Science.gov

Sample records for strength steel welded

  1. High Strength Steel Weldment Reliability: Weld Metal Hydrogen Trapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    additions to welding consumables to control weld metal hydrogen and thus reduce susceptibility to cold cracking in high strength steel weldments. 14...applying weld metal hydrogen trapping to improve the resistance to hydrogen cracking in welding of high strength steels . Hydrogen cracking in high...requirements which are necessary to prevent hydrogen cracking in high strength steel welding. Common practices to prevent hydrogen cracking in steel

  2. High Strength Steel Welding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ical A nalysis ............................................................................ 124 4.6.1 Inductively Coupled Plasm a...welding, the heat source is not stationary ................................................................................................ 19 0 Figure 5...primary and secondary phases in weld m etal inclusions ................................................................. 52 Figure 13: HAC in heat

  3. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Carpenter, Joseph A.; Warren, C. D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2008-12-28

    Experiments are continuing to evaluate the feasibility of friction stir spot welding advanced high-strength steels including, DP780, martensitic hot-stamp boron steel, and TRIP steels. Spot weld lap-shear strengths can exceed those required by industry standards such as AWS D8.1.

  5. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  6. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  7. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  8. Structural strength of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Raimond, E.D.; Lapin, P.G.; Pautkin, U.S.; Shiganov, N.V.; Tashchikov, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors devise special measures to increase the resistance of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels. High structural strenght is ensured for shells loaded by internal pressure when ait (impact toughness) greater than or equal to10 J/cm/sup 2/. For welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels of the O3Kh11N10M2T type, this condition is satisfied when the weld strength does not exceed 1400-1450 MPa. A structural strength of 15001750 MPa in welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels can be obtained by means of mechanicothermal treatment.

  9. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  10. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  11. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  12. Assessing Hydrogen Assisted Cracking Modes in High Strength Steel Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    posed theoretical hydrogen assisted cracking mechanisms. It was found that the microplasticity theory of Beachem can best describe how the stress ...steel and determined the stress corrosion cracking toughness, Kscc. Herman and Campbell found that the fracture toughness of this material was 16 MPa...embrittlement Welding Cracking (fracturing) Implant tests Stress intensity ("T, ) ’ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary end identify by

  13. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    PubMed Central

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  14. Strength Recovery in a High-Strength Steel During Multiple Weld Thermal Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinghua; Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, S. S.; Lippold, John C.; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.

    2011-12-01

    BlastAlloy 160 (BA160) is a low-carbon martensitic steel strengthened by copper and M2C precipitates. Heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evaluation of BA160 exhibited softening in samples subjected to the coarse-grained HAZ thermal simulations of this steel. This softening is partially attributed to dissolution of copper precipitates and metal carbides. After subjecting these coarse-grained HAZs to a second weld thermal cycle below the A c1 temperature (at which austenite begins to form on heating), recovery of strength was observed. Atom-probe tomography and microhardness analyses correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of copper precipitates and metal carbides. A continuum model is proposed to rationalize strengthening and softening in the HAZ regions of BlastAlloy 160.

  15. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  17. Hardening characteristics of CO2 laser welds in advanced high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tae-Kyo; Park, Bong-Gyu; Kang, Chung-Yun

    2012-06-01

    When the CO2 laser welder with 6 kW output was used to weld 4 TRIP steels, 2 DP steels and a precipitation-hardened steel, which have the tensile strength in the range of 600-1000 MPa, the effect of welding speed on hardening characteristics was investigated. In the weld of TRIP steels and DP steels, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the HAZ near the bond line, and the hardness was decreased from the HAZ to the base metal. Only in the PH600 steel, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the hardness was decreased from bond line to the base metal. The maximum hardness value was not changed due to the variation of the welding speed within a given range of the welding speed. When the correlation with maximum hardness value using 6 known carbon equivalents was examined, those of CEL (=C+Si/50+Mn/25+P/2+Cr/25) and PL (=C+Mn/22+14B) were 0.96 and 0.95 respectively, and CEL was better because it could reflect the contribution of Si and Cr added to AHSS. The maximum hardness value could be calculated by the equation "Hmax=701CEL+281". The phase transformation analysis indicated that only martensitic transformation was expected in the given range of the welding conditions. Therefore, the maximum hardness of the weld was the same as that of water cooled steel and not changed with the variation of the welding speed

  18. Dissimilar Arc Welding of Advanced High-Strength Car-Body Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Spena, P.; D'Aiuto, F.; Matteis, P.; Scavino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A widespread usage of new advanced TWIP steel grades for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with other automotive steel grades. Therefore, the microstructural features and the mechanical response of dissimilar butt weld seams of TWIP and 22MnB5 steel sheets after metal-active-gas arc welding are examined. The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the welded joints was carried out by optical metallography, microhardness and tensile testing, and fractographic examination. The heat-affected zone on the TWIP side was fully austenitic and the only detectable effect was grain coarsening, while on the 22MnB5 side it exhibited newly formed martensite and tempered martensite. The welded tensile specimens exhibited a much larger deformation on the TWIP steel side than on the 22MnB5. The fracture generally occurred at the interface between the fusion zone and the heat-affected zones, with the fractures surfaces being predominantly ductile. The ultimate tensile strength of the butt joints was about 25% lower than that of the TWIP steel.

  19. Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Development Report Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to- Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals C 0by...Martensitic Steel Weld Metals PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) .J. DeLoach, Jr. .TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 1S PAGE COUNT I...if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP High strength steel , Ductile-brittle transition Martensitic Mechanical proper ties

  20. Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

    2014-05-01

    High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

  1. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  2. Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HY100 and HY130 High Strength Steels During Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    High Yields) Steels for pressure hulls and special applications like flight decks where aluminum is impractical to use. HY80 is the most famous and...most widely used of the HYQ & T steels developed. Interest waned in widely using the steels with strengths above HY80 because of cracking problems...Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HYI00 and HYI30 High Strength Steels During Welding CY) by _RICHARD ALLEN BASS B.S. Electrical

  3. Shielded Metal Arc Welding Consumables for Advanced High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    100 ksi) depends on the availability of adequate welding consumables. In the case of shielded metal arc welding, the electrodes must provide...associated with the potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH2 0). The fluxes were then crushed and sized to 14# Tyler mesh (1.7 mm screen aperture) to...determined that the hydrated potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH20) used in this investi- gation was 50 wt. pct. potassium silicate (K 2SiO 3 ) and

  4. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  5. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  6. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  7. Fatigue crack initiation life prediction in high strength structural steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricoteaux, A.; Fardoun, F.; Degallaix, S.; Sauvage, F.

    1995-02-01

    The local approach method is used to calculate the fatigue crack initiation/early crack growth lives (N(i)) in high strength structural steel weldments. Weld-toe geometries, welding residual stresses and HAZ (heat affected zone) cyclic mechanical properties are taken into account in the N(i) estimation procedure. Fatigue crack initiation lives are calculated from either a Basquin type or a Manson-Coffin type equation. The local (HAZ) stress and strain amplitudes and the local mean stress are determined from an analysis based on the Neuber rule and the Molski-Glinka energy approach. The accuracy of the different methods is evaluated and discussed. Finally the previous methods are used with HAZ cyclic mechanical properties estimated from hardness measurements.

  8. Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114)

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Girvin; Warren Peterson; Jerry Gould

    2004-09-17

    This program evaluated the effects of common manufacturing variables on spike-tempering effectiveness. The investigation used design-of-experiment (DOE) techniques, and examined both dual-phase and martensitic grades of high-strength steels (HSS). The specific grades chosen for this project were: Dual-phase (DP) 600, galvannealed (GA), 1.55 mm (DP) 600; Dual-phase (DP) 980 (uncoated), 1.55 mm (DP) 980; and Martensitic (M) 1300, 1.55 mm (M) 1300. Common manufacturing conditions of interest included tempering practice (quench and temper time), button size, simulated part fitup (sheet angular misalignment and fitup), and electrode wear (increased electrode face diameter). All of these conditions were evaluated against mechanical performance (static and dynamic tensile shear). Weld hardness data was also used to examine correlations between mechanical performance and the degree of tempering. Mechanical performance data was used to develop empirical models. The models were used to examine the robustness of weld strength and toughness to the selected processing conditions. This was done using standard EWI techniques. Graphical representations of robustness were then coupled with metallographic data to relate mechanical properties to the effectiveness of spike tempering. Mechanical properties for all three materials were relatively robust to variation in tempering. Major deviations in mechanical properties were caused by degradation of the weld itself. This was supported by a lack of correlation between hardness data and mechanical results. Small button sizes and large electrode face diameters (worn electrodes) produced large reductions in both static and dynamic strength levels when compared to standard production setups. Dynamic strength was further degraded by edge-located welds.

  9. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  10. FE Simulation Models for Hot Stamping an Automobile Component with Tailor-Welded High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bingtao; Wang, Qiaoling; Wei, Zhaohui; Meng, Xianju; Yuan, Zhengjun

    2016-05-01

    Ultra-high-strength in sheet metal parts can be achieved with hot stamping process. To improve the crash performance and save vehicle weight, it is necessary to produce components with tailored properties. The use of tailor-welded high-strength steel is a relatively new hot stamping process for saving weight and obtaining desired local stiffness and crash performance. The simulation of hot stamping boron steel, especially tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) stamping, is more complex and challenging. Information about thermal/mechanical properties of tools and sheet materials, heat transfer, and friction between the deforming material and the tools is required in detail. In this study, the boron-manganese steel B1500HS and high-strength low-alloy steel B340LA are tailor welded and hot stamped. In order to precisely simulate the hot stamping process, modeling and simulation of hot stamping tailor-welded high-strength steels, including phase transformation modeling, thermal modeling, and thermal-mechanical modeling, is investigated. Meanwhile, the welding zone of tailor-welded blanks should be sufficiently accurate to describe thermal, mechanical, and metallurgical parameters. FE simulation model using TWBs with the thickness combination of 1.6 mm boron steel and 1.2 mm low-alloy steel is established. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the hot stamped automotive component (mini b-pillar), hardness and microstructure at each region are investigated. The comparisons between simulated results and experimental observations show the reliability of thermo-mechanical and metallurgical modeling strategies of TWBs hot stamping process.

  11. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.

  12. Investigations Into the Influence of Weld Zone on Formability of Fiber Laser-Welded Advanced High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two different dual phase steel grades DP980 and DP600, and IFHS steel sheets were laser welded by a 2-kW fiber laser. The weld quality of these three different LWBs was assessed with the help of microstructure, micro-hardness and transverse tensile tests. Tensile testing of longitudinal and miniature samples was performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld zone. Formability of parent materials and LWBs were assessed in bi-axial stretch forming condition by Erichsen cupping test. To validate the weld zone properties, 3-D finite element models of Erichsen cupping test of LWBs was developed, and the failures in the deformed cups were predicted using two theoretical forming limit diagrams. It was observed that hardness of the fusion zone and HAZ in laser welded DP600 and IFHS steels was more compared to the respective parent metal. However, 29% reduction in hardness was observed at the outer HAZ of DP980 steel weldments due to tempering of martensite. Reduction of formability was observed for all the LWBs with two distinct failure patterns, and the maximum reduction in formability was observed in the case of DP980 LWBs. The presence of the soft zone is detrimental in forming of welded DP steels.

  13. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-04-28

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  14. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  15. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  16. Welding of High-Strength Steels for Aircraft and Missile Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-10-12

    investigations have been limited to unwelded ma- terial. Conventional impact testing (such as the V-notch Charpy test) of weld metals also has been limited...is X200 and 300M ... ..................... . .. . . . . . ..... . 16 HOT-WORK DIE STEELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. 17 Peerless...metal. A survey of the procedures currently being used is presented. Low-Alloy Martensitic Steels AISI 4340, AMS 6434, XZOO, 300M , and 17-Z2AS all are

  17. Effective Use of Weld Metal Yield Strength for HY-Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    and Hasubuchi 1959; Hall et al. 1967). Residual stresses also play important roles in stress corrosion cracking and-hydrogen-induced delayed cracking ... stress corrosion cracking . Weldments with inferior strength have been acceptable only in a few limited cases--repair melds in HY-S0 (made with covered...residual weld stresses could reduce the tendency for hydrogen-induced cracking . Welding processes with very low hydrogen potential are available

  18. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-09-16

    A process is described for welding chromium-molybdenum steels which consist of: subjecting the steel to normalization by heating to above the transformation temperature and cooling in air; subjecting the steel to a partial temper by heating to a temperature less than a full temper; welding the steel using an appropriate filler metal; subjecting the steel to a full temper by heating to a temperature sufficient to optimize strength, reduce stress, increase ductility and reduce hardness.

  19. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11–14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge* software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within percent, and the position of the joint interface to within 10 percent, of the experimental results.

  20. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, M.; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge® software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within 4%, and the position of the joint interface to within 10%, of the experimental results.

  1. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; ...

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly preparedmore » joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.« less

  2. Research on High-Strength Steels with an Improved Resistance against Weld Cracking.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    sticks are crayons which melt at a predetermined temperature, and can be applied to a piece of steel in order to monitor its temperature as it is...them from getting too close to those areas which might be melted by the actual welding process. As described previously temperature indicating crayons ...pure sample of metal will melt and solidify at a single temperature for any uniform set of testing conditions. When alloying elements are added to the

  3. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  4. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  5. Influence of the temperature and strain rate on the structure and fracture mode of high-strength steels upon the simulation of the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazilova, U. A.; Il'in, A. V.; Kruglova, A. A.; Motovilina, G. D.; Khlusova, E. I.

    2015-06-01

    Structural changes and the main features of the fracture of the base metal and the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone of the welded joints of high-strength steels have been studied by simulating the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding heat treatment. The effects of the simultaneous action of heating for high-temperature tempering and of deformation allowing the estimation of the impact of residual welding stresses have been studied. The probable reasons of the formation of cracks in welds upon the postwelding tempering have been determined.

  6. Submerged Arc Welding Consumables for HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy)-100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    0.001 Manganese 0.02 Silicon 0.01 Phosphorus 0.002 Sulfur 0.001 Nickel 0.05 Molybdenum 0.01 Chromium 0.02 Vanadium 0.001 Aluminum 0.002 Titanium 0.002...carbon-manganese steels with small amounts of alloys added such as aluminum, titanium , niobium , or vanadium . Since these steels exhibit high strength...83 Chemical check analysis for boron and phosphorus ................................................. 88 Mechanical property data summary

  7. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  8. Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Aluminum to High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel: Microstructure, Tensile and Fatigue Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, V. K.; Bhole, S. D.; Chen, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    The structural applications of lightweight aluminum alloys inevitably involve dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change, lap shear tensile load, and fatigue resistance of dissimilar ultrasonic spot-welded joints of aluminum-to-galvanized high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. Two non-uniform layers were identified in between Al and HSLA steel via SEM/EDS and XRD. One was an Al-Zn eutectic layer and the other was a thin (<2 μm) layer of intermetallic compound (IMC) of Al and Fe in the nugget zone. The lap shear tensile testing gave a maximum load of 3.7 kN and the sample failed initially in between the Al-Zn eutectic film and Al-Fe IMC, and afterward from the region containing Al on both matching fracture surfaces. The fatigue test results showed a fatigue limit of about 0.5 kN (at 1 × 107 cycles). The maximum cyclic stress at which transition of the fatigue fracture from transverse through-thickness crack growth mode to the interfacial failure mode occurs increases with increasing energy input.

  9. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  10. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  11. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds (2006-01-0531)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t1/2 can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  12. Welding-Induced Microstructure Evolution of a Cu-Bearing High-Strength Blast-Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Jeremy L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Lippold, John C.

    2011-12-01

    A new high strength, high toughness steel containing Cu for precipitation strengthening was recently developed for naval, blast-resistant structural applications. This steel, known as BlastAlloy160 (BA-160), is of nominal composition Fe-0.05C-3.65Cu-6.5Ni-1.84Cr-0.6Mo-0.1V (wt pct). The evident solidification substructure of an autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld suggested fcc austenite as the primary solidification phase. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness ranged from a minimum of 353 HV in the coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ) to a maximum of 448 HV in the intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ). After postweld heat treatment (PWHT) of the spot weld, hardness increases were observed in the fusion zone (FZ), CGHAZ, and fine-grained HAZ (FGHAZ) regions. Phase transformation and metallographic analyses of simulated single-pass HAZ regions revealed lath martensite to be the only austenitic transformation product in the HAZ. Single-pass HAZ simulations revealed a similar hardness profile for low heat-input (LHI) and high heat-input (HHI) conditions, with higher hardness values being measured for the LHI samples. The measured hardness values were in good agreement with those from the GTA weld. Single-pass HAZ regions exhibited higher Charpy V-notch impact toughness than the BM at both test temperatures of 293 K and 223 K (20 °C and -50 °C). Hardness increases were observed for multipass HAZ simulations employing an initial CGHAZ simulation.

  13. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  14. Effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on tensile properties of laser welded joint of high strength steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Daimaruya, M.; Tsuda, H.; Horikawa, K.

    2006-08-01

    The impact tensile properties of laser welded butt joints of two kinds of high strength steel plates with the tensile strength level of 590 MPa and 780 MPa (denoted by HR590 and HR780, respectively), were investigated using split Hopkinson bar tensile testing apparatus. Impact tension tests for the joint specimens pre-fatigued were also carried out to examine the effect of pre-fatigue. There were no significant effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on the dynamic and quasi-static tensile strength of laser welded butt joints. However, the decrease in the elongation of HR780 welded joints subjected high cycle pre-fatigue was observed only at a high strain-rate. From the observation of fracture surface, it was found that the decrease in the elongation may be caused by a number of damages due to the combination of high cycle pre-fatigue and high strain-rate.

  15. Mechanical behavior study of laser welded joints for DP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are gaining considerable market shares in the automotive industry. The development and application of Dual Phase (DP) steel is just a consistent step towards high-strength steel grades with improved mechanical behavior. Tailor welded blanks with DP steel are promoted in the application of Body-In-White (BIW) structure by the automotive industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that are laser welded together before stamping. Applied cases of tailor welded blanks of high strength steels on the automotive structural parts are investigated in this paper. The mechanical behavior of laser welded joints for DP steel is studied. Microstructure of laser welded joints for DP steel was observed by SEM. Martensite in the weld seam explains the higher strength of welded joints than the base metal. Results show that the strain safety tolerance of laser welded seam for high strength steel can meet the requirement of automobile parts for stamping if the location of laser welded seam is designed reasonably.

  16. Diode laser welding of high yield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The following article describes results of investigations on influence of laser welding parameters on the weld shape, quality and mechanical properties of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel for cold forming S420MC (according to EN 10149 - 3 and 060XLK according to ASTM) welded with high power diode laser HPDL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 with rectangular laser beam spot and 2.2 kW output power, and 808 nm wavelength. The investigations at the initial stage were focused on detailed analysis of influence of the basic laser welding parameters such as laser power and welding speed on the shape and quality of single bead produced during bead-on-plate welding. Then the optimal parameters were chosen for laser welding of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of the thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel sheets for cold forming S420MC. The test joints were prepared as single square groove and one-side laser welded without an additional material, at a flat position. Edges of steel sheets were melted in argon atmosphere by the laser beam focused on the top joint surface. The test welded joints were investigated by visual inspection, metallographic examinations, mechanical tests such as tensile tests and bending tests. It was found that the high power diode laser may be applied successfully for one-side welding of the S420MC steel butt joints. Additionally it was found that in the optimal range of laser welding parameters the high quality joint were produced.

  17. Cracking Tendancies of Restrained Welds in High Strength Low Alloy Steels under Hyperbaric Conditions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    and burning flux of a typical SMA welding electrode is about equivalent to a CO2 gas flow of 12 litres per minute. 44 The effect of pressure in...the equivalent gas shield flow rate is reduced to about half so that even at thIs shallow depth, lack of adequate protection may begin to show its...subjects Including: 69 A (a) Welding processes and techniques. Which processes are used: "dry" or " wet " shielded metal ar-c process or gas metal ar-c

  18. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  19. Control of Hydrogen Embrittlement in High Strength Steel Using Special Designed Welding Wire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    principle • New filler wire development • Y-Groove test results • Mechanical testing results • Residual stress results • Conclusions Outlin 2...Master title style • HIC testing : Y-Groove (aka Tekken) test (ISO 17642-2) • Chosen over other types of HIC weldability tests for its representative...unlimited. Click to edit Master title style 7 Y-Groove Base Line ER100/110 S HIC testing results HIC crack appeared after 30-40 min. Weld crater

  20. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; Poplawsky, J. D.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility with intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.

  1. Microstructure-Based Strength Distribution Across the Welds of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 751 and Austenite Steel 21-4N Joined by Inertia Friction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanzhi; Guo, Yingying; Yang, Libin

    2013-04-01

    Welding dissimilar metals is always a challenge for their different physical property and microstructures. In this study, the two dissimilar metals 21-4N and Inconel 751 are welded together by inertia friction welding. Microstructure observation shows that the weld can be divided into three regions in 21-4N: the chemical composition mixture zone, shear zone, and base metal. The width of the chemical composition mixture zone (CMZ) is about 80 μm, with relatively larger grains and lower dislocation density distributed in this zone. Shear banding occurs in the shear zone, and carbides are found to have precipitated strongly along these shear bands noncontinuously. The base metal contains an austenite microstructure with carbides distributed in the matrix. In Inconel 751, only two typical zones can be observed: the CMZ and the base metal. The heat-affected zone is too small to be observed in the whole weld. Finally, a strength model based on microstructural evolution is proposed. The strength distribution along the axial direction of the welds is calculated. The results are in good agreement with the measurements.

  2. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  3. Investigation of underwater welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.J.; Watson, J.; Deans, W.F. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    The preliminary underwater welding study described forms part of a European funded research program (EUREKA EU194) which involves a feasibility study into laser welding applications in the offshore oil industry. An investigation was undertaken using a 1.2 KW carbon dioxide laser for underwater butt welding of BS 4360 43A and 50D steel, in order to assess the quality of the welds and to achieve an understanding of the laser/water/material interaction. Using a high-speed camera, the temporal behavior of the melt pool and ''plasma'' dynamics surrounded by an aqueous environment were monitored. Experiments were undertaken to characterize the attenuation of the laser beam in the water as a function of various focal length optics and depth of water. The effect of energy input conditions on the weld bead appearance and mechanical properties were also examined. The interaction of the laser beam with water produced a wave-guiding mechanism in which the focused beam instantaneously vaporizes the water and directs the beam on to the workpiece. The underwater weld beads exhibited sound microstructures over a range of weld energy inputs, mainly due to the formation of a ''dry region'' during welding. Metallurgical analysis of the welds showed a slight increase in hardness, though other post-weld mechanical strengths were similar to in-air results.

  4. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  5. Comparison of microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-narrow gap laser and gas-metal-arc welded S960 high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Lin; Dong, Shiyun; Crowther, Dave; Thompson, Alan

    2017-04-01

    The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties, including micro-hardness, tensile properties, three-point bending properties and Charpy impact toughness at different test temperatures of 8 mm thick S960 high strength steel plates were investigated following their joining by multi-pass ultra-narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) techniques. It was found that the microstructure in the fusion zone (FZ) for the ultra-NGLW joint was predominantly martensite mixed with some tempered martensite, while the FZ for the GMAW joint was mainly consisted of ferrite with some martensite. The strength of the ultra-NGLW specimens was comparable to that of the base material (BM), with all welded specimens failed in the BM in the tensile tests. The tensile strength of the GMAW specimens was reduced approximately by 100 MPa when compared with the base material by a broad and soft heat affected zone (HAZ) with failure located in the soft HAZ. Both the ultra-NGLW and GMAW specimens performed well in three-point bending tests. The GMAW joints exhibited better impact toughness than the ultra-NGLW joints.

  6. Effect of parameters in diode laser welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpaeae, Veli; Maaranen, Petteri; Kostamo, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steel sheets and ordinary cold-rolled carbon steel sheets with variable thickness were welded with 1 kW diode laser. Different weld joints were utilized. The optimal parameters for each case were determined. The joints were examined by metallography and mechanical testing. The results show that diode laser is an optimal tool for sheet metal welding, when a considerable narrow weld is aimed. The edges prepared by mechanical sheering are acceptable as the joint preparation. The tensile strength and ductility of all the joints were acceptable and on the same level or better than that of base metal. The shielding gas seems to play a much higher role than in conventional laser welding (CO2 or Nd:YAG laser welding). When using the non-oxidizing shielding gas (nitrogen or argon), the welding speed to be reached is much slower than when welding without any shielding gas. This is probably due to the increase of absorption by oxygen.

  7. Carbide-Free Bainitic Weld Metal: A New Concept in Welding of Armor Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, N.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Murty, B. S.; Reddy, G. M.; Rao, T. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbide-free bainite, a fine mixture of bainitic ferrite and austenite, is a relatively recent development in steel microstructures. Apart from being very strong and tough, the microstructure is hydrogen-tolerant. These characteristics make it well-suited for weld metals. In the current work, an armor-grade quenched and tempered steel was welded such that the fusion zone developed a carbide-free bainitic microstructure. These welds showed very high joint efficiency and ballistic performance compared to those produced, as per the current industrial practice, using austenitic stainless steel fillers. Importantly, these welds showed no vulnerability to cold cracking, as verified using oblique Y-groove tests. The concept of carbide-free bainitic weld metal thus promises many useful new developments in welding of high-strength steels.

  8. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; ...

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility withmore » intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.« less

  9. Welding of AM350 and AM355 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. J.; Wroth, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to establish optimum procedures for TIG welding and heat treating of AM350 and AM355 steel sheet in thicknesses ranging from 0.010 inch to 0.125 inch. Statistical analysis of the test data was performed to determine the anticipated minimum strength of the welded joints.

  10. Feasibility of Underwater Friction Stir Welding of HY-80 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    FSW ) of high-strength; quench and temper low carbon steels that are susceptible to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC). The specific benefits of...is to determine the feasibility of underwater friction stir welding ( FSW ) of high-strength, quench and temper low carbon steels that are...Tungsten-Rhenium binder was used to conduct three bead-on-plate FSW traverses, approximately 40 inches in length on 0.25 inch HY-80 steel . The

  11. Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu

    2011-01-17

    Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

  12. A Study of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thick Welded Joints of a Cr - Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. Kon; Chien, Yi Cheng

    2015-07-01

    The effect of stress-relieving tempering on the mechanical properties of a welded joint of a high-strength low-alloy steel SAE 4130 (0.3% C - 1% Cr - 0.25% Mo) obtained by multipass arc welding with nonconsumable electrode is studied. The steel is quenched and tempered before the welding. An optimum tempering mode providing a good combination of the characteristics of strength, ductility and toughness of the welded joint is suggested.

  13. U-groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening deceased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A de-peaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve de-peaking in the welding process. Intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  14. U-Groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1996-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking, which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening decreased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  15. Homopolar pulse welding of API 5L carbon steel linepipe

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, P.; Carnes, R.; Harville, M.

    1994-12-31

    Homopolar pulse welding (HPW) is a resistance welding process being investigated as a method to rapidly join API 5L carbon steel linepipe. The target application for this investigation is deepwater offshore pipeline construction utilizing the J-lay method, which requires a rapid one-shot welding process for economic feasibility. HPW utilizes the high current, low-voltage pulse produced by a homopolar generator to rapidly resistance heat the interface between abutting workpieces, and follows that pulse with an upset action to produce a weld. A large number of controllable parameters affecting the quality of the resultant weld are present in the process. Three inch nominal diameter, schedule 160 API 5L X-52 pipe sections were welded in this series while controlling variations in generator discharge speed electrode location and upsetting parameters. Welding current voltage and temperature curves were recorded for the welds. Tensile and Charpy V-notch impact specimens were machined from each weld and tested. Weld cross-sections were macroscopically examined. By delaying the application of the forging action, the `white line` or decarburized zone commonly found in high frequency resistance or flash butt welds was eliminated. Weld tensile strength was found to be primarily dependent on generator discharge speed (heat input). Electrode distance from the weld interface was found to be the critical factor determining weld zone cooling rate. HPW parameters can be selected to produce welds without the `white line` or decarburized zone commonly found in high frequency resistance and flash butt welds. Full tensile strength welds are easily achieved providing two conditions are met: sufficient heat input is supplied and a nominal upsetting action is applied within a few seconds of the discharge current peak. Electrode location provides control over the weld zone cooling rate.

  16. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  17. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  18. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-26

    plates of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL-STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding ( FSW ) process using a...b 124 c FSW 194 d High Hardness Steel (HHS) base material 1034 e GMAW f tbd g AA6061/HHS FSW joint 176 8 a Kaiser Aluminum Certified Test...bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum

  19. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  20. The Effect of Nitrogen and Titanium on the Toughness of High Strength Saw Weld Deposits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-12

    for joining high strength steels . In this endeavor, ten butt-welded HY-100 sample plates were produced using the submerged arc welding process. With...was shown to degrade toughness. In this case, the DBTT increased at a rate of +11C for every 0.01 weight percent increase in titanium. Examination of...to degrade toughness through precipitation and dispersion hardening effects. It is concluded that for the welding of high strength steels , nitrogen

  1. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  2. Occupational rhinitis due to steel welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Castano, Roberto; Suarthana, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to welding fumes is a recognized respiratory hazard. Occupational asthma but not occupational rhinitis has been documented in workers exposed to steel welding fumes. We report a 26-year-old male with work-related rhinitis symptoms as well as lower airways symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma and metal fume fever associated with exposure to steel welding fumes. The diagnosis of occupational rhinitis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge.

  3. U-Groove Aluminum Weld Strength Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1997-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. One is the source of peaking in which the extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe angular distortion that induces bending under uniaxial loading. The other is the filler strain hardening decreasing with increasing filler pass sequences, producing the weakest welds on the last weld pass side. Both phenomena are governed by weld pass sequences. Many industrial welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects, which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thickness, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The result was to select the number and sequence of weld passes to reverse the peaking angle such as to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension component side to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  4. Helium-induced weld degradation of HT-9 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chin-An; Chin, B.A.; Lin, Hua T.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Helium-bearing Sandvik HT-9 ferritic steel was tested for weldability to simulate the welding of structural components of a fusion reactor after irradiation. Helium was introduced into HT-9 steel to 0.3 and 1 atomic parts per million (appm) by tritium doping and decay. Autogenous single pass full penetration welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under laterally constrained conditions. Macroscopic examination showed no sign of any weld defect in HT-9 steel containing 0.3 appm helium. However, intergranular micro cracks were observed in the HAZ of HT-9 steel containing 1 appm helium. The microcracking was attributed to helium bubble growth at grain boundaries under the influence of high stresses and temperatures that were present during welding. Mechanical test results showed that both yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature, while the total elongation increased with increasing temperature for all control and helium-bearing HT-9 steels.

  5. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  6. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  7. Effect of soft root weld layer on fracture toughness of under-matched weld joints on Q+T steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Welding of quenched and tempered (Q+T) high strength low alloyed steels can cause weld strength undermatching to satisfy the toughness requirements for the weld deposit. Cost of pre-heating of these steels can be saved if one can prove that use of soft electrodes for root passes do not endanger the overall quality of the joint. By welding of 40 mm thick Q+T structural steel (grade HT 80), over-matched condition had appeared in the root area of the X-groove weld despite of welding consumable which would give entire weld under-matched properties. This is the effect of weld metal alloying by elements from base material. So, the weld joint is not protected against cold cracking especially in the root region, therefore, a high preheating should be used to reduce the possibility of this phenomenon. In this work soft (lower strength) filler metal was used for first two and four root passes of X-joint. In this case root area was also alloyed by elements from base material and obtained mis-matching factor M was higher than it was expected. So, one homogeneous and two non homogeneous weld joints (with two and four soft passes) were considered. Mechanical properties of weld joints were measured by round tensile bars taken from different parts of the weld. The under-matching factor of weld joint with two and four soft root passes was around 0.80--0.90 in the soft root layer. It was expected that uneven strength distribution along the fatigue crack tip line would affect fracture initiation behavior of all three different weld joints. The metallographical post-test sectioning has revealed the initiation points mainly at the lowest weld metal strength.

  8. Upset Resistance Welding of Carbon Steel to Austenitic Stainless Steel Narrow Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozlati, Ashkaan; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Mohammadkamal, Helia

    2016-11-01

    Effects of welding current (at the range of 2-4 kA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of upset resistance welds of AISI-1035 carbon steel to AISI-304L austenitic stainless steel rods were investigated. The results showed that the joint strength first increased by raising the welding current up to 3 kA and then decreased beyond it. Increasing trend was related to more plastic deformation, accelerated diffusion, reduction of defects and formation of mechanical locks at the joint interface. For currents more than 3 kA, decrease in the joint strength was mainly caused by formation of hot spots. Using the optimum welding current of 3 kA, tensile strength of the joint reached to 76% of the carbon steel base metal strength. Microstructural observations and microhardness results confirmed that there was no hard phase, i.e., martensite or bainite, at the weld zone. Moreover, a fully austenitic transition layer related to carbon diffusion from carbon steel was observed at the weld interface.

  9. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with <50 ppm of sulfur. There was no degradation in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the A-TIG welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  10. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with <50 ppm of sulfur. There was no degradation in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the A-TIG welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  11. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  12. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  13. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  14. Optimization of Fiber Laser Welding of DP980 Steels Using RSM to Improve Weld Properties for Formability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of laser parameters on weld quality is a critical laboratory study before implementation of newly developed high-strength dual-phase steels in fabrication of auto-bodies. In present work, dual-phase steels having tensile strength of 980 MPa (DP980) were welded using different welding speeds by Yb-fiber laser source to fabricate similar material combinations laser-welded blanks (LWBs). The weld zone microhardness, microstructure, and formability of DP980 LWBs were compared with those of the DP600 and micro-alloyed interstitial free high-strength steel (IFHS) LWBs. It was found that the formation of soft zone at the outer side of the HAZ was responsible for significant reduction in formability of DP980 LWBs due to strain localization and premature failure. Hence, response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was implemented to establish a mathematical model which could correlate the influence of laser process parameters such as power, welding speed, and focal position on weld quality in terms of aspect ratio of fusion zone, width of the soft zone, and surface roughness of weld to improve formability. The model was successfully implemented to optimize the laser parameters, and approximately 13.58% improvement in Erichsen cup height was achieved due to complete weld penetration with simultaneous 67% reduction in soft zone width and 55% reduction in softening. However, the failure was still observed to occur in the soft zone propagating parallel to weld in radial direction.

  15. Weld Properties of a Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Brooks; S. H. Goods; C. V. Robino

    2000-08-01

    The all weld metal tensile properties from gas tungsten arc and electron beam welds in free machining austenitic stainless steels have been determined. Ten heats with sulfur contents from 0.04 to 0.4 wt.% and a wide range in Creq/Nieq ratios were studied. Tensile properties of welds with both processes were related to alloy composition and solidification microstructure. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratios and ferrite content, whereas the ductility measured by RA at fracture decreased with sulfur content. Nevertheless, a range in alloy compositions was identified that provided a good combination of both strength and ductility. The solidification cracking response for the same large range of compositions are discussed, and compositions identified that would be expected to provide good performance in welded applications.

  16. Microstructure and Failure Analysis of Flash Butt Welded HSLA 590CL Steel Joints in Wheel Rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Xu, Zhixin; Shu, Yang; Ma, Feng

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructures, mechanical properties and failure behavior of flash butt welded high strength low alloy 590CL steel joints. Acicular ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite and granular bainite were observed in the weld. The micro-hardness values of the welded joints varied between 250 HV and 310 HV. The tensile strength of the welded joints met the strength standard of the wheel steel. The Charpy V-notch impact absorbing energy of the welded joints was higher than the base metal, and the impact fracture of the welded joints was composed of shearing and equiaxed dimples. The fracture mode of the wheel rim in the flaring and expanding process was brittle fracture and ductile fracture, respectively. A limited deviation was found in the terminal of the crack for the wheel in the flaring process. A transition from the weld to the Heat Affected Zone was observed for the wheel in the expanding process.

  17. Microstructure and Failure Analysis of Flash Butt Welded HSLA 590CL Steel Joints in Wheel Rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Xu, Zhixin; Shu, Yang; Ma, Feng

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructures, mechanical properties and failure behavior of flash butt welded high strength low alloy 590CL steel joints. Acicular ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite and granular bainite were observed in the weld. The micro-hardness values of the welded joints varied between 250 HV and 310 HV. The tensile strength of the welded joints met the strength standard of the wheel steel. The Charpy V-notch impact absorbing energy of the welded joints was higher than the base metal, and the impact fracture of the welded joints was composed of shearing and equiaxed dimples. The fracture mode of the wheel rim in the flaring and expanding process was brittle fracture and ductile fracture, respectively. A limited deviation was found in the terminal of the crack for the wheel in the flaring process. A transition from the weld to the Heat Affected Zone was observed for the wheel in the expanding process.

  18. Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

  19. Effect of PTA Hardfaced Interlayer Thickness on Ballistic Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded Armor Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of armor steel welds is very poor due to the usage of low strength and low hardness austenitic stainless steel fillers, which are traditionally used to avoid hydrogen induced cracking. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of plasma transferred arc hardfaced interlayer thickness on ballistic performance of shielded metal arc welded armor steel weldments. The usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the armor grade quenched and tempered steel base metal was also considered in this study. Joints were fabricated using three different thickness (4, 5.5, and 7 mm) hardfaced middle layer by plasma transferred arc hardfacing process between the top and bottom layers of austenitic stainless steel using shielded metal arc welding process. Sandwiched joint, in addition with the buttering layer served the dual purpose of weld integrity and ballistic immunity due to the high hardness of hardfacing alloy and the energy absorbing capacity of soft backing weld deposits. This paper will provide some insight into the usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the weld integrity and plasma transferred arc hardfacing layer on ballistic performance enhancement of armor steel welds.

  20. Fabricating characteristics of an ultrahigh-strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, P.M. . Tool and Alloy R and D); Nye, R.D. . Special Products Division); Robino, C.V. . Physical and Joining Metallurgy Dept.)

    1995-02-01

    AerMet[reg sign] 100 alloy is an ultra-high-strength steel initially developed to meet the demanding specifications for landing gear of US Navy carrier-based jet aircraft. Welding is an important process in the fabrication of parts and components made from AerMet 100 alloy which, because of its unusual combination of ultrahigh strength and fracture toughness, is finding widespread commercial application. It already has been designated by the National Association for Science, Technology and Society as the most significant new steel developed in the last decade. Experience shows that when this new steel is welded properly, and can be fully heat treated, the metallurgical properties of the weld metal are similar to those of the base metal. The alloy can be welded successfully in the overage annealed (as-shipped) condition. It also can be welded in the fully heat treated pulse aged condition without cracking, but there is a sacrifice in yield strength and ductility if not re-heat treated. Some strength and ductility can be restored with a stress relief or an aging heat treatment. Finally, although AerMet 100 alloy and AISI 4130 appear to be similar alloys, greater skill is required to weld the thinner wall AerMet 100 alloy, different equipment settings are necessary and some new welding techniques are needed for best results.

  1. Investigation of defect rate of lap laser welding of stainless steel railway vehicles car body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao

    2015-02-01

    In order to resolve the disadvantages such as poor appearance quality, poor tightness, low efficiency of resistance spot welding of stainless steel rail vehicles, partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated widely. But due to the limitation of processing technology, there will be local incomplete fusion in the lap laser welding seam. Defect rate is the ratio of the local incomplete fusion length to the weld seam length. The tensile shear strength under different defect rate and its effect on the car body static strength are not clear. It is necessary to find the biggest defect rate by numerical analysis of effects of different defect rates on the laser welding stainless steel rail vehicle body structure strength ,and tests of laser welding shear tensile strength.

  2. Application of lap laser welding technology on stainless steel railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Wang, Chunsheng; He, Guangzhong; Li, Wei; Liu, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steel railway vehicles with so many advantages, such as lightweight, antirust, low cost of maintenance and simple manufacturing process, so the production of high level stainless steel railway vehicles has become the development strategy of European, American and other developed nations. The current stainless steel railway vehicles body and structure are usually assembled by resistance spot welding process. The weak points of this process are the poor surface quality and bad airtight due to the pressure of electrodes. In this study, the partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated to resolve the problems, by controlling the laser to stop at the second plate in the appropriate penetration. The lap laser welding joint of stainless steel railway vehicle car body with partial penetration has higher strength and surface quality than those of resistance spot welding joint. The biggest problem of lap laser welding technology is to find the balance of the strength and surface quality with different penetrations. The mechanism of overlap laser welding of stainless steel, mechanical tests, microstructure analysis, the optimization of welding parameters, analysis of fatigue performance, the design of laser welding stainless steel railway vehicles structure and the development of non-destructive testing technology were systematically studied before lap laser welding process to be applied in manufacture of railway vehicles. The results of the experiments and study show that high-quality surface state and higher fatigue strength can be achieved by the partial penetration overlap laser welding of the side panel structure, and the structure strength of the car body can be higher than the requirements of En12663, the standard of structural requirements of railway vehicles bodies. Our company has produced the stainless steel subway and high way railway vehicles by using overlap laser welding technology. The application of lap laser welding will be a big

  3. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  4. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  5. Effects of weld metal strength and defects on the ductility of HSLA-100 plates

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, R.J.; Ferrell, M.

    1995-12-31

    Wide-plate tension tests were performed on high-strength low-alloy steel, minimum yield strength of 690 MPa, with various controlled intentional defects in both undermatched and overmatched welds. Lack-of-fusion areas on the sidewall comprising about 10 percent of the cross-section resulted in full net-section strength. Weld undercut to a depth of 12 percent of the thickness resulted in gross-section yielding and good elongation. Misalignment (offset) of 3 mm slightly reduced the elongation relative to plates within tolerances. There was no consistent difference between the results of the undermatched welds and the overmatched welds.

  6. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    95] K. Kimapong1, T. Watanabe, Effect of welding process parameters on mechanical property of FSW lap joint between aluminum alloy and steel ...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 1 UNCLASSIFIED Welding of aluminum alloys to steels : an overview M. Mazar...welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels . The microstructural development, mechanical properties and application of the joints are discussed

  7. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  8. Properties of formable high strength sheet steels for automotive use

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, S.; Kato, T.; Nishida, M.; Obara, T.; Shinozaki, M.; Tosaka, A.

    1983-11-01

    Metallurgical factors affecting the press formability of the newly developed high strength sheet steels have been discussed. Dual phase steels, CHLY (cold-rolled sheet steel) and HTP-D (as-hotrolled sheet steel), produced by control of cooling conditions after intercritical annealing or hot-rolling exhibit very low yield to tensile strength ratio and high n-value. Rephosphorized extralow carbon steel, CHRX, produced by continuous annealing with rapid cooling is characterized by its extremely high r-value and low yield strength. CHLY, HTP-D and CHRX have large bake hardenability. Precipitation hardened steel, HTP-F (hot-rolled sheel steel), produced by adjusting carbon equivalent and sulfur content is suitable for manufacturing wheel rims owing to its good formability after flash butt welding.

  9. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  10. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  11. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  12. Optimization of resistance spot welding parameters for microalloyed steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viňáš, Ján; Kaščák, Ľuboš; Greš, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of resistance spot welding of hot-dip galvanized microalloyed steel sheets used in car body production. The spot welds were made with various welding currents and welding time values, but with a constant pressing force of welding electrodes. The welding current and welding time are the dominant characteristics in spot welding that affect the quality of spot welds, as well as their dimensions and load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity of welded joints was evaluated by tensile test according to STN 05 1122 standard and dimensions and inner defects were evaluated by metallographic analysis by light optical microscope. Thewelding parameters of investigated microalloyed steel sheets were optimized for resistance spot welding on the pneumatic welding machine BPK 20.

  13. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  14. Fatigue Performance of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Sang, Yan; Jiang, Cindy; Chiang, Dr. John; Kuo, Dr. Min

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue performance of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joints of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are compared and analyzed. The steel studied included a number of different grades of AHSS and baseline mild steels: DP600, DP780, DP980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron steel, fully hardened boron steels, HSLA690 and DR210 (a mild steel). Fatigue testing was conducted under a number of nominal stress ranges to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. A two-phase analytical model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. It was found that there are appreciable differences in the fatigue S/N curves among different AHSS joints made using the same welding practices, suggesting that the local microstructure in the weld toe and root region plays non-negligible role in the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. Changes in weld parameters can influence the joint characteristics which in turn influence fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of those of higher strength AHSS. The analytical model is capable of reasonably predicting the fatigue performance of welds made with various steel grades in this study.

  15. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  16. Novel Approach for Welding Stainless Steel Using Cr-Free Welding Consumables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-31

    compared to type 304L stainless steel. Keywords: Welding , Corrosion , Stainless steel, Nickel, Copper, Palladium , Molybdenum, Dilution... Corrosion Center, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering **Dept. of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering The Ohio State University...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) *Fontana Corrosion Center, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering **Dept. of Industrial, Welding and

  17. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  18. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  19. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  20. Explosive welding technique for joining aluminum and steel tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Silver sheet is wrapped around aluminum portion of joint. Mylar powder box is wrapped over silver sheet. Explosion welds silver to aluminum. Stainless-steel tube is placed over silver-aluminum interface. Mylar powder box, covered with Mylar tape, is wrapped around steel member. Explosion welds steel to silver-aluminum interface.

  1. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-01-01

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  2. Multiphysical Modeling of Transport Phenomena During Laser Welding of Dissimilar Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métais, A.; Matteï, S.; Tomashchuk, I.; Gaied, S.

    The success of new high-strength steels allows attaining equivalent performances with lower thicknesses and significant weight reduction. The welding of new couples of steel grades requires development and control of joining processes. Thanks to high precision and good flexibility, laser welding became one of the most used processes for joining of dissimilar welded blanks. The prediction of the local chemical composition in the weld formed between dissimilar steels in function of the welding parameters is essential because the dilution rate and the distribution of alloying elements in the melted zone determines the final tensile strength of the weld. The goal of the present study is to create and to validate a multiphysical numerical model studying the mixing of dissimilar steels in laser weld pool. A 3D modelling of heat transfer, turbulent flow and transport of species provides a better understanding of diffusion and convective mixing in laser weld pool. The present model allows predicting the weld geometry and element distribution. The model has been developed based on steady keyhole approximation and solved in quasi-stationary form in order to reduce the computation time. Turbulent flow formulation was applied to calculate velocity field. Fick law for diluted species was used to simulate the transport of alloying elements in the weld pool. To validate the model, a number of experiments have been performed: tests using pure 100 μm thick Ni foils like tracer and weld between a rich and poor manganese steels. SEM-EDX analysis of chemical composition has been carried out to obtain quantitative mapping of Ni and Mn distributions in the melted zone. The results of simulations have been found in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Effect of Groove Design and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of P91 Steel Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The martensitic creep-resistant steel designated as ASTM A335 for plate and as P91 for pipe is primarily used for high-temperature and high-pressure applications in steam power plants due to its excellent high-temperature properties such as high creep strength, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and so on. However, in the case of welded joints of such steels, the presence of an inter-critical heat-affected zone (IC-HAZ) can cause the joint to have lower creep strength than the base metal. In the present study, the effect of post-welding heat treatment (PWHT) and weld groove designs on the overall microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel pipe welds produced by the gas tungsten arc welding process was studied. Various regions of welded joints were characterized in detail for hardness and metallographic and tensile properties. Sub-size tensile samples were also tested to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) with respect to PWHT. After PWHT, a homogenous microstructure was observed in the HAZ and tensile test fracture samples revealed shifting of the fracture location from the IC-HAZ to the fine-grained heat-affected zone. Before PWHT, the conventional V-grooved welded joints exhibited higher tensile strength compared to the narrow-grooved joints. However, after PWHT, both narrow- and V-grooved joints exhibited similar strength. Fractography of the samples indicates the presence of carbide precipitates such as Cr23C6, VC, and NbC on the fracture surface.

  4. Welding of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Activated Tungsten Inert Gas Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, E.; Ebrahimi, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of the most notable techniques which are developed recently. This technique, known as A-TIG welding, increases the penetration depth and improves the productivity of the TIG welding. In the present study, four oxide fluxes (SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO) were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth/width ratio and mechanical property of 316L austenitic stainless steel. The effect of coating density of activating flux on the weld pool shape and oxygen content in the weld after the welding process was studied systematically. Experimental results indicated that the maximum depth/width ratio of stainless steel activated TIG weld was obtained when the coating density was 2.6, 1.3, 2, and 7.8 mg/cm2 for SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO, respectively. The certain range of oxygen content dissolved in the weld, led to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. TIG welding with active fluxes can increase the delta-ferrite content and improves the mechanical strength of the welded joint.

  5. A New Perspective on Fatigue Performance of Advanced High- Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Chiang, Dr. John; Kuo, Dr. Min; Jiang, Cindy; Sang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Weld fatigue performance is a critical aspect for application of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) in automotive body structures. A comparative study has been conducted to evaluate the fatigue life of AHSS welds. The material studied included seven AHSS of various strength levels - DP 600, DP 780, DP 980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron and fully hardened boron steels. Two conventional steels, HSLA 590 and DR 210, were also included for baseline comparison. Lap fillet welds were made on 2-mm nominal thick sheets by the gas metal arc welding process (GMAW). Fatigue test was conducted under a number of stress levels to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. It was found that, unlike in the static and impact loading conditions, the fatigue performance of AHSS is not influenced by the HAZ softening in AHSS. There are appreciable differences in the fatigue lives among different AHSS. Changes in weld parameters can influence the fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of these of higher strength AHSS. A model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. The validity of the model is benchmarked with the experimental results. This model is capable to capture the effects of weld geometry and weld microstructure and strength on the fatigue performance experimentally observed. The theoretical basis and application of the newly developed fatigue modeling methodology will be discussed.

  6. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  7. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  8. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  9. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  10. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Electron Beam Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, John W.; Ellsworth, G. Fred; Florando, Jeffrey N.; Golosker, Ilya V.; Mulay, Rupalee P.

    2017-04-01

    Welds can either be stronger or weaker than the base metals that they join depending on the microstructures that form in the fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld. In this paper, weld strengthening in the fusion zone of annealed 21-6-9 stainless steel is investigated using cross-weld tensile samples, hardness testing, and microstructural characterization. Due to the stronger nature of the weld, the cross-weld tensile tests failed in the base metal and were not able to generate true fusion zone mechanical properties. Nanoindentation with a spherical indenter was instead used to predict the tensile behavior for the weld metal. Extrapolation of the nanoindentation results to higher strains was performed using the Steinberg-Guinan and Johnson-Cook strength models, and the results can be used for weld strength modeling purposes. The results illustrate how microstructural refinement and residual ferrite formation in the weld fusion zone can be an effective strengthener for 21-6-9 stainless steel.

  12. Boundary effects in welded steel moment connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Hyeog

    Unprecedented widespread failure of welded moment connections in steel frames caused by the 1994 Northridge and the 1995 Kobe earthquakes have alarmed the engineering communities throughout the world. Welded moment connections in steel frames have been traditionally designed by using the classical beam theory which leads to assumptions that the flanges transfer moment while the web connection primarily resists the shear force. However, this study shows that the magnitude and direction of the principal stresses in the connection region are better approximated by using truss analogy rather than the classical beam theory. Accordingly, both the bending moment and the shear force are transferred across the connection near the beam flanges through diagonal strut action. Thus, the beam flange region of the traditionally designed connection is overloaded. This conclusion explains, to a large extent, the recently observed steel moment connection failures. In this study, detailed finite element analyses were carried out for a representative beam-to-column subassemblage with fully welded connection. The stress distribution in the beam web and flanges in the vicinity of the connection were closely studied. The factors responsible for stress redistribution and concentration were identified by using fundamental principles of mechanics. It was concluded that peak resultant stresses can exceed the values used in simple design calculations by large margins. Using the finite element analysis results and the truss analogy to establish a realistic load path in the connection, a practical and more rational analysis and design procedure was developed. The proposed design procedure and the new connection details were successfully validated through cyclic load testing of a nearly full size specimen. The truss model represented the force transmission around the beam-to-column moment connection region very well. Results of the finite element analyses and the laboratory testing showed

  13. Multi-response optimization of CO 2 laser-welding process of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyounis, K. Y.; Olabi, A. G.; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2008-02-01

    Recently, laser welding of austenitic stainless steel has received great attention in industry. This is due to its widespread application in petroleum refinement stations, power plants, the pharmaceutical industry and also in households. Therefore, mechanical properties should be controlled to obtain good welded joints. The welding process should be optimized by the proper mathematical models. In this research, the tensile strength and impact strength along with the joint-operating cost of laser-welded butt joints made of AISI304 was investigated. Design-expert software was used to establish the design matrix and to analyze the experimental data. The relationships between the laser-welding parameters (laser power, welding speed and focal point position) and the three responses (tensile strength, impact strength and joint-operating cost) were established. Also, the optimization capabilities in design-expert software were used to optimize the welding process. The developed mathematical models were tested for adequacy using analysis of variance and other adequacy measures. In this investigation, the optimal welding conditions were identified in order to increase the productivity and minimize the total operating cost. Overlay graphs were plotted by superimposing the contours for the various response surfaces. The process parameters effect was determined and the optimal welding combinations were tabulated.

  14. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam/Dense Steel Composite by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Koyama, Shinji; Hasegawa, Makoto; Utsunomiya, Takao

    2010-09-01

    Aluminum foam/dense steel composites were fabricated by friction stir welding (FSW). It is expected that both mixing a blowing agent into aluminum and bonding the aluminum precursor to steel can be conducted simultaneously by FSW. It was shown that although heat treatment of the precursor evolved a brittle intermetallic compound layer, the bonding strength of the interface consisting of the intermetallic compound layer was relatively high compared with the fracture strength of the aluminum foam itself.

  15. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

  16. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the <101> + <001> grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    and around particle inclusions within the WZ. In the case of FSW aluminum to steel , the structure often seen is one of steel particles dispersed...the microstructure and mechanical performance of dissimilar FSWs between aluminum and steel , this study focuses on the characterization of the...MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FRICTION STIR WELDED ALUMINUM - STEEL JOINTS By ERIN ELIZABETH PATTERSON A thesis submitted in

  18. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  19. Test to Determine Margin-to-Failure for Hy-100 Steel with Undermatched Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-01

    This test program was undertaken to determine the flaw tolerance and to quantify the strength margin-to-failure of high yield strength steel fillet welded specimens. The tests demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure for HY-100 specimens fabricated with matched welding systems. In the use of high yield (HY) steel materials in designs required to accommodate rapidly applied dynamic loads, the concern was raised where the possibility of decreased flaw tolerance and premature failure by unstable ductile tearing could limit their use. Tests were developed and conducted to demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure in HY-100 fillet and partial penetration welded structures. In addition, inelastic analytical predictions were performed to assess the accuracy of such predictive tools compared to actual test data. Results showed that adequate margin-to-failure exists when using matched welding systems.

  20. 75 FR 32911 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  1. 76 FR 33210 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  2. The Impact of Corrosion on the Mechanical Behavior of Welded Splices of Reinforcing Steel S400 and B500c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Ch. Alk.; Michalopoulos, D.; Dimitrov, L.

    2008-02-01

    The reinforcing steel, used in concrete structures, when corroded causes reduction of the strength properties and especially drastic reduction of ductility. Steel corrosion constitutes an important factor of progressive devaluation of its mechanical properties and serious reduction of the integrity of structures. The problem becomes more evident specifically for structures near coastal areas where salt corrosion is predominant. Reinforced concrete columns and beams are quite often extended by welding new steel reinforcement to the already corroded existing steel. In the present article the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of welded splices of reinforcing Steel S400 and B500c is examined. An experimental investigation was conducted and tensile and compressive results are presented for welded precorroded S400 and noncorroded B500c steel splices. The mechanical behavior of welded splices in tension are different in compression and depend strongly on the level of corrosion of the S400 bars.

  3. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  4. Characterization of welded HP 9-4-30 steel for the advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, George William

    1990-01-01

    Solid rocket motor case materials must be high-strength, high-toughness, weldable alloys. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) cases currently being developed will be made from a 9Ni-4Co quench and temper steel called HP 9-4-30. These ultra high-strength steels must be carefully processed to give a very clean material and a fine grained microstructure, which insures excellent ductility and toughness. The HP 9-4-30 steels are vacuum arc remelted and carbon deoxidized to give the cleanliness required. The ASRM case material will be formed into rings and then welded together to form the case segments. Welding is the desired joining technique because it results in a lower weight than other joining techniques. The mechanical and corrosion properties of the weld region material were fully studied.

  5. The effect of yield strength on side-bonding upset welds

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G.; Perkins, M.A.

    1991-09-24

    During the course of 9{degree} tapered side-bonding resistance upset weld development at Mound, various studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of yield strength on welds in 304L stainless steel. The results of these studies have concluded that at high yield strengths there may be a minor reduction in the length of Class 2 or better bond. Satisfactory welds have been produced with materials having yield strengths ranging from 36.0 to 141.0 ksi. However, when body yield strengths exceed 80.0 ksi a minor decrease in bond lengths begins. A significant inverse relationship between stem yield strength and bond length was shown to exist. 8 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Fusion welding of a modern borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments designed to assess the fabrication and service weldability of 304B4A borated stainless steel were conducted. Welding procedures and parameters for manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, autogenous electron beam (EB) welding and filler-added EB welding were developed and found to be similar to those for austenitic stainless steels. Following the procedure development, four test welds were produced and evaluated by microstructural analysis and Charpy impact testing. Further samples were used for determination of the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) response of the welds. The fusion zone structure of welds in this alloy consists of primary austenite dendrites with an interdendritic eutectic-like austenite/boride constituent. Welds also show an appreciable partially molten zone that consists of the austenite/boride eutectic surrounding unmelted austenite islands. The microstructure of the EB welds was substantially finer than that of the GTA welds, and boride coarsening was not observed in the solid state heat-affected zone (HAZ) of either weld type. The impact toughness of as-welded samples was found to be relatively poor, averaging less than 10 J for both GTA and EB welds. For fusion zone notched GTA and EB samples and centerline notched EB samples, fracture generally occurred along the boundary between the partially molten and solid-state regions of the HAZ. The results of the PWHT study were very encouraging, with typical values of the impact energy for HAZ notched samples approaching 40 J, or twice the minimum code-acceptable value.

  7. Feasibility of Underwater Friction Stir Welding of Hardenable Alloy Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    bead-on-plate FSW traverses, approximately 64 inches (1.6 m) in total length, on 0.25 inch (6.4 mm) thick plates of a hardenable alloy steel . The...base plate. Based on preliminary findings, FSW of hardenable alloy steel is a feasible process and should be further researched and refined. 15...v ABSTRACT The objective of this thesis is to determine whether friction stir welding ( FSW ) is a feasible welding process for steels in an

  8. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviors of NiTi and Stainless Steel Laser-Welded Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshekari, G. R.; Saatchi, A.; Kermanpur, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of NiTi shape memory wire, laser welded to the 304 stainless steel wire were investigated. The results showed that PWHT at 200 °C increased corrosion resistance and tensile strength of the joint up to ~1.8 times that of the as-weld joint, with no heat treatment. On the contrary, precipitation of neoteric intermetallic compounds like Fe2Ti, Cr2Ti, FeNi, Ni3Ti, and Ti2Ni in the welded region deteriorated these properties, when PWHT was conducted at 400 °C. Due to the vital effects of the PWHT performed after the laser welding, careful control of the PWHT temperature was found to be a prerequisite for achievement of desirable properties in the dissimilar NiTi-304 stainless steel laser-welded wires.

  9. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  10. Analysis of factors responsible for the accelerated creep rupture of 12% Cr martensitic steel weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Okhapkin, K. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.; Skutin, V. S.; Zubova, G. E.; Fedotov, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the process of the investigation of the heat resistance of a 0.07C-12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel of the martensitic-ferritic class, a reduction was revealed in the long-term strength of its welded joints to below the level of the strength of the base metal. To establish the causes for the accelerated failure of the welded joints, an imitation of the thermal cycles was carried out that produce the structure of the heataffected zone using a dilatometer. In the samples with the structure that corresponds to that of the heataffected zone, a local zone of softening was revealed. The investigations of the metal structure using transmission electron microscopy have shown that the reduction in the creep rupture strength was caused by structural changes under the conditions of the thermal cycle of welding upon the staying of the steel in the temperature range between the Ac 1 and Ac 3 points.

  11. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-17

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  12. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh R., V.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  13. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  14. Investigation of Torsional Strength of the VT6 Weld Joint Produced by Linear Friction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanova, G. R.; Kabirov, R. R.; Karavaeva, M. V.; Ershova, Yu. A.; Zhilyaev, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Results of measurement of torsional strength of the weld joint of the VT6 titanium alloy produced by linear friction welding are presented. For a comparison, the same method was used to test monolithic specimens of the VT6 alloy. Torsional strength values of the weld joint (τUS = 861 MPa and φ = 110°) correspond to the strength of the monolithic material. In this case, the specimens fail along the base metal.

  15. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    most of the commercially available metallic materials, in particular steels (including stainless steels ), super alloys, aluminum alloys, etc., can...REPORT Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel 14. ABSTRACT 16...Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Report Title ABSTRACT A conventional gas metal

  16. Investigation of aluminum-steel joint formed by explosion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.; Volgyi, B.; Sikari-Nagl, I.

    2015-04-01

    Explosion welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of metals. Explosion cladding can be used to join a wide variety of dissimilar or similar metals [1]. This process uses the controlled detonation of explosives to accelerate one or both of the constituent metals into each other in such a manner as to cause the collision to fuse them together [2]. In this study, bonding ability of aluminum and steel with explosion welding was investigated. Experimental studies, microscopy, microhardness, tensile and bend test showed out that, aluminum and steel could be bonded with a good quality of bonding properties with explosion welding.

  17. Weld microstructure development and properties of precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.

    1994-12-31

    Precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels provide excellent strength (170--220 ksi Y.S.) with high corrosion resistance. However, upon aging, a large reduction in toughness may also occur. The gas tungsten arc (GTA) cold wire feed process was used to weld half inch thick plates of PH 13-8 Mo and Custom 450 from which both tensile and Charpy specimens were machined. A fundamental understanding of the details of weld microstructural evolution was developed by liquid tin quenching GTA welds in which the solidification behavior, primary phase of solidification, microsegregation, and solid-state transformations could be followed. For both alloys studied, the as-welded yield strengths were similar to those of the unaged base material, 130 ksi. Weld properties were very similar to those of the base materials for both alloy systems. Weld strength increases significantly upon aging and achieves a maximum at intermediate aging temperatures. The increase in strength is accompanied by a large decrease in Charpy impact energy; however, the minimum in toughness occurs at aging temperatures slightly less than those resulting in peak strengths. The evolution of the weld microstructure was found to support predictions of microstructural modeling. Although a high degree of alloying partitioning occurs during solidification, a large degree of homogenization occurs upon further solidification and cooling as a result of solid-state diffusion.

  18. Practical method for diffusion welding of steel plate in air.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a simple and easily applied method of diffusion welding steel plate in air which does not require a vacuum furnace or hot press. The novel feature of the proposed welding method is that diffusion welds are made in air with deadweight loading. In addition, the use of an autogenous (self-generated) surface-cleaning principle (termed 'auto-vac cleaning') to reduce the effects of surface oxides that normally hinder diffusion welding is examined. A series of nine butt joints were diffusion welded in thick sections of AISI 1020 steel plate. Diffusion welds were attempted at three welding temperatures (1200, 1090, and 980 C) using a deadweight pressure of 34,500 N/sq m (5 psi) and a two-hour hold time at temperature. Auto-vac cleaning operations prior to welding were also studied for the same three temperatures. Results indicate that sound welds were produced at the two higher temperatures when the joints were previously fusion seal welded completely around the periphery. Also, auto-vac cleaning at 1200 C for 2-1/2 hours prior to diffusion welding was highly beneficial, particularly when subsequent welding was accomplished at 1090 C.

  19. Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties

    SciTech Connect

    Penik, M.A. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

  20. Welding high-strength aluminum alloys at the Paton Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, Yatsenko, S.I.; Cherednichok, V.T.; Semenov, L.A. )

    1993-07-01

    The choice of the flash method for welding aluminum-alloy sections was governed first of all by the possibility of producing homogeneous-structure joints with the minimum amount of possible discontinuities and an insignificant metal strength loss in the welding zone. The aluminum alloy welding technology under consideration relies on the method of flash welding without using any protective atmospheres. The reason is first of all that a complex cross-sectional shape of workpieces being joined, their configuration and considerable overall dimensions make it difficult to use chambers of any type. Besides, conducted studies ascertained that in flash welding, in contrast to various fusion welding processes, the use of protective atmospheres or a vacuum is of little benefit. Here are the results of studying the specifics of thermal and electric processes in flashing, the physical features of weld joint formation, the basics of the welding technology, and the characteristics of the equipment.

  1. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  2. Friction Stir Welding of Stainless Steel to Al Alloy: Effect of Thermal Condition on Weld Nugget Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Husain, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials is always a global challenge. Sometimes it is unavoidable to execute multifarious activities by a single component. In the present investigation, 6061 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel were joined by friction stir welding (FSW) at different tool rotational rates. Welded joints were characterized in optical and scanning electron microscopes. Reaction products in the stirring zone (SZ) were confirmed through X-ray diffraction. Joint strength was evaluated by tensile testing. It was found that the increment in average heat input and temperature at the weld nugget (WN) facilitated iron enrichment near the interface. Enhancement in the concentration of iron shifted the nature of intermetallics from the Fe2Al5 to Fe-rich end of the Fe-Al binary phase diagram. The peak microhardness and ultimate tensile strength were found to be maxima at the intermediate tool rotational rate, where Fe3Al and FeAl2 appeared along with Fe2Al5.

  3. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 and Hot-Stamp Boron Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L.; Frederick, Alan; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2008-05-16

    Friction stir spot welds were made in two high-strength steels: DP780, and a hot-stamp-boron steel with tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The spot welds were made at either 800 or 1600 rpm using either of two polycrystalline boron nitride tools. One stir tool, BN77, had the relatively common pin-tool shape. The second tool, BN46, had a convex rather than a concave shoulder profile and a much wider and shorter pin. The tools were plunged to preprogrammed depths either at a continuous rate (1-step schedule) or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate. In all cases, the welds were completed in 4s. The range of lap-shear values were compared to values required for resistance spot welds on the same steels. The minimum value of 10.3 kN was exceeded for friction stir spot welding of DP780 using a 2-step schedule and either the BN77- or the BN46-type stir tool. The respective minimum value of 12 kN was also exceeded for the HSB steel using the 2-step process and the BN46 stir tool.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  5. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A MULTILAYERED MULTIPASS FRICTION STIR WELD IN STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    Multilayered multipass friction stir welding (MM-FSW) makes it possible to use FSW to fabricate thick-section structures. In this work, MM-FSW was demonstrated on a high strength low alloy steel; ASTM A572 Grade 50. Three steel plates with thicknesses of 0.18", 0.18", 0.24" respectively were stacked and friction stir welded together to form a 0.6" thick welded structure. The welded plate was sectioned into rectangular bars transverse to the weld direction for tensile testing to evaluate mechanical properties. Digital image correlation (DIC) was employed to map the local strain fields during tensile testing. The initial failure was found to occur simultaneously at the bottom and middle layers away from the weld zone. The top layer failed last in the base metal. The failure locations were consistent among different samples tested. Also, Charpy V-notch impact tests were conducted for weld metal, heat affected zone, and the base metal at each layer as a function of temperature. The weld microstructures were characterized using optical and electron microscopy and micro-hardness mapping.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on the structure and the mechanical and technological properties of corrosion-resistant nitrogen-bearing 0Kh16N4AFD steel for high-strength welding constructions of railway engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Kostina, M. V.; Lukin, E. I.; Blinov, E. V.; Rigina, L. G.

    2015-07-01

    The problems of applying a new nitrogen-alloyed martensitic corrosion-resistant 0Kh16N4AFD steel as a promising material for manufacturing car bodies are considered. The microstructure and properties of the steel after various heat treatments have been studied. It is shown that the steel is not behind 12Kh18N9T steel in the characteristics of ductility and corrosion resistance and significantly exceeds it in the static and cyclic strengths.

  7. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel weld metal with three different microstructures has been systematically evaluated using electrochemical techniques with the simulated produced water containing CO2 at 90 °C. Microstructures include acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, and a small amount of pearlite. With welding heat input increasing, weld metal microstructure becomes more uniform. Electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic polarization curve, linear polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the corrosion properties on weld joint, indicating that the best corrosion resistance corresponded to the weld metal with a polygonal ferrite microstructure, whereas the weld metal with the acicular ferrite + polygonal ferrite microstructure showed the worst corrosion resistance. The samples with high welding heat input possessed better corrosion resistance. Results were discussed in terms of crystal plane orientation, grain size, and grain boundary type found in each weld metal by electron backscatter diffraction test.

  8. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  9. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  10. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Weld Metal and Heat-Affected Zone of Electron Beam-Welded Joints of HG785D Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Jianmin; Tan, Caiwang; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Junqiang

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum electron beam welding (EBW) process was employed to butt weld 10-mm-thick HG785D high-strength steels. The penetration into the steel was adjusted by beam current. Microstructures at weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) regions were comparatively observed. Mechanical properties of the EBWed joints including Vickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were evaluated. The results indicated that microstructures at the weld metal consisted of coarse lath martensite and a small amount of acicular martensite, while that in the HAZ was tempered sorbite and martensite. The grain size in the weld metal was found to be larger than that in the HAZ, and its proportion in weld metal was higher. The hardness in the weld metal was higher than the HAZ and base metal. The tensile strength and impact toughness in the HAZ was higher than that in the weld metal. All the behaviors were related to microstructure evolution caused by higher cooling rates and state of base metal. The fracture surfaces of tensile and impact tests on the optimized joint were characterized by uniform and ductile dimples. The results differed significantly from that obtained using arc welding process.

  11. Building No. 392, interior overview with welding stalls and steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building No. 392, interior overview with welding stalls and steel plate floor, view facing west-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Marine Railway No. 1 Accessories House & Apprentice Welding School, Additions, Intersection of Avenue B & Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  13. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Evolution of Welded Eglin Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leister, Brett M.

    Eglin steel is a new ultra-high strength steel that has been developed at Eglin Air Force Base in the early 2000s. This steel could be subjected to a variety of processing steps during fabrication, each with its own thermal history. This article presents a continuous cooling transformation diagram developed for Eglin steel to be used as a guideline during processing. Dilatometry techniques performed on a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator were combined with microhardness results and microstructural characterization to develop the diagram. The results show that four distinct microstructures form within Eglin steel depending on the cooling rate. At cooling rates above about 1 °C/s, a predominately martensitic microstructure is formed with hardness of ˜520 HV. Intermediate cooling rates of 1 °C/s to 0.2 °C/s produce a mixed martensitic/bainitic microstructure with a hardness that ranges from 520 - 420 HV. Slower cooling rates of 0.1 °C/s to 0.03 °C/s lead to the formation of a bainitic microstructure with a hardness of ˜420 HV. The slowest cooling rate of 0.01 °C/s formed a bainitic microstructure with pearlite at the prior austenite grain boundaries. A comprehensive study was performed to correlate the mechanical properties and the microstructural evolution in the heat affected zone of thermally simulated Eglin steel. A Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator was used to resistively heat samples of wrought Eglin steel according to calculated thermal cycles with different peak temperatures at a heat input of 1500 J/mm. These samples underwent mechanical testing to determine strength and toughness, in both the `as-simulated' condition and also following post-weld heat treatments. Mechanical testing has shown that the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) has the lowest strength following thermal simulation, and the fine-grain and coarse-grain heat affected zone having an increased strength when compared to the inter-critical HAZ. The toughness of the heat

  14. The Effect of Ultrasonic Peening on Service Life of the Butt-Welded High-Temperature Steel Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daavari, Morteza; Vanini, Seyed Ali Sadough

    2015-09-01

    Residual stresses introduced by manufacturing processes such as casting, forming, machining, and welding have harmful effects on the mechanical behavior of the structures. In addition to the residual stresses, weld toe stress concentration can play a determining effect. There are several methods to improve the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior of the welded structures. In this paper, the effects of ultrasonic peening on the fatigue life of the high-temperature seamless steel pipes, used in the petrochemical environment, have been investigated. These welded pipes are fatigued due to thermal and mechanical loads caused by the cycle of cooling, heating, and internal pressure fluctuations. Residual stress measurements, weld geometry estimation, electrochemical evaluations, and metallography investigations were done as supplementary examinations. Results showed that application of ultrasonic impact treatment has led to increased fatigue life, fatigue strength, and corrosion resistance of A106-B welded steel pipes in petrochemical corrosive environment.

  15. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  16. Thermophysical property measurements on low alloy high strength carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Brooks, J.A.; Atteridge, D.G.; Porter, W.D.

    1997-06-15

    The alloys of interest in this study were AISI Type 4230 and Type 4320 low alloy high strength carbon steels. They are heat-treatable steels and are usually used in the quenched and tempered condition. The Type 4130 has about 0.3% (wt.)C, 0.95%Cr, and 0.2% Mo. The Type 4320 has about 0.2%C, 1.7%Ni, 0.7%Cr, and 0.3% Mo. They are among the most popular alloy steels because of their excellent combination of mechanical properties and are used in both cast and wrought forms for many applications requiring high strength and toughness. However, during the casting operation, carbon segregation to the part surface forms a high carbon content surface layer in the part, which will induce surface cracking in the subsequent quenching process. And, during the welding operation, the critical cooling rate in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) will determine if the weldment is crack-free or not. Thus, the numerical effort to study the thermal history, microstructure evolution and residual stress development during welding and casting is critical to the application of these steels. This modeling effect requires the accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties, such as thermal expansion, solidus and liquidus temperatures, specific heat capacity, and heat of fusion. Unfortunately, these thermophysical properties are unavailable for temperatures over 1,000 C (1,2), thus the need for this study.

  17. Development of low-cost welding procedures for thick sections of HY-150 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, P. M.; Snow, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost welding procedures were developed for welding 6-inch thick HY-150 steel to be used in the manufacture of large diameter motor case Y rings and nozzle attachment flanges. An extensive investigation was made of the mechanical and metallurgical properties and fracture toughness of HY-150 base plate and welds made with manual shielded metal arc process and semi-automatic gas metal arc process in the flat position. Transverse tensiles, all-weld metal tensiles, Charpy V-notch specimens and edge notched bend specimens were tested in the course of the program. In addition metallographic studies and hardness tests were performed on the weld, weld HAZ and base metal. The results of the work performed indicate that both the shielded metal arc and gas metal arc processes are capable of producing consistently sound welds as determined by radiographic and ultrasonic inspection. In addition, the weld metal, deposited by each process was found to exhibit a good combination of strength and toughness such that the selection of a rolled and welded procedure for fabricating rocket motor case components would appear to be technically feasible.

  18. Effects of welding on weldment mechanical performance in two austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1982-06-01

    The effect of autogenous gas-tungsten arc-welding on the mechanical performance of two austenitic steels has been evaluated for cable jackets of force-cooled superconductor coils. The original candidate material was Nitronic 40, a nitrogen-strengthened stainless steel. The in-situ reaction heat treatment at 700/sup 0/C necessary for the formation of the superconducting A15 phase results in severe degradation of the cryogenic tensile ductility in the weld metal. The search for an alternate material led to JBK-75, a modified A-286 type ..gamma..' precipitation hardening iron-based superalloy. Observations of a tensile strength mismatch between base metal and the weaker weld metal in JBK-75 prompted a study into the aging response in weldments of this alloy. Localized strain through slip step traces show an easy path of deformation within the solidification structure. Weldment strength varies with grain size. It was found that through post-weld annealing treatments at 950/sup 0/C, prior to aging, weldment hardness levels can be matched. However, although increased strength levels are obtained in the weld metal, concomitant decreases in base metal strengths are suffered, presumably due to observed grain growth. 24 figures, 9 tables.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded High Strength Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-18

    Angelo Guinasso, " Stress Corrosion Susceptibility in 7050 -T751 Aluminum Following Friction Stir Welding", Proc. First Friction Stir Welding Symposium...potential of the nugget. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was evaluated using the slow strain rate (SSR) method described in ASTM Standards...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP015941 TITLE: Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded High Strength

  20. Microstructures and Type-IV Creep Damage of High Cr Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Yukio

    Creep strength of welded joints in high Cr steels decreases due to the formation of Type-IV creep damage in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) during long-term use at high temperatures. This paper aims to elucidate the processes and mechanisms of Type-IV failure. Creep tests for the welded joints with different groove configurations of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted. Distributions of Type-IV creep damages in HAZ of these welds were measured quantitatively, and were compared with FEM computations using damage mechanics analysis. For the welded joints with double U groove, creep voids were observed mostly at 20% below the surface of the plate, and scarcely near surfaces and center of thickness. For the welded joints with single U groove, creep voids were observed inside the plate thickness more than 3mm below the surfaces. From the comparison of experimental damage distributions with FEM analysis, it is considered to be important to take the stress triaxiality into account for the prediction of damage location and fracture life of high Cr ferritic steel welds.

  1. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Wasson, Andrew J; Fairchild, Doug P; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  2. Fracture toughness properties of welded stainless steels for tritium service

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    1994-10-01

    Studies to determine tritium exposure effects on the properties of welded steels are being conducted. In this investigation, the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) Incoloy 903 were. Fracture toughness measurements were conducted for tritium-exposed samples in the as-forged condition and compared with welded samples. Tritium-exposed HERF Incoloy 903 had fracture toughness values that were 33% lower than those for unexposed HERF Incoloy 903. Tritium-exposed welded samples had fracture toughness values that were just 8% of the unexposed HERF alloys and 28% of unexposed welded alloys.

  3. Microstructural Development in HSLA-100 Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    AD-A2 3 7 931 MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN HSLA-100 STEEL WELD METALS A*.t - AI* Final Report Grant No. N00014-89-J-1958 -. .o, Submitted by j Paul...on pages 30-32. The microstructures that develop in the coarse-grained heat affected zone (CG- HAZ) of the welds are discussed on page 21 and figures...stringent welding procedures as well as reduce the mechanical property deterioration from welding operations. The development of the ultra low carbon

  4. Characterization of Properties in Friction Welded Stainless Steel and Copper Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Mumin; Çıl, Ender; Misirli, Cenk

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the metallurgical and mechanical properties of friction welded stainless steel-copper joints. One of the manufacturing methods used to produce parts made from different materials is the friction welding method. Application of classical welding techniques to such materials is difficult because of they have different thermal properties. Stainless steel-copper joints are inevitable for certain applications due to unique performances such as higher electric conductivity, heat conductivity, corrosion resistance, and mechanical properties. In the present study, austenitic stainless steel and copper parts were joined by friction welding. Tensile, fatigue, and notch-impact tests were applied to friction welded specimens, and the results were compared with those for the original materials. Microstructure, energy dispersive x-ray, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and hardness variations were conducted on the joints. Results showed that various intermetallic phases such as FeCu4 and Cu2NiZn occurred at the interface. It was found from the microstructure and XRD analysis that intermetallic phases formed in the interface which further caused a decrease in the strength of the joints. However, hardness of the copper increased slightly, whereas the hardness of steel decreases slightly on the horizontal distance from the center.

  5. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  6. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  7. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; ...

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW onmore » grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.« less

  8. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  9. 77 FR 65712 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From Vietnam; Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From Vietnam; Termination of Investigation AGENCY... investigation concerning circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from Vietnam (investigation No....

  10. Increasing Strength and Operational Reliability of Fixed Joints of Tubes by MMA Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Schlyakhova, G. V.; Gotovschik, Y. M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents peculiar properties of structure formation, phase and chemical composition while welding of low-alloy steel 09MnSi2-l depending on the dynamic characteristics of power sources of different types. Proper selection of power sources enables to decrease burning of alloy elements in metal of weld (Mn by 14% and Si by 17% of the weight ratio), to obtain more homogenous structure of deposited metal, to reduce length of heat-affected zone by 50% and to improve impact strength by 4-9%.

  11. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  12. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1930-02-06

    STRENGTH OF WELDED JOINTS IN TUBULAR MEMBERS FOR AIRCRAFT By H. L. WHITTEMORE and W. C. BRUEGGEMAN Bureau of Standards ——— - ..— .-.— .— .— —___ 107346->1...331 331 332 341 341 342 343 343 343 347 347 347 367 .— .— — ● REPORT ~0, 348 STRENGTH OF WELDED JOINTS IN TUBULAR MELMBERS FOR AIRCRAFT By H. L...airoraft welds has been publi~hed)lit ig beh%redthat euch tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerablemdueto the

  13. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; Muransky, Ondrej; Sisneros, Thomas A.

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250 MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.

  14. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; ...

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250more » MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.« less

  15. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... 564 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead...

  16. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  17. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  18. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  19. 76 FR 76437 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would... Publication 4280 (December 2011), entitled Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe from Korea and...

  20. 75 FR 44766 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Final Results of...) order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey for the January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2008, period of review (POR). See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From...

  1. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.51 Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel...) Cylindrical type cylinders must be of circumferentially welded or brazed construction. (b) Steel. The...

  2. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  3. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  4. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  5. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  6. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.51 Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel...) Cylindrical type cylinders must be of circumferentially welded or brazed construction. (b) Steel. The...

  7. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). (a) The qualification of welding procedures, welders,...

  8. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). (a) The qualification of welding procedures, welders,...

  9. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe... injured or threatened with material injury by reason of LTFV imports of welded stainless steel...

  10. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.51 Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel...) Cylindrical type cylinders must be of circumferentially welded or brazed construction. (b) Steel. The...

  11. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). (a) The qualification of welding procedures, welders,...

  12. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  13. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  14. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  15. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). (a) The qualification of welding procedures, welders,...

  16. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  17. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  18. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  19. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). (a) The qualification of welding procedures, welders,...

  20. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  1. 78 FR 70069 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping and countervailing duty orders on circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from China would be... Publication 4435 (November 2013), entitled Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from China:...

  2. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  3. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  4. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.51 Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel...) Cylindrical type cylinders must be of circumferentially welded or brazed construction. (b) Steel. The...

  5. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  6. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  7. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  8. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  9. 77 FR 64468 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Affirmative... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel... the publication of the preliminary determination.\\1\\ \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel...

  10. 75 FR 36635 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Rescission of... antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand. See Antidumping or... welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand for the period March 1, 2009 through February 28,...

  11. 77 FR 20782 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes have been made below normal value (NV) during the March...

  12. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  13. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sayiram, G. Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-04-15

    In this work, the microstructural character of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel has been discussed. The microscopic examination of the base metals, fusion zones and interfaces was characterized using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed precipitates of Ti (C, N) in the austenitic matrix along the grain boundaries of the base metals. Migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive when compared to Inconel 617 weldment. Epitaxial growth was observed in the 617 weldment which increases the strength and ductility of the weld metal. Unmixed zone near the fusion line between 321 Stainless Steel and Inconel 82 weld metal was identified. From the results, it has been concluded that Inconel 617 filler metal is a preferable choice for the joint between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel. - Highlights: • Failure mechanisms produced by dissimilar welding of Incoloy 800H to AISI 321SS • Influence of filler wire on microstructure properties • Contemplative comparisons of metallurgical aspects of these weldments • Microstructure and chemical studies including metallography, SEM–EDS • EDS-line scan study at interface.

  14. First samples of Ti and Nb tubes explosion welding joint with stainless steel for ILC 1.8 K cryomodule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabirov, B. M.; Budagov, J. A.; Shirkov, G. D.

    2013-07-01

    The world first samples of Ti and Nb tubes joint with stainless steel ones by an explosion welding by the JINR-VNIIEF-FNAL-INFN cooperation were manufactured in the frame of ILC R&D programe. An applying methods of relaxation of residual tensions (after explosion and electron beam welding), macro- and microanalyses of welding seam and cryogenic tests of the samples produced manifest the achievement of high mechanic strength (≈250 MPa/share) of welding seam, solidity and leak absence on 10-10 l atm/s level at 1.8 K. The explosion welding technology and methods introducing to industrial manufacturing of the 4-th generation of cryomodule of TESLA TYPE DESIGN can exclude the Ti—communications, connect the Nb—cavity with stainless steel vessel and reduce significantly the accelerator cost.

  15. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stir zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.

  16. Hydrogen accelerated fatigue crack growth of friction stir welded X52 steel pipe

    DOE PAGES

    Ronevich, Joseph Allen; Somerday, Brian P.; Feng, Zhili

    2016-11-17

    Friction stir welded steel pipelines were tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to examine the effects of hydrogen accelerated fatigue crack growth. Fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) vs. stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) relationships were measured for an X52 friction stir welded pipe tested in 21 MPa hydrogen gas at a frequency of 1 Hz and R = 0.5. Tests were performed on three regions: base metal (BM), center of friction stir weld (FSW), and 15 mm off-center of the weld. For all three material regions, tests in hydrogen exhibited accelerated fatigue crack growth rates that exceeded an order of magnitudemore » compared to companion tests in air. Among tests in hydrogen, fatigue crack growth rates were modestly higher in the FSW than the BM and 15 mm off-center tests. Select regions of the fracture surfaces associated with specified ΔK levels were examined which revealed intergranular fracture in the BM and 15 mm off-center specimens but an absence of intergranular features in the FSW specimens. In conclusion, the X52 friction stir weld and base metal tested in hydrogen exhibited fatigue crack growth rate relationships that are comparable to those for conventional arc welded steel pipeline of similar strength found in the literature.« less

  17. Hydrogen accelerated fatigue crack growth of friction stir welded X52 steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Ronevich, Joseph Allen; Somerday, Brian P.; Feng, Zhili

    2016-11-17

    Friction stir welded steel pipelines were tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to examine the effects of hydrogen accelerated fatigue crack growth. Fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) vs. stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) relationships were measured for an X52 friction stir welded pipe tested in 21 MPa hydrogen gas at a frequency of 1 Hz and R = 0.5. Tests were performed on three regions: base metal (BM), center of friction stir weld (FSW), and 15 mm off-center of the weld. For all three material regions, tests in hydrogen exhibited accelerated fatigue crack growth rates that exceeded an order of magnitude compared to companion tests in air. Among tests in hydrogen, fatigue crack growth rates were modestly higher in the FSW than the BM and 15 mm off-center tests. Select regions of the fracture surfaces associated with specified ΔK levels were examined which revealed intergranular fracture in the BM and 15 mm off-center specimens but an absence of intergranular features in the FSW specimens. In conclusion, the X52 friction stir weld and base metal tested in hydrogen exhibited fatigue crack growth rate relationships that are comparable to those for conventional arc welded steel pipeline of similar strength found in the literature.

  18. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  19. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  20. Parametric Optimization Of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process By Using Grey Based Taguchi Method On Aisi 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabendu; Kumar, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam

    2016-10-01

    Welding input process parameters play a very significant role in determining the quality of the welded joint. Only by properly controlling every element of the process can product quality be controlled. For better quality of MIG welding of Ferritic stainless steel AISI 409, precise control of process parameters, parametric optimization of the process parameters, prediction and control of the desired responses (quality indices) etc., continued and elaborate experiments, analysis and modeling are needed. A data of knowledge - base may thus be generated which may be utilized by the practicing engineers and technicians to produce good quality weld more precisely, reliably and predictively. In the present work, X-ray radiographic test has been conducted in order to detect surface and sub-surface defects of weld specimens made of Ferritic stainless steel. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and percentage of elongation of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by considering ultimate tensile strength ,yield strength and percentage elongation combined with use of Grey-Taguchi methodology.

  1. Ultrasonic Spot Welding of AZ31B to Galvanized Mild Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu; Franklin, Teresa; Pan, Professor Jwo; Brown, Elliot; Santella, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic spot welds were made between sheets of 0.8-mm-thick hot-dip-galvanized mild steel and 1.6-mm-thick AZ31B-H24. Lap-shear strengths of 3.0-4.2 kN were achieved with weld times of 0.3-1.2 s. Failure to achieve strong bonding of joints where the Zn coating was removed from the steel surface indicate that Zn is essential to the bonding mechanism. Microstructure characterization and microchemical analysis indicated temperatures at the AZ31-steel interfaces reached at least 344 C in less than 0.3 s. The elevated temperature conditions promoted annealing of the AZ31-H24 metal and chemical reactions between it and the Zn coating.

  2. Post-weld Tempered Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welded Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-12-01

    Manufacturing of hydroelectric turbine components involves the assembly of thick-walled stainless steels using conventional multi-pass arc welding processes. By contrast, hybrid laser-arc welding may be an attractive process for assembly of such materials to realize deeper penetration depths, higher production rates, narrower fusion, and heat-affected zones, and lower distortion. In the present work, single-pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick CA6NM, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel, was carried out in the butt joint configuration using a continuous wave fiber laser at its maximum power of 5.2 kW over welding speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.2 m/minute. The microstructures across the weldment were characterized after post-weld tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 1 hour. From microscopic examinations, the fusion zone was observed to mainly consist of tempered lath martensite and some residual delta-ferrite. The mechanical properties were evaluated in the post-weld tempered condition and correlated to the microstructures and defects. The ultimate tensile strength and Charpy impact energy values of the fully penetrated welds in the tempered condition were acceptable according to ASTM, ASME, and industrial specifications, which bodes well for the introduction of hybrid laser-arc welding technology for the manufacturing of next generation hydroelectric turbine components.

  3. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  4. Weldability characteristics of shielded metal arc welded high strength quenched and tempered plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Jha, S.; Narasimhan, K.; Veeraraghavan, R.

    2002-02-01

    High strength, quench and tempered (Q&T) plates having yield strength of a minimum of 670 MPa and conforming to SA 517 Gr. F specification were successfully developed at Rourkela Steel Plant in plates up to 40 mm thickness. The plates are used extensively for the fabrication of impellers, penstocks, excavators, dumpers, and raw material handling devices, where welding is an important processing step. SA 517 Gr. F plates, characterized by a relatively high carbon equivalent (CE: ˜0.6) and alloyed with Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, and V, are susceptible to a crack-sensitive microstructure and cold cracking during welding. In view of the above, the present study investigated the weldability properties of 20 mm thick plates using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were carried out to assess the cold cracking resistance of the weld joint under different welding conditions. Preheat of 100 °C, partial or full rebake, and a heat input of 14.9 to 15.4 KJ/cm resulted in static fatigue limit (SFL) values well in excess of the minimum specified yield strength (MSYS) of 670 MPa and a critical restraint intensity (K cr) value of 34,650 MPa, indicating adequate cold cracking resistance. Lamellar tear tests conducted using full thickness plates at heat input levels ranging from 9.7 to 14.4 KJ/cm and weld restraint loads (WRL) of 510 to 685 MPa showed no incidence of lamellar tear upon visual, ultrasonic, and four-section macroexamination. The weld joint, based on optimized welding parameters, exhibited adequate tensile strength (812.4 MPa) and low temperature impact toughness 88.3 and 63.4 J (9.2 and 6.6 kg-m) at -40 °C for weld metal (WM), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) properties, respectively. The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) values of WM and HAZ (0.40 and 0.36 mm, respectively) were superior to that of the parent metal (0.29 mm), indicating adequate resistance of weld joint to brittle fracture. It was concluded that

  5. The cause of welding cracks in aircraft steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, J

    1940-01-01

    The discussion in this article refers to gas welding of thin-walled parts of up to about 3 mm thickness. It was proven that by restricting the sulphur, carbon, and phosphorous content, and by electric-furnace production of the steel, it was possible in a short time to remove this defect. Weld hardness - i.e., martensite formation and hardness of the overheated zone - has no connection with the tendency to weld-crack development. Si, Cr, Mo, or V content has no appreciable effect, while increased manganese content tends to reduce the crack susceptibility.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  7. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  8. 76 FR 36086 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico... Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico, 75...

  9. Microstructure, Hardness, and Residual Stress Distributions in T-Joint Weld of HSLA S500MC Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frih, Intissar; Montay, Guillaume; Adragna, Pierre-Antoine

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the characterization of the microstructure, hardness, and residual stress distributions of MIG-welded high-strength low-alloy S500MC steel. The T-joint weld for 10-mm-thick plates was joined using a two passes MIG welding technology. The contour method was performed to measure longitudinal welding residual stress. The obtained results highlighted a good correlation between the metallurgical phase constituents and hardness distribution within the weld zones. In fact, the presence of bainite and smaller ferrite grain size in the weld-fusion zone might be the reason for the highest hardness measured in this region. A similar trend of the residual stress and hardness distributions was also obtained.

  10. Microstructure, Hardness, and Residual Stress Distributions in T-Joint Weld of HSLA S500MC Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frih, Intissar; Montay, Guillaume; Adragna, Pierre-Antoine

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the characterization of the microstructure, hardness, and residual stress distributions of MIG-welded high-strength low-alloy S500MC steel. The T-joint weld for 10-mm-thick plates was joined using a two passes MIG welding technology. The contour method was performed to measure longitudinal welding residual stress. The obtained results highlighted a good correlation between the metallurgical phase constituents and hardness distribution within the weld zones. In fact, the presence of bainite and smaller ferrite grain size in the weld-fusion zone might be the reason for the highest hardness measured in this region. A similar trend of the residual stress and hardness distributions was also obtained.

  11. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of 9%Cr/CrMoV Dissimilar Steels Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Lu, Fenggui; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xiaojin; Huo, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Advanced 9%Cr steel with good heat resistance and CrMoV with good toughness were chosen as candidate materials to fabricate combined rotor for steam turbine operating at over 620 °C. But the great difference in base metals properties presents a challenge in achieving sound defect-free joint with optimal properties in dissimilar welded rotor. In this paper, appropriate selection of filler metal, welding parameters, and post-weld heat treatment was combined to successfully weld 1100-mm-diameter 9%Cr/CrMoV dissimilar experimental rotor through ultra-narrow gap submerge arc welding. Some properties such as hardness, low-cycle fatigue (LCF), and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) combined with microstructural characterization qualify the integrity of the weld. Microstructural analysis indicated the presence of high-temperature tempered martensite as the phase responsible for the improved properties obtained in the weld. The Coffin-Manson parameters were obtained by fitting the data in LCF test, while the conditional fatigue strength was derived from the HCF test based on S-N curve. Analysis of hardness profile showed that the lowest value occurred at heat-affected zone adjacent to base metal which represents the appropriate location of fracture for the samples after LCF and HCF tests.

  12. A Correlation Between the Heat Affected Zone Microstructure and the Thermal History During Welding of HY-130 Steel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    the weld. Additionally, Lipsey [Ref. 9] used a computer program to predict the temperature at various 11 locations in the test plate. in all of these...M.I.T. OSP#82558, November 1980. 7. Rogalski, W. J., "An Economic and Technical Study on the Feasibility of Using Advanced Joining Techniques in... Lipsey , M. D., "Investigation of Welding Thermal Strains in High Strength Quenched and Tempered Steel," Ocean Engineer Thesis, Massachusetts Institute

  13. Microstructure, Tensile Properties and Work Hardening Behavior of GTA-Welded Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, H.; Shamanian, M.; Emadi, R.; Saeidi, N.

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, microstructure, tensile properties and work hardening behavior of a DP700 steel after gas tungsten arc welding were investigated. Formation of bainite in the fusion zone resulted in a hardness increase compared to that for the base metal (BM), whereas tempering of the pre-existing martensite in the subcritical heat-affected zone (HAZ) led to softening. The GTA-welded joint exhibited a continuous yielding behavior and a yield strength close to that for the BM, while its ultimate tensile strength and total elongation were lower than those for the BM owing to the formation of soft zone in the HAZ. A joint efficiency of about 81% was obtained for the GTA-welded joint, and it failed in the softened HAZ. Analysis of work hardening based on the Kocks-Mecking approach showed one stage of hardening behavior corresponding to the stage III for both the DP700 BM and welded sample. It was also revealed that the DP700 BM has larger values of work hardening exponent and magnitude of work hardening compared with the welded sample. Analysis of fractured surfaces showed that the dominant fracture mode for both the DP700 BM and welded joint was ductile.

  14. Microstructure, Tensile Properties and Work Hardening Behavior of GTA-Welded Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, H.; Shamanian, M.; Emadi, R.; Saeidi, N.

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, microstructure, tensile properties and work hardening behavior of a DP700 steel after gas tungsten arc welding were investigated. Formation of bainite in the fusion zone resulted in a hardness increase compared to that for the base metal (BM), whereas tempering of the pre-existing martensite in the subcritical heat-affected zone (HAZ) led to softening. The GTA-welded joint exhibited a continuous yielding behavior and a yield strength close to that for the BM, while its ultimate tensile strength and total elongation were lower than those for the BM owing to the formation of soft zone in the HAZ. A joint efficiency of about 81% was obtained for the GTA-welded joint, and it failed in the softened HAZ. Analysis of work hardening based on the Kocks-Mecking approach showed one stage of hardening behavior corresponding to the stage III for both the DP700 BM and welded sample. It was also revealed that the DP700 BM has larger values of work hardening exponent and magnitude of work hardening compared with the welded sample. Analysis of fractured surfaces showed that the dominant fracture mode for both the DP700 BM and welded joint was ductile.

  15. Effect of Submerged Arc Welding Parameters on the Microstructure of SA516 and A709 Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanie, James

    The effects of submerged arc welding (SAW) current and speed on the microstructures of SA516 grade 70 and A709 grade 50 steel welds were studied in this research. Steel plates 17 mm-thick were submerged arc welded using different welding currents (from 700 to 850 A) and welding speeds (from 5.3 to 15.3 mm/s). The effect of heat input on the weld metal chemistry, morphologies and chemistry of inclusions and nucleation of acicular ferrite (AF), grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) were evaluated. Optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the microstructures of the developed weld joints. PAX-it image analysis software program was utilized for quantitative analysis of the microstructures. The results showed that it is difficult to ascribe changes in the microstructure that occurred in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal regions to a single welding process parameter. Inclusion analysis revealed two types of inclusions formed in the weld metals for both steels. They are spherical and faceted inclusions. It was also observed that acicular ferrite nucleated only on the spherical inclusions. EDS analysis showed that the two inclusions have different chemical compositions. The results further showed that the total oxygen content of the weld metals of both steels generally increased with welding current, but decreased with increasing welding speed. The prior austenite grain width decreased with increasing welding speed, but increased with increasing welding current (increased heat input). For both SA516 and A709 steel welds, the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF) in the weld metals increased initially, while those of grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) decreased with increasing welding current when welding current was increased from 700 A to 800 A. With further increase in the

  16. The influence of oxygen on the impact toughness and microstructure of steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kuwana, Takeshi; Maie, Tsuyoshi

    1995-12-31

    A steel plate was welded in a low oxygen potential welding atmosphere. The weld metal obtained is classified in two groups on the oxygen content, very low oxygen content (less than 0.002 mass %) weld metal and relatively high oxygen content (over 0.015 mass%) weld metal. The effect of oxygen in steel weld metal on the Charpy v-notch impact values and the microstructure is investigated and discussed. Very low oxygen content steel weld metal shows superior impact toughness at 273 K as well as the well-known ``optimum oxygen`` containing steel weld metal. The very low oxygen weld metal has relatively large amounts of grain boundary ferrite and side plate ferrite microstructure, instead of upper bainite compared with the relatively high oxygen content weld metal.

  17. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  18. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittemore, H L; Brueggeman, W C

    1931-01-01

    The object of this investigation is to make available to the aircraft industry authoritative information on the strength, weight, and cost of a number of types of welded joints. This information will, also, assist the aeronautics branch in its work of licensing planes by providing data from which the strength of a given joint may be estimated. As very little material on the strength of aircraft welds has been published, it is believed that such tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerable value to the aircraft industry. Forty joints were welded under procedure specifications and tested to determine their strengths. The weight and time required to fabricate were also measured for each joint.

  19. Laser shock-induced mechanical and microstructural modification of welded maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, G. ); Elsayed-Ali, H.E. ); Lawrence, F.V. Jr. ); Rigsbee, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    The effect of laser-induced high-intensity stress waves on the hardness, fatigue resistance, and microstructure in the heat affected zone of welded 18 Ni(250) maraging steel was investigated. Laser-shock processing increased the hardness and fatigue strength of the weldments. Some melting of the surface was involved during laser-shock hardening which produced the reverted austenite phase. Microscopic analyses showed an increased dislocation density in the laser-shocked area.

  20. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  1. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  2. Stress corrosion evaluation of HP 9Ni-4Co-0.30C steel plate welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Pablo D.

    1993-01-01

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) investigation was conducted on HP 9Ni-4Co-0.30C steel plate welds (welded by using straight polarity plasma arc and HP 9Ni-4Co-0.20C weld wire) since this material is being considered for use in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program. Prior to the welding, the material was double tempered at 538 C (1,000 F). After welding, only part of the material was stress relieved at 510 C (950 F) for 3 h. Round tensile specimens obtained from nonstress-relieved material were tested in 100-percent relative humidity at 38 C (100 F), in 3.5-percent NaCl alternate immersion, and in 5-percent salt spray at 35 C (95 F). Specimens obtained from stress-relieved material were tested in alternate immersion. The stress levels were 50, 75, and 90 percent of the corresponding 0.2-percent yield strength (YS). All the nonstress-relieved specimens exposed to salt spray and alternate immersion failed. Stress-relieved specimens (exposed to alternate immersion) failed at 75 and 90 percent of YS. No failures occurred at 50 percent of YS in the stress-relieved specimens which indicates a beneficial effect of the stress relief on the SCC resistance of these welds. The stress relief also had a positive effect on the mechanical properties of the welds (the most important being an increase of 21 percent on the YS). Under the conditions of these tests, the straight polarity plasma are welded HP 9Ni4Co-0.30C steel plate was found highly susceptible to SCC in the nonstress-relieved condition. This susceptibility to SCC was reduced by stress relieving.

  3. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, David Alan; Grant, Glenn J; Dahl, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  4. Characterization of microstructures and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 stainless steel dissimilar welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shah Hosseini, H. Shamanian, M.; Kermanpur, A.

    2011-04-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 austenitic stainless steel dissimilar welds were investigated in this work. Three types of filler materials, Inconel 617, Inconel 82 and 310 austenitic stainless steels were used to obtain dissimilar joint using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Microstructural observations showed that there was no evidence of any possible cracking in the weldments achieved by the nickel-base filler materials. The welds produced by 617 and 310 filler materials displayed the highest and the lowest ultimate tensile strength and total elongation, respectively. The impact test results indicated that all specimens exhibited ductile fracture. Among the fillers, Inconel 617 exhibited superlative fracture toughness (205 J). The mechanical properties of the Inconel 617 filler material were much better than those of other fillers. - Research Highlights: {yields} A fine dendritic structure was seen for the Inconel 617 weld metal. {yields} A number of cracks were initiated when the 310 SS filler metal was used. {yields} All welded samples showed ductile fracture. {yields} The Inconel 617 filler material presents the optimum mechanical properties.

  5. Threshold Corrosion Fatigue of Welded Shipbuilding Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    of a deposit composition equivalent to the. L-TEC 95 solid electrode produced welds of similar tensile properties but of lower weld metal impact...toughness for welds produced with the powder-cored electrode of a deposit composition equivalent to the L-TEC 95 solid electrode was improved...consisting of a 5N H2SO 4 acid with 0.25 mg/i of arsenite (As2O3 ). Shims were placed in the electrospark discharge machined face-grooves and the

  6. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  7. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  8. Characterization of HAZ of API X70 Microalloyed Steel Welded by Cold-Wire Tandem Submerged Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadijoo, Mohsen; Kenny, Stephen; Collins, Laurie; Henein, Hani; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2017-03-01

    High-strength low-carbon microalloyed steels may be adversely affected by the high-heat input and thermal cycle that they experience during tandem submerged arc welding. The heat-affected zone (HAZ), particularly the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ), i.e., the region adjacent to the fusion line, has been known to show lower fracture toughness compared with the rest of the steel. The deterioration in toughness of the CGHAZ is attributed to the formation of martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents, local brittle zones, and large prior austenite grains (PAG). In the present work, the influence of the addition of a cold wire at various wire feed rates in cold-wire tandem submerged arc welding, a recently developed welding process for pipeline manufacturing, on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HAZ of a microalloyed steel has been studied. The cold wire moderates the heat input of welding by consuming the heat of the trail electrode. Macrostructural analysis showed a decrease in the CGHAZ size by addition of a cold wire. Microstructural evaluation, using both tint etching optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, indicated the formation of finer PAGs and less fraction of M-A constituents with refined morphology within the CGHAZ when the cold wire was fed at 25.4 cm/min. This resulted in an improvement in the HAZ impact fracture toughness. These improvements are attributed to lower actual heat introduced to the weldment and lower peak temperature in the CGHAZ by cold-wire addition. However, a faster feed rate of the cold wire at 76.2 cm/min adversely affected the toughness due to the formation of slender M-A constituents caused by the relatively faster cooling rate in the CGHAZ.

  9. Residual stresses and plastic deformation in GTA-welded steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, P.C. ); Keijser, T.H. de; Ouden, G. den )

    1993-03-01

    Residual stresses and plastic deformation in single pass GTA welded low-carbon steel were studied by means of x-ray diffraction in combination with optical microscopy and hardness measurements. The residual stresses and the amount of plastic deformation (microstrain) were obtained from x-ray diffraction line positions and line broading. Since the plates were polished before welding, it was possible to observe in the optical microscope two types of Lueders bands. During heating curved Lueders bands and during cooling straight Lueders bands perpendicular to the weld are formed. The curved Lueders bands extend over a larger distance from the weld than the straight Lueders bands. The amount of plastic deformation as obtained from the x-ray diffraction analysis is in agreement with these observations. An explanation is offered for the stresses measured in combination with plastic deformations observed. It is concluded that in the present experiments plastic deformation is the main cause of the residual stresses.

  10. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  11. Joining of dissimilar AZ31B magnesium alloy and SS400 mild steel by hybrid gas tungsten arc friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, SungMin

    2013-11-01

    The joining of dissimilar materials, magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and mild steel (SS400), was performed using a hybrid gas tungsten arc-friction stir welding (HGTAFSW) method that applied a preceding gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) preheating heat source to a mild steel plate surface during friction stir welding (FSW). The mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the HGTAFS welds were evaluated and compared to those of FS welds to confirm the effect of the additional GTAW preheating heat source. The tensile strength of the HGTAFS welds was approximately 91% of that of the magnesium alloy base metal but higher than that of the FS welds. This was attributed to the enhanced material plastic flow and partial annealing effect in the magnesium alloy and mild steel materials by GTAW reheating of the mild steel side, which induced a significant increase in the elongation of the welds. The concentration profiles indicated that no intermetallic FeAl and FeAl3 compounds had formed according to the phase diagram, which led to a decrease in joint strength. Overall, the use of HGTAFSW by applying a GTAW preheating heat source to a mild steelplate surface resulted in a mechanically sounder and metallurgically defect-free welds compared to FSW.

  12. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    of the commercially available metallic materials, in particular, steels (including stainless steels ), super alloys, aluminum alloys, etc.; (b) welding...REPORT Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding Report Title ABSTRACT A fully coupled (two-way

  13. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a water... a maximum wall stress of 24,000 p.s.i. in the formula described in paragraph (f)(4) of this section... weldable steel, the carbon content of which may not exceed 0.25 percent. (f) Wall thickness. For...

  14. Characterization of ferritic G. M. A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel for cryogenic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mahin, K.W.

    1980-04-01

    Low temperature containment vessels of 9% Ni are normally fabricated using the shielded metal arc (S.M.A.W.) or the gas metal arc (G.M.A.W.) welding processes. Available filler metals compatible with these processes are highly alloyed austenitics, whose strength levels undermatch those of the base plate. A more efficient weld joint would be a low alloy ferritic deposit. Although acceptable matching ferritic gas tungsten arc weld (G.T.A.W.) wires have been developed, similar progress has not been made in the area of ferritic G.M.A. weld wires. Most of the prior work in this area has focused on correlating composition with mechanical properties, without a corresponding evaluation of resultant microstructure. The study presented focused on establishing correlations between chemistry, microstructure and mechanical properties for four different ferritic G.M.A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel, with the purpose of developing a better understanding of the factors controlling the 77K (-196/sup 0/C) toughness behavior of these weld metals. Microstructural characterization was carried out using standard optical and scanning electron microscopes, as well as a variety of advanced analytical techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.), scanning T.E.M., Moessbauer spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy.

  15. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 K to 1173 K (700 °C to 900 °C), was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/and above 1073 K (800 °C). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 °C). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine-grained heat-affected zone region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard "normalization and tempering" processes. The steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room temperature toughness. The above data are also analyzed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.

  16. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    DOE PAGES

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-02-23

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 to 1173 K (700 to 900ºC) was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/andmore » above 1073 K (800 ºC). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 ºC). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard “normalization and tempering” processes. Lastly, the steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room-temperature toughness. The above data is also analysed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.« less

  17. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-02-23

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 to 1173 K (700 to 900ºC) was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/and above 1073 K (800 ºC). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 ºC). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard “normalization and tempering” processes. Lastly, the steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room-temperature toughness. The above data is also analysed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.

  18. Laser Welded Corrugated Steel Panels in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kananen, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Keskitalo, M.; Hietala, M.; Järvenpää, A.; Holappa, K.; Saine, K.; Teiskonen, J.

    Corrugated core steel panels are an effective way to reduce weight and increase stiffness of steel structures. In numerous applications, these panels have shown very promising commercial possibilities. This study presents the design, manufacturing and commercializing process for two practical examples: Case 1) a fly wheel cover for a diesel engine and Case 2) rotationally symmetrical panel for an electric motor. Test materials of various kinds were used for corrugated cores and skin plates: conventional low-carbon steel grade EN 10130 and ferritic stainless steel grade 1.4509 with plate the thicknesses of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.75 mm. To manufacture different kinds of corrugated core steel panels, flexible manufacturing tools and cost-effective processes are needed. The most important criterion for laser welding panels was the capability of forming tools for producing high quality geometry for the core. Laser welding assembly showed that the quality of the core in both studied cases was good enough for welding the lap joints properly. Developed panels have been tested in industrial applications with excellent feedback. If thickness of a corrugated panel structure is not a limiting issue, these panels are good solution on application where stiffness and lighter weight are required as well as vibrational aspect considered.

  19. Axisymmetric guided wave scattering by cracks in welded steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, W.; Shah, A.H.; Datta, S.K.

    1997-11-01

    Scattering of axisymmetric guided waves by cracks and weldments of anisotropic bonding material in welded steel pipes is investigated in this paper by a hybrid method employing finite element and modal representation techniques. The study is motivated by the need to develop a quantitative ultrasonic technique to distinguish flaws and bonding materials in welded cylindrical structures. Numerical results for reflection coefficients are presented for a steel pipe with cracks and V-shaped weldments with and without cracks at the interface between the weldment and the steel pipe. It is shown that as the frequency increases, the coefficients of reflection exhibit resonant peaks at the cutoff frequencies of higher guided modes. These peaks become increasingly pronounced as the slope and the length of the crack increase. Numerical results presented have important applications in quantitative nondestructive evaluation.

  20. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, N. Kishore; Cross, Carl E.

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  1. 78 FR 72863 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ...). \\3\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China, 78 FR 70069 (November 22, 2013). Scope... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China... revocation of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular welded...

  2. 77 FR 41967 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Certain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ..., A-583-814, and A-583-008] Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand... pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and Turkey; (2) certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from... welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and Turkey, certain circular welded...

  3. Hardness, Microstructure, and Residual Stresses in Low Carbon Steel Welding with Post-weld Heat Treatment and Temper Bead Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloraier, Abdulkareem S.; Joshi, Suraj; Price, John W. H.; Alawadhi, Khaled

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effects of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and temper bead welding (TBW) on hardness, microstructure and residual stresses in multi-layer welding on low carbon steel specimens made with two different weld geometries, viz. (1) smooth-contoured and (2) U-shaped. It was found that the PWHT technique gave overall lower hardness than the TBW technique, but the hardness values in both techniques were acceptable. Microscopy analysis showed that the TBW technique was more effective in tempering the heat affected zone as the grain size decreased slightly at the fusion line in spite of the higher temperature at the fusion line. Residual stresses measured using the hole-drilling method showed that the residual stress is not reduced below yield stress near the last bead solidified in TBW. Only PWHT gives low residual stress results in this area. High tensile residual stresses may result in sensitivity to fatigue loading.

  4. Fabrication of thick multilayered steel structure using A516 Grade 70 by multipass friction stir welding

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Y. C.; Sanderson, S.; Mahoney, M.; ...

    2016-04-06

    Here, we fabricated a thick-sectioned multilayered steel structure by multipass friction stir welding on A516 Grade 70 steel. Tensile strength of the multilayered samples was comparable to that of the base metal. Failure was located in the base metal when a defect-free sample was tested. Charpy impact toughness was higher in the stir zone and heat affected zone than in the base metal. For higher microhardness values were found in the stir zone and heat affected zone than the base metal due to grain refinement and modification of the microstructures. As a result, improved mechanical properties compared to the basemore » metal were found in the weld zones of friction stir welded A516 Grade 70 steel.« less

  5. Fabrication of thick multilayered steel structure using A516 Grade 70 by multipass friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Y. C.; Sanderson, S.; Mahoney, M.; Wang, Y.; Chen, J.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2016-04-06

    Here, we fabricated a thick-sectioned multilayered steel structure by multipass friction stir welding on A516 Grade 70 steel. Tensile strength of the multilayered samples was comparable to that of the base metal. Failure was located in the base metal when a defect-free sample was tested. Charpy impact toughness was higher in the stir zone and heat affected zone than in the base metal. For higher microhardness values were found in the stir zone and heat affected zone than the base metal due to grain refinement and modification of the microstructures. As a result, improved mechanical properties compared to the base metal were found in the weld zones of friction stir welded A516 Grade 70 steel.

  6. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  7. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  8. Influence of repair welding of aged 18Ni 250 maraging steel weldments on tensile and fracture properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, P.P.; Arumugham, S.; Nagarajan, K.V. . Materials and Metallurgy Group)

    1993-08-01

    The effects of repair welding on tensile strength and fracture toughness of aged weldments of 18 Ni 250-grade maraging steel have been studied. It has been established that aged weldments in the steel can be repaired and approximately 95% of the tensile strength of the initial welds could be achieved by postrepair aging treatment. Also, the repairs had practically no effect on the fracture toughness (K[sub IC]) of the weldment. These results have been discussed in terms of microstructural conditions in the various affected and unaffected zones of the initial weld. One important inference that emerges from the mechanical properties-microstructural correlation in the study is that (K[sub IC]) of the weld is independent of the gross microstructural features of the dendritic size and shapes in the ranges observed in this study. It has, however, been cautioned that the above statement is not valid in cases in which heavy segregation occurs along the interdendritic boundaries resulting in heavily banded microstructure. This can result from faulty weld parameters such as excessive heat input. A second aging to recover the mechanical properties of the repaired zone has additional beneficial effects on tensile strengths and helps in maintaining fracture toughness to the original level of the initial weld.

  9. Hydrogen trapping in high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, B.G.

    1998-10-09

    Hydrogen trapping in three high-strength steels -- AerMet 100 and AISI 4340 and H11 -- was studied using a potentiostatic pulse technique. Irreversible trapping constants (k) and hydrogen entry fluxes were determined for these alloys in 1 mol/1 acetic acid/1 mol/1 sodium acetate. The order of the k values for the three steels and two 18Ni maraging steels previously studies inversely parallels their threshold stress intensities for stress corrosion cracking (K{sub 1SCC}). Irreversible trapping in AerMet 100 varies with aging temperature and appears to depend on the type of carbide (Fe{sub 3}C or M{sub 2}C) present. For 4340 steel, k can be correlated with K{sub 1SCC} over a range of yield strengths. The change in k is consistent with a change in the principal type of irreversible trap from matrix boundaries to incoherent Fe{sub 3}C. The principal irreversible traps in H11 at high yield strengths are thought to be similar to those in 4340 steel.

  10. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  11. Strength gradient enhances fatigue resistance of steels

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Gang; Wang, Hongtao; Wei, Yujie; Gao, Huajian

    2016-01-01

    Steels are heavily used in infrastructure and the transportation industry, and enhancing their fatigue resistance is a major challenge in materials engineering. In this study, by introducing a gradient microstructure into 304 austenitic steel, which is one of the most widely used types of stainless steel, we show that a strength gradient substantially enhances the fatigue life of the material. Pre-notched samples with negative strength gradients in front of the notch’s tip endure many more fatigue cycles than do samples with positive strength gradients during the crack initiation stage, and samples with either type of gradient perform better than do gradient-free samples with the same average yield strength. However, as a crack grows, samples with positive strength gradients exhibit better resistance to fatigue crack propagation than do samples with negative gradients or no gradient. This study demonstrates a simple and promising strategy for using gradient structures to enhance the fatigue resistance of materials and complements related studies of strength and ductility. PMID:26907708

  12. Preventive strength training improves working ergonomics during welding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Karsten; Petermann, Carmen; Pilat, Christian; Schubert, Emil; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Mooren, Frank C

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a preventive strength training program on cardiovascular, metabolic and muscular strains during welding. Welders are one of the occupation groups which typically have to work in extended forced postures which are known to be an important reason for musculoskeletal disorders. Subjects (exercise group) accomplished a 12-week strength training program, while another group served as controls (control group). Pre and post training examinations included the measurements of the one repetition maximum and an experimental welding test. Local muscle activities were analysed by surface electromyography. Furthermore, heart rate, blood pressure, lactate and rating of perceived exertion were examined. In the exercise group, strength training lead to a significant increase of one repetition maximum in all examined muscles (p<.05). During the experimental welding test muscle activities of trunk and shoulder muscles and arm muscles were significantly reduced in the exercise group after intervention (p<.05). While no changes of neither cardiovascular nor metabolic parameters were found, subjects of the exercise group rated a significantly decreased rate of perceived exertion welding (p<.05). Effects of strength training can be translated in an improved working ergonomics and tolerance against the exposure to high physical demands at work.

  13. Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils

    DOEpatents

    Leigh, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

  14. Modeling of Linear Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maran, P.; Sornakumar, T.; Sundararajan, T.

    2008-08-01

    A heat and fluid flow model has been developed to solve the gas tungsten arc (GTA) linear welding problem for austenitic stainless steel. The moving heat source problem associated with the electrode traverse has been simplified into an equivalent two-dimensional (2-D) transient problem. The torch residence time has been calculated from the arc diameter and torch speed. The mathematical formulation considers buoyancy, electromagnetic induction, and surface tension forces. The governing equations have been solved by the finite volume method. The temperature and velocity fields have been determined. The theoretical predictions for weld bead geometry are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  16. Microstructure characteristics of laser MIG hybrid welded mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Jun; Hu, Qianwu

    2008-07-01

    To deepen the understanding of laser-arc hybrid welding, the weld shape and microstructure characteristics of laser-metal inert gas hybrid welded mild steel were analyzed. The results showed typical hybrid weld could be classified as two parts: the wide upper zone and the narrow nether zone, which were defined as arc zone and laser zone, respectively. In the hybrid weld, the microstructure, alloy element distribution and microhardness all have evident difference between laser zone and arc zone. The microstructure of arc zone consists of coarse columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone is composed of fine equiaxed dendrite in weld center and columnar dendrite around the equiaxed dendrite. Compared to arc zone, laser zone has finer grain size, higher microhardness, smaller alloy element content in the fusion zone and narrower heat affected zone. The discussions demonstrated that the observed difference was caused by the difference of temperature gradient, crystallizing and the effects of arc pressure on the molten pool between laser zone and arc zone.

  17. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  18. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  19. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-11

    Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material...Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are...Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensiticstainless steel , linear friction welding, process modeling REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  20. 77 FR 39735 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines Determination On the basis...)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings From Italy... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4337 (June 2012), entitled Stainless Steel...

  1. 78 FR 21107 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey: Preliminary Results... carbon steel pipes and tubes from Turkey (pipes and tubes from Turkey) for the period of review (POR) of... welded carbon steel pipe and tube with an outside diameter of 0.375 inch or more, but not over 16...

  2. 77 FR 32539 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates: Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates.... Department of Commerce (the Department) preliminarily determines that circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe (certain steel pipe) from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is being, or is likely to be, sold in...

  3. 75 FR 973 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the... review covers one respondent, SeAH Steel Corporation (SeAH). We preliminarily determine that sales...

  4. 77 FR 19192 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Preliminary Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Preliminary Affirmative... being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular... Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and the...

  5. Polymer Welding and Self-healing: Strength Through Entanglements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2013-03-01

    Polymer interfaces are crucial in determining the mechanical strength of many systems. A common means of welding joints or self-healing cracks is to apply heat and allow polymers to interdiffuse. As the microscopic mechanism of interface strengthening is difficult to isolate experimentally, we probe the molecular origins of interfacial strength using large scale molecular simulations of welding and self-healing of cut systems. Systems are heated well above the glass temperature Tg and then quenched below Tg for mechanical testing. The interfacial strength is characterized by the maximum shear stress σmax before failure. As strength grows, the dominant failure mode changes from chain pullout at the interface to chain scission, as in the bulk. In all simulations, σmax saturates long before polymers diffuse by their own size. Bulk strength is observed for miscible welds, while strength is suppressed for cut systems due to short chain segments that remain near the interface. Entanglements are tracked using the Primitive Path Analysis. We find that the bulk response is not fully recovered until the density of entanglements at the interface reaches the bulk value. Moreover, the increase of σmax beforesaturationisproportionaltothenumberofinterfacial entanglements between chains from opposite sides, which correlates linearly with the interdiffusion depth. This material is based upon work supported by NSF Grant DMR-1006805 and DMR-0907390.

  6. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koji

    2002-01-01

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors. Chapter 1 reviews the mechanical properties of ultrahigh strength steels and the physical metallurgy of AerMet 100. It also describes the fracture mechanisms of steel, i.e. ductile microvoid coalescence, brittle transgranular cleavage, and intergranular separation. Chapter 2 examines the strength-toughness relationship for three heats of AerMet 100. A wide variation of toughness is obtained at the same strength level. The toughness varies despite the fact that all heat fracture in the ductile fracture mode. The difference originates from the inclusion content. Lower inclusion volume fraction and larger inclusion spacing gives rise to a greater void growth factor and subsequently a higher fracture toughness. The fracture toughness value, JIc, is proportional to the particle spacing of the large non-metallic inclusions. Chapter 3 examines the ductile-brittle transition of AerMet 100 and the effect of a higher austenitization temperature, using the Charpy V-notch test. The standard heat treatment condition of AerMet 100 shows a gradual ductile-brittle transition due to its fine effective grain size. Austenitization at higher temperature increases the prior austenite grain size and packet size, leading to a steeper transition at a higher temperature. Both transgranular cleavage and intergranular separation are observed in the brittle fracture mode. Chapter 4 examines the effect of inclusion content, prior austenite grain size, and the amount of austenite on the strength-toughness relationship. The highest toughness is achieved by low inclusion content, small prior austenite grain size

  7. Laser Welded versus Resistance Spot Welded Bone Implants: Analysis of the Thermal Increase and Strength

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Bonanini, Mauro; Lagori, Giuseppe; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Nammour, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The first aim of this “ex vivo split mouth” study was to compare the thermal elevation during the welding process of titanium bars to titanium implants inserted in pig jaws by a thermal camera and two thermocouples. The second aim was to compare the strength of the joints by a traction test with a dynamometer. Materials and Methods. Six pigs' jaws were used and three implants were placed on each side of them for a total of 36 fixtures. Twelve bars were connected to the abutments (each bar on three implants) by using, on one side, laser welding and, on the other, resistance spot welding. Temperature variations were recorded by thermocouples and by thermal camera while the strength of the welded joint was analyzed by a traction test. Results. For increasing temperature, means were 36.83 and 37.06, standard deviations 1.234 and 1.187, and P value 0.5763 (not significant). For traction test, means were 195.5 and 159.4, standard deviations 2.00 and 2.254, and P value 0.0001 (very significant). Conclusion. Laser welding was demonstrated to be able to connect titanium implant abutments without the risk of thermal increase into the bone and with good results in terms of mechanical strength. PMID:25110731

  8. Mechanical characteristics and microstructure of weld joint of high-temperature martensitic steel containing 9% Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Ya. E.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and mechanical characteristics of a weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel (0.097 C, 0.17.Si, 0.54 Mn, 8.75 Cr, 0.21 Ni, 0.51 Mo, 0.07 Nb, 0.23 V, 0.004 N, 0.003 B, 1.6 W, 0.15 Cu, and Fe for balance, wt %) have been studied; the joint was produced by hand welding in an argon atmosphere using 03Kh20N45M7G6B welding wire (0.3 C, 20 Cr, 45 Ni, 7 Mo, 6 Mn, and 1 Nb, wt %). The weld joint is divided into the zone of the base metal, a thermal effect zone, which consists of zones that contain fine and coarse original austenitic grains, and the zone of seam metal. It has been shown that the weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel possesses high strength characteristics at the room temperature under static loading and a satisfactorily impact toughness, which has the minimum value of 30 J/cm2 in the zone of the seam metal and does not depend on the temperature. With a decrease in the temperature from the room temperature to 253 K, a ductile-brittle transition occurs in the thermal effect zone. Creep tests carried out at the temperature of 923 K have shown that the long-term strength of the weld seam is lower than that of the base material in the entire stress range being tested. At stresses of 140 MPa or higher, the acceleration of creep in the weld seam is observed, while at low stresses of about 120 MPa, the rates of creep in the weld seam and in the base metal remain similar until the transition to the stage of accelerated fracture occurs. The difference in the values of the long-term strength is due to premature fracture, which occurs in the thermal effect zone with the finegrained structure.

  9. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  10. Selecting Processes to Minimize Hexavalent Chromium from Stainless Steel Welding

    PubMed Central

    KEANE, M.; SIERT, A.; STONE, S.; CHEN, B.; SLAVEN, J.; CUMPSTON, A.; ANTONINI, J.

    2015-01-01

    Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in stainless steel welding fumes. The processes examined were gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (axial spray, short circuit, and pulsed spray modes), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The Cr6+ fractions were measured in the fumes; fume generation rates, Cr6+ generation rates, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit mass of welding wire were determined. A limited controlled comparison study was done in a welding shop including SMAW, FCAW, and three GMAW methods. The processes studied were compared for costs, including relative labor costs. Results indicate the Cr6+ in the fume varied widely, from a low of 2800 to a high of 34,000 ppm. Generation rates of Cr6+ ranged from 69 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit of wire ranged from 1 to 270 μg/g. The results of field study were similar to the findings in the laboratory. The Cr6+ (ppm) in the fume did not necessarily correlate with the Cr6+ generation rate. Physical properties were similar for the processes, with mass median aerodynamic diameters ranging from 250 to 336 nm, while the FCAW and SMAW fumes were larger (360 and 670 nm, respectively). Conclusion: The pulsed axial spray method was the best choice of the processes studied based on minimal fume generation, minimal Cr6+ generation, and cost per weld. This method is usable in any position, has a high metal deposition rate, and is relatively simple to learn and use. PMID:26690276

  11. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  12. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  13. 76 FR 27987 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Amended Final... on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand, which covered Saha Thai Steel Pipe... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

  14. Relationship between apposition pressure during welding and tensile strength of the acute weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul J.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2001-05-01

    Dye-assisted photothermal welding is a technique used to close wounds by thermally cross-linking collagen across apposed tissue edges. For a successful weld, not only do laser parameters have to be optimized, but also apposition of the incision has to be consistent and controlled. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between the applied apposition pressure (i.e., the compressive force holding the wound closed during the welding procedure divided by the area of the skin-to-skin interface) and the tensile strength of the wound following the welding procedure. By using a clamping device made of two complementary pieces, each 3 cm wide with a row of 10 equally spaced blunt wire mesh tips, the apposition pressure along a 2-cm-long incision in each albino guinea pig was quantified using a 127-micrometers -thick load cell and varied from 0-1.8 kgf/cm2. A continuous wave, Nd:YAG laser emitting 10.0 W of 1.06-micrometers radiation from a 600-micrometers -diameter fiber irradiating a 5-mm-diameter spot size was scanned across the incision in order to deliver 300 J of total energy. As the apposition pressure of the incisions was increased, the resulting tensile strength of welded skin increased in a sigmoidal manner. For this welding technique, an apposition pressure of at least 1.2 kgf/cm2 is necessary to obtain maximum weld strength of the skin (2.56+/- 0.36 kg/cm2).

  15. Study of Residual Stresses and Distortion in Structural Weldments in High-Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-30

    and Cracking due to Stress Relieving Heat Treatment of HY80 Steel ", Welding in the World, 10 (1/2), 1972. -114- elastic-plastic and creep analysis...900°F (500C) is adequate. In these steels stress relief treatments are beneficial for the prevention of stress corrosion and reheat cracking . For...of * Contract NOO014-75-C-0469 (M.I.T. OSP #82558) STUDY OF RESIDUAL STRESSES AND DISTORTION IN - . -- ISTRUCTURAL WELT*IENTS IN HIGH-STRENGTH STEELS

  16. Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel: Procedure Development and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    2 Welding The material used in this study was quenched and tempered martensitic HY80 steel which conforms to MIL-S-1621 [2]. The testing...Canada Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel Proceedure Development and Testing Christopher Bayley DLP Neil Aucoin DLP Xinjin Cao NRC IAR AMTC Technical...Memorandum DRDC Atlantic TM 2009-187 September 2010 This page intentionally left blank. Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel Procedure

  17. Effect of Cryogenic Treatment on Sensitization of 304 Stainless Steel in TIG Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rupinder; Slathia, Ravinder Singh

    2016-04-01

    Stainless steel (SS) is sensitized by a thermal treatment in the range of 400-850 °C and inter-granular attack would occur upon subsequent exposure to certain media. In many practical situations, such as welding, sensitization is best studied by continuous cooling through the sensitizing temperature range wherein the variables are the peak temperature reached and the cooling rate in contrast to temperature and time of the isothermal hold which has been the customary practice. There are also various methods of controlling the inter-granular corrosion viz. lowering the carbon content, adding stabilizers and applying solution heat treatment but all these methods are either costly or difficult to apply. This study is focussed on the effect of cryogenically treated tungsten electrode of TIG welding on the sensitization behaviour of 304SS by taking into consideration the weld properties (like: hardness, tensile strength, percentage elongation and micro-structure). The parameters of significance are current, pulse frequency and gas flow rate. Further the study suggested that the results of non cryo treated electrode were better than the treated one on sensitization of welded joints during TIG welding within the range of selected parameters.

  18. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sang-Sub; Mun, Jae-Chul; Kim, Tae-Won; Kang, Chung-Gil

    2014-12-01

    In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  19. Microstructure and Strength Characteristics of Alloy 617 Welds

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; D.E. Clark; J.A. Simpson

    2005-06-01

    Three types of high-temperature joints were created from alloy 617 base metal: fusion welds, braze joints, and diffusion bonds. The microstructures of all joint types and tensile properties of fusion welds and braze joints were characterized. Sound fusion welds were created by the GTAW process with alloy 617 filler wire. Cross-weld tensile strengths were equal to the parent metal at temperatures of 25, 800, and 1000°C; ductilities of the joints were only slightly lower than that of the parent metal. Failure occurred in the weld fusion zone at room temperature and in the parent metal at elevated temperatures. Incomplete wetting occurred in joints produced by vacuum brazing using AWS BNi-1 braze alloy, believed to be due to tenacious Al and Ti oxide formation. Incompletely bonded butt joints showed relatively poor tensile properties. A second set of braze joints has been created with faying surfaces electroplated with pure Ni prior to brazing; characterization of these joints is in progress. Conditions resulting in good diffusion bonds characterized by grain growth across the bondline and no porosity were determined: vacuum bonding at 1150°C for 3 hours with an initial uniaxial stress of 20 MPa (constant ram displacement). A 15 µm thick pure Ni interlayer was needed to achieve grain growth across the bondline. Tensile testing of diffusion bonds is in progress

  20. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  1. Effects of water temperature on cracking of wet-welded carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    West, T.C.; Mitchell, W.E.; Murray, R.I.

    1996-10-01

    Industry generally accepts that carbon steel shielded metal arc welding electrodes can be used to wet-weld carbon steel base metals without incurring hydrogen-induced underbead cracking, as long as the carbon equivalent of the base metal is approximately 0.40 or less. At higher carbon equivalents, austenitic wet welding electrodes can be used to avoid such cracking. ANSI/AWS D3.6-93, Specification for Underwater Welding, lists both the carbon equivalent and carbon content as essential variables during wet welding procedure qualification. Since variations in water temperature might seem insignificant compared to typical electric welding arc temperatures, the specification omits water temperature as an essential variable during wet welding procedure qualification. However, recent welding procedure qualification testing, and follow-on evaluations, have shown that the water temperature does contribute to base metal cracking, if the carbon equivalent of the carbon steel (ASTM A516 Gr.70) base metal approaches 0.40.

  2. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding of Different Dissimilar Joints of Steel and Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, Oliver; Pfeifer, Ronny; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan

    Due to the enormous potential of weight saving, and the consequential reduction of pollutant emissions, the use of hybrid components made of steel and aluminum alloys is increasing steadily, especially concerning automotive lightweight construction. However, thermal joining of steel and aluminum is still being researched, due to a limited solubility of the binary system of iron and aluminum causing the formation of hard and brittle intermetallic phases, which decrease the strength and the formability of the dissimilar seam. The presented results show the investigation of laser beam welding for joining different dissimilar hybrid components of the steel materials HX220LAD+Z100, 22MnB5+AS150 and 1.4301, as well as the aluminum alloy AA6016-T4 as a lap joint. Among other things, the influences of the energy per unit length, the material grade, the sheet thickness t, the weld type (lap weld, fillet weld) and the arrangement of the base materials in a lap joint (aluminum-sided irradiation, steel-sided irradiation) on the achievable strengths are analyzed. The characterization of the dissimilar joints includes tensile shear tests and metallographic analyses, depending on the energy per unit length.

  3. Three-Dimensional Numerical Model Considering Phase Transformation in Friction Stir Welding of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hoon-Hwe; Kim, Dong-Wan; Hong, Sung-Tae; Jeong, Yong-Ha; Lee, Keunho; Cho, Yi-Gil; Kang, Suk Hoon; Han, Heung Nam

    2015-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-mechanical model is developed considering the phase transformation occurring during the friction stir welding (FSW) of steel, and the simulated result is compared with both the measured temperature distribution during FSW and the microstructural changes after FSW. The austenite grain size (AGS) decreases significantly because of the frictional heat and severe plastic deformation generated during FSW, and the decreased AGS accelerates the diffusional phase transformation during FSW. The ferrite phase, one of the diffusional phases, is developed mainly in mild steel, whereas the bainite phase transformation occurs significantly in high-strength steel with large hardenability. Additionally, transformation-induced heat is observed mainly in the stir zone during FSW. The measured temperature distribution and phase fraction agree fairly well with the predicted data.

  4. Room temperature crack growth rates and -20 deg F fracture toughness of welded 1 1/4 inch A-285 steel plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Rzasnicki, W.

    1977-01-01

    Data are presented which were developed in support of a structural assessment of NASA-LEWIS' 10-foot by 10-foot supersonic wind tunnel, critical portions of which are fabricated from rolled and welded 1 1/4 inch thick A-285 steel plate. Test material was flame cut from the tunnel wall and included longitudinal and circumferential weld joints. Parent metal, welds, and weld heat affected zone were tested. Tensile strength and fracture toughness were determined at -20 F, the estimated lowest tunnel operating temperature. Crack growth rates were measured at room temperature, where growth rates in service are expected to be highest.

  5. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  6. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  7. High Strength, Weldable Precipitation Aged Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alexander D.

    1987-03-01

    The family of plate steels represented by ASTM Specification A7101 is finding increasing applications. These low carbon, Cu-Ni-Cr-Mo-Cb, copper precipitation hardened steels have been identified by a number of designations over the years. During early development in the late 1960's and first commercial production in 1970, the steels were known as IN-787 (trademark of International Nickel Company).2 ASTM specifications were subsequently developed for structural (A710) and pressure vessel (A736) applications over ten years ago. More recent interest and application of this family of steels by the U.S. Navy has lead to development of a military specification MIL-S-24645 (SH),3 also initially known as "HSLA-80." Significant tonnage is being produced for the U.S. Navy as a replacement for HY80 (MIL-S-16216) in cruiser deck, bulkhead and hull applications.4 In these applications, the enhanced weldability and requirement of no preheat at this high strength and toughness level has been the main motivation for its use. Over the past 15 years, A710 type steels have also been used in a variety of applications, including off-shore platforms, pressure vessels, arctic linepipe valves and off-highway mining truck frames.

  8. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  9. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  10. Microstructure and Hardness Profiles of Bifocal Laser-Welded DP-HSLA Steel Overlap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajcar, A.; Matter, P.; Stano, S.; Wilk, Z.; Różański, M.

    2017-03-01

    The article presents results related to the bifocal laser welding of overlap joints made of HSLA and DP high-strength steels. The joints were made using a disk laser and a head enabling the 50-50% distribution of laser power. The effects of the laser welding rates and the distance between laser spots on morphological features and hardness profiles were analyzed. It was established that the positioning of beams at angles of 0° or 90° determined the hardness of the individual zones of the joints, without causing significant differences in microstructures of the steels. Microstructural features were inspected using scanning electron microscopy. Both steels revealed primarily martensitic-bainitic microstructures in the fusion zone and in the heat-affected zone. Mixed multiphase microstructures were revealed in the inter-critical heat-affected zone of the joint. The research involved the determination of parameters making it possible to reduce the hardness of joints and prevent the formation of the soft zone in the dual-phase steel.

  11. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  12. Influence of Zn Coating on Interfacial Reactions and Mechanical Properties During Laser Welding-Brazing of Mg to Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liqun; Tan, Caiwang; Chen, Yanbin; Guo, Wei; Hu, Xinbin

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the influence of Zn coating on the joining of magnesium alloy AZ31 to Zn-coated steel, dissimilar metal joining both with and without Zn coating was performed by the laser welding-brazing (LWB) process. Welding characteristics including joint appearance, identification of interfacial reaction layers, and mechanical properties were comparatively studied. The results indicated that the presence of Zn coating promoted the wetting of liquid filler wire on the steel substrate. Heterogeneous interfacial reaction layers formed along the interface between the Mg alloy and Zn-coated steel, whereas no distinct reaction layer and increased concentration of Al were identified at the interface between the Mg alloy and noncoated steel. The maximum tensile-shear strength of Mg/steel lap joint with Zn coating reached 180 N/mm, which was slightly higher than that achieved without Zn coating (160 N/mm). Failure of joint in both cases occurred at the interface; however, the fracture mode was found to differ. For Zn-coated steel, the crack propagated along the Mg-Zn reaction layer and Fe-Al phase, with little Mg-Zn reaction phases remaining on the steel side. As for noncoated steel, some remnants of the seam adhered to the steel substrate.

  13. Reduced-activation steels: Future development for improved creep strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.

    2008-08-01

    Reduced-activation steels for fusion applications were developed in the 1980s to replace the elevated-temperature commercial steels first considered. The new steels were patterned after the commercial steels, with the objective that the new steels have yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and impact toughness in a Charpy test comparable to or better than the steels they replaced. That objective was achieved in reduced-activation steels developed in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Although tensile and impact toughness of the reduced-activation steels exceed those of the commercial steels they were patterned after, their creep-rupture properties are inferior to some commercial steels they replaced. They are even more inferior to commercial steels developed since the 1980s. In this paper, compositional differences between reduced-activation steels and new commercial steels are examined, and compositions are proposed for development of new-and-improved reduced-activation steels.

  14. Microstructure and Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by PAW + GTAW Combined Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan

    2016-10-01

    The combined double-pass process of plasma arc welding (PAW) + gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was performed on 304 austenitic stainless steel with the thickness of 12 mm. Results indicated that two different morphologies of ferrite (e.g., lathy δ-ferrite and skeletal δ-ferrite) were formed within the austenite matrix in PAW weld metal (PAW-WM). GTAW weld metal (GTAW-WM) was mainly composed of fine austenite and skeletal δ-ferrite. In transition zone between PAW-WM and GTAW-WM, epitaxial growth contributed to cellular dendritic crystals transforming into columnar crystals. The tensile strength of joint is about 700 MPa. The impact toughness of WM varied from 281 J (20 °C) to 122 (-196 °C), while the impact toughness of heat-affected zone (HAZ) varied from 205 J (20 °C) to 112 J (-196 °C).

  15. Dissimilar Al/steel friction stir welding lap joints for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, D.; Spena, P. Russo; Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.

    2016-10-01

    A widespread usage of aluminum alloys for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with automotive steel grades. Dissimilar welding of aluminum alloys and steel grades poses some issues concerning the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, difference in physical and chemical properties of the parent metals, and poor wetting behavior of aluminum. Friction stir welding is considered to be a reasonable solution to obtain sound aluminum/steel joints. A study on the join quality of dissimilar lap joints of steel and aluminum alloy sheets after friction stir welding is proposed here. A low carbon steel is joined with AA6016 aluminum alloy to study preliminarily the feasibility to assembly car-body parts. The joints, welded with tool rotation and feed rate varying in a wide range, have been studied from a visual examination and microstructural point of view. Optical microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of the examined sheets in as-received and welded conditions. Micro-hardness measurements have been carried out to quantitatively analyze the local hardness of the welded joints. Set welding process parameters are identified to assemble without the presence of macroscopic defects the examined steel and aluminum welded parts.

  16. Type IV Creep Damage Behavior in Gr.91 Steel Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (ASME Grade 91 steel) is used as a key structural material for boiler components in ultra-supercritical (USC) thermal power plants at approximately 873 K (600 °C). The creep strength of welded joints of this steel decreases as a result of Type IV creep cracking that forms in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under long-term use at high temperatures. The current article aims to elucidate the damage processes and microstructural degradations that take place in the HAZ of these welded joints. Long-term creep tests for base metal, simulated HAZ, and welded joints were conducted at 823 K, 873 K, and 923 K (550 °C, 600 °C, and 650 °C). Furthermore, creep tests of thick welded joint specimens were interrupted at several time steps at 873 K (600 °C) and 90 MPa, after which the distribution and evolution of creep damage inside the plates were measured quantitatively. It was found that creep voids are initiated in the early stages (0.2 of life) of creep rupture life, which coalesce to form a crack at a later stage (0.8 of life). In a fine-grained HAZ, creep damage is concentrated chiefly in an area approximately 20 pct below the surface of the plate. The experimental creep damage distributions coincide closely with the computed results obtained by damage mechanics analysis using the creep properties of a simulated fine-grained HAZ. Both the concentration of creep strain and the high multiaxial stress conditions in the fine-grained HAZ influence the distribution of Type IV creep damage.

  17. 78 FR 72114 - Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Line Pipe From China; Institution of Five-Year Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Line Pipe From China; Institution of Five-Year Reviews AGENCY... welded carbon quality steel line pipe from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of... circular welded carbon quality steel line pipe from China (74 FR 4136). On May 13, 2009, the Department...

  18. 75 FR 60814 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand AGENCY... antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and... antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan,...

  19. 77 FR 5240 - Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... International Trade Administration Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Continuation... light-walled welded rectangular carbon steel tubing from Taiwan would likely lead to a continuation or... sunset review of the antidumping duty order \\1\\ on light-walled welded rectangular carbon steel...

  20. 78 FR 72863 - Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ...'') Review, 78 FR 33063 (June 3, 2013). \\2\\ See Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's... FR 60849 (October 2, 2013). \\3\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from China, 78 FR 70069... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of...

  1. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan... welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would likely lead to... published the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan.\\1\\...

  2. 76 FR 64106 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and... duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe (specifically ASTM A-312 pipe) from Korea and...

  3. 75 FR 27987 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final... welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea). This review covers one producer... antidumping duty order on WSSP from Korea. See Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes from the Republic of...

  4. 76 FR 63902 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of... preliminary results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan, 76 FR 33210 (June 8, 2011) (Preliminary Results)....

  5. 76 FR 66893 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand... antidumping duty orders on certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and... India, Thailand, and Turkey. See Antidumping Duty Order; Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes...

  6. 75 FR 62366 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  7. 77 FR 64473 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Sultanate of Oman: Final Affirmative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Sultanate of Oman: Final... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel... Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from the Sultanate of Oman: Preliminary Negative Countervailing...

  8. 77 FR 64465 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates: Final Affirmative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel...\\ \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates: Preliminary...

  9. 76 FR 78313 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam of circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe, provided for in... material injury by reason of LTFV and subsidized imports of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe...

  10. 75 FR 68327 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission... certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India. The period of review is May 1, 2009... initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel...

  11. 76 FR 5205 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand AGENCY... concerning the antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, China, Japan... whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from...

  12. 77 FR 46713 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey: Final Results of...) order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey for the January 1, 2010, through December... Results of Review'' section. \\1\\ See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey:...

  13. 75 FR 64696 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... preliminary results of administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular ] welded carbon steel... the antidumping duty order on pipes and tubes from Thailand. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  14. 76 FR 15941 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  15. 77 FR 8808 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  16. 77 FR 73015 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... conducting an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe... merchandise subject to the order is circular welded non-alloy steel pipe and tube. The product is...

  17. 76 FR 14649 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Extension of Time... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico for the November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009, period of review. See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results...

  18. 75 FR 20342 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of... antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

  19. 75 FR 69626 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative... review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India... duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India. See Certain...

  20. 75 FR 70723 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Partial... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The review covers two firms: Yieh Phui Enterprise... the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan covering...

  1. 76 FR 77480 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of... of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The period... the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan covering...

  2. 76 FR 78886 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Intent To Rescind Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Intent To... the countervailing duty (CVD) order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey. See... products covered by this order are certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube with an outside diameter of...

  3. 77 FR 6542 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of... of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey for... the preliminary decision. See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube from Turkey:...

  4. 76 FR 64900 - Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Final Results of Expedited...) initiated a sunset review of the countervailing duty order (CVD) on welded carbon steel pipe and tube from... CVD order on welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey was published in the Federal Register...

  5. 75 FR 28557 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time... antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Preliminary Results and Rescission, in Part, of...

  6. 75 FR 4529 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes (pipes and tubes) from Thailand. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review, 74...

  7. 77 FR 55807 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Partial... welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The review covers four respondents. Based on a... welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan covering the period May 1, 2011, through April 30,...

  8. 77 FR 72818 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Turkey.\\1\\ This review covers four producers and... section entitled ``Final Results of Review.'' \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes...

  9. 76 FR 44304 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Amended Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Amended..., 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the... during the period of review. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of...

  10. 75 FR 76025 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead...

  11. 78 FR 21105 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary... tubes from Thailand. This review covers two producers/exporters of the subject merchandise, Saha Thai... The products covered by the antidumping order are certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and...

  12. 78 FR 49255 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Partial... certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The period of review (POR) is May 1... pipes and tubes from Taiwan covering the period May 1, 2012, through April 30, 2013.\\1\\ The...

  13. 78 FR 34335 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Preliminary... pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The period of review (POR) is May 1, 2011, through April 30, 2012, and the... is certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The product is...

  14. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  15. Occupational asthma due to gas metal arc welding on mild steel.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O.; Dargent, F.; Auverdin, J. J.; Boulanger, J.; Bossiroy, J. M.; Roosels, D.; Vande Weyer, R.

    1995-01-01

    Occupational asthma has been documented in electric arc welders exposed to manual metal arc welding on stainless steel. A subject is described who developed late and dual asthmatic reactions after occupational-type challenge exposure to gas metal arc welding on uncoated mild steel. PMID:7597679

  16. Partially degradable friction-welded pure iron-stainless steel 316L bone pin.

    PubMed

    Nasution, A K; Murni, N S; Sing, N B; Idris, M H; Hermawan, H

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of a partially degradable metal bone pin, proposed to minimize the occurrence of bone refracture by avoiding the creation of holes in the bone after pin removal procedure. The pin was made by friction welding and composed of two parts: the degradable part that remains in the bone and the nondegradable part that will be removed as usual. Rods of stainless steel 316L (nondegradable) and pure iron (degradable) were friction welded at the optimum parameters: forging pressure = 33.2 kPa, friction time = 25 s, burn-off length = 15 mm, and heat input = 4.58 J/s. The optimum tensile strength and elongation was registered at 666 MPa and 13%, respectively. A spiral defect formation was identified as the cause for the ductile fracture of the weld joint. A 40-µm wide intermetallic zone was identified along the fusion line having a distinct composition of Cr, Ni, and Mo. The corrosion rate of the pin gradually decreased from the undeformed zone of pure iron to the undeformed zone of stainless steel 316L. All metallurgical zones of the pin showed no toxic effect toward normal human osteoblast cells, confirming the ppb level of released Cr and Ni detected in the cell media were tolerable.

  17. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

  18. Nine percent nickel steel heavy forging weld repair study. [National Transonic Wind Tunnel fan components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P., Jr.; Gerringer, A. H.; Brooks, T. G.; Berry, R. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of making weld repairs on heavy section 9% nickel steel forgings such as those being manufactured for the National Transonic Facility fan disk and fan drive shaft components was evaluated. Results indicate that 9% nickel steel in heavy forgings has very good weldability characteristics for the particular weld rod and weld procedures used. A comparison of data for known similar work is included.

  19. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  20. Oxide Evolution in ODS Steel Resulting From Friction Stir Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Master’s Thesis 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE OXIDE EVOLUTION IN ODS STEEL RESULTING FROM FRICTION STIR WELDING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6 . AUTHOR(S...temperatures, from [5]. ........... 6   Figure 4 .  The phase diagram for aluminum and yttrium oxide, from [13]. ......................8  Figure 5...millimeters per minute. FSW Conditions RPM IPM MMPM Heat Index 400 7 175 2.3 300 4 100 3 200 2 50 4 400 4 100 4 300 2 50 6 400 2 50 8 500 1 25

  1. Variable amplitude corrosion fatigue and fracture mechanics of weldable high strength jack-up steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etube, Linus Sone

    The tubular welded joints used in the construction of Offshore structures can experience millions of variable amplitude wave induced stress cycles during their operational life. Fatigue has been identified as the main cause of degradation of structural integrity in these structures. As a result, fatigue is an important consideration in their design. Jack-up legs are made from a range of high strength steels with yield strengths up to TOOMPa. These steels are thought to exhibit fatigue resistance properties which are different when compared with conventional fixed platform steels such as BS 4360 50D and BS 7191 355D. The difference in their behaviour was heightened by the discovery, in the late 80s and early 90s, of extensive cracking around the spud can regions of several Jack-ups operating in the North Sea. It was thought that these steels may be more susceptible to hydrogen cracking and embrittlement. There was the additional requirement to study their behaviour under realistic loading conditions typical of the North Sea environment. This thesis contains results of an investigation undertaken to assess the performance of a typical high strength weldable Jack-up steel under realistic loading and environmental conditions. Details of the methodology employed to develop a typical Jack-up Offshore Standard load History (JOSH) are presented. The factors which influence fatigue resistance of structural steels used in the construction of Jack-up structures are highlighted. The methods used to model the relevant factors for inclusion in JOSH are presented with particular emphasis on loading and structural response interaction. Results and details of experimental variable amplitude corrosion fatigue (VACF) tests conducted using JOSH are reported and discussed with respect to crack growth mechanisms in high strength weldable Jack-up steels. Different fracture mechanics models for VACF crack growth prediction are compared and an improved generalised methodology for fast

  2. The Bendability of Ultra High strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, S. K.; Efthymiadis, P.; Alamoudi, A.; Kumar, R. L. V.; Shollock, B.; Dashwood, R.

    2016-08-01

    Automotive manufacturers have been reducing the weight of their vehicles to meet increasingly stringent environmental legislation that reflects public demand. A strategy is to use higher strength materials for parts with reduced cross-sections. However, such materials are less formable than traditional grades. The frequent result is increased processing and piece costs. 3D roll forming is a novel and flexible process: it is estimated that a quarter of the structure of a vehicle can be made with a single set of tooling. Unlike stamping, this process requires material with low work hardening rates. In this paper, we present results of ultra high strength steels that have low elongation in a tension but display high formability in bending through the suppression of the necking response.

  3. Comparative Structural Strength Research of Hardened Carbon Steel and Hot-Rolled Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Zhakupov, A. N.; Kanayev, A. T.; Sikach, I. A.; Tugumov, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on quantitative evaluation of fatigue strength showed that St5ps and St5sp carbon steels with A400 strength class can be fully applied for erection of constructions and buildings having cyclical loads during operation. Study of corrosion resistance of hardened carbon steel in comparison with hot-rolled alloy steel consists in difference in structures and hence, difference in intensity of electric and chemical processes featuring presence of steel in concrete. Structure of St5sp steel with A400 strength class in surface area has significantly less corrosion rate than ferritic-perlitic structure of 35GS steel with A400 strength class.

  4. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation deals in detail with the three recognized stages of plastic fracture in high strength steels, namely, void initiation, void growth, and void coalescence. The particular steels under investigation include plates from both commercial purity and high purity heats of AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steels. A scanning electron microscope equipped with an X-ray energy dispersive analyzer, together with observations made using light microscopy, revealed methods of improving the resistance of high strength steels to plastic fracture.

  5. A Nondestructive Evaluation Method: Measuring the Fixed Strength of Spot-Welded Joint Points by Surface Electrical Resistivity.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Keitaro; Inoue, Hirofumi; Yang, Sung-Mo; Iwata, Masahiro; Ike, Natsuko

    2013-04-01

    Destructive tests are generally applied to evaluate the fixed strength of spot-welding nuggets of zinc-plated steel (which is a widely used primary structural material for automobiles). These destructive tests, however, are expensive and time-consuming. This paper proposes a nondestructive method for evaluating the fixed strength of the welded joints using surface electrical resistance. A direct current nugget-tester and probes have been developed by the authors for this purpose. The proposed nondestructive method uses the relative decrease in surface electrical resistance, α. The proposed method also considers the effect of the corona bond. The nugget diameter is estimated by two factors: RQuota, which is calculated from variation of resistance, and a constant that represents the area of the corona bond. Since the maximum tensile strength is correlated with the nugget diameter, it can be inferred from the estimated nugget diameter. When appropriate measuring conditions for the surface electrical resistance are chosen, the proposed method can effectively evaluate the fixed strength of the spot-welded joints even if the steel sheet is zinc-plated.

  6. Welding fabrication defects in two offshore steel jacket structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thurlbeck, S.D.; Stacey, A.; Sharp, J.V.; Nichols, N.W.

    1996-12-01

    The results of a survey of welding fabrication defects in two North Sea jacket structures fabricated in the mid 1980`s and the early 1990`s are presented in this paper. The results were used to assess the general defectiveness of the two structures. Information was collected from the initial fabrication inspections and the post-repair inspections. The defects were classified as reportable defects, which remain unrepaired, and repairable defects, which are repaired and re-inspected. The data showed that the defects were exclusively embedded defects or root defects which were detected by ultrasonic and radiographic methods respectively. No surface breaking defects were reported from the magnetic particle inspections. The data were used to determine incidence rates, expressed in terms of the length of defective weld, distributions of defect sizes and the number of defective welds. The results can be used in the consideration of fabrication inspection capability and construction standards, as well as to obtain a measure of the level of reportable defects which remain un-repaired in a steel jacket.

  7. Detailed Microstructural Characterization and Restoration Mechanisms of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel Friction-Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, T. F. A.; Torres, E. A.; Lippold, J. C.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Duplex stainless steels are successfully used in a wide variety of applications in areas such as the food industry, petrochemical installations, and sea water desalination plants, where high corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength are required. However, during fusion welding operations, there can be changes to the favorable microstructure of these materials that compromise their performance. Friction stir welding with a non-consumable pin enables welded joints to be obtained in the solid state, which avoids typical problems associated with solidification of the molten pool, such as segregation of alloying elements and the formation of solidification and liquefaction cracks. In the case of superduplex stainless steels, use of the technique can avoid unbalanced proportions of ferrite and austenite, formation of deleterious second phases, or growth of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone. Consolidated joints with full penetration were obtained for 6-mm-thick plates of UNS S32101 and S32205 duplex stainless steels, and S32750 and S32760 superduplex steels. The welding heat cycles employed avoided the conditions required for formation of deleterious phases, except in the case of the welded joint of the S32760 steel, where SEM images indicated the formation of secondary phases, as corroborated by decreased mechanical performance. Analysis using EBSD and transmission electron microscopy revealed continuous dynamic recrystallization by the formation of cellular arrays of dislocations in the ferrite and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in the austenite. Microtexture evaluation indicated the presence of fibers typical of shear in the thermomechanically affected zone. These fibers were not obviously present in the stir zone, probably due to the intensity of microstructural reformulation to which this region was subjected.

  8. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  9. Review of Fillet Weld Strength Parameters for Shipbuilding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-ACED 356M ASSACHUJSETTS INST OF TECH CAMRaIDOS DEPT OF OCEAN E-EcTC Pft 13110 REVIEW OF FILLET WELD STREMOYN PARAMETERS FOR SHIPSUILOINS. RU) FES...hours are devoted to welding . A further analysis indicated that 75 percent of the welded joints were fillet welded . Inasmuch as the requirements of...fillet weld sizes have not been revised for many years, the Ship Structure Committee considered a review and analysis of current marine fillet weld

  10. Impact Welding of Aluminum to Copper and Stainless Steel by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: Effect of Heat Treatment Cycles on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Anupam; Hansen, Steven; Benzing, Jake; He, Mei; Daehn, Glenn

    2015-10-01

    This work studies the mechanical property effect of microstructure on impact welds of aluminum alloy AA6061 with both copper alloy Cu 110 and stainless steel AISI 304. AA6061-T6 and T4 temper aluminum sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched toward copper and stainless steel targets using the vaporizing foil actuator technique. Flyer plate velocities, measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, were observed to be approximately 800 m/s. The welded aluminum-copper samples were subjected to instrumented peel testing, microhardness testing, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The welded joints exhibited cracks through their continuous intermetallic layers. The cracks were impeded upon encountering a ductile metallic wave. The welds created with T6 temper flyer sheets were found to have smaller intermetallic-free and wavy interface regions as compared to those created with T4 temper flyer sheets. Peel strength tests of the two weld combinations resulted in failure along the interface in the case of the T6 flyer welds, while the failure generally occurred in the parent aluminum for the T4 temper flyer welds. Half of the T4 flyer welds were subjected to aging for 18 h at 433 K (160 °C) to convert the aluminum sheet to the T6 condition. Although the aged flyer material did not attain the hardness of the as-received T6 material, it was found to be significantly stronger than the T4 material. These welds retained their strength after the aging process, and diffusion across the interface was minimal. The welded aluminum-stainless steel samples were analyzed on a more basic level than aluminum-copper samples, but were found to exhibit similar results.

  11. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    DOE PAGES

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; ...

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stirmore » zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.« less

  12. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  13. Effect of adherend steel strength on static and fatigue strength of adhesive/rivet combined joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Makoto; Haraga, Kosuke; Nishikawa, Tetsuya

    1992-02-01

    Adhesive/rivet combined bonding has attracted special interest recently as a joining technique of high-strength steel because of its high joint efficiency. In this study, the effects of steel strength on the tensile and fatigue strength of adhesive/rivet combined and adhesive joints were investigated. In addition, the stress distributions of these joints were analyzed by finite-element methods, taking into consideration the plastic deformation of adherend steels. With the increase of steel strength, the tensile strength of combined and adhesive joints increased and tensile strength was improved by the combination with the rivet. However, irrespective of the steel strength, the fatigue strength of combined and adhesive joints was constant and the fatigue strength of the combined joint was similar to that of the adhesive joint. These findings could be explained from the difference of stress distribution between static and fatigue load conditions.

  14. Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chapman, Rebecca; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Welding generates complex metal fumes that vary in composition. The objectives of this study were to compare the persistence of deposited metals and the inflammatory potential of stainless and mild steel welding fumes, the two most common fumes used in US industry. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 mg/m(3) of stainless or mild steel welding fumes for 3 h/day for 3 days. Controls were exposed to filtered air. Generated fume was collected, and particle size and elemental composition were determined. Bronchoalveolar lavage was done on days 0, 8, 21, and 42 after the last exposure to assess lung injury/inflammation and to recover lung phagocytes. Non-lavaged lung samples were analyzed for total and specific metal content as a measure of metal persistence. Both welding fumes were similar in particle morphology and size. Following was the chemical composition of the fumes-stainless steel: 57% Fe, 20% Cr, 14% Mn, and 9% Ni; mild steel: 83% Fe and 15% Mn. There was no effect of the mild steel fume on lung injury/inflammation at any time point compared to air control. Lung injury and inflammation were significantly elevated at 8 and 21 days after exposure to the stainless steel fume compared to control. Stainless steel fume exposure was associated with greater recovery of welding fume-laden macrophages from the lungs at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. A higher concentration of total metal was observed in the lungs of the stainless steel welding fume at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. The specific metals present in the two fumes were cleared from the lungs at different rates. The potentially more toxic metals (e.g., Mn, Cr) present in the stainless steel fume were cleared from the lungs more quickly than Fe, likely increasing their translocation from the respiratory system to other organs.

  15. Technical note: Preliminary results on underwater laser beam welding of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.J.; Watson, J.; Deans, W.F. . Dept. of Engineering); Nuttall, R. )

    1994-07-01

    An investigation is underway at The University of Aberdeen using a high-power carbon dioxide laser for direct underwater butt joint welding of steels to assess the quality of welds compared to in-air laser welds. This preliminary work forms part of a general study of the application of laser beam welding and cutting within the offshore oil and gas industry. To this end, the feasibility of laser beam welding in both direct wet conditions and in dry hyperbaric conditions is being explored. Considerable advantages may lie in the remote direct wet repair of pipelines and structural members in terms of convenience, low cost and freedom from diver intervention. The laser beam welding mechanism, being fundamentally different from arc welding processes, may be able to overcome the normal problems of weld embrittlement and porosity when wet welding is attempted. In the current work, the primary concern is with the butt joint welding of steel plate without a filler metal. This technical note provides a comparison of underwater and in-air weld characteristics for fully penetrating butt joint welds, and provides an insight into the propagation characteristics of a high-power beam in water. The effect of increasing water depth is also investigated.

  16. Optimization of process parameters of pulsed TIG welded maraging steel C300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, P.; Jualeash, M. J.; Jishnu, J.; Srinivasan, P.; Arivarasu, M.; Padmanaban, R.; Thirumalini, S.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed TIG welding technology provides excellent welding performance on thin sections which helps to increase productivity, enhance weld quality, minimize weld costs, and boost operator efficiency and this has drawn the attention of the welding society. Maraging C300 steel is extensively used in defence and aerospace industry and thus its welding becomes an area of paramount importance. In pulsed TIG welding, weld quality depends on the process parameters used. In this work, Pulsed TIG bead-on-plate welding is performed on a 5mm thick maraging C300 plate at different combinations of input parameters: peak current (Ip), base current (Ib) and pulsing frequency (HZ) as per box behnken design with three-levels for each factor. Response surface methodology is utilized for establishing a mathematical model for predicting the weld bead depth. The effect of Ip, Ib and HZ on the weld bead depth is investigated using the developed model. The weld bead depth is found to be affected by all the three parameters. Surface and contour plots developed from regression equation are used to optimize the processing parameters for maximizing the weld bead depth. Optimum values of Ip, Ib and HZ are obtained as 259 A, 120 A and 8 Hz respectively. Using this optimum condition, maximum bead depth of the weld is predicted to be 4.325 mm.

  17. Thermomechanical history measurements on Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Turpin, R.; West, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    Thermal and strain histories were recorded for three 40-cm-diameter (16 inch), Type 304L stainless steel (SS), schedule 40 (1.27 cm thickness) pipe girth welds. Two weld groove preparations were standard V grooves while the third was a narrow groove configuration. The welding parameters for the three pipe welds simulated expected field practice as closely as possible. The narrow gap weld was completed in four continuous passes while the other two welds required six and nine (discontinuous) passes, due to the use of different weld wire diameters. Thermomechanical history measurements were taken on the inner counterbore surface, encompassing the weld centerline and heat-affected zone (HAZ), as well as 10 cm of inner counterbore surface on either side of the weld centerline; a total of 47 data acquisition instruments were used for each weld. These instruments monitored: (1) weld shrinkages parallel to the pipe axis; (2) surface temperatures; (3) surface strains parallel to weld centerline; and (4) radial deformations. Results show that the weld and HAZ experienced cyclic deformation in the radial direction during welding, indicating that the final residual stress distribution in multi-pass pipe weldments is not axisymmetric. Measured radial and axial deformations were smaller for the narrow gap groove than for the standard V grooves, suggesting that the narrow gap groove weldment may have lower residual stress levels than the standard V groove weldments. This study provides the experimental database and a guideline for further computational modeling work.

  18. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. The Influence of TIG Welding Thermal Cycles on HSLA-100 Steel Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    THERMAL CYCLES ON HSLA-100 STEEL PLATE Alan G. Fox Sanjiwan D. Bhole November 1993 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Prepared for...Cycles on HSLA-100 Steel Plate I. AUTHOR(S) N00167-93-WR-30331 Alan G3. Fox and Sanjiwan D. Bhole 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION MAMES(S) AND ADORESS(ES...welds were performed on U.S. Navy HSLA-100 steel . Power variations in these welds was achieved by altering the welding speed, voltage and current and

  20. Reliable Welding of HSLA Steels by Square Wave Pulsing Using an Advanced Sensing (EDAP) Technique.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-30

    situation is the result of welding on A710 steel . (A similar effect on welding on HY80 ?) The following is offered by Woods and Milner (Ref. 12): "The...AD-R69 762 RELIABLE MELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE MAVE PULSING 1/2 USING AN ADV NCED.. (U) APPLIED FUSION TECHNOLOGIES INC FORT COLLINS CO C...6 p . 0 Report 0001 AZ AD-A 168 762 I "RELIABLE WELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE WAVE PULSING USING AN ADVANCED SENSING (EDAP) TECHNIQUE- Preliminary

  1. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  2. Sample preparation method for glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses yields higher seam strength

    SciTech Connect

    Cvecek, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Strauss, J.; Wolf, M.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-05-01

    Glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses allows joining without the need of an absorber or a preheating and postheating process. However, cracks generated during the welding process substantially impair the joining strength of the welding seams. In this paper a sample preparation method is described that prevents the formation of cracks. The measured joining strength of samples prepared by this method is substantially higher than previously reported values.

  3. 77 FR 36256 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Postponement of Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Postponement of Final... investigation on circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe from India.\\1\\ On June 1, 2012, the Department... antidumping duty investigation is currently due on August 6, 2012. \\1\\ See Circular Welded...

  4. 76 FR 78612 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission... certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India. The period of review is May 1, 2010... notice of initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded...

  5. 76 FR 52636 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial... the antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``circular welded...

  6. 76 FR 21331 - Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the People...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... order consists of certain carbon steel butt-weld type fittings, other than couplings, under 14 inches in... consists of certain carbon steel butt-weld type fittings, other than couplings, under 14 inches in inside...-weld type fittings, other than couplings, under 14 inches in inside diameter, whether finished...

  7. Formability Characterization of a New Generation High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram Sadagopan; Dennis Urban; Chris Wong; Mai Huang; Benda Yan

    2003-05-16

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are being progressively explored by the automotive industry all around the world for cost-effective solutions to accomplish vehicle lightweighting, improve fuel economy, and consequently reduce greenhouse emissions. Because of their inherent high strength, attractive crash energy management properties, and good formability, the effective use of AHSS such as Duel Phase and TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels, will significantly contribute to vehicle lightweighting and fuel economy. To further the application of these steels in automotive body and structural parts, a good knowledge and experience base must be developed regarding the press formability of these materials. This project provides data on relevant intrinsic mechanical behavior, splitting limits, and springback behavior of several lots of mild steel, conventional high strength steel (HSS), advanced high strength steel (AHSS) and ultra-high strength steel (UHSS), supplied by the member companies of the Automotive Applications Committee (AAC) of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Two lots of TRIP600, which were supplied by ThyssenKrupp Stahl, were also included in the study. Since sheet metal forming encompasses a very diverse range of forming processes and deformation modes, a number of simulative tests were used to characterize the forming behavior of these steel grades. In general, it was found that formability, as determined by the different tests, decreased with increased tensile strength. Consistant with previous findings, the formability of TRIP600 was found to be exceptionally good for its tensile strength.

  8. Nickel-based alloy/austenitic stainless steel dissimilar weld properties prediction on asymmetric distribution of laser energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Siyu; Ma, Guangyi; Chai, Dongsheng; Niu, Fangyong; Dong, Jinfei; Wu, Dongjiang; Zou, Helin

    2016-07-01

    A properties prediction method of Nickel-based alloy (C-276)/austenitic stainless steel (304) dissimilar weld was proposed and validated based on the asymmetric distribution of laser energy. Via the dilution level DC-276 (the ratio of the melted C-276 alloy), the relations between the weld properties and the energy offset ratio EC-276 (the ratio of the irradiated energy on the C-276 alloy) were built, and the effects of EC-276 on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds were analyzed. The element distribution Cweld and EC-276 accorded with the lever rule due to the strong convention of the molten pool. Based on the lever rule, it could be predicted that the microstructure mostly consists of γ phase in each weld, the δ-ferrite phase formation was inhibited and the intermetallic phase (P, μ) formation was promoted with the increase of EC-276. The ultimate tensile strength σb of the weld joint could be predicted by the monotonically increasing cubic polynomial model stemming from the strengthening of elements Mo and W. The corrosion potential U, corrosion current density I in the active region and EC-276 also met the cubic polynomial equations, and the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar weld was enhanced with the increasing EC-276, mainly because the element Mo could help form a steady passive film which will resist the Cl- ingress.

  9. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the plastic fracture process to improve tensile strength in high strength steels is presented. Two generic types of steels are considered: a quenched and tempered grade and a maraging grade, in order to compare two different matrix microstructures. Each type of steel was studied in commercial grade purity and in special melted high purity form, low in residual and impurity elements. The specific alloys dealt with include AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steel, both heat treated to the same yield strength level of approximately 200 ksi.

  10. Research on key influence factors of laser overlap welding of automobile body galvanized steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genyu; Mei, Lifang; Zhang, Mingjun; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Zujian

    2013-02-01

    In views of structure characteristics of the auto-body parts, the influences of the beam incident angle and joint gap on the performance of laser overlap welded joints were investigated. The experimental results indicate that there were the critical values of beam incident angle and joint gap during laser overlap welding of galvanized steel. The thickness of sheet and the width of joint had a certain influence on the critical beam incident angle and the limit joint gap. With regard to thicker sheet, the limit joint gap can increase appropriately, but the critical beam incident angle should not be too big. With narrow weld width, the laser beam incident angle can increase appropriately, but the joint gap should not be bigger. Additionally, the critical beam incident angle and the limit joint gap were varied with the thickness of the upper sheet. The tensile-shear tests show that the maximum tensile-shear strength of the joint can be obtained with an optimized beam incident angle and joint gap.

  11. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Dissimilar Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Using Copper Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding with Cu3Si filler wire was employed to join dissimilar Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and AISI316 stainless steel (316SS). The effects of welding parameters on bead shape, microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior were investigated in detail. The results show that cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 212 MPa. In the joint, obvious nonuniformity of the microstructure is found in the fusion zone (FZ) and at the interfaces from the top to the bottom, which could be improved by increasing heat input. For the homogeneous joint, the FZ is characterized by Fe67- x Si x Ti33 dendrites spreading on α-Cu matrix, and the two interfaces of 316SS/FZ and FZ/Ti6Al4V are characterized by a bamboo-like 316SS layer and a CuTi2 layer, respectively. All the tensile samples fractured in the hardest CuTi2 layer at Ti6Al4V side of the joints. The fracture surface is characterized by river pattern revealing brittle cleavage fracture. The bead formation mechanisms were discussed according to the melt flow and the thermodynamic calculation.

  12. The limit of strength and toughness of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhen

    2001-12-01

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the governing principles of strength and toughness, along with the approaches that can be used to improve these properties and the inherent limits to how strong and tough a steel can be.

  13. Microstructural Effects on the Mechanical Integrity of a TRIP-800 Steel Welded by Laser-CO2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Medina, G. Y.; López, H. F.; Zambrano, P.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, a TRIP-800 steel was welded using a Laser CO2 process, and the resultant microstructures were characterized by optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) means. It was found that the microstructure of the steel in the as-received condition consisted of ferrite, bainite, and retained austenite (RA), including some martensite. In particular, TEM observations indicated that the developed martensites were high carbon twinned martensites. It was found that laser beam welding (LBW) promoted the development of up to 23% martensite in the fusion zone (FZ) and up to 30% in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In addition, determinations of RA using x-ray diffraction indicated that the amount of RA developed in the FZ was relatively small (<6%). Confirmation for the relatively large amounts of martensite in both the FZ and HAZ was indirectly made by the shape of microhardness profiles, which resembled a "top hat." Tensile testing in welded strips indicated a loss of strength and ductility. An examination of the fracture surfaces indicated that the steel fractured in a brittle fashion at the HAZ-BM interface. Apparently, the development of relatively large amounts of martensite in the HAZ reduced the steel toughness. In turn, this indicated that LBW leads to martensite embrittlement in the HAZ regions, but not at the parting line of the FZ.

  14. The structure and properties of filler metal-free laser beam welded joints in steel S700MC subjected to TMCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górka, Jacek; Stano, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The research-related tests aimed to determine the effect of filer-metal free laser beam welding on the structure and properties of 10 mm thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP). The nondestructive tests revealed that the welded joints represented quality level B according to the requirements of standard 13919-1. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The tests of thin foils performed using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope revealed that filler metal-free welding led to the increased amount of alloying microagents (Ti and Nb) in the weld (particularly near fusion line) in comparison with welding performed using a filler metal. The significant content of hardening phases in the welds during cooling resulted in considerable precipitation hardening through finedispersive (Ti,Nb)(C,N) type precipitates (several nm in size) leading to the deterioration of plastic properties. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The increase in the concentration of microagents responsible for steel hardening (Ti and Nb) also contributed to the decrease in weld toughness being below the allowed value of 25 J/cm2.

  15. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  16. Microsegregation in high-molybdenum austenitic stainless steel laser beam and gas tungsten arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kujanpaeae, V.P.; David, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel with 6% molybdenum (thickness 6 mm) was welded using laser beam (LB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes at various welding speeds. Depending on the welding speed the primary dendrite spacing ranged from 12 to 17 ..mu..m and from 2 to 7 ..mu..m for the GTA and LB welds, respectively. Extensive segregation of molybdenum was observed in the GTA welds. The segregation ratio for molybdenum, C/sub ID//C/sub D/, was found to be 1.9 in the GTA weld, and 1.2 in the LB weld. Distribution of iron, chromium and nickel was found nearly uniform in both welds. A recovered microstructure was observed after a post-weld annealing heat treatment. Annealing had a profound effect on the molybdenum segregation ratio in the laser weld. The critical pitting temperature (CPT) determined by a standard test was 55/sup 0/C for welds made using both processes, whereas it was 75/sup 0/C for the base metal. Upon homogenization the CPT of the laser beam weld increased to the base metal value, while that of the gas tungsten arc weld remained at 60/sup 0/C.

  17. Effect of preheat on residual stress distributions in arc-welded mild steel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Adedayo, S.M.; Adeyemi, M.B.

    2000-02-01

    Residual stress distribution in the longitudinal and transverse directions on a 6-mm-thick arc-welded mild steel plate was experimentally examined with and without initial preheat. Stress measurements were completed by monitoring strain changes on mounted strain gauges resulting from successive milling of the welded plate specimens. Machining stresses were also compensated for by carrying out measurements of strain changes due to milling operation of a stress-free unwelded annealed mild steel plate. High tensile residual stresses exist close to the weld line in both longitudinal and transverse stresses. Maximum longitudinal residual stress values existing close to the weld line are reduced (between 50 and 75%) due to the effect of initial metal preheat of 200 C of the welded steel plate.

  18. Adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Brandelli, Adriano; de Oliveira Casarin, Fabrício; Soave, Paulo Azevedo; Wanke, Cesar Henrique; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2014-11-17

    Pathogenic microorganisms are able to adhere on equipment surfaces, being possible to contaminate food during processing. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important pathogens that can be transmitted by food, causing severe foodborne diseases. Most surfaces of food processing industry are made of stainless steel joined by welds. However currently, there are few studies evaluating the influence of welds in the microorganism's adhesion. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes on surface of metal inert gas (MIG), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, as well as to evaluate the cell and surface hydrophobicities. Results demonstrated that both bacteria adhered to the surface of welds and stainless steel at same levels. Despite this, bacteria and surfaces demonstrated different levels of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, results indicated that there was no correlation between adhesion to welds and stainless steel and the hydrophobicity.

  19. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Development of Appropriate Resistance Spot Welding Practice for Transformation-Hardened Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Chuko; Jerry Gould

    2002-07-08

    This report describes work accomplished in the project, titled ''Development of Appropriate Resistance Spot Welding Practice for Transformation-Hardened Steels.'' The Phase 1 of the program involved development of in-situ temper diagrams for two gauges of representative dual-phase and martensitic grades of steels. The results showed that tempering is an effective way of reducing hold-time sensitivity (HTS) in hardenable high-strength sheet steels. In Phase 2, post-weld cooling rate techniques, incorporating tempering, were evaluated to reduce HTS for the same four steels. Three alternative methods, viz., post-heating, downsloping, and spike tempering, for HTS reduction were investigated. Downsloping was selected for detailed additional study, as it appeared to be the most promising of the cooling rate control methods. The downsloping maps for each of the candidate steels were used to locate the conditions necessary for the peak response. Three specific downslope conditions (at a fix ed final current for each material, timed for a zero-, medium-, and full-softening response) were chosen for further metallurgical and mechanical testing. Representative samples, were inspected metallographically, examining both local hardness variations and microstructures. The resulting downslope diagrams were found to consist largely of a C-curve. The softening observed in these curves, however, was not supported by subsequent metallography, which showed that all welds made, regardless of material and downslope condition, were essentially martensitic. CCT/TTT diagrams, generated based on microstructural modeling done at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, showed that minimum downslope times of 2 and 10 s for the martensitic and dual-phase grades of steels, respectively, were required to avoid martensite formation. These times, however, were beyond those examined in this study. These results show that downsloping is not an effective means of reducing HTS for production resistance spot

  20. A hot-cracking mitigation technique for welding high-strength aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.P.; Dong, P.; Zhang, J.; Tian, X.

    2000-01-01

    A hot-cracking mitigation technique for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of high-strength aluminum alloy 2024 is presented. The proposed welding technique incorporates a trailing heat sink (an intense cooling source) with respect to the welding torch. The development of the mitigation technique was based on both detailed welding process simulation using advanced finite element techniques and systematic laboratory experiments. The finite element methods were used to investigate the detailed thermomechanical behavior of the weld metal that undergoes the brittle temperature range (BTR) during welding. As expected, a tensile deformation zone within the material BTR region was identified behind the weld pool under conventional GTA welding process conventional GTA welding process conditions for the aluminum alloy studied. To mitigate hot cracking, the tensile zone behind the weld pool must be eliminated or reduce to a satisfactory level if the weld metal hot ductility cannot be further improved. With detailed computational modeling, it was found that by the introduction of a trailing heat sink at some distance behind the welding arc, the tensile strain rate with respect to temperature in the zone encompassing the BTR region can be significantly reduced. A series of parametric studies were also conducted to derive optimal process parameters for the trailing heat sink. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the trailing heat sink technique. With a proper implementation of the trailing heat sink method, hot cracking can be completely eliminated in welding aluminum alloy 2024 (AA 2024).

  1. Gravitational effects on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding of 304 stainless steel and Al-4 wt% Cu alloy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Namhyun; Singh, Jogender; Kulkarni, Anil K

    2004-11-01

    Effects of gravitational acceleration were investigated on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution for 304 stainless steel and Al-4wt% Cu alloy. Effects of welding heat source were investigated by using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). As the gravitational level was increased from low gravity (LG approximately 1.2 g) to high gravity (HG approximately 1.8 g) using a NASA KC-135 aircraft, the weld pool shape for 304 stainless steel was influenced considerably during GTAW. However, insignificant change in the microstructure and solute distribution was observed at gravitational levels between LG and HG. The GTAW on Al-4 wt% Cu alloy was used to investigate the effect of gravitational orientation on the weld solidification behavior. Gravitational orientation was manipulated by varying the welding direction with respect to gravity vector; that is, by welding upward opposing gravity ( ||-U) and downward with gravity ( ||-D) on a vertical weld piece and welding perpendicular to gravity (perpendicular) on a horizontal weld piece. Under the same welding conditions, a larger primary dendrite spacing in the ||-U weld was observed near the weld pool surface and the fusion boundary than in the case of perpendicular or ||-D welds. The ||-D weld exhibited different solidification morphology and abnormal S shape of solidification rate curve during its growth. For 304 stainless steel GTAW, significant effects of gravitational orientation were observed on the weld pool shape that was associated with weld surface morphology and convection flow. However, the weld pool shape for LBW was mostly constant with respect to the gravitational orientation.

  2. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  3. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  4. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a water capacity (nominal) not over 1,000 pounds water capacity and a service pressure of 480 psig. Closures welded... the required thickness of the side wall. Seams must be made as follows: (1) Circumferential seams...

  5. 77 FR 64471 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Final Negative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... Vietnam: Final Negative Countervailing Duty Determination AGENCY: Import Administration, International... welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular welded pipe'') from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam''). DATES: Effective Date: October 22, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christopher...

  6. Effect of Spot and Stud Welding on ESR 4340 Steel Armor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    ESR ) 4340 steel armor. MATERIALS The armor used in this program was commercially produced ESR 4340 steeL in thicknesses of...N — AO—AO5k 025 ARMY MATERIALS AND MECHANICS RESEARCH CENTER WATERTO——ETC F/S 13/5 EFFECT OF SPOT AND STUD WELDING ON ESR 14314 0 STEEL ARMOR. (U...5 lAD I ~ EFFECT OF SPOT~AND STUD WELDING ON ESR 434O~ STEEL ARMOR~ ~~ - /, ‘ , ~ . ~~~ — ~ — ~~~ — , ~~~~~~ ——-...—- ( -~~/ ~~~ - ‘~/ ~~~ ‘ .

  7. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-12

    Estimated Heat -Affected-Zone Edges October 12, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. S.G. LambrakoS Center for Computational Materials...PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat -Affected-Zone Edges S.G. Lambrakos...experimentally measured estimates of the heat -affected-zone edge to examine the consistency of calculated temperature histories for steel welds. 12-10-2016 NRL

  8. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    development. While high speed steel or WC-Co tools can be used for aluminum and copper alloys, FSW of steel generally requires even more refractory... steel and the microstructure produced by FSW is much more critical than in aluminum alloys. The αγδ phase transformations can cause complex, multi...thesis explores the processing-microstructure-property relationships in friction stir welded ( FSW ) HT9A ferritic-martensitic steel . HT9 has previously

  9. Towards the problem of forming full strength welded joints on aluminum alloy sheets. Part II: AA7475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Tatiana; Tarasov, Sergey; Eliseev, Alexander; Fortuna, Anastasiya

    2016-11-01

    The microstructural evolution in welded joint zones obtained both by friction stir welding and ultrasonic- assisted friction stir welding on dispersion hardened 7475 aluminum alloy has been examined together with the analysis of mechanical strength and microhardness. It was established that ultrasonic-assisted friction stir provided leveled microhardness profiles across the weld zones as well as higher joint strength as compared to those of standard friction stir welding.

  10. 77 FR 61738 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... preliminary results of administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel... (Pacific Pipe) and Saha Thai Steel Pipe (Public) Company, Ltd. (Saha Thai). Based on our analysis of...

  11. 77 FR 73674 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...-1191-1194 (Final)] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates... of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... and Conduit, Harvey, IL; JMC Steel Group, Chicago, IL; Wheatland Tube, Sharon, PA; and United...

  12. 76 FR 72173 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, the Sultanate of Oman... Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam, dated..., producers, or importers of certain steel pipe from India, the Sultanate of Oman (``Oman''), the United...

  13. 76 FR 19788 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... COMMISSION Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand... U.S.C. 1675(c)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4222 (April 2011), entitled Carbon Steel...

  14. 78 FR 65272 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand. This review covers two... carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand.\\1\\ We invited interested parties to comment on...

  15. 75 FR 73033 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Amended Final... steel pipes and tubes (pipes and tubes) from Thailand, covering the period March 1, 2008 through... published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2010. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes...

  16. 78 FR 64916 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey: Final Results of... administrative review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes (steel pipes and tubes) from Turkey for the January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2011, period of...

  17. 78 FR 71563 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from... Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

  18. 76 FR 38688 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Institution of a Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan AGENCY... steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  19. 77 FR 24459 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... grades of stainless steel and ``commodity'' and ``specialty'' fittings. Specifically excluded from the... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings (SSBW pipe fittings) from Italy.\\1\\ This review covers...

  20. High-strength laser welding of aluminum-lithium scandium-doped alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of laser welding of an aluminum alloy (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by cold plastic deformation on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys. The strength of the plastically deformed welded joint, aluminum alloys of the Al-Mg-Li and Al-Cu-Li systems reached 0.95 and 0.6 of the base alloy strength, respectively.

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of Carbonitrided Low-Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taweejun, Nipon; Poapongsakorn, Piyamon; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-04-01

    Carbonitrided low-carbon steels are resistance welded in various engineering components. However, there are no reports on the microstructure and mechanical properties of their resistance spot welding (RSW) joints. Therefore, various carbonitridings were performed on the low-carbon steel sheets, and then various RSWs were applied to these carbonitrided sheets. The metallurgical and mechanical properties of the welding joint were investigated and discussed. The peak load and failure energy increased with the increases of welding current and fusion zone (FZ) size. At 11 kA welding current, the carbonitrided steel joint had the failure energy of 16 J, i.e., approximately 84 pct of untreated steel joint. FZ of carbonitrided steel joint consisted of ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite, and untempered martensite, i.e., the solid-state transformation products, while the microstructure at the outer surfaces consisted of untempered martensite and retained austenite. The surface hardening of carbonitrided steel after RSW could be maintained, i.e., approximately 810 HV. The results can be applied to carbonitriding and RSW to achieve a good welding joint.

  2. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of steel weld joints after long time exposures at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandová, D.; Kasl, J.; Rek, A.

    2010-02-01

    The structural changes of three trial weld joints of creep resistant modified 9Cr-1Mo steels and low alloyed chromium steel after post-weld heat treatment and long-term creep tests were investigated. Smooth cross-weld specimens ruptured in different zones of the weld joints as a result of different structural changes taking place during creep exposures. The microstructure of the weld joint is heterogeneous and consequently microstructural development can be different in the weld metal, the heat affected zone, and the base material. Precipitation reactions, nucleation and growth of some particles and dissolution of others, affect the strengthening of the matrix, recovery at high temperatures, and the resulting creep resistance. Therefore, a detailed study of secondary phase's development in individual zones of weld joints can elucidate mechanism of cracks propagation in specific regions and the causes of creep failure. Type I and II fractures in the weld metal and Type IV fractures in the fine prior austenite grain heat affected zones occurred after creep tests at temperatures ranging from 525 to 625 °C and under stresses from 40 to 240 MPa. An extended metallographic study of the weld joints was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were prepared from individual weld joint regions and quantitative evaluation of dislocation substructure and particles of secondary phases has been performed.

  3. Welding duplex stainless steels for maximum corrosion resistance in chemical process industry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, T.G.; Gunn, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fabrication of process plant, pipework etc in ferritic-austenitic steels commonly entails fusion welding. The weld thermal cycle can significantly influence material corrosion behavior and hence service performance. The paper reviews the situation, with emphasis on arc welding as most commonly employed by industry. An outline is given of the major metallurgical changes due to welding which take place in the heat affected zone in base steel and in the fused weld metal. The weld thermal cycle experienced alters the ferrite/austenite structure from that in the parent material, and can induce intermetallic precipitation. Nitrogen may also be lost from the weld metal. These changes affect corrosion resistance, and must be controlled to achieve optimum service properties. The consequences of surface oxidation in the weld area and of local residual stresses are also considered, and it is pointed out that resistance to stress corrosion cracking in chloride or sour, H{sub 2}S media is dependent on ferrite/austenite balance. The main factors in formulating a welding procedure are described. Depending on the material composition and joint heat sink, arc energy should be held between minimum and maximum levels to promote adequate austenite formation in the weld area without inducing intermetallic formation. Nitrogen loss should be minimized, and adequate filler should be added: slight overalloying of the consumable is preferred, provided that intermetallic precipitation is avoided.

  4. Low carbon dual phase steels for high strength wire

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.; Ahn, J.H.

    1985-08-01

    This paper shows that dual phase steels can be designed and processed as new, economical low carbon steels for cold drawing into high tensile strength steel wires. Current work indicates wires of tensile strengths up to 400,000 psi can be obtained. Potential applications for dual phase steel wire include bead wire, tire cord, wire rope and prestressed concrete. It should be possible to produce wire rods in existing rod mills by adapting the controlled rolling and quenching procedures outlined in this paper.

  5. Influence of Cu-Interlayer Thickness on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of MIG-Welded Mg-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Sun, D. Q.; Sun, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The joining of AZ31B Mg alloy to Q235 steel was realized by metal inert-gas arc welding using Cu-interlayer. Microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties of Mg-steel joints with Cu-interlayer of different thicknesses were investigated. The results indicated that acceptable joints with sound appearance could be obtained by adjusting the thickness to the range of 0.1-0.2 mm. In particular, at the thickness of 0.15 mm, the average tensile strength reached a maximum of 190 MPa, representing a 79% joint efficiency relative to the Mg base metal. Further increasing the thickness would cause more formation of coarse and thick Mg-Cu eutectic structure and Mg-Al-Cu ternary phase, which resulted in the decrease of joint strength. Therefore, the best thickness of Cu-interlayer to obtain high strength of Mg-steel MIG-welded joint was in the range of 0.1-0.15 mm. The average microhardness reached the maximum value in the reaction layer because of the presence of FeAl intermetallic compounds.

  6. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    distribution is unlimited. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation The views...Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation Report Title In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the...utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor- grade martensitic steel

  7. Fracture Toughness and Strength in a New Class of Bainitic Chromium-Tungsten Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. X.; Sikka, V. K.

    2006-06-01

    This project dealt with developing an understanding of the toughening and stengthening mechanisms for a new class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with Nooter Corporation and other industrial partners. The new steele had 50% higher tensile strength up to 650 degrees Celsius than currently used steels and the potential for not requiring any postweld heat treatment (PWHT) and for reducing equipment weight by 25%. This project was closely related to the Nooter project described in the report Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic steels for Industrial Process Applications (ORNL/TM-2005/82). The project was carried out jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and ORNL. The University of Pittsburgh carried out fracture toughness measurements and microstructural analysis on base metal and welded plates prepared at ORNL. The project focused on three areas. The first dealt with detailed microstructural analysis of base compositions of 3Cr-3WV and 3Cr-3WBV(Ta) in both normalized (N) and normalized and tempered (NT) conditions. The second aspect of the prject dealt with determining tensile properties and fracture toughness values of K{subIC} at room temperature for both 3Cr-3Wv and 3Cr-3WV(Ta) compositions. The third focus of the project was to measure the fracture toughness values of the base metal and the heat-affectged zone (HAZ) of a plate of Fe-3Cr-W(Mo)V steel plate welded by the gas tungsten are (GTA) process. The HAZ toughness was measured in both the as-welded and the PWHT condition.

  8. Growth of lamellar pearlite in the weld zone between dissimilar steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Popelyukh, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to study the welds between high-carbon pearlitic and chromium-nickel austenitic steel workpieces performed by flash butt welding. It has been established that lamellar pearlite colonies alloyed with chromium and nickel are formed in the weld zones between dissimilar steels. Thin austenite interlayers have been detected in the center of ferrite plates. The structure formed presents the C-F-A-F-C-F-A-F (and so on) sequence of three plate-shaped phases. The ferrite-cementite structure in alloyed-pearlite colonies is finer than that in unalloyed pearlite.

  9. Weld bead reinforcement removal: A method of improving the strength and ductility of peaked welds in 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study to determine the degree to which the ductility and tensile properties of peaked welds could be enhanced by removing the reinforcing bead and fairing the weld nugget into the adjacent parent metal are presented. The study employed 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and 2319 filler wire. The study concluded that significant improvements in peak weld, ultimate strength, and ductility can be obtained through removal and fairing of the weld reinforcing bead. The specimens so treated and tested in this program exhibited ultimate strength improvements of 2 to 3 percent for peak angles of 5.8 to 10 degrees and 10 to 22 percent for welds with peak angles of 11.7 to 16.9 degrees. It was also determined that removal of the weld bead enhanced the ability of peaked welds to straighten when exposed to cyclic loading at stress levels above the yield strength.

  10. Residual Stress and Fatigue Strength of Hybrid Laser-MIG-Welded A7N01P-T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Peixian; Zhu, Zongtao

    2017-02-01

    A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy is widely used in some important welded components of high-speed trains. The hybrid laser-metal inert gas (MIG) welding process was studied to solve problems associated with the MIG welding process, such as low welding efficiency, high residual stress and deformation, and serious loss of strength. A high-speed camera, a voltage and current collection system, and NI DAQ were used to acquire arc profiles, welding voltage, and welding current simultaneously. Thermal cycle tests were carried out. Residual stresses induced by the welding process and fatigue strength of the joint were investigated. Large-size fatigue specimens were used in fatigue tests. The results show that the energy of the hybrid welding process is focused, and the power density of hybrid welding process is intense. The heat input per unit of the hybrid welding process is only half of that of the MIG welding process. Compared with the MIG welded joint, the overall residual stress level of the hybrid-welded joint is lower. The peak longitudinal stress of the hybrid-welded joint is reduced by 20 pct. The fatigue strength of hybrid joints is 14 pct higher than that of MIG-welded joints. Narrow weld and HAZ, weak softening behavior, and low residual stress level are the causes of the improvement of fatigue strength.

  11. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  12. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Welds Calculated Using Solidification-Boundary Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    Temperature histories of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented, which are calculated using numerical-analytical basis functions and solidification-boundary constraints. These weld temperature histories can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, which include numerical models for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these temperature histories can be used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries. In addition, the present study uses experimentally measured estimates of the heat effect zone edge to examine the consistency of calculated temperature histories for steel welds.

  13. Study of Residual Stresses and Distortion in Structural Weldments in High-Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    following students worked on this project. In chronological order: Lipsey , M.D. Coneybear, G.W. Mylonas, G.A. Rogalski, W.J. Marby, J.P. LCoumis, G.A...Officers and so their services were furnished at no cost to the project): lipsey , M.D.: Ocean Engineer, and Master of Science in Naval Architecture and...completed: L. Lipsey , M.D., "Investigation of Welding Thermal Strains in High Strength Quenched and Tempered Steel", Ocean Engineer Thesis, M.[.T., June 1978

  14. Capabilities of Ultrasonic Phased Arrays for Far-Side Examinations of Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-10-01

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of advanced ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of nuclear system austenitic piping welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements for near side inspection. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm (24inch) diameter, 36mm (1.42inch) thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches ranged in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through-wall to 64% through-wall. The welds were examined with phased array technology at 2.0 MHz, and compared to conventional ultrasonic techniques as a baseline. The examinations showed that phased-array methods were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, the notches and flaws through the welds. The ultrasonic results were insensitive to the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  15. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased-Array Ultrasonic Probes.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-08-05

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of phased-array ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of these welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches range in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through wall to 64% through wall. The welds were examined with two phased-array probes, a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive longitudinal wave array and a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive shear wave array. These examinations showed that both phased-array transducers were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, all of the notches and flaws through the welds. The phased-array results were not strongly affected by the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  16. Re-weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steels studied by multi-pass TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.; Koshiishi, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Anzai, H.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.

    2002-12-01

    Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied by multi-pass bead-on-plate and build-up tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, simulating the repair-welding of reactor components. Specimens were submerged arc welding (SAW) joint of Type 304 SS containing 0.5 appm helium (1.8 appm in the SAW weld metal). Sound welding could be obtained by one- to three-pass welding on the plates at weld heat inputs less than 1 MJ/m in the irradiated 304 SS base metal. In the case of the build-up welding of a groove, no visible defects appeared in the specimen at a heat input as low as 0.4 MJ/m. However, build-up welding at a high heat input of 1 MJ/m was prone to weld cracking, owing to the formation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries of the base metal or dendrite boundaries of pre-existing SAW weld metal, in the area within 0.6 mm from the fusion line.

  17. Influence of sulfur and welding conditions on penetration in thin strip stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Scheller, P.R. ); Brooks, R.F.; Mills, K.C. . Division of Materials Metrology)

    1995-02-01

    Welding trials and surface tension measurements have been carried out on 304 stainless steels with sulfur (S) contents between 20 and 100 ppm. Surface tension measurements, determined by the levitated drop method, indicated that the temperature coefficient of surface tension (d[gamma]/dT) changed from negative to positive values at S contents exceeding approximately 50 ppm. Strips with a thickness of approximately 1 mm were GTA welded on both single-electrode, small-scale and multi-electrode industrial-scale units. Welding speeds of 1 to 2 m min[sup [minus]1] were used on the small-scale unit and up to 5 m min[sup [minus]1] on the industrial unit. The weld penetration was found to increase, for both full and partial penetration welds, with (1) increasing sulfur contents; and (2) increasing linear energy. On the small scale-unit markedly higher penetration was observed in heats with S contents > 60 ppm. But the influence of S contents was only of minor importance for welds obtained on the industrial unit. It was found that the similar weld geometry could be obtained for both low ([<=] 60 ppm) and high (> 60 ppm) sulfur contents by careful adjustment of welding parameters. The observed changes in weld geometry are consistent with the proposition that the fluid flow in the weld pool is dominated by thermo-capillary (Marangoni) forces during the GTA welding of thin strips.

  18. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  19. Dissimilar Laser Welding/Brazing of 5754 Aluminum Alloy to DP 980 Steel: Mechanical Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yulong; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Wei; Weckman, David; Zhou, Norman

    2015-11-01

    A diode laser welding/brazing technique was used for lap joining of 5754 aluminum alloy to DP 980 steel with Al-Si filler metal. The correlation between joint interfacial microstructure, wettability of filler metal, and mechanical properties was systematically investigated. At low laser power (1.4 kW), a layer of intermetallic compounds, composed of θ-Fe(Al,Si)3 and τ 5 -Al7.2Fe1.8Si, was observed at the interface between fusion zone and steel. Because of the poor wettability of filler metal on the steel substrate, the joint strength was very low and the joint failed at the FZ/steel interface. When medium laser power (2.0 kW) was applied, the wettability of filler metal was enhanced, which improved the joint strength and led to FZ failure. With further increase of laser power to 2.6 kW, apart from θ and τ 5, a new hard and brittle η-Fe2(Al,Si)5 IMC with microcracks was generated at the FZ/steel interface. The formation of η significantly degraded the joint strength. The failure mode changed back to interfacial failure.

  20. The Influence of Modes of Deposition of Coatings on the Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Steels in Acidic Media;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Selivanov, Y. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, effect of welding on corrosion of welded joints of austenitic steel 12KH18N10T. It is shown that the use of pulsed - arc welding steel 12KH18N10T allows you to create a protective coating with dispersed structure with less thermal impact on the zone of the welded joint. Coating is of such structure allows 1.5 to 6 times to reduce the corrosion rate of welded joints of steel 12KH18N10T in active chemical environments. Pulse the process of deposition of coatings on welded joint of steels can be effectively used for the protection against corrosion in the repair of equipment of chemical industry. The results obtained can be recommended for use when welding a protective corrosion - resistant coatings on working surfaces of equipment of chemical productions.

  1. Microstructure and Tensile-Shear Properties of Resistance Spot Welded 22MnMoB Hot-Stamping Annealed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Cui, Xuetuan; Luo, Zhen; Ao, Sansan

    2017-01-01

    The present paper deals with the joining of 22MnMoB hot-stamping annealed steel carried out by the spot welding process. Microstructural characterization, microhardness testing and tensile-shear testing were conducted. The effects of the welding parameters, including the electrode tip diameter, welding current, welding time and electrode force upon the tensile-shear properties of the welded joints, were investigated. The results showed that a weld size of 9.6 mm was required to ensure pullout failure for the 1.8 -mm-thick hot-stamping annealed steel sheet. The welding current had the largest influence upon the tensile-shear properties of the 22MnMoB steel welded joint. The bulk resistance should play an important role in the nugget formation. In pullout failure mode, failure was initiated at the heat-affected zone, where softening occurs owing to the tempering of martensite.

  2. Magnetic Barkhausen noise for reliable detection of the heat affected zone in welded ship steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaow, Mohamed M.; Shaw, Brian A.

    2014-02-01

    The applicability of the Barkhausen noise technique to non-destructively determine the heat affected zone (HAZ) in welded steel plates was investigated. Magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements were conducted on welded hot-rolled low carbon ship steel plates to determine the MBN behaviour following the exposure to elevated heat in a localized region by welding. The exciting field was applied parallel to the weld bead. The results showed a variation in MBN level along a line that crosses the weld bead. The MBN intensity was higher in the near weld material compared with a lower intensity when the measurement setup was moved away from the weld bead in both sides of the weld. The increased MBN level was attributed to the induced residual tensile stresses as a result of the shrinkage of the hot zone. The variation of MBN along the measurement line was eliminated after the welded plate was shot peened. The decrease in MBN intensity after shot peening was attributed to the induced compressive stresses. The results were explained in terms of different mechanisms of interaction of domain walls with residual tensile and compressive stresses.

  3. Retention of ductility in high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. R.; Zackay, V. F.

    1969-01-01

    To produce high strength alloy steel with retention of ductility, include tempering, cooling and subsequent tempering. Five parameters for optimum results are pretempering temperature, amount of strain, strain rate, temperature during strain, and retempering temperature.

  4. High-strength braze joints between copper and steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, R. F.

    1967-01-01

    High-strength braze joints between copper and steel are produced by plating the faying surface of the copper with a layer of gold. This reduces porosity in the braze area and strengthens the resultant joint.

  5. Finite element modeling and analysis of electro-magnetic pulse welding of aluminium tubes to steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Doley, Jyoti; Kore, Sachine

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic pulse welding is a high-speed, solid-state welding process that is applicable to sheets or tube-to-tube or tube-to-bar configurations. In this article we discuss about the MPW process modeling and simulation for welding Al tubes to steel bars. Finite element simulation was done to weld 6061 Al tubes of 1.65 mm wall thickness to 1010 steel bars of a 47.6 mm nominal diameter. Simulation results indicate that Al tubes can be successfully welded to steel bars using MPW. It is found that the standoff distance between the Al tube and the steel bar i.e. gap between inner diameter of Al tube and diameter of steel bar is a dominant factor for achieving a sound weld. The addition of receding angles to the bars can promote MPW weldability window.

  6. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  7. Microstructural Characteristics of a Stainless Steel/Copper Dissimilar Joint Made by Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Xingke

    2013-08-01

    The microstructures and its formation mechanism of a stainless steel/copper dissimilar joint by laser welding were investigated. It was found that the two modes of joining, i.e., welding-brazing and fusion welding, depend on different processing parameters. In the welding-brazing mode, the interface between copper and the fusion zone has scraggy morphology because the molten pool is frozen by solid copper with high thermal conductivity. The interdiffusion of elements occurs in the neighborhood of the interface, which leads to the metallurgy bond of the mode. In the fusion welding mode, the liquid phase in the fusion zone undergoes not only primary but also secondary liquid separation due to the high cooling rate and high supercooling level of laser welding. Some microcracks generated in the fusion zone by thermal stress mismatch are healed by liquid copper filling.

  8. An Approach to Maximize Weld Penetration During TIG Welding of P91 Steel Plates by Utilizing Image Processing and Taguchi Orthogonal Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Debnath, Tapas; Dey, Vidyut; Rai, Ram Naresh

    2016-06-01

    P-91 is modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Fabricated structures and components of P-91 has a lot of application in power and chemical industry owing to its excellent properties like high temperature stress corrosion resistance, less susceptibility to thermal fatigue at high operating temperatures. The weld quality and surface finish of fabricated structure of P91 is very good when welded by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG). However, the process has its limitation regarding weld penetration. The success of a welding process lies in fabricating with such a combination of parameters that gives maximum weld penetration and minimum weld width. To carry out an investigation on the effect of the autogenous TIG welding parameters on weld penetration and weld width, bead-on-plate welds were carried on P91 plates of thickness 6 mm in accordance to a Taguchi L9 design. Welding current, welding speed and gas flow rate were the three control variables in the investigation. After autogenous (TIG) welding, the dimension of the weld width, weld penetration and weld area were successfully measured by an image analysis technique developed for the study. The maximum error for the measured dimensions of the weld width, penetration and area with the developed image analysis technique was only 2 % compared to the measurements of Leica-Q-Win-V3 software installed in optical microscope. The measurements with the developed software, unlike the measurements under a microscope, required least human intervention. An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) confirms the significance of the selected parameters. Thereafter, Taguchi's method was successfully used to trade-off between maximum penetration and minimum weld width while keeping the weld area at a minimum.

  9. HAZ fracture properties of Ti-microalloyed offshore steel in as-welded and simulated condition

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.F.; Kocak, M.; Petrovski, B.I.; Gliha, V.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a study on the heat affected zone (HAZ) fracture toughness of submerged arc welded (SAW) joints of 40 mm thick Ti treated StE 355 grade offshore steel. The CTOD values measured on 34 mm thick SENB specimens taken from multipass 1/2K joints were compared with the values obtained from 8 mm thick SENB specimens with simulated microstructures of CGHAZ at {minus}10 C (a/W=0.5). Single and double thermal cycles were used to simulate various thermal treatments which HAZ may experience during welding. The microstructural examination of these simulated specimens show the presence of the local brittle zones (LBZ) in the CGHAZ in spite of the steel being Ti-microalloyed. The CTOD fracture toughness testing of the simulated specimens can produce toughness values not affected by the mechanical heterogeneity (strength mis-match between weld and base metals) provided the microstructure of interest has been simulated correctly. Seven different thermal simulations were examined, one single cycle and six double cycles. The peak temperature of the first thermal cycle was always above 1,350 C and cooling time (800--500 C) was about 40 sec. The peak temperature of the second thermal cycle was varied between 700 and 1,025 C and cooling time was 40 sec as well which reflects the situation in the multipass HAZ of the real joint adjacent to the fusion line. The measurement of fracture toughness and metallographical examination prove that a second thermal cycle below AC{sub 1} and between AC{sub 1} and AC{sub 3} does not improve the lowest toughness values of the unaffected CGHAZ. The CTOD results of the simulated and real weld specimens show similar toughness values in terms of stable crack initiation (CTOD at {Delta}a=0.2 mm). However, the CTOD values obtained after stable crack growth ({delta}{sub u} or {delta}{sub m}) show no correlation between both sets of data.

  10. Consumable Guide Electroslag Welding of 4 to 24 Inch Thick Carbon Steel Castings (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    ENGLISH SERBOCROAT SUBMERGED ARC, MANUAL METAL ARC, METAL INERT GAS AND CONSUMABLE GUIDE WELDS IN HY80 STEEL WERE PREPARED USING COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE...JOINTS IN THICK PLATES OF MILD STEEL , QUENCHED AND TEMPERED LOW ALLOY STEELS QT35 AND HY80 AND 2-1/4 PER CENT CR-1 PER CENT MO STEEL ARE RECORDED. IT IS...THICKNESSES FROM 3/8 TO 24 IN. CAN BE WELDED, DEPENDING ON THE MACHINE CHOSEN. ONE MACHINE CAN WELD HY90, HY80 , AUSTENITIC STAINLESS AND HIGH-C STEELS , MONEL

  11. 2169 steel waveform measurements for equation of state and strength determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnish, M. D.; Alexander, C. S.; Brown, J. L.; Reinhart, W. D.

    2014-01-01

    In support of efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eleven gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel, a high-strength austenitic stainless steel. These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock, and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa. Both windowed and free-surface measurements on samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm were made to increase the utility of the data set. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release/reshock paths (windowed and free-surface), with associated strength information. The Hugoniot is nearly linear in US-up space. Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results, by contrast with earlier reshock tests with glued impactors which showed gap signatures. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A preliminary strength analysis suggests the flow strength increases with stress from ˜1 GPa to ˜2.5 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 25% above the Steinberg model.

  12. Stainless Steel 18-10 CO2 Laser Welding And Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Taibi; Michel, Laurent

    2008-09-01

    The welding of materials by CO2 laser took significant considerations in industry, for the reason of the quality of the carried out weldings, and for other many advantages, but the automation of the welding operation requires a control system in real time. The operation of welding is an operation of interaction between the radiation (laser), and the matter (welded part), which is characterized by the vaporization of the matter, formation of the keyhole in material, and appearance of plasma over the material. This study relates to the relation between the welding (molten material) and the plasma which is formed on material. The light emitted by plasma during laser welding was recorded by an OMA detector (Optical Multichannel Analyzer) over a wavelength width of 450 Å. The analysis of this light allows to determine the composition of this plasma, its dimensions, and the state of its energy according to the laser parameters. The welded material is the stainless steel 18-10, it was found that the intensity of the light emitted by plasma depends on laser power, the welding speed, the flow rate of assist gas. The relation between the plasma and the state of the bead were analyzed for on-line monitoring welding.

  13. Stainless Steel 18-10 CO2 Laser Welding And Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Amar, Taibi; Michel, Laurent

    2008-09-23

    The welding of materials by CO2 laser took significant considerations in industry, for the reason of the quality of the carried out weldings, and for other many advantages, but the automation of the welding operation requires a control system in real time. The operation of welding is an operation of interaction between the radiation (laser), and the matter (welded part), which is characterized by the vaporization of the matter, formation of the keyhole in material, and appearance of plasma over the material. This study relates to the relation between the welding (molten material) and the plasma which is formed on material. The light emitted by plasma during laser welding was recorded by an OMA detector (Optical Multichannel Analyzer) over a wavelength width of 450 A ring . The analysis of this light allows to determine the composition of this plasma, its dimensions, and the state of its energy according to the laser parameters. The welded material is the stainless steel 18-10, it was found that the intensity of the light emitted by plasma depends on laser power, the welding speed, the flow rate of assist gas. The relation between the plasma and the state of the bead were analyzed for on-line monitoring welding.

  14. Changes in the Structure and Properties of Welded Joints of Low-Alloy Steels, Subjected to Cyclic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, V. N.; Kovenskiy, I. M.; Kuskov, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    Time-varying loads negatively affect the properties and structure of materials. Structural failures typically occur at loads below the yield point. In this work, fatigue tests of welded joints of low-alloy steels were carried out in an asymmetric cycle at loads of 60 and 80% of the yield strength. The stress ratio was 0.8-0.9. On the basis of the results of the tests, equations linking the number of cycles to failure with test parameters were obtained. Such equations can be used for estimating the residual life of elements both under construction and in operation. It has been found that the failure is not instantaneous. Specimens of steels continue to resist variable loads for 4000 - 26000 cycles to failure, depending on steel grade and the parameters of the test. Under operating conditions, it gives an opportunity to discover the onset of failure and dispose of the defective part or to replace the entire structure. A standard technique was used to measure the microhardness on the fractured specimens. The distance between the nearest indentations was 0.2 mm. The results of the measurements were plotted in graphs of ahardness change characteristic for all steels under study. A microhardness “step” has been discovered in areas with high dislocation density, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An intermediate stage of the investigation is the development of recommendations for determining the moment of failure of welded constructions with a probability of 95%.

  15. Change of Hot Cracking Susceptibility in Welding of High Strength Aluminum Alloy AA 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, M.; Hofmann, K.; Mann, V.; Hugger, F.; Roth, S.; Schmidt, M.

    High strength aluminum alloys are known as hard to weld alloys due to their high hot crack susceptibility. However, they have high potential for applications in light weight constructions of automotive industry and therefore it is needed to increase weldability. One major issue is the high hot cracking susceptibility. Vaporization during laser beam welding leads to a change of concentration of the volatile elements magnesium and zinc. Hence, solidification range of the weld and therefore hot cracking susceptibility changes. Additionally, different welding velocities lead to changed solidification conditions with certain influence on hot cracking. This paper discusses the influence of energy per unit length during laser beam welding of AA 7075 on the change of element concentration in the weld seam and the resulting influence on hot cracking susceptibility. Therefore EDS-measurements of weld seams generated with different velocities are performed to determine the change of element concentration. These quantitative data is used to numerically calculate the solidification range in order to evaluate its influence on the hot cracking susceptibility. Besides that, relative hot crack length and mechanical properties are measured. The results increase knowledge about welding of high strength aluminum alloy AA 7075 and hence support further developing of the welding process.

  16. Microvoid Formation during Shear Deformation of Ultrahigh Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    axial ....,e 0. 1 . and I and quasIstatc shear tests (iO AM. ESR . and VAR 4340 steeL the yield strength METALLURGICAL TRANSACTIONS A ’OUE20lA. JA...in high strength 4340 steel is nearly identical for both isothermal (quas- 11. BACKGROUND istatic) and adiabatic (dynamic) loading conditions. While...a 4340 steel Rc 52 plate (5.6 mm thick)I that underwent a localized deformation mode of failure during ballistic R=5.56 T impact. Note the white

  17. Qualification of large diameter duplex stainless steel girth welds intended for low temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, K.; Robinson, A.G.; Rogers, P.F.

    1996-12-31

    British Gas recently had a requirement to fabricate some UNS31803 duplex stainless steel pipework for an offshore topsides process plant. The pipework had a maximum diameter of 600mm, with a corresponding wall thickness of 18mm, and it was designed to operate at a minimum temperature of {minus}40 C. There is a lack of published toughness data for girth welds in duplex stainless steel at this thickness and minimum design temperature. Additionally, toughness requirements for girth welds in current pipework and pressure vessel codes are based on experience with carbon steels. As a result, a program of work has been carried out to study the Charpy, CTOD and wide plate toughness of girth welds in 22%Cr duplex stainless steel pipework. The welds were produced using a typical gas tungsten arc/gas metal arc pipework fabrication procedure. In addition, non-destructive evaluation trials have been carried out on a deliberately defective weld using radiography and ultrasonics. It was demonstrated that double wall single image {gamma}-radiography, single wall single image and panoramic X-radiography, and conventional shear wave ultrasonics were all able to detect planar root defects varying from 3 to 7mm in depth. There was good agreement between the sizes recorded by ultrasonics and those measured from macrosections. Small scale mechanical tests demonstrated that welds with overmatching tensile properties, and low temperature toughness properties which were acceptable to specification, could be produced. Wide plate tests demonstrated that defect size calculations from BS PD7493 were conservative.

  18. Acoustic emisson and ultrasonic wave characteristics in TIG-welded 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Sang Pill; Son, In Su; Bae, Dong Su

    2014-05-01

    A TIG welded 316 stainless steel materials will have a large impact on the design and the maintenance of invessel components including pipes used in a nuclear power plant, and it is important to clear the dynamic behavior in the weld part of stainless steel. Therefore, nondestructive techniques of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic wave were applied to investigate the damage behavior of welded stainless steel. The velocity and attenuation ratio of the ultrasonic wave at each zone were measured, and a 10 MHz sensor was used. We investigated the relationship between dynamic behavior and AE parameters analysis and derived the optimum parameters to evaluate the damage degree of the specimen. By measuring the velocity and the attenuation of an ultrasonic wave propagating each zone of the welded stainless steel, the relation of the ultrasonic wave and metal structure at the base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) metal and weld metal is also discussed. The generating tendency of cumulated counts is similar to that of the load curve. The attenuation ratios from the ultrasonic test results were 0.2 dB/mm at the base zone, and 0.52 dB/mm and 0.61 dB/mm at the HAZ zone and weld zone, respectively.

  19. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. Methods: We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO2 and 100% CO2. The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. Results: The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm2 at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. Conclusions: The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous. PMID:27488036

  20. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, S.; Fernandezbaca, J. A.; David, S. A.; Hubbard, C. R.; Holden, T. M.; Root, J. H.

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction technique. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances strain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition during welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 +/- 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa +/- 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 x 10(exp -4) compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  1. Effect of Dwell Time on Joint Interface Microstructure and Strength of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot-Welded Al-5083 and St-12 Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereiduni, Eskandar; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Najafi, Hossein

    2017-04-01

    Joining of Al-5083 alloy sheet to St-12 steel sheet was performed using a new friction stir spot welding (FSSW) technique in which the tool pin tip did not enter lower steel sheet. Effect of dwell time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was studied by various methods including microhardness measurements, shear test, stereo and light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Results indicated that compared to the conventional FSSW process, stronger joints can be achieved by this FSSW technique. Cross-sectional observation of the failed specimens indicated the occurrence of final fracture from the circumference of the tool pin where the Al sheet thickness was decreased as a result of the tool pin penetration. However, microhardness measurements introduced these fracture locations as the hardest regions of the Al part of welds. In addition to the Al3Fe and Al5Fe2 intermetallic compounds reported in the literature to form at the interface of dissimilar Al/steel joints, a third layer of AlFe intermetallic compound was also identified adjacent to the steel side of welds. Enhancement of the dwell time from 5 to 15 seconds increased the intermetallic layer thickness from 1.7 to 3 µm and resulted in the formation of harder stirred zone. This consequently increased the strength of the weld.

  2. Effect of Dwell Time on Joint Interface Microstructure and Strength of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot-Welded Al-5083 and St-12 Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereiduni, Eskandar; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Najafi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Joining of Al-5083 alloy sheet to St-12 steel sheet was performed using a new friction stir spot welding (FSSW) technique in which the tool pin tip did not enter lower steel sheet. Effect of dwell time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was studied by various methods including microhardness measurements, shear test, stereo and light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Results indicated that compared to the conventional FSSW process, stronger joints can be achieved by this FSSW technique. Cross-sectional observation of the failed specimens indicated the occurrence of final fracture from the circumference of the tool pin where the Al sheet thickness was decreased as a result of the tool pin penetration. However, microhardness measurements introduced these fracture locations as the hardest regions of the Al part of welds. In addition to the Al3Fe and Al5Fe2 intermetallic compounds reported in the literature to form at the interface of dissimilar Al/steel joints, a third layer of AlFe intermetallic compound was also identified adjacent to the steel side of welds. Enhancement of the dwell time from 5 to 15 seconds increased the intermetallic layer thickness from 1.7 to 3 µm and resulted in the formation of harder stirred zone. This consequently increased the strength of the weld.

  3. Johnson - Cook Strength Models for Mild and DP 590 Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantam, K.; Brar, N. S.; Bajaj, D.; Hill, S.

    2006-07-28

    Automotive steels, Mild and Dual Phase590 (DP590) are characterized in tension at room temperature, using the quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar techniques at various strain rates ranging from {approx}10-3/s to {approx}1800/s. Tension stress-strain data for both the steels are analyzed to determine the Johnson-Cook Strength model constants, J-C strength model constants for mild steel are A=217 MPa, B = 234 MPa, n = 0.643 and C = 0.076 and for DP590 steel are A = 430 MPa, B = 824 MPa, n = 0.510 and C = 0.017. Higher value of strain rate sensitivity constant C for mild steel (0.076) compared to DP 590 (0.017) is also reflected in the stress- strain data at various strain rates.

  4. The Strength and Characteristics of VPPA Welded 2219-T87 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process and those factors that control the structure and properties of VPPA welded aluminum alloy 2219-T87 was conducted. The importance of joint preparation, alignment of parts and welding process variables are already established. Internal weld defects have been eliminated. However, a variation of properties was found to be due to the size variation of interdendritic particles in the fusion zone. These particles contribute to the void formation process, which controls the ultimate tensile strength of the welded alloy. A variation of 150 microns in particle size correlated with a 10 ksi variation of ultimate tensile strength. It was found that all fracture surfaces were of the dimple rupture type, with fracture initiating within the fusion zone.

  5. Investigation into Microstructures of Maraging Steel 250 Weldments and Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Fawad; Baloch, Rasheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Bilal; Naz, Nausheen

    2010-03-01

    This study was undertaken to gain a better understanding of microstructures obtained by multipass gas tungsten arc welding in maraging steel grade 250. Metallography and microhardness measurements were carried out on sheet and welded joints in as-welded and post-weld aged conditions. It was found that there was a significant amount of reverted austenite formed on cell boundaries of weld metal after aging at 758-823 K for 3-5 h, and was stable at room temperature. Aging at higher temperatures led to an increase in the continuous network of patchy austenite along the cell boundaries. The reason for the above, in our opinion, is the concentrational heterogeneity which characterizes the microstructure of maraging steel welds. No reverted austenite was observed in as-welded specimens. Solution annealing at 1093 K for 1 h did not completely eliminate the chemical heterogeneity associated with weld structures. However, homogenizing at 1373 K produced homogenous structure that on subsequent aging produces austenite-free lath martensitic structure.

  6. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.; De, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  7. Welding stainless and 9% nickel steel cryogenic vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Parsons, D.

    1995-11-01

    Gases are often more efficiently stored and shipped as liquids at cryogenic temperatures. Pure gases commonly stored below liquefaction temperatures include oxygen {minus}297 F ({minus}183 C), argon {minus}302 f ({minus}186 C), nitrogen {minus}320 F ({minus}196 C), hydrogen {minus}423 F ({minus}253 C) and helium {minus}452 F ({minus}269 C). Natural gas is also transported and frequently stored as liquefied natural gas (LNG) at temperatures below {minus}261 F ({minus}163 C). Storage tanks for the pure gases are generally shop fabricated in sizes that can be shipped by conventional carriers. Smaller LNG vessels for over-the-road and railroad fuel applications are also shop-fabricated. Shown in a figure is a rail-mounted tank designed to supply liquefied natural gas to locomotives. Another example of a tank installation is also shown. LNG terminal storage tanks are generally field-erected vessels fabricated from 9% nickel steel in sizes of 50,000 to 100,000 m{sup 3} (315,000 to 630,000 bbls). This article focuses on welding practices for shop-fabricated vessels and equipment.

  8. Improved High Strength Armor Steel through Texturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    80 I 14 02w INTRODUCTION During metal manufacturing processing, such as rolling of sheet and plate, the polycrystalline aggregate of the material...of the quenched martensite has been documented by previous investigators including Kula and Dhosi who ob- served that thermomechanical processing can...textured armor steel exhibits improved ballistic resistance to conventionally uncontrolled rolled steels of equal hardness at normal obliquity. This

  9. Microstructural Characterization of 6061 Aluminum to 304L Stainless Steel Inertia Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    1999-09-29

    'Microstructural characterization of 6061-T6 aluminum-to-Type 304L stainless steel inertia welds provided a technical basis to conclude that transition joints fabricated from such welds should satisfactorily contain helium/hydrogen gas mixtures. This conclusion is based on the lack of semi-continuous alignments of particles and/or inclusions at, or near, the aluminum-to-stainless steel interface. These dissimilar metal transition joints play a key role in the operation of an accelerator driven, spallation neutron source designed for the production of tritium. The Accelerator Production of Tritium system will produce tritium through neutron interactions with 3He gas contained in water-cooled, 6061-T6 aluminum pressure tubes. Current design concepts include thousands of thin-walled pressure tubes distributed throughout a number of aluminum-clad, lead-filled, blanket modules. The aluminum pressure tubes are connected to a tritium extraction and purification system through a stainless steel manifold. The transition from aluminum to stainless steel is made via transition joints machined from the aluminum-to-stainless steel inertia welds. The paper describes the baseline microstructural characterization of the welds, including optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and uses that characterization to evaluate potential gas leakage across the weld.'

  10. Optimizing friction stir welding parameters to maximize tensile strength of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S.; Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balasubramanian, M.

    2009-04-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. In contrast to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and the tool pin profile play a major role in determining the joint strength. An attempt has been made here to develop a mathematical model to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. A central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model has been optimized using the Hooke and Jeeves search technique to maximize the tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  11. Technology Of MIG-MAG Welds Strength Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodskiy, S. A.; Saraev, Yu N.; Malchik, A. G.; Korotkov, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    A new technology of MIG MAG welding control is developed. Authors introduce use of power AC and pulse feed of welding wire in the arc zone, that downsizes the heat affected zone, stabilizes formation of electrode metal droplets, as external magnetic field's effect on the arc is reduced. Principal criteria for electrode metal transfer control, when powered by AC sources, are specified.

  12. Stress Engineering of Multi-pass Welds of Structural Steel to Enhance Structural Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Supriyo; Sule, Jibrin; Yakubu, Mustapha Y.

    2016-08-01

    In multi-pass welding, the weld metal and the associated heat-affected zone are subjected to repeated thermal cycling from successive deposition of filler metals. The thermal straining results into multi-mode deformation of the weld metal which causes a variably distributed residual stress field through the thickness and across the weld of a multi-pass weldment. In addition to this, the as-welded fusion zone microstructure shows dendritic formation of grains and segregation of alloying element. This may result in formation of micro-corrosion cells and the problem would aggravate in case of highly alloyed materials. Local mechanical tensioning is an effective way of elimination of the weld tensile residual stress. It has been shown that application of cold rolling is capable not only of removing the residual stress, but depending on its magnitude it may also form beneficial compressive stress state. Multi-pass structural steel welds used as structural alloy in general engineering and structural applications. Such alloys are subjected to severe in-service degradation mechanisms e.g., corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Welds and the locked-in residual stress in the welded area often initiate the defect which finally results in failure. In the present study, a multi-pass structural steel weld metal was first subjected to post-weld cold rolling which was followed by controlled heating by a fiber laser. Cold straining resulted in redistribution of the internal stress through the thickness and controlled laser processing helps in reforming of the grain structure. However, even with controlled laser, processing the residual stress is reinstated. Therefore, a strategy has been adopted to roll the metal post-laser processing so as to obtain a complete stress-free and recrystallized microstructure.

  13. 75 FR 13729 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2007 through October 31, 2008. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea:...

  14. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  15. 78 FR 35248 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (CWP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea) for the period... Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2010-2011, 77 FR...

  16. 75 FR 20334 - Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Line Pipe from the People's Republic of China: Correction to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Line Pipe from the People's Republic of...: April 19, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Conniff, AD/CVD Operations, Office 3, ] Import... final determination pursuant to final court decision for circular welded carbon quality steel line...

  17. 75 FR 44763 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. We also received review requests on November 30, 2009, from... require additional time with respect to cost of production data used in the margin calculation...

  18. 76 FR 65179 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey: Extension of Time for Preliminary Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey: Extension of Time for... countervailing duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey covering the period of review... ve Ticaret A.S., and the Government of the Republic of Turkey. There are 14 programs under review...

  19. 76 FR 3083 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from...

  20. 76 FR 4633 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China... scope of the Order \\1\\ as excluding carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from the People's Republic of.... LLC, d/b/a King Architectural Metals v. United States, Slip Op. 10-111, Court No. 09-00477...