixty seven samples were collected from different sand dunes types ranging in morphology from linear, barchans, parabolic to stars dunes. In overall, the sand dunes are fine to coarse grained mean grain size, moderately sorted, near symmetrical skewness with mesokurtic distribution characterized sand dunes in most locations. The sand dunes grains are subrounded in all locations except in the Red sea, Qassim, central Arabia and the eastern province which showed sub-angular grains. The main mineral compositions of studied aeolian sand dunes are quartz, feldspar, calcite, and mica. Quartz is the dominant mineral in locations with significant amount of feldspars and mica in Najran, Red sea and Central Arabia locations. Moreover, calcite is present in Sakaka and NW Empty Quarter (Jafurah). Basement related sand dunes in Najran, Central Arabia and Red sea locations are sub-mature in terms of their mineralogical maturity. Whereas, sand dunes in other locations are texturally mature except those from the Red sea which showed sub-mature sand. The sands are classified as quartz arenite, except in the basement related sand dunes in Najran, central Arabia and the Red sea are ranging from sub-arkose, sub-litharenite and lithraenite. Morphologically, parallel to sub-parallel sand ridges with NE-SW orientation occurred in east and north parts of Empty Quarter (Najran and Jafurah) and NW-SE orientation in Dahna and Nafud deserts in central and north regions of Saudi Arabia. Parabolic sand dunes characterized the Nafud desert (Hail, Sakaka, Tayma locations). Barchans and star sand dunes characterize the Empty Quarter (Jafurah). Major, trace, and rare earth elements studies were carried out to determine the composition

  17. Constraints on the Dynamics of Seabed Pockmarks: an Integrated Sedimentological, Biostratigraphic, Geophysical, Oceanographic and Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, M.; Hammer, Ø.; Chand, S.; Gisler, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Pockmarks are crater-like seabed depressions commonly resulting from focused fluid escape from soft, fine-grained sediments. Typically measuring 20-50 m across with depths of 2-10 m, these features often occur in extensive fields containing hundreds of them per square kilometre. They are prominent hazards for offshore installations such as oil rigs and pipelines, affecting vast areas worldwide. Besides, they represent a major geological source of methane, and their importance has been pointed out as contributors to the global climate variability.Sedimentological and biostratigraphic analyses of sediment cores were coupled with shallow seismic images to investigate the origin and evolution of a pockmark field in the southwestern Barents Sea, an epicontinental sea part of the Arctic Ocean. The pockmarks formed as a result of reduced sedimentation above active gas seeps near the retreating edge of the Barents Sea ice sheet about 15,000 years ago. The seepage is ascribed to climate change-induced dissociation of methane hydrates. These findings strengthen the case that pockmarks, worldwide, recorded the release of massive quantities of methane from the seafloor into the ocean during the last deglaciation. No evidence was found for current upward methane flux, so the pockmarks in the study area appear as inactive seabed features. Field measurements of currents and sediment fluxes in pockmarks in the Oslofjord, Norway, along with an experimental hydrodynamics study, provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for the long-term maintenance of inactive pockmarks. Near-bed currents may control the net sedimentation rate in these depressions by inhibiting the sedimentation from suspended transport. Enhanced turbulence and more intense biological activity suggest that the suspended fines are supported in the water column more easily in the pockmarks than on the surrounding bed, and can be transported away before settling. Moreover, upwelling generated by flow deflection

  18. Cambrian to Devonian evolution of alluvial systems: The sedimentological impact of the earliest land plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Neil S.; Gibling, Martin R.

    2010-02-01

    In present-day alluvial environments, the impact of vegetation on sedimentological processes and deposits is well known. A vegetated catchment may decrease sediment yield, sediment erodibility, Hortonian overland flow, aeolian winnowing of fines, the proportion of sediment transported as bedload, and may increase bank stability, infiltration into substrates, and bed roughness. Vegetation also promotes the production of chemically-weathered clays and soils and the adoption of a meandering style. It is generally understood that, prior to the evolution of terrestrial vegetation during the Early Palaeozoic, ancient alluvial systems were markedly different from modern systems, with many systems adopting a "sheet-braided" style. This understanding has previously informed the interpretations of many Precambrian pre-vegetation alluvial successions, but there has been relatively little work regarding Early Palaeozoic alluvial successions laid down prior to and during the initial colonization of the Earth's surface by plants. A comprehensive review of 144 Cambrian to Devonian alluvial successions documented in published literature was combined with original field data from 34 alluvial successions across Europe and North America. The study was designed to identify changes in alluvial style during the period that vegetation was evolving and first colonizing alluvial environments. An increase in mudrock proportion and sandstone maturity is apparent, along with a decrease in overall sand grain size through the Early Palaeozoic. These trends suggest that primitive vegetation cover promoted the production and preservation of muds from the mid Ordovician onwards and increased the residence time of sand-grade sediment in alluvial systems. The compilation also enables the first stratigraphic occurrence of certain vegetation-dependent sedimentary features to be pinpointed and related to the evolution of specific palaeobotanical adaptations. The first markedly heterolithic alluvial

  19. Sedimentology, diagenesis and ichnology of Cretaceous and Palaeogene calcretes and palustrine carbonates from Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Zarza, Ana M.; Genise, Jorge F.; Verde, Mariano

    2011-05-01

    The Cretaceous (Mercedes Formation) and Paleogene (Queguay Formation) deposits cropping out in W and S Uruguay comprise two terrestrial limestone units that are very rich in trace fossils. The study of these units permits to propose a sedimentological model for palustrine limestones and calcretes in which the distribution of different types of trace fossils is considered. The study units include three main types of deposit: lacustrine limestones, palustrine limestones and calcretes. The lacustrine limestones are relatively homogeneous and contain gastropods, charophytes and ostracods, but no trace fossils. They were deposited in a relatively more perennial lacustrine environment. The palustrine limestones include four different facies: desiccated mudstones, nodular limestones, granular limestones and gravel-sheets. The desiccated mudstones indicate a lesser degree of pedogenic modification and the granular limestones a higher degree. The gravel-sheets are an indication of the reworking of previous limestones deposits during low lakewater levels. Most of the palustrine limestones (except the gravel sheets) contain the same bioclasts as the lacustrine limestones plus a variety of trace fossils such as Rebuffoichnus sciuttoi, Fictovichnus gobiensis and different ichnospecies of Celliforma. The calcretes are either massive (groundwater) or laminar. The massive calcretes are sandy limestones made up of a carbonate matrix and cements. The laminar calcretes (root mats), which contain alveolar septal structures, occur as centimetre-thick layers and can be seen in all types of deposit. They contain the same trace fossil association as the palustrine limestones; the massive calcretes are poorer in such fossils. The distribution of trace fossils in these environments is under strong facies control and provides good evidence of subaerial exposure and semi-arid climates. All the limestones are partially replaced and cemented by opal and quartz, but in all cases the primary

  20. Sedimentological characteristics of lake sediment of the Lake Jelonek (North Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramkowski, Mateusz; Filbrandt-Czaja, Anna; Ott, Florian; Słowiński, Michał; Tjallingii, Rik; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake Jelonek is located in Northern Poland (53°45'58N, 18°23'30E). The lake is surrounded by forest, covers an area of 19,9 ha and has a maximum depth of 13,8 m. In 2013 and 2014 three overlapping and parallel series of long sediment cores JEL14-A-(1445 cm), JEL14-B-(1430 cm), JEL14-C-(1435 cm) and seven short gravity cores JEL13 (K1-K7) have been recovered from the deepest part of the lake. A continuous composite profile JEL14 covering 1426 cm has been established by correlation based on 28 distinct macroscopic marker layers. The sediment sequence can be divided into 15 (I-XV) lithological units. These units comprise biochemical calcite varves, homogeneous calcite-rich gyttja, homogeneous organic-diatomaceous gyttja, and sandy layers. The chronology established so far is based on 14 AMS 14C dates from terrestrial plant remains and tephrochronology (Askja AD-1875) and covers the interval from the Younger Dryas to present times. Based on the chronology and sedimentological characteristics the composite profile has been correlated to a previous core from which a detailed pollen diagram had been established (Filbrandt-Czaja 2009). Here we present initial results from thin section analyses for two intervals from the new composite record JEL14, (I) the uppermost 0-256 cm and (II) the interval from 768-1296 cm. Intercalated between these two varved interval is a thick section (512 cm) of homogeneous organic-ditomaceous sediments. We present varve micro-facies data in combination with μ-XRF element scanning for comprehensive reconstruction of the sedimentation processes in Lake Jelonek. Preliminary varve counting reveals that the uppermost 256 cm varved sediments comprise ca 925 years (2008-1083 AD), while the lower floating varve interval covers the time period from 1850 - 10500 cal a BP. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis -ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association; grant number VH-VI-415. References

  1. Lower Palaeozoic Alluvial Systems: The Sedimentological Impact of Evolving Vegetation in Terrestrial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, N. S.; Gibling, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    In present-day alluvial environments, the impact of vegetation on sedimentological processes and deposits is well known. A vegetated catchment may decrease sediment yield, sediment erodability, Hortonian overland flow, aeolian winnowing of fines, the proportion of sediment transported as bedload, may increase bank stability, infiltration into substrates, bed roughness, and can promote the production of chemically-weathered clays and soils and the adoption of a meandering style. It is generally understood that, prior to the evolution of terrestrial vegetation during the Lower Palaeozoic, ancient alluvial systems were markedly different from modern systems, with many systems adopting a "sheet-braided" style. This understanding has previously informed the interpretations of many Precambrian pre-vegetation alluvial successions, but there has been relatively little work regarding Lower Palaeozoic alluvial successions that existed during the active terrestrialization of plants. In this study, a comprehensive review of 141 Cambrian to Devonian alluvial successions documented in published literature was combined with original field data from 20 alluvial successions from across Europe and North America, in order to identify changes in the sedimentary style of alluvial strata while vegetation was evolving and colonizing alluvial environments. This approach has established clear trends indicating an increase in mudrocks and sandstone maturity and a decrease in overall sand grain size through the Lower Palaeozoic, suggesting that primitive vegetation cover was able to promote the production and preservation of muds and increase the residence time of sand-grade sediment (and thus sediment reworking) in alluvial systems. It has also enabled the first stratigraphic occurrence of certain vegetation-dependent sedimentary features to be pinpointed and tied directly to the onset of specific evolutionary adaptations recorded in the palaeobotanical fossil record. As such, the first

  2. Coral Patch seamount (NE Atlantic) - a sedimentological and macrofaunal reconnaissance based on video and hydroacoustic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienberg, C.; Wintersteller, P.; Beuck, L.; Hebbeln, D.

    2012-12-01

    The present study provides new knowledge about the so far largely unexplored Coral Patch seamount which is located in the NE Atlantic Ocean half-way between the Iberian Peninsula and Madeira. For the first time a detailed hydroacoustic mapping (MBES) in conjunction with video surveys (ROV, camera sled) were performed to describe the sedimentological and biological characteristics of this sub-elliptical ENE-WSW elongated seamount. Video observations were restricted to the south-western summit area of Coral Patch seamount (area: ~ 8 km2, water depth: 560-760 m) and revealed that this part of the summit is dominated by exposed hard substrate, whereas soft sediment is just a minor substrate component. Although exposed hardgrounds are dominant for this summit area, and thus, offer suitable habitat for settlement by benthic organisms, the macrofauna shows rather low abundance and diversity. In particular, scleractinian framework-building cold-water corals are apparently rare with very few isolated and small-sized live occurrences of the species Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. In contrast, dead coral framework and coral rubble are more frequent pointing to a higher abundance of cold-water corals on Coral Patch during the recent past. This is even supported by the observation of fishing lines that got entangled with rather fresh-looking coral frameworks. Overall, long lines and various species of commercially important fish were frequently observed emphasising the potential of Coral Patch as an important target for fisheries that may have impacted the entire benthic community. Hydroacoustic seabed classification covered the entire summit of Coral Patch and its northern and southern flanks (area: 560 km2; water depth: 560-2660 m) and revealed extended areas dominated by mixed and soft sediments at the northern flank and to a minor degree at its easternmost summit and southern flank. Nevertheless, also these data predict most of the summit area to be dominated by

  3. Coral Patch seamount (NE Atlantic) - a sedimentological and megafaunal reconnaissance based on video and hydroacoustic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienberg, C.; Wintersteller, P.; Beuck, L.; Hebbeln, D.

    2013-05-01

    The present study provides new knowledge about the so far largely unexplored Coral Patch seamount which is located in the NE Atlantic Ocean half-way between the Iberian Peninsula and Madeira. For the first time a detailed hydroacoustic mapping (MBES) in conjunction with video surveys (ROV, camera sled) were performed to describe the sedimentological and biological characteristics of this sub-elliptical ENE-WSW elongated seamount. Video observations were restricted to the southwestern summit area of Coral Patch seamount (water depth: 560-760 m) and revealed that this part of the summit is dominated by exposed hard substrate, whereas soft sediment is just a minor substrate component. Although exposed hardgrounds are dominant for this summit area and, thus, offer suitable habitat for settlement by benthic organisms, the benthic megafauna shows rather scarce occurrence. In particular, scleractinian framework-building cold-water corals are apparently rare with very few isolated and small-sized live occurrences of the species Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. In contrast, dead coral framework and coral rubble are more frequent pointing to a higher abundance of cold-water corals on Coral Patch during the recent past. This is even supported by the observation of fishing lines that got entangled with rather fresh-looking coral frameworks. Overall, long lines and various species of commercially important fish were frequently observed emphasising the potential of Coral Patch as an important target for fisheries that may have impacted the entire benthic community. Hydroacoustic seabed classification covered the entire summit of Coral Patch and its northern and southern flanks (water depth: 560-2660 m) and revealed extended areas dominated by mixed and soft sediments at the northern flank and to a minor degree at its easternmost summit and southern flank. Nevertheless, these data also predict most of the summit area to be dominated by exposed bedrock which would offer

  4. Rare earth and trace elements of fossil vertebrate bioapatite as palaeoenvironmental and sedimentological proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žigaitė, Živilė; Fadel, Alexandre; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Jeffries, Teresa

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth (REE) and trace element compositions of fossil vertebrate dental microremains have been studied in Silurian and Devonian vertebrate dental scales and spines in-situ, using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Samples were selected from the well-known Silurian bone beds of Vesiku and Ohesaare in Saaremaa island of Estonia, and a number of Lower Devonian localities from Spitsbergen (Svalbard), Andrée Land group. Biomineral preservation was assessed using spot semi-quantitative elemental chemistry (SEM-EDS) and electron back-scatter difractometry (EBSD) for cristallinity imaging. The obtained PAAS shale-normalised REE concentrations were evaluated using basic geochemical calculations and quantifications. The REE patterns from the Lower Devonian vertebrate apatite from Andrée Land, Spitsbergen (Wood Bay and Grey Hœk formations) did not show any recognisable taxon-specific behavior, but had rather well expressed differences of REE compositions related to biomineral structure and sedimentary settings, suggesting REE instead to reflect burial environments and sedimentological history. The Eu anomaly recorded in two of the studied localities but not in the other indicate different taphonomic conditions and palaeoenvironment, while La/Sm, La/Yb ratios sugeest considerable influence of terrestrial freshwater during the early diagenesis. The La/Yb and La/Sm plots also agree with the average REE concentrations, reflecting domination of the adsoption over substitution as principal REE uptake mechanism in the fossils which had significantly lower overall REE concentrations, and vice versa. Vesiku (Homerian, Wenlock) microremains yielded very uniform REE patterns with slightly lower overall REE concentrations in enameloid than in dentine, with strong enrichment in middle REE and depletion in heavy REE. Negative Europium (Eu) anomaly was pronounced in all the profiles, but Cerium (Ce) anomalies were not detected suggesting possible

  5. Improved method for correlating late Pleistocene/Holocene records from the Bering Sea: application of a biosiliceous/geochemical stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Joseph J.; Robinson, Stephen W.

    1986-09-01

    The combination of high-resolution siliceous biostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating provides a mechanism for detailed assessment of the depositional history in late Pleistocene sediments from the Bering Sea where average accumulation rates are uncharacteristically high compared to rates calculated for most other ocean basins. Vital to the development of this stratigraphy was the recognition that the abundance pattern of the radiolarian species Cycladophora davisiana in Bering Sea cores is quite similar to this species' previously correlated abundance curve in a late Pleistocene/Holocene record from the northwest Pacific. Comparison of this high-resolution stratigraphy with other recently developed floral and lithologic stratigraphies for late Pleistocene Bering Sea sediments shows that the various stratigraphies do not always yield identical results when applied to a particular sediment sequence. With this new stratigraphy based upon a combination of siliceous microfaunal abundance patterns and radiocarbon dating, one can identify reworking, discontinuities and other interruptions in the depositional sequence more precisely than with previously devised stratigraphies, thereby improving the correlation techniques for comparison of late Pleistocene/Holocene records from this marginal sea.

  6. The Late Holocene Stratigraphy of an Inlet-Dominated Barrier Island, Pea Island, North Carolina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. G.; Ames, D.; Corbett, D. R.; Culver, S.; Mallinson, D.; Riggs, S. R.; Vance, D.

    2002-12-01

    Sedimentological, foraminiferal, geochemical, and geophysical data sets as well as aerial photographs have been used to investigate the natural processes (inlet dynamics, ocean/estuarine washover, and sea-level change) responsible for the late Holocene units preserved in the barrier island subsurface at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. Historic nautical charts indicate that three inlets characterized Pea Island between early European exploration (1590) and the late 19th century; aerial photographs show New Inlet open in 1932 and 1940. Vibracores (up to 5.5 m) collected along three transects across Pea Island extend our knowledge of the geological evolution of this region to pre-historic times. The section in the longest core (PI01S6) consists of four fining-upwards depositional sequences. The basal unit of each sequence is a bedded, medium to fine, clean quartz sand with increasing concentrations of organic matter (3-4 % detrital and 5-7 % in situ Spartina alterniflora roots) or irregular mud clasts (2-5 cm) to spherical mud balls (1-2 cm) up core. The clean sand units have so far proven to be barren of foraminifera except for a shelly unit at ca. 220 cm below MSL. The foraminiferal assemblage in this unit is of open shelf character (Elphidium excavatum, Hanzawaia strattoni, and Buccella inusitata). A 14C age on a disarticulated Chione cancellata valve from this unit is cal. 930+/-60 BP. The sand grades into a gray, tight mud in the first two sequences and into an inter-laminated mud and in situ peat in the third sequence. The peat contains leaf fragments and rhizomes of the marsh plants Juncus roemarianus, Spartina cynosuroides, and/or Phragmites spp. The peat and muddy sand units contain marsh foraminifera (Trochammina spp., Miliammina fusca, Arenoparrella mexicana), which are also found in modern marsh deposits. A peat sample from the third fining upward sequence (the only one to grade into a true peat) has a 14C age of cal. 395+/-35 BP, cal. 295+/-35 BP, or

  7. Seismic stratigraphy of the Tyrrhenian Sea (western Mediterranean Sea) based on ODP leg results: Consequences for the basin evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mascle, J.; Rehault, J.

    1988-08-01

    A revision of the seismic stratigraphy of the Tyrrehenian Sea is based on detailed calibrations between a dense network of single-channel seismic reflection lines, about 2,000 km of recent multichannel seismic profiles, and the seven sites drilled within the Tyrrhenian in 1986 during the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 107. These correlations substantiate that the basin has been submitted to a succession of short-lived rifting episodes progressively shifting toward the southeast and leading to the local creation of discrete oceanic crust floored basins. Most of the Tyr-rhenian basins and margins have been created in a very short time (between 8 and 2 m.y. in age) and are much younger than previously anticipated. Rifting processes have been acting on a very heterogeneous continental basement (including several suture zones); drifting has created small oceanic subbasins also floored by a very heterogeneous magmatic basement (including serpentinized peridotites). The hypothesis of an asymmetric evolution facilitated by one or several crustal detachment fault systems and driven by geodynamic mechanisms of the bordering collision/subduction is considered.

  8. Nannofossil biostratigraphy, strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy, cyclostratigraphy and an astronomically calibrated duration of the Late Campanian Radotruncana calcarata Zone.

    PubMed

    Wagreich, Michael; Hohenegger, Johann; Neuhuber, Stephanie

    2012-12-01

    A section from the southern (Austro-Alpine Northern Calcareous Alps) margin of the Penninic Ocean in the NW Tethys realm of Late Campanian age is investigated stratigraphically. Plankton foraminifer and nannofossil biostratigraphy designate the presence of the Globotruncana ventricosa Zone and the Radotruncana (Globotruncanita) calcarata Zone, and standard nannofossil zones CC21-UC15c(TP) and CC22ab-UC15de(TP). The combination of carbon isotope stratigraphy, strontium isotopes, and cyclostratigraphy allows a detailed chronostratigraphic correlation. Periodicity was obtained by power spectral analysis, sinusoidal regression, and Morlet wavelets. The duration of the calcarata Total Range Zone is calculated by orbital cyclicity expressed in thickness data of limestone-marl rhythmites and stable carbon isotope data. Precessional, obliquity, and short and long eccentricity cycles are identified and give an extent of c. 806 kyr for the zone. Mean sediment accumulation rates are as low as 1.99 cm/kyr and correspond well to sediment accumulation rates in similar settings. We further discuss chronostratigraphic implications of our data.

  9. 3-D seismic evidence of the effects of carbonate karst collapse on overlying clastic stratigraphy and reservoir compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Simmons, J.L. Jr.; Jons, R.A.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Pendleton, V.M.

    1996-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team, composed of stratigraphers, petrophysicists, reservoir engineers, and geophysicists, studied a portion of Boonsville gas field in the Fort Worth Basin of north-central Texas to determine how modern techniques can be combined to understand the mechanisms by which fluvio-deltaic depositional processes create reservoir compartmentalization in a low- to moderate-accommodation basin. An extensive database involving well logs, cores, production, and pressure data from more than 200 wells, 26 mi{sup 2} of 3-D seismic data, vertical seismic profiles, and checkshots was assembled to support this investigation. The authors found the most important geologic influence on stratigraphy and reservoir compartmentalization in this basin to be the existence of numerous karst collapse chimneys over the area covered. These near-vertical karst collapses originated in, or near, the deep Ordovician-age Ellenburger carbonate section and created vertical chimneys extending as high as 2,500 ft above their point of origin, causing significant disruptions in the overlying clastic strata.

  10. Nannofossil biostratigraphy, strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy, cyclostratigraphy and an astronomically calibrated duration of the Late Campanian Radotruncana calcarata Zone

    PubMed Central

    Wagreich, Michael; Hohenegger, Johann; Neuhuber, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    A section from the southern (Austro-Alpine Northern Calcareous Alps) margin of the Penninic Ocean in the NW Tethys realm of Late Campanian age is investigated stratigraphically. Plankton foraminifer and nannofossil biostratigraphy designate the presence of the Globotruncana ventricosa Zone and the Radotruncana (Globotruncanita) calcarata Zone, and standard nannofossil zones CC21–UC15cTP and CC22ab–UC15deTP. The combination of carbon isotope stratigraphy, strontium isotopes, and cyclostratigraphy allows a detailed chronostratigraphic correlation. Periodicity was obtained by power spectral analysis, sinusoidal regression, and Morlet wavelets. The duration of the calcarata Total Range Zone is calculated by orbital cyclicity expressed in thickness data of limestone–marl rhythmites and stable carbon isotope data. Precessional, obliquity, and short and long eccentricity cycles are identified and give an extent of c. 806 kyr for the zone. Mean sediment accumulation rates are as low as 1.99 cm/kyr and correspond well to sediment accumulation rates in similar settings. We further discuss chronostratigraphic implications of our data. PMID:27087718

  11. Effects of sequence stratigraphy on distribution of Cambro-Ordovician siliciclastic hydrocarbon reservoirs in Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, J.C.; Reel, C.L.; Cummins, G.D. )

    1989-08-01

    The lateral and vertical distribution of Cambrian-Ordovician siliciclastic reservoir-potential rock types in the Michigan basin is governed by the sequence stratigraphy. The sequence stratigraphy is controlled primarily by the interaction of four variables: subsidence, eustasy, volume of sediments, and climate. Seven sequential stratigraphic intervals can be defined in the pre-Utica, Cambrian-Ordovician deposits of the Michigan basin. Each of these unconformity-bounded sequences begins with a siliciclastic unit deposited over a lowstand surface of erosion. These lowstand surfaces developed during periods when eustatic sea level decline exceeded the rate of subsidence in the basin, and much or all of the basin became exposed. Where the sedimentation rate was less than the sum of the rate of subsidence and sea level change, a transgressive sequence developed with more open-marine carbonates overlying shallower water and/or non-marine facies. Reservoir-potential siliciclastics accumulated in incised valley-fill and transgressive reworked deposits.

  12. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Suzette Payne

    2006-04-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  13. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Suzette Payne

    2007-08-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  14. The Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Western Cordillera Oriental, Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.B.; Alfonso, C.A.; Ressetar, R.; Salazar, A. ); Ballesteros, I.; Cardozo, E.; Laverde, F.; Ramirez, C. ); Moreno, J.M. ); Rubiano, J.; Sarmiento, L. )

    1993-02-01

    During 1987 and 1988, a major field project sponsored by Tenneco was undertaken along the west flank of the Cordillera Oriental of Colombia between Alpujarra (between the Neiva and Girardot Sub-Basins) and the Middle Magdalena Basin (Cimitarra area). An important result of this study was the documentation of pronounced regional variation in the age, thickness, and facies of the Cretaceous section. The maximum thickness estimated was 7 km for the Bogota-Villeta section, with ages as old as Berriasian. This section can be divided into 4 or 5 depositional sequences. A clastic source to the west or southwest is indicated for the lower sequence 1 (and 2 ), an eastern source dominated sequences 3 and 4, and eastern and western sources supplied the upper sequence. Toward the north the section thins to an estimated 3-5 km but still ranges in age throughout the Cretaceous. Southward, on the other hand, the Cretaceous thins to about 2 km and is restricted to Aptian-Albian and younger ages. The variations in ages, facies, and thickness are consistent with recent models of the evolution of the Cretaceous basin. During the Neocomian, the Bogata area formed the main depocenter of the basin and was characterized by restricted facies and turbidites, suggesting steep, possibly faulted basin margins. Facies to the north, near the Middle Magdalena Basin, indicate shallower water, possibly a platform. By the end of the Early Cretaceous, expansion of the marine basin out of the central Cordillera Oriental and regionally more constant facies indicate the onset of dominantly thermal subsidence. The end of the Cretaceous was marked by regression and asymmetric clastic input from east and west of the basin.

  15. A ground penetrating radar survey to assist the sedimentologic and geomorphologic interpretation of washover fans in NW Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, Matthias; Callow, Nik; May, Simon Matthias

    2015-04-01

    The NW Australian coast is prone to both tropical cyclones and tsunamis which can generate extreme wave events in this region. Along the W coast of the Exmouth Gulf, distinct lobate washover fans consist of shell debris and sand layers and exhibit delta-type sedimentation patterns. Using ground penetrating radar (GPR) and unmanned aerial vehicle survey (UAV) techniques helps in a first step to locate important geomorphic points of interest for later sedimentologic, pedologic and chronologic studies. UAV surveys developed a detailed 3D surface model (cm resolution) which helps to better understand the extent and the general pattern of the geomorphic forms. A subsequent GPR survey using a bi-static 250 MHz antenna with a Mala CU-II in a continuous mode generated multiple transects which could be further interpreted. Coarse sandy-gravelly washover fan-matrix sits on top of clayey pan sediments which provide an excellent sedimentologic contrast for GPR surveys. Multiple delta like structures representing single wave activities, erosion channels and their backfill structures as well as several palaeosols could be identified in the GPR images. This information is now used in a subsequent chrono-stratigraphic approach for a final geomorphic interpretation.

  16. Hydrocarbon potential, organic matter diagenesis, sedimentology, and paleoenvironment of upper Mesozoic dark shales, northern Himalayas and Argo abyssal plain

    SciTech Connect

    Thurow, J.; Gibling, M.

    1989-03-01

    The Late Jurassic was a time favorable for the deposition of black shale-type sediments in shallow environments as known from circum-North Atlantic basins, North Sea, and Himalayan Tethys regions. Locally these shales have excellent hydrocarbon source potential. The site of the Spiti shales in the Thakkola region of north-central Nepal provides the opportunity to study a long-term (Oxfordian-Tithonian) stable, shallow, and oxygen-depleted environment. Strata with calcareous benthic communities show that the environment was not anoxic. Organic geochemical and sedimentological analyses on the Spiti shales (Oxfordian-Valanginian) were done to understand the hydrocarbon potential, organic matter diagenesis, sedimentology, and paleoenvironment of this sequence. The depositional environment changed, driven by tectono-eustatic and climatic events, from an open shelf (approximately 250 m) with low amounts of detrital input and rich macrofossil communities to an extremely shallow, partly continental environment with intercalations of quartzose channel fill, silty shales, rare lumachelle layers, and coal seams. Paleocurrents suggest a north-facing continental margin bordering the Tethys Sea. The organic matter changed from marine (Jurassic) to terrestrial in the Cretaceous. Analysis of coeval strata, deposited in the deep-marine environment off the northern Indian shelf (contiguous with the present-day Argo abyssal plain), demonstrates the changing shallow to deep-water hydrocarbon potential. It reflects the more advanced organic matter maturation of the onshore material due to Himalayan tectonics and allows tracing the transport of the organic matter.

  17. Improved Quaternary North Atlantic stratigraphy using relative paleointensity (RPI), oxygen isotopes, and magnetic excursions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Improving the resolution of Quaternary marine stratigraphy is one of the major challenges in paleoceanography. IODP Expedition 303/306, and ODP Legs 162 and 172, have yielded multiple high-resolution records (mean sedimentation rates in the 7-20 cm/kyr range) of relative paleointensity (RPI) that are accompanied by oxygen isotope data and extend through much of the Quaternary. Tandem fit of RPI and oxygen isotope data to calibrated templates (LR04 and PISO), using the Match protocol, yields largely consistent stratigraphies, implying that both RPI and oxygen isotope data are dominated by regional/global signals. Based on the recent geomagnetic field, RPI can be expected to be a global signal (i.e. dominated by the axial dipole field) when recorded at sedimentation rates less than several decimeters/kyr. Magnetic susceptibility, on the other hand, is a local/regional lithologic signal, and therefore less useful for long-distance correlation. Magnetic excursions are directional phenomena and, when adequately recorded, are manifest as paired reversals in which the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) reach high latitudes in the opposite hemisphere, and they occupy minima in RPI records. Reversed VGPs imply that excursions are attributable to the main axial dipole, and therefore provide global stratigraphy. The so-called Iceland Basin excursion is recorded at many IODP/ODP sites and lies at the MIS 6/7 boundary at ~188 ka, with a duration of 2-3 kyr. Other excursions in the Brunhes chron are less commonly recorded because their duration (perhaps <~1 kyr) requires sedimentation rates >20 cm/kyr to be adequately recorded. On the other hand, several excursions within the Matuyama Chron are more commonly recorded in North Atlantic drift sediments due to relatively elevated durations. With some notable exceptions (e.g. Iberian Margin), high quality RPI records from North Atlantic sediments, together with magnetic excursions, can be used in tandem with oxygen isotope data to

  18. Regional Stratigraphy and Petroleum Systems of the Illinois Basin, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    The publication combines data on Paleozoic and Mesozoic stratigraphy and petroleum geology of the Illinois basin, U.S.A., in order to facilitate visualizing the stratigraphy on a regional scale and visualizing stratigraphic relations within the basin. Data are presented in eight schematic chronostratigraphic sections arranged approximately from north to south, with time denoted in equal increments along the sections, in addition to the areal extent of this structural basin. The stratigraphic data are modified from Hass (1956), Conant and Swanson (1961), Wilman and others (1975), American Association of Petroleum Geologists (1984, 1986), Olive and McDowell (1986), Shaver and others (1986), Thompson (1986), Mancini and others (1996), and Harrison and Litwin (1997). The time scale is taken from Gradstein and others (2004). Additional stratigraphic nomenclature is from Harland and others (1990), Babcock and others (2007), and Bergstrom and others (2008). Stratigraphic sequences as defined by Sloss (1963, 1988) and Wheeler (1963) also are included, as well as the locations of major petroleum source rocks and major petroleum plays. The stratigraphic units shown are colored according to predominant lithology, in order to emphasize general lithologic patterns and to provide a broad overview of the Illinois basin. For the purpose of comparison, three columns on the right show schematic depictions of stratigraphy and interpreted events in the Illinois basin and in the adjacent Michigan and Appalachian basins.

  19. Bio-, Magneto- and event-stratigraphy across the K-T boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preisinger, A.; Stradner, H.; Mauritsch, H. J.

    1988-01-01

    Determining the time and the time structure of rare events in geology can be accomplished by applying three different and independent stratigraphic methods: Biostratigraphy, magneto-stratigraphy and event-stratigraphy. The optimal time resolution of the two former methods is about 1000 years, while by means of event-stratigraphy a resolution of approximately one year can be achieved. For biostratigraphy across the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary micro- and nannofossils have been found best suited. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of minerals and trace elements across the K-T boundary show anomalies on a millimeter scale and permit conclusions regarding the time structure of the K-T event itself. The results of the analyses find a most consistent explanation by the assumption of an extraterrestrial impact. The main portion of the material rain from the atmosphere evidently was deposited within a short time. The long-time components consist of the finest portion of the material rain from the atmosphere and the transported and redeposited fall-out.

  20. Coupling of sedimentological and limnological dynamics in subarctic thermokarst ponds in Northern Québec (Canada) on an interannual basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulombe, Olivier; Bouchard, Frédéric; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    Landscapes are changing at fast rates in subarctic regions due to recent climate warming and related permafrost thaw. As a consequence, thermokarst lakes and ponds are forming and their properties are changing rapidly. Here, we report on the interannual (2012-2014) variability of sedimentological and limnological conditions in a recently formed thermokarst pond in discontinuous permafrost terrain in Northern Quebec, and we discuss various aspects of pond sedimentation processes. Sediment samples from collecting traps and a short core were analyzed for particle size, organic matter content and geochemical composition, as well as 14C dating of a peat sample from the core. Results reveal the preponderance of silts containing 2 to 13% organic matter and an age of 1825-1950 cal. yr. BP for the peat sample. A hypoxic hypolimnion formed in the pond during the short summers. Apparent sedimentation rates (up to 5.5 mm/d) varied in relation to local meteorological conditions and snow cover. The results also reveal major parameters associated with sediment composition, most notably dissolved oxygen in the water column, sampling depth and the year of sampling. Microplankton (20-200 μm) is likely the main source of organic matter, which represents up to 10 to 13% of sediment trap samples, considering its size matching a major grain size mode (44.9-59.0 μm). Using sedimentation rates and an estimation of long-term sediment compaction, the pond's "life span" was calculated at 370 to 600 years. This represents a baseline for the general understanding of the development of young (15-20 years) subarctic thermokarst ponds overlying impermeable soils, and provides an approximate time frame for the potential response of such systems to climate change impacts on northern landscapes.

  1. Sedimentology of Hirnantian glaciomarine deposits in the Balkan Terrane, western Bulgaria: Fixing a piece of the north peri-Gondwana jigsaw puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatalov, Athanas

    2017-04-01

    Glaciomarine deposits of late Hirnantian age in the western part of the Palaeozoic Balkan Terrane have persistent thickness ( 7 m) and lateral uniformity in rock colour, bedding pattern, lithology, and sedimentary structures. Four lithofacies are distinguished from base to top: lonestone-bearing diamictites, interbedded structureless mudstones, crudely laminated diamictites, and finely laminated mudstones. The diamictites are clast-poor to clast-rich comprising muddy to sandy varieties. Their compositional maturity is evidenced by the very high amount of detrital quartz compared to the paucity of feldspar and unstable lithic grains. Other textural components include extraclasts derived from the local Ordovician basement, mudstone intraclasts, and sediment aggregates. Turbate structures, grain lineations, and soft sediment deformation of the matrix below larger grains are locally observed. Sedimentological analysis reveals that deposition occurred in an ice-intermediate to ice-distal, poorly agitated shelf environment by material supplied from meltwater buoyant plumes and rain-out from ice-rafted debris. Remobilization by mass-flow processes (cohesive debris flows and slumps) was an important mechanism particularly for the formation of massive diamictites. The glaciomarine deposits represent a typical deglaciation sequence reflecting retreat of the ice front (grounded or floating ice sheet), relative sea-level rise and gradually reduced sedimentation rate with increasing contribution from suspension fallout. This sequence was deposited on the non-glaciated shelf of the intracratonic North Gondwana platform along the southern margin of the Rheic Ocean. The Hirnantian strata of the Balkan Terrane can be correlated with similar glaciomarine deposits known from peri-Gondwana terranes elsewhere in Europe showing clear 'Armorican affinity'. Several lines of evidence suggest that the provenance of siliciclastic material was associated mainly with sedimentary recycling of

  2. Site characterization using a portable optically stimulated luminescence reader: delineating disrupted stratigraphy in Holocene eolian deposits on the Canadian Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyikwa, K.; Gilliland, K.; Gibson, T.; Plumb, E.

    2012-12-01

    The use of portable optically stimulated luminescence (POSL) readers to elucidate on complex depositional sequences has been demonstrated in a number of recent studies. POSL readers are robust versions of the traditional lab-bound luminescence readers and they can be used in the field, allowing for rapid decisions to be made when collecting samples for dating. Furthermore, in contrast with lab-bound readers, POSL readers can perform measurements on bulk samples, negating the need to carry out time-intensive mineralogical separations. The POSL reader is equipped with both infra-red and blue light (OSL) stimulating sources such that signal separation during measurement can be carried out by selectively exciting feldspar using the IR source (IRSL) after which a quartz dominant signal is obtained from the same sample using post-IR blue OSL. The signals obtained are then plotted to give luminescence profiles that depict the variation of the luminescence signal with depth. Signal intensities depend on mineralogical concentrations, grain luminescence sensitivities, dose rates as well as on burial ages of the grains. Where all these variables, apart from the burial age, are held constant up the depositional sequence the luminescence profile serves as a proxy for the chronostratigraphy. As a contribution to a growing archive of studies that have employed POSL readers to unravel complex depositional sequences, this study uses a POSL system developed by the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre to characterize the stratigraphy at an archaeological site that lies next to an oilfield plant located on a Holocene fossil dune landscape in southern Alberta, Canada. Oilfield activity was initiated at the site several decades ago and it involved the laying of pipelines below ground which disturbed considerable archaeological deposits. Subsequent work led to the discovery of the archeological site which was previously occupied by ancestral indigenous peoples at various

  3. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (Antarctic Peninsula): Sedimentology of glacially influenced continental margin topsets and foresets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyles, N.; Daniels, J.; Osterman, L.E.; Januszczak, N.

    2001-01-01

    stratified diamictites interbedded with massive and graded sandstones and mudstones. The sedimentary record and seismic stratigraphy is consistent with deposition on a continental slope from debris flows and turbidity currents released from a glacial source. Data from Sites 1097 and 1103 suggest the importance of aggradation of the Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf by tilt deposition and progradation of the slope by mass flow. This may provide a model for the interpretation of Palaeozoic and Proterozoic glacial successions that accumulated on glacially influenced continental margins.

  4. Morphodynamics and Sedimentology of a Falling Stage Sandy Fjord Delta, Goose River, Labrador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slingerland, R.; Edmonds, D. A.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Royce, J.; Burpee, A.; Cederberg, J.; Caldwell, R.; Nijhuis, A.; McGuffin, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment size and degree of cohesion are thought to exert a strong control on the morphodynamic processes, planform shape and clinoform stratigraphy of deltas. To test model predictions concerning these two parameters, we present a morphometric and stratigraphic analysis of a sandy delta formed where the Goose River flows into Goose Bay at the western end of Lake Melville, Labrador. Goose River delta sediments consist of arkosic, heavy-mineral-rich sand (D50 = 225 to 600 microns) with very little silt and clay, placing this delta at the coarser-grained, non-cohesive end of the spectrum. The delta started to form approx. 7000 years ago as the Laurentide ice sheet retreated and post-glacial rebound created a relative base level fall of approximately 4 mm/yr. The current tidal range in Goose Bay averages 0.5 m, and the average wave height is negligible. Results from our 2012 field season show that the delta planform consists of two moribund lobes at elevations of ~ 5 m and ~ 2 m and a presently active delta at sea level. Aerial photography from 1951 to 2012 show there has been surprisingly little progradation despite active channel change at the six-month timescale and an assumed base level fall of 244 mm during that period. A topographic section along a dipline consists of three treads and two clinoform risers. The bottomset tread is a virtually featureless fjord bottom at ~35 m from which a first clinoform rises to a second tread at ~-15 m. The second tread is a sandy platform onto which an upper clinoform downlaps. This upper sandy clinoform ranges in dip from 9 to 17 dg. and passes into the topset at an elevation of ~ -1 m. The topset consists of braid-like trapezoidal unit bars that in GPR show little evidence of wave, alongshore current, or ice reworking, even though they are submerged at higher high tides. The planform, bar geometries and facies, and clinoform dips and dip-directions are remarkably consistent with model predictions from Delft3d.

  5. Sedimentological discontinuties as chances for enhancing process-based palaeo-environmental reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Kai; Lockot, Gregori; Wünnemann, Bernd; Ramisch, Arne; Diekmann, Bernhard; Yan, Dada

    2014-05-01

    Morpho-stratigraphic approaches in the field of palaeoenvironmental reconstruction are time consuming, have a low temporal resolution and the problem of equifinality in terms of processes or simply the reputation of fuzziness. Nevertheless, investigations of seemingly continuous archives such as lake sediments are more effective if climate driven catchment signals are considered. Lake level data sets provide valuable indices for modelling the palaeoclimatic history and feedback-mechanisms on regional, supra-regional or even hemispherical scales. However, they are frequently used without considering the role of sediment trapping, signal buffering and random events (tectonic, mass-movements, etc.) along related sediment cascades. Moreover, dating inversions, record gaps and unlikely high or low SARs are considered as archive-internal disturbances or simply measurement errors which have to be smoothed by increasingly sophisticated tools of statistics or simply eliminated. This poster examines the value of such discontinuities and random events within continuous lake record for deciphering catchment-wide feedbacks/responses and their related processes. Our first example shows the influence of lake level changes and permafrost uplift on the reservoir effect of Lake Heihai, Northern Tibetan Plateau. A drop in lake level induced the reworking of sediment sequences, which is not identifiable by disturbances of the stratighraphy. This problem only becomes apparent, if several on-shore sediment records and at least two lake cores are compared. Several lake records from Hala Lake, Qilian Mountains, northeastern Tibetan Plateau confirm highly diverse stratigraphies and sediment properties, thus underpinning the necessity of data comparison from different locations (within the lake) for a reliable reconstruction of climate-driven hydrological variations within a lake-catchment system. A third example from a large endorheic foreland basin of the Tibetan Plateau (Ejina Basin also

  6. Geomorphology and sedimentology of hummocky terrain, south-central Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro-Stasiuk, Mandy J.

    The landscape in south-central Alberta, Canada, is dominated by a suite of landforms that formed beneath the Laurentide Ice Sheet. This thesis explores the origins of those landforms, specifically hummocky terrain. Sediments in the hummocks, hummock form, and associations with other landforms are examined to determine hummock genesis. Sediment was examined from over one hundred exposures through the "Buffalo Lake Moraine" at Travers Reservoir, McGregor Reservoir, and the Little Bow River. This belt of hummocky terrain (like most hummocky terrain regions) is traditionally interpreted as forming at, or near, the stagnating margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet by supraglacial letdown. However, hummocks in south-central Alberta contain a complex variety of sediments and materials atypical of supraglacial letdown: in situ bedrock, thrust bedrock, lodgement till, melt-out till, sorted sand and gravel, rippled sand, rhythmically-bedded sand, silt, and clay, and pervasively sheared beds. All sediment types and deformation structures were deposited, or formed, subglacially. Also, the deposits make up in situ stratigraphies that record the history of initial Laurentide Ice Sheet advance into the area (lodgment till and thrust bedrock), the extensive accumulation of water at the bed (glaciolacustrine beds), and ice stagnation (melt-out till). Regardless of the genesis of sediments in hummocks, sedimentary units and structures are abruptly truncated by the surface that represents the hummock and trough morphology, demonstrating that the hummocks are erosional forms and that they represent a landscape unconformity. Subglacial sediments predating the erosion and subglacial eskers overlying the erosion surface strongly suggest that hummock erosion was subglacial. Also, hummock morphology, lithostratigraphy correlated from hummock to hummock, abrupt truncation at the land surface, and widespread boulder lags support meltwater erosion for hummocky terrain in the region. Well

  7. Neogene carbonate exploration play concepts for Northern New Guinea: New iteration from field work and seismic stratigraphy along the Northern New Guinea Fault Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Pigott, J.D.; Geiger, C. )

    1994-07-01

    Recent field reconnaissance, petrography, nanno and foraminifera age determinations, and seismic stratigraphy of the Sepik and Piore subbasins of northern New Guinea reveal the existence of an extensive, tectonically unstable, Miocene-Pliocene carbonate shelf system. These findings represent the first recorded evidence of northern Papuan limestones coeval in age to those of the hydrocarbon productive Salawati Basin of Irian Jaya. Moreover, these observations also demonstrate the significance of episodic activities of the northern New Guinea fault zone upon the changes in carbonate sedimentation and diagenesis. During the Neogene, algal biosparites to foraminiferal biomicrites defined the clean portion of a mixed clastic-carbonate shelf system of the northern New Guinea basin, which began at the central New Guinea cordillera and deepened northward. This shelf was interrupted by coral-coralline algal boundstone fringing- to patch-reef buildups with associated skeletal grainstones. Clean carbonates were spatially and temporally restricted to basement blocks, which episodically underwent uplift while terrigenous dilutes carbonates were more common in adjacently subsiding basement block bathymetric lows. These tectonic expressions were caused by the spatially transient nature of constraining bends of the evolving north New Guinea faults. As shown by seismic stratigraphy, by the late Miocene to the early Pliocene the uplift of the Bewani-Torricelli Mountains sagittally divided the shelf of the northern New Guinea basin into the Ramu-Sepik and the Piore basins. Continued regional sinistral transpression between the Pacific and the New Guinea leading edge of the Indo-Australian plates led to the reverse tilting of the Piore basin, the shallowing of the former distal shelf with concomitant extensive biolithite development (e.g., on subsiding volcanic islands) eventual uplifting of the Oenake Range, and en echelon faulting of the Bewani-Torricelli Mountains.

  8. New Insights into West Antarctic Ice Sheet History Based on Ground Penetrating Radar Linking Stratigraphy With Surface-Exposure Dated Geomorphology in Lower Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, M. L.; Arcone, S.; Ackert, R.

    2002-05-01

    A most extensive record of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) during the last glacial cycle is found in lower Taylor Valley. We gained new insights into the drift stratigraphy using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and surface-exposure dating in selected locations there. Evidence for the following two hypotheses will be presented. The WAIS achieved Last Glacial Maximum size between the LGM and the penultimate glaciation based on the exposure ages of boulders mantling moraines that GPR indicates are stratigraphically older than late Wisconsin drift. The drift record is on Hjorth Hill. Exposure ages range between 29 and 85 kya. The Taylor lobe of the WAIS dammed a valley-wide glacial lake, Glacial Lake Washburn between 21,200 and 8,340 14C yr BP. How and when the Taylor Lobe disintegrated are debated. We collected GPR profiles at both 100 and 400 MHz on transverse ridges that could date the recession of the Taylor Lobe. We calibrated GPR to sediment stratigraphy, primarily using 10 drill holes in eastern Taylor Valley. Ridge GPR consistently shows multiple superposed sediment packets each with internal sub-parallel reflections that resemble the stratification of migrating current ripples. We interpret the reflectors as foreset (megaripple) bedding. We think that the scalloped-shaped surfaces represent erosion indicative of a shift in current regime. Cross profiles show the festoon-shaped packets of cross-bedded units that characterize undulatory to lunate ripples. We interpret the ridges as form-discordant composite mega- and giant-current ripples. The boulders on the ripples are glacial erratics and attest to the close presence of glacial ice. The environment of deposition, ice-contact supraglacial, was characterized by high meltwater outflow from streams running off the glacier. Therefore, ridge chronology directly dates recession of the Taylor Valley lobe to about 17,000 - 13,000 14C yrs BP. Climate warming was involved in ice disintegration.

  9. Time-stratigraphic reconstruction and integration of paleopedologic, sedimentologic, and biotic events (Willwood Formation, Lower Eocene, northwest Wyoming, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    An empirically-based model is advanced using paleosol maturities to estimate the relative geologic time separating any stratigraphic levels within the lower Eocene Willwood Formation. The reviewed Willwood time stratigraphy from this analysis helps evaluate the nature, tempo, and possible causes of three major episodes of mammalian appearance and disappearance. These faunal events are directly correlated with certain apects of paleosol evolution in the Willwood Formation. That evolution is tied directly to climatic changes and to varying sediment accumulation rates in response to tectonism. -from Authors

  10. Upper crustal mechanical stratigraphy and the evolution of thrust wedges: insights from sandbox analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Flavio; Storti, Fabrizio; Nestola, Yago; Cavozzi, Cristian; Magistroni, Corrado; Meda, Marco; Salvi, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Crustal mechanical stratigraphy i.e. alternating mechanically weaker and stronger layers within the crust, plays a key role in determining how contractional deformations are accommodated at convergent plate boundaries. In the upper crust, evaporites typically provide preferential décollement layers for fault localization and foreland ward propagation, thus significantly influencing evolution of thrust-fold belts in terms of mechanical balance, geometries, and chronological sequences of faulting. Evaporites occur at the base of many passive margin successions that underwent positive inversion within orogenic systems. They typically produce salient geometries in deformation fronts, as in the Jura in the Northern Alps, the Salakh Arch in the Oman Mountains, or the Ainsa oblique thrust-fold belt in the Spanish Pyrenees. Evaporites frequently occur also in foredeep deposits, as in the Apennines, the Pyrenees, the Zagros etc. causing development of additional structural complexity. Low-friction décollement layers also occur within sedimentary successions involved in thrust-fold belts and they contribute to the development of staircase fault trajectories. The role of décollement layers in thrust wedge evolution has been investigated in many experimental works, particularly by sandbox analogue experiments that have demonstrated the impact of basal weak layers on many first order features of thrust wedges, including the dominant fold vergence, the timing of fault activity, and the critical taper. Some experiments also investigated on the effects of weak layers within accreting sedimentary successions, showing how this triggers kinematic decoupling of the stratigraphy above and below the décollements, thus enhancing disharmonic deformation. However, at present a systematic experimental study of the deformation modes of an upper crustal mechanical stratigraphy consisting of both low-friction and viscous décollement layers is still missing in the specific literature. In

  11. Seismic stratigraphy of shelf and slope, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Addy, S.K.; Buffler, R.T.

    1984-11-01

    A seismic stratigraphic framework of the shelf in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico near Destin dome is established by correlating multifold seismic lines with deep wells that penetrate to the Middle Jurassic Louann Salt and with a previously published seismic stratigraphic study based on shallow core holes. Nine depositional sequences or seismic units are recognized and are designated A through I in the order of increasing age. During the Middle Jurassic to middle Cretaceous, shallow-water deposition prevailed in the area. This deposition was followed by a period of general transgression until middle Oligocene, during which deeper water deposition took place. After the middle Oligocene, a shallow-water regime returned to the area. Thinning of seismic units and onlap of reflectors of post-middle Cretaceous age on the Destin dome suggest that the dome was uplifted in Late Cretaceous and into the early Tertiary. Six previously established seismic stratigraphic units from the deep Gulf of Mexico are traced into the lower slope near De Soto Canyon. Although several units thin and pinch out, two key boundaries can be traced onto the shelf. The important Challenger-Campeche boundary, which is recognized as a marker horizon and unconformity throughout the abyssal Gulf, is correlated to the F-E boundary, the middle Cretaceous (97 Ma) unconformity on the shelf. The base of the Sigsbee-Cinco de Mayo unit is correlated to an 8-Ma reflector on the shelf. These correlations confirm previous age estimates for the deep Gulf units. Absence of coherent reflections in the Lower Cretaceous carbonate margin indicates possible reef growth. This margin is the southeastward subsurface extension of the Stuart City reef trend in Texas and Louisiana. This trend extends farther to the southeast where the carbonate margin crops out along the Florida Escarpment.

  12. Stratigraphy of the outcropping formations in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Melvin Carroll; Hoy, Nevin Douglas

    1952-01-01

    The geology of southern Florida, except for the Pliocene deposits, is not widely known among geologists and paleontologists. The popular concept is that there are very few outcrops in this part of the State. It is true that there are very few natural exposures, but the dredging of rivers and the construction of canals have made many exposures. The Tamiami formation is the only formation of Miocene age exposed at the surface that is recognized in southwestern Florida. The Hawthorn formation and the older Tertiary formations have been recognized in samples from wells in southern Florida.

  13. Stratigraphy and tephra of the Kibish Formation, southwestern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Francis H; Fuller, Chad R

    2008-09-01

    The Kibish Formation in southwestern Ethiopia, with an aggregate thickness of approximately 105 m, consists of lacustrine, marginal lacustrine, and deltaic deposits. It is divided into four members numbered I to IV on the basis of erosion surfaces (disconformities) between the strata of each member. It overlies the Mursi and Nkalabong formations, the latter of which is here shown to correlate with the Shungura Formation. Tephra layers in each member allow for secure correlation between geographically separated sections on the basis of the composition of their volcanic glass. Members I, III, and IV of the Kibish Formation appear to have been deposited at the same times as sapropels S7 (197 ka), S4 (104 ka), and S1 (8 ka) in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, respectively. We correlate the KHS Tuff of the Kibish Formation with a >154-kyr-old unnamed tuff in the Konso Formation. Tephra in Member IV may derive from Mount Wenchi, a volcano situated on the divide between the Omo and Blue Nile drainage basins. Thin-bedded sedimentary layers probably represent annual deposition reflecting rapid sedimentation (approximately 30 m/kyr) of parts of the formation. This conclusion is supported by variation in paleomagnetic inclination through a sequence of these layers at KHS. Two fossils of early Homo sapiens (Omo I and Omo II) derive from Member I. Their stratigraphic placement is confirmed by analysis of the KHS Tuff in the lower part of Member II at both fossil sites. The KHS Tuff lies above a disconformity, which itself lies above the fossils at both sites. (40)Ar/(39)Ar dates provide an estimated age of approximately 195 kyr for these fossils. Omo III, a third fossil H. sapiens, probably also derives from Member I of the Kibish Formation and is of similar age. Hominin fossils from AHS, a new site, also derive from Member I. Hominin fossils from CHS can only be placed between 104 ka and 10 ka, the H. sapiens specimen from JHS is most likely 9-13 kyr in age, and a partial

  14. Geological map and stratigraphy of asteroid 21 Lutetia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massironi, Matteo; Marchi, Simone; Pajola, Maurizio; Snodgrass, Colin; Thomas, Nicolas; Tubiana, Cecilia; Baptiste Vincent, Jean; Cremonese, Gabriele; da Deppo, Vania; Ferri, Francesca; Magrin, Sara; Sierks, Holger; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe; Rickman, Hans; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Osiris Team

    2012-06-01

    The OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) images acquired during the recent Rosetta fly-by of Lutetia (10th of July 2010), enabled us to unravel the long geological history of the asteroid. This is recorded on its highly varied surface which displays geological units of disparate ages. In particular, using images of the closest approach, five main regions (in turn subdivided into minor units) have been discriminated on the basis of crater density, overlapping and cross-cutting relationships, and presence of linear features (i.e., fractures, faults, grooves, troughs). Other regions, with still unclear stratigraphic position, were also recognized on images of lower resolution on the bases of geomorphological properties such as crater density, relationship with scarp and ridges, and sharp morphological boundaries. In this work the geological evolution of Lutetia surface is reconstructed through the description of its main units and related contacts. The oldest regions imaged during the closest approach (Achaia and Noricum) are pervasively affected by fractures and grooves and display surfaces so heavily cratered to be dated back to a period not far from the Late Heavy Bombardment (yielding Achaia a crater retention age of 3.6-3.7 Ga). A crater of 55 km diameter, named Massilia and corresponding to the Narbonensis region, cuts both Achaia and Noricum regions and probably represents the most prominent event of the Lutetia history. The considerable crater density on its floor and walls, the absence of discernable deposits related to the impact event, and the intense deformation of it floor - all attest to its relatively great age. The North Polar Cluster (Baetica region) is associated with smooth ejecta broadly mantling the surrounding units and displays few craters and no linear features, demonstrating its relatively young age (estimated at less than 300 Ma). The North Polar Crater Cluster is the product of superimposed impacts; the last

  15. Sedimentology and arsenic pollution in the Bengal Basin: insight into arsenic occurrence and subsurface geology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, Andrew; McArthur, John

    2014-05-01

    The Bengal delta system is a geologically recent feature overlying a deeply incised palaeo-surface formed during the Last Glacial Maximum. This surface is a series of terraces and valleys created by river incision (Goodbred & Kuehl 2003). The terraces were weathered, forming a thin, indurated laterite deposit (Goodbred & Kuehl 2000) at depths greater than 50 m. McArthur et al. (2008) define this as a palaeosol and have identified it at depths greater than 30 m though out Bangladesh and West Bengal. It has been observed that arsenic concentrations at these sites are lower than the rest of the delta. It has been assumed that the surface morphology at sites where there is a palaeosol are similar and can therefore be characterised by remote sensing, in the form of Google Earth images. Sites were selected in Bangladesh and West Bengal, from work by McArthur et al. (2011); Hoque et al. (2012), where groundwater chemistry and sedimentology data are available making it possible to determine if the subsurface is a palaeo-channel or palaeo-interfluve. Arsenic concentration data have been inputted into Google Earth and the palaeo-channels marked where the arsenic concentration is greater than 10 µg/L, and palaeo-interfluves where arsenic concentration is less than 10 µg/L. The surface morphologies in these domains have been examined for similarities, and it was shown that avulsion scars and abandoned river channels are found where arsenic concentrations are greater than 10 µg/L. Conversely the surrounding areas that are devoid of channel scars have arsenic concentrations less than 10 µg/L. Using the correlation between avulsion features being representative of palaeo-channels and high arsenic concentrations, sites were selected that had a similar surface morphology to the type localities. A comparison of these images and arsenic concentrations showed that the postulate is valid for over 80 percent of cases. Where this is not valid, this could indicate that the subsurface

  16. Sedimentological Properties of Natural Gas Hydrates-Bearing Sands in the Nankai Trough and Mallik Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Tsuji, T.; Waseda, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough parallels the Japanese Island, where extensive BSRs have been interpreted from seismic reflection records. High resolution seismic surveys have definitely indicated gas hydrate distributions, and drilling the MITI Nankai Trough wells in 2000 and the METI Tokai-oki to Kumano-nada wells in 2004 have revealed subsurface gas hydrate in the eastern part of Nankai Trough. In 1998 and 2002 Mallik wells were drilled at Mackenzie Delta in the Canadian Arctic that also clarified the characteristics of gas hydrate-dominant sandy layers at depths from 890 to 1110 m beneath the permafrost zone. During the field operations, the LWD and wire-line well log data were continuously obtained and plenty of gas hydrate-bearing sand cores were recovered. Subsequence sedimentological and geochemical analyses performed on those core samples revealed the crucial geologic controls on the formation and preservation of natural gas hydrate in sediments. Pore-space gas hydrates reside in sandy sediments mostly filling intergranular porosity. Pore waters chloride anomalies, core temperature depression and core observations on visible gas hydrates confirm the presence of pore-space gas hydrates within moderate to thick sandy layers, typically 10 cm to a meter thick. Sediment porosities and pore-size distributions were obtained by mercury porosimetry, which indicate that porosities of gas hydrate-bearing sandy strata are approximately 45 %. According to grain size distribution curves, gas hydrate is dominant in fine- to very fine-grained sandy strata. Gas hydrate saturations are typically up to 80 % in pore volume throughout most of the hydrate-dominant sandy layers, which are estimated by well log analyses as well as pore water chloride anomalies. It is necessary for investigating subsurface fluid flow behaviors to evaluate both porosity and permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sandy sediments, and the measurements of water permeability for them indicated that highly saturated

  17. Sedimentological and Geochemical Characteristics of Turbidites Related to Earthquake Activity in the Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagatay, M.; Belucci, L.; Polonia, A.; Sancar, U.; Eris, K.; Gasperini, L.; Gorur, N.; Henry, P.; Zitter, T. A.; Geli, L.; Tryon, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Sea of Marmara (SoM) is a tectonically active basin being located on a major continental transform fault boundary between the Eurasian and Anatolian plates. It consists of three transtensional major subbasins in excess of -1250 m and smaller ones with -100 to -200 m forming the E-W elongated gulfs and bays. The major subbasins have steep slopes, especially in the north, with slope angles greater than 18°. The sedimentary infill sequence in the deep basins consists of about 75% turbidite-homogenite units (THU) and 25% hemiplagic sediments, deposited at sedimentation rates of 1 to 3 m/ka. Deposition of most of the THU has been triggered by seismo-tectonic activity that constitute a serious geohazard in the densely populated coastal areas. Identification and dating of the THUs are therefore important in the repeat-time determination of the earthquakes on different fault segments, and thus, for the probabilistic earthquake risk assessment in the region. We studied the sedimentological, physical and chemical characteristics of THUs in several cores recovered from different Marmara basins, and identified the record of the devastating (Mw=7.4) 1999 Izmit earthquake, using digital X-Ray Radiography, XRF Core Scanner, MSCL, stable isotope and grain-size analyses. The units were dated using AMS C-14 and radionuclide methods. THUs are characterized by a relatively thin (commonly mm to several cm thick) sand-silt unit at the base and thick (commonly several tens of cm) homogeneous mud at the top. Digital X-ray radiography indicates that the THUs have multiple sand-silt laminae in the basal unit showing bidirectional foresets and a sharp and often erosional basal contact. These features indicates deposition by a single turbidity current reflecting or deflecting from the opposite slopes. The XRF Core Scanner analysis indicates two specific geochemical anomalies associated with the turbiditites sampled over the active faults: Ca enrichment in the basal coarse part, and Mn

  18. Geology and stratigraphy of the San Lorenzo Tezonco deep well and its correlation to surrounding ranges, Mexico Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Morales-Casique, E.; Benowitz, J.

    2014-12-01

    The San Lorenzo Tezonco deep well stratigraphy records intense episodic volcanic activity in the Mexico Basin and surroundings during the past 20 Ma. The 2008-m deep lithological column is dominated by volcanic material, either as lava flows or pyroclastic deposits (97%), and only the upper most 70 m are composed of lacustrine deposits (3%). Based on geochronology and geochemistry, the lower part of the drill core is represented by rocks correlating to the Tepoztlán Formation (876-2008 m deep) that vary in composition from basaltic-andesite to rhyolite, and ages ranging from 13 to 21.2 Ma. On the surface this formation outcrops near the towns of Malinalco and Tepoztlán, ~43 km south of the deep well. Between depths of 581 and 875 m, volcanic rocks were recovered and are interpreted as lavas from the Sierra de las Cruces that vary in composition from andesite to dacite and range in age from 0.9 Ma to 5 Ma. Additionally, we documented rocks belonging to the Xochitepec Formation, outcropping around Xochimilco, in the Mexico City, with ages ranging from 1.2 and 1.7 Ma, in contrast with the Oligocene age proposed in previous works for these rocks. These new ages plus the chemical composition data, allow us to correlate the Xochitepec rocks with Sierra de las Cruces. Upward in the drill core (510-580 m) there are andesitic rocks that correlate with the 0.25 Ma Cerro de la Estrella volcanic center. The last volcanic package found in the well is correlated to the Santa Catarina basaltic andesites (70-120 m) that are younger than 0.25 Ma, and probably Holocene. Lacustrine deposits crown the stratigraphic column of the drill core with ages probably younger than 34 ka. The San Lorenzo Tezonco well is in a graben-like structure that was filled with more than 1900 m of volcanic products, suggesting that volcanism were intense in the Miocene to the Recent, and the south drainage of the Mexico Basin was closed probably in the early Pleistocene.

  19. The late Cenozoic diatom stratigraphy and paleolimnology of Tule Lake, Siskiyou Co. California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    very dry. Aulacoseira ambigua characterizes the late glacial and early Holocene record of Tule Lake. Its distribution indicates that warmer and wetter climates began about 15 ka in this part of the Great Basin. Fluctuations in diatom concentration suggests a 41000-yr. cycle between 3.0 and 2.5 Ma and 100000-yr. cycles after 1.0 Ma. In the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, Aulacoseira solida percentages wax and wane in an approximately 400000-yr. cycle. The apparent response of Tule Lake diatom communities to orbitally induced insolation cycles underscores the importance of this record for the study of late Cenozoic paleoclimate change. The diatom stratigraphy records the evolution and local extinction of several species that may be biochronologically important. Stephanodiscus niagarae first appeared and became common in the Tule Lake record shortly after 1.8 Ma. Stephanodiscus carconensis disappeared about 1.8 Ma, while Aulacoseira solida is rare in the core after about 1.35 Ma. Cyclotella elgeri, a diatom characteristic of some outcrops referred to the Yonna Formation (Pliocene), is common only near the base of the core at an age of about 3 Ma. Detection of local extinctions is complicated by reworking of distinctive species from Pliocene diatomites surrounding Tule Lake. A new species, Aulacoseira paucistriata, is described from Pliocene lake deposits in the Klamath Basin. ?? 1991 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  20. Combining sedimentological and geophysical data for high-resolution 3-D mapping of fluvial architectural elements in the Quaternary Po plain (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersezio, R.; Giudici, M.; Mele, M.

    2007-11-01

    Current approaches to the reconstruction of the geometry of fluvial sediments of Quaternary alluvial plains and the characterization of their internal architecture are strongly dependent on core data (1-D). Accurate 2-D and 3-D reconstructions and maps of the subsurface are needed in hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and geotechnical studies. The present study aims to: 1) improve current methods for geophysical imaging of the subsurface by means of VES, ERGI and GPR data, and calibration with geomorphological and geological reconstructions, 2) optimize the horizontal and vertical resolution of subsurface imaging in order to resolve sedimentary heterogeneity, and 3) check the reliability/uncertainty of the results (maps and architectural reconstructions) by comparison with exposed analogues. The method was applied to shallow (0 to 15 m) aquifers of the fluvial plain of southern Lombardy (Northern Italy). At two sites we studied fluvial sediments of meandering systems of the Last Glacial Maximum and post-glacial historical age. These sediments comprise juxtaposed and superimposed gravel-sand units with fining-upward sequences (channel-bar depositional elements), which are separated by thin and laterally discontinuous silty and sandy clay units (overbank and flood plain deposits). The sedimentary architecture has been studied at different scales in the two areas. At the scale of the depositional system, we reconstructed the subsurface over an area of 4 km 2 to a depth of 18 m (study site 1). Reconstructed sequences based on 10 boreholes and water-well stratigraphic logs were integrated with the interpretation of 10 vertical electrical soundings (VES) with Schlumberger arrays and 1570 m long dipole-dipole electrical resistivity ground imaging profiles (ERGI). In unsaturated sediments, vertical and horizontal transitions between gravel-sand units and fine-grained sediments could be mapped respectively at the meter- to decameter scale after calibration of the VES with

  1. Mapping Stratigraphy and Anomalies in Iron-Rich Volcanoclastics Using Ground-Penetrating Radar: Potential for Subsurface Exploration on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Clifford, S.; Khan, S.; Fernandez, J.; Wiggs, E.; Gonzalez, S. L.; Wyrick, D.; Grimm, R.; Dinwiddie, C.; Pommerol, A.

    2004-12-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) studies conducted in iron-rich volcanoclastics can yield valuable information for interpreting the subsurface stratigraphy resulting from lava flows and intervening unconsolidated volcanic and sedimentary deposits with different compositions and ages. GPR is also valuable for mapping subsurface anomalies and structures, such as rifts and lava tubes. We performed a geophysical field survey in Craters of the Moon National Park to evaluate the potential for using GPR to map local areas of the Martian subsurface for evidence of subsurface water. Craters of the Moon is located in the South Central portion of Idaho, and lies within the Eastern Snake River Plain; it is a composite of more than forty different lava flows, erupted from approximately twenty-five cinder cones and eruptive fissures over eight distinct eruptive periods ranging in age from Late Pleistocene to Holocene. We used a GPR operating at 16 and 100 MHz to perform structural mapping at several different locations. Radar studies were combined with transient electromagnetic soundings and infrared spectroscopy to assess the effect of soil conductivity and geochemistry on identification of subsurface structures. Our results show that, even with a relatively high amount of irons oxides (~14 %), GPR penetration depths of 50 m were achieved with the 100 MHz antenna and penetration depths of 150 m were achieved with the 16 MHz antenna. These depths of investigation may be attributable to the high porosity of the soil at the studied areas, which lowered the electrical losses, thus favoring a relatively deep penetration of the radar wave.

  2. Cretaceous stratigraphy and biostratigraphy, Sierra Blanca basin, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G. ); Anderson, O.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The Sierra Blanca basin of Otero and Lincoln counties, New Mexico contains a Lower (upper Albian)-Upper (Santonian) Cretaceous section of marine and nonmarine strata as much as 700 m thick which represent the upper part of a regressive cycle followed by two transgressive-regressive deposition cycles. The lower 55 m of the Cretaceous section are the same tripartite Dakota Group units recognized in Guadalupe and San Miguel counties: basal Mesa Rica Sandstone (late Albian), medial Pajarito formation (late Albian) and upper Romeroville sandstone (earliest Cenomanian). The Mesa Rica and Pajarito represent a regression and are overlain disconformably by the transgressive Romeroville sandstone. Overlying transgressive marine clastics and minor carbonates of the Mancos Shale are as much as 73 m thick and include the early Turonian Greenhorn Limestone. The overlying Tres Hermanos formation (up to 91 m thick) consists of the (ascending order) Atarque sandstone and the Carthage and Fite Ranch sandstone members. These strata represent a mid-Turonian regression in response to regional tectonism (Atarque and Carthage), followed by a transgression (Fite Ranch sandstone) that ended in the deposition of the D-Cross Tongue of the Mancos Shale and Fort Hays Member of the Niobrara Formation during the late Turonian. The subsequent regression began with the Coniacian Gallup Sandstone (55 m) followed by coal-bearing Crevasse Canyon Formation (up to 244 m thick). The Coniacian-Santonian Crevasse Canyon Formation, the youngest Cretaceous unit in the basin, is disconformably overlain by middle Eocene conglomerates and red-bed siliciclastics of the Cub Mountain formation. Dakota Group age determinations in the Sierra Blanca basin are those of well-dated sections to the north, but ammonites and inoceramid bivalves from the Sierra Blanca basin provide precise age control for Cenomanian-Santonian marine and marginal marine strata and palynology and megafossil plants for nonmarine strata.

  3. Turonian (Eaglefordian) stratigraphy of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    A stratigraphic analysis of 14 localities from New England to Georgia and of 1 well from the type area of the Eaglefordian Stage at Dallas, Texas, has resulted in a reevaluation of the ages of both formal and informal stratigraphic units previously established for the Atlantic and eastern Gulf Coastal Plains. Lower Turonian strata, once thought to be absent beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain, are present. The study focused on a stratigraphic interval th