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Sample records for streptococcus promotes resistance

  1. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  2. Acriflavine-Resistant Mutant of Streptococcus cremoris†

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Selection for resistance to acriflavine in Streptococcus cremoris resulted in cross-resistance to the drugs neomycin, streptomycin, ethidium bromide, mitomycin C, and proflavine. Furthermore, the mutants showed resistance to lytic bacteriophages to which the parental strain was sensitive, and, unlike the parent, the mutants grew well at higher temperatures (40°C). Revertants selected independently either for temperature sensitivity or for acriflavine sensitivity lost resistance to all the drugs and dyes but retained the bacteriophage resistance phenotype. The acriflavine-resistant mutation resulted in an increase in resistance by the bacterial cells to sodium dodecyl sulfate, a potent solvent of lipopolysaccharide and lipoprotein. It is suggested that the acriflavine resistance mutation determines the synthesis of a membrane substance resistant to higher temperatures. PMID:907329

  3. Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Clones, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Balsalobre, Luz; Ardanuy, Carmen; Fenoll, Asunción; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Liñares, Josefina

    2004-01-01

    Among 2,882 Streptococcus pneumoniae sent to the Spanish Reference Laboratory during 2002, 75 (2.6%) were ciprofloxacin-resistant. Resistance was associated with older patients (3.9% in adults and 7.2% in patients >65 years of age), with isolation from noninvasive sites (4.3% vs. 1.0%), and with penicillin and macrolide resistance. Among 14 low-level resistant (MIC 4–8 µg/mL) strains, 1 had a fluoroquinolone efflux phenotype, and 13 showed single ParC changes. The 61 high-level ciprofloxacin-resistant (MIC >16 µg/mL) strains showed either two or three changes at ParC, ParE, and GyrA. Resistance was acquired either by point mutation (70 strains) or by recombination with viridans streptococci (4 strains) at the topoisomerase II genes. Although 36 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns were observed, 5 international multiresistant clones (Spain23F-1, Spain6B-2, Spain9V-3, Spain14-5 and Sweden15A-25) accounted for 35 (46.7%) of the ciprofloxacin-resistant strains. Continuous surveillance is needed to prevent the dissemination of these clones. PMID:15504260

  4. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  5. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Baek, Jin Yang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens the successful treatment of pneumococcal infections. Here we report a case of bacteremic pneumonia caused by an extremely drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nonsusceptible to at least one agent in all classes but vancomycin and linezolid, posing an important new public health threat in our region.

  6. First Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Streptococcus suis▿

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; San Millan, Alvaro; Catalan, Ana; de la Campa, Adela G.; Rivero, Estefania; Lopez, Gema; Dominguez, Lucas; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    We have identified and sequenced the genes encoding the quinolone-resistance determining region (QRDR) of ParC and GyrA in fluoroquinolone-susceptible and -resistant Streptococcus suis clinical isolates. Resistance is the consequence of single point mutations in the QRDRs of ParC and GyrA and is not due to clonal spread of resistant strains or horizontal gene transfer with other bacteria. PMID:17116660

  7. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Elshafie, Sittana; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7). Methods A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%), 14 (11.90%), 1 (11.90%), 19A (9.00%), 9V (5.20%), 23F (5.20%), and 19F (4.50%). Coverage rates for infant <2 years for PCV-7, the 10-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-10), and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13) were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in cefotaxime nonsusceptible strains from 3.55% to 16.66%. Conclusion Invasive pneumococcal strains and the emergence of MDR serotypes is a global burden that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including vaccination, antibiotic stewardship, and continuous

  8. Transfer of penicillin resistance from Streptococcus oralis to Streptococcus pneumoniae identifies murE as resistance determinant.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Katya; Maurer, Patrick; Rieger, Martin; Becker, Tina; Bui, Nhat Khai; Gray, Joe; Vollmer, Waldemar; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2015-09-01

    Beta-lactam resistant clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae contain altered penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes and occasionally an altered murM, presumably products of interspecies gene transfer. MurM and MurN are responsible for the synthesis of branched lipid II, substrate for the PBP catalyzed transpeptidation reaction. Here we used the high-level beta-lactam resistant S. oralis Uo5 as donor in transformation experiments with the sensitive laboratory strain S. pneumoniae R6 as recipient. Surprisingly, piperacillin-resistant transformants contained no alterations in PBP genes but carried murEUo5 encoding the UDP-N-acetylmuramyl tripeptide synthetase. Codons 83-183 of murEUo5 were sufficient to confer the resistance phenotype. Moreover, the promoter of murEUo5 , which drives a twofold higher expression compared to that of S. pneumoniae R6, could also confer increased resistance. Multiple independent transformations produced S. pneumoniae R6 derivatives containing murEUo5 , pbp2xUo5 , pbp1aUo5 and pbp2bUo5 , but not murMUo5 sequences; however, the resistance level of the donor strain could not be reached. S. oralis Uo5 harbors an unusual murM, and murN is absent. Accordingly, the peptidoglycan of S. oralis Uo5 contained interpeptide bridges with one L-Ala residue only. The data suggest that resistance in S. oralis Uo5 is based on a complex interplay of distinct PBPs and other enzymes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Resistant to Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Haanperä-Heikkinen, M.; Lindgren, M.; Seppälä, H.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2006-01-01

    The telithromycin susceptibility of 210 erythromycin-resistant pneumococci was tested with the agar diffusion method. Twenty-six erm(B)-positive isolates showed heterogeneous resistance to telithromycin, which was manifested by the presence of colonies inside the inhibition zone. When these cells were cultured and tested, they showed stable, homogeneous, and high-level resistance to telithromycin. PMID:16641460

  10. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Norway: Population Structure and Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Caugant, D. A.; Sangvik, M.; Høiby, E. A.; Sundsfjord, A.; Simonsen, G. S.

    2006-01-01

    A 2.7% prevalence of macrolide resistance in 1,657 Norwegian clinical Streptococcus pyogenes isolates was primarily due to erm(TR) (59%) and mef(A) (20%). Four clonal complexes comprised 75% of the strains. Macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes in Norway is imported as resistant strains or locally selected in internationally disseminated susceptible clones. PMID:16641473

  11. Novel Levofloxacin-Resistant Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 11A Isolates, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miey; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Han-Sung; Park, Ji Young; Song, Wonkeun; Cho, Hyoun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Of 608 Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical strains isolated at a hospital in South Korea during 2009–2014, sixteen (2.6%) were identified as levofloxacin resistant. The predominant serotype was 11A (9 isolates). Two novel sequence types of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae with serotype 11A were identified, indicating continuous diversification of resistant strains. PMID:27767906

  12. Differentiation of cultured keratinocytes promotes the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, G L; Fleckman, P; Jonas, M; Chi, E; Rubens, C E

    1998-01-01

    Based on a consideration of the histopathology of nonbullous impetigo that shows localization of Streptococcus pyogenes to highly differentiated, subcorneal keratinocytes, we hypothesized that adherence of an impetigo strain of S. pyogenes would be promoted by terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. An assay was developed in which S. pyogenes adhered via pilus-like projections from the cell wall to the surface of cultured human keratinocytes in a time- and inoculum-dependent manner suggestive of a receptor-mediated process. Terminal differentiation of keratinocytes was induced by increasing the calcium concentration in the growth medium, and was confirmed by morphologic analysis using electron microscopy. Adherence of S. pyogenes was three and fourfold greater to keratinocytes differentiated in 1.0 and 1.5 mM calcium, respectively, compared with undifferentiated keratinocytes in 0.15 mM calcium. The presence of calcium during the adherence assay further enhanced adherence nearly twofold. Adherence occurred preferentially to sites of contact between adjacent keratinocytes, suggesting that the keratinocyte receptor may be a molecule involved in cell-to-cell adhesion. In contrast, nonpathogenic Streptococcus gordonii adhered poorly to keratinocytes regardless of their state of terminal differentiation, and adherence of a pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes was twofold greater to undifferentiated than differentiated keratinocytes. This is the first report of in vitro adherence of S. pyogenes to keratinocytes in a manner that emulates human impetigo. Adherence of only the impetigo strain, and not the pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes or the nonpathogenic S. gorgonii isolate, was promoted by keratinocyte differentiation. This result provides a model system for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of streptococcal skin infections. PMID:9421474

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Healthy Ghanaian Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Dayie, Nicholas T K D; Arhin, Reuben E; Newman, Mercy J; Dalsgaard, Anders; Bisgaard, Magne; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Slotved, Hans-Christian

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the cause of high mortality among children worldwide. Antimicrobial treatment and vaccination are used to control pneumococcal infections. In Ghana, data on antimicrobial resistance and the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clones are scarce; hence, the aim of this study was to determine the antibiogram of S. pneumoniae recovered from Ghanaian children younger than six years of age and to what extent resistances were due to the spread of certain sero- and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) types. The susceptibility of 115 pneumococcal isolates, recovered in a previous study, to six antimicrobials was determined by disk diffusion test. Overall, 90.4% of isolates were intermediate penicillin resistant, 99.1% were trimethoprim resistant, 73.0% were tetracycline resistant, and 33.9% were sulfamethoxazole resistant. Low resistance was recorded for erythromycin (2.6%) and cefotaxime (5.2%). Overall, 72.2% of isolates were resistant to penicillin (I or R) and at least two other antimicrobials. MLST of 20 isolates showing resistance to at least four antimicrobials revealed a high diversity documented by 16 different clones, none of which had previously been associated with multidrug resistance. The resistances found may have emerged due to nonprudent antimicrobial use practices and there is a need to monitor and promote prudent antimicrobial usage in Ghana.

  14. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  15. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae from a university hospital, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srifuengfung, Somporn; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Comerungsee, Sopita

    2010-11-01

    The most frequent markers of fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae are chromosomal mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining regions of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV encoding for the gyrA, gyrB and parC, parE genes. In 2008, 6.5% of the Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in a Bangkok university hospital were resistant to ofloxacin. Using PCR and DNA sequencing, we identified mutations in both the gyrA and parC genes of four ofloxacin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates (minimum inhibitory concentrations > 32 microg/ml). Mutations were found in the gyrA gene at positions Ser81Phe, Glu85Gly, Glu85Lys and in the parC gene at position Ser79Tyr. Three isolates had mutations in both genes. Two of the isolates were serotype 6B and two were serotypes not contained in currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines. This is the first report of the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae in Thailand.

  16. Inference of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Among Diverse Group A Streptococcus Strains Using emm Sequencing and Multilocus Genotyping Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-04

    pneumonia . Less frequently, it can cause severe symptoms such as toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing fasciitis, and sterile rheumatic sequelae [1]. Penicillin ... Pneumonia outbreak associated with group A Streptococcus at a military training facility. Clin Infect Dis 40: 511–518. 17. Lamagni TL, Neal S, Keshishian C...Macrolide resistance and erythromycin resistance determinants among Belgian Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. J Antimicrob

  17. National Department of Defense Surveillance for Invasive Streptococcus Pneumoniae: Antibiotic Resistance, Serotype Distribution, and Arbitrarily Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-15

    penicillin -susceptible and peni- cillin-resistant Streptococcnspneuttmoniae serotypes in Canada. J Infect Dis Streptococcus pneumoniae Surveillance Group...Gray for the Streptococcus pneumonia Surveillance Group Report No. 00-44 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH...Defense Surveillance for Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae : Antibiotic Resistance, Serotype Distribution, and Arbitrarily Primed Polymerase Chain

  18. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Onkar; O’Seaghdha, Maghnus; Velarde, Jorge J.; Wessels, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS) has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase). When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO), and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase) that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells. PMID:26938870

  19. Genes Involved in Bacitracin Resistance in Streptococcus mutans†

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Shibata, Yukie; Nakano, Yoshio; Koga, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is resistant to bacitracin, which is a peptide antibiotic produced by certain species of Bacillus. The purpose of this study was to clarify the bacitracin resistance mechanism of S. mutans. We cloned and sequenced two S. mutans loci that are involved in bacitracin resistance. The rgp locus, which is located downstream from rmlD, contains six rgp genes (rgpA to rgpF) that are involved in rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide (RGP) synthesis in S. mutans. The inactivation of RGP synthesis in S. mutans resulted in an approximately fivefold-higher sensitivity to bacitracin relative to that observed for the wild-type strain Xc. The second bacitracin resistance locus comprised four mbr genes (mbrA, mbrB, mbrC, and mbrD) and was located immediately downstream from gtfC, which encodes the water-insoluble glucan-synthesizing enzyme. Although the bacitracin sensitivities of mutants that had defects in flanking genes were similar to that of the parental strain Xc, mutants that were defective in mbrA, mbrB, mbrC, or mbrD were about 100 to 120 times more sensitive to bacitracin than strain Xc. In addition, a mutant that was defective in all of the mbrABCD genes and rgpA was more sensitive to bacitracin than either the RGP or Mbr mutants. We conclude that RGP synthesis is related to bacitracin resistance in S. mutans and that the mbr genes modulate resistance to bacitracin via an unknown mechanism that is independent of RGP synthesis. PMID:12435673

  20. Penicillin resistance and serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Paulo; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Mocelin, Helena; Dias, Cícero; Ruvinsky, Raúl

    2006-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Strep. pneumoniae) is the main cause of bacterial pneumonia in children less than 5 years of age, with high mortality rates in developing countries. In 1993, the Regional System for Vaccines Group (SIREVA) of the pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO) began a study involving six Latin American countries to identify serotypes and their representativity in the new conjugated vaccines, and to determine the degree of resistance to penicillin. Serotypes 14 (highest resistance level), 5, 1, 6A/B, 23F, 7F, 9V, 19F, 18C, 19A, 9N, were prevalent in the region, with some differences among countries. Although resistance to penicillin ranged from 2% (Brazil) to 21.1% (Mexico), studies have shown that pneumonia caused by Strep. pneumoniae with diminished sensitivity to penillin can be treated with this antibiotic. Only 58% of the serotypes isolated in the region studied were represented in the seven-valent vaccine. Continual surveillance is essential to determine which formulation of conjugated vaccine will be suitable for use in Latin America.

  1. Streptococcus pyogenes polymyxin B-resistant mutants display enhanced ExPortal integrity.

    PubMed

    Port, Gary C; Vega, Luis A; Nylander, Andrew B; Caparon, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The ExPortal protein secretion organelle in Streptococcus pyogenes is an anionic phospholipid-containing membrane microdomain enriched in Sec translocons and postsecretion protein biogenesis factors. Polymyxin B binds to and disrupts ExPortal integrity, resulting in defective secretion of several toxins. To gain insight into factors that influence ExPortal organization, a genetic screen was conducted to select for spontaneous polymyxin B-resistant mutants displaying enhanced ExPortal integrity. Whole-genome resequencing of 25 resistant mutants revealed from one to four mutations per mutant genome clustered primarily within a core set of 10 gene groups. Construction of mutants with individual deletions or insertions demonstrated that 7 core genes confer resistance and enhanced ExPortal integrity through loss of function, while 3 were likely due to gain of function and/or combinatorial effects. Core resistance genes include a transcriptional regulator of lipid biosynthesis, several genes involved in nutrient acquisition, and a variety of genes involved in stress responses. Two members of the latter class also function as novel regulators of the secreted SpeB cysteine protease. Analysis of the most frequently isolated mutation, a single nucleotide deletion in a track of 9 consecutive adenine residues in pstS, encoding a component of a high-affinity Pi transporter, suggests that this sequence functions as a molecular switch to facilitate stress adaptation. Together, these data suggest the existence of a membrane stress response that promotes enhanced ExPortal integrity and resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  2. Contribution of IL-1 to resistance to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Daniel; Ling, Eduard; Feldman, Galia; Benharroch, Daniel; Voronov, Elena; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Dagan, Ron; Apte, Ron N; Mizrachi-Nebenzahl, Yaffa

    2008-09-01

    The role of IL-1 in susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection was studied in mice deficient in genes of the IL-1 family [i.e. IL-1alpha-/-, IL-1beta-/-, IL-1alpha/beta-/- and IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra)-/- mice] following intra-nasal inoculation. Intra-nasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae of IL-1beta-/- and IL-1alpha/beta-/- mice displayed significantly lower survival rates and higher nasopharyngeal and lung bacterial load as compared with control, IL-1alpha-/- and IL-1Ra-/- mice. Treatment of IL-1beta-/- mice with rIL-1beta significantly improved their survival. A significant increase in blood neutrophils was found in control, IL-1alpha-/- and IL-1Ra-/- but not in IL-1beta-/- and IL-1alpha/beta-/- mice. Local infiltrates of neutrophils and relatively preserved organ architecture were observed in the lungs of IL-1alpha-/- and control mice. However, S. pneumoniae-infected IL-1beta-/-, IL-1alpha/beta-/- and IL-1Ra-/- mice demonstrated diffuse pneumonia and tissue damage. Altogether, all three isoforms contribute to protection against S. pneumoniae; our results point to differential role of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in the pathogenesis and control of S. pneumoniae infection and suggest that IL-1beta has a major role in resistance to primary pneumococcal infection while the role of IL-1alpha is less important.

  3. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. Material/Methods Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. Results Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. Conclusions SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  4. Is Streptococcus pyogenes Resistant or Susceptible to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole?

    PubMed Central

    Lilliebridge, Rachael A.; Tong, Steven Y. C.; Baird, Robert W.; Ward, Peter; McDonald, Malcolm I.; Currie, Bart J.; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is commonly believed to be resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), resulting in reservations about using SXT for skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) where S. pyogenes is involved. S. pyogenes' in vitro susceptibility to SXT depends on the medium's thymidine content. Thymidine allows S. pyogenes to bypass the sulfur-mediated inhibition of folate metabolism and, historically, has resulted in apparently reduced susceptibility of S. pyogenes to sulfur antibacterials. The low thymidine concentration in Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) is now regulated. We explored S. pyogenes susceptibility to SXT on various media. Using two sets of 100 clinical S. pyogenes isolates, we tested for susceptibility using SXT Etests on MHA containing defibrinated horse blood and 20 mg/liter β-NAD (MHF), MHA with sheep blood (MHS), MHA alone, MHA with horse blood (MHBA), and MHA with lysed horse blood (MHLHBA). European Committee on Antibacterial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints defined susceptibility (MIC, ≤1 mg/liter) and resistance (MIC, >2 mg/liter). In study 1, 99% of S. pyogenes isolates were susceptible to SXT on MHA, MHBA, and MHLHBA, with geometric mean MICs of 0.04, 0.04, and 0.05 mg/liter, respectively. In study 2, all 100 S. pyogenes isolates were susceptible to SXT on MHF, MHS, MHA, and MHLHBA with geometric mean MICs of 0.07, 0.16, 0.07, and 0.09 mg/liter, respectively. This study confirms the in vitro susceptibility of S. pyogenes to SXT, providing support for the use of SXT for SSTIs. A clinical trial using SXT for impetigo is ongoing. PMID:23052313

  5. mef(A) is the predominant macrolide resistance determinant in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bley, Christine; van der Linden, Mark; Reinert, Ralf René

    2011-05-01

    In this study, macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Germany were carefully characterised by susceptibility testing, phenotyping, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of macrolides resistance genes, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Of 2045 S. pneumoniae and 352 S. pyogenes isolates, 437 (21.4%) and 29 (8.2%), respectively, were found to be macrolide-resistant. Amongst the S. pneumoniae isolates, the most prevalent resistance marker was mef(A) (57.7%) followed by erm(B) (27.0%) and mef(E) (11.2%). Of note, the dual resistance mechanism mef(E)+erm(B) was found in a relatively high proportion (4.1%) of pneumococcal isolates. Amongst the S. pyogenes isolates, 31.0% carried mef(A), 34.5% erm(B) and 13.8% erm(A). Dissemination of a single clone [mef(A)-positive England(14)-9] has significantly contributed to the emergence of macrolide resistance amongst pneumococci in Germany.

  6. Spring forward with improved Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus resistant to Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae IB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tilapia aquaculture worldwide is valued around US $ 7 billion. Tilapia are an important source of protein for domestic (top 5 most consumed seafoods) and global food security. Two gram postitive bacteria, Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae, are responsible for billion dollar losses annually. Gen...

  7. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in the Pediatric Population in Germany during 2000-2001

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Lütticken, Rudolf; Bryskier, André; Al-Lahham, Adnan

    2003-01-01

    In a nationwide study in Germany covering 13 clinical microbiology laboratories, a total of 307 Streptococcus pyogenes (mainly pharyngitis) and 333 Streptococcus pneumoniae (respiratory tract infections) strains were collected from outpatients less than 16 years of age. The MICs of penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin A, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and telithromycin were determined by the microdilution method. In S. pyogenes isolates, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin, 0%; erythromycin A, 13.7%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin showed good activity against S. pyogenes isolates (MIC90 = 0.25 μg/ml; MIC range, 0.016 to 16 μg/ml). Three strains were found to be telithromycin-resistant (MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml). Erythromycin-resistant strains were characterized for the underlying resistance genotype, with 40.5% having the efflux type mef(A), 38.1% having the erm(A), and 9.5% having the erm(B) genotypes. emm typing of macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes isolates showed emm types 4 (45.2%), 77 (26.2%), and 12 (11.9%) to be predominant. In S. pneumoniae, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin intermediate, 7.5%; penicillin resistant, 0%; erythromycin A, 17.4%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin was highly active against pneumococcal isolates (MIC90 ≤ 0.016 μg/ml; range, 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml). The overall resistance profile of streptococcal respiratory tract isolates is still favorable, but macrolide resistance is of growing concern in Germany. PMID:12543648

  8. Serotype Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated in Algiers, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, Nadjia; Rahal, Kheira

    2003-01-01

    There are few data on antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Algeria. Among 309 strains, 34.6% were penicillin G-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae strains (25.2% were intermediate and 9.4% were resistant). Serotypes 1, 5, 14, and 6 were the most frequent in invasive child infections. A multicenter study to standardize the national guidelines is needed. PMID:12543703

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Attenuated Novobiocin-Resistant Streptococcus iniae Vaccine Strain ISNO

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dunhua; Zhang, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae ISNO is an attenuated novobiocin-resistant vaccine strain. Its full genome is 2,070,182 bp in length. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identify potential virulence genes important for pathogenesis of S. iniae and potential mechanisms associated with novobiocin resistance in this strain. PMID:24874684

  10. Determining the frequency of resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin, grepafloxacin, and gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Evans, M E

    2001-12-01

    Newer fluoroquinolones have good activity against Streptococcus pneunoniae and may be useful clinically for the treatment of pneumonia. Although resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae has been reported, it is rare. The frequency of single-step resistance and the emergence of resistance were compared in serial transfer of 49 clinical isolates of penicillin-sensitive and -resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin, grepafloxacin, and gemifloxacin. Single-step resistance frequencies to four times the minimum inhibitory concentration were 2.73 x 10(-6) (+/- 8.46 x 10(-6)) for ciprofloxacin, 1.78 x 10(-7) (+/- 4.62 x 10(-7)) for trovafloxacin, 5.45 x 10(-7) (+/- 1.24 x 10(-6)) for grepafloxacin, 6.78 x 10(-7) (+/- 1.38 x 10(-6)) for gemifloxacin, and 9.23 x 10(-8) (+/- 4.47 x 10(-7)) for levofloxacin. In serial transfer experiments, all isolates became resistant to clinically relevant levels of all fluoroquinolones after eight passages. The resistance occurred most rapidly with ciprofloxacin followed by grepafloxacin, gemifloxacin, trovafloxacin, and levofloxacin. These results show that strains with decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones occur frequently in cultures of Streptococcus pneumoniae, and this organism can readily become resistant to clinically relevant concentrations of fluoroquinolones in vitro.

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae: the evolution of antimicrobial resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Cornick, J E; Bentley, S D

    2012-07-01

    Multi drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae constitute a major public health concern worldwide. In this review we discuss how the transformable nature of the pneumococcus, in parallel with antimicrobial induced stress, contributes to the evolution of antimicrobial resistance; and how the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has affected the situation.

  12. Identification and Functional Analysis of Genome Mutations in a Fluoride-Resistant Streptococcus mutans Strain

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Bernd Willem; Zhu, Yuanfang; Li, Jiyao; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    It is known that fluoride-resistant microorganisms are different from fluoride-sensitive ones in growth, adherence and metabolic activity. It was hypothesized that these phenotypic differences were due to stable genotypic changes in the fluoride-resistant strains. However, until now, no studies have reported these genotypic changes. The aim of this study is to identify such changes in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain (C180-2FR) using whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and to examine the potential function of the identified mutations by comparing gene expression between the fluoride-sensitive (C180-2) and C180-2FR strains. We performed 50 bp paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing for both strains. Through extensive bioinformatic analysis, we were able to identify 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genome of C180-2FR, which were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Expression of the genes containing or in proximity to the SNPs in C180-2 and C180-2FR was then quantified by real-time PCR. A gene cluster containing genes coding for fluoride antiporters was up-regulated 10-fold in C180-2FR when compared to that in C180-2, independent of growth phase. Two SNPs are located in this gene cluster, one in its promoter region and the other in its protein-coding region. In addition, one gene, which codes for a putative glycerol uptake facilitator protein, was found to be down-regulated by 60% in C180-2FR at an early growth phase. The promoter region of this gene contained a SNP. No difference in expression was found for the other SNP-containing genes. In summary, using WGS sequencing, we were able to uncover genetic changes in the genome of a fluoride-resistant strain. These findings can provide new insights into the mechanism of microbial fluoride resistance. PMID:25856576

  13. Identification and functional analysis of genome mutations in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ying; Chen, Jianwei; Brandt, Bernd Willem; Zhu, Yuanfang; Li, Jiyao; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    It is known that fluoride-resistant microorganisms are different from fluoride-sensitive ones in growth, adherence and metabolic activity. It was hypothesized that these phenotypic differences were due to stable genotypic changes in the fluoride-resistant strains. However, until now, no studies have reported these genotypic changes. The aim of this study is to identify such changes in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain (C180-2FR) using whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and to examine the potential function of the identified mutations by comparing gene expression between the fluoride-sensitive (C180-2) and C180-2FR strains. We performed 50 bp paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing for both strains. Through extensive bioinformatic analysis, we were able to identify 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genome of C180-2FR, which were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Expression of the genes containing or in proximity to the SNPs in C180-2 and C180-2FR was then quantified by real-time PCR. A gene cluster containing genes coding for fluoride antiporters was up-regulated 10-fold in C180-2FR when compared to that in C180-2, independent of growth phase. Two SNPs are located in this gene cluster, one in its promoter region and the other in its protein-coding region. In addition, one gene, which codes for a putative glycerol uptake facilitator protein, was found to be down-regulated by 60% in C180-2FR at an early growth phase. The promoter region of this gene contained a SNP. No difference in expression was found for the other SNP-containing genes. In summary, using WGS sequencing, we were able to uncover genetic changes in the genome of a fluoride-resistant strain. These findings can provide new insights into the mechanism of microbial fluoride resistance.

  14. Emergence of a Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolate highly resistant to telithromycin and fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Faccone, Diego; Andres, Patricia; Galas, Marcelo; Tokumoto, Marta; Rosato, Adriana; Corso, Alejandra

    2005-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen causing community-acquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis. Macrolides, fluoroquinolones (FQs), and, recently, telithromycin (TEL) constitute primary therapeutic options, and rare cases of resistance have been reported. In this report, we describe the emergence of an S. pneumoniae clinical isolate with high-level TEL resistance (MIC, 256 microg/ml) and simultaneous resistance to FQs. Ongoing studies are oriented to elucidate the precise mechanism of resistance to TEL.

  15. Streptococcus pyogenes Polymyxin B-Resistant Mutants Display Enhanced ExPortal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Port, Gary C.; Vega, Luis A.; Nylander, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    The ExPortal protein secretion organelle in Streptococcus pyogenes is an anionic phospholipid-containing membrane microdomain enriched in Sec translocons and postsecretion protein biogenesis factors. Polymyxin B binds to and disrupts ExPortal integrity, resulting in defective secretion of several toxins. To gain insight into factors that influence ExPortal organization, a genetic screen was conducted to select for spontaneous polymyxin B-resistant mutants displaying enhanced ExPortal integrity. Whole-genome resequencing of 25 resistant mutants revealed from one to four mutations per mutant genome clustered primarily within a core set of 10 gene groups. Construction of mutants with individual deletions or insertions demonstrated that 7 core genes confer resistance and enhanced ExPortal integrity through loss of function, while 3 were likely due to gain of function and/or combinatorial effects. Core resistance genes include a transcriptional regulator of lipid biosynthesis, several genes involved in nutrient acquisition, and a variety of genes involved in stress responses. Two members of the latter class also function as novel regulators of the secreted SpeB cysteine protease. Analysis of the most frequently isolated mutation, a single nucleotide deletion in a track of 9 consecutive adenine residues in pstS, encoding a component of a high-affinity Pi transporter, suggests that this sequence functions as a molecular switch to facilitate stress adaptation. Together, these data suggest the existence of a membrane stress response that promotes enhanced ExPortal integrity and resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24794568

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes resistant to macrolides but sensitive to clindamycin: a common resistance pattern mediated by an efflux system.

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, J; Tait-Kamradt, A; Wondrack, L

    1996-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Finland, Australia, and the United Kingdom and, more recently, Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pyogenes strains from the United States were shown to have an unusual resistance pattern to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramin B antibiotics. This pattern, referred to as M resistance, consists of susceptibility to clindamycin and streptogramin B antibiotics but resistance to 14- and 15-membered macrolides. An evaluation of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes among our streptococcal strains collected from 1993 to 1995 suggested that this unusual resistance pattern is not rare. Eighty-five percent (n = 66) of the S. pneumoniae and 75% (n = 28) of the S. pyogenes strains in our collection had an M phenotype. The mechanism of M resistance was not mediated by target modification, as isolated ribosomes from a pneumococcal strain bearing the M phenotype were fully sensitive to erythromycin. Further, the presence of an erm methylase was excluded with primers specific for an erm consensus sequence. However, results of studies that determined the uptake and incorporation of radiolabeled erythromycin into cells were consistent with the presence of a macrolide efflux determinant. The putative efflux determinant in streptococci seems to be distinct from the multicomponent macrolide efflux system in coagulase-negative staphylococci. The recognition of the prevalence of the M phenotype in streptococci has implications for sensitivity testing and may have an impact on the choice of antibiotic therapy in clinical practice. PMID:8843287

  17. Streptococcus anginosus (milleri) Group Strains Isolated in Poland (1996-2012) and their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns.

    PubMed

    Obszańska, Katarzyna; Kern-Zdanowicz, Izabella; Kozińska, Aleksandra; Machura, Katarzyna; Stefaniuk, Elzbieta; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Sitkiewicz, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus constellatus form a group of related streptococcal species, namely the Streptococcus Anginosus Group (SAG). The group, previously called "milleri" had been rarely described until 1980/1990 as source of infections. Nowadays SAG bacteria are often described as pathogens causing predominantly purulent infections. The number of infections is highly underestimated, as SAG strains are often classified in the microbiology laboratory as less virulent "viridans streptococci" Epidemiological situation regarding SAG infections in Poland has been unrecognized, therefore we performed a retrospective analysis of strains isolated between 1996 and 2012. Strains suspected of belonging to SAG were re-identified using an automated biochemical approach (Vitek2) and MALDI-TOF MS. We performed first analysis of antibiotic resistance among SAG strains isolated in Poland using automated methods (Vitek2), disk diffusion tests and E-Tests. We also performed PCR detection of resistance determinants in antibiotic resistant strains. Clonal structure of analyzed strains was evaluated with PFGE and MLVF methods. All three species are difficult to distinguish using automated diagnostic methods and the same is true for automated MIC evaluation. Our analysis revealed SAG strains are rarely isolated in Poland, predominantly from purulent infections. All isolates are very diverse on the genomic level as estimated by PFGE and MLVF analyses. All analyzed strains are sensitive to penicillin, a substantial group of strains is resistant to macrolides and the majority of strains are resistant to tetracycline.

  18. mefE is necessary for the erythromycin-resistant M phenotype in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A; Clancy, J; Cronan, M; Dib-Hajj, F; Wondrack, L; Yuan, W; Sutcliffe, J

    1997-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that a significant number of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes strains contain a determinant that mediates resistance via a putative efflux pump. The gene encoding the erythromycin-resistant determinant was cloned and sequenced from three strains of S. pneumoniae bearing the M phenotype (macrolide resistant but clindamycin and streptogramin B susceptible). The DNA sequences of mefE were nearly identical, with only 2-nucleotide differences between genes from any two strains. When the mefE sequences were compared to the mefA sequence from S. pyogenes, the two genes were found to be closely related (90% identity). Strains of S. pneumoniae were constructed to confirm that mefE is necessary to confer erythromycin resistance and to explore the substrate specificity of the pump; no substrates other than 14- and 15-membered macrolides were identified. PMID:9333056

  19. Characterization of Spectinomycin Resistance in Streptococcus suis Leads to Two Novel Insights into Drug Resistance Formation and Dissemination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kaisong; Zhang, Qiang; Song, Yajing; Zhang, Zhewen; Zhang, Anding; Xiao, Jingfa

    2016-01-01

    Spectinomycin is an aminocyclitol antibiotic used clinically to treat a variety of infections in animals. Here, we characterized drug resistance prevalence in clinical Streptococcus suis isolates and discovered a novel resistance mechanism in which the s5 mutation (Gly26Asp) results in high spectinomycin resistance. Additionally, a novel integrative and conjugative element encompassing a multidrug resistance spw_like-aadE-lnu(B)-lsa(E) cluster and a cadmium resistance operon were identified, suggesting a possible cause for the wide dissemination of spectinomycin resistance in S. suis. PMID:27458226

  20. Resistance determinants and their association with different transposons in the antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Siwiec, Radoslaw; Malm, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Multiple resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae is generally associated with their unique recombination-mediated genetic plasticity and possessing the mobile genetic elements. The aim of our study was to detect antibiotic resistance determinants and conjugative transposons in 138 antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains isolated from nasopharynx of healthy young children from Lublin, Poland. These strains resistant to tetracycline and/or to chloramphenicol/erythromycin/clindamycin were tested by PCR using the specific genes as markers. The presence of Tn916 family transposons, carrying tet(M) and int/xisTn916, was observed in all of the tested strains. Tn916 was detected in 16 strains resistant only to tetracycline. Tn6002 and Tn3872-related element were found among 99 erm(B)-carrying strains (83.8% and 3.0%, resp.). Eight strains harbouring mef(E) and erm(B) genes were detected, suggesting the presence of Tn2010 and Tn2017 transposons. Among 101 chloramphenicol-resistant strains, two variants of Tn5252-related transposon were distinguished depending on the presence of int/xis5252 genes specific for cat gene-containing Tn5252 (75.2% of strains) or int Sp23FST81 gene, specific for cat-containing ICESp23FST81 element (24.8% of strains). In 6 strains Tn916-like and Tn5252-like elements formed a Tn5253-like structure. Besides clonal dissemination of resistant strains of pneumococci in the population, horizontal transfer of conjugative transposons is an important factor of the high prevalence of antibiotic resistance.

  1. Development of live attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae as potential vaccines by selecting for resistance to sparfloxacin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, sparfloxacin was used in this study to modify 40 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae. Majority of S. agalactiae used in this study were able to develop at least 80-fold resistance to sparfloxacin. When the virulence of the sparfloxacin-resi...

  2. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through selection of resistance to sparfloxacin, an attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar was obtained from its virulent parent strain S. agalactiae 138P. The full genome of S. agalactiae 138spar is 1,838,126 bp. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identi...

  3. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of a sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine strain 138spar is 1,838,126 bp in size. The genome has 1892 coding sequences and 82 RNAs. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline. The publishing of this genome will allo...

  4. Characterization of tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus thermophilus isolates from Italian soft cheeses.

    PubMed

    Rizzotti, Lucia; La Gioia, Federica; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    2009-06-01

    Tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus thermophilus isolates from soft cheeses harbored the genes tet(S), tet(M), and tet(L). Molecular analysis of these genes revealed their expression, localization on plasmids or Tn916-Tn1545 family transposons, and their similarity with published sequences. The study highlights the importance of an accurate safety assessment of using S. thermophilus as a starter culture.

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Streptococcus pneumoniae with High-Level Resistance to Respiratory Fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Keness, Yoram; Bisharat, Naiel

    2016-03-31

    Streptococcus pneumoniaeis the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Levofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone used for treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia. Here, we describe the draft genome sequences ofS. pneumoniaewith emerging resistance to levofloxacin, resulting in failure of treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia.

  6. Molecular characterization of cadmium resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus strain 4134: an example of lateral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Schirawski, Jan; Hagens, Werner; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Van Sinderen, Douwe

    2002-11-01

    Two genes (cadC(St) and cadA(St) [subscript St represents Streptococcus thermophilus]), located on the chromosome of S. thermophilus 4134, were shown to constitute a cadmium/zinc resistance cassette. The genes seem to be organized in an operon, and their transcription is cadmium dependent in vivo. The proposed product of the cadA open reading frame (CadA(St)) is highly similar to P-type cadmium efflux ATPases, whereas the predicted protein encoded by cadC(St) (CadC(St)) shows high similarity to ArsR-type regulatory proteins. The observed homologies and G+C content of this cassette and surrounding regions suggest that this DNA was derived from Lactococcus lactis and may have been introduced relatively recently into the S. thermophilus 4134 genome by a lateral gene transfer event. The complete cassette confers cadmium and zinc resistance to both S. thermophilus and L. lactis, but expression of cadA(St) alone is sufficient to give resistance. By using electrophoretic mobility shift assays it was shown that the CadC(St) protein is a DNA binding protein that binds specifically to its own promoter region, possibly to two copies of an inverted repeat, and that this CadC(St)-DNA interaction is lost in the presence of cadmium. Using lacZ fusion constructs it was shown that the cadmium-dependent expression of CadA(St) is mediated by the negative regulator CadC(St). A model for the regulation of the expression of cadmium resistance in S. thermophilus is discussed.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Cadmium Resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus Strain 4134: an Example of Lateral Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Schirawski, Jan; Hagens, Werner; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2002-01-01

    Two genes (cadCSt and cadASt [subscript St represents Streptococcus thermophilus]), located on the chromosome of S. thermophilus 4134, were shown to constitute a cadmium/zinc resistance cassette. The genes seem to be organized in an operon, and their transcription is cadmium dependent in vivo. The proposed product of the cadA open reading frame (CadASt) is highly similar to P-type cadmium efflux ATPases, whereas the predicted protein encoded by cadCSt (CadCSt) shows high similarity to ArsR-type regulatory proteins. The observed homologies and G+C content of this cassette and surrounding regions suggest that this DNA was derived from Lactococcus lactis and may have been introduced relatively recently into the S. thermophilus 4134 genome by a lateral gene transfer event. The complete cassette confers cadmium and zinc resistance to both S. thermophilus and L. lactis, but expression of cadASt alone is sufficient to give resistance. By using electrophoretic mobility shift assays it was shown that the CadCSt protein is a DNA binding protein that binds specifically to its own promoter region, possibly to two copies of an inverted repeat, and that this CadCSt-DNA interaction is lost in the presence of cadmium. Using lacZ fusion constructs it was shown that the cadmium-dependent expression of CadASt is mediated by the negative regulator CadCSt. A model for the regulation of the expression of cadmium resistance in S. thermophilus is discussed. PMID:12406744

  8. Transduction of the Streptococcus pyogenes bacteriophage Φm46.1, carrying resistance genes mef(A) and tet(O), to other Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Giovanetti, Eleonora; Brenciani, Andrea; Morroni, Gianluca; Tiberi, Erika; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Mingoia, Marina; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-01-01

    Φm46.1 - Streptococcus pyogenes bacteriophage carrying mef(A) and tet(O), respectively, encoding resistance to macrolides (M phenotype) and tetracycline - is widespread in S. pyogenes but has not been reported outside this species. Φm46.1 is transferable in vitro among S. pyogenes isolates, but no information is available about its transferability to other Streptococcus species. We thus investigated Φm46.1 for its ability to be transduced in vitro to recipients of different Streptococcus species. Transductants were obtained from recipients of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus suis. Retransfer was always achieved, and from S. suis to S. pyogenes occurred at a much greater frequency than in the opposite direction. In transductants Φm46.1 retained its functional properties, such as inducibility with mitomycin C, presence both as a prophage and as a free circular form, and transferability. The transductants shared the same Φm46.1 chromosomal integration site as the donor, at the 3' end of a conserved RNA uracil methyltransferase (rum) gene, which is an integration hotspot for a variety of genetic elements. No transfer occurred to recipients of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus salivarius, even though rum-like genes were also detected in the sequenced genomes of these species. A largely overlapping 18-bp critical sequence, where the site-specific recombination process presumably takes place, was identified in the rum genes of all recipients, including those of the species yielding no transductants. Growth assays to evaluate the fitness cost of Φm46.1 acquisition disclosed a negligible impact on S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, and S. gordonii transductants and a noticeable fitness advantage in S. suis. The S. suis transductant also displayed marked overexpression of the autolysin-encoding gene atl.

  9. [Emergence of macrolide resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains in pediatric patients in France].

    PubMed

    Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Doit, C; Deforche, D; Brahimi, N; Francois, M; Van den Abbeele, T; Bingen, E

    2004-10-01

    A total of 206 recent throat isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes collected between 2002 and 2004 from children were tested for their susceptibility to penicillin, amoxycillin, erythromycin, clarythromycin and clindamycin. The erythromycin resistant isolates were further studied for their genetic mechanism of resistance by means of PCR. In all, 14.5% of the strains were erythromycin resistant and 13.5 and 1% expressed the constitutive MLS(B) and M resistance phenotypes and harbored the ermB and mef A genes respectively.

  10. Persistence and complex evolution of fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clone.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Debby; Schwaber, Mitchell J; Adler, Amos; Masarwa, Samira; Edgar, Rotem; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwartz, David; Porat, Nurith; Kotlovsky, Tali; Polivkin, Nikolay; Weinberg, Irina; Lazary, Avraham; Ohana, Nissim; Dagan, Ron

    2014-05-01

    Prolonged outbreaks of multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in health care facilities are uncommon. We found persistent transmission of a fluroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae clone during 2006-2011 in a post-acute care facility in Israel, despite mandatory vaccination and fluoroquinolone restriction. Capsular switch and multiple antimicrobial nonsusceptibility mutations occurred within this single clone. The persistent transmission of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae during a 5-year period underscores the importance of long-term care facilities as potential reservoirs of multidrug-resistant streptococci.

  11. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  12. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress.

  13. Fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Strains with Topoisomerase IV Recombinant Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Balsalobre, Luz; de la Campa, Adela G.

    2008-01-01

    The low prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cpr) Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates carrying recombinant topoisomerase IV genes could be attributed to a fitness cost imposed by the horizontal transfer, which often implies the acquisition of larger-than-normal parE-parC intergenic regions. A study of the transcription of these genes and of the fitness cost for 24 isogenic Cpr strains was performed. Six first-level transformants were obtained either with PCR products containing the parC quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of S. pneumoniae Cpr mutants with point mutations or with a PCR product that includes parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR from a Cpr Streptococcus mitis isolate. The latter yielded two strains, T6 and T11, carrying parC-QRDR and parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR, respectively. These first-level transformants were used as recipients in further transformations with the gyrA-QRDR PCR products to obtain 18 second-level transformants. In addition, strain Tr7 (which contains the GyrA E85K change) was used. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that parE and parC were cotranscribed in R6, T6, and T11; and a single promoter located upstream of parE was identified in R6 by primer extension. The fitness of the transformants was estimated by pairwise competition with R6 in both one-cycle and two-cycle experiments. In the one-cycle experiments, most strains carrying the GyrA E85K change showed a fitness cost; the exception was recombinant T14. In the two-cycle experiments, a fitness cost was observed in most first-level transformants carrying the ParC changes S79F, S79Y, and D83Y and the GyrA E85K change; the exceptions were recombinants T6 and T11. The results suggest that there is no impediment due to a fitness cost for the spread of recombinant Cpr S. pneumoniae isolates, since some recombinants (T6, T11, and T14) exhibited an ability to compensate for the cost. PMID:18160515

  14. Fluoroquinolone resistance in atypical pneumococci and oral streptococci: evidence of horizontal gene transfer of fluoroquinolone resistance determinants from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ip, Margaret; Chau, Shirley S L; Chi, Fang; Tang, Julian; Chan, Paul K

    2007-08-01

    Atypical strains, presumed to be pneumococcus, with ciprofloxacin MICs of > or =4.0 microg/ml and unique sequence variations within the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes in comparison with the Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 strain, were examined. These strains were reidentified using phenotypic methods, including detection of optochin susceptibility, bile solubility, and agglutination by serotype-specific antisera, and genotypic methods, including detection of pneumolysin and autolysin genes by PCR, 16S rRNA sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The analysis based on concatenated sequences of the six MLST loci distinguished the "atypical" strains from pneumococci, and these strains clustered closely with S. mitis. However, all these strains and five of nine strains from the viridans streptococcal group possessed one to three gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes whose QRDR sequences clustered with those of S. pneumoniae, providing evidence of horizontal transfer of the QRDRs of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes from pneumococci into viridans streptococci. These genes also conferred fluoroquinolone resistance to viridans streptococci. In addition, the fluoroquinolone resistance determinants of 32 well-characterized Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis strains from bacteremic patients were also compared. These strains have unique amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC that were distinguishable from those in fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci and the "atypical" isolates. Both recombinational events and de novo mutations play an important role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance.

  15. In vitro selective antibiotic concentrations of beta-lactams for penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae populations.

    PubMed Central

    Negri, M C; Morosini, M I; Loza, E; Baquero, F

    1994-01-01

    Therapeutic regimens containing beta-lactam antibiotics are selecting penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae populations all over the world. The selective pressure after 4 h of exposure to different concentrations of amoxicillin, cefixime, cefuroxime, and cefotaxime for low-level or high-level penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae was evaluated in an in vitro model with mixed populations with penicillin susceptibilities of 0.015, 0.5, 1, and 2 micrograms/ml. The antibiotic concentration selecting for low-level resistance strongly reduced the susceptible population. Increasing antibiotic concentrations tended to decrease the total proportion of penicillin-resistant bacteria because of reduced numbers of the low-level-resistant population. The antibiotic concentration selecting for high-level resistance produced fewer resistant populations, but most of the organisms selected represented high-level resistance. In general, amoxicillin was a good selector for the low-level-resistant population and a poor selector for high-level resistance; cefuroxime and cefotaxime were poor selectors for low-level resistance and better selectors than amoxicillin for high-level penicillin resistance. Cefixime was the best selector of low-level penicillin resistance. When only resistant populations were mixed, the strains with high-level resistance were selected even at low antibiotic concentrations. Determination of the effects of selective antibiotic concentrations on mixed cultures of bacteria expressing different antibiotic resistance levels may help researchers to understand the ecology and epidemiology of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae populations. PMID:8141563

  16. Macrolide resistance gene mreA of Streptococcus agalactiae encodes a flavokinase.

    PubMed

    Clarebout, G; Villers, C; Leclercq, R

    2001-08-01

    The mreA gene from Streptococcus agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta, resistant to macrolides and clindamycin by active efflux, has recently been cloned in Escherichia coli, where it was reported to confer macrolide resistance (J. Clancy, F. Dib-Hajj, J. W. Petitpas, and W. Yuan, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:2719--2723, 1997). Cumulative data suggested that the mreA gene was located on the chromosome of S. agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of mreA revealed significant homology with several bifunctional flavokinases/(flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) synthetases, which convert riboflavin to flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and FMN to FAD, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography experiments showed that the mreA gene product had a monofunctional flavokinase activity, similar to that of RibR from Bacillus subtilis. Sequences identical to those of the mreA gene and of a 121-bp upstream region containing a putative promoter were detected in strains of S. agalactiae UCN4, UCN5, and UCN6 susceptible to macrolides. mreA and its allele from S. agalactiae UCN4 were cloned on the shuttle vector pAT28. Both constructs were introduced into E. coli, where they conferred a similar two- to fourfold increase in the MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, and clindamycin. The MICs of a variety of other molecules, including crystal violet, acriflavin, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and antibiotics, such as certain cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, nalidixic acid, novobiocin, and rifampin, were also increased. In contrast, resistance to these compounds was not detected when the constructs were introduced into E. faecalis JH2-2. In conclusion, the mreA gene was probably resident in S. agalactiae and may encode a metabolic function. We could not provide any evidence that it was responsible for macrolide resistance in S. agalactiae COH31 gamma/delta; broad-spectrum resistance conferred by the gene in E. coli could involve multidrug efflux pumps

  17. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  18. Screening for cephalosporin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae with the Kirby-Bauer disk susceptibility test.

    PubMed

    Friedland, I R; Shelton, S; McCracken, G H

    1993-06-01

    Kirby-Bauer disk susceptibility tests with five standard cephalosporin disks were performed on 23 penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates for which ceftriaxone MICs were 0.125 to 4 micrograms/ml. Cefuroxime disk inhibition zone diameters distinguished clearly isolates for which ceftriaxone MICs were > or = 2 micrograms/ml from more susceptible strains, whereas cephalothin, ceftizoxime, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone disks distinguished these isolates less clearly than the cefuroxime disk did.

  19. Characterization of Tetracycline-Resistant Streptococcus thermophilus Isolates from Italian Soft Cheeses▿

    PubMed Central

    Rizzotti, Lucia; La Gioia, Federica; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus thermophilus isolates from soft cheeses harbored the genes tet(S), tet(M), and tet(L). Molecular analysis of these genes revealed their expression, localization on plasmids or Tn916-Tn1545 family transposons, and their similarity with published sequences. The study highlights the importance of an accurate safety assessment of using S. thermophilus as a starter culture. PMID:19395571

  20. Fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae isolates from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Faccone, D; Guerriero, L; Méndez, E; Errecalde, L; Cano, H; Yoyas, N; Togneri, A; Romanowski, V; Galas, M; Whonet, Red; Corso, A

    2010-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance is a growing problem that has only recently emerged in S. agalactiae. Between 2005-2007, WHONET--Argentina network evaluated levofloxacin susceptibility in 1128 clinical S. agalactiae isolates, 10 (0.9%) of which proved to be resistant. Nine of them had come from 5 hospitals (in Buenos Aires City and 4 Argentinean provinces) and recovered from urine (n=7) and vaginal screening cultures (n=2). Three strains were also resistant to macrolides, lincosamides and B streptogramins due to the ermA gene. All nine fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates bore the same two mutations, Ser79Phe in ParC and Ser81Leu in GyrA proteins. Genetic relationships were analyzed by Apal-PFGE and two clones were determined, A (n=6) and B (n=3). To our knowledge, these are the first fluoroquinolone-resistant S. agalactiae isolates detected in Latin America.

  1. Connection between trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Nyberg, Solja T; Bergman, Miika; Voipio, Tinna; Paakkari, Pirkko; Huovinen, Pentti; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2008-07-01

    The association between trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among the major respiratory tract pathogens was investigated by comparing regional consumption of the drug to regional resistance in the following year in 21 central hospital districts in Finland. A total of 23,530 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 28,320 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 14,138 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates were tested for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptibility during the study period (1998-2004). Among the S. pneumoniae isolates, a statistically significant connection was found between regional consumption and resistance. No statistically significant connection was found between regional trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates. According to our results, it seems that only in pneumococci can the development of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance be influenced by restricting its use. However, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains an important antimicrobial agent because of its reasonable price. Hence, resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole among these pathogens needs continuous monitoring.

  2. Connection between Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Use and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Bergman, Miika; Voipio, Tinna; Paakkari, Pirkko; Huovinen, Pentti; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    The association between trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among the major respiratory tract pathogens was investigated by comparing regional consumption of the drug to regional resistance in the following year in 21 central hospital districts in Finland. A total of 23,530 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 28,320 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 14,138 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates were tested for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptibility during the study period (1998-2004). Among the S. pneumoniae isolates, a statistically significant connection was found between regional consumption and resistance. No statistically significant connection was found between regional trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates. According to our results, it seems that only in pneumococci can the development of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance be influenced by restricting its use. However, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains an important antimicrobial agent because of its reasonable price. Hence, resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole among these pathogens needs continuous monitoring. PMID:18443116

  3. Comparative Genomic Analysis of the Streptococcus dysgalactiae Species Group: Gene Content, Molecular Adaptation, and Promoter Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Haruo; Lefébure, Tristan; Hubisz, Melissa Jane; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina; Lang, Ping; Siepel, Adam; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomics of closely related bacterial species with different pathogenesis and host preference can provide a means of identifying the specifics of adaptive differences. Streptococcus dysgalactiae (SD) is comprised of two subspecies: S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis is both a human commensal organism and a human pathogen, and S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae is strictly an animal pathogen. Here, we present complete genome sequences for both taxa, with analyses involving other species of Streptococcus but focusing on adaptation in the SD species group. We found little evidence for enrichment in biochemical categories of genes carried by each SD strain, however, differences in the virulence gene repertoire were apparent. Some of the differences could be ascribed to prophage and integrative conjugative elements. We identified approximately 9% of the nonrecombinant core genome to be under positive selection, some of which involved known virulence factors in other bacteria. Analyses of proteomes by pooling data across genes, by biochemical category, clade, or branch, provided evidence for increased rates of evolution in several gene categories, as well as external branches of the tree. Promoters were primarily evolving under purifying selection but with certain categories of genes evolving faster. Many of these fast-evolving categories were the same as those associated with rapid evolution in proteins. Overall, these results suggest that adaptation to changing environments and new hosts in the SD species group has involved the acquisition of key virulence genes along with selection of orthologous protein-coding loci and operon promoters. PMID:21282711

  4. A novel gene amplification causes upregulation of the PatAB ABC transporter and fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Baylay, Alison J; Ivens, Alasdair; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the ABC transporter genes patA and patB confers efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and is also linked to pneumococcal stress responses. Although upregulation of patAB has been observed in many laboratory mutants and clinical isolates, the regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of these genes are unknown. In this study, we aimed to identify the cause of high-level constitutive overexpression of patAB in M184, a multidrug-resistant mutant of S. pneumoniae R6. Using a whole-genome transformation and sequencing approach, we identified a novel duplication of a 9.2-kb region of the M184 genome which included the patAB genes. This duplication did not affect growth and was semistable with a low segregation rate. The expression levels of patAB in M184 were much higher than those that could be fully explained by doubling of the gene dosage alone, and inactivation of the first copy of patA had no effect on multidrug resistance. Using a green fluorescent protein reporter system, increased patAB expression was ascribed to transcriptional read-through from a tRNA gene upstream of the second copy of patAB. This is the first report of a large genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae and also of a genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance by a promoter switching mechanism.

  5. Consumption patterns and in vitro resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Verhaegen, Jan; van Bleyenbergh, Pascal; Peetermans, Willy E; Decramer, Marc

    2011-06-01

    This article analyzes patterns of consumption of fluoroquinolones and documents the in vitro resistances of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates to fluoroquinolones in the ambulatory care setting in Belgium over time. The volume of fluoroquinolone consumption has fallen consistently since 2003. Fluoroquinolones were used primarily for their registered indications (i.e., urinary tract infections and lower respiratory tract infections). The MIC distributions of moxifloxacin and levofloxacin in S. pneumoniae isolates remained stable during 2004 to 2009, and the level of resistance to moxifloxacin and levofloxacin was low (≤1%).

  6. Apparent involvement of a multidrug transporter in the fluoroquinolone resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, N N; Neyfakh, A A

    1997-01-01

    A Streptococcus pneumoniae strain selected for resistance to ethidium bromide demonstrated enhanced energy-dependent efflux of this toxic dye. Both the ethidium resistance and the ethidium efflux could be inhibited by the plant alkaloid reserpine. The ethidium-selected cells demonstrated cross-resistance to the fluoroquinolones norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin; this resistance could also be completely reversed by reserpine. Furthermore, reserpine potentiated the susceptibility of wild-type S. pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones and ethidium. The most plausible explanation for these results is that S. pneumoniae, like some other gram-positive bacteria, expresses a reserpine-sensitive multidrug transporter, which may play an important role in both intrinsic and acquired resistances of this pathogen to fluoroquinolone therapy. PMID:9174208

  7. Intravitreal Ampicillin Sodium for Antibiotic-Resistant Endophthalmitis: Streptococcus uberis First Human Intraocular Infection Report

    PubMed Central

    Velez-Montoya, Raul; Rascón-Vargas, Dulce; Mieler, William F.; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; Morales-Cantón, Virgilio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment with intravitreal ampicillin sodium of a postoperative endophthalmitis case due to Streptococcus uberis; an environmental pathogen commonly seen in mastitis cases of lactating cows. Methods. Case Report. A 52-year-old, Hispanic diabetic patient who suddenly developed severe pain and severe loss of vision, following vitrectomy. Results. The patient was diagnosed with postoperative endophthalmitis secondary to a highly resistant strain of Streptococcus uberis that did not respond to intravitreal antibiotics. He was treated with an air-fluid interchange, anterior chamber washout, intravitreal ampicillin sodium (5 mg/0.1 mL), and silicon oil tamponade (5000 ck). The eye was anatomically stabilized, though there was no functional recovery. Conclusion. Streptococcus uberis is an uncommon pathogen to the human eye, which has unique features that help the strain in developing resistance to antibiotics. While treatment with intravitreal ampicillin is feasible, there are still concerns about its possible toxicity. PMID:20706679

  8. Streptococcus agalactiae from pregnant women: antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance mechanisms and molecular typing.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Bezares, B; Azcona-Gutiérrez, J M; Martin, C; Jareño, M S; Torres, C; Sáenz, Y

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance mechanisms, virulence genes and clonal relationships of macrolide- and/or lincosamide-resistant (M+/-LR) Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) isolates from pregnant women in La Rioja in Northern Spain, a region with a significant immigrant population. In total 375 GBS isolates were recovered during 2011. About three-quarters of isolates were from European nationals and the remainder distributed among 23 other nationalities. Seventy-five (20%) were classified as M+/-LR strains and 28 (37%) of these were resistant to ⩾3 classes of antibiotics. Capsular serotypes III (29·3%), V (21·3%) and II (12%) were the most frequent. A wide variety of antibiotic resistance genes were detected in M+/-LR strains; notably, 5·3% harboured the lsa(C) gene associated with cross-resistance, and tet(W) was identified in a single strain. We report, for the first time, the detection of cadmium and copper resistance encoded by tcrB + cadA + cadC genes in 20 M+/-LR strains, which raises the possibility of co-selection of antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance disseminated through mobile genetic elements. The M+/-LR strains were highly diverse by DNA macrorestriction profiles (65 patterns) and 16 multilocus sequence types (STs) distributed among six clonal complexes; the most frequent were ST1, ST19, and ST12, and two strains were novel (ST586 and ST601). In conclusion, a wide diversity of genetic lineages of macrolide, lincosamide and heavy-metal- resistant GBS strains was observed in an ethnically diverse maternal population.

  9. Antibodies against a Surface Protein of Streptococcus pyogenes Promote a Pathological Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Fredrik; Mörgelin, Matthias; Shannon, Oonagh; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Herwald, Heiko; Olin, Anders I.; Björck, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) caused by Streptococcus pyogenes is a clinical condition with a high mortality rate despite modern intensive care. A key feature of STSS is excessive plasma leakage leading to hypovolemic hypotension, disturbed microcirculation and multiorgan failure. Previous work has identified a virulence mechanism in STSS where M1 protein of S. pyogenes forms complexes with fibrinogen that activate neutrophils to release heparin-binding protein (HBP), an inducer of vascular leakage. Here, we report a marked inter-individual difference in the response to M1 protein–induced HBP release, a difference found to be related to IgG antibodies directed against the central region of the M1 protein. To elicit massive HBP release, such antibodies need to be part of the M1 protein–fibrinogen complexes. The data add a novel aspect to bacterial pathogenesis where antibodies contribute to the severity of disease by promoting a pathologic inflammatory response. PMID:18787689

  10. Two-Year Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae in Four African Cities

    PubMed Central

    Benbachir, Mohamed; Benredjeb, Saida; Boye, Cheick Saadbouh; Dosso, Mireille; Belabbes, Houria; Kamoun, Aouatef; Kaire, Omar; Elmdaghri, Naima

    2001-01-01

    Worldwide spread of antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major problem. However, data from West and North African countries are scarce. To study the level of resistance and compare the situations in different cities, a prospective study was conducted in Abidjan (Ivory Coast), Casablanca (Morocco), Dakar (Senegal), and Tunis (Tunisia), from 1996 to 1997. The resistances to eight antibiotics of 375 isolates were studied by E test, and the results were interpreted using the breakpoints recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Overall, 30.4% of the isolates were nonsusceptible to penicillin G (25.6% were intermediate and 4.8% were resistant). Amoxicillin (96.3% were susceptible) and parenteral third-generation cephalosporins (92.7%) were highly active. Resistance to chloramphenicol was detected in 8.6% of the isolates. High levels of resistance were noted for erythromycin (28%), tetracycline (38.3%), and cotrimoxazole (36.4%). Resistance to rifampin was rare (2.1%). There were significant differences in resistance rates between individual countries. Multiple resistance was more frequent in penicillin-nonsusceptible isolates than in penicillin-susceptible isolates. Recommendations for treatment could be generated from these results in each participating country. PMID:11158769

  11. Genomic analyses of DNA transformation and penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Fani, Fereshteh; Leprohon, Philippe; Zhanel, George G; Bergeron, Michel G; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in penicillin-binding proteins, the target enzymes for β-lactam antibiotics, are recognized as primary penicillin resistance mechanisms in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Few studies have analyzed penicillin resistance at the genome scale, however, and we report the sequencing of S. pneumoniae R6 transformants generated while reconstructing the penicillin resistance phenotypes from three penicillin-resistant clinical isolates by serial genome transformation. The genome sequences of the three last-level transformants T2-18209, T5-1983, and T3-55938 revealed that 16.2 kb, 82.7 kb, and 137.2 kb of their genomes had been replaced with 5, 20, and 37 recombinant sequence segments derived from their respective parental clinical isolates, documenting the extent of DNA transformation between strains. A role in penicillin resistance was confirmed for some of the mutations identified in the transformants. Several multiple recombination events were also found to have happened at single loci coding for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that increase resistance. Sequencing of the transformants with MICs for penicillin similar to those of the parent clinical strains confirmed the importance of mosaic PBP2x, -2b, and -1a as a driving force in penicillin resistance. A role in resistance for mosaic PBP2a was also observed for two of the resistant clinical isolates.

  12. Predominant role of msr(D) over mef(A) in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Hata, Nanako; Matsumoto, Masakado; Isaka, Masanori; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is reported to be increasing. mef(A) gene-positive macrolide-resistant emm1 strains are thought to possibly contribute to the rise in the frequency of STSS. Although analyses of macrolide-resistant mechanisms, including mef(A) resistance, have been performed mainly in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the role of this gene in Streptococcus pyogenes has not been completely investigated. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, we established the first mef(A)-knockout strain using an emm1-type S. pyogenes strain, and tested its susceptibility to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities were almost identical to those of the parental strain. Hence, we established a knockout strain for another gene, msr(D), that is located immediately downstream of mef(A). The macrolide resistances of the resulting strain significantly decreased, and were further altered when both mef(A) and msr(D) were knocked out. The introduction of the msr(D) gene into a macrolide-sensitive strain conferred more resistance than the introduction of the mef(A) gene. The erythromycin susceptibilities of knockout strains were further dissected using two additional emm4- and emm75-type S. pyogenes strains. We found almost identical results for both strains except for the mef(A) knockout emm4 type, whose susceptibility was altered, although the change was less than that for the msr(D) knockout. These results suggest that both mef(A) and msr(D) are involved in macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes, and that the msr(D) gene plays a more predominant role in macrolide resistance than mef(A).

  13. Saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 associates with dental plaque and caries experience.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2007-01-01

    Colonization of enamel surfaces by Streptococcus mutans is thought to be initiated by the attachment of bacteria to a saliva-derived conditioning film (acquired pellicle). However, the clinical relevance of the contribution of saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in biofilm formation has not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to correlate saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion with biofilm formation in humans. We correlated all measurements of salivary factors and dental plaque formation in 70 healthy subjects. Dental plaque development after thorough professional teeth cleaning correlated positively with S. mutans adhesion onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite pellets and the glycoprotein content of either parotid or whole saliva. Saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion and glycoprotein content were also positively correlated with each other in parotid and whole saliva. By contrast, neither salivary mutans streptococci, Lactobacillus nor Candida correlated with biofilm formation. Parotid saliva-mediated S. mutans adhesion was significantly higher in 12 caries-experienced (CE) subjects than in 9 caries-inexperienced (CI) subjects. Salivary S. mutans adhesion was significantly less (p < 0.01) in the CI group than in the CE group. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the initial S. mutans adhesion, modulated by salivary protein adsorption onto the enamel surface, as a possible correlate of susceptibility to dental plaque and caries.

  14. Evolving trends in Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance: implications for therapy of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Jacobs, Michael R; Sader, Helio S

    2010-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major infectious disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality and utilisation of healthcare resources. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), accounting for 20-60% of bacterial cases. Emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae has become a significant problem in the management of CAP. Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccine usage in children has led to significant decreases in morbidity and mortality due to S. pneumoniae in all age groups, disease management has been further complicated by the unexpected increase in resistant serotypes, such as 19A, in some regions. Until rapid and accurate diagnostic tests become available, initial treatment of CAP will remain empirical. Thus, selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for CAP must be based on prediction of the most likely pathogens and their local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. This article reviews information on antimicrobial resistance patterns amongst S. pneumoniae and implications for managing CAP.

  15. Multiple changes of penicillin-binding proteins in penicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Hakenbeck, R; Tarpay, M; Tomasz, A

    1980-01-01

    Penicillin-binding properties and characteristics of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) were investigated in several clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae differing in their susceptibilities to penicillin (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC], 0.03 to 0.5 microgram/ml) and compared with the penicillin-susceptible strain R36A (MIC, 0.07 microgram/ml). Several changes accompanied the development of resistance: the relative affinity to penicillin of whole cells, isolated membranes, and two major PBPs after in vivo or in vitro labeling decreased (with increasing resistance). Furthermore, one additional PBP (2') appeared in four of five relatively resistant strains with an MIC of 0.25 microgram/ml and higher. PBP 3 maintained the same high affinity toward penicillin in all strains under all labeling conditions. Images PMID:7425601

  16. Molecular Basis of Resistance to Selected Antimicrobial Agents in the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Mamata; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Moon, Dong Chan; Kim, Su-Ran; Jeong, Jin-Ha; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Park, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of 227 Streptococcus suis strains isolated from pigs during 2010 to 2013 showed high levels of resistance to clindamycin (95.6%), tilmicosin (94.7%), tylosin (93.8%), oxytetracycline (89.4%), chlortetracycline (86.8%), tiamulin (72.7%), neomycin (70.0%), enrofloxacin (56.4%), penicillin (56.4%), ceftiofur (55.9%), and gentamicin (55.1%). Resistance to tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolone was attributed to the tet gene, erm(B), erm(C), mph(C), and mef(A) and/or mef(E) genes, aph(3′)-IIIa and aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia genes, and single point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of ParC and GyrA, respectively. PMID:25903569

  17. Molecular Basis of Resistance to Selected Antimicrobial Agents in the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Mamata; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Moon, Dong Chan; Kim, Su-Ran; Jeong, Jin-Ha; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Park, Yong-Ho; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Characterization of 227 Streptococcus suis strains isolated from pigs during 2010 to 2013 showed high levels of resistance to clindamycin (95.6%), tilmicosin (94.7%), tylosin (93.8%), oxytetracycline (89.4%), chlortetracycline (86.8%), tiamulin (72.7%), neomycin (70.0%), enrofloxacin (56.4%), penicillin (56.4%), ceftiofur (55.9%), and gentamicin (55.1%). Resistance to tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolone was attributed to the tet gene, erm(B), erm(C), mph(C), and mef(A) and/or mef(E) genes, aph(3')-IIIa and aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia genes, and single point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of ParC and GyrA, respectively.

  18. Macrolide and Tetracycline Resistance and emm Type Distribution of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Recovered from Turkish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sayan, Murat; Tamer, Gulden Sonmez

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the susceptibilities to macrolide and tetracycline antibiotics and emm type distribution of Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated in the Kocaeli University Hospital, Turkey. A total of 127 S. pyogenes clinical isolates were tested. Eleven (9%) isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and 23 (18%) isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Ten of the erythromycin-resistant isolates were also resistant to tetracycline. By the triple-disk test, all erythromycin-resistant isolates showed the inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin-C phenotype and harbored erm(TR) gene. tet(O) was the most common tetracycline resistance gene. Among erythromycin-tetracycline coresistant isolates, seven harbored the tet(O) gene. emm 4, emm 1, emm 2,114, and emm 89 were the most common emm types. These isolates were more susceptible to erythromycin. There was considerable emm type heterogeneity in macrolide or tetracycline resistant isolates. According to our knowledge, this is the first study in which emm type distribution is investigated in Turkey. More comprehensive studies are needed to obtain true information about the epidemiology of macrolide and tetracycline resistance and emm type distribution in Turkey. PMID:20624096

  19. emm Gene distribution among erythromycin-resistant and -susceptible Italian isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Zampaloni, Claudia; Cappelletti, Paola; Prenna, Manuela; Vitali, Luca Agostino; Ripa, Sandro

    2003-03-01

    The phenotypes and genetic determinants for macrolide resistance were determined for 167 erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains. A cMLS phenotype was shown in 18% of the erythromycin-resistant strains, while inducible resistance was apparent in 31% and the M phenotype was apparent in 50%. The emm gene type of this set of resistant isolates and that of 48 erythromycin-sensitive isolates were determined. emm2 and emm48 were recorded only in the resistant strains of the M phenotype, while approximately all of the strains harboring the emm22 gene had the cMLS phenotype. More than 80% of the emm89-positive strains had the iMLS phenotype, and the same portion of emm4 strains presented the M phenotype. emm3 is recorded only among sensitive strains. The distribution of frequencies of the genetic determinant for the virulence factor M protein was significantly different both among organisms of different types of resistance and between resistant and sensitive populations of S. pyogenes under study.

  20. emm Gene Distribution among Erythromycin-Resistant and -Susceptible Italian Isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zampaloni, Claudia; Cappelletti, Paola; Prenna, Manuela; Vitali, Luca Agostino; Ripa, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    The phenotypes and genetic determinants for macrolide resistance were determined for 167 erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains. A cMLS phenotype was shown in 18% of the erythromycin-resistant strains, while inducible resistance was apparent in 31% and the M phenotype was apparent in 50%. The emm gene type of this set of resistant isolates and that of 48 erythromycin-sensitive isolates were determined. emm2 and emm48 were recorded only in the resistant strains of the M phenotype, while approximately all of the strains harboring the emm22 gene had the cMLS phenotype. More than 80% of the emm89-positive strains had the iMLS phenotype, and the same portion of emm4 strains presented the M phenotype. emm3 is recorded only among sensitive strains. The distribution of frequencies of the genetic determinant for the virulence factor M protein was significantly different both among organisms of different types of resistance and between resistant and sensitive populations of S. pyogenes under study. PMID:12624074

  1. [Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated from sterile body sites].

    PubMed

    Oznur, A K; Ozer, Serdar; Benzonana, Nur A

    2006-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae has become an important issue in the last years. Penicillin resistance rates vary among countries and among different regions in countries. It is important to know penicillin resistance rates among isolates, in planning empirical antimicrobial therapy in pneumococcal infections. In this study, the antibiotic resistance rates of S. pneumoniae strains isolated from sterile body sites were investigated with both E-test and disc diffusion methods for penicillin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, and with only disc diffusion method for chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, rifampin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), clindamycin, and tetracycline. A total of 165 strains were included into the study of which 52 were isolated from blood, 46 from cerebrospinal fluids, 25 from pleural fluids, 24 from dacryocystitis materials, 13 from tympanocentesis materials, 3 from joint fluids and 2 from wound specimens. Intermediate resistance to penicilin was 18.8%, while the resistance rates to TMP-SMX, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin and levofloxacin were detected as 21.2%, 10.9%, 9.7%, 5.4% and 0.6%, respectively. None of the isolates were highly resistant to penicillin, nor resistant to vancomycin, ceftriaxone and rifampin. In conclusion, penicillin is still the first line therapeutic agent for pneumococcal infections except for severe infections such as meningitis, in our region.

  2. Comparative Genomics Study of Multi-Drug-Resistance Mechanisms in the Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus suis R61 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anding; Wu, Jiayan; Chen, Bo; Hua, Yafeng; Yu, Jun; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Jingfa; Jin, Meilin

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis infections are a serious problem for both humans and pigs worldwide. The emergence and increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant S. suis strains pose significant clinical and societal challenges. Results In our study, we sequenced one multi-drug-resistant S. suis strain, R61, and one S. suis strain, A7, which is fully sensitive to all tested antibiotics. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that the R61 strain is phylogenetically distinct from other S. suis strains, and the genome of R61 exhibits extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity with high levels of gene gain and loss. Our results indicate that the multi-drug-resistant strain R61 has evolved three main categories of resistance. Conclusions Comparative genomic analysis of S. suis strains with diverse drug-resistant phenotypes provided evidence that horizontal gene transfer is an important evolutionary force in shaping the genome of multi-drug-resistant strain R61. In this study, we discovered novel and previously unexamined mutations that are strong candidates for conferring drug resistance. We believe that these mutations will provide crucial clues for designing new drugs against this pathogen. In addition, our work provides a clear demonstration that the use of drugs has driven the emergence of the multi-drug-resistant strain R61. PMID:21966396

  3. Molecular characterization of a novel mosaic tet(S/M) gene encoding tetracycline resistance in foodborne strains of Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Barile, Simona; Devirgiliis, Chiara; Perozzi, Giuditta

    2012-09-01

    The presence of antibiotic-resistance (AR) genes in foodborne bacteria of enteric origin represents a relevant threat to human health in the case of opportunistic pathogens, which can reach the human gut through the food chain. Streptococcus bovis is a human opportunistic pathogen often associated with infections in immune-compromised or cancer patients, and it can also be detected in the environment, including fermented foods. We have focused on the molecular characterization of a tetracycline (Tet)-resistance gene present in 39 foodborne isolates of S. bovis phenotypically resistant to this drug. The gene was identified as a novel tet(S/M) fusion, encoding a mosaic protein composed of the N-terminal 33 amino acids of Tet(S), in-frame with the Tet(M) coding sequence. Heterologous expression of the mosaic gene was found to confer Tet resistance upon Escherichia coli recipients. Moreover, the tet(S/M) gene was found to be transcriptionally inducible by Tet under the endogenous tet(S) promoter in both S. bovis and E. coli. Nucleotide sequencing of the surrounding genomic region of 16.2 kb revealed large blocks of homology with the genomes of Streptococcus infantarius and Lactococcus lactis. A subregion of about 4 kb containing mosaic tet(S/M) was flanked by two copies of the IS1216 mobile element. PCR amplification with primers directed outwards from the tet(S/M) gene identified the presence of a 4.3 kb circular form corresponding to the intervening chromosomal region between the two IS1216 elements, but lacking a replication origin. The circular element shared extensive overall homology with a region of the multidrug-resistance plasmid pK214 from Lc. lactis, containing tet(S), as well as the IS1216 transposase-containing element and intervening non-coding sequences. Linear reconstruction of the insertion events likely to have occurred within this genomic region, inferred from sequence homology, provides further evidence of the chromosomal rearrangements that drive

  4. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  5. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of macrolide and lincosamide resistance in Streptococcus uberis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Van de Leemput, E; Zadoks, R N

    2007-11-01

    Streptococcus uberis isolates (n = 55) were obtained from milk samples of cases of mild clinical mastitis in 55 dairy cows from 35 herds serviced by one veterinary practice in Mayenne, France. Isolates were tested for macrolide and lincosamide resistance by using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Erythromycin resistance was detected in 12 of the 55 (22%) isolates based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, and was encoded by ermB. This gene also conferred phenotypic resistance to pirlimycin based on MIC measurements, but the D-test was needed for detection of the resistance phenotype in the agar disc diffusion test. Isolates with ermB were also highly resistant to the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin. Seventeen of the 55 isolates (31%) were classified as resistant to spiramcyin only and as having intermediate susceptibility to spiramycin based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, respectively. The genetic mechanism behind this phenotype and its clinical relevance are unknown. The efflux pump gene mefA was not detected in any of the 55 isolates in this study. Pirlimycin resistance without macrolide resistance was encoded by the lincosamide resistance gene linB in 4 isolates. Based on current guidelines, some linB-positive isolates would be classified as susceptible by using phenotypic tests, and alternative values for the interpretation of the agar disc diffusion test are suggested. We conclude that the agar disc diffusion test is a useful indicator for macrolide and lincosamide resistance of Strep. uberis in veterinary practice, provided that the D-test is used for detection of pirlimycin resistance.

  6. Emergence and spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae with erm(B) and mef(A) resistance.

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; Jenkins, Stephen G; Brown, Steven D; Patel, Manish; Lavin, Bruce S; Klugman, Keith P

    2005-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (N = 31,001) were collected from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections during the PROTEKT US surveillance study (2000-2003). While the macrolide (erythromycin) resistance rate remained stable at approximately 29%, the prevalence of resistant isolates containing both erm(B) and mef(A) increased from 9.7% in year 1 to 16.4% in year 3, with substantial regional variability. Almost all (99.2%) dual erm(B) + mef(A) macrolide-resistant isolates exhibited multidrug resistance, whereas 98.6% and 99.0% were levofloxacin- and telithromycin-susceptible, respectively. These strains were most commonly isolated from the ear or middle-ear fluid of children. Of 152 representative erm(B)+mef(A) isolates, >90% were clonally related to the multidrug-resistant international Taiwan19F-14 clonal complex 271 (CC271). Of 366 erm(B)+mef(A) isolates from the PROTEKT global study (1999-2003), 83.3% were CC271, with the highest prevalence seen in South Africa, South Korea, and the United States. This study confirms the increasing global emergence and rapidly increasing US prevalence of this multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clone.

  7. Changes in fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae after 7-valent conjugate vaccination, Spain.

    PubMed

    de la Campa, Adela G; Ardanuy, Carmen; Balsalobre, Luz; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Marimón, Jose M; Fenoll, Asunción; Liñares, Josefina

    2009-06-01

    Among 4,215 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates obtained in Spain during 2006, 98 (2.3%) were ciprofloxacin resistant (3.6% from adults and 0.14% from children). In comparison with findings from a 2002 study, global resistance remained stable. Low-level resistance (30 isolates with MIC 4-8 microg/mL) was caused by a reserpine-sensitive efflux phenotype (n = 4) or single topoisomerase IV (parC [n = 24] or parE [n = 1]) changes. One isolate did not show reserpine-sensitive efflux or mutations. High-level resistance (68 isolates with MIC >or=16 microg/mL) was caused by changes in gyrase (gyrA) and parC or parE. New changes in parC (S80P) and gyrA (S81V, E85G) were shown to be involved in resistance by genetic transformation. Although 49 genotypes were observed, clones Spain9V-ST156 and Sweden15A-ST63 accounted for 34.7% of drug-resistant isolates. In comparison with findings from the 2002 study, clones Spain14-ST17, Spain23F-ST81, and ST8819F decreased and 4 new genotypes (ST9710A, ST57016, ST43322, and ST71733) appeared in 2006.

  8. Identification, antimicrobial resistance and molecular characterization of the human emerging pathogen Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Giovanni; Palmieri, Claudio; Marini, Emanuela; Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Creti, Roberta; Facinelli, Bruna

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively identify 22Streptococcus bovis clinical strains based on the new taxonomy, as well as to investigate their antibiotic-resistance and clonality. Strains were identified by Phoenix100 system, 16S rRNA sequencing, and two MALDI-TOF MS platforms (Bruker Biotyper, Vitek MS). Antibiotic resistance was determined both phenotypically and genotypically, and clonality was assessed by PFGE. Most of strains (63.6%) were isolated from urine, and diabetes was the most common underlying disease (31.8%). Phoenix100 system revealed all strains belonged to biotype II, and 16S rRNA sequencing identified all strains as S. gallolyticus subsp pasteurianus (SGSP). Although both MALDI-TOF MS systems correctly identified isolates to the species level, only Bruker Biotyper accurately identified to the subspecies level. Erythromycin-resistant strains (31.8%) were also clindamycin-resistant and positive for erm(B). Strains resistant to tetracycline (68.2%) were also resistant to erythromycin. PFGE showed high genetic variability identifying 17 different pulsotypes, most of which single.

  9. Changes in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus pneumonia after 7-Valent Conjugate Vaccination, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ardanuy, Carmen; Balsalobre, Luz; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Marimón, Jose M.; Fenoll, Asunción; Liñares, Josefina

    2009-01-01

    Among 4,215 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates obtained in Spain during 2006, 98 (2.3%) were ciprofloxacin resistant (3.6% from adults and 0.14% from children). In comparison with findings from a 2002 study, global resistance remained stable. Low-level resistance (30 isolates with MIC 4–8 μg/mL) was caused by a reserpine-sensitive efflux phenotype (n = 4) or single topoisomerase IV (parC [n = 24] or parE [n = 1]) changes. One isolate did not show reserpine-sensitive efflux or mutations. High-level resistance (68 isolates with MIC ≥16 μg/mL) was caused by changes in gyrase (gyrA) and parC or parE. New changes in parC (S80P) and gyrA (S81V, E85G) were shown to be involved in resistance by genetic transformation. Although 49 genotypes were observed, clones Spain9V-ST156 and Sweden15A-ST63 accounted for 34.7% of drug-resistant isolates. In comparison with findings from the 2002 study, clones Spain14-ST17, Spain23F-ST81, and ST8819F decreased and 4 new genotypes (ST9710A, ST57016, ST43322, and ST71733) appeared in 2006. PMID:19523289

  10. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C M; Honscha, M; Truong, N D; Holland, R; Hövener, B; Bryskier, A; Lütticken, R; Reinert, R R

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide-resistance was assessed in 216 consecutive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany. Seventeen isolates were resistant to erythromycin: 12 isolates revealed a macrolide (M) phenotype and harbored mefA, and five strains expressed an inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype of which four strains harbored ermA(TR) and one strain contained ermB(AM). Telithromycin (HMR 3647) and quinupristin/dalfopristin remained active particularly against the ermA(TR)-containing S. pyogenes isolates studied. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis identified multiple clones among erythromycin-resistant strains, but did not discriminate beyond the emm-type. mefA was present in three isolates either with emm2, emm12, or emm75, and in nine isolates with emm4. All four strains with ermA(TR) contained emm77, and the single strain with ermB(AM) harbored emm1. Despite the relative low rate of macrolide-resistance, these data suggest that at least three different macrolide-resistance determinants are prevalent in Germany and that mefA has spread rapidly into multiple clones of S. pyogenes.

  11. Molecular Basis for Erythromycin Resistance in Group A Streptococcus Isolated From Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Thangam

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increase in the use of erythromycin in the treatment of infections caused by bacteria other than Group A Streptococcus (GAS), which has resulted in increased resistance to this antibiotic. Erythromycin and other macrolides are alternative agents for treating GAS infections in patients, who are allergic to penicillin and its derivatives. Aim The main aim of this study was to identify frequency, pattern and genetic determinant of erythromycin resistance among the GAS isolated from skin and soft tissue infections. Materials and Methods A total 100 isolates of GAS were screened for erythromycin resistance by phenotypic and genotypic method. Results The results of the present study showed that 38% isolates were resistant to erythromycin. The iMLS (inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin) phenotype was predominant (55.26%) followed by M phenotype (26.32%) and cMLS (constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin) (18.42%). Conclusion Phenotypic and genotypic analysis showed that the MLSB phenotype with ermB mediated mechanism of resistance was found the most common (76.31%) followed by mefA (20.51%). The ermTR genes was absent in all the isolates. PMID:26672671

  12. Active efflux as a mechanism of resistance to ciprofloxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, V; Janoir, C; Kitzis, M D; Gutmann, L; Moreau, N J

    1997-01-01

    The accumulation of fluoroquinolones (FQs) was studied in a FQ-susceptible laboratory strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae (strain R6). Uptake of FQs was not saturable, was rapidly reversible, and appeared to occur by passive diffusion. In the presence of glucose, which energizes bacteria, the uptake of FQs decreased. Inhibitors of the proton motive force and ATP synthesis increased the uptake of FQs in previously energized bacteria. Similar results were observed with the various FQs tested and may be explained to be a consequence simply of the pH gradient that exists across the cytoplasmic membrane. From a clinical susceptible strain (strain SPn5907) we isolated in vitro on ciprofloxacin an FQ-resistant mutant (strain SPn5929) for which the MICs of hydrophilic molecules were greater than those of hydrophobic molecules, and the mutant was resistant to acriflavine, cetrimide, and ethidium bromide. Strain SPn5929 showed a significantly decreased uptake of ciprofloxacin, and its determinant of resistance to ciprofloxacin was transferred by transformation to susceptible laboratory strain R6 (strain R6tr5929). No mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA and parC genes were found. In the presence of arsenate or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, the levels of uptake of ciprofloxacin by the two resistant strains, SPn5929 and R6tr5929, reached the levels of uptake of their susceptible parents. These results suggest an active efflux of ciprofloxacin in strain SPn5929. PMID:9303396

  13. Comparative genome analysis of high-level penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tait-Kamradt, Amelia G; Cronan, Melissa; Dougherty, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with very high levels of penicillin resistance (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] >or=8 microg/ml) emerged in the 1990 s. Previous studies have traced the changes in penicillin binding proteins (PBP) that result in decreased penicillin susceptibility, and the role of several PBP genes in high-level resistance. In the present study, we investigated the changes that occurred at the two highest levels of penicillin resistance using NimbleGen's Comparative Genome Sequencing (CGS) technology. DNA from a highly resistant (Pen MIC 16 microg/ml) pneumococcus was used to serially transform the R6 strain to high-level resistance. Four distinct levels of penicillin resistance above the susceptible R6 strain (MIC 0.016 microg/ml) were identified. Using CGS technology, the entire genome sequences of the two highest levels of resistant transformants were examined for changes associated with the resistance phenotypes. At the third level of resistance, changes in PBPs 1a, 2b, and 2x were found, very similar to previous reports. At the fourth resistance level, two additional changes were observed in the R6 transformants. More changes were observed in PBP2x, as well as in peptidoglycan GlcNAc deacetylase (pdgA), which had a missense mutation in the coding region. Genetic transformation with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated from the high-level resistant parent containing either the additional PBP2x or mutant pdgA gene did not increase the MIC of the third-level transformant. Only when both PCR products were simultaneously transformed into the third-level transformant did colonies emerge that were at the highest level of resistance (16-32 microg/ml), equivalent to the highly resistant parent strain. This is the first instance of the involvement of a variant pdgA gene in penicillin resistance. It is also clear from these experiments and the literature that there are multiple paths to the pneumococcus achieving high

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide-Dependent DNA Release and Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Streptococcus gordonii ▿

    PubMed Central

    Itzek, Andreas; Zheng, Lanyan; Chen, Zhiyun; Merritt, Justin; Kreth, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Certain oral streptococci produce H2O2 under aerobic growth conditions to inhibit competing species like Streptococcus mutans. Additionally, H2O2 production causes the release of extracellular DNA (eDNA). eDNA can participate in several important functions: biofilm formation and cell-cell aggregation are supported by eDNA, while eDNA can serve as a nutrient and as an antimicrobial agent by chelating essential cations. eDNA contains DNA fragments of a size that has the potential to transfer genomic information. By using Streptococcus gordonii as a model organism for streptococcal H2O2 production, H2O2-dependent eDNA release was further investigated. Under defined growth conditions, the eDNA release process was shown to be entirely dependent on H2O2. Chromosomal DNA damage seems to be the intrinsic signal for the release, although only actively growing cells were proficient eDNA donors. Interestingly, the process of eDNA production was found to be coupled with the induction of the S. gordonii natural competence system. Consequently, the production of H2O2 triggered the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. These results suggest that H2O2 is potentially much more than a simple toxic metabolic by-product; rather, its production could serve as an important environmental signal that facilitates species evolution by transfer of genetic information and an increase in the mutation rate. PMID:21984796

  15. Efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-sensitive and -resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in an experimental rabbit meningitis model.

    PubMed

    Cottagnoud, P; Cottagnoud, M; Acosta, F; Stucki, A

    2013-10-01

    Ceftaroline is a new cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against resistant Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. This study tested the prodrug, ceftaroline fosamil, against a penicillin-sensitive and a penicillin-resistant strain of S. pneumoniae in an experimental rabbit meningitis model. The penetration of ceftaroline into inflamed meninges was approximately 14%. Ceftaroline fosamil was slightly superior to ceftriaxone against the penicillin-sensitive strain and significantly superior to the combination of ceftriaxone and vancomycin against the penicillin-resistant strain.

  16. Genetic Characterization of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Isolated during Ciprofloxacin Therapy from a Patient with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    de la Campa, Adela G.; Ferrandiz, María-José; Tubau, Fe; Pallarés, Román; Manresa, Federico; Liñares, Josefina

    2003-01-01

    Five Spain9V-3 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from a patient with bronchiectasis who had received long-term ciprofloxacin therapy. One ciprofloxacin-susceptible strain was isolated before treatment, and four ciprofloxacin-resistant strains were isolated during treatment. The resistant strains were derived from the susceptible strain either by a parC mutation (low-level resistance) or by parC and gyrA mutations (high-level resistance). This study shows that ciprofloxacin therapy in a patient colonized by susceptible S. pneumoniae may select fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants. PMID:12654682

  17. Tracking of chromosome dynamics in live Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals that transcription promotes chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is an essential part of the bacterial cell cycle but is poorly characterized in oval-shaped streptococci. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have tracked the dynamics of chromosome segregation in live cells of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our observations show that the chromosome segregation process last for two-thirds of the total cell cycle; the origin region segregates rapidly in the early stages of the cell cycle while nucleoid segregation finishes just before cell division. Previously we have demonstrated that the DNA-binding protein ParB and the condensin SMC promote efficient chromosome segregation, likely by an active mechanism. We now show that in the absence of SMC, cell division can occur over the unsegregated chromosomes. However, neither smc nor parB are essential in S. pneumoniae, suggesting the importance of additional mechanisms. Here we have identified the process of transcription as one of these mechanisms important for chromosome segregation in S. pneumoniae. Transcription inhibitors rifampicin and streptolydigin as well as mutants affected in transcription elongation cause chromosome segregation defects. Together, our results highlight the importance of passive (or indirect) processes such as transcription for chromosome segregation in oval-shaped bacteria.

  18. Clinical resistance and decreased susceptibility in Streptococcus suis isolates from clinically healthy fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte F; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Butaye, Patrick; Dewulf, Jeroen; Boyen, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) has often been reported as an important swine pathogen and is considered as a new emerging zoonotic agent. Consequently, it is important to be informed on its susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. In the current study, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) population distribution of nine antimicrobial agents has been determined for nasal S. suis strains, isolated from healthy pigs at the end of the fattening period from 50 closed or semiclosed pig herds. The aim of the study was to report resistance based on both clinical breakpoints (clinical resistance percentage) and epidemiological cutoff values (non-wild-type percentage). Non-wild-type percentages were high for tetracycline (98%), lincomycin (92%), tilmicosin (72%), erythromycin (70%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). Clinical resistance percentages were high for tetracycline (95%), erythromycin (66%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0.3%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). For tiamulin, for which no clinical breakpoint is available, 57% of the isolates did not belong to the wild-type population. Clinical resistance and non-wild-type percentages differed substantially for penicillin. Only 1% of the tested S. suis strains was considered as clinically resistant, whereas 47% of the strains showed acquired resistance when epidemiological cutoff values were used. In conclusion, MIC values for penicillin are gradually increasing, compared to previous reports, although pigs infected with strains showing higher MICs may still respond to treatment with penicillin. The high rate of acquired resistance against tiamulin has not been reported before. Results from this study clearly demonstrate that the use of different interpretive criteria contributes to the extent of differences in reported antimicrobial resistance results. The early detection of small changes in the MIC population distribution of isolates, while clinical failure may not yet be

  19. High-Efficiency Generation of Antibiotic-Resistant Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae by PCR and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; de la Campa, Adela G.

    2003-01-01

    We designed a method by which to generate antibiotic-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae at frequencies 4 orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous mutation rate. The method is based on the natural ability of this organism to be genetically transformed with PCR products carrying sequences homologous to its chromosome. The genes encoding the targets of ciprofloxacin (parC, encoding the ParC subunit of DNA topoisomerase IV), rifampin (rpoB, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase), and streptomycin (rpsL, encoding the S12 ribosomal protein) from susceptible laboratory strain R6 were amplified by PCR and used to transform the same strain. Resistant mutants were obtained with a frequency of 10−4 to 10−5, depending on the fidelity of the DNA polymerase used for PCR amplifications. Ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants, for which the MICs were four-to eightfold higher than that for R6, carried a single mutation of a residue in the quinolone resistance-determining region: S79 (change to A, F, or Y) or D83 (change to N or V). Rifampin-resistant strains, for which the MICs were at least 133-fold higher than that for R6, contained a single mutation within cluster I of rpoB: S482 (change to P), Q486 (change to L), D489 (change to V), or H499 (change to L or Y). Streptomycin-resistant mutants, for which the MICs were at least 64-fold higher than that for R6, carried a mutation at either K56 (change to I, R, or T) or K101 (change to E). PCR products obtained from the mutants were able to transform R6 to resistance with high efficiency (>104). This method could be used to efficiently obtain resistant mutants for any drug whose target is known. PMID:12654655

  20. [Epidemiological study of levofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from 2003 through 2006 in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sohma, Maemi; Yokozawa, Ikuyo; Kaneko, Shingaku; Satake, Sachiko

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of WHONET, free software from the World Health Organization (WHO), in a laboratory-based survey analyzing infectious disease, i.e., Streptococcus pneumoniae, and its antimicrobial susceptibility, i.e., to levofloxacin (LVFX), between 2003 and 2006 at 5 hospitals. The percentage of resistant strains (MIC > or = 8 microg/mL) isolated by the Maebashi Red Cross Hospital Laboratory between 2003 and 2005 was 3.8% (26/684 = number of resistant isolates/number of all isolates), significantly higher (p<0.001, Fisher's exact test) than the 0.5% (8/1717) recorded at 4 other hospital laboratories. In 2006 the Maebashi Red Cross Hospital Laboratory percentage of resistant strains was 0.9% (2/221) in the absence of intervention to reduce the percentage of resistant isolates, while that at 4 other hospital laboratories was 1.3% (9/ 717)--a difference not statistically significant (p = 0.574). Of resistant strains, 86% (24/28) came from patients older than 67 years and 71% (20/28) from outpatients or those newly hospitalized 1 or 2 days. Where and when pathogens are isolated are the two priority factors in epidemiological analysis. Superimposing plot of patient residences and isolated times of LVFX-resistant S. pneumoniae strains for each incidences showed no unusual trends in pathogen distribution. Analysis of possible multiple drug resistance for all LVFX-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates, i.e., resistance profile determination, indicated that no strain isolated in any one-month period shared an identical resistance profile, suggesting that the probability of a community outbreak of one specific S. pneumoniae strain is minimal. We did not find possible causes for the high resistance percentage of isolates recorded by the Maebashi Red Cross Hospital Laboratory during 2003-2005, or for the low resistance percentage for strains isolated during 2006. Analysis of our survey indicated that LVFX-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates are still rare in the

  1. Resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes in France in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bingen, E; Fitoussi, F; Doit, C; Cohen, R; Tanna, A; George, R; Loukil, C; Brahimi, N; Le Thomas, I; Deforche, D

    2000-06-01

    A total of 1,500 recent throat isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes collected between 1996 and 1999 from children throughout France were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, clindamycin, and streptogramin B. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were further studied for their genetic mechanism of resistance, by means of PCR. The clonality of these strains was also investigated by means of serotyping and ribotyping. In all, 6.2% of the strains were erythromycin resistant, and 3.4 and 2.8% expressed the constitutive MLS(B) and M resistance phenotypes and harbored the ermB and mefA genes, respectively; ermTR was recovered from one isolate which also harbored the ermB gene. Ten serotypes and 8 ribotypes were identified, but we identified 17 strains by combining serotyping with ribotyping. Among the eight ribotypes, the mefA gene was recovered from six clusters, one being predominant, while the ermB gene was recovered from four clusters, of which two were predominant.

  2. The MCP-8 gene and its possible association with resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Gui Hong; Wan, Zi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Xiao Jun; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-09-01

    Mast cell proteases play an important role in the regulation of the immune response. We identified the cDNA of the mast cell protease 8 (MCP-8) gene and analyzed its genomic structure in tilapia. The ORF of the MCP-8 was 768 bp, encoding 255 amino acids. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the MCP-8 gene was expressed predominantly in spleen, moderately in liver, blood, brain, gill, intestine, skin, and weakly expressed in kidney, muscle and eye. After a challenge with Streptococcus agalactiae, the gene was induced significantly (p < 0.05) in intestine, kidney, spleen and liver. Furthermore, we identified five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MCP-8 gene and found that three SNPs were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with resistance against S. agalactiae. However, we found no association between four SNPs and growth traits (p > 0.05). These results suggest that the MCP-8 gene play an important role in the resistance to S. agalactiae in tilapia. The SNP markers in the MCP-8 gene associated with the resistance to the bacterial pathogen may facilitate selection of tilapia resistant to the bacterial disease.

  3. Prevalence and mechanism of resistance against macrolides and lincosamides in Streptococcus suis isolates.

    PubMed

    Martel, A; Baele, M; Devriese, L A; Goossens, H; Wisselink, H J; Decostere, A; Haesebrouck, F

    2001-11-26

    Eighty-seven Streptococcus suis isolates recovered in 1999-2000 from diseased pigs, all from different farms, were screened for resistance against macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics by the disk diffusion and agar dilution test and a PCR assay, amplifying the ermB gene and the mefA/E gene. Seventy-one percent of the isolates showed constitutive resistance to macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics (MLS(B)-phenotype). All these isolates were positive for the ermB gene in the PCR, but negative for the mefA/E gene. For all strains minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against five other antimicrobial agents were determined. All strains were susceptible to penicillin. Ninety-nine percent of the isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin and tiamulin. Eighty-five percent of the strains were resistant to doxycycline. A 540bp fragment of the ermB genes of eight S. suis strains was sequenced and compared with ermB genes of five S. pneumoniae and five S. pyogenes strains of human origin. A 100% homology was found between these fragments in seven S. suis, one S. pneumoniae and three of the S. pyogenes isolates. This study demonstrates that resistance against macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B is widespread in S. suis and mediated by ribosome methylation, encoded by the ermB gene.

  4. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from Argentinian pediatric patients suffering from acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Fossati, Sofía; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Hernández, Claudia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Lopardo, Horacio; Corso, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in Argentina in 1995, representing 26% of invasive infection isolates in children under 5 years old. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from acute otitis media (AOM) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 126 S. pneumoniae isolates from 324 otherwise healthy children with a first episode of AOM were included. Twenty six of these isolates (20.6%) were resistant to erythromycin. Most frequent serotypes were: 14 (46.2%), 6A (23.1%), 19F (7.7%) and 9V (7.7%). Twenty (76.9%) carried the mefA gene, 5 (19.2%) have the ermB gene, and 1 (3.9%) both ermB + mefA. Ten clonal types were identified, mostly related to Sweden(15A)-25/ST782 (SLV63), CloneB(6A)/ST473 and England(14)-9/ ST9. This is the first study assessing the mechanisms of macrolide resistance in pneumococci isolates from pediatric AOM in Argentina and their genetic relatedness.

  5. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  6. Genetic resistance elements carrying mef subclasses other than mef(A) in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, Maria; Camilli, Romina; Barbabella, Giada; Blackman Northwood, John; Farrell, David J; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2011-07-01

    In Streptococcus pyogenes, efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance is associated with the mef gene, represented mostly by mef(A), although a small portion of strains carry different mef subclasses. We characterized the composite genetic elements, including mef subclasses other than mef(A), associated with other resistance genes in S. pyogenes isolates. Determination of the genetic elements was performed by PCR mapping. The strains carrying mosaic mef(A/E), in which the 5' region was identical to mef(A) and the 3' region was identical to mef(E), also carried tet(O). The two genes were found enclosed in an element similar to S. pyogenes prophage Φm46.1, designated the Φm46.1-like element. In S. pyogenes strains carrying mef(E) and tet(M), mef(E) was included in a typical mega element, and in some strains, it was physically associated with tet(M) in the composite element Tn2009. S. pyogenes strains carrying mef(I) also carried catQ; the two genes were linked in a fragment representing a portion of the 5216IQ complex of Streptococcus pneumoniae, designated the defective IQ element. In the only isolate carrying a novel mef gene, this was associated with catQ and tet(M) in a genetic element similar to the 5216IQ complex of S. pneumoniae (5216IQ-like complex), suggesting that the novel mef is in fact a variant of mef(I). This study demonstrates that the composite elements containing mef are shared between S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae and suggests that it is important to distinguish the mef subclass on the basis of the genetic element containing it.

  7. Streptococcus suis in invasive human infections in Poland: clonality and determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Bojarska, A; Molska, E; Janas, K; Skoczyńska, A; Stefaniuk, E; Hryniewicz, W; Sadowy, E

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an analysis of Streptococcus suis human invasive isolates, collected in Poland by the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. Isolates obtained from 21 patients during 2000-2013 were investigated by phenotypic tests, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), analysis of the TR9 locus from the multilocus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of SmaI-digested DNA. Determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analysed by sequencing. All isolates represented sequence type 1 (ST1) and were suggested to be serotype 2. PFGE and analysis of the TR9 locus allowed the discrimination of four and 17 types, respectively. Most of the isolates were haemolysis- and DNase-positive, and around half of them formed biofilm. Genes encoding suilysin, extracellular protein factor, fibronectin-binding protein, muramidase-released protein, surface antigen one, enolase, serum opacity factor and pili were ubiquitous in the studied group, while none of the isolates carried sequences characteristic for the 89K pathogenicity island. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, gentamicin, linezolid, vancomycin and daptomycin. Five isolates (24 %) were concomitantly non-susceptible to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, and harboured the tet(O) and erm(B) genes; for one isolate, lsa(E) and lnu(B) were additionally detected. Streptococcus suis isolated in Poland from human invasive infections belongs to a globally distributed clonal complex of this pathogen, enriched in virulence markers. This is the first report of the lsa(E) and lnu(B) resistance genes in S. suis.

  8. In vitro activity of telithromycin against Spanish Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with characterized macrolide resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Morosini, M I; Cantón, R; Loza, E; Negri, M C; Galán, J C; Almaraz, F; Baquero, F

    2001-09-01

    The susceptibilities to telithromycin of 203 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates prospectively collected during 1999 and 2000 from 14 different geographical areas in Spain were tested and compared with those to erythromycin A, clindamycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, and levofloxacin. Telithromycin was active against 98.9% of isolates (MICs, < or =0.5 microg/ml), with MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited being 0.06 microg/ml, irrespective of the resistance genotype. The corresponding values for erythromycin were 61.0% (MICs, < or =0.25 microg/ml) and >64 microg/ml. The erm(B) gene (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotype) was detected in 36.4% (n = 74) of the isolates, which corresponded to 93.6% of erythromycin-intermediate and -resistant isolates, whereas the mef(A) gene (M phenotype [resistance to erythromycin and susceptibility to clindamycin and spiramycin without blunting]) was present in only 2.4% (n = 5) of the isolates. One of the latter isolates also carried erm(B). Interestingly, in one isolate for which the erythromycin MIC was 2 microg/ml, none of these resistance genes could be detected. Erythromycin MICs for S. pneumoniae erm(B)-positive isolates were higher (range, 0.5 to >64 microg/ml) than those for erm(B)- and mef(A)-negative isolates (range, 0.008 to 2 microg/ml). The corresponding values for telithromycin were lower for both groups, with ranges of 0.004 to 1 and 0.002 to 0.06 microg/ml, respectively. The erythromycin MIC was high for a large number of erm(B)-positive isolates, but the telithromycin MIC was low for these isolates. These results indicate the potential usefulness of telithromycin for the treatment of infections caused by erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant S. pneumoniae isolates when macrolides are indicated.

  9. In vitro pharmacodynamic evaluation of garenoxacin against quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yoshiko; Takahata, Masahiro; Sugiura, Yoko; Shinmura, Yuko; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    The bactericidal activity and resistance selectivity of garenoxacin against Streptococcus pneumoniae with mutations in ParC (S79F) or both GyrA (S81F) and ParC (D83Y and K137N) were investigated using in vitro pharmacokinetic models simulating plasma concentrations for a standard clinical regimen [400mg once daily (q.d.)]. The efficacy of garenoxacin was compared with that of levofloxacin (500 mg q.d.) and moxifloxacin (400mg q.d.). Garenoxacin showed excellent bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae, including quinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae (QRSP), achieving ratios of area under the plasma concentration-time curve over 24h to minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC(0-24)/MIC) ≥ 26.3, without emerging resistant subpopulations. The area above the killing curves was greater and the time to achieve 99.9% killing was shorter for garenoxacin than the corresponding values for levofloxacin and moxifloxacin. No resistant subpopulations and no additional substitution of amino acids in GyrA or ParC emerged following treatment with garenoxacin. On the other hand, in the parC mutant strain, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin treatment caused an increase in the frequency of the resistant population and an additional substitution of amino acids in GyrA (levofloxacin, S81Y/F/C; moxifloxacin, S81Y or E85K). In QRSP with mutations in GyrA and ParC, levofloxacin had no bactericidal activity, whilst the bactericidal activity of moxifloxacin was less than that of garenoxacin; moreover, an additional substitution of amino acids in ParC (S79Y) was noted. In conclusion, garenoxacin corresponding to an oral dose of 400mg showed excellent bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae, including QRSP, without the emergence of resistant mutants.

  10. [Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy children and multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Bayer, Müjgan; Aslan, Gönül; Emekdaş, Gürol; Kuyucu, Necdet; Kanik, Arzu

    2008-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae plays an important role for the development of invasive disease and the spread of resistant strains within the community. The aims of this study were to determine the carriage rate of nasopharyngeal S. pneumoniae at healthy school children, to search the susceptibility of the strains to various antibiotics and to evaluate the risk factors for nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin-resistant pneumococci. A total of 1440 healthy children (age range: 6-13 years old) attending to three primary schools which were chosen randomly in Mersin province (Mediterranean region of Turkey) were included to the study between April 2003 to March 2004. The isolation and identification of S. pneumoniae strains from nasopharyngeal samples were performed by conventional culture methods. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were done according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute directions by disk diffusion method, and penisilin MIC values were detected by E-test (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden). S.pneumoniae were isolated from 201 (13.9) of the children. The susceptibility rate of the isolates to penicilin was found as 87.1% (n:175), while 12% (n:24) of the strains yielded intermediate and 1% (n:2) yielded high resistance against penicilin. Overall percentages of resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and macrolides were 30% and 4%, respectively. Two out of eight erythromycin (E) resistant strains showed inducible MLS(B) (macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B) type while six showed M (due to active efflux system) type of resistance. Resistance to meropenem, vancomycin, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin were not detected. Of S. pneumoniae isolates, 20% were found resistant to only one antibiotic (two strains to penicilin; 39 strains to TMP-SMX), 8.9% to two antibiotics (16 strains to penicillin+TMP-SMX; two strains to penicillin+E) and 2.9% to three or more antibiotics (five strains to penicillin+E+TMP-SMX; one strain to

  11. Application of pbp1A PCR in Identification of Penicillin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Mignon; Smith, Anthony M.; Klugman, Keith P.

    1999-01-01

    A seminested PCR assay, based on the amplification of the pneumococcal pbp1A gene, was developed for the detection of penicillin resistance in clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The assay was able to differentiate between intermediate (MICs = 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml) and higher-level (MICs = ≥1 μg/ml) resistance. Two species-specific primers, 1A-1 and 1A-2, which amplified a 1,043-bp region of the pbp1A penicillin-binding region, were used for pneumococcal detection. Two resistance primers, 1A-R1 and 1A-R2, were designed to bind to altered areas of the pbp1A gene which, together with the downstream primer 1A-2, amplify DNA from isolates with penicillin MICs of ≥0.25 and ≥1 μg/ml, respectively. A total of 183 clinical isolates were tested with the pbp1A assay. For 98.3% (180 of 183) of these isolates, the PCR results obtained were in agreement with the MIC data. The positive and negative predictive values of the assay were 100 and 91%, respectively, for detecting strains for which the MICs were ≥0.25 μg/ml and were both 100% for strains for which the MICs were ≥1 μg/ml. PMID:9986824

  12. Spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 8-ST63 Multidrug-Resistant Recombinant Clone, Spain

    PubMed Central

    de la Campa, Adela G.; García, Ernesto; Fenoll, Asunción; Calatayud, Laura; Cercenado, Emilia; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Bouza, Emilio; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, a total of 131 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae multidrug-resistant invasive serotype 8 have been detected in Spain. These isolates showed resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. All isolates were obtained from adult patients and shared a common genotype (sequence type [ST]63; penicillin-binding protein 1a [pbp1a], pbp2b, and pbp2x gene profiles; ermB and tetM genes; and a ParC-S79F change). Sixty-eight isolates that required a ciprofloxacin MIC ≥16 μg/mL had additional gyrA gene changes. Serotype 8-ST63 pbp2x sequences were identical with those of antimicrobial drug–susceptible serotype 8-ST53 isolates. Serotype 8-ST63 pbp2b sequences were identical with those of the multidrug-resistant Sweden 15A-ST63 clone. Recombination between the capsular locus and flanking regions of an ST53 isolate (donor) and an ST63 pneumococcus (recipient) generated the novel 15A-ST63 clone. One recombination point was upstream of pbp2x and another was within pbp1a. A serotype 8-ST63 clone was identified as a cause of invasive disease in Spain. PMID:25340616

  13. Capsular Serotype and Antibiotic Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Two Chilean Cities

    PubMed Central

    Inostroza, Jaime; Trucco, Olivia; Prado, Valeria; Vinet, Ana Maria; Retamal, Gloria; Ossa, Gonzalo; Facklam, Richard R.; Sorensen, Ricardo U.

    1998-01-01

    We compared the incidence of nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the serotypes causing mucosal and invasive diseases, and the antibiotic resistance of these strains in patients admitted to three large hospitals and children attending day care centers in two Chilean cities (Santiago and Temuco). The populations in both cities were similar in ethnic background, socioeconomic status, family size, and access to medical care. Significant differences in nasopharyngeal colonization rates, in serotypes causing infections, and in antibiotic resistance were found between the two cities. In children 0 to 2 years of age, 42% were colonized with S. pneumoniae in Santiago compared to 14% in Temuco. A total of 41 serotypes were identified in both Chilean cities studied. Six serotypes were found only in Santiago; 14 serotypes were found only in Temuco. Antibiotic-resistant serotypes 6A, 6B, 14, 19F, and 23F were detected only in Santiago. We show that important differences in the incidence of nasopharyngeal carriage, infection, and S. pneumoniae serotypes can exist in similar populations in different areas of the same country. Our findings are relevant for prevention strategies, antibiotic usage, and vaccine design. PMID:9521139

  14. Commensal Streptococci Serve as a Reservoir for β-Lactam Resistance Genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Valdórsson, Oskar; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hollingshead, Susan; Kilian, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia, meningitis, septicemia, and middle ear infections. The incidence of S. pneumoniae isolates that are not susceptible to penicillin has risen worldwide and may be above 20% in some countries. Beta-lactam antibiotic resistance in pneumococci is associated with significant sequence polymorphism in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). Commensal streptococci, especially S. mitis and S. oralis, have been identified as putative donors of mutated gene fragments. However, no studies have compared sequences of the involved pbp genes in large collections of commensal streptococci with those of S. pneumoniae. We therefore investigated the sequence diversity of the transpeptidase region of the three pbp genes, pbp2x, pbp2b, and pbp1a in 107, 96, and 88 susceptible and nonsusceptible strains of commensal streptococci, respectively, at the nucleotide and amino acid levels to determine to what extent homologous recombination between commensal streptococci and S. pneumoniae plays a role in the development of beta-lactam resistance in S. pneumoniae. In contrast to pneumococci, extensive sequence variation in the transpeptidase region of pbp2x, pbp2b, and pbp1a was observed in both susceptible and nonsusceptible strains of commensal streptococci, conceivably reflecting the genetic diversity of the many evolutionary lineages of commensal streptococci combined with the recombination events occurring with intra- and interspecies homologues. Our data support the notion that resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in pneumococci is due to sequences acquired from commensal Mitis group streptococci, especially S. mitis. However, several amino acid alterations previously linked to beta-lactam resistance in pneumococci appear to represent species signatures of the donor strain rather than being causal of resistance. PMID:25845880

  15. New Genetic Element Carrying the Erythromycin Resistance Determinant erm(TR) in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Romina; Del Grosso, Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2008-01-01

    erm(A) subclass erm(TR), a common macrolide resistance determinant in Streptococcus pyogenes but quite rare in Streptococcus pneumoniae, was found in a clinical S. pneumoniae isolate (AP200) from Italy. In this isolate, erm(TR) was found included in a genetic element approximately 56 kb in size that did not appear to be conjugative but could be transferred by transformation. An erm(TR)-containing DNA fragment of approximately 10 kb was sequenced and 12 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified. Upstream of erm(TR), a regulatory protein of the TetR family and the two components of an efflux pump of the ABC type were found. Downstream of erm(TR), there were ORFs homologous to a spectinomycin phosphotransferase, transposases, and a relaxase. Since the genomic sequence of S. pyogenes MGAS10750 carrying erm(TR) became available, comparison between the erm(TR)-containing genetic elements in AP200 and in MGAS10750 was performed. The region flanking erm(TR) in MGAS10750 showed identity with AP200 for 10 ORFs out of 12. PCR mapping using primers designed on the sequence of MGAS10750 confirmed that AP200 carries a genetic element similar to that of MGAS10750. In AP200 the genetic element was inserted inside an ORF homologous to spr0790 of S. pneumoniae R6, coding for a type I restriction modification system. Homologies between the insertion sites in AP200 and MGAS10750 consisted of eight conserved nucleotides, of which three were duplicated, likely representing target site duplication. The structure of the erm(TR)-carrying genetic element shows characteristics of a transposon/prophage remnant chimera. In AP200 this genetic element was designated Tn1806. PMID:18070957

  16. Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus suis from Ontario swine.

    PubMed

    Glass-Kaastra, Shiona K; Pearl, David L; Reid-Smith, Richard J; McEwen, Beverly; Slavic, Durda; Fairles, Jim; McEwen, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    Susceptibility results for Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus suis isolated from swine clinical samples were obtained from January 1998 to October 2010 from the Animal Health Laboratory at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, and used to describe variation in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) to 4 drugs of importance in the Ontario swine industry: ampicillin, tetracycline, tiamulin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Four temporal data-analysis options were used: visualization of trends in 12-month rolling averages, logistic-regression modeling, temporal-scan statistics, and a scan with the "What's strange about recent events?" (WSARE) algorithm. The AMR trends varied among the antimicrobial drugs for a single pathogen and between pathogens for a single antimicrobial, suggesting that pathogen-specific AMR surveillance may be preferable to indicator data. The 4 methods provided complementary and, at times, redundant results. The most appropriate combination of analysis methods for surveillance using these data included temporal-scan statistics with a visualization method (rolling-average or predicted-probability plots following logistic-regression models). The WSARE algorithm provided interesting results for quality control and has the potential to detect new resistance patterns; however, missing data created problems for displaying the results in a way that would be meaningful to all surveillance stakeholders.

  17. Contribution of phosphoglucosamine mutase to the resistance of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 to polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ayako; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Shimazu, Kisaki; Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Uchikawa, Yoshimori; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2009-08-01

    Phosphoglucosamine mutase (GlmM; EC 5.4.2.10) catalyzes the interconversion of glucosamine-6-phosphate to glucosamine-1-phosphate, an essential step in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the formation of the peptidoglycan precursor uridine 5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine. We have recently identified the gene (glmM) encoding the enzyme of Streptococcus gordonii, an early colonizer on the human tooth and an important cause of infective endocarditis, and indicated that the glmM mutation in S. gordonii appears to influence bacterial cell growth, morphology, and sensitivity to penicillins. In the present study, we assessed whether the glmM mutation also affects escape from polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-dependent killing. Although no differences in attachment to human PMNs were observed between the glmM mutant and the wild-type S. gordonii, the glmM mutation resulted in increased sensitivity to PMN-dependent killing. Compared with the wild type, the glmM mutant induced increased superoxide anion production and lysozyme release by PMNs. Moreover, the glmM mutant is more sensitive to lysozyme, indicating that the GlmM may be required for synthesis of firm peptidoglycans for resistance to bacterial cell lysis. These findings suggest that the GlmM contributes to the resistance of S. gordonii to PMN-dependent killing. Enzymes such as GlmM could be novel drug targets for this organism.

  18. Streptococcus sanguinis isolate displaying a phenotype with cross-resistance to several rRNA-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Deshpande, Lalitagauri M; Kim, Jihye; Myers, Debra S; Ross, James E; Jones, Ronald N

    2013-08-01

    This study describes a clinical case of a 71-year-old male with a history of ischemic cardiomyopathy after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) and a rare linezolid-resistant Streptococcus sanguinis strain (MIC, 32 μg/ml). The patient received courses of several antimicrobial agents, including linezolid for 79 days. The S. sanguinis strain had mutations in the 23S rRNA (T2211C, T2406C, G2576T, C2610T) and an amino acid substitution (N56D) in L22 and exhibited cross-resistance to ribosome-targeting agents.

  19. Population Structure, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Mutation Frequencies of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Morosini, María-Isabel; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez-G.; Fenoll, Asunción; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Máiz, Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Forty-eight Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from sputum samples from 26 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients attending our CF unit (1995 to 2003) were studied. Mean yearly incidence of isolation was 5.5%, and all were strains recovered from young patients (≤12 years). The isolation was linked to clinical exacerbation in 35% of the cases, but only 27% of these were not accompanied by other CF pathogens. Fifty percent of the patients presented with two to four isolates over the studied period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-SmaI digestion revealed a high heterogeneity (32 pulsotypes among 48 isolates) and the persistence over a 6-month period of a single clone (clone A) in two patients. This clone, presenting a varied multiresistance phenotype, was identified as the Spain23F-1 clone and was also recognized in six other patients, including two out of nine patients from the CF unit of Sant Joan de Dèu Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. In our isolates, 16 different serotypes were recognized, the most frequent being 23F (33.3%), 19F (18.8%), 6A (6.2%), and 6B (6.2%). High overall resistance rates were observed: to penicillin, 73%; to cefotaxime, 33%; to erythromycin, 42%; to tetracycline, 58%; to chloramphenicol, 48%; and to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 67%. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was not detected. Multiresistance was a common feature (60%). The percentage of S. pneumoniae strains with increased frequencies of mutation to rifampin resistance (≥7.5 × 10−8) was significantly higher (P = 0.02) in CF (60%) than among non-CF (37%) isolates in the same institution (M. I. Morosini et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 47:1464-1467, 2003). Even though a clear association with acute exacerbations could not be observed, long-term clonal persistence and variability, high frequency of antibiotic resistance, and hypermutability indicate the plasticity for adaptation of S. pneumoniae to the CF lung environment. PMID:15872243

  20. Population structure, antimicrobial resistance, and mutation frequencies of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Rosa; Morosini, María-Isabel; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez-G; Fenoll, Asunción; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Máiz, Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    Forty-eight Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from sputum samples from 26 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients attending our CF unit (1995 to 2003) were studied. Mean yearly incidence of isolation was 5.5%, and all were strains recovered from young patients (< or = 12 years). The isolation was linked to clinical exacerbation in 35% of the cases, but only 27% of these were not accompanied by other CF pathogens. Fifty percent of the patients presented with two to four isolates over the studied period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-SmaI digestion revealed a high heterogeneity (32 pulsotypes among 48 isolates) and the persistence over a 6-month period of a single clone (clone A) in two patients. This clone, presenting a varied multiresistance phenotype, was identified as the Spain23F-1 clone and was also recognized in six other patients, including two out of nine patients from the CF unit of Sant Joan de Deu Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. In our isolates, 16 different serotypes were recognized, the most frequent being 23F (33.3%), 19F (18.8%), 6A (6.2%), and 6B (6.2%). High overall resistance rates were observed: to penicillin, 73%; to cefotaxime, 33%; to erythromycin, 42%; to tetracycline, 58%; to chloramphenicol, 48%; and to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 67%. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was not detected. Multiresistance was a common feature (60%). The percentage of S. pneumoniae strains with increased frequencies of mutation to rifampin resistance (> or = 7.5 x 10(-8)) was significantly higher (P = 0.02) in CF (60%) than among non-CF (37%) isolates in the same institution (M. I. Morosini et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 47:1464-1467, 2003). Even though a clear association with acute exacerbations could not be observed, long-term clonal persistence and variability, high frequency of antibiotic resistance, and hypermutability indicate the plasticity for adaptation of S. pneumoniae to the CF lung environment.

  1. Multiple mutations and increased RNA expression in tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae as determined by genome-wide DNA and mRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lupien, Andréanne; Gingras, Hélène; Bergeron, Michel G.; Leprohon, Philippe; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to characterize chromosomal mutations associated with resistance to tetracycline in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Methods Chronological appearance of mutations in two S. pneumoniae R6 mutants (R6M1TC-5 and R6M2TC-4) selected for resistance to tetracycline was determined by next-generation sequencing. A role for the mutations identified was confirmed by reconstructing resistance to tetracycline in a S. pneumoniae R6 WT background. RNA sequencing was performed on R6M1TC-5 and R6M2TC-4 and the relative expression of genes was reported according to R6. Differentially expressed genes were classified according to their ontology. Results WGS of R6M1TC-5 and R6M2TC-4 revealed mutations in the gene rpsJ coding for the ribosomal protein S10 and in the promoter region and coding sequences of the ABC genes patA and patB. These cells were cross-resistant to ciprofloxacin. Resistance reconstruction confirmed a role in resistance for the mutations in rpsJ and patA. Overexpression of the ABC transporter PatA/PatB or mutations in the coding sequence of patA contributed to resistance to tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and ethidium bromide, and was associated with a decreased accumulation of [3H]tetracycline. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the resistant mutants further revealed that, in addition to the overexpression of patA and patB, several genes of the thiamine biosynthesis and salvage pathway were increased in the two mutants, but also in clinical isolates resistant to tetracycline. This overexpression most likely contributes to the tetracycline resistance phenotype. Conclusions The combination of genomic and transcriptomic analysis coupled to functional studies has allowed the discovery of novel tetracycline resistance mutations in S. pneumoniae. PMID:25862682

  2. Activity of telithromycin against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from French children with invasive and noninvasive infections.

    PubMed

    Bingen, Edouard; Doit, Catherine; Loukil, Chawki; Brahimi, Naima; Bidet, Philippe; Deforche, Dominique; Geslin, Pierre

    2003-07-01

    We compared the activities of telithromycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefpodoxime, and ceftriaxone against invasive and noninvasive non-penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from children. Of the 186 isolates tested, 89% were positive for erm(B) by PCR. Telithromycin had the lowest MICs, with MICs at which 90% of the isolates tested are inhibited of 0.032 and 0.25 micro g/ml for erythromycin-sensitive and -resistant isolates, respectively.

  3. Streptococcus pyogenes Pharyngeal Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin in Spain: Mechanisms of Resistance and Clonal Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Albertí, Sebastián; Cortés, Guadalupe; García-Rey, Cesar; Rubio, Carmen; Baquero, Fernando; García-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Bouza, Emilio; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2005-01-01

    A survey of emm gene sequences and an analysis of the pulsed-field electrophoretic profiles of 30 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with reduced susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin detected the prevalence of isolates with emm type 6 and considerable genetic diversity among isolates. The mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in these isolates was based on point mutations in topoisomerase IV subunit C encoded by parC, mainly replacement of serine-79 by alanine. PMID:15616324

  4. Evaluation of disk approximation and single-well broth tests for detection of inducible clindamycin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, James H; McElmeel, M Leticia; Fulcher, Letitia C; McGee, Lesley; Glennen, Anita

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated an agar disk diffusion D-zone test and an erythromycin-clindamycin (ERY + CLI) single-well broth test for inducible CLI resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The standard CLSI disk approximation test and a single-well combination test incorporating 1 plus 0.5 μg/ml ERY + CLI detected >96% of isolates containing the ermB determinant.

  5. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  6. Controlled laboratory challenge demonstrates substantial additive genetic variation in resistance to Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is an etiologic agent of streptococcal disease in tilapia and is one of several Streptococcus spp. that negatively impact worldwide tilapia production. Methods for the prevention and control of S. iniae include vaccines, management strategies, and antibiotics. An alternative and ...

  7. Molecular resistance mechanisms of macrolide-resistant invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Alaska, 1986 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Karen; Bulkow, Lisa; Bruce, Michael; Zulz, Tammy; Reasonover, Alisa; Harker-Jones, Marcella; Hurlburt, Debby; Hennessy, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains has reduced treatment options. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities, serotype distributions, and molecular resistance mechanisms among macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal isolates in Alaska from 1986 to 2010. We identified cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska from 1986 to 2010 through statewide population-based laboratory surveillance. All invasive pneumococcal isolates submitted to the Arctic Investigations Program laboratory were confirmed by standard microbiological methods and serotyped by slide agglutination and the Quellung reaction. MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method, and macrolide-resistant genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. Among 2,923 invasive pneumococcal isolates recovered from 1986 to 2010, 270 (9.2%) were nonsusceptible to erythromycin; 177 (66%) erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates demonstrated coresistance to penicillin, and 167 (62%) were multidrug resistant. The most frequent serotypes among the macrolide-resistant isolates were serotypes 6B (23.3%), 14 (20.7%), 19A (16.7%), 9V (8.9%), 19F (6.3%), 6A (5.6%), and 23F (4.8%). mef and erm(B) genes were detected in 207 (77%) and 32 (12%) of the isolates, respectively. Nineteen (7%) of the erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates contained both mef and erm(B) genotypes; 15 were of serotype 19A. There was significant year-to-year variation in the proportion of isolates that were nonsusceptible to erythromycin (P < 0.001). Macrolide resistance among pneumococcal isolates from Alaska is mediated predominantly by mef genes, and this has not changed significantly over time. However, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of isolates that possess both erm(B) and mef, primarily due to serotype 19A isolates.

  8. Oxacillin disk diffusion testing for the prediction of penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Horna, Gertrudis; Molero, María L; Benites, Liliana; Roman, Sigri; Carbajal, Luz; Mercado, Erik; Castillo, María E; Zerpa, Rito; Chaparro, Eduardo; Hernandez, Roger; Silva, Wilda; Campos, Francisco; Saenz, Andy; Reyes, Isabel; Villalobos, Alex; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-08-01

    Objective To 1) describe the correlation between the zones of inhibition in 1-µg oxacillin disk diffusion (ODD) tests and penicillin and ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of meningeal and non-meningeal strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 2) evaluate the usefulness of the ODD test as a predictor of susceptibility to penicillin in S. pneumoniae and as a quick and cost-effective method easily implemented in a routine clinical laboratory setting. Methods S. pneumoniae isolates from healthy nasopharyngeal carriers less than 2 years old, obtained in a multicentric cross-sectional study conducted in various Peruvian hospitals and health centers from 2007 to 2009, were analyzed. Using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints, the correlation between the zones of inhibition of the ODD test and the MICs of penicillin and ceftriaxone was determined. Results Of the 571 S. pneumoniae isolates, 314 (55%) showed resistance to penicillin (MIC ≥ 0.12 µg/mL) and 124 (21.7%) showed resistance to ceftriaxone (MIC ≥ 1 µg/mL). Comparison of the ODD test zones of inhibition and the penicillin MICs, using the CLSI meningeal breakpoints, showed good correlation (Cohen's kappa coefficient = 0.8239). Conclusions There was good correlation between ODD zones of inhibition and penicillin meningeal breakpoints but weak correlation between the ODD results and non-meningeal breakpoints for both penicillin and ceftriaxone. Therefore, the ODD test appears to be a useful tool for predicting penicillin resistance in cases of meningeal strains of S. pneumoniae, particularly in low- and middle- income countries, where MIC determination is not routinely available.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae, le transformiste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Campo, Nathalie; Bergé, Matthieu J; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Natural genetic transformation, which was discovered in this species, involves internalization of exogenous single-stranded DNA and its incorporation into the chromosome. It allows acquisition of pathogenicity islands and antibiotic resistance and promotes vaccine escape via capsule switching. This opinion article discusses how recent advances regarding several facets of pneumococcal transformation support the view that the process has evolved to maximize plasticity potential in this species, making the pneumococcus le transformiste of the bacterial kingdom and providing an advantage in the constant struggle between this pathogen and its host.

  10. Phenotypes and genotypes of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains in Italy and heterogeneity of inducibly resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Giovanetti, E; Montanari, M P; Mingoia, M; Varaldo, P E

    1999-08-01

    A total of 387 clinical strains of erythromycin-resistant (MIC, >/=1 microg/ml) Streptococcus pyogenes, all isolated in Italian laboratories from 1995 to 1998, were examined. By the erythromycin-clindamycin double-disk test, 203 (52.5%) strains were assigned to the recently described M phenotype, 120 (31.0%) were assigned to the inducible macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance (iMLS) phenotype, and 64 (16.5%) were assigned to the constitutive MLS resistance (cMLS) phenotype. The inducible character of the resistance of the iMLS strains was confirmed by comparing the clindamycin MICs determined under normal testing conditions and those determined after induction by pregrowth in 0.05 microg of erythromycin per ml. The MICs of erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, spiramycin, and the ketolide HMR3004 were then determined and compared. Homogeneous susceptibility patterns were observed for the isolates of the cMLS phenotype (for all but one of the strains, HMR3004 MICs were 0.5 to 8 microg/ml and the MICs of the other drugs were >128 microg/ml) and those of the M phenotype (resistance only to the 14- and 15-membered macrolides was recorded, with MICs of 2 to 32 microg/ml). Conversely, heterogeneous susceptibility patterns were observed in the isolates of the iMLS phenotype, which were subdivided into three distinct subtypes designated iMLS-A, iMLS-B, and iMLS-C. The iMLS-A strains (n = 84) were highly resistant to the 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides and demonstrated reduced susceptibility to low-level resistance to HMR3004. The iMLS-B strains (n = 12) were highly resistant to the 14- and 15-membered macrolides, susceptible to the 16-membered macrolides (but highly resistant to josamycin after induction), and susceptible to HMR3004 (but intermediate or resistant after induction). The iMLS-C strains (n = 24) had lower levels of resistance to the 14- and 15-membered macrolides (with erythromycin MICs increasing two to four times after

  11. New macrolides active against Streptococcus pyogenes with inducible or constitutive type of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P B; Baker, W R; Freiberg, L A; Hardy, D J; McDonald, E J

    1989-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant bacteria can be classified as inducibly resistant or constitutively resistant. Inducibly resistant bacteria are resistant to 14-membered macrolides, such as erythromycin and clarithromycin (A-56268), but are susceptible to the 16-membered macrolides, such as tylosin and spiramycin, as well as to clindamycin. Constitutively resistant bacteria are resistant to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics. In this study, the MICs of several erythromycin and clarithromycin analogs against macrolide-susceptible and macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains were determined. Four 11,12-carbamate analogs of clarithromycin had lower MICs than erythromycin did against S. pyogenes with the inducible or constitutive type of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance. Five 11,12-carbonate analogs of erythromycin with modifications at the 4" position of cladinose had lower MICs than did erythromycin against S. pyogenes with the constitutive type of resistance, and one of these compounds, which had a naphthyl-glycyl substitution at the 4" position, had a lower MIC than erythromycin against both the inducibly resistant and constitutively resistant strains. Two analogs of erythromycin with a modification on the 4" position of cladinose had lower MICs than erythromycin did against the constitutively resistant organisms but not against the inducibly resistant organisms. Thus, 14-membered macrolides can be modified so as to confer a low MIC when tested in vitro.

  12. Analysis of multiply antimicrobial-resistant isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from the United States.

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, L K; Facklam, R; Reeves, M; Hunter, S; Swenson, J M; Hill, B C; Tenover, F C

    1992-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates resistant to penicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole-trimethroprim are being recovered with increasing frequency in the United States. We analyzed the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) genotypes, and ribotypes of 22 multiresistant serotype 23F isolates of S. pneumoniae from the United States and 1 isolate each from Spain and South Africa. Also included were seven multiresistant isolates of other serotypes, three penicillin-resistant but chloramphenicol-susceptible serotype 23F isolates, and two penicillin-susceptible isolates (one penicillin-susceptible isolate was serotype 23F). Fifteen of the 22 multiresistant isolates from the United States and the isolates from Spain and South Africa had identical PBP patterns, MLEE profiles, and ribotypes. Six of the remaining seven multiresistant isolates were related by PBP pattern, but demonstrated slightly different MLEE and/or ribotype profiles, possibly because of acquisition of additional resistance markers (four of the six isolates were also resistant to erythromycin). The remaining multiresistant serotype 23F isolate had a unique PBP pattern and ribotype and was only distantly related to the other pneumococcal isolates by MLEE analysis. The PBP patterns, MLEE profiles, and ribotypes of the multiresistant serotype 23F isolates were easily distinguished from those of six multiresistant isolates of other serotypes; three other penicillin-resistant, chloramphenicol-susceptible, serotype 23F isolates; and two penicillin-susceptible isolates. One exception was a multiresistant serotype 19A isolate that was highly related to the clonal group by PBP pattern and MLEE analysis and that had a ribotype similar to those of the other erythromycin-resistant serotype 23F isolates. MLEE analysis and ribotyping were more discriminating than were the PBP patterns in discerning strain differences. These data strongly suggest that a

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 interspecies transformation: genetic analysis of penicillin resistance determinants and genome-wide recombination events.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Julia; Maurer, Patrick; Rieger, Martin; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2012-11-01

    Interspecies gene transfer has been implicated as the major driving force for the evolution of penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Genomic alterations of S. pneumoniae R6 introduced during four successive transformations with DNA of the high-level penicillin-resistant Streptococcus mitis B6 with beta-lactam selection have now been determined and the contribution of genes to high resistance levels was analysed genetically. Essential for high level resistance to penicillins of the transformant CCCB was the combination of murM(B) (6) and the 3' region of pbp2b(B) (6) . Sequences of both genes were detected in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae, confirming the participation of S. mitis in the global gene pool of beta-lactam resistance determinants. The S. mitis PBP1b gene which contains an authentic stop codon within the transpeptidase domain is now shown to contribute only marginal to resistance, but it is possible that the presence of its transglycosylase domain is important in the context of cognate PBPs. The genome sequence of CCCB revealed 36 recombination events, including deletion and acquisition of genes and repeat elements. A total of 78 genes were affected representing 67 kb or 3.3% of the genome, documenting extensive alterations scattered throughout the genome.

  14. [Evaluation of penicillin-binding protein genotypes in penicillin susceptible and resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Gönül; Tezcan, Seda; Delialioğlu, Nuran; Aydın, Fatma Esin; Kuyucu, Necdet; Emekdaş, Gürol

    2012-04-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are the natural targets of beta-lactam antibiotics and mutations in pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x genes, which encode PBPs, are responsible for resistance to beta-lactams in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, we intended to determine how often the common mutation patterns occurred within the pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x PBP gene regions and evaluate the PBP genotype mutations which were associated with penicillin resistance in several penicillin-susceptible and - resistant S.pneumoniae isolates in Mersin, Turkey. A total of 62 S.pneumoniae strains isolated from different clinical specimens (32 nasopharyngeal swab, 16 sputum, 3 blood, 3 wound, 2 cerebrospinal fluids and one of each urine, abscess, bronchoalveolar lavage, conjunctival swab, tracheal aspirate, middle ear effusion) were included in the study. Penicillin susceptibilities of the isolates were searched by disc diffusion and E-test methods, and 23 of them were identified as susceptible, 31 were intermediate susceptible, and eight were resistant to penicillin. A rapid DNA extraction procedure was performed for the isolation of nucleic acids from the strains. Distribution of PBP gene mutations in pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x gene regions related to penicillin resistance was determined by using a wild-type specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based technique. PBP gene alterations of those isolates were also evaluated in relation to penicillin susceptibility and resistance patterns. Twenty two (95.7%) of 23 penicillin-susceptible S.pneumoniae isolates exhibited no mutation in the three PBP genes (pbp1a, pbp2x, and pbp 2b), while 1 (4.3%) of these harbored mutations in all of the three PBP genes. The penicillin-intermediate susceptible S.pneumoniae isolates exhibited various combinations of mutations. One (3.2%) of 31 penicillin-intermediate susceptible isolates exhibited no mutation in the three PBP genes, while 22 (71%) of them yielded mutations in all of the three PBP

  15. Capsule Switching and Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired during Repeated Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia Episodes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bin; Nariai, Akiyoshi; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Akeda, Yukihiro; Kuroda, Makoto; Oishi, Kazunori; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharyngeal mucus in healthy people and causes otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. In this study, we analyzed an S. pneumoniae strain that caused 7 repeated pneumonia episodes in an 80-month-old patient with cerebral palsy during a period of 25 months. A total of 10 S. pneumoniae strains were obtained from sputum samples, and serotype 6B was isolated from samples from the first 5 episodes, whereas serotype 6A was isolated from samples from the last 2. Whole-genome sequencing showed clonality of the 10 isolates with 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genomes. Among these SNPs, one single point mutation in the wciP gene was presumed to relate to the serotype switching from 6B to 6A, and the other mutations in parC and gyrA were related to fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggested that an S. pneumoniae strain, which asymptomatically colonized the patient's nasopharynx or was horizontally transmitted from an asymptomatic carrier, caused the repeated pneumonia events. Phenotypic variations in the capsule type and antimicrobial susceptibility occurred during the carrier state. Hyporesponsiveness to serotypes 6B and 6A of S. pneumoniae was found even after vaccination with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. After an additional vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, opsonic activities for both serotypes 6A and 6B significantly increased and are expected to prevent relapse by the same strain.

  16. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Sequence Type 25 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Taryn B. T.; Teatero, Sarah; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Strains of serotype 2 Streptococcus suis are responsible for swine and human infections. Different serotype 2 genetic backgrounds have been defined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). However, little is known about the genetic diversity within each MLST sequence type (ST). Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to test the hypothesis that S. suis serotype 2 strains of the ST25 lineage are genetically heterogeneous. We evaluated 51 serotype 2 ST25 S. suis strains isolated from diseased pigs and humans in Canada, the United States of America, and Thailand. Whole-genome sequencing revealed numerous large-scale rearrangements in the ST25 genome, compared to the genomes of ST1 and ST28 S. suis strains, which result, among other changes, in disruption of a pilus island locus. We report that recombination and lateral gene transfer contribute to ST25 genetic diversity. Phylogenetic analysis identified two main and distinct Thai and North American clades grouping most strains investigated. These clades also possessed distinct patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes, which correlated with acquisition of different integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). Some of these ICEs were found to be integrated at a recombination hot spot, previously identified as the site of integration of the 89K pathogenicity island in serotype 2 ST7 S. suis strains. Our results highlight the limitations of MLST for phylogenetic analysis of S. suis, and the importance of lateral gene transfer and recombination as drivers of diversity in this swine pathogen and zoonotic agent. PMID:26954687

  17. [Bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin and other new quinolones against antimicrobial resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Intetsu; Kanayama, Akiko; Hasegawa, Miyuki; Kaneko, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a study assess the bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin (STFX) against Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from respiratory infections including penicillin-resistant (PRSP) isolates, macrolide resistant isolates possessing mefA and ermB resistance genes and quinolone resistance isolates with mutations in gyrA or gyrA and parC. Each isolate tested was grown in hemosupplemented Mueller-Hinton broth and adjusted to approximately 10(5) CFU/ mL. Isolates were than exposed to a Cmax antimicrobial blood level that would be attained with routine antimicrobial administration and an antimicrobial level that would be expected 4 hours post-Cmax (Cmax 4hr). Bactericidal activity was measured for up to 8 hours. Excluding a subset of S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR), all quinolones showed bactericidal activity at Cmax and Cmax 4 hr antimicrobial concentrations for up to 8 hours. Against S. pneumoniae isolates with either gyrA or gyrA and parC mutations, bactericidal activity of STFX was shown for up to 4 to 8 hours following Cmax based on a limit of detection of < 1.3 log CFU/mL. Garenoxacin (GRNX) did not showed bactericidal activity below the limit of detection for up to 8 hours with exposure to Cmax and no bactericidal activity was seen with levofloxacin. When all quinolones tested where adjusted to concentrations corresponding to their MICs, STFX showed the most rapid bactericidal activity against PRSP. This rapid bactericidal activity in PRSP is a key to the effectiveness of STFX. Our findings show that beyond inhibition of bacterial replication by blocking their DNA replication pathway and synthesis of proteins, STFX demonstrated characteristics contributing to greater bactericidal activity compared to GRNX. In conclusion, of the newer quinolones, STFX showed the strongest bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the QRDR which indicates that it may show the most

  18. Antibiotic resistance and serotypes of 100 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated in a children's hospital in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, C; Juncosa, T; Sanfeliu, I

    1985-01-01

    A total of 100 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with various penicillin G susceptibilities, isolated in Barcelona, Spain, from different pediatric sources during 1983 and the first 4 months of 1984, were tested for susceptibility to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, clindamycin, vancomycin, and rifampin. The isolates were distributed in nine patterns of antibiotic resistance, and 15 different serotypes were encountered. The high incidence of resistance to multiple antibiotics clearly indicates the need to perform antibiotic susceptibility testing of all pneumococcal isolates with proved pathologic significance to avoid therapeutic failure. PMID:3834840

  19. Canadian national survey of prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Canadian Bacterial Surveillance Network.

    PubMed Central

    Simor, A E; Louie, M; Low, D E

    1996-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 1,089 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from 39 laboratories across Canada between October 1994 and August 1995 were determined. A total of 91 isolates (8.4%) demonstrated intermediate resistance (MIC, 0.1 to 1.0 microgram/ml) and 36 (3.3%) had high-level resistance (MIC, > or = 2.0 micrograms/ml) to penicillin. Penicillin-resistant strains were more likely to have been recovered from normally sterile sites (P = 0.005) and to be cross-resistant to several beta-lactam and non-beta-lactam antimicrobial agents (P < 0.05). These results indicate that there has been a recent significant increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae in Canada. PMID:8878605

  20. Clindamycin resistant emm33 Streptococcus pyogenes emerged among invasive infections in Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, 2012 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Pesola, A K; Sihvonen, R; Lindholm, L; Pätäri-Sampo, A

    2015-05-07

    In 2012, blood, skin and soft tissue infections caused by clindamycin resistant Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) appeared to be increasing in the Helsinki metropolitan area. We compared monthly percentages of clindamycin resistant isolates in the area between 2012 and 2013, with those in 2010 and 2011. Resistance frequency in terms of patient age was also studied. We reviewed the medical records of bacteraemic cases in 2012 and 2013 and linked the data to emm types. To inform on the emm distribution among GAS isolated from skin and soft tissue infections during the epidemic, GAS isolates of one month (March 2013) were emm typed. For GAS blood, skin, and soft tissue isolates taken together, the proportions of clindamycin resistant isolates were significantly higher in 2012 and 2013 (23% and 17%, respectively) compared with the two previous years (3%, p<0,001). The erythromycin resistance percentages were almost equal to clindamycin (22% and 17%) in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Clindamycin resistance was most frequent in GAS isolates of 40 to 60 year-old patients (148/417; 36%). Among clindamycin resistant isolates, 12 of 14 blood isolates from 2012 to 2013, and 11 of 13 skin and soft tissue isolates from March 2013, were emm33. Emm33 GAS bacteraemia was associated with clindamycin and erythromycin resistance (odds ratio (OR): 7.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-25.3). Infection focus was mainly the skin; either cellulitis (7/12) or necrotising fasciitis (3/12). All emm33 GAS isolates harboured the ermTR resistance gene with constitutive macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramines B (MLS(B)) phenotype. Emm33 GAS was responsible for the higher proportion of clindamycin resistance in skin, soft tissue, and blood isolates locally in 2012 and 2013.

  1. Determination of Characteristics of Erythromycin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae with Preferred PCV Usage in Iran.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Malihe; Azadegan, Azadeh; Sadeghi, Javad; Ahmadi, Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Katouli, Mohammad; Owlia, Parviz; Pourshafie, Mohammad R

    2016-01-01

    Amongst 100 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from clinical cases and nasopharynx of healthy individuals, 60 erythromycin resistant strains were isolated and characterized using MLST, PFGE, transposon analysis and Quellung reaction. Most of the S. pneumoniae erythromycin resistant (80%) were found to be attributable to the ermB-edncoded ribosome methylase activity which differs from the dominant mechanism of macrolide resistance seen in North America. The most predominant transposons were; Tn1545/6003 (27%), Tn6002 (22%), Tn2009 (20%), Tn2010 (17%). Number of the clinical isolates carrying Tn2010 was more significant than the normal flora. The serotypes found were; 14 (33%), 3 (22%), 23F (15%), 19F (15%), 19A (7%), 6A (3%), 9V (3%) and 6B (2%). The most prevalent serotypes among the clinical (n = 28) and normal flora (n = 32) isolates were serotypes 14 (46%) and 3 (31%), respectively. The most prevalent vaccine serotypes amongst the clinical isolates and the healthy individuals were pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) 13 and PCV10, respectively. PFGE revealed 34 pulsotypes with 9 common and 25 single types. Significant number of the normal isolates belonged to CT5 and CT6. On the other hand, significant number of clinical isolates belonged to CT8 as compared to the normal flora isolates. MLST showed 2 dominant sequence types. ST3130 (23%) and ST180 (22%) were the most predominant sequence types in the clinical and normal isolates, respectively. There was no significant difference in other sequence types between clinical and normal flora isolates. Three polyclonal complexes including Sweden15A -25, Spain23F-1 and Spain9V-3 constituted 58% of the isolates. Our results suggest that the genetic diversity and transposon distribution were high among S. pneumoniae, particularly in the isolates containing erm(B) and double antibiotic resistant genes (erm/mef). The results presented here could influence the change in the current vaccination practices in Iran which

  2. Determination of Characteristics of Erythromycin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae with Preferred PCV Usage in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Malihe; Azadegan, Azadeh; Sadeghi, Javad; Ahmadi, Ali; Katouli, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Amongst 100 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from clinical cases and nasopharynx of healthy individuals, 60 erythromycin resistant strains were isolated and characterized using MLST, PFGE, transposon analysis and Quellung reaction. Most of the S. pneumoniae erythromycin resistant (80%) were found to be attributable to the ermB-edncoded ribosome methylase activity which differs from the dominant mechanism of macrolide resistance seen in North America. The most predominant transposons were; Tn1545/6003 (27%), Tn6002 (22%), Tn2009 (20%), Tn2010 (17%). Number of the clinical isolates carrying Tn2010 was more significant than the normal flora. The serotypes found were; 14 (33%), 3 (22%), 23F (15%), 19F (15%), 19A (7%), 6A (3%), 9V (3%) and 6B (2%). The most prevalent serotypes among the clinical (n = 28) and normal flora (n = 32) isolates were serotypes 14 (46%) and 3 (31%), respectively. The most prevalent vaccine serotypes amongst the clinical isolates and the healthy individuals were pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) 13 and PCV10, respectively. PFGE revealed 34 pulsotypes with 9 common and 25 single types. Significant number of the normal isolates belonged to CT5 and CT6. On the other hand, significant number of clinical isolates belonged to CT8 as compared to the normal flora isolates. MLST showed 2 dominant sequence types. ST3130 (23%) and ST180 (22%) were the most predominant sequence types in the clinical and normal isolates, respectively. There was no significant difference in other sequence types between clinical and normal flora isolates. Three polyclonal complexes including Sweden15A -25, Spain23F-1 and Spain9V-3 constituted 58% of the isolates. Our results suggest that the genetic diversity and transposon distribution were high among S. pneumoniae, particularly in the isolates containing erm(B) and double antibiotic resistant genes (erm/mef). The results presented here could influence the change in the current vaccination practices in Iran which

  3. Treatment of experimental pneumonia due to penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in immunocompetent rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldà, J; Capdevila, J A; Almirante, B; Otero, J; Ruiz, I; Laguarda, M; Allende, H; Crespo, E; Pigrau, C; Pahissa, A

    1997-01-01

    A model of pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to penicillin was developed in immunocompetent Wistar rats and was used to evaluate the efficacies of different doses of penicillin, cefotaxime, cefpirome, and vancomycin. Adult Wistar rats were challenged by intratracheal inoculation with 3 x 10(9) CFU of one strain of S. pneumoniae resistant to penicillin (MICs of penicillin, cefotaxime, cefpirome, and vancomycin, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively) suspended in brain heart broth supplemented with 0.7% agar. The rats experienced a fatal pneumonia, dying within 5 days and with peak mortality (70 to 80%) occurring 48 to 72 h after infection, and the bacterial counts in the lungs persisted from 8.87 +/- 0.3 log10 CFU/g of lung at 24 h of the infection to 9.1 +/- 0.3 log10 CFU/g at 72 h. Four hours after infection the animals were randomized into the following treatment groups: (i) control without treatment, (ii) penicillin G at 100,000 IU/kg of body weight every 2 h, (iii) penicillin G at 250,000 IU/kg every 2 h, (iv) cefotaxime at 100 mg/kg every 2 h, (v) cefpirome at 200 mg/kg every 2 h, and (vi) vancomycin at 50 mg/kg every 8 h. Two different protocols were used for the therapeutic efficacy studies: four doses of beta-lactams and one dose of vancomycin or eight doses of beta-lactams and two doses of vancomycin. Results of the therapy for experimental pneumonia caused by penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae showed that initially, all the antimicrobial agents tested had similar efficacies, but when we prolonged the treatment, higher doses of penicillin, cefotaxime, and cefpirome were more effective than penicillin at lower doses in decreasing the residual bacterial titers in the lungs. Also, when we extended the treatment, vancomycin was more efficacious than penicillin at lower doses but was less efficacious than higher doses of penicillin or cefpirome. The model that we have developed is simple and amenable for inducing pneumonia in

  4. High-level fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae requires mutations in parC and gyrA.

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, C; Zeller, V; Kitzis, M D; Moreau, N J; Gutmann, L

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance was studied in strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, either selected in vitro or isolated from clinical samples. By using DNA from these high-level-resistant strains, low-level-resistant transformants (MIC of pefloxacin, > or = 32 micrograms/ml; MIC of ciprofloxacin, 4 micrograms/ml; MIC of sparfloxacin, 0.50 micrograms/ml) were obtained at high frequencies (ca.10(-2)), while high-level-resistant transformants (MIC of pefloxacin, > or = 64 micrograms/ml; MIC of ciprofloxacin, 16 to 64 micrograms/ml; MIC of sparfloxacin, > or = 8 micrograms/ml) were obtained only at low frequencies (ca.10(-4)). This suggested that mutations in at least two unlinked genes were necessary to obtain high-level resistance. Low-level resistance was associated with ParC mutations (change from Ser to Tyr at position 79 [Ser79Tyr], Ser79Phe, or Asp83Gly). ParC mutations were associated, in high-level-resistant strains and transformants, with alterations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of GyrA (Ser84Tyr, Ser84Phe, and/or Glu88Lys). Low-level resistance was shown to be necessary for expression of the gyrA mutations. No mutation in the region corresponding to the quinolone resistance-determining region of GyrB and no alteration of drug accumulation were found. PMID:9124836

  5. Induction of Efflux-Mediated Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Zhou, Xiaoliu; Zähner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S.

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial efflux system encoded by the operon mef(E)-mel on the mobile genetic element MEGA in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria is inducible by macrolide antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. Induction may affect the clinical response to the use of macrolides. We developed mef(E) reporter constructs and a disk diffusion induction and resistance assay to determine the kinetics and basis of mef(E)-mel induction. Induction occurred rapidly, with a >15-fold increase in transcription within 1 h of exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin. A spectrum of environmental conditions, including competence and nonmacrolide antibiotics with distinct cellular targets, did not induce mef(E). Using 16 different structurally defined macrolides, induction was correlated with the amino sugar attached to C-5 of the macrolide lactone ring, not with the size (e.g., 14-, 15- or 16-member) of the ring or with the presence of the neutral sugar cladinose at C-3. Macrolides with a monosaccharide attached to C-5, known to block exit of the nascent peptide from the ribosome after the incorporation of up to eight amino acids, induced mef(E) expression. Macrolides with a C-5 disaccharide, which extends the macrolide into the ribosomal exit tunnel, disrupting peptidyl transferase activity, did not induce it. The induction of mef(E) did not require macrolide efflux, but the affinity of macrolides for the ribosome determined the availability for efflux and pneumococcal susceptibility. The induction of mef(E)-mel expression by inducing macrolides appears to be based on specific interactions of the macrolide C-5 saccharide with the ribosome that alleviate transcriptional attenuation of mef(E)-mel. PMID:21537010

  6. Emergence of Neoteric Serotypes Among Multidrug Resistant Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae Prevalent in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Bahy, Rehab H; Hamouda, Hayam M; Shahat, Amal S; Yassin, Aymen S; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The prevalent serotype distribution had shown variation along different studies conducted at different time intervals. In order to efficiently assess the epidemiology of the diseases for effective preventive and treatment strategies, serotype prevalence need to be periodically reassessed. Objectives Conducting a reassessment of the prevalent S. pneumoniae serotypes in Egypt as an essential step in the search for a regional vaccine. In addition, monitoring the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pneumococcal strains currently causing infections as an evaluation of therapeutic strategies applied. Materials and Methods A total of 100 specimens of different sources were collected in Cairo, Egypt, from 2011 to 2013, representing almost all different types of diseases caused by S. pneumoniae such as meningitis, pneumonia, otitis media and sinusitis. Conventional and molecular identification methods were performed, the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were assessed and serotyping was done using PCR assays to identify the most prevalent types. In addition, detection of certain virulence genes for the most prevalent serotypes was carried out. Results Our results revealed that in Egypt, currently, the most prevalent serotypes were serogroup 6 and serotype 19F as they represented 58% of all isolates. High rates of resistance were found to different antibiotic classes. The lytA and psaA genes were found to be more sensitive for S. pneumoniae identification than ply. Conclusions Our study illustrates the importance of constantly monitoring the prevalent serotypes in any region in order to aid in the development of more effective vaccines. PMID:27303614

  7. Ser-127-to-Leu substitution in the DNA gyrase B subunit of Streptococcus pneumoniae is implicated in novobiocin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R; Bustamante, M; de la Campa, A G

    1995-01-01

    We report the cloning of the gyrB gene from Streptococcus pneumoniae 533 that carries the nov-1 allele. The gyrB gene codes for a protein homologous to the gyrase B subunit of archaebacteria and eubacteria. The same amino acid substitution (Ser-127 to Leu) confers novobiocin resistance on four isolates of S. pneumoniae. This amino acid position is equivalent to Val-120 of Escherichia coli GyrB, a residue that lies inside the ATP-binding domain as revealed by the crystal structure of the protein. PMID:7608096

  8. Molecular epidemiology survey of penicillin-susceptible and -resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients with meningitis in France.

    PubMed

    Doit, C; Picard, B; Loukil, C; Geslin, P; Bingen, E

    2000-06-01

    The genetic diversity of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n=291) recovered from cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis in France was investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the ribosomal RNA gene regions and of the pbp2b and 2x genes. Statistical analysis of the data by factorial analysis of correspondence established the following: penicillin-susceptible isolates had a high level of genetic diversity, especially those belonging to serogroups frequently associated with carriage; capsular serotype switches could occur among penicillin-susceptible and -resistant isolates; and the mechanisms of acquired penicillin resistance were clearly distinct in isolates with penicillin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values <1 mg/L and isolates with penicillin MIC values >/=1 mg/L. Thus, an increase in the penicillin MIC for a given strain, from intermediate to high-level resistance would be a rare event.

  9. Clonal Spread of Levofloxacin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Invasive Isolates in Madrid, Spain, 2007 to 2009▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Ramos, Belén; Ríos, Esther; Cercenado, Emilia; Ordobás, María; Sanz, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Among 1,349 Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive isolates, 45 (3.3%) were levofloxacin resistant. Serotype distribution was as follows: 8 (n = 32 isolates), 19A (n = 4 isolates), 7F (n = 3 isolates), 9V (n = 2 isolates), 10A (n = 1 isolate), 19F (n = 1 isolate), 6B (n = 1 isolate), and nontypeable (n = 1 isolate). Levofloxacin-resistant isolates had dual mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. Serotype 8 strains corresponded to a capsular switching of the Sweden15A-25 clone. Levofloxacin resistance was also detected among multiresistant (ST27619A, Spain9V-ST156, ST8819F, and ST15426B) and among usually antibiotic-susceptible (Netherlands7F-ST191, ST120119A, and ST263910A) clones. PMID:21383091

  10. Postantibiotic effects and postantibiotic sub-MIC effects of tilmicosin, erythromycin and tiamulin on erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yuanshu

    2009-10-01

    The postantibiotic effects (PAEs) and postantibiotic sub-MIC effects (PA SMEs) of tilmicosin, erythromycin and tiamulin on erythromycin-susceptible and erythromycin-resistant strains of Streptococcus suis (M phenotype) were investigated in vitro. Tilmicosin and tiamulin induced significantly longer PAE and PA SME against both erythromycin-susceptible and erythromycin-resistant strains than did erythromycin. The durations of PAE and PA SMEs were proportional to the concentrations of drugs used for exposure. The PA SMEs were substantially longer than PAEs on S. suis (P<0.05) regardless of the antimicrobial used for exposure. The results indicated that the PAE and PA SME could help in the design of efficient control strategies for infection especially caused by erythromycin-resistant S. suis and that they may provide additional valuable information for the rational drug use in clinical practice.

  11. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from the San Francisco Bay area of northern California.

    PubMed

    York, M K; Gibbs, L; Perdreau-Remington, F; Brooks, G F

    1999-06-01

    During 1994 and 1995, 157 isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes from patients with invasive disease were consecutively collected in the San Francisco Bay area to determine the frequency of antimicrobial resistance. Susceptibility testing was performed according to the guidelines of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards by the disk method and by broth microdilution. For comparison of susceptibility patterns, an additional 149 strains were randomly collected from patients with pharyngitis. For San Francisco County, 32% of the isolates from invasive-disease-related specimens but only 9% of the isolates from throat cultures from the same period were resistant to erythromycin (P = 0.0007). Alameda County and Contra Costa County had rates of resistance of resistance (39%) among the strains from serious infections compared to those from other counties (P = <0. 0003). For tetracycline, high rates of resistance were observed in San Francisco County for both isolates from patients with invasive disease (34%) and pharyngitis (21%) in the same period. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, two clones, one at the San Francisco County Hospital and a second in the entire area, were identified. The latter clone exhibited resistance to bacitracin. Of 146 strains that were tested by microdilution, all were susceptible to penicillin. Clindamycin resistance was not seen among the erythromycin-susceptible strains, but two of the 39 erythromycin-resistant strains were also resistant to clindamycin. An additional 34 strains showed resistance to clindamycin when exposed to an erythromycin disk in the double-disk diffusion test, suggesting that the mechanism of erythromycin resistance is due to an erm gene. This study demonstrates a high rate of resistance to macrolides and tetracycline among S. pyogenes isolates

  12. Cell Surface Glycoside Hydrolases of Streptococcus gordonii Promote Growth in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Luxia; Shah, Nehal; Palmer, Robert J.; Cisar, John O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The growth of the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii in saliva may depend on a number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs), including three cell wall-anchored proteins that are homologs of pneumococcal β-galactosidase (BgaA), β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (StrH), and endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase D (EndoD). In the present study, we introduced unmarked in-frame deletions into the corresponding genes of S. gordonii DL1, verified the presence (or absence) of the encoded proteins on the resulting mutant strains, and compared these strains with wild-type strain DL1 for growth and glycan foraging in saliva. The overnight growth of wild-type DL1 was reduced 3- to 10-fold by the deletion of any one or two genes and approximately 20-fold by the deletion of all three genes. The only notable change in the salivary proteome associated with this reduction of growth was a downward shift in the apparent molecular masses of basic proline-rich glycoproteins (PRG), which was accompanied by the loss of lectin binding sites for galactose-specific Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA) and mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The binding of ECA to PRG was also abolished in saliva cultures of mutants that expressed cell surface BgaA alone or together with either StrH or EndoD. However, the subsequent loss of GNA binding was seen only in saliva cocultures of different mutants that together expressed all three cell surface GHs. The findings indicate that the growth of S. gordonii DL1 in saliva depends to a significant extent on the sequential actions of first BgaA and then StrH and EndoD on N-linked glycans of PRG. IMPORTANCE The ability of oral bacteria to grow on salivary glycoproteins is critical for dental plaque biofilm development. Little is known, however, about how specific salivary components are attacked and utilized by different members of the biofilm community, such as Streptococcus gordonii. Streptococcus gordonii DL1 has three cell wall

  13. Identification of the Novel Lincosamide Resistance Gene lnu(E) Truncated by ISEnfa5-cfr-ISEnfa5 Insertion in Streptococcus suis: De Novo Synthesis and Confirmation of Functional Activity in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qin; Wendlandt, Sarah; Li, Hui; Li, Jun; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The novel lincosamide resistance gene lnu(E), truncated by insertion of an ISEnfa5-cfr-ISEnfa5 segment, was identified in Streptococcus suis. The gene lnu(E) encodes a 173-amino-acid protein with ≤69.4% identity to other lincosamide nucleotidyltransferases. The lnu(E) gene and its promoter region were de novo synthesized, and Staphylococcus aureus RN4220 carrying a shuttle vector with the cloned lnu(E) gene showed a 16-fold increase in the lincomycin MIC. Mass spectrometry experiments demonstrated that Lnu(E) catalyzed the nucleotidylation of lincomycin. PMID:24366733

  14. Induction of prophages by fluoroquinolones in Streptococcus pneumoniae: implications for emergence of resistance in genetically-related clones.

    PubMed

    López, Elena; Domenech, Arnau; Ferrándiz, María-José; Frias, Maria João; Ardanuy, Carmen; Ramirez, Mario; García, Ernesto; Liñares, Josefina; de la Campa, Adela G

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae has increased worldwide by the spread of a few clones. Fluoroquinolone resistance occurs mainly by alteration of their intracellular targets, the type II DNA topoisomerases, which is acquired either by point mutation or by recombination. Increase in fluoroquinolone-resistance may depend on the balance between antibiotic consumption and the cost that resistance imposes to bacterial fitness. In addition, pneumococcal prophages could play an important role. Prophage induction by fluoroquinolones was confirmed in 4 clinical isolates by using Southern blot hybridization. Clinical isolates (105 fluoroquinolone-resistant and 160 fluoroquinolone-susceptible) were tested for lysogeny by using a PCR assay and functional prophage carriage was studied by mitomycin C induction. Fluoroquinolone-resistant strains harbored fewer inducible prophages (17/43) than fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains (49/70) (P = 0.0018). In addition, isolates of clones associated with fluoroquinolone resistance [CC156 (3/25); CC63 (2/20), and CC81 (1/19)], had lower frequency of functional prophages than isolates of clones with low incidence of fluoroquinolone resistance [CC30 (4/21), CC230 (5/20), CC62 (9/21), and CC180 (21/30)]. Likewise, persistent strains from patients with chronic respiratory diseases subjected to fluoroquinolone treatment had a low frequency of inducible prophages (1/11). Development of ciprofloxacin resistance was tested with two isogenic strains, one lysogenic and the other non-lysogenic: emergence of resistance was only observed in the non-lysogenic strain. These results are compatible with the lysis of lysogenic isolates receiving fluoroquinolones before the development of resistance and explain the inverse relation between presence of inducible prophages and fluoroquinolone-resistance.

  15. Local changes in rates of group A Streptococcus disease and antibiotic resistance are associated with geographically widespread strain turnover events.

    PubMed

    Metzgar, David; McDonough, Erin A; Hansen, Christian J; Blaesing, Carl R; Baynes, Darcie; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Blair, Patrick J; Faix, Dennis J; Russell, Kevin L

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the effects of dynamic strain turnover and antibiotic prophylaxis on rates of group A Streptococcus (GAS) antibiotic resistance and disease. The authors analyzed the strain distributions, disease rates, and patterns of antibiotic resistance of 802 GAS isolates collected from 2002 through 2007. These samples were collected from patients with GAS infection symptoms at 10 military facilities. Macrolide resistance peaked at 25% during 2004, due to the geographically widespread dominance of a single resistant strain (M75). The resistant strain was not retained regardless of local patterns of macrolide use, and resistance rates decreased upon replacement of M75 with macrolide-susceptible strains. Disease rates were similarly correlated with dominance of specific M types. Statistical analysis revealed temporal correlations between strain distributions at multiple locations. Only the most common strains yielded enough data at multiple sites for statistically significant comparison of temporal fluctuations in dominance, but these (including M44, M3, M18, M118, and M6) all yielded highly significant temporal correlations of 90% or greater on yearly scales. As expected given the complexity and variability of strain distributions on shorter time scales, analysis on a monthly scale yielded lower degrees of positive correlation (31-62%), but in this case all significant correlations were still positive. Shifts in antibiotic resistance profiles and disease rates at specific sites appear to be associated with strain replacements happening on larger scales, independent of antibiotic use at individual sites.

  16. The selection of resistance to and the mutagenicity of different fluoroquinolones in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Sierra, J M; Cabeza, J G; Ruiz Chaler, M; Montero, T; Hernandez, J; Mensa, J; Llagostera, M; Vila, J

    2005-09-01

    Two quinolone-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and five quinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were used to obtain in-vitro quinolone-resistant mutants in a multistep resistance selection process. The fluoroquinolones used were ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, gemifloxacin, trovafloxacin and clinafloxacin. The mutagenicity of these quinolones was determined by the Salmonella and the Escherichia coli retromutation assays. All quinolone-resistant Staph. aureus mutants had at least one mutation in the grlA gene, while 86.6% of quinolone-resistant Strep. pneumoniae mutants had mutations in either or both the gyrA and parC genes. Moxifloxacin and levofloxacin selected resistant mutants later than the other quinolones, but this difference was more obvious in Staph. aureus. Accumulation of the fluoroquinolones by Staph. aureus did not explain these differences, since levofloxacin and moxifloxacin accumulated inside bacteria to the same extent as clinafloxacin and trovafloxacin. The results also showed that moxifloxacin and levofloxacin had less mutagenic potency in both mutagenicity assays, suggesting a possible relationship between the selection of resistance to quinolones and the mutagenic potency of the molecule. Furthermore, gemifloxacin selected efflux mutants more frequently than the other quinolones used. Thus, the risk of developing quinolone resistance may depend on the density of the microorganism at the infection site and the concentration of the fluoroquinolone, and also on the mutagenicity of the quinolone used, with moxifloxacin and levofloxacin being the least mutagenic.

  17. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Rebecca A.; Puricelli, Jessica M.; Higashi, Dustin L.; Park, Claudia J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. PMID:26238711

  18. Genomic Characterization of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in a Laboratory-Derived Mutant and a Clinical Isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lupien, Andréanne; Billal, Dewan S.; Fani, Fereshteh; Soualhine, Hafid; Zhanel, George G.; Leprohon, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is a bactericidal antibiotic targeting DNA topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase encoded by the parC and gyrA genes. Resistance to ciprofloxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae mainly occurs through the acquisition of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the ParC and GyrA targets. A role in low-level ciprofloxacin resistance has also been attributed to efflux systems. To look into ciprofloxacin resistance at a genome-wide scale and to discover additional mutations implicated in resistance, we performed whole-genome sequencing of an S. pneumoniae isolate selected for resistance to ciprofloxacin in vitro (128 μg/ml) and of a clinical isolate displaying low-level ciprofloxacin resistance (2 μg/ml). Gene disruption and DNA transformation experiments with PCR fragments harboring the mutations identified in the in vitro S. pneumoniae mutant revealed that resistance is mainly due to QRDR mutations in parC and gyrA and to the overexpression of the ABC transporters PatA and PatB. In contrast, no QRDR mutations were identified in the genome of the S. pneumoniae clinical isolate with low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin. Assays performed in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor reserpine suggested that resistance is likely mediated by efflux. Interestingly, the genome sequence of this clinical isolate also revealed mutations in the coding region of patA and patB that we implicated in resistance. Finally, a mutation in the NAD(P)H-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase identified in the S. pneumoniae clinical strain was shown to protect against ciprofloxacin-mediated reactive oxygen species. PMID:23877698

  19. Nosocomial Outbreak of Drug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 9V in an Adult Respiratory Medicine Ward

    PubMed Central

    Khan-Orakzai, Zareena; Kapatai, Georgia; Bloch, Susannah; Singleton, Julie; Atkin, Sara; Shah, Victoria; Hatcher, James; Samarasinghe, Dunisha; Sheppard, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae infections arising in hospitalized patients are often assumed to be sporadic and linked to community acquisition. Here, whole-genome sequencing was used to demonstrate nosocomial acquisition of antimicrobial-resistant sequence type 156 (ST156) serotype 9V S. pneumoniae in 3 respiratory patients that resulted in two bacteremias and one lower respiratory tract infection. Two of the cases arose in patients who had recently been discharged from the hospital and were readmitted from the community. Nosocomial spread was suspected solely because of the highly unusual resistance pattern and case presentations within 24 h of one another. The outbreak highlights the potential for rapid transmission and the short incubation period in the respiratory ward setting. PMID:27974539

  20. Erythromycin resistance in italian isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes and correlations with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis.

    PubMed

    Zampaloni, Claudia; Vitali, Luca A; Prenna, Manuela; Toscano, Maria A; Tempera, Gianna; Ripa, Sandro

    2002-01-01

    Erythromycin resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes strains has been reported in Italy at high rates during the last few years. A total of 152 erythromycin-resistant isolates of this species from southern Italian regions were characterized for the macrolide-resistance phenotype and screened by PCR for the corresponding genetic determinant. A close correlation was found between these phenotypic/genotypic data concerning macrolide resistance and results of Sma I macrorestriction fragment patterns (PFGE) analysis. In fact, the vast majority of the isolates assigned to individual PFGE classes mostly belonged to a single phenotype of macrolide resistance. All untypeable isolates belonged to the M phenotype. Twenty-two distinct PFGE types were recognized, of which 11 were recorded in only one isolate (one-strain type); about 50% of typeable isolates fell into five type clusters and 70% in seven. The increased erythromycin resistance among Italian isolates of S. pyogenes does not appear to be due to the spread of a single clone, but results indicate that the majority of group A streptococci examined are probably spread from a limited number of clones.

  1. Efficacy of moxifloxacin for treatment of penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, C; Torres, A; Choudhri, S; Haverstock, D; Herrington, J; Ambler, J

    2005-11-01

    This pooled analysis of six prospective, multicentre trials aimed to determine the efficacy of moxifloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MDRSP). At a central laboratory, isolates were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility determined (microbroth dilution). MDRSP was defined as resistance > or =3 drug classes. Patients received oral or sequential intravenous/oral 400 mg moxifloxacin once daily for 7-14 days. The primary endpoint was clinical success at test-of-cure for efficacy-valid patients with proven pretherapy S. pneumoniae infection. Of 140 S. pneumoniae isolated (112 respiratory, 28 blood), 23 (16.4%) were penicillin resistant, 26 (18.6%) macrolide resistant and 31 (22.1%) MDRSP. The moxifloxacin MIC90 was 0.25 microg/ml. Clinical cure with moxifloxacin was 95.4% (125/131) overall, and 100% (21/21) for penicillin-, 95.7% (22/23) for macrolide- and 96.4% (27/28) for multidrug-resistant strains. Moxifloxacin provided excellent clinical and bacteriological cure rates in CAP due to drug-resistant pneumococci.

  2. Rise of multidrug-resistant non-vaccine serotype 15A Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United Kingdom, 2001 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Carmen; Fry, Norman K.; Mushtaq, Shazad; Woodford, Neil; Reynolds, Rosy; Janes, Regina; Pike, Rachel; Hill, Robert; Kimuli, Maimuna; Staves, Peter; Doumith, Michel; Harrison, Timothy; Livermore, David M

    2016-01-01

    Conjugate vaccines have reduced pneumococcal disease in vaccinated children and unvaccinated adults, but non-vaccine serotypes are of concern, particularly if antibiotic resistant. We reviewed Streptococcus pneumoniae collected via: (i) the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) surveillances from 2001–2014; (ii) Public Health England’s (PHE) invasive isolate surveillance from 2005–2014 and (iii) referral to PHE for resistance investigation from 2005–2014. Serotype 15A increased in all series, with many representatives showing triple resistance to macrolides, tetracyclines and penicillin. 15A was consistently among the 10 most prevalent serotypes from 2011 in PHE and BSAC invasive isolate/bacteraemia surveillance but never previously; 26–33% of these invasive 15A isolates had triple resistance. BSAC respiratory isolates were only serotyped in 2013/14 and 2014/15 (October to September); 15A was most prevalent serotype in both periods, comprising 9–11% of isolates, 38–48% of them with triple resistance. Serotype 15A represented 0–4% of S. pneumoniae referred to PHE for reference investigation annually until 2008 but rose to 29% (2013) and 32% (2014). Almost all multidrug-resistant 15A isolates were sequence type (ST) 63 variants, whereas susceptible 15A isolates were clonally diverse. The rise of serotype 15A suggests that pneumococcal conjugate vaccines will need ongoing adaptation. PMID:28006650

  3. Pili of oral Streptococcus sanguinis bind to salivary amylase and promote the biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Terao, Yutaka; Isoda, Ryutaro; Sakurai, Atsuo; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kimura, Richard K; Oiki, Eiji; Kawabata, Shigetada; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of oral streptococci and one of the most abundant species found in oral biofilm called dental plaque. Colonization of the oral streptococci on the tooth surface depends on the adhesion of bacteria to salivary components adsorbed to the tooth surface. Recently, we identified unique cell surface long filamentous structures named pili in this species. Herein, we investigated the role of S. sanguinis pili in biofilm formation. We found that pili-deficient mutant, in which the genes encoding the three pilus proteins PilA, PilB and PilC have been deleted, showed an impaired bacterial accumulation on saliva-coated surfaces. Confocal microscopic observations suggested that the mutant was incapable of producing typical three-dimensional layer of biofilm. Ligand blot analysis showed that the ancillary pilus proteins PilB and PilC bound to human whole saliva. Additional analysis demonstrated that PilC bound to multiple salivary components, and one of which was found to be salivary α-amylase. These results indicate that pilus proteins are members of saliva-binding proteins of oral S. sanguinis, and suggest the involvement of pili in its colonization on saliva-coated tooth surfaces and in the human oral cavity.

  4. Deciphering Key Residues Involved in the Virulence-promoting Interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Human Plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Christophe; Terrasse, Rémi; Thielens, Nicole M; Vernet, Thierry; Gaboriaud, Christine; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie

    2017-02-10

    Bacterial pathogens recruit circulating proteins to their own surfaces, co-opting the host protein functions as a mechanism of virulence. Particular attention has focused on the binding of plasminogen (Plg) to bacterial surfaces, as it has been shown that this interaction contributes to bacterial adhesion to host cells, invasion of host tissues, and evasion of the immune system. Several bacterial proteins are known to serve as receptors for Plg including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytoplasmic enzyme that appears on the cell surface in this moonlighting role. Although Plg typically binds to these receptors via several lysine-binding domains, the specific interactions that occur have not been documented in all cases. However, identification of the relevant residues could help define strategies for mitigating the virulence of important human pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp). To shed light on this question, we have described a combination of peptide-spot array screening, competition and SPR assays, high-resolution crystallography, and mutational analyses to characterize the interaction between SpGAPDH and Plg. We identified three SpGAPDH lysine residues that were instrumental in defining the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction. Altogether, the integration of the data presented in this work allows us to propose a structural model for the molecular interaction of the SpGAPDH-Plg complex.

  5. Nicotine promotes Streptococcus mutans extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, cell aggregation and overall lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Li, M; Gregory, R L

    2015-08-01

    Several epidemiology studies have reported a positive relationship between smoking and dental caries. Nicotine, an alkaloid component of tobacco, has been demonstrated to stimulate biofilm formation and metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans, one of the most important pathogens of dental caries. The first aim of the present study was to explore the possible mechanisms leading to increased biofilm by nicotine treatment from three aspects, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) synthesis, glucosyltransferase (Gtf) synthesis and glucan-binding protein (Gbp) synthesis at the mRNA and protein levels. The second aim was to investigate how nicotine affects S. mutans virulence, particular in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Confocal laser scanning microscopy results demonstrated that both biofilm bacterial cell numbers and EPS were increased by nicotine. Gtf and GbpA protein expression of S. mutans planktonic cells were upregulated while GbpB protein expression of biofilm cells were downregulated by nicotine. The mRNA expression trends of those genes were mostly consistent with results on protein level but not statistically significant, and gtfD and gbpD of biofilm cells were inhibited. Nicotine was not directly involved in S. mutans LDH activity. However, since it increases the total number of bacterial cells in biofilm, the overall LDH activity of S. mutans biofilm is increased. In conclusion, nicotine stimulates S. mutans planktonic cell Gtf and Gbp expression. This leads to more planktonic cells attaching to the dental biofilm. Increased cell numbers within biofilm results in higher overall LDH activity. This contributes to caries development in smokers.

  6. Host-derived extracellular RNA promotes adhesion of Streptococcus pneumoniae to endothelial and epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewicz, Dariusz; Bergmann, Simone; Didiasova, Miroslava; Giaimo, Benedetto Daniele; Borggrefe, Tilman; Mieth, Maren; Hocke, Andreas C.; Lochnit, Guenter; Schaefer, Liliana; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Preissner, Klaus T.; Wygrecka, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The infection process involves bacterial cell surface receptors, which interact with host extracellular matrix components to facilitate colonization and dissemination of bacteria. Here, we investigated the role of host-derived extracellular RNA (eRNA) in the process of pneumococcal alveolar epithelial cell infection. Our study demonstrates that eRNA dose-dependently increased S. pneumoniae invasion of alveolar epithelial cells. Extracellular enolase (Eno), a plasminogen (Plg) receptor, was identified as a novel eRNA-binding protein on S. pneumoniae surface, and six Eno eRNA-binding sites including a C-terminal 15 amino acid motif containing lysine residue 434 were characterized. Although the substitution of lysine 434 for glycine (K434G) markedly diminished the binding of eRNA to Eno, the adherence to and internalization into alveolar epithelial cells of S. pneumoniae strain carrying the C-terminal lysine deletion and the mutation of internal Plg-binding motif were only marginally impaired. Accordingly, using a mass spectrometric approach, we identified seven novel eRNA-binding proteins in pneumococcal cell wall. Given the high number of eRNA-interacting proteins on pneumococci, treatment with RNase1 completely inhibited eRNA-mediated pneumococcal alveolar epithelial cell infection. Our data support further efforts to employ RNAse1 as an antimicrobial agent to combat pneumococcal infectious diseases. PMID:27892961

  7. Differences between Macrolide-Resistant and -Susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes: Importance of Clonal Properties in Addition to Antibiotic Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Costa, C.; Friães, A.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2012-01-01

    A steady decline in macrolide resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) in Portugal was reported during 1999 to 2006. This was accompanied by alterations in the prevalence of macrolide resistance phenotypes and in the clonal composition of the population. In order to test whether changes in the macrolide-resistant population reflected the same changing patterns of the overall population, we characterized both macrolide-susceptible and -resistant GAS associated with a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis recovered in the period from 2000 to 2005 in Portugal. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling was the best predictor of emm type and the only typing method that could discriminate clones associated with macrolide resistance and susceptibility within each emm type. Six PFGE clusters were significantly associated with macrolide susceptibility: T3-emm3-ST406, T4-emm4-ST39, T1-emm1-ST28, T6-emm6-ST382, B3264-emm89-ST101/ST408, and T2-emm2-ST55. Four PFGE clusters were associated with macrolide resistance: T4-emm4-ST39, T28-emm28-ST52, T12-emm22-ST46, and T1-emm1-ST28. We found no evidence for frequent ongoing horizontal transfer of macrolide resistance determinants. The diversity of the macrolide-resistant population was lower than that of susceptible isolates. The differences found between the two populations suggest that the macrolide-resistant population of GAS has its own dynamics, independent of the behavior of the susceptible population. PMID:22908153

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Macrolide-Resistant Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae Collected from Blood and Respiratory Specimens in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Sangvik, M.; Caugant, D. A.; Høiby, E. A.; Simonsen, G. S.; Sundsfjord, A.

    2005-01-01

    Norway has a low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, including macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MRSP). In a nationwide surveillance program, a total of 2,200 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from blood cultures and respiratory tract specimens. Macrolide resistance was detected in 2.7%. M-type macrolide resistance was found in 60% of resistant isolates, and these were mainly mef(A)-positive, serotype-14 invasive isolates. The erm(B)-encoded macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) type dominated among the noninvasive isolates. One strain had an A2058G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Coresistance to other antibiotics was seen in 96% of the MLSB-type isolates, whereas 92% of the M-type isolates were susceptible to other commonly used antimicrobial agents. Serotypes 14, 6B, and 19F accounted for 84% of the macrolide-resistant isolates, with serotype 14 alone accounting for 67% of the invasive isolates. A total of 29 different sequence types (STs) were detected by multilocus sequence typing. Twelve STs were previously reported international resistant clones, and 75% of the macrolide-resistant isolates had STs identical or closely related to these clones. Eleven isolates displayed 10 novel STs, and 7/11 of these “Norwegian strains” coexpressed MLSB and tetracycline resistance, indicating the presence of Tn1545. The invasive serotype-14 isolates were all classified as ST9 or single-locus variants of this clone. ST9 is a mef-positive M-type clone, commonly known as England14-9, reported from several European countries. These observations suggest that the import of major international MRSP clones and the local spread of Tn1545 are the major mechanisms involved in the evolution and dissemination of MRSP in Norway. PMID:15872231

  9. The antimicrobial resistance patterns and associated determinants in Streptococcus suis isolated from humans in southern Vietnam, 1997-2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen and is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adults in Vietnam. Systematic data on the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of S. suis strains isolated from human cases are lacking. We studied antimicrobial resistance and associated resistance determinants in S. suis isolated from patients with meningitis in southern Vietnam. Methods S. suis strains isolated between 1997 and 2008 were investigated for their susceptibility to six antimicrobial agents. Strains were screened for the presence and expression of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance determinants and the association of tet(M) genes with Tn916- like transposons. The localization of tetracycline resistance gene tet(L) was determined by pulse field gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting. Results We observed a significant increase in resistance to tetracycline and chloramphenicol, which was concurrent with an increase in multi-drug resistance. In tetracycline resistance strains, we identified tet(M), tet(O), tet(W) and tet(L) and confirmed their expression. All tet(M) genes were associated with a Tn916-like transposon. The co-expression of tet(L) and other tetracycline resistance gene(s) encoding for ribosomal protection protein(s) was only detected in strains with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tetracycline of ≥ 64 mg/L Conclusions We demonstrated that multi-drug resistance in S. suis causing disease in humans in southern Vietnam has increased over the 11-year period studied. We report the presence and expression of tet(L) in S. suis strains and our data suggest that co-expression of multiple genes encoding distinct mechanism is required for an MIC ≥ 64 mg/L to tetracycline. PMID:21208459

  10. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    PubMed

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone.

  11. In Vitro Resistance Development to Nemonoxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Unique Profile for a Novel Nonfluorinated Quinolone

    PubMed Central

    Roychoudhury, Siddhartha; Makin, Kelly; Twinem, Tracy; Leunk, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Selection of resistant strains in Streptococcus pneumoniae was studied in vitro with nemonoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated quinolone (NFQ), in comparison with quinolone benchmarks, ciprofloxacin, garenoxacin, and gatifloxacin. In stepwise resistance selection studies, a 256-fold loss of potency was observed after three to four steps of exposure to ciprofloxacin or garenoxacin. In contrast, the loss of potency was limited to eightfold after three steps of exposure to nemonoxacin and repeated attempts to isolate highly resistant organisms after four steps of exposure yielded isolates that could not be subcultured in liquid medium. The quinolone resistance-determining regions of the target genes, parC, parE, gyrA, and gyrB, were analyzed through DNA sequencing. Known mutations, especially in the hotspots of parC and gyrA, were selected with exposure to garenoxacin, ciprofloxacin, and gatifloxacin. In contrast, mutations selected with nemonoxacin were limited to GyrA, GyrB, and ParE, sparing ParC, which is known as a key driver of resistance in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae. This observation is consistent with previous data using other NFQs, which showed no loss of potency due to ParC mutations in clinical isolates. This apparently unique feature of nemonoxacin is potentially attributable to the structural uniqueness of the NFQs, distinguishing them from the fluoroquinolones that are commonly prescribed for infections by S. pneumoniae. PMID:27267788

  12. Effects of dietary levels of vitamin A on growth, hematology, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplemental levels of vitamin A (0, 2,500, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 IU/kg diet) on the growth performance, hematology, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus to Streptococcus iniae challenge. Each diet was fed to Nil...

  13. Fitness cost, gyrB mutation, and absence of phosphotransferase system fructose specific IIABC component in novobiocin-resistant Streptococcus iniae vaccine strain ISNO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the fitness cost of novobiocin-resistance in an attenuated Streptococcus iniae vaccine strain ISNO compared to its virulent parent strain ISET0901, cell proliferation rate of the two strains were compared to each other. Our results revealed that the cell proliferation rates of ISNO wer...

  14. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  15. Neuraminidase A-Exposed Galactose Promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Formation during Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Krystle A.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Milner, Jeffrey; Gilley, Ryan P.; McClure, Erin; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Kumar, Nikhil; Daugherty, Sean C.; Tallon, Luke J.; Ott, Sandra; King, Samantha J.; Ferreira, Daniela M.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Tettelin, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx. Herein we show that carbon availability is distinct between the nasopharynx and bloodstream of adult humans: glucose is absent from the nasopharynx, whereas galactose is abundant. We demonstrate that pneumococcal neuraminidase A (NanA), which cleaves terminal sialic acid residues from host glycoproteins, exposed galactose on the surface of septal epithelial cells, thereby increasing its availability during colonization. We observed that S. pneumoniae mutants deficient in NanA and β-galactosidase A (BgaA) failed to form biofilms in vivo despite normal biofilm-forming abilities in vitro. Subsequently, we observed that glucose, sucrose, and fructose were inhibitory for biofilm formation, whereas galactose, lactose, and low concentrations of sialic acid were permissive. Together these findings suggested that the genes involved in biofilm formation were under some form of carbon catabolite repression (CCR), a regulatory network in which genes involved in the uptake and metabolism of less-preferred sugars are silenced during growth with preferred sugars. Supporting this notion, we observed that a mutant deficient in pyruvate oxidase, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate under non-CCR-inducing growth conditions, was unable to form biofilms. Subsequent comparative transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of planktonic and biofilm-grown pneumococci showed that metabolic pathways involving the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate and subsequently leading to fatty acid biosynthesis were consistently upregulated during diverse biofilm growth conditions. We conclude that carbon availability in the nasopharynx impacts pneumococcal biofilm formation in vivo. Additionally, biofilm formation involves metabolic pathways not previously appreciated to play an important role. PMID:27481242

  16. Increase in numbers of beta-lactam-resistant invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in Brazil and the impact of conjugate vaccine coverage.

    PubMed

    Brandileone, Maria-Cristina C; Casagrande, Silvana Tadeu; Guerra, Maria-Luiza L S; Zanella, Rosemeire Cobo; Andrade, Ana-Lucia S S; Di Fabio, José-Luis

    2006-05-01

    A comprehensive investigation of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae was carried out in Brazil as part of the programme of the national epidemiological surveillance system. The investigation provided data on the trends of resistance to antimicrobial agents. A total of 6470 isolates of S. pneumoniae collected in the country from 1993 to 2004 were tested. During this period of time, the number of penicillin-resistant strains rose from 10.2 to 27.9%. The proportions of intermediate and high-level resistant strains in 1993, which were 9.1 and 1.1%, respectively, rose to 22.0 and 5.9% in 2004. Geometric mean MICs for penicillin increased after the year 2000, to 0.19 microg ml(-1) in 2004; most of these isolates were from patients with pneumonia and from children under 5 years old, and belonged to serotype 14. There was a significant increase in the number of isolates belonging to serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine from children under 5 years old: from 48.6% in 1993 to 69.6% in 2004, mainly related to an increase in the frequency of serotype 14 isolates. From 2000 to 2004, meningitis isolates showed higher resistance rates to cefotaxime (2.6%) compared to non-meningitis isolates (0.7%); percentages of isolates resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, erythromycin, chloramphenicol and rifampicin were 65, 14.6, 6.2, 1.3 and 0.7 %, respectively. No levoflaxin resistance was observed. Multidrug resistance was identified in 4.6% of isolates, of which 3.8% were resistant to three classes, 0.7% to four classes and 0.1% to five classes of antimicrobial agent. The study provides valuable information that may support empirical antimicrobial therapy for severe S. pneumoniae infections in Brazil, and emphasizes the need for conjugate pneumococcal vaccination.

  17. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mogen, Austin B; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  18. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mogen, Austin B.; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A.; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  19. Rapid Determination of Macrolide and Lincosamide Resistance in Group B Streptococcus Isolated from Vaginal-Rectal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Dela Cruz, Wilfred P.; Richardson, Joann Y.; Broestler, Judith M.; Thornton, Jennifer A.; Danaher, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Our objective was to assess the ability of real-time PCR to predict in vitro resistance in isolates of group B streptococcus (GBS). Methods. The first real-time PCR assays for the genes known to confer resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin in GBS were developed. Three hundred and forty clinical GBS isolates were assessed with these assays and compared with conventional disk diffusion. Results. The presence of an erythromycin ribosome methylation gene (ermB or ermTR variant A) predicted in vitro constitutive or inducible resistance to clindamycin with a sensitivity of 93% (95% CI 86%–97%), specificity of 90% (95% CI 85%–93%), positive predictive value of 76% (95% CI 67%–84%), and negative predictive value of 97% (95% CI 94%–99%). Conclusion. This rapid and simple assay can predict in vitro susceptibility to clindamycin within two hours of isolation as opposed to 18–24 hours via disk diffusion. The assay might also be used to screen large numbers of batched isolates to establish the prevalence of resistance in a given area. PMID:17710240

  20. Comparative growth, cross stress resistance, transcriptomics of Streptococcus pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity and normal gravity

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, Duraisamy; Im, Chanki; Lee, Yang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is commonly found on pharynx, mouth and rarely on skin, lower gastrointestinal tract. It is a potential pathogen causing tonsillitis, pneumonia, endocarditis. The present study was undertaken to study the effects of low shear modeled microgravity on growth, morphology, antibiotic resistance, cross-stress resistance to various stresses and alteration in gene expression of S. pyogenes. The growth analysis performed using UV–Visible spectroscopy indicated decrease in growth of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity. Morphological analysis by Bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Bio-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) did not reveal much difference between normal and low shear modeled microgravity grown S. pyogenes. The sensitivity of S. pyogenes to antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, hygromycin, rifampicin indicates that the bacterium is resistant to hygromycin. Further S. pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity was found to be more sensitive to ampicillin and rifampicin as compared with normal gravity grown S. pyogenes. The bacteria were tested for the acid, osmotic, temperature and oxidative cross stress resistances. The gene expression of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity analyzed by microarray revealed upregulation of 26 genes and down regulation of 22 genes by a fold change of 1.5. PMID:26858535

  1. Comparative growth, cross stress resistance, transcriptomics of Streptococcus pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity and normal gravity.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, Duraisamy; Im, Chanki; Lee, Yang Soo

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is commonly found on pharynx, mouth and rarely on skin, lower gastrointestinal tract. It is a potential pathogen causing tonsillitis, pneumonia, endocarditis. The present study was undertaken to study the effects of low shear modeled microgravity on growth, morphology, antibiotic resistance, cross-stress resistance to various stresses and alteration in gene expression of S. pyogenes. The growth analysis performed using UV-Visible spectroscopy indicated decrease in growth of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity. Morphological analysis by Bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Bio-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) did not reveal much difference between normal and low shear modeled microgravity grown S. pyogenes. The sensitivity of S. pyogenes to antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, hygromycin, rifampicin indicates that the bacterium is resistant to hygromycin. Further S. pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity was found to be more sensitive to ampicillin and rifampicin as compared with normal gravity grown S. pyogenes. The bacteria were tested for the acid, osmotic, temperature and oxidative cross stress resistances. The gene expression of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity analyzed by microarray revealed upregulation of 26 genes and down regulation of 22 genes by a fold change of 1.5.

  2. Correlation between genetic features of the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Luca Agostino; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Prenna, Manuela; Petrelli, Dezemona

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the genetic variation within mef(A)-msr(D) determinants of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes and the level of erythromycin resistance. Twenty-eight mef(A)-positive strains were selected according to erythromycin MIC (4-32 μg/mL), and their mef(A)-msr(D) regions were sequenced. Strains were classified according to the bacteriophage carrying mef(A)-msr(D). A new Φm46.1 genetic variant was found in 8 strains out of 28 and named VP_00501.1. Degree of allelic variation was higher in mef(A) than in msr(D). Hotspots for recombination were mapped within the locus that could have shaped the apparent mosaic structure of the region. There was a general correlation between mef(A)-msr(D) sequence and erythromycin resistance level. However, lysogenic conversion of susceptible strains by mef(A)-msr(D)-carrying Φm46.1 indicated that key determinants may not all reside within the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and that horizontal gene transfer could contribute to changes in the level of antibiotic resistance in S. pyogenes.

  3. Molecular epidemiology, antimicrobial susceptibilities and resistance mechanisms of Streptococcus pyogenes isolates resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline in Spain (1994–2006)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes human diseases ranging in severity from uncomplicated pharyngitis to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis and shows high rates of macrolide resistance in several countries. Our goal is to identify antimicrobial resistance in Spanish GAS isolates collected between 1994 and 2006 and to determine the molecular epidemiology (emm/T typing and PFGE) and resistance mechanisms of those resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline. Results Two hundred ninety-five out of 898 isolates (32.8%) were erythromycin resistant, with the predominance of emm4T4, emm75T25, and emm28T28, accounting the 67.1% of the 21 emm/T types. Spread of emm4T4, emm75T25 and emm28T28 resistant clones caused high rates of macrolide resistance. The distribution of the phenotypes was M (76.9%), cMLSB (20.3%), iMLSB (2.7%) with the involvement of the erythromycin resistance genes mef(A) (89.5%), msr(D) (81.7%), erm(B) (37.3%) and erm(A) (35.9%). Sixty-one isolates were tetracycline resistant, with the main representation of the emm77T28 among 20 emm/T types. To note, the combination of tet(M) and tet(O) tetracycline resistance genes were similar to tet(M) alone reaching values close to 40%. Resistance to both antibiotics was detected in 19 isolates of 7 emm/T types, being emm11T11 and the cMLSB phenotype the most frequent ones. erm(B) and tet(M) were present in almost all the strains, while erm(A), mef(A), msr(D) and tet(O) appeared in less than half of them. Conclusions Spanish GAS were highly resistant to macrolides meanwhile showed minor resistance rate to tetracycline. A remarkable correlation between antimicrobial resistance and emm/T type was noticed. Clonal spread of emm4T4, emm75T25 and emm28T28 was the main responsable for macrolide resistance where as that emm77T28 clones were it to tetraclycline resistance. A wide variety of macrolide resistance genes were responsible for three macrolide resistance phenotypes. PMID:22998619

  4. SmaI macrorestriction analysis of Italian isolates of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes and correlations with macrolide-resistance phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ripa, S; Zampaloni, C; Vitali, L A; Giovanetti, E; Montanari, M P; Prenna, M; Varaldo, P E

    2001-01-01

    High rates of erythromycin resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes strains have been reported in Italy in the last few years. In this study, 370 erythromycin-resistant (MIC, > or = 1 microg/mL) Italian isolates of this species obtained in 1997-1998 from throat swabs from symptomatic patients were typed by analyzing SmaI macrorestriction fragment patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the typable isolates (n = 341; the genomic DNA of the remaining 29 isolates was not restricted by SmaI), 48 distinct PFGE types were recognized, of which 31 were recorded in only one isolate (one-strain types). Fifty-two percent of typable isolates fell into three type clusters and 75% into six, suggesting that erythromycin-resistant group A streptococci circulating in Italy are polyclonal, but the majority of them probably derives from the spread of a limited number of clones. In parallel experiments, the 370 test strains were characterized for the macrolide resistance phenotype: 80 were assigned to phenotype cMLS, 89 to phenotype iMLS-A, 33 to phenotype iMLS-B, 11 to phenotype iMLS-C, and 157 to phenotype M. There was a close correlation between these phenotypic data and the genotypic results of PFGE analysis, the vast majority of the isolates assigned to individual PFGE classes belonging usually to a single phenotype of macrolide resistance. All of the 29 untypable isolates belonged to the M phenotype. Further correlations were observed with tetracycline resistance.

  5. Transcriptional attenuation controls macrolide inducible efflux and resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in other Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr(D)) elements.

    PubMed

    Chancey, Scott T; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F; Daugherty, Sean C; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5'-TATACT-3') and -35 (5'-TTGAAC-3') boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5' region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5' of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements.

  6. Transcriptional Attenuation Controls Macrolide Inducible Efflux and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in Other Gram-Positive Bacteria Containing mef/mel(msr(D)) Elements

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5′-TATACT-3′) and -35 (5′-TTGAAC-3′) boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5’ region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5’ of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements. PMID:25695510

  7. Distribution of mef(A)-containing genetic elements in erythromycin-resistant isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes from Italy.

    PubMed

    D'Ercole, S; Petrelli, D; Prenna, M; Zampaloni, C; Catania, M R; Ripa, S; Vitali, L A

    2005-11-01

    In total, 124 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates were obtained from throat cultures of different symptomatic patients. All isolates showed M-phenotype macrolide resistance and contained the macrolide efflux gene mef(A). The isolates were screened for the presence and insertion site of mef(A)-containing genetic elements. In 25.8% of the isolates, mef(A) was found to be carried by elements belonging to the Tn1207.3/Phi10394.4 family inserted in the comEC gene, while 74.2% contained chimeric elements with a different genetic structure and chromosomal location, probably associated with the recently described 60-kb tet(O)-mef(A) element.

  8. Promoting Improved Ballistic Resistance of Transparent Armor

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Patel, P; Templeton, D W

    2011-01-01

    Transparent armor is a material or system of materials designed to be optically transparent, yet protect from fragmentation or ballistic impacts. Although engineered to defeat specific threats, or a range of threats, there are general requirements common to all of these designs. The primary requirement for a transparent armor system is to not only defeat the designated threat but also provide a multi-hit capability with minimized distortion of surrounding areas. Ground platforms have several parameters that must be optimized, such as weight, space efficiency, and cost versus performance. Glass exhibits tensile failure stress that is very much dependent on the amount of material being stressed, the side being tensile-stressed (i.e., air-versus tin-side if a float glass), and where it is being tensile stressed (i.e., in the middle or near an edge). An axiom arising from those effects is a greater amount of allowable deflection (i.e., higher failure stress) of a ballistically impacted transparent armor will result in improved ballistic resistance. Therefore, the interpretation and management of those tensile-failure-stress dependencies shall ultimately improve ballistic resistance and its predictability of transparent armor. Each of those three dependencies (size, side, and location) in a soda-lime silicate glass is described.

  9. β-lactam Resistance, Serotype Distribution, and Genotypes of Meningitis-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, David E.; Godoy, Daniel; Castiñeiras, Terezinha M. P. P.; Tulenko, Mary M.; Rebelo, Maria C.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Here, we report a laboratory-based study of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients with meningitis in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Methods The aim of this study was to determine the evolution of β-lactam resistance, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, serotypes, and genetic diversity of S. pneumoniae, isolated from meningitis patients between 2000 and 2008. Results A total of 264 S. pneumoniae recovered from patients between 2000 and 2008 were included. Susceptibility testing (E-test) of S. pneumoniae showed resistance to penicillin, ceftriaxone, oxacillin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, ofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and rifampicin. Penicillin resistance (PEN-R, minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥0.12 μg/mL) increased from 8% of isolates in 2000–2002, to 12% in 2003–2005, and to 20% in 2006–2008. Ceftriaxone resistance (MIC ≥1.0 μg/mL) was detected among some PEN-R isolates (13%) from 2004 onward. Within the PEN-R isolates, serotypes that are included in 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine predominated (90%), and resistance was detected mostly in isolates of serotypes 14 (61%), 23F (16%), 6B (10%), and 19F (3%). Multilocus sequence typing showed that 52% of the PEN-R isolates, and 89% of those with MICs ≥0.5 μg/mL, were sequence type (ST)-156 or single-locus variants of this ST (ST-557 or ST-4388); all of these isolates were serotype 14 and were assigned to the Spain9V-3 clone. Conclusions β-lactam resistance increased recently among cerebrospinal fluid isolates and was mainly due to the surge of the ST-4388, a previously undescribed gki single-locus variants of ST-156. Regional surveillance is shown to be essential to provide optimal antimicrobial therapy, monitor highly successful clones, and formulate adequate vaccination strategy. PMID:21860337

  10. Garenoxacin activity against isolates form patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S; Stilwell, Matthew G; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide, and the principal bacterial pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae) have acquired numerous resistance mechanisms over the last few decades. CAP treatment guidelines have suggested the use of broader spectrum agents, such as antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones as the therapy for at-risk patient population. In this report, we studied 3087 CAP isolates from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1999-2005) worldwide and all respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolate population of pneumococci (14665 strains) grouped by antibiogram patterns against a new des-F(6)-quinolone, garenoxacin. Results indicated that garenoxacin was highly active against CAP isolates of S. pneumoniae (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL) and H. influenzae (MIC(90), < or =0.03 microg/mL). This garenoxacin potency was 8- to 32-fold greater than gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin against the pneumococci and >99.9% of strains were inhibited at < or =1 microg/mL (proposed susceptible breakpoint). Garenoxacin MIC values were not affected by resistances among S. pneumoniae strains to penicillin or erythromycin; however, coresistances were high among the beta-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins), macrolides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Analysis of S. pneumoniae isolates with various antimicrobial resistance patterns to 6 drug classes demonstrated that garenoxacin was active against >99.9% (MIC, < or =1 microg/mL) of strains, and the most resistant pneumococci (6-drug resistance, 1051 strains or 7.2% of all isolates) were completely susceptible (100.0% at < or =1 microg/mL) to garenoxacin (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL). These results illustrate the high activity of garenoxacin against contemporary CAP isolates and especially against multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. pneumoniae that have created therapeutic dilemmas for all RTI presentations. Garenoxacin appears to be a

  11. Association between fluoroquinolone usage and a dramatic rise in ciprofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Canada, 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    Adam, Heather J; Hoban, Daryl J; Gin, Alfred S; Zhanel, George G

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of fluoroquinolone usage and investigated the association between usage and resistance in respiratory isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Canada. Fluoroquinolone susceptibility testing was conducted on S. pneumoniae collected from 25 medical centres across Canada over nine study years. Fluoroquinolone prescriptions and consumption figures were derived from data in the IMS Health, Canada CompuScript Audit. Between 1997 and 2006, 11825 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected. Ciprofloxacin resistance rates increased significantly (P<0.01) during the study from 0% to 4.5% in children (0-15 years), from 0.2% to 5.4% in adults (16-64 years) and from 1.4% to 11.6% in the elderly (> or = 65 years). Outpatient ciprofloxacin and respiratory fluoroquinolone prescriptions increased by 55.6% (38.2 prescriptions/1000 population to 59.4 prescriptions/1000 population; P<0.01) and 416.2% (5.3 prescriptions/1000 to 27.4 prescriptions/1000; P<0.01), respectively. Ciprofloxacin and respiratory fluoroquinolone consumption increased by 10.6% [1.1 defined daily doses (DDDs)/1000/day to 1.2 DDDs/1000/day; P=0.02] and 38.2% (0.5 to 0.7 DDDs/1000/day; P=0.02), respectively, from 2001 to 2006. A strong association between ciprofloxacin use and resistance (R(2)=0.89) was identified. Fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae increased significantly in Canada from 1997 to 2006 in conjunction with increased ciprofloxacin and respiratory fluoroquinolone consumption. Ciprofloxacin usage appears to be the biggest driver of resistance; however, total fluoroquinolone usage is also important.

  12. Comparative Genome Analysis of the Daptomycin-Resistant Streptococcus anginosus Strain J4206 Associated with Breakthrough Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Maliha; Nguyen, Scott V.; McCullor, Kimberly A.; King, Catherine J.; Jorgensen, James H.; McShan, W. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a member of the normal oral flora that can become a pathogen causing pyogenic infections in humans. The genome of daptomycin-resistant strain J4206, originally isolated from a patient suffering from breakthrough bacteremia and septic shock at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, was determined. The circular genome is 2,001,352 bp long with a GC content of 38.62% and contains multiple mobile genetic elements, including the phage-like chromosomal island SanCI that mediates a mutator phenotype, transposons, and integrative conjugative elements. Daptomycin resistance involves multiple alterations in the cell membrane and cell wall, and unique features were identified in J4206 that may contribute to resistance. A cluster of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) genes for choline metabolism and transport are present that may help neutralize cell surface charges, destabilizing daptomycin binding. Further, unique J4206 genes encoding sortases and LPXTG-target proteins that are involved in cell wall modification were present. The J4206 genome is phylogenetically closely related to the recently reported vancomycin-resistant SA1 strain; however, these genomes differ with SNPs in cardiolipin synthetase, histidine kinase yycG, teichoic acid modification genes, and other genes involved in cell surface modification. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the cell walls of both strains J4206 and SA1 were significantly thicker and more electron dense than daptomycin- and vancomycin-sensitive strain J4211. This comparative genomic study has identified unique genes as well as allelic variants in the J4206 genome that are involved in cell surface modification and thus might contribute to the acquisition of daptomycin resistance. PMID:27678123

  13. [In vitro resistance rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates to the antibiotics used in therapy].

    PubMed

    Uncu, Hikmet; Colakoğlu, Sule; Turunç, Tuba; Demiroğlu, Yusuf Ziya; Arslan, Hande

    2007-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae which cause infections with high morbidity and mortality all over the world, are also the most important bacterial pathogens of community-acquired pneumoniae. In recent years S. pneumoniae is becoming increasingly resistant to a variety of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to detect the in vitro resistance rates of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae strains isolated from different clinical samples to the antibiotics which are used in the therapy of infections due to these pathogens. Between the period of January 2005 to May 2006, 77 S. pneumoniae (44 sputum, 20 blood, 8 bronchoalveolar lavage, 4 pleural fluids and 1 tracheal aspirate isolate) and 31 H. influenzae (30 sputum and 1 bronchoalveolar lavage isolate) strains isolated from patients who were admitted to Baskent University Hospital, Research and Practice Center of Adana (located in southern Turkey), were included to the study. The antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by disc diffusion method according to CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; M100-S13) guidelines. The MIC values of S. pneumoniae which gave an inhibition zone diameter of > or =19 mm in with disc diffusion test, were detected by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Intermediate and high resistance rates of pneumococci to penicilin were found as 38.9% (30/77) and 10.4% (8/77), respectively, with a total resistance rate of 49.4%. Trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), erithromycin, tetracyclin, clindamycin and chloramphenicol were the other antibiotics which followed penicillin with the resistance rates of 42.8%, 37.6%, 31.1%, 23.3% and 10.3%, respectively. Amongst H. influenzae strains, one (3.2%) was found to be a beta-lactamase producer and it was resistant to both ampicillin and azitromycin. Eight (25.8%) of H. influenzae isolates were resistant to TMP/SMX, and two (6.4%) were resistant to chloramphenicol. As a result, the high penicilin and erithromycin resistance rates

  14. Changing Trends in Antimicrobial Resistance and Serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Asian Countries: an Asian Network for Surveillance of Resistant Pathogens (ANSORP) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Yang, Yonghong; Wang, Hui; Lu, Min; So, Thomas Man-kit; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Yasin, Rohani M.; Carlos, Celia C.; Pham, Hung Van; Lalitha, M. K.; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Perera, Jennifer; Shibl, Atef M.; Baek, Jin Yang; Kang, Cheol-In; Ko, Kwan Soo; Peck, Kyong Ran

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a serious concern worldwide, particularly in Asian countries, despite the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). The Asian Network for Surveillance of Resistant Pathogens (ANSORP) performed a prospective surveillance study of 2,184 S. pneumoniae isolates collected from patients with pneumococcal infections from 60 hospitals in 11 Asian countries from 2008 to 2009. Among nonmeningeal isolates, the prevalence rate of penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci (MIC, ≥4 μg/ml) was 4.6% and penicillin resistance (MIC, ≥8 μg/ml) was extremely rare (0.7%). Resistance to erythromycin was very prevalent in the region (72.7%); the highest rates were in China (96.4%), Taiwan (84.9%), and Vietnam (80.7%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 59.3% of isolates from Asian countries. Major serotypes were 19F (23.5%), 23F (10.0%), 19A (8.2%), 14 (7.3%), and 6B (7.3%). Overall, 52.5% of isolates showed PCV7 serotypes, ranging from 16.1% in Philippines to 75.1% in Vietnam. Serotypes 19A (8.2%), 3 (6.2%), and 6A (4.2%) were the most prominent non-PCV7 serotypes in the Asian region. Among isolates with serotype 19A, 86.0% and 79.8% showed erythromycin resistance and MDR, respectively. The most remarkable findings about the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Asian countries after the introduction of PCV7 were the high prevalence of macrolide resistance and MDR and distinctive increases in serotype 19A. PMID:22232285

  15. Trends in Antimicrobial Resistance in 1,968 Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Isolated in Spanish Hospitals (2001 to 2003): Decreasing Penicillin Resistance in Children's Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Oteo, Jesús; Lázaro, Edurne; de Abajo, Francisco J.; Baquero, Fernando; Campos, José

    2004-01-01

    To address the public health problem of antibiotic resistance, the European Union (EU) founded the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System. A network of 40 hospitals that serve approximately 30% of the Spanish population (about 12 million) participated. Each laboratory reported data on antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard laboratory procedures that were evaluated by an external quality control program. The antibiotic consumption data were obtained from the National Health System. We compared the antibiotic susceptibility of Spanish isolates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (2001 to 2003) with antibiotic consumption. Invasive S. pneumoniae was isolated from 1,968 patients, 20% of whom were children at or below the age of 14 years. Of non-penicillin-susceptible strains (35.6%; 95% confidence interval, 34 to 37.2), 26.4% were considered intermediate and 9.2% were considered resistant. Between 2001 and 2003, penicillin resistance decreased from 39.5 to 33% overall and from 60.4 to 41.2% in children at or below the age of 14 years (P = 0.002). Resistance to erythromycin was at 26.6%, and coresistance with penicillin was at 19.1%. Of total isolates, the ciprofloxacin MIC was >2 μg/ml for 2.1%, with numbers increasing from 0.4% (2001) to 3.9% (2003). Total antibiotic use decreased from 21.66 to 19.71 defined daily doses/1,000 inhabitants/day between 1998 and 2002. While consumption of broad-spectrum penicillins, cephalosporins, and erythromycin declined, use of amoxicillin-clavulanate and quinolones increased by 17.5 and 27%, respectively. The frequency of antibiotic resistance in invasive S. pneumoniae in Spain was among the highest in the EU. However, a significant decrease in penicillin resistance was observed in children. This decrease coincided with the introduction of a heptavalent conjugate pneumoccocal vaccine (June 2001) and with a global reduction in antibiotic consumption levels. PMID:15583283

  16. [Resistance to macrolides in the species Streptococcus pyogenes in the Czech Republic in 1996-2003].

    PubMed

    Urbásková, P; Jakubů, V

    2004-11-01

    The study of the prevalence of erythromycin resistance in 22 169 S. pyogenes strains in the Czech Republic in 1996-2003 on the background of rough data on the nationwide consumption of macrolide antibiotics confirmed that the exponential growth of resistance observed in 1998-2001 copied with a delay the rise in macrolide antibiotic consumption recorded in 1992-1995. The highest frequency of erythromycin resistance was found in 2001 (16.5%) with a subsequent decrease to 14.5% in 2002 and to 9.1% in 2003. The drop in resistance followed the stagnation in macrolide consumption and its decrease by 17% in 2002. Upward and downward trends in macrolide resistance in different regions and age groups copied the nationwide trends with some quantitative differences that could not be analyzed in view of the lack of detailed data on antibiotic consumption. A 99.5% concordance was found between the results of the phenotypic method and those of detection of genes coding for constitutive, inducible and efflux resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB (MLSB) antibiotics. In 2001 when the highest erythromycin resistance was recorded in the Czech Republic, most of the tested strains (91.2%) showed resistance to all MLSB antibiotics, with macrolide efflux (susceptibility to lincosamides and 16-membered macrolides was conserved) being implicated in resistance of 8.8% of the strains only. In 2003, the number of erythromycin resistant strains decreased and the resistance mechanism was ascribed to macrolide efflux in 26.8% of them. Almost all of the strains with constitutive or induced MLSB resistance are also resistant to either tetracycline or bacitracin or both. In the light of S. pyogenes resistance to bacitracin, the bacitracin disk is not usable in preliminary identification any more.

  17. Pharmacodynamic assessment based on mutant prevention concentrations of fluoroquinolones to prevent the emergence of resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tomoyuki; Hori, Toshihiko; Sugimori, Giichi; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, on the basis of the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) concept, and the emergence of resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolone antibacterials. Some clinical isolates with various MIC and MPC values of moxifloxacin and levofloxacin were exposed under conditions simulating the time-concentration curves observed when moxifloxacin (400 or 80 mg, once a day) or levofloxacin (200 mg, twice a day) was orally administered by using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model. The decrease in susceptibility was evaluated by altering the population analysis profiles after moxifloxacin or levofloxacin treatment for 72 h. When the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24))/MPC and peak concentration (C(max))/MPC were above 13.41 and 1.20, respectively, complete eradication occurred and no decrease in susceptibility was observed. On the other hand, when AUC(0-24)/MPC and C(max)/MPC were below 0.84 and 0.08, respectively, the susceptibility decreased. However, the time inside the mutant selective window and the time above the MPC did not show any correlation with the decrease in susceptibility. These results suggest that AUC(0-24)/MPC and C(max)/MPC are important parameters for predicting the emergence of resistant mutants and that higher values indicate greater effectiveness.

  18. The Streptococcus pneumoniae pezAT Toxin–Antitoxin System Reduces β-Lactam Resistance and Genetic Competence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai T.; Espinosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomally encoded Type II Toxin–Antitoxin operons are ubiquitous in bacteria and archaea. Antitoxins neutralize the toxic effect of cognate Toxins by protein–protein interactions and sequestering the active residues of the Toxin. Toxins target essential bacterial processes, mostly translation and replication. However, one class apart is constituted by the PezAT pair because the PezT toxin target cell wall biosynthesis. Here, we have examined the role of the pezAT toxin–antitoxin genes in its natural host, the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. The pezAT operon on Pneumococcal Pathogenicity Island 1 was deleted from strain R6 and its phenotypic traits were compared with those of the wild type. The mutant cells formed shorter chains during exponential phase, leading to increased colony-forming units. At stationary phase, the mutant was more resilient to lysis. Importantly, the mutant exhibited higher resistance to antibiotics targeting cell walls (β-lactams), but not to antibiotics acting at other levels. In addition, the mutants also showed enhanced genetic competence. We suggest that PezAT participates in a subtle equilibrium between loss of functions (resistance to β-lactams and genetic competence) and gain of other traits (virulence). PMID:27610103

  19. Horizontal Transfer of parC and gyrA in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, María José; Fenoll, Asunción; Liñares, Josefina; De La Campa, Adela G.

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed genetically three clinical isolates (3180, 3870, and 1244) of Streptococcus pneumoniae with high-level ciprofloxacin resistance. Isolates 3180 and 3870 were atypical because of their insolubility in deoxycholate. However, they hybridized specifically with pneumococcal autolysin and pneumolysin gene probes and have typical pneumococcal atpC and atpA gene sequences. Analysis of the complete sequences of the parC and gyrA genes revealed total variations of 8 and 8.7% (isolate 3180) and 7.4 and 3.6% (isolate 3870), respectively, compared to the wild-type strain R6 sequence. The variations observed between the sequences of R6 and isolate 1244 were less than 0.9%. The structure of the gyrA and parC genes from isolates 3180 and 3870 was organized in sequence blocks that show different levels of divergence, suggesting a pattern of recombination. These results are evidence for recombination at the fluoroquinolone target genes in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae. The genetically related viridans group streptococci could act as a reservoir for fluoroquinolone resistance genes. PMID:10722479

  20. Natural Variation in the Promoter of the Gene Encoding the Mga Regulator Alters Host-Pathogen Interactions in Group A Streptococcus Carrier Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Anthony R.; Olsen, Randall J.; Wunsche, Andrea; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Carroll, Ronan K.

    2013-01-01

    Humans commonly carry pathogenic bacteria asymptomatically, but the molecular factors underlying microbial asymptomatic carriage are poorly understood. We previously reported that two epidemiologically unassociated serotype M3 group A Streptococcus (GAS) carrier strains had an identical 12-bp deletion in the promoter of the gene encoding Mga, a global positive gene regulator. Herein, we report on studies designed to test the hypothesis that the identified 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter alters GAS virulence, thereby potentially contributing to the asymptomatic carrier phenotype. Using allelic exchange, we introduced the variant promoter into a serotype M3 invasive strain and the wild-type promoter into an asymptomatic carrier strain. Compared to strains with the wild-type mga promoter, we discovered that strains containing the promoter with the 12-bp deletion produced significantly fewer mga and Mga-regulated gene transcripts. Consistent with decreased mga transcripts, strains containing the variant mga promoter were also significantly less virulent in in vivo and ex vivo models of GAS disease. Further, we provide evidence that the pleiotropic regulator protein CodY binds to the mga promoter and that the 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter reduces CodY-mediated mga transcription. We conclude that the naturally occurring 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter significantly alters the pathogen-host interaction of these asymptomatic carrier strains. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular basis of the carrier state of an important human pathogen. PMID:23980109

  1. [MALDI-ToF mass-spectrometry in analysis of genetically determined resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones].

    PubMed

    Malakhova, M V; Vereshchagin, V A; Il'ina, E N; Govorun, V M; Filimonova, O Iu; Grudinina, S A; Sidorenko, S V

    2007-01-01

    New fluoroquinolones with higher antipneumococcal activity are considered promising in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Still, their wide use in clinical practice is connected with possible selection and rapid distribution of the resistance, requiring constant monitoring. Development of resistance to fluoroquinolones results from step-wise accumulation of mutations in the genes of DNA-gyrase and topoisomerase IV, the mutations of the first step being not always accompanied by a significant increase of the MIC of the new fluoroquinolones. Therefore, to detect the first signs of the resistance development, it is necessary not only to detect the susceptibility of the circulating Streptococcus pneumoniae strains phenotypically, but also to detect the genetic changes. In the present study the minisequent reaction followed by detection of the reaction products by MALD-ToF mass-spectrometry was used to reveal the mutations in the genes of the fluoroquinolone targets of 38 S. pneumoniae strains with different levels of the resistance to ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin. In the strains with high resistance to all the three fluoroquinolones (MIC 4-16 mcg/ml) there were detected mutations in GyrA (Ser81Tyr or Glu85Zys) and as well in ParC (Ser79Phe or Ser79Tyr). In the strains resistant to ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (MIC 4-8 mcg/ml) with preserved susceptibility to levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, the mutations were detected only in GyrA (Ser114Gly). In the moderately resistant strains (MICs 4 and 2-4 mcg/ml respectively for ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin) there were detected the known mutations in ParC (Ser79Tyr or Ser79Phe or Asp83Tyr) and in GyrB (Glu475Lys) as well as the earlier not described mutations in ParE (ins Asn381a) and in Gyr B (Thr329Ala or Va1355Ile). The described method can be used in mass screening of S. pneumoniae strains for the presence of mutations in the genes of the fluoroquinolone targets.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of emm28 Type Streptococcus pyogenes MEW123, a Streptomycin-Resistant Derivative of a Clinical Throat Isolate Suitable for Investigation of Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Kristin M.; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.; Dawid, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    We present here the complete genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes type emm28 strain MEW123, a streptomycin-resistant derivative of a pediatric throat isolate. The genome length is 1,878,699 bp, with 38.29% G+C% content. The genome sequence adds value to this virulent emm28 representative strain and will aid in the investigation of streptococcal pathogenesis. PMID:26988051

  3. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 19A with Different Susceptibilities to the Myxobacterial Metabolite Carolacton

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, Boyke; Schober, Isabel; Spröer, Cathrin; Bergmann, Simone; Jarek, Michael; Overmann, Jörg; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The full-genome sequences of three drug- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates of serotype 19A were determined by PacBio single-molecule real-time sequencing, in combination with Illumina MiSeq sequencing. A comparison to the genomes of other pneumococci indicates a high nucleotide sequence identity to strains Hungary19A-6 and TCH8431/19A. PMID:28209832

  4. Effect of new breakpoints proposed by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute in 2008 for evaluating penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in a Turkish University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ozlem; Gülmez, Dolunay; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2010-03-01

    Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute changed penicillin susceptibility breakpoints for Streptococcus pneumoniae in 2008. After reevaluation with new breakpoints, resistance rates decreased from 6.1% to 0.5% for nonmeningitis and increased from 6.6% to 33.3% for meningitis isolates in our hospital. This breakpoint modification is expected to reduce the inconsistency between susceptibility results and therapeutic outcomes; however, both the clinical microbiology laboratories and the clinicians should be aware of the change to interpret the susceptibility results.

  5. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  6. Involvement of the Putative ATP-Dependent Efflux Proteins PatA and PatB in Fluoroquinolone Resistance of a Multidrug-Resistant Mutant of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Marrer, Estelle; Schad, Karen; Satoh, Andreas T.; Page, Malcolm G. P.; Johnson, Maggie M.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2006-01-01

    The multidrug-resistant mutant Streptococcus pneumoniae M22 constitutively overexpresses two genes (patA and patB) that encode proteins homologous to known efflux proteins belonging to the ABC transporter family. It is shown here that PatA and PatB were strongly induced by quinolone antibiotics and distamycin in fluoroquinolone-sensitive strains. PatA was very important for growth of S. pneumoniae, and it could not be disrupted in strain M22. PatB appeared to control metabolic activity, particularly in amino acid biosynthesis, and it may have a pivotal role in coordination of the response to quinolone antibiotics. The induction of PatA and PatB by antibiotics showed a pattern similar to that exhibited by SP1861, a homologue of ABC-type transporters of choline and other osmoprotectants. A second group of quinolone-induced transporter genes comprising SP1587 and SP0287, which are homologues of, respectively, oxalate/formate antiporters and xanthine or uracil permeases belonging to the major facilitator family, showed a different pattern of induction by other antibiotics. There was no evidence for the involvement of PmrA, the putative proton-dependent multidrug transporter that has been implicated in norfloxacin resistance, in the response to quinolone antibiotics in either the resistant mutant or the fluoroquinolone-sensitive strains. PMID:16436727

  7. Salivaricin D, a Novel Intrinsically Trypsin-Resistant Lantibiotic from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c Isolated from a Healthy Infant

    PubMed Central

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we purified and characterized a newly identified lantibiotic (salivaricin D) from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c. Salivaricin D is a 34-amino-acid-residue peptide (3,467.55 Da); the locus of the gene encoding this peptide is a 16.5-kb DNA segment which contains genes encoding the precursor of two lantibiotics, two modification enzymes (dehydratase and cyclase), an ABC transporter, a serine-like protease, immunity proteins (lipoprotein and ABC transporters), a response regulator, and a sensor histidine kinase. The immunity gene (salI) was heterologously expressed in a sensitive indicator and provided significant protection against salivaricin D, confirming its immunity function. Salivaricin D is a naturally trypsin-resistant lantibiotic that is similar to nisin-like lantibiotics. It is a relatively broad-spectrum bacteriocin that inhibits members of many genera of Gram-positive bacteria, including the important human pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c may be a potential biological agent for the control of oronasopharynx-colonizing streptococcal pathogens or may be used as a probiotic bacterium. PMID:22101034

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae resists intracellular killing by olfactory ensheathing cells but not by microglia

    PubMed Central

    Macedo-Ramos, Hugo; Ruiz-Mendoza, Susana; Mariante, Rafael M.; Guimarães, Erick V.; Quadros-de-Souza, Lucas C.; Paiva, Mauricio M.; Ferreira, Eliane de O.; Pinto, Tatiana C. A.; Teixeira, Lucia M.; Allodi, Silvana; Baetas-da-Cruz, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a type of specialized glial cell currently considered as having a double function in the nervous system: one regenerative, and another immune. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major agent of severe infections in humans, including meningitis. It is commonly found in the nasopharynx of asymptomatic carriers, and, under certain still unknown conditions, can invade the brain. We evaluated whether pneumococcal cells recovered from lysed OECs and microglia are able to survive by manipulating the host cell activation. An intracellular-survival assay of S. pneumoniae in OECs showed a significant number of bacterial CFU recovered after 3 h of infection. In contrast, microglia assays resulted in a reduced number of CFU. Electron-microscopy analysis revealed a large number of pneumococci with apparently intact morphology. However, microglia cells showed endocytic vesicles containing only bacterial cell debris. Infection of OEC cultures resulted in continuous NF-κB activation. The IFN-γ-induced increase of iNOS expression was reversed in infected OECs. OECs are susceptible to S. pneumoniae infection, which can suppress their cytotoxic mechanisms in order to survive. We suggest that, in contrast to microglia, OECs might serve as safe targets for pneumococci, providing a more stable environment for evasion of the immune system. PMID:27827453

  9. ABA receptor PYL9 promotes drought resistance and leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Chan, Zhulong; Gao, Jinghui; Xing, Lu; Cao, Minjie; Yu, Chunmei; Hu, Yuanlei; You, Jun; Shi, Haitao; Zhu, Yingfang; Gong, Yuehua; Mu, Zixin; Wang, Haiqing; Deng, Xin; Wang, Pengcheng; Bressan, Ray A; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-02-16

    Drought stress is an important environmental factor limiting plant productivity. In this study, we screened drought-resistant transgenic plants from 65 promoter-pyrabactin resistance 1-like (PYL) abscisic acid (ABA) receptor gene combinations and discovered that pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic lines showed dramatically increased drought resistance and drought-induced leaf senescence in both Arabidopsis and rice. Previous studies suggested that ABA promotes senescence by causing ethylene production. However, we found that ABA promotes leaf senescence in an ethylene-independent manner by activating sucrose nonfermenting 1-related protein kinase 2s (SnRK2s), which subsequently phosphorylate ABA-responsive element-binding factors (ABFs) and Related to ABA-Insensitive 3/VP1 (RAV1) transcription factors. The phosphorylated ABFs and RAV1 up-regulate the expression of senescence-associated genes, partly by up-regulating the expression of Oresara 1. The pyl9 and ABA-insensitive 1-1 single mutants, pyl8-1pyl9 double mutant, and snrk2.2/3/6 triple mutant showed reduced ABA-induced leaf senescence relative to the WT, whereas pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic plants showed enhanced ABA-induced leaf senescence. We found that leaf senescence may benefit drought resistance by helping to generate an osmotic potential gradient, which is increased in pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic plants and causes water to preferentially flow to developing tissues. Our results uncover the molecular mechanism of ABA-induced leaf senescence and suggest an important role of PYL9 and leaf senescence in promoting resistance to extreme drought stress.

  10. Controlled challenge experiment demonstrates substantial additive genetic variation in resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is an etiologic agent of streptococcal disease in tilapia and is one of several Streptococcus spp. that negatively impact worldwide tilapia production. Methods for the prevention and control of S. iniae include vaccines, management strategies, and antibiotics. A complimentary pre...

  11. Host-derived probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus improves resistance against Streptococcus iniae infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) via immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Safari, Reza; Adel, Milad; Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Dadar, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    The present study evaluated the benefits of dietary administration of host-derived candidate probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus in juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Experimental diets were prepared by incorporating the microorganisms in the basal feed at 3 inclusion levels (i.e. 10(7) CFU g(-1) of feed [T1], 10(8) CFU g(-1) of feed [T2], 10(9) CFU g(-1) of feed [T3]). The probiotic feeds were administered for 8 weeks, with a group fed with the basal diet serving as control. The effects on growth performance, gut health, innate immunity and disease resistance were evaluated. Results showed that growth performance parameters were significantly improved in T2 and T3 groups. Activities of digestive enzymes such as trypsin and lipase were significantly higher in these two groups as well. Gut micro-ecology was influenced by probiotic feeding as shown by the significant increase in intestinal lactic acid bacteria and total viable aerobic counts in T2 and T3. Humoral immunity was impacted by dietary probiotics as total serum protein and albumin were significantly elevated in T3. The levels of serum IgM significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups at week 8; with the T3 group registering the highest increment. Respiratory burst activity of blood leukocytes were significantly improved in T2 and T3. Hematological profiling further revealed that neutrophil counts significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups. Challenge test showed that probiotic feeding significantly improved host resistance to Streptococcus iniae infection, specifically in T2 and T3 where a considerable modulation of immune responses was observed. Taken together, this study demonstrated E. casseliflavus as a potential probiotics for rainbow trout with the capability of improving growth performance and enhancing disease resistance by immunomodulation.

  12. Activity of gemifloxacin against quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in vitro and in a mouse pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Bédos, J P; Mohler, J; Moine, P; Cherbuliez, C; Peytavin, G; Fantin, B; Köhler, T

    2005-03-01

    Gemifloxacin is a novel fluoronaphthyridone quinolone with enhanced in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae. We investigated the activities of gemifloxacin and trovafloxacin, their abilities to select for resistance in vitro and in vivo, and their efficacies in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Immunocompetent Swiss mice were infected with 10(5) CFU of a virulent, encapsulated S. pneumoniae strain, P-4241, or its isogenic parC, gyrA, parC gyrA, and efflux mutant derivatives (serotype 3); and leukopenic mice were infected with 10(7) CFU of two poorly virulent clinical strains (serotype 11A) carrying either a parE mutation or a parC, gyrA, and parE triple mutation. The drugs were administered six times every 12 h, starting at either 3 or 18 h postinfection. In vitro, gemifloxacin was the most potent agent against strains with and without acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones. While control mice died within 6 days, gemifloxacin at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg of body weight was highly effective (survival rates, 90 to 100%) against the wild-type strain and against mutants harboring a single mutation, corresponding to area under the time-versus-serum concentration curve at 24 h (AUC(24))/MIC ratios of 56.5 to 113, and provided a 40% survival rate against a mutant with a double mutation (parC and gyrA). A total AUC(24)/MIC ratio of 28.5 was associated with poor efficacy and the emergence of resistant mutants. Trovafloxacin was as effective as gemifloxacin against mutants with single mutations but did not provide any protection against the mutant with double mutations, despite treatment with a high dose of 200 mg/kg. Gemifloxacin preferentially selected for parC mutants both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. The S2 Cu(i) site in CupA from Streptococcus pneumoniae is required for cellular copper resistance.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yue; Bruce, Kevin E; Wu, Hongwei; Giedroc, David P

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved copper homeostasis and resistance systems for fighting copper toxicity imposed by the human immune system. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen that encodes an obligatorily membrane-anchored Cu(i) binding protein, CupA, and a P1B-type ATPase efflux transporter, CopA. The soluble, cytoplasmic domain of CupA (sCupA) contains a binuclear Cu(i) cluster consisting of S1 and S2 Cu(i) ions. The NMR solution structure of apo-sCupA reveals the same cupredoxin fold of Cu2-sCupA, except that the Cu(i) binding loop (residues 112-116, harboring S2 Cu ligands M113 and M115) is highly dynamic as documented by both backbone and side chain methionine methyl order parameters. In contrast to the more solvent exposed, lower affinity S2 Cu site, the high affinity S1 Cu-coordinating cysteines (C74, C111) are pre-organized in the apo-sCupA structure. Biological experiments reveal that the S1 site is largely dispensable for cellular Cu resistance and may be involved in buffering low cytoplasmic Cu(i). In contrast, the S2 site is essential for Cu resistance. Expression of a chimeric CopZ chaperone fused to the CupA transmembrane helix does not protect S. pneumoniae from copper toxicity and substitution of a predicted cytoplasm-facing Cu(i) entry metal-binding site (MBS) on CopA also gives rise to a Cu-sensitivity phenotype. These findings suggest that CupA and CopA may interact and filling of the CupA S2 site with Cu(i) results in stimulation of cellular copper efflux by CopA.

  14. [Antibiotic resistance analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from the hospitalized children in Shanxi Children's Hospital from 2012 to 2014].

    PubMed

    Ge, L L; Han, Z Y; Liu, A H; Zhu, L; Meng, J H

    2017-02-02

    Objective: To investigate the antibiotic resistance status of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from hospitalized children in Shanxi Children's Hospital. Method: E-test and Kirby-Bauer methods were applied to determine drug sensitivity of the isolates collected from the body fluid specimens of hospitalized children in Shanxi Children's Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014. The antimicrobial sensitivity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Streptococcus pneumoniae to the conventional antibiotics were analyzed, in order to compare the annual trends of non-invasive isolates, while the differentiation of sensitivity from specimens. The comparison of rates was performed by Chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test. Result: A total of 671 isolates of streptococcus pneumoniae were obtained, which could be divided as non-invasive isolates(607), invasive isolates from non-cerebrospinal fluid(non-CSF)(40) and invasive isolates from cerebrospinal fluid(CSF)(24). The antimicrobial sensitivity(isolates(%)) of the 671 isolates were respectively vancomycin 671(100.0%), linezolid 671(100.0%), levofloxacin 665(99.1%), penicillin 595(88.7%), ceftriaxone 516(76.9%), cefotaxime 512(76.3%), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprin(SMZ-TMP) 103(15.4%), clindamycin 28(4.2%), tetracycline 26(3.9%), erythromycin 12(1.8%). From 2012 to 2014, the susceptibility rates of non-invasive isolates to penicillin every year were 95.0%(96/101), 97.3%(110/113), 87.3%(343/393), respectively, and there was significant difference among the three years(χ(2)=13.266, P<0.05), and the values of MIC(50, )MIC(90) and the maximum values of MIC(mg/L) of penicillin were 0.064, 2.000, 6.000 in 2012, which grew up to 1.000, 3.000, 16.000 in 2014. There was no significant difference in the susceptibility rate of non-invasive isolates to ceftriaxone and cefotaxime during these three years, (χ(2)=1.172, 1.198, both P>0.05). On the other hand, the values of MIC(50, )MIC(90) and the maximum value of MIC(mg/L) of

  15. Molecular architecture of Streptococcus pneumoniae surface thioredoxin-fold lipoproteins crucial for extracellular oxidative stress resistance and maintenance of virulence

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Malek; Bartual, Sergio G; Abdullah, Mohammed R; Jensch, Inga; Asmat, Tauseef M; Petruschka, Lothar; Pribyl, Thomas; Gellert, Manuela; Lillig, Christopher H; Antelmann, Haike; Hermoso, Juan A; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae has evolved efficient mechanisms to resist oxidative stress conditions and to displace other bacteria in the nasopharynx. Here we characterize at physiological, functional and structural levels two novel surface-exposed thioredoxin-family lipoproteins, Etrx1 and Etrx2. The impact of both Etrx proteins and their redox partner methionine sulfoxide reductase SpMsrAB2 on pneumococcal pathogenesis was assessed in mouse virulence studies and phagocytosis assays. The results demonstrate that loss of function of either both Etrx proteins or SpMsrAB2 dramatically attenuated pneumococcal virulence in the acute mouse pneumonia model and that Etrx proteins compensate each other. The deficiency of Etrx proteins or SpMsrAB2 further enhanced bacterial uptake by macrophages, and accelerated pneumococcal killing by H2O2 or free methionine sulfoxides (MetSO). Moreover, the absence of both Etrx redox pathways provokes an accumulation of oxidized SpMsrAB2 in vivo. Taken together our results reveal insights into the role of two extracellular electron pathways required for reduction of SpMsrAB2 and surface-exposed MetSO. Identification of this system and its target proteins paves the way for the design of novel antimicrobials. PMID:24136784

  16. [Morphological changes in penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-lactamase-nonproducing, ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae after exposure to oral antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Chiba, Naoko; Morozumi, Miyuki; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2012-10-01

    Morphological changes in penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) and beta-lactamase-nonproducing, ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae (BLNAR) after exposure to oral antibacterial agents could be observed over time under a phase-contrast microscope. Morphological changes in BLNAR were also observed using a scanning electron microscope. The organisms used in this study were ME19F strain identified as genotypic(g) gPRSP (serotype: 19F) and JPH002 strain identified as gBLNAR (serotype: b). The antibacterial agents used were amoxicillin (AMPC), cefditoren (CDTR), tebipenem (TBPM), and tosufloxacin (TFLX). The concentration of each antibacterial agent to which the bacteria were exposed was set at the blood level one hour after Cmax when administered to children at the usual dose. Bacteriolysis of gPRSP cells started after exposure of only 20minutes to TBPM, and 90% of the cells were lysed within 2 hours. A high bactericidal action of TBPM on gPRSP was supported by these findings. When gBLNAR was exposed to AMPC and TBPM, lysis from spheroplasts and cells with vacuoles were sometimes observed. In contrast, after gBLNAR was exposed to CDTR, lysis occurred after marked filamentation in the cells, but after exposure to TFLX, cells deduced to be killed after mild filamentation without lysis. Time-dependent morphological changes that reflect the differences in bactericidal activity and PBP affinity among beta-lactams provide beneficial information to select antibacterial agents.

  17. TET1 promotes cisplatin-resistance via demethylating the vimentin promoter in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Xi; Zhou, Yuanyuan; You, Yuanyi; Lu, Jiaojiao; Wang, Lijie; Hou, Huilian; Li, Jing; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Le; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    The development of chemo-resistance impairs the outcome of the first line platinum-based chemotherapies for ovarian cancer. Deregulation of DNA methylation/demethylation provides a critical mechanism for the occurrence of chemo-resistance. The ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of dioxygenases including TET1/2/3 plays an important part in DNA demethylation, but their roles in cisplatin resistance have not been elucidated. Using cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell models, we found that TET1 was significantly upregulated in cisplatin-resistant CP70 cells compared with that in cisplatin-sensitive A2780 cells. Ectopic expression of TET1 in A2780 cells promoted cisplatin resistance and decreased cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin, while inhibition of TET1 by siRNA transfection in CP70 cells attenuated cisplatin resistance and enhanced cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Increased TET1 induced re-expression of vimentin through active DNA demethylation, and cause partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) in A2780 cells. Contrarily, knocking down of TET1 in CP70 cells reduced vimentin expression and reversed EMT process. Immunohistochemical analysis of TET1 in human ovarian cancer tissues revealed that TET1 existed in nucleus and cytoplasm in ovarian cancer tissues. And the expression of nuclear TET1 was positively correlated with residual tumor and chemotherapeutic response. Thus, TET1 expression causes resistance to cisplatin and one of the targets of TET1 action is vimentin in ovarian cancer.

  18. Development and efficacy of a novobiocin-resistant Streptococcus iniae as a novel vaccine in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H

    2011-08-11

    A novel attenuated Streptococcus iniae vaccine was developed from a virulent strain of Streptococcus iniae (ISET0901) through selection for novobiocin resistance (named ISNO). The safety of ISNO was then evaluated in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) through intraperitoneal (IP) injection. When male tilapia (average weight 10 g) were IP injected with 2×10(7) colony-forming units (CFU) of the attenuated S. iniae vaccine strain, no fish died. However, when the same age and size matched tilapia were IP injected with 2×10(7) and 1×10(5)CFU of the virulent parent strain of S. iniae, 100 and 90% fish died, respectively. Backpassage safety studies revealed that ISNO was unable to revert back to a virulent state. When IP vaccinated fish were challenged by the virulent ISET0901 strain of S. iniae, relative percent survival (RPS) values of vaccinated fish at 14, 28, 60, 90, and 180 days post ISNO vaccination (dpv) were 100, 100, 100, 89, and 75%, respectively, The RPS values of ISNO vaccinated fish (IP vaccination) against infections by five heterologous virulent strains of S. iniae (F3CB, 102 F1K, 405 F1K, IF6, and ARS60) at 60 dpv were 78, 90, 100, 100, and 100%, respectively. When tilapia were IP vaccinated by ISNO at dose of 1×10(2), 1×10(3), 1×10(4), 1×10(5), 1×10(6), and 1×10(7)CFU/fish, RPS values at 28 dpv were 81, 94, 100, 100, 100, and 100%, respectively. At 28 dpv, RPS of vaccinated fish by ISNO through bath immersion (1×10(7)CFU/ml) was 88%. ELISA results revealed that protection elicited by ISNO was due to antibody- as well as cell- mediated immunity. Our results suggest that ISNO could be used as a novel safe and efficacious vaccine to protect Nile tilapia from S. iniae infections.

  19. [Genetic analysis of multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae including meropenem resistance that was isolated from elderly residents with pneumonia in nursing-care facilities].

    PubMed

    Ota, Kazuko; Chiba, Naoko; Sato, Kentaro; Nara, Syoetu; Kato, Satoko; Kanazawa, Hisao; Ikejima, Shin; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Satoshi; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2014-07-01

    From February to December 20XX, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) showing MICs of 16-32 microg/mL to cefotaxime (CTX) and 4-8 microg/mL to meropenem (MEPM) were isolated from 6 patients hospitalized at the general hospital S (2 cases) and hospital A (4 cases), close to the hospital S. Five elderly patients among these six cases came from nursing care facilities or nursing care-related medical facilities. All elderly persons (mean age: 81.7 years) were diagnosed as having pneumonia at the time of admission and the problematic PRSP was isolated from sputum samples collected on admission. Notably, all of these PRSP isolates simultaneously showed high resistance to macrolide agents mediated by an erm (B) gene and to fluoroquinolone agents via mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. Eventually, they were identified as multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae (MDRSP) with high resistance to many agents. The capsule type of all strains was serotype 19F and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed that they belonged to clonal complex (CC) 7993, which has not been reported before. It was thus concluded that the MDRSP that had spread within the nursing facilities was transmitted to the general hospitals via the elderly inpatients with pneumonia caused by these agents. Although one case finally had a poor outcome, the pneumococcal infection was not the direct trigger of the event. The current ratio of MDRSP is concluded to be very low. However, general hospitals that accept patients for therapeutic purposes from nursing-care facilities have to share epidemiological information in a timely manner with the nursing homes to prevent nosocomial infections.

  20. Prevalence and Molecular Genetics of Macrolide Resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Collected in Finland in 2002

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Huikko, S.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide resistance among 1,007 clinical pneumococcal isolates collected in Finland were investigated. Of these, 217 (21.5%) were resistant to erythromycin and 11% to clindamycin. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, mef(E) was present in 95 isolates (44%), mef(A) was present in 12 isolates (6%), and erm(B) was present in 90 isolates (41%). A double mechanism, mef(E) and erm(B), was detected in five isolates (2%). Ribosomal mutation was detected in 14 (6%) macrolide-resistant isolates in which no other determinant was found. Based on the telithromycin MICs, two groups of isolates were formed: 83.3% of the isolates belonged to a major group for which the telithromycin MIC range was ≤0.008 to 0.063 μg/ml, and 16.7% belonged to a minor group for which the telithromycin MIC range was 0.125 to 8 μg/ml. All except three isolates in the minor population carried a macrolide resistance gene. PMID:16189096

  1. Dissemination of an erythromycin-resistant penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae Poland(6B)-20 clone in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bonofiglio, Laura; Regueira, Mabel; Pace, Julio; Corso, Alejandra; García, Ernesto; Mollerach, Marta

    2011-03-01

    Prevalence of serotype 6B penicillin (PEN)-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae significantly increased from 15.8% (1993-1997) to 67.3% (1998-2002) (p<0.001) in Argentina. Serogroup 6 ranks fourth among different capsular types within invasive isolates from Argentinean patients <6 years of age. To evaluate whether the increase in PEN resistance in serotype 6B pneumococci was due to the dissemination of one or more clones, the genetic diversity of 93 S. pneumoniae serotype 6B isolates was analyzed. Five BOX-polymerase chain reaction types were obtained (65.5% isolates) and a group of 15 isolates, representing 41.6% of those having a decreased susceptibility to PEN, were further characterized. The antibiotype of these isolates showed their multiresistance, with 100% of the isolates being resistant to erythromycin, 80% to tetracycline, and 73.3% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Of the 15 isolates, 13 belonged to the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type and galU cluster and were members of the same clone. The identity of the clone was confirmed in four isolates by multilocus sequence typing. The sequence type found (ST315) corresponds to the Poland(6B)-20 clone. In summary, BOX-polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and galU polymorphism were useful tools to detect the presence of a clone whose identity was confirmed by multilocus sequence typing. The isolates belonging to Poland(6B)-20 found in this work are described for the first time in Latin America.

  2. Amoxicillin is effective against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in a mouse pneumonia model simulating human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Abgueguen, Pierre; Azoulay-Dupuis, Esther; Noel, Violaine; Moine, Pierre; Rieux, Veronique; Fantin, Bruno; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    High-dose oral amoxicillin (3 g/day) is the recommended empirical outpatient treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in many European guidelines. To investigate the clinical efficacy of this treatment in CAP caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with MICs of amoxicillin > or =2 microg/ml, we used a lethal bacteremic pneumonia model in leukopenic female Swiss mice with induced renal failure to replicate amoxicillin kinetics in humans given 1 g/8 h orally. Amoxicillin (15 mg/kg of body weight/8 h subcutaneously) was given for 3 days. We used four S. pneumoniae strains with differing amoxicillin susceptibility and tolerance profiles. Rapid bacterial killing occurred with an amoxicillin-susceptible nontolerant strain: after 4 h, blood cultures were negative and lung homogenate counts under the 2 log(10) CFU/ml detection threshold (6.5 log(10) CFU/ml in controls, P < 0.01). With an amoxicillin-intermediate nontolerant strain, significant pulmonary bacterial clearance was observed after 24 h (4.3 versus 7.9 log(10) CFU/ml, P < 0.01), and counts were undetectable 12 h after treatment completion. With an amoxicillin-intermediate tolerant strain, 24-h bacterial clearance was similar (5.4 versus 8.3 log(10) CFU/ml, P < 0.05), but 12 h after treatment completion, lung homogenates contained 3.3 log(10) CFU/ml. Similar results were obtained with an amoxicillin-resistant and -tolerant strain. Day 10 survival rates were usually similar across strains. Amoxicillin with pharmacokinetics simulating 1 g/8 h orally in humans is bactericidal in mice with pneumonia due to S. pneumoniae for which MICs were 2 to 4 microg/ml. The killing rate depends not only on resistance but also on tolerance of the S. pneumoniae strains.

  3. In vitro activity of older and newer fluoroquinolones against efflux-mediated high-level ciprofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Daporta, Matilde Trigo; Muñoz Bellido, Juan Luis; Guirao, Genoveva Yagüe; Hernández, Manuel Segovia; García-Rodríguez, José Angel

    2004-08-01

    The effect of high-level efflux activity on the MICs of fluoroquinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae in the absence of topoisomerase mutations leading to fluoroquinolones resistance was investigated. A S. pneumoniae ATCC 46619-derived strain with high-level efflux activity was obtained (SP-25A). Both the parent and obtained strains were tested against efflux substrates acriflavine (Acr) and ethidium bromide (EtBr), and against norfloxacin (NFX), ciprofloxacin (CFX), levofloxacin (LFX), moxifloxacin (MFX), trovafloxacin (TVX) and sitafloxacin (SFX), in presence and absence of the efflux pump inhibitor reserpine. gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE QRDR genes were amplified by PCR and sequenced. MICs of NFX and CFX against SP-25A were 64-fold higher than parent strain MICs (256 mg/L versus 4 mg/L and 64 mg/L versus 1mg/L, respectively). MIC of LFX increased from 1 to 4 mg/L and MICs of MFX, TVX and SFX remained virtually unchanged (0.1-0.2 mg/L). MICs of Acr and EtBr against SP-25A were 8- and 16-fold higher than against parent strains. In both cases, reserpine reverted MICs to the parent strain values (1 and 0.2 mg/L). Only parE showed two mutations leading to a Pro(454) --> Ser and Glu(443) changes, which have previously been shown not to lead to significant fluoroquinolones MIC increases. SP-25A showed a significant increase of MICs of the hydrophilic fluoroquinolones, apparently derived only from efflux activity. Efflux activity, at these high levels, can lead to high-level resistance to older hydrophilic fluoroquinolones, but does affect newer fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin and sitafloxacin.

  4. The Efflux Pump Inhibitor Reserpine Selects Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains That Overexpress the ABC Transporters PatA and PatB▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Mark I.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2008-01-01

    One way to combat multidrug-resistant microorganisms is the use of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Spontaneous mutants resistant to the EPI reserpine selected from Streptococcus pneumoniae NCTC 7465 and R6 at a frequency suggestive of a single mutational event were also multidrug resistant. No mutations in pmrA (which encodes the efflux protein PmrA) were detected, and the expression of pmrA was unaltered in all mutants. In the reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant mutants, the overexpression of both patA and patB, which encode ABC transporters, was associated with accumulation of low concentrations of antibiotics and dyes. The addition of sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of ABC efflux pumps, or the insertional inactivation of either gene restored wild-type antibiotic susceptibility and wild-type levels of accumulation. Only when patA was insertionally inactivated were both multidrug resistance and reserpine resistance lost. Strains in which patA was insertionally inactivated grew significantly more slowly than the wild type. These data indicate that the overexpression of both patA and patB confers multidrug resistance in S. pneumoniae but that only patA is involved in reserpine resistance. The selection of reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant pneumococci has implications for analogous systems in other bacteria or in cancer. PMID:18362193

  5. Activities of a New Fluoroketolide, HMR 3787, and Its (Des)-Fluor Derivative RU 64399 Compared to Those of Telithromycin, Erythromycin A, Azithromycin, Clarithromycin, and Clindamycin against Macrolide-Susceptible or -Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kensuke; Davies, Todd A.; Ednie, Lois M.; Bryskier, Andre; Palavecino, Elizabeth; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 were compared to those of three macrolides, telithromycin, and clindamycin against 175 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates and 121 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates. HMR3787 and telithromycin were the most active compounds tested against pneumococci. Telithromycin and RU 64399 were equally active against macrolide-susceptible (MICs, 0.008 to 0.06 μg/ml) and -resistant S. pyogenes isolates, but HMR 3787 had lower MICs for ermB strains. PMID:11600391

  6. Serotypes, antimicrobial resistance and genotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae associated with infections in cancer patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Nayara Torres; Santos, Bárbara Araújo; Barbosa, André Victor; Superti, Silvana Vargas; Teixeira, Lúcia Martins; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves

    2017-03-01

    We sought to characterize pneumococcal isolates associated with bacteremia, pneumonia and meningitis in cancer patients and to estimate the coverage of the available pneumococcal vaccines. Fifty isolates recovered from 49 patients attending a cancer reference center over a 1-year period were analyzed. The prevalent serotypes were: 23F (12%), 6A (8%), 3, 4, 20, and 23A (6% each). All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, levofloxacin, rifampicin, and vancomycin. Resistance or reduced susceptibility to penicillin made up 14%, and one isolate was also intermediately resistant to ceftriaxone. The three (6%) erythromycin-resistant isolates presented the M or cMLSB phenotypes and harbored the mef(A/E) gene exclusively or along with the erm(B) gene. Twenty-two (44%) isolates were closely related to 11 international clones, being strongly associated with penicillin non-susceptibility. Combined immunization with the 13-valent conjugate and the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccines might contribute to reduce (76%) the burden of the pneumococcal infections in the population investigated.

  7. Fluoroquinolone resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease: special focus on zabofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tark; Park, Su-Jin; Chong, Yong Pil; Park, Ki-Ho; Lee, Yu-Mi; Hong, Hyo-Lim; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Eun Sil; Lee, Sungkyoung; Choi, Dong Rack; Kim, Sung-Han; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Yang Soo

    2016-10-01

    The present study examined the in vitro activity of various antibiotics including zabofloxacin, against isolates responsible for invasive pneumococcal diseases. Between 1997 and 2008, a total of 208 isolates were collected from sterile fluids, including blood (n=196, 94.2%), pleural fluid (n=5, 2.4%), cerebrospinal fluid (n=5, 2.4%), and ascites (n=2, 1.0%). Zabofloxacin showed the lowest MIC50 (0.015μg/mL) and MIC90 (0.025μg/mL) values of all the tested antibiotics. Rates of isolates resistant to penicillin (MIC ≥8μg/mL), ceftriaxone (MIC ≥4μg/mL) and levofloxacin (MIC ≥8μg/mL) were 3.4%, 0.4% and 2.0%, respectively. Four isolates (2.0%) were resistant to levofloxacin, and zabofloxacin showed low MICs (range, 0.025-0.125μg/mL). Zabofloxacin shows potent in vitro activity against S. pneumoniae isolates that caused invasive disease, even strains that are resistant to levofloxacin.

  8. [Evolution of the antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae from 1997 to 2004 at Hôtel-Dieu de France, a university hospital in Lebanon].

    PubMed

    Karam Sarkis, D; Hajj, A; Adaimé, A

    2006-12-01

    Various rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae with diminished susceptibility to Penicillin G (PNSP) are reported worldwide, while resistance to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone is actually increasing among S. pneumoniae. The aim of this survey was to determine the evolution of the susceptibility and resistance of S. pneumoniae at our hospital, throughout the years 1997-2004. 582 S. pneumoniae strains, isolated from different patients with pulmonary disease, otitis media, bacteremia and/or meningitis have been observed. MIC to benzylpenicillin (P), ampicillin (AMP) and ceftriaxone (CRO) were determined by E-TEST. Susceptibility to erythromycin (ERY), cotrimoxazole (SXT), tetracycline (TE) and rifampicin (RA) were determined by agar diffusion. All tests were interpreted according to CA-SFM guidelines. The percentage of PNSP varied between 49.6 and 69%. S. pneumoniae with reduced susceptibility to benzylpenicillin had stable rates, while fully resistant S. pneumoniae decreased significantly. Resistance to ampicillin varied alongside with penicillin with a decrease of fully resistant S. pneumoniae. Strains intermediate to ceftriaxone also decreased significantly while those fully resistant were not detected, except for 1999 (1 strain). The resistance (I+R) to SXT and TE remained stable with small variations, but resistance to ERY increased up to 43% of isolated strains in 2004. Resistance to LVX and RA was absent, with unexpected levels for RA (1 and 5%) in 2002 and 2003.

  9. Activities of garenoxacin against quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in vitro and in a mouse pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Bédos, J P; Mohler, J; Peytavin, G; Isturiz, R; Moine, P; Rieux, V; Cherbuliez, C; Péchère, J C; Fantin, B; Köhler, T

    2004-03-01

    Garenoxacin is a novel des-F(6) quinolone with enhanced in vitro activities against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. We compared the activity of garenoxacin with that of trovafloxacin (TVA) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, together with their efficacies and their capacities to select for resistant mutants, in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. In vitro, garenoxacin was more potent than TVA against wild-type S. pneumoniae and against a mutant with a single mutation (parC), a mutant with double mutations (gyrA and parC), and a mutant with triple mutations (gyrA, parC, and parE). Swiss mice were infected with 10(5) CFU of virulent, encapsulated S. pneumoniae strain P-4241 or its derived isogenic parC, gyrA, gyrA parC, and efflux mutants and 10(7) CFU of poorly virulent clinical strains carrying a parE mutation or gyrA, parC, and parE mutations. The drugs were administered six times, every 12 h, beginning at either 3 or 18 h postinfection. The pulmonary pharmacokinetic parameters in mice infected with strain P-4241 and treated with garenoxacin or TVA (25 mg/kg of body weight) were as follows: maximum concentration of drug in serum (C(max); 17.3 and 21.2 micro g/ml, respectively), C(max)/MIC ratio (288 and 170, respectively), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC; 48.5 and 250 microg. h/ml, respectively), and AUC/MIC ratio (808 and 2000, respectively). Garenoxacin at 25 and 50 mg/kg was highly effective (survival rates, 85 to 100%) against the wild-type strain and mutants harboring a single mutation. TVA was as effective as garenoxacin against these strains. TVA at 200 mg/kg and garenoxacin at 50 mg/kg were ineffective against the mutant with the parC and gyrA double mutations and the mutant with the gyrA, parC, and parE triple mutations. The efficacy of garenoxacin was reduced only when strains bore several mutations for quinolone resistance.

  10. In Vitro Activity of the New Ketolide Telithromycin Compared with Those of Macrolides against Streptococcus pyogenes: Influences of Resistance Mechanisms and Methodological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bemer-Melchior, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Tassin, Sandrine; Bryskier, Andre; Schito, Gian Carlo; Drugeon, Henri-B.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seven clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes, 80 susceptible to macrolides and 27 resistant to erythromycin A (MIC >0.5 μg/ml), were examined. The erythromycin A-lincomycin double-disk test assigned 7 resistant strains to the M-phenotype, 8 to the inducible macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance (iMLSB) phenotype, and 12 to the constitutive MLSB resistance (cMLSB) phenotype. MICs of erythromycin A, clarithromycin, azithromycin, roxithromycin, and clindamycin were determined by a broth microdilution method. MICs of telithromycin were determined by three different methods (broth microdilution, agar dilution, and E-test methods) in an ambient air atmosphere and in a 5 to 6% CO2 atmosphere. Erythromycin A resistance genes were investigated by PCR in the 27 erythromycin A-resistant isolates. MICs of erythromycin A and clindamycin showed six groups of resistant strains, groups A to F. iMLSB strains (A, B, and D groups) are characterized by two distinct patterns of resistance correlated with genotypic results. A- and B-group strains were moderately resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and highly susceptible to telithromycin. All A- and B-group isolates harbored erm TR gene, D-group strains, highly resistant to macrolides and intermediately resistant to telithromycin (MICs, 1 to 16 μg/ml), were all characterized by having the ermB gene. All M-phenotype isolates (C group), resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and susceptible to clindamycin and telithromycin, harbored the mefA gene. All cMLSB strains (E and F groups) with high level of resistance to macrolides, lincosamide, and telithromycin had the ermB gene. The effect of 5 to 6% CO2 was remarkable on resistant strains, by increasing MICs of telithromycin from 1 to 6 twofold dilutions against D-E- and F-group isolates. PMID:11036012

  11. Frequency of mutation to rifampin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical strains: hexA and hexB polymorphisms do not account for hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Morosini, María-Isabel; Baquero, María-Rosario; Sánchez-Romero, J M; Negri, María-Cristina; Galán, Juan-Carlos; del Campo, Rosa; Pérez-Díaz, J C; Baquero, Fernando

    2003-04-01

    The frequency of mutation to rifampin resistance of 200 clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was examined. Two peaks were observed in the distribution, with mode frequencies of 2.5 x 10(-7) (20% of isolates) and 2.5 x 10(-8). The hexA and hexB gene entire sequences were analyzed in 13 isolates. Sequences from both hypermutable and "normomutable" strains were conserved relative to that of the R6 S. pneumoniae control strain. The phenotypic Hex system proficiency, in terms of transforming efficiency, was also maintained irrespective of the variations in mutation frequency values.

  12. Termites promote resistance of decomposition to spatiotemporal variability in rainfall.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Michiel P; Laso, Francisco J; Olff, Han; Berg, Matty P

    2017-02-01

    The ecological impact of rapid environmental change will depend on the resistance of key ecosystems processes, which may be promoted by species that exert strong control over local environmental conditions. Recent theoretical work suggests that macrodetritivores increase the resistance of African savanna ecosystems to changing climatic conditions, but experimental evidence is lacking. We examined the effect of large fungus-growing termites and other non-fungus-growing macrodetritivores on decomposition rates empirically with strong spatiotemporal variability in rainfall and temperature. Non-fungus-growing larger macrodetritivores (earthworms, woodlice, millipedes) promoted decomposition rates relative to microbes and small soil fauna (+34%) but both groups reduced their activities with decreasing rainfall. However, fungus-growing termites increased decomposition rates strongest (+123%) under the most water-limited conditions, making overall decomposition rates mostly independent from rainfall. We conclude that fungus-growing termites are of special importance in decoupling decomposition rates from spatiotemporal variability in rainfall due to the buffered environment they create within their extended phenotype (mounds), that allows decomposition to continue when abiotic conditions outside are less favorable. This points at a wider class of possibly important ecological processes, where soil-plant-animal interactions decouple ecosystem processes from large-scale climatic gradients. This may strongly alter predictions from current climate change models.

  13. Additive genetic variation in resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae capsular type Ib: is genetic resistance correlated?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus (S.) iniae and S. agalactiae are both economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens affecting the globally farmed tilapia (Oreochromis spp.). Historically control of these bacteria in tilapia culture has included biosecurity, therapeutants and vaccination strategies. Genet...

  14. Macrolide-resistance mechanisms in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Chinese children in association with genes of tetM and integrase of conjugative transposons 1545.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xuzhuang; Yang, Hui; Yu, Shangjie; Yao, Kaihu; Wang, Yonghong; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Yonghong

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by Beijing children presenting with respiratory tract infections. Nasopharyngeal S. pneumoniae strains were tested for sensitivity with 15 antibiotics and further analyzed for phenotypes of macrolide-resistant strains and by PCR for the macrolide-resistant genes ermB, mefA, tetM, and integrase of conjugative transposon (Tn1545) intTn. We found 185 strains of S. pneumoniae relatively highly resistant to erythromycin (78.9%), clindamycin (76.2%), tetracycline (86%), and SMZ-TMP (78.7%) but with relatively low resistance to amoxicillin (2.2%), cefaclor (15.5%), ceftriaxone (2.8%), and cefuroxime (14.1%). The 146 strains of erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae showed extensive cross-resistance to other macrolides like azithromycin (100%), clarithromycin (100%), acetylspiramycin (95.2%), and clindamycin (95.9%). Genes ermB and mefA were detected in all erythromycin-resistant strains, with ermB(+) 79.5%, ermB + mefA(+) 17.8%, and mefA(+) 2.7%. About 96.9% of tetracycline-resistant isolates were positive for tetM, compared to 26.9% of sensitive strains. Ninety percent of tetracycline-resistant strains were also erythromycin-resistant versus 11.5% of tetracycline-sensitive strains. The intTn gene was present in 87.6% of S. pneumoniae strains and correlated with erythromycin and tetracycline resistance. The close relationship between the conjugative transposon Tn1545 and the genes ermB and tetM is probably one of the important mechanisms explaining the multiple drug resistance of S. pneumoniae.

  15. Emergence of quinolone-resistant strains in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from paediatric patients since the approval of oral fluoroquinolones in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ohkusu, Misako; Hoshino, Tadashi; Naito, Sachiko; Takaya, Akiko; Yamamoto, Tomoko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-01-31

    Tosufloxacin (TFLX) is a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent. TFLX granules for children were initially released in Japan in 2010 to treat otitis media and pneumonia caused by drug-resistant bacteria, e.g. penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae. The evolution of bacterial resistance since TFLX approval is not known. To clarify the influence of quinolones administered to children since their approval, we examined the resistance mechanism of TFLX-resistant S. pneumoniae isolated from paediatric patients as well as patient clinical characteristics. TFLX-resistant strains (MIC ≥ 2 mg/L) were detected among clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae derived from children (≤15 years old) between 2010 and 2014. These strains were characterised based on quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs), i.e. gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype, and multilocus sequence type of strains were determined, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed, and patient clinical characteristics based on medical records were assessed for cases with underling TFLX-resistant strains. Among 1168 S. pneumoniae isolates, two TFLX-resistant strains were detected from respiratory specimens obtained from paediatric patients with frequent exposure to TFLX. Both strains had mutations in the QRDRs of gyrA and parC. One case exhibited gradual changes in the QRDR during the clinical course. This is the first study of quinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolated from children, including clinical data, in Japan. These data may help prevent increases in infections of quinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae in children; specifically, the results emphasise the importance of administering fluoroquinolones only in appropriate cases.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance in Scandinavia after ban of antimicrobial growth promoters.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Björn; Wierup, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The banned use of antimicrobial growth promoters resulted in a considerably decreased use of antimicrobials in food animal production in Sweden (65%), Denmark (47%), Norway (40%) and Finland (27%). The current prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in animal bacterial populations is also considerably lower than in some other countries in the EU. In the swine production, no or limited effect was found in the finisher production (>25 to 30 kg). Temporary negative effects occurred during the post weaning period (7-30 kg). In Denmark, the cost of production from birth to slaughter per pig produced increased by approximately 1.0 euro with a high variability between pig producers. In the broiler production the termination had no significant negative effect on animal health and welfare or on production economy.

  17. Reduction of saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 and dental biofilm development by tragacanth gum and yeast-derived phosphomannan.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Nakamura, J; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate materials which reduce saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans onto enamel surfaces, and their potential in preventing dental biofilm development. The effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) surface pretreatment with hydrophilic polysaccharides on saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in vitro and de novo dental biofilm deposition in vivo were examined. Saliva-promoted adhesion of S. mutans MT8148 was significantly reduced by pretreatment of the HA surface with tragacanth gum (TG) and yeast-derived phosphoglycans. Extracellular phosphomannan (PM) from Pichia capsulata NRRL Y-1842 and TG reduced biofilm development on lower incisors in plaque-susceptible rats when administered via drinking water at concentrations of 0.5% and 0.01%, respectively. The inhibitory effect of TG on de novo dental biofilm formation was also demonstrated when administered via mouthwash in humans. It is concluded that TG and yeast-derived PM have the potential for use as anti-adherent agents and are effective in reducing de novo dental biofilm formation.

  18. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  19. beta-Lactamase-producing Moraxella catarrhalis may prevent the emergence of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Joki-Erkkilä, Veli-Pekka; Aittoniemi, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Puhakka, Heikki

    2002-05-15

    We studied the effect of concomitant nasopharyngeal carriage of beta-lactamase producing Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae on the occurrence of penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We took nasopharyngeal samples from 306 children with recurrent otitis media and a history of several antibiotic treatments. We could isolate at least one of the pathogens in 89 subjects. Of these children 13% carried more than one pathogen. Of the isolated M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae strains 93% and 43% produced beta-lactamase, respectively. Of the S. pneumoniae strains 25% were non-susceptible (I/R) to penicillin. However, in patients carrying beta-lactamase-producing M. catarrhalis together with pneumococci all strains were susceptible to penicillin (P=0.0353). This finding suggests that beta-lactamase producing M. catarrhalis may hinder the emergence of penicillin resistance of S. pneumoniae in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

  20. Antibacterial resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) from healthy carriers and tonsillitis patients and association with antibacterial sale in the Faroe Islands.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Marita D; Gaini, Shahin; Gislason, Hannes; Kristinsson, Karl G

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), and correlate the findings with the sales of erythromycin and tetracycline. General practitioners in the Faroe Islands were recruited to send oropharyngeal swabs. From an ongoing pneumococcal study, nasopharyngeal swabs were sampled from healthy children 0-7 years of age. Erythromycin susceptibility data from Iceland were obtained from the reference laboratory at the Landspitali University Hospital. Susceptibility testing in the Faroe Islands and Iceland was performed according to CLSI methods and criteria. The resistance rate to erythromycin and tetracycline found in patients in the Faroe Islands in 2009/2010 was 6% and 30% respectively. Tetracycline resistance in patients declined significantly from 2009 to 2010 (37-10%, p-value = 0.006 < 0.05) and differed significantly between age groups (p-value = 0.03 < 0.05). In Iceland, there was a peak in erythromycin resistance in 2008 (44%) and a substantial decrease in 2009 (5%). Although the prevalence of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance in the Faroe Islands and Iceland may be associated with antimicrobial use, sudden changes can occur with the introduction of new resistant clones.

  1. Risk factors for development of multiple-class resistance to Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains in Belgium over a 10-year period: antimicrobial consumption, population density, and geographic location.

    PubMed

    Van Eldere, Johan; Mera, Robertino M; Miller, Linda A; Poupard, James A; Amrine-Madsen, Heather

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the impact of the usage of antibiotics in ambulatory patients in Belgium in 147 defined geographical circumscriptions and at the individual isolate level. The study included 14,448 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains collected by the Belgium national reference lab from 1994 to 2004. Additional risk factors for resistance, such as population density/structure and day care attendance, were investigated for the same time-space window. A statistical model that included resistance to two or more antimicrobial classes offered the best fit for measuring the changes in nonsusceptibility to penicillin, macrolides, and tetracycline over time and place in Belgium. Analysis at the geographic level identified antimicrobial consumption with a 1-year lag (0.5% increase per additional defined daily dose) and population density as independent predictors of multiple resistance. Independent risk factors at the isolate level were age (odds ratio [OR], 1.55 for children aged <5 years), population density (7% increase in multiple resistance per 100 inhabitants/km(2)), conjugate 7-valent vaccine serotype (OR, 14.3), location (OR, 1.55 for regions bordering high-resistance France), and isolate source (OR, 1.54 for ear isolates). The expansion of multiple-resistant strains explains most of the overall twofold increase and subsequent decrease in single antimicrobial resistance between 1994 and 2004. We conclude that factors in addition to antibiotic use, such as high population density and proximity to high-resistance regions, favor multiple resistance. Regional resistance rates are not linearly related to actual antibiotic use but are linked to past antibiotic use plus a combination of demographic and geographic factors.

  2. Levofloxacin-Ceftriaxone Combination Attenuates Lung Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Bacteremic Pneumonia Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae via Inhibition of Cytolytic Activities of Pneumolysin and Autolysin

    PubMed Central

    Majhi, Arnab; Adhikary, Rana; Bhattacharyya, Aritra; Mahanti, Sayantika

    2014-01-01

    In this study, our objective was to determine whether a synergistic antimicrobial combination in vitro would be beneficial in the downregulation of pneumococcal virulence genes and whether the associated inflammation of the lung tissue induced by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in vivo needs to be elucidated in order to consider this mode of therapy in case of severe pneumococcal infection. We investigated in vivo changes in the expression of these virulence determinants using an efficacious combination determined in previous studies. BALB/c mice were infected with 106 CFU of bacteria. Intravenous levofloxacin at 150 mg/kg and/or ceftriaxone at 50 mg/kg were initiated 18 h postinfection; the animals were sacrificed 0 to 24 h after the initiation of treatment. The levels of cytokines, chemokines, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the serum and lungs, along with the levels of myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide the inflammatory cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), changes in pneumolysin and autolysin gene expression and COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression in the lungs were estimated. Combination therapy downregulated inflammation and promoted bacterial clearance. Pneumolysin and autolysin expression was downregulated, with a concomitant decrease in the expression of COX-2 and iNOS in lung tissue. Thus, the combination of levofloxacin and ceftriaxone can be considered for therapeutic use even in cases of pneumonia caused by drug-resistant isolates. PMID:24957840

  3. Levofloxacin-ceftriaxone combination attenuates lung inflammation in a mouse model of bacteremic pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae via inhibition of cytolytic activities of pneumolysin and autolysin.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Arnab; Adhikary, Rana; Bhattacharyya, Aritra; Mahanti, Sayantika; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2014-09-01

    In this study, our objective was to determine whether a synergistic antimicrobial combination in vitro would be beneficial in the downregulation of pneumococcal virulence genes and whether the associated inflammation of the lung tissue induced by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in vivo needs to be elucidated in order to consider this mode of therapy in case of severe pneumococcal infection. We investigated in vivo changes in the expression of these virulence determinants using an efficacious combination determined in previous studies. BALB/c mice were infected with 10(6) CFU of bacteria. Intravenous levofloxacin at 150 mg/kg and/or ceftriaxone at 50 mg/kg were initiated 18 h postinfection; the animals were sacrificed 0 to 24 h after the initiation of treatment. The levels of cytokines, chemokines, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the serum and lungs, along with the levels of myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide the inflammatory cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), changes in pneumolysin and autolysin gene expression and COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression in the lungs were estimated. Combination therapy downregulated inflammation and promoted bacterial clearance. Pneumolysin and autolysin expression was downregulated, with a concomitant decrease in the expression of COX-2 and iNOS in lung tissue. Thus, the combination of levofloxacin and ceftriaxone can be considered for therapeutic use even in cases of pneumonia caused by drug-resistant isolates.

  4. In vitro activity of beta-lactams, macrolides, telithromycin, and fluoroquinolones against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: correlation between drug resistance and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Hashikita, Giichi; Takahashi, Shun; Itabashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2005-10-01

    The in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined using 16 strains of penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) and 26 strains of penicillin intermediately resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) + penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) in Japan. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of potent antibiotics, including eight beta-lactams (benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cefotiam, cefepime, cefditoren, faropenem, panipenem, and biapenem), three macrolides (erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin), telithromycin, and three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin), were determined. Twenty-three strains exhibited genetic variations at pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b, which are genetic-PRSP (g-PRSP). g-PISP strains accounted for 62.5% (10/16) of the PSSP strains. The existence of an abnormal pbp gene conferred not only penicillin resistance but resistance to cephems; however, panipenem and biapenem had potent in vitro efficacy against alterations. Regarding the macrolide resistance mechanisms (mefA or ermB): 16 isolates had only mefA, 18 isolates had ermB, and 2 isolates had both mefA and ermB. There was no correlation between the existence of an abnormal pbp gene and the existence of the mefA gene or the ermB gene.

  5. Growth response and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, fed diets containing different levels of wheat distiller dried grains with solubles with or without lysine supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of wheat distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) with or without lysine supplementation on growth, body composition, hematology, immune response, and resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, to Streptococcus iniae challen...

  6. Cancer cell mitochondria confer apoptosis resistance and promote metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kulawiec, Mariola; Owens, Kjerstin M; Singh, Keshav K

    2009-07-01

    Mutations in mtDNA are found in most cancers. In this study, we studied the role of cancer cell mutant mtDNA in tumorigenesis. We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of three different breast cancer cell lines and found that all three, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435, contained mutations in mtDNA. MDA-MB-435 cells contained a mutation in the tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene known to be involved in pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases. We generated a mutant cybrid (cytoplasmic hybrid) by repopulating the recipient rho(0) (completely devoid of mtDNA) cells with donor mtDNA derived from an enucleated MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cell line. An isogenic wild-type cybrid was produced by transfer of normal mtDNA from a healthy donor. When compared to the wild type, we found that mutant mtDNA increases mitochondrial membrane potential. However, this increase in mitochondrial membrane potential was not associated with increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. MtDNA mutations conferred resistance to apoptosis triggered by etoposide. Our study also revealed that mutations in mtDNA increase metastatic potential. Using a tail-vein model of metastasis in a mouse model, we show that the mutant cybrid metastatizes to the lungs and forms macrometastic foci. Additionally we found that mutations in mtDNA constitutively activate the PI3/Akt pathway that contributes to increased metastatis. Together our study demonstrates that mutant mtDNA promotes apoptotic resistance and metastasis in a mouse model.

  7. Camel Streptococcus agalactiae populations are associated with specific disease complexes and acquired the tetracycline resistance gene tetM via a Tn916-like element

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Camels are the most valuable livestock species in the Horn of Africa and play a pivotal role in the nutritional sustainability for millions of people. Their health status is therefore of utmost importance for the people living in this region. Streptococcus agalactiae, a Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an important camel pathogen. Here we present the first epidemiological study based on genetic and phenotypic data from African camel derived GBS. Ninety-two GBS were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), capsular polysaccharide typing and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We analysed the GBS using Bayesian linkage, phylogenetic and minimum spanning tree analyses and compared them with human GBS from East Africa in order to investigate the level of genetic exchange between GBS populations in the region. Camel GBS sequence types (STs) were distinct from other STs reported so far. We mapped specific STs and capsular types to major disease complexes caused by GBS. Widespread resistance (34%) to tetracycline was associated with acquisition of the tetM gene that is carried on a Tn916-like element, and observed primarily among GBS isolated from mastitis. The presence of tetM within different MLST clades suggests acquisition on multiple occasions. Wound infections and mastitis in camels associated with GBS are widespread and should ideally be treated with antimicrobials other than tetracycline in East Africa. PMID:24083845

  8. Bacterial Superantigens Promote Acute Nasopharyngeal Infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Human MHC Class II-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Katherine J.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Xu, Stacey X.; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L.; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P. Patrick; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; McCormick, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as ‘trademark’ virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC –II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  9. Relationship between mutations in parC and gyrA of clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and resistance to ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B A; Johnson, A P; Woodford, N

    1999-12-01

    The mechanisms of resistance to ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin were studied in 54 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis following HinfI digestion was used with DNA sequencing to identify mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the parC and gyrA genes. Ciprofloxacin MICs up to 16 mg/L were not associated with mutations to these genes in approximately half of the isolates. In other isolates, moderate levels of ciprofloxacin resistance (MIC 8-16mg/L) were associated with an alteration of ParC, most commonly entailing replacement of serine-79 by phenylalanine. High-level ciprofloxacin resistance (MIC 32-128 mg/L) entailed the additional mutation of GyrA with substitution of serine-83 by phenylalanine. Grepafloxacin MICs >4 mg/L were associated with this GyrA mutation alone; no relationship was detected between grepafloxacin MICs and mutation of the QRDR of parC.

  10. Overexpression of patA and patB, which encode ABC transporters, is associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mark I; Baylay, Alison J; Wong, Ryan L; Piddock, Laura J V

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-seven clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were divided into four groups based on their susceptibilities to the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin and the dyes ethidium bromide and acriflavine. Comparative reverse transcription-PCR was used to determine the level of expression of the genes patA and patB, which encode putative ABC transporters. Overexpression was observed in 14 of the 15 isolates that were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and dyes and in only 3 of 24 of those resistant to fluoroquinolones only. Isolates overexpressing patA and patB accumulated significantly less of the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 than wild-type isolates, suggesting that PatA and PatB are involved in efflux. Inactivation of patA and patB by in vitro mariner mutagenesis conferred hypersusceptibility to ethidium bromide and acriflavine in all isolates tested and lowered the MICs of ciprofloxacin in the patAB-overproducing and/or fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. These data represent the first observation of overexpression of patA and patB in clinical isolates and show that PatA and PatB play a clinically relevant role in fluoroquinolone resistance.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from outpatients in the United States during the winter months of 1994 to 1995: results of a 30-center national surveillance study.

    PubMed Central

    Doern, G V; Brueggemann, A; Holley, H P; Rauch, A M

    1996-01-01

    A total of 1,527 clinically significant outpatient isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were prospectively collected in 30 different U.S. medical centers between November 1994 and April 1995. Overall, 23.6% of strains were not susceptible to penicillin, with 14.1% intermediate and 9.5% high-level resistant. The frequencies of recovery of intermediate and high-level resistant strains varied considerably between different medical centers and in different geographic areas. In general, intermediate and high-level penicillin resistance was most common with isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from pediatric patients. The in vitro activities of 22 other antimicrobial agents were assessed against this collection of isolates. Ampicillin was consistently 1 twofold dilution less active than penicillin. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were essentially equivalent to penicillin in activity. The rank order of activity for cephalosporins was cefotaxime = ceftriaxone > or = cefpodoxime > or = cefuroxime > cefprozil > or = cefixime > cefaclor = loracarbef > cefadroxil = cephalexin. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards [Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Sixth Information Supplement (M100-S6), 1995] has established MIC breakpoints for resistance (i.e., > or = 2 micrograms/ml) with three cephalosporins versus S. pneumoniae, namely, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and cefuroxime. The overall percentages of strains resistant to these three antimicrobial agents were 3, 5, and 12, respectively. The overall frequency of resistance was 10% with all three macrolides examined in this study, clarithromycin, erythromycin, and azithromycin. The overall percentages of chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance were 4.3, 7.5, and 18, respectively. The resistance percentages among the cephalosporins, macrolides, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were consistently higher among penicillin

  12. Antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from outpatients in the United States during the winter months of 1994 to 1995: results of a 30-center national surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Doern, G V; Brueggemann, A; Holley, H P; Rauch, A M

    1996-05-01

    A total of 1,527 clinically significant outpatient isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were prospectively collected in 30 different U.S. medical centers between November 1994 and April 1995. Overall, 23.6% of strains were not susceptible to penicillin, with 14.1% intermediate and 9.5% high-level resistant. The frequencies of recovery of intermediate and high-level resistant strains varied considerably between different medical centers and in different geographic areas. In general, intermediate and high-level penicillin resistance was most common with isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from pediatric patients. The in vitro activities of 22 other antimicrobial agents were assessed against this collection of isolates. Ampicillin was consistently 1 twofold dilution less active than penicillin. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were essentially equivalent to penicillin in activity. The rank order of activity for cephalosporins was cefotaxime = ceftriaxone > or = cefpodoxime > or = cefuroxime > cefprozil > or = cefixime > cefaclor = loracarbef > cefadroxil = cephalexin. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards [Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Sixth Information Supplement (M100-S6), 1995] has established MIC breakpoints for resistance (i.e., > or = 2 micrograms/ml) with three cephalosporins versus S. pneumoniae, namely, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and cefuroxime. The overall percentages of strains resistant to these three antimicrobial agents were 3, 5, and 12, respectively. The overall frequency of resistance was 10% with all three macrolides examined in this study, clarithromycin, erythromycin, and azithromycin. The overall percentages of chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance were 4.3, 7.5, and 18, respectively. The resistance percentages among the cephalosporins, macrolides, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were consistently higher among penicillin

  13. Oral cavities of healthy infants harbour high proportions of Streptococcus salivarius strains with phenotypic and genotypic resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Palma, Thaís H; Harth-Chú, Erika N; Scott, Jodie; Stipp, Rafael N; Boisvert, Heike; Salomão, Mariana F; Theobaldo, Jéssica D; Possobon, Rosana F; Nascimento, Leandro C; McCafferty, Jonathan W; Faller, Lina; Duncan, Margaret J; Mattos-Graner, Renata O

    2016-12-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance in the oropharyngeal microbiota, of which Streptococcus salivarius is a prominent species, represents a challenge for treating paediatric populations. In this study, we investigated the role of Streptococcussalivarius as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the oral microbiota by analysing 95 Streptococcussalivarius isolates from 22 healthy infants (2-16 months of age). MICs of penicillin G, amoxicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, doxycycline and streptomycin were determined. ARG profiles were assessed in a subset of 21 strains by next-generation sequencing of genomes, followed by searches of assembled reads against the Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database. Strains resistant to erythromycin, penicillins and tetracyclines were isolated from 83.3, 33.3 and 16.6 %, respectively, of infants aged 2 to 8 months with no prior antibiotic treatment. These percentages were100.0, 66.6 and 50.0 %, by 13 to 16 months of age. ARG or polymorphisms associated with antibiotic resistance were the most prevalent and involved genes for macrolide efflux (mel, mefA/E and macB), ribosomal protection [erm(B), tet(M) and tet(O)] and β-lactamase-like proteins. Phylogenetically related strains showing multidrug-resistant phenotypes harboured multidrug efflux ARG. Polymorphic genes associated with antibiotic resistance to drugs affecting DNA replication, folate synthesis, RNA/protein synthesis and regulators of antibiotic stress responses were detected. These data imply that Streptococcussalivarius strains established during maturation of the oral microbiota harbour a diverse array of functional ARG, even in the absence of antibiotic selective pressures, highlighting a potential role for this species in shaping antibiotic susceptibility profiles of oropharyngeal communities.

  14. Comparison of drug sensitivity and genotypes of clinically isolated strains of levofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from Okinawa Island, the Japanese main island and Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Satoko; Fujita, Jiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Haranaga, Shusaku; Nakasone, Isamu; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Uno, Tsukasa

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. In the present study, a comparison of drug sensitivity and genotypes of clinically isolated strains of levofloxacin (LVFX)-resistant S. pneumoniae obtained from Hong Kong, Okinawa Island and the Japanese main island (Honshu) was performed. MICs of quinolones (LVFX, tosufloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin and sitafloxacin (STFX)) and other antibiotics (penicillin G, cefcapene, cefditoren, clarithromycin and azithromycin) were determined by a microdilution broth method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Standards. The quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE of these strains were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing. All 40 strains tested had more than one amino-acid substitution in the QRDRs of gyrA, gyrB, parC or parE. Although there seemed to be some clonality in strains obtained from Hong Kong, there was no clonality in strains obtained from Okinawa and Japan. Strains obtained from Hong Kong, Okinawa Island and the Japanese main island were genetically different by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The range of MIC values of STFX against isolates resistant to LVFX (MIC 4-32 mg l(-1)) was 0.12-0.5 mg l(-1), and MIC(80) values of STFX against LVFX-resistant isolates were 0.25 mg l(-1). This study suggests that LVFX-resistant S. pneumoniae is similar in all three locations and STFX is potent against LVFX-resistant S. pneumoniae with multiple mutations in QRDRs of gyrase A and topoisomerase IV.

  15. Optimisation of storage conditions for maintaining culturability of penicillin-susceptible and penicillin-resistant isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in transport medium.

    PubMed

    Mason, C K; Goldsmith, C E; Moore, J E; McCarron, P; Leggett, P; Montgomery, J; Coulter, W A

    2010-01-01

    Methods employed by the World Health Organization (WHO) are used during this study to determine the optimum storage conditions for maintaining the culturability of Streptococcus pneumoniae in skimmed milk, tryptone, glucose and glycerin (STGG) transport medium. A comparison of S. pneumoniae strains sensitive and resistant to penicillin showed no significant difference in their survival ability in STGG medium. Furthermore, it is confirmed that storage at -70 degrees C remains most effective for maintaining viability by culture of S. pneumoniae. Storage at -20 degrees C would only be acceptable in the short-term, while storage at +4 degrees C is not recommended. Of note, this study has shown STGG medium at room temperature to be an efficient growth medium for pneumococci in the short-term. This work will help to establish robust sampling protocols when performing community studies to ensure culturability of comparison between community and laboratory pneumococci survival.

  16. dpr and sod in Streptococcus mutans are involved in coexistence with S. sanguinis, and PerR is associated with resistance to H2O2.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Kei; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Oogai, Yuichi; Tokuda, Masayuki; Torii, Mitsuo; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of bacteria coexist in the oral cavity. Streptococcus sanguinis, one of the major bacteria in dental plaque, produces hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which interferes with the growth of other bacteria. Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, can coexist with S. sanguinis in dental plaque, but to do so, it needs a means of detoxifying the H(2)O(2) produced by S. sanguinis. In this study, we investigated the association of three oxidative stress factors, Dpr, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and AhpCF, with the resistance of S. sanguinis to H(2)O(2). The knockout of dpr and sod significantly increased susceptibility to H(2)O(2), while the knockout of ahpCF had no apparent effect on susceptibility. In particular, dpr inactivation resulted in hypersensitivity to H(2)O(2). Next, we sought to identify the factor(s) involved in the regulation of these oxidative stress genes and found that PerR negatively regulated dpr expression. The knockout of perR caused increased dpr expression levels, resulting in low-level susceptibility to H(2)O(2) compared with the wild type. Furthermore, we evaluated the roles of perR, dpr, and sod when S. mutans was cocultured with S. sanguinis. Culturing of the dpr or sod mutant with S. sanguinis showed a significant decrease in the S. mutans population ratio compared with the wild type, while the perR mutant increased the ratio. Our results suggest that dpr and sod in S. mutans are involved in coexistence with S. sanguinis, and PerR is associated with resistance to H(2)O(2) in regulating the expression of Dpr.

  17. Moraxella catarrhalis outer membrane vesicles carry β-lactamase and promote survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae by inactivating amoxicillin.

    PubMed

    Schaar, Viveka; Nordström, Therése; Mörgelin, Matthias; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2011-08-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a common pathogen found in children with upper respiratory tract infections and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during exacerbations. The bacterial species is often isolated together with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released by M. catarrhalis and contain phospholipids, adhesins, and immunomodulatory compounds such as lipooligosaccharide. We have recently shown that M. catarrhalis OMVs exist in patients upon nasopharyngeal colonization. As virtually all M. catarrhalis isolates are β-lactamase positive, the goal of this study was to investigate whether M. catarrhalis OMVs carry β-lactamase and to analyze if OMV consequently can prevent amoxicillin-induced killing. Recombinant β-lactamase was produced and antibodies were raised in rabbits. Transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and Western blotting verified that OMVs carried β-lactamase. Moreover, enzyme assays revealed that M. catarrhalis OMVs contained active β-lactamase. OMVs (25 μg/ml) incubated with amoxicillin for 1 h completely hydrolyzed amoxicillin at concentrations up to 2.5 μg/ml. In functional experiments, preincubation of amoxicillin (10× MIC) with M. catarrhalis OMVs fully rescued amoxicillin-susceptible M. catarrhalis, S. pneumoniae, and type b or nontypeable H. influenzae from β-lactam-induced killing. Our results suggest that the presence of amoxicillin-resistant M. catarrhalis originating from β-lactamase-containing OMVs may pave the way for respiratory pathogens that by definition are susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics.

  18. Toll-like receptor 4 agonistic antibody promotes innate immunity against severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akitaka; Nakamura, Shigeki; Seki, Masafumi; Fukudome, Kenji; Iwanaga, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Coinfection with bacteria is a major cause of mortality during influenza epidemics. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists were shown to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness and mechanisms of the new TLR4 agonistic monoclonal antibody UT12 against secondary pneumococcal pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus in a mouse model. Mice were intranasally inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae 2 days after influenza virus inoculation. UT12 was intraperitoneally administered 2 h before each inoculation. Survival rates were significantly increased and body weight loss was significantly decreased by UT12 administration. Additionally, the production of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by the administration of UT12. In a histopathological study, pneumonia in UT12-treated mice was very mild compared to that in control mice. UT12 increased antimicrobial defense through the acceleration of macrophage recruitment into the lower respiratory tract induced by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) pathway-dependent monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) production. Collectively, these findings indicate that UT12 promoted pulmonary innate immunity and may reduce the severity of severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and S. pneumoniae. This immunomodulatory effect of UT12 improves the prognosis of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia and makes UT12 an attractive candidate for treating severe infectious diseases.

  19. Free Sialic Acid Acts as a Signal That Promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae Invasion of Nasal Tissue and Nonhematogenous Invasion of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Brandon L.; Hale, Joanetha Y.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and neurological sequelae in children worldwide. Acute bacterial meningitis is widely considered to result from bacteremia that leads to blood-brain barrier breakdown and bacterial dissemination throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Previously, we showed that pneumococci can gain access to the CNS through a nonhematogenous route without peripheral blood infection. This access is thought to occur when the pneumococci in the upper sinus follow the olfactory nerves and enter the CNS through the olfactory bulbs. In this study, we determined whether the addition of exogenous sialic acid postcolonization promotes nonhematogenous invasion of the CNS. Previously, others showed that treatment with exogenous sialic acid post-pneumococcal infection increased the numbers of CFU recovered from an intranasal mouse model of infection. Using a pneumococcal colonization model, an in vivo imaging system, and a multiplex assay for cytokine expression, we demonstrated that sialic acid can increase the number of pneumococci recovered from the olfactory bulbs and brains of infected animals. We also show that pneumococci primarily localize to the olfactory bulb, leading to increased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These findings provide evidence that sialic acid can enhance the ability of pneumococci to disseminate into the CNS and provide details about the environment needed to establish nonhematogenous pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27354445

  20. Antimicrobial growth promoter ban and resistance to macrolides and vancomycin in enterococci from pigs.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Wissing, A; Aarestrup, F M; Frey, J; Nicolet, J

    2001-11-01

    Ninety-six enterococcus isolates from fecal samples of pigs receiving tylosin as an antimicrobial growth promoter and 59 isolates obtained in the same farms 5 to 6 months after the ban of antimicrobial growth promoters in Switzerland were tested for susceptibility to nine antimicrobial agents. A clear decrease in resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and tetracycline was visible after the ban. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium belonged to the same clonal lineage as vancomycin-resistant isolates previously isolated from Danish pigs.

  1. Phenotypes and genotypes of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from invasive and non-invasive infections from Mexico and the USA during 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Katahira, Eva; Jaramillo-Valdivia, Abril N.; de los Angeles Barajas-García, María; Bryant, Amy; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Márquez-Díaz, Francisco; Tinoco, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Corona, José; Stevens, Dennis L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the prevalence, phenotypes, and genes responsible for erythromycin resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Mexico and the USA. Methods Eighty-nine invasive and 378 non-invasive isolates from Mexico, plus 148 invasive, 21 non-invasive, and five unclassified isolates from the USA were studied. Susceptibilities to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin were evaluated according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standards. Phenotypes of erythromycin resistance were identified by triple disk test, and screening for mefA, ermTR, and ermB genes was carried out by PCR. Results All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin. Erythromycin resistance was found in 4.9% of Mexican strains and 5.2% of USA strains. Phenotypes in Mexican strains were 95% M and 5% cMLS; in strains from the USA, phenotypes were 33.3% iMLS, 33.3% iMLS-D, and 33.3% M. Erythromycin resistance genes in strains from Mexico were mefA (95%) and ermB (5%); USA strains harbored ermTR (56%), mefA (33%), and none (11%). In Mexico, all erythromycin-resistant strains were non-invasive, whereas 89% of strains from the USA were invasive. Conclusions Erythromycin resistance continues to exist at low levels in both Mexico and the USA, although the genetic mechanisms responsible differ between the two nations. These genetic differences may be related to the invasive character of the S. pyogenes isolated. PMID:22217469

  2. D-Alanylation of Lipoteichoic Acids Confers Resistance to Cationic Peptides in Group B Streptococcus by Increasing the Cell Wall Density

    PubMed Central

    Saar-Dover, Ron; Bitler, Arkadi; Nezer, Ravit; Shmuel-Galia, Liraz; Firon, Arnaud; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) serve as the first line of defense of the innate immune system against invading microbial pathogens. Gram-positive bacteria can resist CAMPs by modifying their anionic teichoic acids (TAs) with D-alanine, but the exact mechanism of resistance is not fully understood. Here, we utilized various functional and biophysical approaches to investigate the interactions of the human pathogen Group B Streptococcus (GBS) with a series of CAMPs having different properties. The data reveal that: (i) D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) enhance GBS resistance only to a subset of CAMPs and there is a direct correlation between resistance and CAMPs length and charge density; (ii) resistance due to reduced anionic charge of LTAs is not attributed to decreased amounts of bound peptides to the bacteria; and (iii) D-alanylation most probably alters the conformation of LTAs which results in increasing the cell wall density, as seen by Transmission Electron Microscopy, and reduces the penetration of CAMPs through the cell wall. Furthermore, Atomic Force Microscopy reveals increased surface rigidity of the cell wall of the wild-type GBS strain to more than 20-fold that of the dltA mutant. We propose that D-alanylation of LTAs confers protection against linear CAMPs mainly by decreasing the flexibility and permeability of the cell wall, rather than by reducing the electrostatic interactions of the peptide with the cell surface. Overall, our findings uncover an important protective role of the cell wall against CAMPs and extend our understanding of mechanisms of bacterial resistance. PMID:22969424

  3. Expression of the mef(E) gene encoding the macrolide efflux pump protein increases in Streptococcus pneumoniae with increasing resistance to macrolides.

    PubMed

    Wierzbowski, Aleksandra K; Boyd, Dave; Mulvey, Michael; Hoban, Daryl J; Zhanel, George G

    2005-11-01

    Active macrolide efflux is a major mechanism of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae in many parts of the world, especially North America. In Canada, this active macrolide efflux in S. pneumoniae is predominantly due to acquisition of the mef(E) gene. In the present study, we assessed the mef(E) gene sequence as well as mef(E) expression in variety of low- and high-level macrolide-resistant, clindamycin-susceptible (M-phenotype) S. pneumoniae isolates (erythromycin MICs, 1 to 32 microg/ml; clindamycin MICs, < or = 0.25 microg/ml). Southern blot hybridization with mef(E) probe and EcoRI digestion and relative real-time reverse transcription-PCR were performed to study the mef(E) gene copy number and expression. Induction of mef(E) expression was analyzed by Etest susceptibility testing pre- and postincubation with subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, telithromycin, and clindamycin. The macrolide efflux gene, mef(E), was shown to be a single-copy gene in all 23 clinical S. pneumoniae isolates tested, and expression post-macrolide induction increased 4-, 6-, 20-, and 200-fold in isolates with increasing macrolide resistance (erythromycin MICs 2, 4, 8, and 32 microg/ml, respectively). Sequencing analysis of the macrolide efflux genetic assembly (mega) revealed that mef(E) had a 16-bp deletion 153 bp upstream of the putative start codon in all 23 isolates. A 119-bp intergenic region between mef(E) and mel was sequenced, and a 99-bp deletion was found in 11 of the 23 M-phenotype S. pneumoniae isolates compared to the published mega sequence. However, the mef(E) gene was fully conserved among both high- and low-level macrolide-resistant isolates. In conclusion, increased expression of mef(E) is associated with higher levels of macrolide resistance in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  4. An important site in PBP2x of penicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: mutational analysis of Thr338.

    PubMed

    Zerfass, Ilka; Hakenbeck, Regine; Denapaite, Dalia

    2009-03-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) of Streptococcus pneumoniae represents a primary resistance determinant for beta-lactams, and low-affinity PBP2x variants can easily be selected with cefotaxime. Penicillin-resistant clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae frequently contain in their mosaic PBP2x the mutation T338A adjacent to the active site S337, and T338P as well as T338G substitutions are also known. Site-directed mutagenesis has now documented that a single point mutation at position T338 confers selectable levels of beta-lactam resistance preferentially to oxacillin. Despite the moderate impact on beta-lactam susceptibility, the function of the PBP2x mutants appears to be impaired, as can be documented in the absence of a functional CiaRH regulatory system, resulting in growth defects and morphological changes. The combination of low-affinity PBP2x and PBP1a encoded by mosaic genes is known to result in high cefotaxime resistance. In contrast, introduction of a mosaic pbp1a into the PBP2x(T338G) mutant did not lead to increased resistance. However, the mosaic PBP1a gene apparently complemented the PBP2x(T338G) defect, since Cia mutant derivatives grew normally. The data support the view that PBP2x and PBP1a interact with each other on some level and that alterations of both PBPs in resistant clinical isolates have evolved to ensure cooperation between both proteins.

  5. Inducible Expression of both ermB and ermT Conferred High Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meixia; Cai, Chao; Chen, Juan; Cheng, Changwei; Cheng, Guofu; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus is an under-recognized pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in humans. Despite increasing recognition of this subspecies as a cause for human infectious diseases, limited information is known about its antibiotic resistance mechanism. In this study, we aim to identify the molecular mechanism underlying the high macrolide resistance of six S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates from dead ducklings collected in several natural outbreaks in China during 2010–2013. All isolates exhibited multi-drug resistance including high macrolide resistance (MIC ≥ 1024 mg/L for erythromycin, and 512 mg/L for clarithromycin). Efflux-encoding mefA and mefE genes were not detectable in these isolates. The presence of 23S rRNA mutations in specific isolates did not significantly change macrolide MICs. No nucleotide substitutions were found in genes encoding ribosomal proteins L4 or L22. The ermB and ermT genes were found in the genomes of all isolates. These two genes were acquired independently in one highly virulent isolate AL101002, and clustered with Tn916 and IS1216, respectively. The expression of both ermB and ermT in all isolates was erythromycin inducible and yielded comparable macrolide MICs in all six isolates. Taken together, inducible expression of both ermB and ermT conferred high macrolide resistance in these S. gallolyticus subsp. pasterianus isolates. Our findings reveal new macrolide resistance features in S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus by both ermB and ermT. PMID:27669217

  6. Rapid Assessment of Resistance to Antibiotic Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis in the Gram-Positive Pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Based on Evaluation of the Lytic Response.

    PubMed

    Otero, Fátima; Tamayo, María; Santiso, Rebeca; Gosálvez, Jaime; Bou, Germán; Fernández, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    A novel assay for rapid determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis was developed for the gram-positive pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. To this purpose, a lytic response was obtained by a brief incubation with lysozyme or a mixture of lysozyme, Triton X-100, and EDTA for E. faecalis (n = 82) and S. pneumoniae (n = 51), respectively. Lysis was quantified by visualizing the released nucleoids. Antibiotic-susceptible bacteria treated with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint doses of erythromycin, azithromycin, or doxycycline that inhibited protein synthesis demonstrated a large reduction of lysed cells with respect to the control, that is, without antibiotics. However, cell lysis prevention was much lower in nonsusceptible strains, with unsuccessful inhibition of protein synthesis. ROC analysis showed that a reduction value of ≥35.6% and ≥40.4% discriminates susceptible and nonsusceptible strains for erythromycin and for doxycycline, respectively, in E. faecalis, whereas ≥20.0% is adequate for both macrolides and doxycycline in S. pneumoniae. Resistant stains were identified in 90-120 min with sensitivity and specificity between 91.7% and 100%. This is a proof of concept that evaluation of the lytic response may be a rapid and efficient test for determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis.

  7. Evolution of antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal diseases in Algeria from 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, N.; Ziane, H.; Bekhoucha, S.; Guechi, Z.; Azzam, A.; Touati, D.; Naim, M.; Azrou, S.; Hamidi, M.; Mertani, A.; Laraba, A.; Annane, T.; Kermani, S.; Tazir, M.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases. PCVs are not currently being used in Algeria. We conducted a prospective study from 2005 to 2012 in Algeria to determine antimicrobial drug resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children with pneumococcal disease. Among 270 isolated strains from children, 97 (36%) were invasive disease; of these, 48% were not susceptible to penicillin and 53% not susceptible to erythromycin. A high rate of antimicrobial nonsusceptibility was observed in strains isolated from children with meningitis. The serotype distribution from pneumococci isolated from children with invasive infections was (by order of prevalence): 14, 1, 19F, 19A, 6B, 5, 3, 6A and 23F. Multidrug resistance was observed in serotypes 14, 19F, 19A and 6B. The vaccine coverage of serotypes isolated from children aged <5 years was 55.3% for PCV7, 71.1% for PCV10 and 86.8% for PCV13. Our results highlight the burden of pneumococcal disease in Algeria and the increasing S. pneumoniae antibiotic resistance. The current pneumococcal vaccines cover a high percentage of the circulating strains. Therefore, vaccination would reduce the incidence of pneumococcal disease in Algeria. PMID:26106481

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile and Genotypic Characteristics of Streptococcus suis Capsular Type 2 Isolated from Clinical Carrier Sows and Diseased Pigs in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunping; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Song, Li; Fan, Xuezheng; Wen, Fang; Xu, Shixin; Ning, Yibao

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an important zoonotic pathogen. Antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypic characterizations of S. suis 2 from carrier sows and diseased pigs remain largely unknown. In this study, 96 swine S. suis type 2, 62 from healthy sows and 34 from diseased pigs, were analyzed. High frequency of tetracycline resistance was observed, followed by sulfonamides. The lowest resistance of S. suis 2 for β-lactams supports their use as the primary antibiotics to treat the infection of serotype 2. In contrast, 35 of 37 S. suis 2 with MLSB phenotypes were isolated from healthy sows, mostly encoded by the ermB and/or the mefA genes. Significantly lower frequency of mrp+/epf+/sly+ was observed among serotype 2 from healthy sows compared to those from diseased pigs. Furthermore, isolates from diseased pigs showed more homogeneously genetic patterns, with most of them clustered in pulsotypes A and E. The data indicate the genetic complexity of S. suis 2 between herds and a close linkage among isolates from healthy sows and diseased pigs. Moreover, many factors, such as extensive use of tetracycline or diffusion of Tn916 with tetM, might have favored for the pathogenicity and widespread dissemination of S. suis serotype 2. PMID:26064892

  9. Dominance of multidrug-resistant Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) clone among Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates causing pneumococcal disease in Bulgaria from 1992 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Setchanova, Lena Petrova; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Dacheva, Daniela; Mitov, Ivan; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio

    2015-02-01

    A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in Bulgarian national immunization program since April 2010. Clonal composition based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing genotyping of 52 serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was analyzed. These were invasive and respiratory isolates collected between 1992 and 2013 from both children (78.8% <5 years) and adults with pneumococcal infections. Multidrug resistance was found in 82.7% of all 19A isolates. The most prevalent genotype (63.5%) among serotype 19A pneumococcal strains was the multidrug-resistant clonal complex CC230, which is a capsular switched variant of the Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) global clone. The most frequent sequence type (ST) was ST230 (48.1%) and together with four other closely related STs (15.4%), belonging to ST1611, ST276, ST7466, and ST2013, which were single- and double-locus variants; they were included in the main CC230. The disappearance of highly drug-resistant ST663 clone and emergence of new clones as CC320 and CC199 was also observed among the rest 19A isolates. A comparison of clonal composition between invasive and noninvasive isolates did not show a great genetic diversity among both kinds of isolates. Continuous surveillance of serotype 19A population following the introduction of PCV10 is essential to evaluate the impact of the vaccine on the epidemiology of this serotype.

  10. Effect of Sophora flavescens on non-specific immune response of tilapia (GIFT Oreochromis niloticus) and disease resistance against Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-rui; Gong, Qing-fang; Fang, Hong; Liang, Wan-wen; Chen, Ming; He, Rui-jie

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the effect of a diet supplemented with the Chinese traditional herbal medicine Sophora flavescens on the immunity and disease resistance of an Oreochromis niloticus GIFT strain. Experimental diets containing 0.025%, 0.050%, 0.100%, 0.200%, and 0.400% S. flavescens, as well as a control group without S. flavescens were used. We tested the non-specific humoral immune responses (lysozyme, antiprotease, and complement) and cellular immune responses (reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species production and myeloperoxidase), as well as disease resistance against Streptococcus agalactiae. S. flavescens supplementation at all dose significantly enhanced serum lysozyme, antiprotease, and natural hemolytic complement activity. Similarly, all S. flavescens doses enhanced cellular myeloperoxidase activity. The increased production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen intermediates by peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in most of the treatment groups throughout the test period. The fish fed 0.100% S. flavescens had a percent mortality of 21.1% and a relative percent survival of 73.3% compared with the group fed the basal diet during the S. agalactiae challenge. The results suggest that S. flavescens can be recommended as a tilapia feed supplement to enhance fish immunity and disease resistance against S. agalactiae.

  11. Cross-Resistance to Lincosamides, Streptogramins A, and Pleuromutilins Due to the lsa(C) Gene in Streptococcus agalactiae UCN70▿

    PubMed Central

    Malbruny, Brigitte; Werno, Anja M.; Murdoch, David R.; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae UCN70, isolated from a vaginal swab obtained in New Zealand, is resistant to lincosamides and streptogramins A (LSA phenotype) and also to tiamulin (a pleuromutilin). By whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 5,224-bp chromosomal extra-element that comprised a 1,479-bp open reading frame coding for an ABC protein (492 amino acids) 45% identical to Lsa(A), a protein related to intrinsic LSA resistance in Enterococcus faecalis. Expression of this novel gene, named lsa(C), in S. agalactiae BM132 after cloning led to an increase in MICs of lincomycin (0.06 to 4 μg/ml), clindamycin (0.03 to 2 μg/ml), dalfopristin (2 to >32 μg/ml), and tiamulin (0.12 to 32 μg/ml), whereas no change in MICs of erythromycin (0.06 μg/ml), azithromycin (0.03 μg/ml), spiramycin (0.25 μg/ml), telithromycin (0.03 μg/ml), and quinupristin (8 μg/ml) was observed. The phenotype was renamed the LSAP phenotype on the basis of cross-resistance to lincosamides, streptogramins A, and pleuromutilins. This gene was also identified in similar genetic environments in 17 other S. agalactiae clinical isolates from New Zealand exhibiting the same LSAP phenotype, whereas it was absent in susceptible S. agalactiae strains. Interestingly, this extra-element was bracketed by a 7-bp duplication of a target site (ATTAGAA), suggesting that this structure was likely a mobile genetic element. In conclusion, we identified a novel gene, lsa(C), responsible for the acquired LSAP resistance phenotype in S. agalactiae. Dissection of the biochemical basis of resistance, as well as demonstration of in vitro mobilization of lsa(C), remains to be performed. PMID:21245447

  12. Rationale for revised penicillin susceptibility breakpoints versus Streptococcus pneumoniae: coping with antimicrobial susceptibility in an era of resistance.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Melvin P; Klugman, Keith P; Jones, Ronald N

    2009-06-01

    In January 2008, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute published revised susceptibility breakpoints for penicillin and Streptococcus pneumoniae, and shortly thereafter, the United States Food and Drug Administration similarly revised its breakpoints via changes in the package insert for penicillin. The revised susceptibility breakpoint is < or =2 microg/mL for nonmeningeal infections treated with parenteral penicillin at a dosage of 12 million units-24 million units per day. The susceptibility breakpoint of < or =0.06 microg/mL remains unchanged for pneumococcal meningitis treated with parenteral penicillin at a dosage of > or =18 million units per day. Herein, we review the scientific basis for the revisions to the breakpoints, which were supported by microbiologic, pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic, and clinical data. Clinicians, once again, should feel comfortable prescribing penicillin for pneumococcal pneumonia and other pneumococcal infections outside the central nervous system.

  13. Prevalence and antibacterial susceptibility of mef(A)-positive macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae over 4 years (2000 to 2004) of the PROTEKT US Study.

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; File, Thomas M; Jenkins, Stephen G

    2007-02-01

    In the United States, approximately 30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates are macrolide (erythromycin [ERY]) resistant (ERSP), most commonly due to expression of the mef(A) gene previously associated with lower-level ERY resistance (ERYr; MIC=1 to 4 microg/ml). The data from the PROTEKT US surveillance study were analyzed to evaluate the prevalence and antibacterial susceptibility of mef(A)-positive ERSP. In all, 26,634 isolates of S. pneumoniae were collected in the United States between 2000 and 2004 from centers common to all years. ERYr was stable at approximately 29% over the 4 years, but the proportion of ERSP isolates positive for mef(A) alone decreased (year 1 [2000 to 2001], 69.0%; year 4 [2003 to 2004], 60.7%), with the sharpest declines seen in isolates from patients from 0 to 2 years of age. Conversely, the proportion isolates positive for both erm(B) and mef(A) increased over the duration of the present study (year 1, 9.3%; year 4, 19.1%), a change that was again most marked in patients aged

  14. Engineered strains of Streptococcus macedonicus towards an osmotic stress resistant phenotype retain their ability to produce the bacteriocin macedocin under hyperosmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Anastasiou, Rania; Driessche, Gonzalez Van; Boutou, Effrossyni; Kazou, Maria; Alexandraki, Voula; Vorgias, Constantinos E; Devreese, Bart; Tsakalidou, Effie; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos

    2015-10-20

    Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 produces the bacteriocin macedocin in milk only under low NaCl concentrations (<1.0%w/v). The thermosensitive plasmid pGh9:ISS1 was employed to generate osmotic stress resistant (osmr) mutants of S. macedonicus. Three osmr mutants showing integration of the vector in unique chromosomal sites were identified and the disrupted loci were characterized. Interestingly, the mutants were able to grow and to produce macedocin at considerably higher concentrations of NaCl compared to the wild-type (up to 4.0%w/v). The production of macedocin under hyperosmotic conditions solely by the osmr mutants was validated by the well diffusion assay and by mass spectrometry analysis. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that the macedocin biosynthetic regulon was transcribed at high salt concentrations only in the mutants. Mutant osmr3, the most robust mutant, was converted in its markerless derivative (osmr3f). Co-culture of S. macedonicus with spores of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in milk demonstrated that only the osmr3f mutant and not the wild-type inhibited the growth of the spores under hyperosmotic conditions (i.e., 2.5%w/v NaCl) due to the production of macedocin. Our study shows how genetic manipulation of a strain towards a stress resistant phenotype could improve bacteriocin production under conditions of the same stress.

  15. Molecular characterization of quinolone resistance-determining regions and their correlation with serotypes and genotypes among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan.

    PubMed

    Osawa, M; Ito, Y; Ishida, T; Imai, S; Ichiyama, S; Mishima, M

    2010-02-01

    We established the distribution of amino acid alterations in quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan and described the correlation of these alterations with serotypes determined by multilocus sequencing typing. Among 141 S. pneumoniae isolates, five levofloxacin-resistant isolates harbored mutations in both gyrA and parC and/or parE and were clonally unrelated. Among 136 levofloxacin-susceptible isolates, one isolate (MIC = 2 mg/l) had a first-step parC mutation at Asp78. Twenty isolates had Lys137Asp in parC and Ile460Val in parE and contained nine serotypes and eight clonal complexes (CCs), including all eight Colombia(23F)-26 (CC138) isolates. Eighty-one isolates had Ile460Val in parE alone and contained 14 serotypes and 16 CCs, including 36 of 37 Netherlands(3)-31 (CC180) isolates and all 22 Taiwan(19F)-14 (CC271) isolates. In contrast, seven of ten Taiwan(23F)-15 (CC242) isolates were wild-type. Although each QRDR genotype contained various serotypes and CCs, prevalent clones were mostly associated with a single QRDR genotype.

  16. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  17. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain.

    PubMed

    van Loveren, C; Hoogenkamp, M A; Deng, D M; ten Cate, J M

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR were preincubated at pH 7 or 4 with NaF, the amine fluorides Olaflur and Dectaflur and amine chloride controls. After preincubations, enolase and ATPase activities of the cells were assessed. Enolase activity was more inhibited after preincubation at pH 7 with NaF than with Olaflur. Amine chloride stimulated, although not with statistical significance, the enolase activity of both strains. After preincubation at pH 4 the enolases were strongly inactivated, but the fluoride-resistant strain's enolase to a lesser extent. The results suggested that amine acts to protect enolase activity against the detrimental low pH effect. Gene sequencing showed that the enolase genes of the fluoride-resistant and fluoride-sensitive strain were identical. ATPase activity was not reduced after NaF preincubation at either pH 7 or pH 4. The amine fluorides and their chloride controls in the preincubation mixture reduced the ATPase activity significantly at both pH values. In conclusion, our results showed that preincubation with amine fluoride did not inhibit enolase activity more effectively than NaF. The amine part of the molecule may protect enolase activity against preincubations at low pH. ATPase activity was not inhibited by NaF preincubation but was significantly inhibited after preincubation with amine fluorides and amine chlorides.

  18. Identification and characterization of SMU.244 encoding a putative undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase protein required for cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Naif; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Upham, Jacqueline; Chen, Chao; Parcells, Madison; Li, Yung-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans in dental biofilms often faces life-threatening threats such as killing by antimicrobial molecules from competing species or from the host. The ability of S. mutans to cope with such threats is crucial for its survival and persistence in dental biofilms. By screening a transposon mutant library, we identified 11 transposon insertion mutants that were sensitive to bacitracin. Two of these mutants, XTn-01 and XTn-03, had an independent insertion in the same locus, SMU.244, which encoded a homologue of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (UppP). In this study, we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of SMU.244 in antibiotic resistance. The results revealed that deletion of SMU.244 results in a mutant (XTΔ244) that is highly sensitive to bacitracin, but confers more resistance to lactococcin G, a class IIb bacteriocin. Introduction of the intact SMU.244 into XTΔ244 in trans completely restores its resistance to bacitracin and the susceptibility to lactococcin G. The XTΔ244 was also defective in forming the WT biofilm, although its growth was not significantly affected. Using recombinant protein technology, we demonstrated that the SMU.244-encoded protein displays enzyme activity to catalyse dephosphorylation of the substrate. The lux transcriptional reporter assays showed that S. mutans maintains a moderate level of expression of SMU.244 in the absence of bacitracin, but bacitracin at sub-MICs can further induce its expression. We concluded that SMU.244 encodes an UppP protein that plays important roles in cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in S. mutans. The results described here may further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which S. mutans copes with antibiotics such as bacitracin.

  19. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant Pneumococcal molecular epidemiology network clones among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imai, S; Ito, Y; Ishida, T; Hirai, T; Ito, I; Maekawa, K; Takakura, S; Iinuma, Y; Ichiyama, S; Mishima, M

    2009-11-01

    A total of 141 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from patients with community-acquired pneumonia were collected from May 2003 through October 2004. The strains were tested for antimicrobial agent susceptibility, serotype and genotype by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and the presence of the pilus rlrA islet. MLST analysis identified 49 sequence types (STs), of which 19 were novel. eBURST analysis using the MLST database (3773 STs) grouped the isolates into 27 clonal complexes and three singletons. A total of 92 (65.2%) isolates were related to ten of the 43 international Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN) clones; major clones found were multidrug-resistant Netherlands(3)-31 [clonal complex (CC) 180], Taiwan(19F)-14 (CC271), Taiwan(23F)-15 (CC242), and Colombia(23F)-26 (CC138) (the latter new to Asia). We adopted univariate and multiple logistic regression models to identify factors associated with PMEN CCs. Multivariate analysis showed that multidrug resistance (OR 6.3; 95% CI 2.0-22.9), carriage serogroups (OR 7.2; 95% CI 2.5-23.7), prevalence of rlrA (OR 12.6; 95% CI 3.6-59.7) and central nervous system-related disorders (OR 7.7; 95% CI 1.8-48.4) were independently associated with PMEN CCs. Our data indicate that multidrug-resistant PMEN clones are highly prevalent, contributing to the high frequency of resistance to antimicrobial agents in Japan, and suggest that certain predisposing factors in patients contribute to the high frequency of these clones.

  20. Nationwide survey of the development of drug-resistant pathogens in the pediatric field in 2007 and 2010: drug sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan (second report).

    PubMed

    Tajima, Takeshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2013-06-01

    We previously conducted nationwide surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in 2000-2001 (period 1) and 2004 (period 2) and reported the findings. Subsequent surveillance surveys conducted in 2007 (period 3) and 2010 (period 4) are now reported. Bacterial strains were clinically isolated from children with meningitis, sepsis, and respiratory tract infections at 27 hospitals participating in the Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease. Twenty-one drugs were investigated for 283 isolated strains in period 3, and 24 drugs were investigated for 459 strains in period 4. In period 3, 43.8 % of strains were penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP), 52.3 % were penicillin-intermediate S. pneumoniae (PISP), and 3.9 % were penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP). In period 4, the percentages were PSSP 23.1 %, PISP 49.9 %, and PRSP 27.0 %. The resistance rates were 56.2 % and 76.9 %, respectively. Drug sensitivity was best with panipenem, at a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)90 ≤0.063 μg/ml in period 3, and with tebipenem (MIC90 ≤ 0.063 μg/ml) in period 4. Patients' background factors related to increased bacterial resistance were investigated, and significant differences were found depending on whether a child had siblings (P = 0.0056) or was a daycare center attendee (P = 0.0195) in period 3, and age category (P = 0.0256) in period 4. No factors were common to both periods 3 and 4. Pneumococcus is a major causative organism of pediatric infectious disease, and we plan to continue conducting surveillance and providing information in the future.

  1. Sil: A Streptococcus iniae Bacteriocin with Dual Role as an Antimicrobial and an Immunomodulator That Inhibits Innate Immune Response and Promotes S. iniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo-fei; Zhang, Bao-cun; Li, Jun; Sun, Li

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a Gram-positive bacterium and a severe pathogen to a wide range of economically important fish species. In addition, S. iniae is also a zoonotic pathogen and can cause serious infections in humans. In this study, we identified from a pathogenic S. iniae strain a putative bacteriocin, Sil, and examined its biological activity. Sil is composed of 101 amino acid residues and shares 35.6% overall sequence identity with the lactococcin 972 of Lactococcus lactis. Immunoblot analysis showed that Sil was secreted by S. iniae into the extracellular milieu. Purified recombinant Sil (rSil) exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the growth of Bacillus subtilis but had no impact on the growths of other 16 Gram-positive bacteria and 10 Gram-negative bacteria representing 23 different bacterial species. Treatment of rSil by heating at 50°C abolished the activity of rSil. rSil bound to the surface of B. subtilis but induced no killing of the target cells. Cellular study revealed that rSil interacted with turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) head kidney monocytes and inhibited the innate immune response of the cells, which led to enhanced cellular infection of S. iniae. Antibody blocking of the extracellular Sil produced by S. iniae significantly attenuated the infectivity of S. iniae. Consistent with these in vitro observations, in vivo study showed that administration of turbot with rSil prior to S. iniae infection significantly increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Taken together, these results indicate that Sil is a novel virulence-associated bacteriostatic and an immunoregulator that promotes S. iniae infection by impairing the immune defense of host fish. PMID:24781647

  2. Interaction of Candida albicans cell wall Als3 protein with Streptococcus gordonii SspB adhesin promotes development of mixed-species communities.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Richard J; Nobbs, Angela H; Vickerman, M Margaret; Barbour, Michele E; Jenkinson, Howard F

    2010-11-01

    Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa and prosthetic surfaces associated with artificial joints, catheters, and dentures. In the oral cavity, C. albicans coexists with numerous bacterial species, and evidence suggests that bacteria may modulate fungal growth and biofilm formation. Streptococcus gordonii is found on most oral cavity surfaces and interacts with C. albicans to promote hyphal and biofilm formation. In this study, we investigated the role of the hyphal-wall protein Als3p in interactions of C. albicans with S. gordonii. Utilizing an ALS3 deletion mutant strain, it was shown that cells were not affected in initial adherence to the salivary pellicle or in hyphal formation in the planktonic phase. However, the Als3(-) mutant was unable to form biofilms on the salivary pellicle or deposited S. gordonii DL1 wild-type cells, and after initial adherence, als3Δ/als3Δ (ΔALS3) cells became detached concomitant with hyphal formation. In coaggregation assays, S. gordonii cells attached to, and accumulated around, hyphae formed by C. albicans wild-type cells. However, streptococci failed to attach to hyphae produced by the ΔALS3 mutant. Saccharomyces cerevisiae S150-2B cells expressing Als3p, but not control cells, supported binding of S. gordonii DL1. However, S. gordonii Δ(sspA sspB) cells deficient in production of the surface protein adhesins SspA and SspB showed >50% reduced levels of binding to S. cerevisiae expressing Als3p. Lactococcus lactis cells expressing SspB bound avidly to S. cerevisiae expressing Als3p, but not to S150-2B wild-type cells. These results show that recognition of C. albicans by S. gordonii involves Als3 protein-SspB protein interaction, defining a novel mechanism in fungal-bacterial communication.

  3. Resisting "Reason": A Comparative Anthropological Study of Social Differences and Resistance toward Health Promotion and Illness Prevention in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Merrild, Camilla Hoffmann; Andersen, Rikke Sand; Risør, Mette Bech; Vedsted, Peter

    2016-04-30

    Social differences in health and illness are well documented in Denmark. However, little is known about how health practices are manifested in the everyday lives of different social classes. We propose acts of resistance and formation of health subjectivities as helpful concepts to develop our understanding of how dominant health discourses are appropriated by different social classes and transformed into different practices promoting health and preventing illness. Based on fieldwork in two different social classes, we discuss how these practices both overtly and subtly challenge the normative power of the health promotion discourse. These diverse and ambiguous forms of everyday resistance illustrate how and when situated concerns move social actors to subjectively appropriate health promotion messages. Overall, the different forms of resistance elucidate how the standardized awareness and education campaigns may perpetuate the very inequalities they try to diminish.

  4. A novel mutation in the alpha-helix 1 of the C subunit of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase responsible for optochin resistance of a Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Cogné, N; Claverys, J; Denis, F; Martin, C

    2000-10-01

    Previously reported mutations involved in optochin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates changed residues 48, 49 or 50, in the transmembrane alpha-helix 2 of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase subunit. We report here an unusual mutation which changes the sequence of the transmembrane alpha-helix 1 of the AtpC subunit. This mutation involves a Gly to Ser substitution resulting from a G to A transition at codon 14 of the atpC gene.

  5. Survey of strain distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Nasaj, Mona; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profils with particular emphasis on susceptible or resistant strains to macrolides and lincosamids antibiotics and to determine possible antibiotic resistance mechanisms occurring in group B streptococci (GBS) strains using PCR assay and disk diffusion method. Methods: A total of 62 clinical GBS strains were investigated. Antibacterial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and inducible resistance test for clindamycin by standard double disk diffusion or D-zone test for all isolates to differentiate macrolide resistance phenotype (M), constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (cMLSB) and induced macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (iMLSB). In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin were determined for all isolates. Finally, possible existence of antibiotic resistance genes for erythromycin (ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) and for clindamycin (linB) were examined among isolates using PCR assay. Results: All 62 isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, cefazoline and vancomycin. However, 93.5% (n=58) of isolates showed an increased MIC to penicillin. The overall rate of erythromycin resistance was 35.5% (n=22). All erythromycin-resistant isolates displayed the M phenotype (100%, n=22). All three erythromycin resistance genes (i.e. ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) were found in erythromycin-resistant isolates. Conclusion: It was concluded that prescribing antibiotic without antibacterial susceptibility tests should be prevented because of the high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS strains and the fact that erythromycin-resistant GBS strains has shown an increased MIC to penicillin, as the drug of choice for treating GBS infections. PMID:27648402

  6. Perturbation of iron homeostasis promotes the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Méhi, Orsolya; Bogos, Balázs; Csörgő, Bálint; Pál, Ferenc; Nyerges, Akos; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-10-01

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in microbes is frequently achieved by acquisition of spontaneous mutations during antimicrobial therapy. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of a central transcriptional regulator of iron homeostasis (Fur) facilitates laboratory evolution of ciprofloxacin resistance in Escherichia coli. To decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms, we first performed a global transcriptome analysis and demonstrated that the set of genes regulated by Fur changes substantially in response to antibiotic treatment. We hypothesized that the impact of Fur on evolvability under antibiotic pressure is due to the elevated intracellular concentration of free iron and the consequent enhancement of oxidative damage-induced mutagenesis. In agreement with expectations, overexpression of iron storage proteins, inhibition of iron transport, or anaerobic conditions drastically suppressed the evolution of resistance, whereas inhibition of the SOS response-mediated mutagenesis had only a minor effect. Finally, we provide evidence that a cell permeable iron chelator inhibits the evolution of resistance. In sum, our work revealed the central role of iron metabolism in the de novo evolution of antibiotic resistance, a pattern that could influence the development of novel antimicrobial strategies.

  7. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  8. Development and evaluation of a novel vaccine against prevalent invasive multi-drug resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bahy, Rehab H.; Hamouda, Hayam M.; Shahat, Amal S.; Amin, Magdy A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogen that causes serious invasive infections, such as septicemia, meningitis and pneumonia in addition to mild upper respiratory tract infections. Protection from pneumococcal diseases is thought to be mediated mainly by serotype-specific antibodies to capsular antigens. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine consists of sugars (polysaccharides) from the capsule of the bacterium S. pneumoniae that are conjugated to a carrier protein. Three pneumococcal conjugated vaccines, each directed against a group of serotypes, are registered in Egypt; however, local vaccine production is required to cover the most prevalent serotypes. In this work, capsular polysaccharide from the most current and prevalent serotypes in Egypt were extracted, purified and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The polysaccharide protein conjugate was purified through ultrafiltration technique and molecular size distribution was compared to an available vaccine. The immunogenicity of the prepared vaccine was examined via two methods: First, by measuring the levels of the elicited antibodies in the sera of the vaccinated mice; second, by challenging the vaccinated groups of mice with approximately 107 CFU of each specific serotype and determining the degree of protection the developled vaccine offers. Our results show that the developed conjugated capsular polysaccharide vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in mice. This finding illustrates the importance of tracking the most recent and predominant peneumococcal serotypes to generate effective vaccines, instead of using expensive imported vaccines with large number of serotypes which might not be even present in the community. PMID:27917323

  9. Iron efflux by PmtA is critical for oxidative stress resistance and contributes significantly to group A streptococcus virulence.

    PubMed

    VanderWal, Arica R; Makthal, Nishanth; Pinochet-Barros, Azul; Helmann, John D; Olsen, Randall J; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2017-03-27

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a human-only pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease conditions. Given its survival in inflamed lesions, the ability to sense and overcome oxidative stress is critical for GAS pathogenesis. PerR senses oxidative stress and coordinates the regulation of genes involved in GAS antioxidant defenses. In this study, we investigated the role of PerR-controlled metal transporter A (PmtA) in GAS pathogenesis. Previously, PmtA was implicated in GAS antioxidant defenses and suggested to protect against zinc toxicity. Here, we report that PmtA is a P1B4-type ATPase that functions as an Fe(II) exporter and aids GAS defenses against iron intoxication and oxidative stress. Expression of pmtA is specifically induced by iron excess and this induction requires PerR. Furthermore, the pmtA mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to iron toxicity and oxidative stress due to elevated intracellular accumulation of iron. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed that GAS undergoes significant alterations in gene expression to adapt to iron toxicity. Finally, using two mouse models of invasive infection, we demonstrated that iron efflux by PmtA is critical for bacterial survival during infection and GAS virulence. Together, these data demonstrate that PmtA is a key component of GAS antioxidant defenses and contributes significantly to GAS virulence.

  10. In vitro infection model characterizing the effect of efflux pump inhibition on prevention of resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Louie, Arnold; Brown, David L; Liu, Weiguo; Kulawy, Robert W; Deziel, Mark R; Drusano, George L

    2007-11-01

    The prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is slowly rising as a consequence of the increased use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics to treat community-acquired pneumonia. We tested the hypothesis that increased efflux pump (EP) expression by S. pneumoniae may facilitate the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance. By using an in vitro pharmacodynamic infection system, a wild-type S. pneumoniae strain (Spn-058) and an isogenic strain with EP overexpression (Spn-RC2) were treated for 10 days with ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin in the presence or absence of the EP inhibitor reserpine to evaluate the effect of EP inhibition on the emergence of resistance. Cultures of Spn-058 and Spn-RC2 were exposed to concentration-time profiles simulating those in humans treated with a regimen of ciprofloxacin at 750 mg orally once every 12 h and with regimens of levofloxacin at 500 and 750 mg orally once daily (QD; with or without continuous infusions of 20 microg of reserpine/ml). The MICs of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin for Spn-058 were both 1 microg/ml when susceptibility testing was conducted with each antibiotic alone and with each antibiotic in the presence of reserpine. For Spn-RC2, the MIC of levofloxacin alone and with reserpine was also 1 mug/ml; the MICs of ciprofloxacin were 2 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, when determined with ciprofloxacin alone and in combination with reserpine. Reserpine, alone, had no effect on the growth of Spn-058 and Spn-RC2. For Spn-058, simulated regimens of ciprofloxacin at 750 mg every 12 h or levofloxacin at 500 mg QD were associated with the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance. However, the use of ciprofloxacin at 750 mg every 12 h and levofloxacin at 500 mg QD in combination with reserpine rapidly killed Spn-058 and prevented the emergence of resistance. For Spn-RC2, levofloxacin at 500 mg QD was associated with the emergence of resistance, but again, the resistance was prevented when this levofloxacin regimen

  11. [From resistance [corrected] to resilience: promoting wellbeing in the workplace].

    PubMed

    Magrin, M E

    2008-01-01

    Research on work stress has focused to date for the most part on the environmental and psychosocial factors inducing stress and great strides have been made in assisting both individuals and organizations in managing distress. This, however, is only half of the battle. As a complement to healing the wounded, there is need to explore models of intervention aimed at the promotion of well-being at work through the development and reinforcement of health-promoting factors. An important contribution toward this goal comes today from Positive Psychology, a new current of research focused on investigating the qualities and predictors that enable individuals to flourish. Within this perspective, health is seen not as the absence of disease and of risk factors but rather as the presence of those resources that underpin wellbeing. Among the new theoretical constructs emerging from Positive Psychology, of particular relevance to the domain of occupational health psychology is the notion of adult resilience. A definition of this notion is proposed and a review given of the main resources of resilience identified in the literature. Particular attention is given to the dimension of meaning, which seems to act as an important health-protector in the work setting. Resilience factors may also play a role in the implementing of interventions oriented both to distress prevention and wellbeing promotion. Establishing and maintaining an effective dialogue between researchers and practitioners in the field of work health promotion is strongly recommended.

  12. Impact of new Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin susceptibility testing breakpoints on reported resistance changes over time.

    PubMed

    Mera, Robertino M; Miller, Linda A; Amrine-Madsen, Heather; Sahm, Daniel F

    2011-03-01

    The analysis comprised a total of 97,843 U.S. isolates from the Surveillance Network(®) database for the period 1996-2008. Penicillin resistance, when defined using the old Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoint (≥2 μg/ml), had an initial rise that started in 1996, peaked in 2000, declined until 2003, and rebounded through 2008 (15.6%, 23.2%, 15.4%, and 16.9%, respectively). Using the new Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute criteria and applying a breakpoint of ≥8 μg/ml to blood and bronchial isolates, resistance was unchanged (0.24% in 2003) but rose to 1.52% in 2008. Using the new meningitis criteria (≥0.12 μg/ml), resistance prevalence was 34.8% in 2008, whereas it was 12.3% using the old criteria (≥2 μg/ml) for cerebrospinal fluid isolates. The rise, fall, and subsequent rebound of penicillin resistance in the United States, presumably influenced by the introduction of the conjugate pneumococcal vaccine, is clearly seen with the old definition, but only the rebound is seen when the new criteria are applied. In the postvaccine period, isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 1 and 2 μg/ml decline, whereas those with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 0.12-0.5 increase, which may signal the loss of resistant vaccine serotypes and the acquisition of resistance by nonvaccine serotypes.

  13. PatA and PatB form a functional heterodimeric ABC multidrug efflux transporter responsible for the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Durmort, Claire; Bernay, Benoît; Ebel, Christine; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Croizé, Jacques; Vernet, Thierry; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-02

    All bacterial multidrug ABC transporters have been shown to work as either homodimers or heterodimers. Two possibly linked genes, patA and patB from Streptococcus pneumococcus, that encode half-ABC transporters have been shown previously to be involved in fluoroquinolone resistance. We showed that the ΔpatA, ΔpatB, or ΔpatA/ΔpatB mutant strains were more sensitive to unstructurally related compounds, i.e., ethidium bromide or fluoroquinolones, than the wild-type R6 strain. Inside-out vesicles prepared from Escherichia coli expressing PatA and/or PatB transported Hoechst 33342, a classical substrate of multidrug transporters, only when both PatA and PatB were coexpressed. This transport was inhibited either by orthovanadate or by reserpine, and mutation of the conserved Walker A lysine residue of either PatA or PatB fully abrogated Hoechst 33342 transport. PatA, PatB, and the PatA/PatB heterodimer were purified from detergent-solubilized E. coli membrane preparations. Protein dimers were identified in all cases, albeit in different proportions. In contrast to the PatA/PatB heterodimers, homodimers of PatA or PatB failed to show a vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity. Thus, PatA and PatB need to interact together to make a functional drug efflux transporter, and they work only as heterodimers.

  14. Positive selection for resistance to 2-deoxyglucose gives rise, in Streptococcus salivarius, to seven classes of pleiotropic mutants, including ptsH and ptsI missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, L; Thomas, S; Gagnon, G; Frenette, M; Trahan, L; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1994-09-01

    We have used the toxic non-metabolizable glucose/mannose analogue 2-deoxyglucose to isolate a comprehensive collection of mutants of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system from Streptococcus salivarius. To increase the range of possible mutations, we isolated spontaneous mutants on different media containing 2-deoxyglucose and various metabolizable sugars, either lactose, melibiose, galactose or fructose. We found that the frequency at which 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutants were isolated varied according to the growth substrate. The highest frequency was obtained with the combination galactose and 2-deoxyglucose and was 15-fold higher than the rate observed with the mixture melibiose and 2-deoxyglucose, the combination that gave the lowest frequency. By combining results from: (i) Western blot analysis of IIIMan, a specific component of the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system in S. salivarius; (ii) rocket immunoelectrophoresis of HPr and EI, the two general energy-coupling proteins of the phosphotransferase system; and (iii) from gene sequencing, mutants could be assigned to seven classes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  16. Antibiotic and Antimicrobial Resistance: Threat Report 2013

    MedlinePlus

    ... resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) [page 77] Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae [page 79] Drug-resistant tuberculosis [page 81] Microorganisms with a Threat Level of Concerning Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ... Streptococcus [page 87] Clindamycin-resistant Group B Streptococcus [page ...

  17. Presence and resistance of Streptococcus agalactiae in vaginal specimens of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women and association with other aerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Numanović, Fatima; Smajlović, Jasmina; Gegić, Merima; Delibegović, Zineta; Bektaš, Sabaheta; Halilović, Emir; Nurkić, Jasmina

    2017-02-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence rate and resistance profile of Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) in vaginal swabs of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women in the Tuzla region, Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H), as well as its association with other aerobic bacteria. Methods This prospective study included 200 women, 100 pregnant and 100 adult non-pregnant. The research was conducted at the Institute of Microbiology, University Clinical Center Tuzla from October to December 2015. Standard aerobic microbiological techniques were used for isolation and identification of S. agalactiae and other aerobic bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion and microdilution method(VITEK 2/AES instrument). Results Among 200 vaginal swabs, 17 (8.50%) were positive for S. agalactiae, e. g., 7% (7/100) of pregnant and 10% (10/100) of adult non-pregnant women. In the pregnant group, 71.4% (5/7) of S. agalactiae isolates were susceptible to clindamycin and 85.7%(6/7) to erythromycin. In the adult non-pregnant group, only resistance to clindamycin was observed in one patient (1/10; 10%). S. agalactiae as single pathogen was isolated in 57.14% (4/7) of pregnant and 60% (6/10) of adult non-pregnant S. agalactiae positive women. In mixed microbial cultures S. agalactiae was most frequently associated with Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. Conclusion The rate of S. agalactiae positive women in the population of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women of Tuzla Canton, B&H is comparable with other European countries. Large studies are needed to develop a common national strategy for the prevention of S. agalactiae infection in B&H, especially during pregnancy.

  18. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-01-29

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens.

  19. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R.; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P.; Williams, Matthew L.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)–ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  20. Antibacterial activity and PK/PD of ceftriaxone against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae isolates from patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2007-10-01

    The suitability of ceftriaxone for penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) and ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae (especially beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) H. influenzae) and the relationship between in vitro antimicrobial activities and pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated. The values for percentage of time above the MIC (%T>MIC) for ceftriaxone, cefotiam, flomoxef, sulbactam/cefoperazone, sulbactam/ampicillin, and meropenem, using 400 S. pneumoniae isolates and 430 H. influenzae isolates from patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from more than 100 geographically diverse medical centers during January to July of 2005, were calculated by measuring the MIC for each isolate and by using patameters of pharmacokinetics. A broth microdilution method was used to determine the MIC, using the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Meropenem showed the lowest MIC against penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae, followed by sulbactam/cefoperazone and ceftriaxone. Ceftriaxone had the best activity against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and beta-lactamase-negative and beta-lactamase-producing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae. Ceftriaxone was unique, showing a long elimination half-life and low MIC values where its serum level duration time was above the MIC for longer than other cephalosporins. Accordingly, the %T>MIC of ceftriaxone for a once-daily administration greatly exceeded the efficacy levels of those for the other antibacterial agents tested. Ceftriaxone has an excellent balance between in vitro antimicrobial activities and pharmacokinetic profiles; and therefore remains effective as a therapeutic agent against PRSP and BLNAR H. influenzae in CAP.

  1. Dissociation of mitogenesis and late-stage promotion of tumor cell phenotype by phorbol esters: mitogen-resistant variants are sensitive to promotion.

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, N H; Wendel, E J; Abruzzo, G

    1981-01-01

    The JB-6 mouse epidermal cell line has been used as a model system for studying the mechanism of late-stage promoter-dependent preneoplastic progression. The studies reported here are concerned with determining whether there is a requirement for mitogenic stimulation in promotion of anchorage independence and tumorigenicity in JB-6 cells. Such a requirement would predict that variants selected for 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) mitogen resistance would also be promotion resistant. Promotion-responsive cell lines have been selected for resistance to TPA-induced mitogenic stimulation at plateau density by cotreatment with colchicine and removal of mitogen-responsive colchicine-detached cells. The selected TPA-resistant population of cells showed a mitogenic response that was diminished by a factor of four but showed no diminution in the promotion-of-anchorage-independence response to TPA. Mitogen-resistant clonal lines derived from the selected population fell into three phenotypic classes when assayed in soft agar: (i) anchorage-independent transformants; (ii) variants resistant to promotion of anchorage independence by TPA; and (iii) variants sensitive to promotion by TPA. The existence of the latter class (i.e., the mitogen-resistant promotable variants) indicates a lack of obligatory causal relationship between TPa-induced mitogenesis and late-stage promotion and, thereby suggests that the two events can be dissociated. Images PMID:6947266

  2. Weathering resistance of carbonate fault mirrors promotes rupture localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, R.; Siman-Tov, S.; Emmanuel, S.

    2016-04-01

    Fractured rocks in fault zones regain their mechanical strength through a process called healing. A central pathway for healing involves the dissolution and reprecipitation of minerals in the fault zone which cements the fractured rocks during interseismic periods. However, some faults contain highly polished surfaces—coated in a thin nanoparticle layer—along which slip is localized. Crucially, these surfaces show little evidence of postseismic mineralization and healing. Here we use atomic force microscopy to show that naturally polished rocks from carbonate fault zones are resistant to dissolution, in stark contrast to the reactive minerals that make up the fault breccia. Our results suggest that the low reactivity of the nanoparticle layer could retard healing, helping to maintain the localization of the fault zone between seismic slip events. As fault localization affects seismic motion, the geochemical reactivity of fault mirrors could be an important control on seismicity along faults.

  3. Influence of methylene blue-mediated photodynamic therapy on the resistance to detachment of streptococcus mutans biofilms from titanium substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharab, Lina Y.

    In dental settings, as well as in other natural systems, plaque-forming microorganisms develop biofilms in which the microbes become protected via their own phenotypic changes and their polymeric exudates from disinfection by washes and antibiotics. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is variably effective against these microorganisms, depending on such factors as whether the bacteria are Gram positive or Gram negative, plaque age and thickness, and internal biofilm oxygen concentration. This investigation applied a novel combination of PDT and water-jet impingement techniques to Streptococcus mutans (ATCC strain 27351)-formed biofilms on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) starting with three different phases (ages) of the bacteria, to examine whether the detachment shear stress --as a signature for the work required for removal of the biofilms- would be affected by prior PDT treatment independently from microbial viability. Biofilms were grown with sucrose addition to Brain Heart Infusion media, producing visible thick films and nearly invisible thin films (within the same piece) having the same numbers of culturable microorganisms, the thicker films having greater susceptibility to detachment by water--jet impingement. Colony-forming-unit (CFU) counts routinely correlated well with results from a spectrophotometric Alamar Blue (AB) assay. Use of Methylene Blue (MB) as a photosensitizer (PS) for PDT of biofilms did not interfere with the AB assay, but did mask AB reduction spectral changes when employed with planktonic organisms. It was discovered in this work that PD-treated microbial biofilms, independently from starting or PS-influenced microorganism viability, were significantly (p<0.05) and differentially more easily delaminated and ultimately removed from their substrata biomaterials by the hydrodynamic forces of water-jet impingement. Control biofilms of varying thickness, not receiving PDT treatment, required between 144 and 228 dynes/cm2 of shear stress to

  4. Penicillin-Binding Protein Transpeptidase Signatures for Tracking and Predicting β-Lactam Resistance Levels in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Chochua, Sopio; Li, Zhongya; Gertz, Robert E.; Walker, Hollis; Hawkins, Paulina A.; Tran, Theresa; Whitney, Cynthia G.; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Lactam antibiotics are the drugs of choice to treat pneumococcal infections. The spread of β-lactam-resistant pneumococci is a major concern in choosing an effective therapy for patients. Systematically tracking β-lactam resistance could benefit disease surveillance. Here we developed a classification system in which a pneumococcal isolate is assigned to a “PBP type” based on sequence signatures in the transpeptidase domains (TPDs) of the three critical penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), PBP1a, PBP2b, and PBP2x. We identified 307 unique PBP types from 2,528 invasive pneumococcal isolates, which had known MICs to six β-lactams based on broth microdilution. We found that increased β-lactam MICs strongly correlated with PBP types containing divergent TPD sequences. The PBP type explained 94 to 99% of variation in MICs both before and after accounting for genomic backgrounds defined by multilocus sequence typing, indicating that genomic backgrounds made little independent contribution to β-lactam MICs at the population level. We further developed and evaluated predictive models of MICs based on PBP type. Compared to microdilution MICs, MICs predicted by PBP type showed essential agreement (MICs agree within 1 dilution) of >98%, category agreement (interpretive results agree) of >94%, a major discrepancy (sensitive isolate predicted as resistant) rate of <3%, and a very major discrepancy (resistant isolate predicted as sensitive) rate of <2% for all six β-lactams. Thus, the PBP transpeptidase signatures are robust indicators of MICs to different β-lactam antibiotics in clinical pneumococcal isolates and serve as an accurate alternative to phenotypic susceptibility testing. PMID:27302760

  5. Two New Mechanisms of Macrolide Resistance in Clinical Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Eastern Europe and North America

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A.; Davies, T.; Appelbaum, P. C.; Depardieu, F.; Courvalin, P.; Petitpas, J.; Wondrack, L.; Walker, A.; Jacobs, M. R.; Sutcliffe, J.

    2000-01-01

    Resistance to macrolides in pneumococci is generally mediated by methylation of 23S rRNA via erm(B) methylase which can confer a macrolide (M)-, lincosamide (L)-, and streptogramin B (SB)-resistant (MLSB) phenotype or by drug efflux via mef(A) which confers resistance to 14- and 15-membered macrolides only. We studied 20 strains with unusual ML or MSB phenotypes which did not harbor erm(B) or mef(A). The strains had been isolated from patients in Eastern Europe and North America from 1992 to 1998. These isolates were found to contain mutations in genes for either 23S rRNA or ribosomal proteins. Three strains from the United States with an ML phenotype, each representing a different clone, were characterized as having an A2059G (Escherichia coli numbering) change in three of the four 23S rRNA alleles. Susceptibility to macrolides and lincosamides decreased as the number of alleles in isogenic strains containing A2059G increased. Sixteen MSB strains from Eastern Europe were found to contain a 3-amino-acid substitution (69GTG71 to TPS) in a highly conserved region of the ribosomal protein L4 (63KPWRQKGTGRAR74). These strains formed several distinct clonal types. The single MSB strain from Canada contained a 6-amino-acid L4 insertion (69GTGREKGTGRAR), which impacted growth rate and also conferred a 500-fold increase in MIC on the ketolide telithromycin. These macrolide resistance mechanisms from clinical isolates are similar to those recently described for laboratory-derived mutants. PMID:11083646

  6. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection.

  7. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some ...

  8. Low prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistant strains and resistance precursor strains in Streptococcus pneumoniae from patients with community-acquired pneumonia despite high fluoroquinolone usage.

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W; van der Linden, Mark; von Baum, Heike; Duesberg, Christoph B; Klugman, Keith P; Welte, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the usage of fluoroquinolones and the prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistant pneumococci and their precursors (first step mutants and efflux expressing isolates) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, who were enroled into the German CAPNETZ surveillance study from 2002 to 2006 before the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (n=5780). Thirty-eight percent of all outpatients received fluoroquinolones. Moxifloxacin accounted for 70%, levofloxacin for 19% and ciprofloxacin for 9% of all fluoroquinolone prescriptions. One hundred and sixty-three pneumococcal isolates from 556 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia were analyzed for fluoroquinolone resistance, efflux phenotype, prevalence of mutations within the quinolone-resistance determining regions and clonality. None of the isolates exhibited fluoroquinolone resistance, 1.2% of the isolates contained a first step mutation and 6.7% exhibited an efflux phenotype. There was no clonal relationship among these strains at increased risk for fluoroquinolone resistance. The absence of fluoroquinolone resistance in the context of high fluoroquinolone usage might be explained by the high proportion of third-generation fluoroquinolones with enhanced activity against pneumococci.

  9. Dietary supplementation with Bacillus subtilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus oryzae enhance immunity and disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila and Streptococcus iniae infection in juvenile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Marina Keiko P; Nakandakare, Ivan B; Terhune, Jeffery S; Wood, Theresa; Ranzani-Paiva, Maria José T

    2015-03-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary administration of probiotic with Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth, innate immune response, Hemato-immunological parameters and disease resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Animals were distributed in three equal groups, each of five replicates and received one of the following experimental diets for four weeks: Control, non-supplemented diet; 5 g kg(-1) probiotic mixture (B. subtilis 1.5 × 10(9) CFU g(-1), S. cerevisiae 10(9) CFU g(-1) and A. oryzae 2 × 10(9) CFU g(-1)); and 10 g kg(-1) probiotic mixture (B. subtilis 3.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1), S. cerevisiae 2.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1) and A. oryzae 4.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1)). The respiratory burst activity, white blood cells and hematological parameters were evaluated after four, five and six weeks of feeding. At the end of the growth trial, fish were sampled for intestinal microbiology and challenged by intraperitoneal injection of LD50 concentration of Aeromonas hydrophila and Streptococcus iniae. Mortality was recorded for the following 3 weeks. Results showed that administration of the probiotic had no significant effect on the growth rates of Nile tilapias, although the fish fed probiotics had better feed conversion. Respiratory burst activity, erythrocyte fragility and levels of white blood cells were significantly improved in tilapias fed diet supplemented with probiotic levels (P < 0.05), which may exhibit up-regulating effects on tilapia immune parameters. The cumulative mortality after A. hydrophila and S. iniae challenge decreased in tilapias fed with probiotic (P < 0.05). The present study demonstrated the potential of B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae and A. oryzae combined as beneficial dietary probiotic in juvenile O. niloticus.

  10. Activity of tedizolid phosphate (TR-701) in murine models of infection with penicillin-resistant and penicillin-sensitive Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghak; Im, Weonbin; Bartizal, Ken

    2012-09-01

    The in vitro activity of tedizolid (previously known as torezolid, TR-700) against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) clinical isolates and the in vivo efficacy of tedizolid phosphate (torezolid phosphate, TR-701) in murine models of PRSP systemic infection and penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) pneumonia were examined using linezolid as a comparator. The MIC(90) against 28 PRSP isolates was 0.25 μg/ml for tedizolid, whereas it was 1 μg/ml for linezolid. In mice infected systemically with a lethal inoculum of PRSP 1 h prior to a single administration of either antimicrobial, oral tedizolid phosphate was equipotent to linezolid (1 isolate) to 2-fold more potent than linezolid (3 isolates) for survival at day 7, with tedizolid phosphate 50% effective dose (ED(50)) values ranging from 3.19 to 11.53 mg/kg of body weight/day. In the PSSP pneumonia model, the ED(50) for survival at day 15 was 2.80 mg/kg/day for oral tedizolid phosphate, whereas it was 8.09 mg/kg/day for oral linezolid following 48 h of treatment with either agent. At equivalent doses (10 mg/kg once daily tedizolid phosphate or 5 mg/kg twice daily linezolid), pneumococcal titers in the lungs at 52 h postinfection were approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower with tedizolid phosphate treatment than with linezolid treatment or no treatment. Lung histopathology showed less inflammatory cell invasion into alveolar spaces in mice treated with tedizolid phosphate than in untreated or linezolid-treated mice. These results demonstrate that tedizolid phosphate is effective in murine models of PRSP systemic infection and PSSP pneumonia.

  11. Effects of some dietary crude plant extracts on the growth and gonadal maturity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and their resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae infection.

    PubMed

    Kareem, Zana H; Abdelhadi, Yasser M; Christianus, Annie; Karim, Murni; Romano, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    A 90-day feeding trial was conducted on the growth performance, feeding efficacy, body indices, various hematological and plasma biochemical parameters, and histopathological examination of the gonads from male and female Nile tilapia fingerlings when fed different crude plant extracts from Cinnamomum camphora, Euphorbia hirta, Azadirachta indica, or Carica papaya at 2 g kg(-1) compared to a control diet. This was followed by a 14-day challenge to Streptococcus agalactiae. All treatments were triplicated, and each treatment consisted of 30 fish. Results showed that C. papaya extracts were the most effective at delaying gonadal maturation to both male and female tilapia, as well as significantly increasing (P < 0.05) growth performance compared to the control treatment. Similarly, dietary C. camphora and E. hirta extracts also significantly improved growth, while no significant growth effect was detected between the A. indica and control treatments (P > 0.05). Further, crude body lipid was lower in the C. camphora, E. hirta and C. papaya treatments, but was only significantly lower for the E. hirta treatment compared to the control. Meanwhile, none of the hematological or biochemical parameters were significantly affected, although plasma ALT was significantly lower for tilapia fed A. indica compared to the control. After the 14-day bacterial challenge, tilapia fed C. camphora supplementation had significantly higher survival, compared to the control, but was not significantly higher than the other supplemented diets. Results indicate that dietary C. papaya extract can significantly promote growth and delay gonadal maturation to both male and female tilapia, while C. camphora was the most effective prophylactic to S. agalactiae and may be a cost-effective and eco-friendly alternative to antibiotics.

  12. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment.

    PubMed

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-02-21

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance.

  13. Regional trends in antimicrobial resistance among clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis in the United States: results from the TRUST Surveillance Program, 1999-2000.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, Clyde; Sahm, Daniel F; Kelly, Laurie J; Critchley, Ian A; Jones, Mark E; Evangelista, Alan T; Karlowsky, James A

    2002-03-01

    The ongoing TRUST (Tracking Resistance in the United States Today) study, which began monitoring antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens in 1996, routinely tracks resistance at national and regional levels. The 1999-2000 TRUST study analyzed 9499 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 1934 Haemophilus influenzae, and 1108 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates that were prospectively collected from 239 laboratories across the 9 US Bureau of the Census regions. Penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae varied significantly by region, from 8.3% to 24.8% (P<.001). In each region, penicillin resistance closely predicted resistance to other beta-lactams, macrolides, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Levofloxacin resistance was 0.5% nationally (regional range, 0.1%-1.0%). Multidrug resistance also varied significantly (P<.001) by region. beta-Lactamase production among H. influenzae varied significantly (regional range, 24.0%-34.6%) and M. catarrhalis (86.2%-96.8%) also varied by region. Notable variation in regional antimicrobial resistance rates (S. pneumoniae) and beta-lactamase production (H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis) exists throughout the United States.

  14. Important Mutations Contributing to High-Level Penicillin Resistance in Taiwan(19F)-14, Taiwan(23F)-15, and Spain(23F)-1 of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Esther Yip-Mei; Chang, Jen-Chang; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2016-12-01

    Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious concern worldwide. In this study, we analyzed the cause of β-lactam resistance in pandemic multidrug-resistant clones. A total of 41 penicillin-nonsusceptible clinical isolates were collected from 1996 to 2012. Sero- and molecular typing confirmed that these isolates were clonal types of Taiwan(19F)-14, Taiwan(23F)-15, and Spain(23F)-1. Sero-switching was found in four isolates. All isolates were multidrug resistant. Sequencing analysis of the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) was performed on PBP1a, 2b, and 2x, and a large number of mutations were identified in comparing to clinical penicillin-susceptible isolates and the recipient strain R6 used for homologous recombination. The T451A substitution was the key amino acid in PBP2b that contributed to penicillin resistance. T338A in PBP2x played a role in resistance and reached the highest level of resistance when combined with other mutations in PBP2x. High-level penicillin resistance could not be obtained without the combination of mutations in PBP1a with PBP2b and 2x. The amino acid substitutions in PBP1a, 2b, and 2x were the crucial factors for β-lactam resistance.

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae: low frequency of penicillin resistance and high resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in nasopharyngeal isolates from children in a rural area in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Miranda Novales, M G; Solorzano Santos, F; Guiscafre Gallardo, H; Leaños Miranda, B; Echaniz Aviles, G; Carnalla Barajas, M N; Palafox Torres, M; Muñoz Hernandez, O

    1997-01-01

    Due to the changes in the frequency of penicillin-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae, it is necessary to perform surveillance studies of bacterial resistance. Isolates from the upper respiratory tract of asymptomatic children have been useful. There is no information about the difference between isolates from children with and without upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). The objective of the authors in this paper is to establish the prevalence of carrier-state, serotype and antimicrobial resistance of S. pneumoniae isolates from children with and without acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a rural area in Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was performed in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Children from one month 5 years of age were included. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained. Identification was done by international microbiology standards. Serotyping was done by the capsular Quellung test. The susceptibility testing was performed by the agar dilution method. Four-hundred and fifty patients were included. S. pneumoniae was isolated in 134 children (29.7%). Frequency of carriers was greater in patients with URTI (107/323) than without URTI (27/127) (33.1% vs. 21.1% p = 0.012, OR 1.84, IC 95% 1.1-3.08). The six most frequent serotypes were: 6B (16.4%); 19F (11.9%); 19A (6.7%); 14, 23F, and 35 (5.2% each), with no difference among the groups. Only 3% of the strains had high level resistance to penicillin, and 12.6% had intermediate resistance, and for ampicillin 4%, amoxicillin 4%, amoxicillin-clavulanate 4%, ceftriaxone 3%, cefotaxime 1.5%, erythromycin 6%, miocamycin 3%, chloramphenicol 4%, and vancomycin 0%. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance was very high (42%). In conclusion, colonization is higher in children with URTI. Five of the most frequent serotypes identified in this study were the same as those identified in patients with S. pneumoniae invasive diseases in Mexico City. In Tlaxcala, Mexico, beta-lactams could be the drug of choice for

  16. Computational studies on the resistance of penicillin-binding protein 2B (PBP2B) of wild-type and mutant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae against β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Jothi; Vennila, Jannet; Subbiah, Parthasarathy

    2013-09-01

    Mutations within transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein 2B of the strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. To uncover the important residues responsible for sensitivity and resistance, the recently determined three dimensional structures of penicillin-binding protein 2B of both wild-type R6 (sensitive) and mutant 5204 (resistant) strains along with the predicted structures of other mutant strains G54, Hungary19A-6 and SP195 were considered for the interaction study with β-lactam antibiotics using induced-fit docking of Schrödinger. Associated binding energies of the complexes and their intermolecular interactions in the binding site clearly show that the wild-type R6 as sensitive, mutant strains 5204 and G54 as highly resistant, and the mutant strains Hungary19A-6 and SP195 as intermediate resistant. The study also reveals that the mutant strains Hungary19A-6 and SP195 exhibit intermediate resistant because of the existence of mutations till the intermediate 538th and 516th positions, respectively, and not till the end of the C-terminus. Furthermore, our investigations show that if the mutations are extended till the end of the C terminus, then the antibiotic resistance of induced-mutated strains increases from intermediate to high as in the strains 5204 and G54. The binding patterns obtained in the study are useful in designing potential inhibitors against multidrug resistant S. pneumoniae.

  17. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. PMID:25059827

  18. Can Clays in Livestock Feed Promote Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence in Pathogenic Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Valverde, José Ramón; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry has long been associated with the appearance of antibiotic resistance and virulence factor determinants. Nonetheless, the number of cases of human infection involving resistant or virulent microorganisms that originate in farms is increasing. While many antibiotics have been banned as dietary supplements in some countries, other additives thought to be innocuous in terms of the development and spread of antibiotic resistance are used as growth promoters. In fact, several clay materials are routinely added to animal feed with the aim of improving growth and animal product quality. However, recent findings suggest that sepiolite, a clay additive, mediates the direct transfer of plasmids between different bacterial species. We therefore hypothesize that clays present in animal feed facilitate the horizontal transfer of resistance determinants in the digestive tract of farm animals.

  19. Urinary Tract Physiological Conditions Promote Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Low-Level-Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel; Costas, Coloma; Aznar, Javier; Pascual, Álvaro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli isolates carrying chromosomally encoded low-level-quinolone-resistant (LLQR) determinants are frequently found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). LLQR mutations are considered the first step in the evolutionary pathway producing high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Therefore, their evolution and dissemination might influence the outcome of fluoroquinolone treatments of UTI. Previous studies support the notion that low urine pH decreases susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (CIP) in E. coli However, the effect of the urinary tract physiological parameters on the activity of ciprofloxacin against LLQR E. coli strains has received little attention. We have studied the activity of ciprofloxacin under physiological urinary tract conditions against a set of well-characterized isogenic E. coli derivatives carrying the most prevalent chromosomal mutations (ΔmarR, gyrA-S83L, gyrA-D87N, and parC-S80R and some combinations). The results presented here demonstrate that all the LLQR strains studied became resistant to ciprofloxacin (according to CLSI guidelines) under physiological conditions whereas the control strain lacking LLQR mutations did not. Moreover, the survival of some LLQR E. coli variants increased up to 100-fold after challenge with a high concentration of ciprofloxacin under UTI conditions compared to the results seen with Mueller-Hinton broth. These selective conditions could explain the high prevalence of LLQR mutations in E. coli Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that recommended methods for MIC determination produce poor estimations of CIP activity against LLQR E. coli in UTIs.

  20. Urinary Tract Physiological Conditions Promote Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Low-Level-Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel; Costas, Coloma; Aznar, Javier; Pascual, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates carrying chromosomally encoded low-level-quinolone-resistant (LLQR) determinants are frequently found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). LLQR mutations are considered the first step in the evolutionary pathway producing high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Therefore, their evolution and dissemination might influence the outcome of fluoroquinolone treatments of UTI. Previous studies support the notion that low urine pH decreases susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (CIP) in E. coli. However, the effect of the urinary tract physiological parameters on the activity of ciprofloxacin against LLQR E. coli strains has received little attention. We have studied the activity of ciprofloxacin under physiological urinary tract conditions against a set of well-characterized isogenic E. coli derivatives carrying the most prevalent chromosomal mutations (ΔmarR, gyrA-S83L, gyrA-D87N, and parC-S80R and some combinations). The results presented here demonstrate that all the LLQR strains studied became resistant to ciprofloxacin (according to CLSI guidelines) under physiological conditions whereas the control strain lacking LLQR mutations did not. Moreover, the survival of some LLQR E. coli variants increased up to 100-fold after challenge with a high concentration of ciprofloxacin under UTI conditions compared to the results seen with Mueller-Hinton broth. These selective conditions could explain the high prevalence of LLQR mutations in E. coli. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that recommended methods for MIC determination produce poor estimations of CIP activity against LLQR E. coli in UTIs. PMID:27139482

  1. Dietary Aloe vera supplementation on growth performance, some haemato-biochemical parameters and disease resistance against Streptococcus iniae in tilapia (GIFT).

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Ndakalimwe Naftal; Qiang, Jun; He, Jie; Ma, Xin Yu; Kpundeh, Mathew D; Xu, Pao

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated effects of dietary Aloe vera on growth performance, some haemato-biochemical parameters and disease resistance against Streptococcus iniae in tilapia (GIFT). Five groups were designed including a basal diet (control) and 100% A. vera powder incorporated in fish feed at 0.5% 1%, 2%, and 4%/kg feed, which were administered for 8 weeks. Fish fed 0.5%, 1%, and 2% A. vera supplemented diet significantly improved (p < 0.05) weight gain, absolute growth rate and specific growth rate. Feed intake significantly increased in fish fed with A. vera diet at 1% and 2%/kg feed. Feed efficiency ratio, feed conversion ratio, and hepatosomatic index were significantly enhanced in 4% A. vera supplemented fish over unsupplemented ones (p < 0.05). Several haemato-biochemical indices were examined before and after fish were challenged with S. iniae pathogen containing 7.7 × 10(6) CFU cells mL(-1). A. vera supplemented fish showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in red blood cells, hematocrits (Hb), hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, serum total protein, glucose and cortisol after challenge when compared to unsupplemented ones. Meanwhile, 4% A. vera supplemented fish showed a decrease (p < 0.05) in RBC, Hb, Ht, WBC, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) after challenge compared to unsupplemented ones and other supplemented ones. In addition, lower mean corpuscular volume values (MCV) (p < 0.05) were observed in fish fed with A. vera diet at 2% and 4% A. vera/kg feed than those fed unsupplemented diet. Unchallenged fish fed 0.5%, 1%, and 2% A. vera showed significantly higher values (p < 0.05) of mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) than those fed unsupplemented diet and 4% A. vera supplemented diet. There was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (N/L) within experimental groups after challenge; N/L ratio in A. vera unsupplemented fish and those supplemented with A. vera

  2. BACH1 Promotes Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma through Antagonizing the Function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Er; Jin, Xin; Wu, Weining; Yu, Tianfu; Zhou, Xu; Zhi, Tongle; Shi, Zhumei; Zhang, Junxia; Liu, Ning; You, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance is a persistent clinical problem limiting the successful treatment of glioblastoma (GBM). However, the molecular mechanisms by which initially chemoresponsive tumors develop therapeutic resistance remain poorly understood. In this study, we report that BACH1, a heme-binding protein that participates in transcriptional repression or activation, was significantly upregulated in glioblastoma tissues. Overexpression of BACH1 in GBM cells conferred resistance to temozolomide, whereas its inhibition markedly sensitized resistant cells to temozolomide in vitro and in vivo. Further investigation revealed that BACH1 activation significantly enhanced the expression of MGMT, and depletion of p53 disrupted the effects of BACH1 on MGMT and temozolomide resistance. P53 sequesters SP1 to prevent its binding to the MGMT promoter region and thus inhibits MGMT expression. Moreover, BACH1 overexpression impaired the association between p53 and SP1 via competitive binding p53, and antagonized the impact of p53 on MGMT expression. Finally, we found that BACH1 low expression correlated with better prognosis in GBM patients undergoing temozolomide therapy, especially in patients with wild-type TP53. Collectively, our findings identify a potential mechanism by which wild-type TP53 GBM cells develop resistance to temozolomide and suggest that targeting this pathway may be beneficial for overcoming resistance. PMID:28000777

  3. Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Maxence; Louit, Loic; Strokosch, Alasdair; Seitz, Laurent B

    2017-04-01

    Rivière, M, Louit, L, Strokosch, A, and Seitz, LB. Variable resistance training promotes greater strength and power adaptations than traditional resistance training in elite youth rugby league players. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 947-955, 2017-The purpose of this study was to examine the strength, velocity, and power adaptations in youth rugby league players in response to a variable resistance training (VRT) or traditional free-weight resistance training (TRAD) intervention. Sixteen elite youth players were assigned to a VRT or TRAD group and completed 2 weekly upper- and lower-body strength and power sessions for 6 weeks. Training programs were identical except that the VRT group trained the bench press exercise with 20% of the prescribed load coming from elastic bands. Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and bench press mean velocity and power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM were measured before and after the training intervention, and the magnitude of the changes was determined using effect sizes (ESs). The VRT group experienced larger increases in both absolute (ES = 0.46 vs. 0.20) and relative (ES = 0.41 vs. 0.19) bench press 1RM. Similar results were observed for mean velocity as well as both absolute and relative mean power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM. Furthermore, both groups experienced large gains in both velocity and power in the heavier loads but small improvements in the lighter loads. The improvements in both velocity and power against the heavier loads were larger for the VRT group, whereas smaller differences existed between the 2 groups in the lighter loads. Variable resistance training using elastic bands may offer a greater training stimulus than traditional free-weight resistance training to improve upper-body strength, velocity, and power in elite youth rugby league players.

  4. Sox2 Is an Androgen Receptor-Repressed Gene That Promotes Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kregel, Steven; Kiriluk, Kyle J.; Rosen, Alex M.; Cai, Yi; Reyes, Edwin E.; Otto, Kristen B.; Tom, Westin; Paner, Gladell P.; Szmulewitz, Russell Z.; Vander Griend, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR), has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5) expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways. PMID:23326489

  5. Nursing organizations call for phase-out of agricultural practices that promote antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Rebecca

    2006-02-01

    The use of antibiotics in agriculture is considered a contributing factor to the problem of antibiotic resistance. A majority of antibiotics and related drugs produced in the United States are not used to treat the infirm, but rather are used as feed additives for agricultural animals to promote growth and compensate for stressful and crowded growing conditions. Significant efforts must be made to decrease inappropriate overuse in animals and agriculture. Several leading health and political organizations have begun to address the issue. The American Nurses Association has established policies that call on Congress, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and meat producers to promptly phase out the agricultural practices that promote antibiotic resistance.

  6. Egr-1 promotes hypoxia-induced autophagy to enhance chemo-resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wan-Xin; Xiong, Er-Meng; Ge, Lu; Wan, Yan-Ya; Zhang, Chun-Li; Du, Feng-Yi; Xu, Min; Bhat, Reyaz Ahmed; Jin, Jie; Gong, Ai-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) plays an important role in hypoxia-induced drug-resistance. However, the mechanism still remains to be clarified. Herein, we investigated the role of Egr-1 in hypoxia-induced autophagy and its resulted hypoxia-driven chemo-resistance in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) cells. Our data demonstrated that Egr-1 was overexpressed in HCC tissues and cells and conferred them drug resistance under hypoxia. Mechanistically, Egr-1 transcriptionally regulated hypoxia-induced autophagy by binding to LC3 promoter in HCC cells, which resulted in resistance of HCC cells to chemotherapeutic agents; while dominant negative Egr-1 could inhibit autophagy level, and thus enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to chemotherapeutic agents, indicating that hypoxia-induced Egr-1 expression enhanced drug resistance of HCC cells likely through autophagy. Accordingly, it is suggested that a mechanism of hypoxia/Egr-1/autophagy axis might be involved in drug resistance in HCC.

  7. Effects of ingesting supplements designed to promote lean tissue accretion on body composition during resistance training.

    PubMed

    Kreider, R B; Klesges, R; Harmon, K; Grindstaff, P; Ramsey, L; Bullen, D; Wood, L; Li, Y; Almada, A

    1996-09-01

    This study examined the effects of ingesting nutritional supplements designed to promote lean tissue accretion on body composition alterations during resistance training. Twenty-eight resistance-trained males blindly supplemented their diets with maltodextrin (M), Gainers Fuel 1000 (GF), or Phosphagain (P). No significant differences were observed in absolute or relative total body water among groups. Energy intake and body weight significantly increased in all groups combined throughout the study with no group or interaction differences observed. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry-determined body mass significantly increased in each group throughout the study with significantly greater gains observed in the GF and P groups. Lean tissue mass (excluding bone) gain was significantly greater in the P group, while fat mass and percent body fat were significantly increased in the GF group. Results indicate that total body weight significantly increased in each group and that P supplementation resulted in significantly greater gains in lean tissue mass during resistance training.

  8. FAP positive fibroblasts induce immune checkpoint blockade resistance in colorectal cancer via promoting immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingling; Qiu, Xiangting; Wang, Xinhua; He, Jian

    2017-03-13

    Immune checkpoint blockades that significantly prolonged survival of melanoma patients have been less effective on colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Growing evidence suggested that fibroblast activation protein-alpha (FAP) on cancer associate fibroblasts (CAFs) has critical roles in regulating antitumor immune response by inducing tumor-promoting inflammation. In this study, we explored the roles of FAP in regulating the tumor immunity and immune checkpoint blockades resistance in CRC experimental systems. We found that CAFs with high FAP expression could induce immune checkpoint blockade resistance in CRC mouse model. Mechanistically, CAFs with high FAP expression promoted immunosuppression in the CRC tumor immune microenvironment by up-regulating CCL2 secretion, recruiting myeloid cells, and decreasing T-cell activity. In human CRC samples, FAP expression was proportional to myeloid cells number, but inversely related to T-cell number. High FAP expression also predicted poor survival of CRC patients. Taken together, our study suggested that high FAP expression in CAFs is one reason leading to immune checkpoint blockades resistance in CRC patients and FAP is an optional target for reversing immune checkpoint blockades resistance.

  9. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received.

  10. Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in south-east Brazil: genetic diversity, resistance profile and the first report of human and equine isolates belonging to the same multilocus sequence typing lineage.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ligia Guedes; Genteluci, Gabrielle Limeira; Corrêa de Mattos, Marcos; Glatthardt, Thaís; Sá Figueiredo, Agnes Marie; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) isolates are the most common group C streptococci in humans and reports of invasive infections associated with SDSE have been increasing. Molecular epidemiology studies are an important strategy to trace the emergence and spread of possible well-fit bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. In this work, we analysed the antimicrobial and clonal profiles of 115 SDSE infection and colonization isolates of human and equine origin. PFGE revealed the spread of two main clusters: clone A (57.4%) and clone A (26.1%). Remarkably, two isolates from clone B obtained from human colonization cases displayed identical PFGE patterns to those of three equine infection isolates. In addition, multilocus sequence typing allocated these isolates to ST129 (CC31). All of the SDSE isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin, levofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Tetracycline and erythromycin resistance rates were 65.2 and 13.9% respectively. Nevertheless, none of the isolates displaying sporadic PFGE patterns showed erythromycin resistance. The majority of erythromycin-resistant isolates from clone A had inducible resistance to macrolides, lincosamines and streptogramins B (iMLSB phenotype), which is associated with the presence of the ermA gene, whereas the resistant isolates from clone B showed the M phenotype, associated with the mefA gene. In conclusion, the data indicated that the analysed collection of SDSE isolates displayed a clonal structure and that the isolates found in human colonization cases could also be involved in equine infections.

  11. TAZ promotes temozolomide resistance by upregulating MCL-1 in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Aimin; Lu, Hong; Luo, Ran; Zhang, Mingzhi; Li, Zhaoming

    2015-08-07

    Temozolomide is a novel cytotoxic agent currently used as first-line chemotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, intrinsic or acquired chemoresistance to temozolomide remains the greatest obstacle to the successful treatment of human GBM. The principal mechanism responsible for this resistance is largely unknown. In the present study, we showed that expression of transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) in glioma cells correlated with temozolomide chemoresistance in human glioma cells. Overexpression of TAZ promoted temozolomide resistance in U-87MG cells, whereas knockdown of TAZ expression sensitized temozolomide-resistant U-251MG cells to temozolomide. Further, TAZ inhibits temozolomide induced apoptosis via upregulation of MCL-1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1) and high expression of TAZ predicts a poor prognosis for GBM patients. In conclusion, our results suggest that TAZ had a critical role in the resistance to temozolomide in glioma cells, and it may provide a promising target for improving the therapeutic outcome of temozolomide-resistant gliomas.

  12. Defective NOD2 peptidoglycan sensing promotes diet-induced inflammation, dysbiosis, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Denou, Emmanuel; Lolmède, Karine; Garidou, Lucile; Pomie, Celine; Chabo, Chantal; Lau, Trevor C; Fullerton, Morgan D; Nigro, Giulia; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Luche, Elodie; Garret, Céline; Serino, Matteo; Amar, Jacques; Courtney, Michael; Cavallari, Joseph F; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Barra, Nicole G; Foley, Kevin P; McPhee, Joseph B; Duggan, Brittany M; O'Neill, Hayley M; Lee, Amanda J; Sansonetti, Philippe; Ashkar, Ali A; Khan, Waliul I; Surette, Michael G; Bouloumié, Anne; Steinberg, Gregory R; Burcelin, Rémy; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-03-01

    Pattern recognition receptors link metabolite and bacteria-derived inflammation to insulin resistance during obesity. We demonstrate that NOD2 detection of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (PGN) regulates metabolic inflammation and insulin sensitivity. An obesity-promoting high-fat diet (HFD) increased NOD2 in hepatocytes and adipocytes, and NOD2(-/-) mice have increased adipose tissue and liver inflammation and exacerbated insulin resistance during a HFD. This effect is independent of altered adiposity or NOD2 in hematopoietic-derived immune cells. Instead, increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance in NOD2(-/-) mice is associated with increased commensal bacterial translocation from the gut into adipose tissue and liver. An intact PGN-NOD2 sensing system regulated gut mucosal bacterial colonization and a metabolic tissue dysbiosis that is a potential trigger for increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. Gut dysbiosis in HFD-fed NOD2(-/-) mice is an independent and transmissible factor that contributes to metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance when transferred to WT, germ-free mice. These findings warrant scrutiny of bacterial component detection, dysbiosis, and protective immune responses in the links between inflammatory gut and metabolic diseases, including diabetes.

  13. Defective NOD2 peptidoglycan sensing promotes diet-induced inflammation, dysbiosis, and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Denou, Emmanuel; Lolmède, Karine; Garidou, Lucile; Pomie, Celine; Chabo, Chantal; Lau, Trevor C; Fullerton, Morgan D; Nigro, Giulia; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Luche, Elodie; Garret, Céline; Serino, Matteo; Amar, Jacques; Courtney, Michael; Cavallari, Joseph F; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Barra, Nicole G; Foley, Kevin P; McPhee, Joseph B; Duggan, Brittany M; O'Neill, Hayley M; Lee, Amanda J; Sansonetti, Philippe; Ashkar, Ali A; Khan, Waliul I; Surette, Michael G; Bouloumié, Anne; Steinberg, Gregory R; Burcelin, Rémy; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors link metabolite and bacteria-derived inflammation to insulin resistance during obesity. We demonstrate that NOD2 detection of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (PGN) regulates metabolic inflammation and insulin sensitivity. An obesity-promoting high-fat diet (HFD) increased NOD2 in hepatocytes and adipocytes, and NOD2−/− mice have increased adipose tissue and liver inflammation and exacerbated insulin resistance during a HFD. This effect is independent of altered adiposity or NOD2 in hematopoietic-derived immune cells. Instead, increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance in NOD2−/− mice is associated with increased commensal bacterial translocation from the gut into adipose tissue and liver. An intact PGN-NOD2 sensing system regulated gut mucosal bacterial colonization and a metabolic tissue dysbiosis that is a potential trigger for increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. Gut dysbiosis in HFD-fed NOD2−/− mice is an independent and transmissible factor that contributes to metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance when transferred to WT, germ-free mice. These findings warrant scrutiny of bacterial component detection, dysbiosis, and protective immune responses in the links between inflammatory gut and metabolic diseases, including diabetes. PMID:25666722

  14. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20420.001 PMID:28220755

  15. Autophagic flux promotes cisplatin resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells through ATP-mediated lysosomal function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liwei; Xu, Ye; Su, Jing; Yu, Huimei; Kang, Jinsong; Li, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoning; Xie, Qi; Yu, Chunyan; Sun, Liankun; Li, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Lysosomes are involved in promoting resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying lysosomal influence of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer remain incompletely understood. We report that, compared with cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells, autophagy increases in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells treated with cisplatin. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in SKOV3/DDP cells, but autophagy inhibition at a later stage by disturbing autophagosome-lysosome fusion is more effective. Notably, SKOV3/DDP cells contained more lysosomes than cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells. Abundant lysosomes and lysosomal cathepsin D activity were required for continued autolysosomal degradation and maintenance of autophagic flux in SKOV3/DDP cells. Furthermore, SKOV3/DDP cells contain abundant lysosomal ATP required for lysosomal function, and inhibition of lysosomal ATP accumulation impaired lysosomal function and blocked autophagic flux. Therefore, our findings suggest that lysosomes at least partially contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells through their role in cisplatin-induced autophagic processes, and provide insight into the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in tumors.

  16. RING domain–deficient BRCA1 promotes PARP inhibitor and platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Krais, John J.; Bernhardy, Andrea J.; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Cai, Kathy Q.; Harrell, Maria I.; Kim, Hyoung H.; George, Erin; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Simpkins, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancers that harbor breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) mutations initially respond well to platinum and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (PARPi) therapy; however, resistance invariably arises in these patients and is a major clinical problem. The BRCA1185delAG allele is a common inherited mutation located close to the protein translation start site that is thought to produce a shortened, nonfunctional peptide. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms that lead to PARPi and platinum resistance in the SUM1315MO2 breast cancer cell line, which harbors a hemizygous BRCA1185delAG mutation. SUM1315MO2 cells were initially sensitive to PARPi and cisplatin but readily acquired resistance. PARPi- and cisplatin-resistant clones did not harbor secondary reversion mutations; rather, PARPi and platinum resistance required increased expression of a really interesting gene (RING) domain–deficient BRCA1 protein (Rdd-BRCA1). Initiation of translation occurred downstream of the frameshift mutation, probably at the BRCA1-Met-297 codon. In contrast to full-length BRCA1, Rdd-BRCA1 did not require BRCA1-associated RING domain 1 (BARD1) interaction for stability. Functionally, Rdd-BRCA1 formed irradiation-induced foci and supported RAD51 foci formation. Ectopic overexpression of Rdd-BRCA1 promoted partial PARPi and cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, Rdd-BRCA1 protein expression was detected in recurrent carcinomas from patients who carried germline BRCA1185delAG mutations. Taken together, these results indicate that RING-deficient BRCA1 proteins are hypomorphic and capable of contributing to PARPi and platinum resistance when expressed at high levels. PMID:27454289

  17. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B promotes tamoxifen resistance in ER-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Law, Emily K.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; LaPara, Kelly; Leonard, Brandon; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Molan, Amy M.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Span, Paul N.; Foekens, John A.; Martens, John W. M.; Yee, Douglas; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Breast tumors often display extreme genetic heterogeneity characterized by hundreds of gross chromosomal aberrations and tens of thousands of somatic mutations. Tumor evolution is thought to be ongoing and driven by multiple mutagenic processes. A major outstanding question is whether primary tumors have preexisting mutations for therapy resistance or whether additional DNA damage and mutagenesis are necessary. Drug resistance is a key measure of tumor evolvability. If a resistance mutation preexists at the time of primary tumor presentation, then the intended therapy is likely to fail. However, if resistance does not preexist, then ongoing mutational processes still have the potential to undermine therapeutic efficacy. The antiviral enzyme APOBEC3B (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3B) preferentially deaminates DNA C-to-U, which results in signature C-to-T and C-to-G mutations commonly observed in breast tumors. We use clinical data and xenograft experiments to ask whether APOBEC3B contributes to ongoing breast tumor evolution and resistance to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. First, APOBEC3B levels in primary estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast tumors inversely correlate with the clinical benefit of tamoxifen in the treatment of metastatic ER+ disease. Second, APOBEC3B depletion in an ER+ breast cancer cell line results in prolonged tamoxifen responses in murine xenograft experiments. Third, APOBEC3B overexpression accelerates the development of tamoxifen resistance in murine xenograft experiments by a mechanism that requires the enzyme’s catalytic activity. These studies combine to indicate that APOBEC3B promotes drug resistance in breast cancer and that inhibiting APOBEC3B-dependent tumor evolvability may be an effective strategy to improve efficacies of targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27730215

  18. AEG-1 promotes anoikis resistance and orientation chemotaxis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Deng, Huan; Yan, Wei; Luo, Min; Tu, Wei; Xia, Yujia; He, Jiayi; Han, Ping; Fu, Yu; Tian, De'an

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis contributes to the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Anoikis resistance and orientation chemotaxis are two important and sequential events in tumor cell metastasis. The process of tumor metastasis is known to be regulated by AEG-1, an important oncogene that plays a critical role in tumor metastasis, though the effects of this oncogene on anoikis resistance and orientation chemotaxis in HCC cells are currently unknown. To directly assess the role of AEG-1 in these processes, we up-regulated AEG-1 expression via exogenous transfection in SMMC-7721 cells, which express low endogenous levels of AEG-1; and down-regulated AEG-1 expression via siRNA-mediated knockdown in MHCC-97H and HCC-LM3 cells, which express high endogenous levels of AEG-1. Our data directly demonstrate that AEG-1 promotes cell growth as assessed by cell proliferation/viability and cell cycle analysis. Furthermore, the prevention of anoikis by AEG-1 correlates with decreased activation of caspase-3. AEG-1-dependent anoikis resistance is activated via the PI3K/Akt pathway and is characterized by the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bad. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 reverses the AEG-1 dependent effects on Akt phosphorylation, Bcl-2 expression and anoikis resistance. AEG-1 also promotes orientation chemotaxis of suspension-cultured cells towards supernatant from Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HPMECs). Our results show that AEG-1 activates the expression of the metastasis-associated chemokine receptor CXCR4, and that its ligand, CXCL12, is secreted by HPMECs. Furthermore, the CXCR4 antoagonist AMD3100 decreases AEG-1-induced orientation chemotaxis. These results define a pathway by which AEG-1 regulates anoikis resistance and orientation chemotaxis during HCC cell metastasis.

  19. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  20. Nickel detoxification and plant growth promotion by multi metal resistant plant growth promoting Rhizobium species RL9.

    PubMed

    Wani, Parvaze Ahmad; Khan, Mohammad Saghir

    2013-07-01

    Pollution of the biosphere by heavy metals is a global threat that has accelerated dramatically since the beginning of industrial revolution. The aim of the study is to check the resistance of RL9 towards the metals and to observe the effect of Rhizobium species on growth, pigment content, protein and nickel uptake by lentil in the presence and absence of nickel. The multi metal tolerant and plant growth promoting Rhizobium strain RL9 was isolated from the nodules of lentil. The strain not only tolerated nickel but was also tolerant o cadmium, chromium, nickel, lead, zinc and copper. The strain tolerated nickel 500 μg/mL, cadmium 300 μg/mL, chromium 400 μg/mL, lead 1,400 μg/mL, zinc 1,000 μg/mL and copper 300 μg/mL, produced good amount of indole acetic acid and was also positive for siderophore, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia. The strain RL9 was further assessed with increasing concentrations of nickel when lentil was used as a test crop. The strain RL9 significantly increased growth, nodulation, chlorophyll, leghaemoglobin, nitrogen content, seed protein and seed yield compared to plants grown in the absence of bioinoculant but amended with nickel The strain RL9 decreased uptake of nickel in lentil compared to plants grown in the absence of bio-inoculant. Due to these intrinsic abilities strain RL9 could be utilized for growth promotion as well as for the remediation of nickel in nickel contaminated soil.

  1. Promoter strength of folic acid synthesis genes affects sulfa drug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Iliades, Peter; Berglez, Janette; Meshnick, Steven; Macreadie, Ian

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) is an important target for sulfa drugs in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. However, the understanding of DHPS function and the action of antifolates in eukaryotes has been limited due to technical difficulties and the complexity of DHPS being a part of a bifunctional or trifunctional protein that comprises the upstream enzymes involved in folic acid synthesis (FAS). Here, yeast strains have been constructed to study the effects of FOL1 expression on growth and sulfa drug resistance. A DHPS knockout yeast strain was complemented by yeast vectors expressing the FOL1 gene under the control of promoters of different strengths. An inverse relationship was observed between the growth rate of the strains and FOL1 expression levels. The use of stronger promoters to drive FOL1 expression led to increased sulfamethoxazole resistance when para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) levels were elevated. However, high FOL1 expression levels resulted in increased susceptibility to sulfamethoxazole in pABA free media. These data suggest that up-regulation of FOL1 expression can lead to sulfa drug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Epithelial IL-22RA1-mediated fucosylation promotes intestinal colonization resistance to an opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tu Anh N; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Arasteh, Julia M; Stares, Mark D; Browne, Hilary P; Keane, Jacqueline A; Page, Andrew J; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda; Harcourt, Katherine; Hale, Christine; Arends, Mark J; Gaffney, Daniel J; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D

    2014-10-08

    Our intestinal microbiota harbors a diverse microbial community, often containing opportunistic bacteria with virulence potential. However, mutualistic host-microbial interactions prevent disease by opportunistic pathogens through poorly understood mechanisms. We show that the epithelial interleukin-22 receptor IL-22RA1 protects against lethal Citrobacter rodentium infection and chemical-induced colitis by promoting colonization resistance against an intestinal opportunistic bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis. Susceptibility of Il22ra1(-/-) mice to C. rodentium was associated with preferential expansion and epithelial translocation of pathogenic E. faecalis during severe microbial dysbiosis and was ameloriated with antibiotics active against E. faecalis. RNA sequencing analyses of primary colonic organoids showed that IL-22RA1 signaling promotes intestinal fucosylation via induction of the fucosyltransferase Fut2. Additionally, administration of fucosylated oligosaccharides to C. rodentium-challenged Il22ra1(-/-) mice attenuated infection and promoted E. faecalis colonization resistance by restoring the diversity of anaerobic commensal symbionts. These results support a model whereby IL-22RA1 enhances host-microbiota mutualism to limit detrimental overcolonization by opportunistic pathogens.

  3. Epithelial IL-22RA1-Mediated Fucosylation Promotes Intestinal Colonization Resistance to an Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tu Anh N.; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Arasteh, Julia M.; Stares, Mark D.; Browne, Hilary P.; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Page, Andrew J.; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda; Harcourt, Katherine; Hale, Christine; Arends, Mark J.; Gaffney, Daniel J.; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our intestinal microbiota harbors a diverse microbial community, often containing opportunistic bacteria with virulence potential. However, mutualistic host-microbial interactions prevent disease by opportunistic pathogens through poorly understood mechanisms. We show that the epithelial interleukin-22 receptor IL-22RA1 protects against lethal Citrobacter rodentium infection and chemical-induced colitis by promoting colonization resistance against an intestinal opportunistic bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis. Susceptibility of Il22ra1−/− mice to C. rodentium was associated with preferential expansion and epithelial translocation of pathogenic E. faecalis during severe microbial dysbiosis and was ameloriated with antibiotics active against E. faecalis. RNA sequencing analyses of primary colonic organoids showed that IL-22RA1 signaling promotes intestinal fucosylation via induction of the fucosyltransferase Fut2. Additionally, administration of fucosylated oligosaccharides to C. rodentium-challenged Il22ra1−/− mice attenuated infection and promoted E. faecalis colonization resistance by restoring the diversity of anaerobic commensal symbionts. These results support a model whereby IL-22RA1 enhances host-microbiota mutualism to limit detrimental overcolonization by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:25263220

  4. Human common salivary protein 1 (CSP-1) promotes binding of Streptococcus mutans to experimental salivary pellicle and glucans formed on hydroxyapatite surface.

    PubMed

    Ambatipudi, Kiran S; Hagen, Fred K; Delahunty, Claire M; Han, Xuemei; Shafi, Rubina; Hryhorenko, Jennifer; Gregoire, Stacy; Marquis, Robert E; Melvin, James E; Koo, Hyun; Yates, John R

    2010-12-03

    The saliva proteome includes host defense factors and specific bacterial-binding proteins that modulate microbial growth and colonization of the tooth surface in the oral cavity. A multidimensional mass spectrometry approach identified the major host-derived salivary proteins that interacted with Streptococcus mutans (strain UA159), the primary microorganism associated with the pathogenesis of dental caries. Two abundant host proteins were found to tightly bind to S. mutans cells, common salivary protein-1 (CSP-1) and deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 (DMBT1, also known as salivary agglutinin or gp340). In contrast to gp340, limited functional information is available on CSP-1. The sequence of CSP-1 shares 38.1% similarity with rat CSP-1. Recombinant CSP-1 (rCSP-1) protein did not cause aggregation of S. mutans cells and was devoid of any significant biocidal activity (2.5 to 10 μg/mL). However, S. mutans cells exposed to rCSP-1 (10 μg/mL) in saliva displayed enhanced adherence to experimental salivary pellicle and to glucans in the pellicle formed on hydroxyapatite surfaces. Thus, our data demonstrate that the host salivary protein CSP-1 binds to S. mutans cells and may influence the initial colonization of this pathogenic bacterium onto the tooth surface.

  5. Mutan: A mixed linkage α-[(1,3)- and (1,6)]-d-glucan from Streptococcus mutans, that induces osteoclast differentiation and promotes alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung Min; Han, Kook-Il; Jung, Eui-Gil; Kim, Yong Hyun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Yoon, Mi Sook; Chung, Sung Kyun; Kim, Wan Jong; Han, Man-Deuk

    2016-02-10

    Mutan is an extracellular polysaccharide of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) that consists of α-(1,3)-linked glucose residues in main chains and α-(1,6) bonds in side chains. In the present study, mutan was isolated from S. mutans, and its structural characteristics were determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The effects of mutan on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells were examined. Furthermore, microCT and morphometric analyses were used to determine the contribution of mutan to alveolar bone loss in the maxilla of a rat periodontitis model. Mutan increased (more than 2-fold) RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Mutan also enhanced the alveolar bone loss in the rat maxilla 2.3-fold. In mutan-treated rats, the bone mineral density, bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness decreased, whereas trabecular separation significantly increased. In addition, mutan and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced similar microarray profiles in RAW 264.7 cells. A total of 43 genes related to osteoclastogenesis were differentially expressed after either mutan or LPS treatment. Five-fold increases in the expression of several genes, including IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-6, and chemokine ligands, were observed in mutan-treated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest a molecular mechanism for the inflammation induced by S. mutans during the establishment of periodontal disease.

  6. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries. PMID:27242713

  7. The roles of epithelial cell contact, respiratory bacterial interactions and phosphorylcholine in promoting biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay; Kyd, Jennelle

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) often share a common niche within the nasopharynx, both associated with infections such as bronchitis and otitis media. This study investigated how the association between NTHi and S. pneumoniae and the host affects their propensity to form biofilms. We investigated a selection of bacterial strain and serotype combinations on biofilm formation, and the effect of contact with respiratory epithelial cells. Measurement of biofilm showed that co-infection with NTHi and S. pneumoniae increased biofilm formation following contact with epithelial cells compared to no contact demonstrating the role of epithelial cells in biofilm formation. Additionally, the influence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) on biofilm production was investigated using the licD mutant strain of NTHi 2019 and found that ChoP had a role in mixed biofilm formation but was not the only requirement. The study highlights the complex interactions between microbes and the host epithelium during biofilm production, suggesting the importance of understanding why certain strains and serotypes differentially influence biofilm formation. A key contributor to increased biofilm formation was the upregulation of biofilm formation by epithelial cell factors.

  8. The plant growth-promoting fungus Aspergillus ustus promotes growth and induces resistance against different lifestyle pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Salas-Marina, Miguel Angel; Silva-Flores, Miguel Angel; Cervantes-Badillo, Mayte Guadalupe; Rosales-Saavedra, Maria Teresa; Islas-Osuna, Maria Auxiliadora; Casas-Flores, Sergio

    2011-07-01

    To deal with pathogens, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms including constitutive and induced defense mechanisms. Phytohormones play important roles in plant growth and development, as well as in the systemic response induced by beneficial and pathogen microorganisms. In this work, we identified an Aspergillus ustus isolate that promotes growth and induces developmental changes in Solanum tuberosum and Arabidopsis thaliana. A. ustus inoculation on A. thaliana and S. tuberosum roots induced an increase in shoot and root growth, and lateral root and root hair numbers. Assays performed on Arabidopsis lines to measure reporter gene expression of auxin-induced/ repressed or cell cycle controlled genes (DR5 and CycB1, respectively) showed enhanced GUS activity, when compared with mock-inoculated seedlings. To determine the contribution of phytohormone signaling pathways in the effect elicited by A. ustus, we evaluated the response of a collection of hormone mutants of Arabidopsis defective in auxin, ethylene, cytokinin, or abscisic acid signaling to the inoculation with this fungus. All mutant lines inoculated with A. ustus showed increased biomass production, suggesting that these genes are not required to respond to this fungus. Moreover, we demonstrated that A. ustus synthesizes auxins and gibberellins in liquid cultures. In addition, A. ustus induced systemic resistance against the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and the hemibiotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, probably through the induction of the expression of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid/ethylene, and camalexin defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

  9. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  10. Terazosin activates Pgk1 and Hsp90 to promote stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinping; Zhao, Chunyue; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Tao; Li, Yizhou; Cao, Cheng; Ding, Yuehe; Dong, Mengqiu; Finci, Lorenzo; Wang, Jia-Huai; Li, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Drugs that can protect against organ damage are urgently needed, especially for diseases such as sepsis and brain stroke. We discovered that terazosin (TZ), a widely marketed α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, alleviated organ damage and improved survival in rodent models of stroke and sepsis. Through combined studies of enzymology and X-ray crystallography, we discovered that TZ binds a new target, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (Pgk1), and activates its enzymatic activity, probably through 2,4-diamino-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinoline's ability to promote ATP release from Pgk1. Mechanistically, the ATP generated from Pgk1 may enhance the chaperone activity of Hsp90, an ATPase known to associate with Pgk1. Upon activation, Hsp90 promotes multistress resistance. Our studies demonstrate that TZ has a new protein target, Pgk1, and reveal its corresponding biological effect. As a clinical drug, TZ may be quickly translated into treatments for diseases including stroke and sepsis.

  11. The Hippo effector YAP promotes resistance to RAF- and MEK-targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Luping; Sabnis, Amit J; Chan, Elton; Olivas, Victor; Cade, Lindsay; Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Asthana, Saurabh; Neel, Dana; Yan, Jenny Jiacheng; Lu, Xinyuan; Pham, Luu; Wang, Mingxue M; Karachaliou, Niki; Cao, Maria Gonzalez; Manzano, Jose Luis; Ramirez, Jose Luis; Torres, Jose Miguel Sanchez; Buttitta, Fiamma; Rudin, Charles M; Collisson, Eric A; Algazi, Alain; Robinson, Eric; Osman, Iman; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Cortes, Javier; Frederick, Dennie T; Cooper, Zachary A; McMahon, Martin; Marchetti, Antonio; Rosell, Rafael; Flaherty, Keith T; Wargo, Jennifer A; Bivona, Trever G

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to RAF- and MEK-targeted therapy is a major clinical challenge1–4. RAF and MEK inhibitors are initially but only transiently effective in some but not all patients with BRAF gene mutation and are largely ineffective in those with RAS gene mutation because of resistance5–14. Through a genetic screen in BRAF-mutant tumor cells, we show that the Hippo pathway effector YAP (encoded by YAP1) acts as a parallel survival input to promote resistance to RAF and MEK inhibitor therapy. Combined YAP and RAF or MEK inhibition was synthetically lethal not only in several BRAF-mutant tumor types but also in RAS-mutant tumors. Increased YAP in tumors harboring BRAF V600E was a biomarker of worse initial response to RAF and MEK inhibition in patients, establishing the clinical relevance of our findings. Our data identify YAP as a new mechanism of resistance to RAF- and MEK-targeted therapy. The findings unveil the synthetic lethality of combined suppression of YAP and RAF or MEK as a promising strategy to enhance treatment response and patient survival. PMID:25665005

  12. Epigenetic silencing of Bim transcription by Spi-1/PU.1 promotes apoptosis resistance in leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ridinger-Saison, M; Evanno, E; Gallais, I; Rimmelé, P; Selimoglu-Buet, D; Sapharikas, E; Moreau-Gachelin, F; Guillouf, C

    2013-09-01

    Deregulation of transcriptional networks contributes to haematopoietic malignancies. The transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 is a master regulator of haematopoiesis and its alteration leads to leukaemia. Spi-1 overexpression inhibits differentiation and promotes resistance to apoptosis in erythroleukaemia. Here, we show that Spi-1 inhibits mitochondrial apoptosis in vitro and in vivo through the transcriptional repression of Bim, a proapoptotic factor. BIM interacts with MCL-1 that behaves as a major player in the survival of the preleukaemic cells. The repression of BIM expression reduces the amount of BIM-MCL-1 complexes, thus increasing the fraction of potentially active antiapoptotic MCL-1. We then demonstrate that Spi-1 represses Bim transcription by binding to the Bim promoter and by promoting the trimethylation of histone 3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me3, a repressive histone mark) on the Bim promoter. The PRC2 repressive complex of Polycomb is directly responsible for the deposit of H3K27me3 mark at the Bim promoter. SUZ12 and the histone methyltransferase EZH2, two PRC2 subunits bind to the Bim promoter at the same location than H3K27me3, distinct of the Spi-1 DNA binding site. As Spi-1 interacts with SUZ12 and EZH2, these results indicate that Spi-1 modulates the activity of PRC2 without directly recruiting the complex to the site of its activity on the chromatin. Our results identify a new mechanism whereby Spi-1 represses transcription and provide mechanistic insights on the antiapoptotic function of a transcription factor mediated by the epigenetic control of gene expression.

  13. Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from food animals to antimicrobial growth promoters and related therapeutic agents in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Bager, F; Jensen, N E; Madsen, M; Meyling, A; Wegener, H C

    1998-06-01

    This study was conducted to describe the occurrence of acquired resistance to antimicrobials used for growth promotion among bacteria isolated from swine, cattle and poultry in Denmark. Resistance to structurally related therapeutic agents was also examined. Three categories of bacteria were tested: 1) indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium), 2) zoonotic bacteria (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Yersinia enterocolitica), and 3) animal pathogens (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Staphylococcus hyicus, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae). All antimicrobials used as growth promoters in Denmark and some structurally related therapeutic agents (in brackets) were included: Avilamycin, avoparcin (vancomycin), bacitracin, carbadox, flavomycin, monensin, olaquindox, salinomycin, spiramycin (erythromycin, lincomycin), tylosin (erythromycin, lincomycin), and virginiamycin (pristinamycin). Bacterial species intrinsically resistant to an antimicrobial were not tested towards that antimicrobial. Breakpoints for growth promoters were established by population distribution of the bacteria tested. A total of 2,372 bacterial isolates collected during October 1995 to September 1996 were included in the study. Acquired resistance to all currently used growth promoting antimicrobials was found. A frequent occurrence of resistance were observed to avilamycin, avoparcin, bacitracin, flavomycin, spiramycin, tylosin and virginiamycin, whereas resistance to carbadox, monensin, olaquindox and salinomycin was less frequent. The occurrence of resistance varied by animal origin and bacterial species. The highest levels of resistance was observed among enterococci, whereas less resistance was observed among zoonotic bacteria and bacteria pathogenic to animals. The association between the occurrence of resistance and the consumption of the antimicrobial is discussed. The results show the present level of resistance to

  14. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabretta, Sara; Bielli, Pamela; Passacantilli, Ilaria; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Fendrich, Volker; Capurso, Gabriele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favour the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, up-regulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to up-regulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM alternative splicing in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  15. RAS signaling promotes resistance to JAK inhibitors by suppressing BAD-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Peter S; Sarosiek, Kristopher A; Lin, Kevin H; Meggendorfer, Manja; Schnittger, Susanne; Letai, Anthony; Wood, Kris C

    2014-12-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) frequently have an activating mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Thus, targeting the pathway mediated by JAK and its downstream substrate, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), may yield clinical benefit for patients with MPNs containing the JAK2(V617F) mutation. Although JAK inhibitor therapy reduces splenomegaly and improves systemic symptoms in patients, this treatment does not appreciably reduce the number of neoplastic cells. To identify potential mechanisms underlying this inherent resistance phenomenon, we performed pathway-centric, gain-of-function screens in JAK2(V617F) hematopoietic cells and found that the activation of the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RAS or its effector pathways [mediated by the kinases AKT and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase)] renders cells insensitive to JAK inhibition. Resistant MPN cells became sensitized to JAK inhibitors when also exposed to inhibitors of the AKT or ERK pathways. Mechanistically, in JAK2(V617F) cells, a JAK2-mediated inactivating phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein BAD [B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2)-associated death promoter] promoted cell survival. In sensitive cells, exposure to a JAK inhibitor resulted in dephosphorylation of BAD, enabling BAD to bind and sequester the prosurvival protein BCL-XL (BCL-2-like 1), thereby triggering apoptosis. In resistant cells, RAS effector pathways maintained BAD phosphorylation in the presence of JAK inhibitors, yielding a specific dependence on BCL-XL for survival. In patients with MPNs, activating mutations in RAS co-occur with the JAK2(V617F) mutation in the malignant cells, suggesting that RAS effector pathways likely play an important role in clinically observed resistance.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of conjugative prophage Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) carrying the mef(A)/msr(D) genes for efflux resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, Francesco; Santagati, Maria; Santoro, Francesco; Oggioni, Marco R; Stefani, Stefania; Pozzi, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Genetic element Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) is a prophage of Streptococcus pyogenes which carries the macrolide efflux resistance genes mef(A)/msr(D) and is capable of conjugal transfer among streptococci. Complete nucleotide sequence showed that Φ1207.3 is 52,491 bp in length and contained 58 open reading frames (ORFs). A manual homology-based annotation with functional prediction of the hypothetical gene product was possible only for 34 out of 58 ORFs. Φ1207.3 codes for two different C-methylation systems, several phage structural genes, a lysis cassette (composed by a holin and a peptidoglycan hydrolase), and three site-specific resolvases of the serine recombinase family.

  17. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  18. Lin28 Induces Resistance to Anti-Androgens Via Promotion of AR Splice Variant Generation

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Ramakumar; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou, Wei; Evans, Christopher P.; Gao, Allen C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen-dependent initially and progresses to a castration-resistant state after androgen deprivation therapy. Treatment options for castration-resistant PCa include the potent second-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide or CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone. Recent clinical observations point to the development of resistance to these therapies which may be mediated by constitutively active alternative splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR). METHODS Sensitivity of LNCaP cells overexpressing Lin28 (LN-Lin28) to enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was compared to that of control LN-neo cells using cell growth assays, proliferation assays using MTT, anchorage-dependent clonogenic ability assays and soft agar assays. Ability of LN-Lin28 cells to maintain AR activation after treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was tested using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, ChIP assays, and qRT-PCR. Importance of Lin28 in enzalutamide resistance was assessed by the downregulation of Lin28 expression in C4-2B and 22Rv1 cells chronically treated with enzalutamide. Requirement for sustained AR signaling in LN-Lin28 cells was examined by the downregulation of either full length AR or AR-V7 using siRNA. RESULTS We show that Lin28 promotes the development of resistance to currently used targeted therapeutics by enhancing the expression of AR splice variants such as AR-V7. PCa cells overexpressing Lin28 exhibit resistance to treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide. Downregulation of Lin28 resensitizes enzalutamide-resistant PCa cells to enzalutamide treatment. We also show that the upregulation of splicing factors such as hnRNPA1 by Lin28 may mediate the enhanced generation of AR splice variants in Lin28-expressing cells. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that Lin28 plays a key role in the acquisition of resistance to AR-targeted therapies by PCa cells and establish the importance of Lin28 in PCa

  19. Mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells promotes breast cancer tumor growth and confers autophagy resistance.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed F; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-11-15

    Here, we set out to test the novel hypothesis that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells would "fuel" enhanced tumor growth. For this purpose, we generated MDA-MB-231 cells (a triple-negative human breast cancer cell line) overexpressing PGC-1α and MitoNEET, which are established molecules that drive mitochondrial biogenesis and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Interestingly, both PGC-1α and MitoNEET increased the abundance of OXPHOS protein complexes, conferred autophagy resistance under conditions of starvation and increased tumor growth by up to ~3-fold. However, this increase in tumor growth was independent of neo-angiogenesis, as assessed by immunostaining and quantitation of vessel density using CD31 antibodies. Quantitatively similar increases in tumor growth were also observed by overexpression of PGC-1β and POLRMT in MDA-MB-231 cells, which are also responsible for mediating increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, we propose that increased mitochondrial "power" in epithelial cancer cells oncogenically promotes tumor growth by conferring autophagy resistance. As such, PGC-1α, PGC-1β, mitoNEET and POLRMT should all be considered as tumor promoters or "metabolic oncogenes." Our results are consistent with numerous previous clinical studies showing that metformin (a weak mitochondrial "poison") prevents the onset of nearly all types of human cancers in diabetic patients. Therefore, metformin (a complex I inhibitor) and other mitochondrial inhibitors should be developed as novel anticancer therapies, targeting mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells.

  20. Rhamnolipids production by multi-metal-resistant and plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-07-01

    The biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa A11, with plant-growth-promoting (PGP) and multi-metal-resistant (MMR) features was isolated from the rhizosphere of a wild plant Parthenium hysterophorus. The strain A11 was able to utilize glycerol as a carbon source and produce 4,436.9 mg/L of biosurfactant after 120 h of incubation. The biosurfactants was characterized as rhamnolipids (RLs) by thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Eight different RLs congeners were detected with RhaRhaC₁₀C₁₀ being most abundant. The purified rhamnolipid, dirhamnolipid, and monorhamnolipid reduced the surface tension of water to 29, 36, and 42 mN/m with critical micelle concentration of 83, 125, and 150 mg/L, respectively. The strain A11 demonstrated resistance against all the metals detected in rhizosphere except Hg and Ni. The strain A11 also possessed plant-growth-promoting features like siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, catalase, ammonia production, and phosphate solubilization. The dirhamnolipids formed crystals upon incubation at 4 °C, thus making separation of dirhamnolipids easy. Biosurfactant-producing ability along with MMR and PGP traits of the strain A11 makes it a potential candidate for application in the bacterial assisted enhancement of phytoremediation of heavy-metal-contaminated sites.

  1. Activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple pathways in promoting castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Riedinger, Mireille; Lin, Shu; Faltermeier, Claire M.; Smith, Bryan A.; Zhang, Kelvin X.; Going, Catherine C.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lee, John K.; Drake, Justin M.; Rice, Meghan A.; Hsu, En-Chi; Nowroozizadeh, Behdokht; Castor, Brandon; Orellana, Sandra Y.; Blum, Steven M.; Cheng, Donghui; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the primary cause of prostate cancer-specific mortality. Defining new mechanisms that can predict recurrence and drive lethal CRPC is critical. Here, we demonstrate that localized high-risk prostate cancer and metastatic CRPC, but not benign prostate tissues or low/intermediate-risk prostate cancer, express high levels of nuclear Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Notch1) receptor intracellular domain. Chronic activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple oncogenic pathways altered in early disease to promote the development of prostate adenocarcinoma. These tumors display features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a cellular state associated with increased tumor aggressiveness. Consistent with its activation in clinical CRPC, tumors driven by Notch1 intracellular domain in combination with multiple pathways altered in prostate cancer are metastatic and resistant to androgen deprivation. Our study provides functional evidence that the Notch1 signaling axis synergizes with alternative pathways in promoting metastatic CRPC and may represent a new therapeutic target for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27694579

  2. Are drought-resistance promoting bacteria cross-compatible with different plant models?

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Vigani, Gianpiero; Borin, Sara; Sorlini, Claudia; Ouzari, Hadda; Zocchi, Graziano; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The association between plant and plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) contributes to the successful thriving of plants in extreme environments featured by water shortage. We have recently shown that, with respect to the non-cultivated desert soil, the rhizosphere of pepper plants cultivated under desert farming hosts PGPB communities that are endowed with a large portfolio of PGP traits. Pepper plants exposed to bacterial isolates from plants cultivated under desert farming exhibited a higher tolerance to water shortage, compared with untreated control. This promotion was mediated by a larger root system (up to 40%), stimulated by the bacteria, that enhanced plant ability to uptake water from dry soil. We provide initial evidence that the nature of the interaction can have a limited level of specificity and that PGPB isolates may determine resistance to water stress in plants others than the one of the original isolation. It is apparent that, in relation to plant resistance to water stress, a feature of primary evolutionary importance for all plants, a cross-compatibility between PGPB and different plant models exists at least on a short-term. PMID:24270625

  3. Rad6 upregulation promotes stem cell-like characteristics and platinum resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Somasagara, Ranganatha R.; Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Spencer, Sebastian M.; Clark, David W.; Barnett, Reagan; Bachaboina, Lavanya; Scalici, Jennifer; Rocconi, Rodney P.; Piazza, Gary A.; Palle, Komaraiah

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most deadly cancer in women in the United States and despite advances in surgical and chemotherapeutic treatments survival rates have not significantly improved in decades. The poor prognosis for ovarian cancer patients is largely due to the extremely high (80%) recurrence rate of ovarian cancer and because the recurrent tumors are often resistant to the widely utilized platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, expression of Rad6, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, was found to strongly correlate with ovarian cancer progression. Furthermore, in ovarian cancer cells Rad6 was found to stabilize β-catenin promoting stem cell-related characteristics, including expression of stem cell markers and anchorage-independent growth. Cancer stem cells can promote chemoresistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis, all of which are limiting factors in treating ovarian cancer. Thus it is significant that Rad6 overexpression led to increased resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin and correlated with tumor cell invasion. These findings show the importance of Rad6 in ovarian cancer and emphasize the need for further studies of Rad6 as a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:26679603

  4. Macrolides and β-lactam antibiotics enhance C3b deposition on the surface of multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains by a LytA autolysin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Rodríguez-Sosa, Cinthya; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Giménez, María-José; Olmedillas, Eduardo; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Yuste, Jose

    2012-11-01

    The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains displaying high levels of multidrug resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for the outcome of the infection. Modifications of the bacterial envelope by antibiotics may assist the recognition and clearance of the pathogen by the host immune system. Recognition of S. pneumoniae resistant strains by the complement component C3b was increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and subinhibitory concentrations of different macrolides and β-lactam antibiotics for all the strains investigated. However, C3b levels were unchanged in the presence of serum containing specific antibodies and sub-MICs of levofloxacin. To investigate whether LytA, the main cell wall hydrolase of S. pneumoniae, might be involved in this process, lytA-deficient mutants were constructed. In the presence of antibiotics, loss of LytA was not associated with enhanced C3b deposition on the pneumococcal surface, which confirms the importance of LytA in this interaction. The results of this study offer new insights into the development of novel therapeutic strategies using certain antibiotics by increasing the efficacy of the host immune response to efficiently recognize pneumococcal resistant strains.

  5. Hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in mice with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Canet, Mark J.; Sheng, Liang; Jiang, Lin; Xiong, Yi; Yin, Lei; Rui, Liangyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metabolic inflammation is believed to promote insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes progression in obesity. TRAF3, a cytoplasmic signaling protein, has been known to mediate/modulate cytokine signaling in immune cells. The goal is to define the metabolic function of hepatic TRAF3 in the setting of obesity. Methods Hepatocyte-specific TRAF3 knockout mice were generated using the loxp/albumin-cre system. Liver TRAF3 was deleted in adult obese mice via Cre adenoviral infection. Both high fat diet-induced and genetic obesity were examined. TRAF3 levels and insulin signaling were measured by immunoblotting. Insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and glucose metabolism were examined by glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance tests. Hepatic steatosis was examined by Oil red O staining of liver sections and measuring liver triacylglycerol levels. Results Liver TRAF3 levels were lower in the fasted states in normal mice, and were aberrantly higher in obese mice and in mice with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Glucose directly increased TRAF3 levels in primary hepatocytes. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of TRAF3 decreased hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis in mice with either high fat diet-induced obesity or genetic obesity (ob/ob); conversely, in lean mice, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of TRAF3 in the liver induced hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Deletion of TRAF3 enhanced the ability of insulin to stimulate phosphorylation of Akt in hepatocytes, whereas overexpression of TRAF3 suppressed insulin signaling. Conclusions Glucose increases the levels of hepatic TRAF3. TRAF3 in turn promotes hyperglycemia through increasing hepatic glucose production, thus forming a glucose-TRAF3 reinforcement loop in the liver. This positive feedback loop may drive the progression of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obesity. PMID:26909311

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolysaccharide Psl promotes resistance to the biofilm inhibitor polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Zegans, Michael E; Wozniak, Daniel; Griffin, Edward; Toutain-Kidd, Christine M; Hammond, John H; Garfoot, Andrew; Lam, Joseph S

    2012-08-01

    Polysorbate 80 (PS80) is a nonionic surfactant and detergent that inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.001% and is well tolerated in human tissues. However, certain clinical and laboratory strains (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa are able to form biofilms in the presence of PS80. To better understand this resistance, we performed transposon mutagenesis with a PS80-resistant clinical isolate, PA738. This revealed that mutation of algC rendered PA738 sensitive to PS80 biofilm inhibition. AlgC contributes to the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Psl and alginate, as well as lipopolysaccharide and rhamnolipid. Analysis of mutations downstream of AlgC in these biosynthetic pathways established that disruption of the psl operon was sufficient to render the PA738 and PAO1 strains sensitive to PS80-mediated biofilm inhibition. Increased levels of Psl production in the presence of arabinose in a strain with an arabinose-inducible psl promoter were correlated with increased biofilm formation in PS80. In P. aeruginosa strains MJK8 and ZK2870, known to produce both Pel and Psl, disruption of genes in the psl but not the pel operon conferred susceptibility to PS80-mediated biofilm inhibition. The laboratory strain PA14 does not produce Psl and does not form biofilms in PS80. However, when PA14 was transformed with a cosmid containing the psl operon, it formed biofilms in the presence of PS80. Taken together, these data suggest that production of the exopolysaccharide Psl by P. aeruginosa promotes resistance to the biofilm inhibitor PS80.

  7. Cigarette smoke promotes drug resistance and expansion of cancer stem cell-like side population.

    PubMed

    An, Yi; Kiang, Alan; Lopez, Jay Patrick; Kuo, Selena Z; Yu, Michael Andrew; Abhold, Eric L; Chen, Jocelyn S; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that many patients continue to smoke cigarettes after being diagnosed with cancer. Although smoking cessation has typically been presumed to possess little therapeutic value for cancer, a growing body of evidence suggests that continued smoking is associated with reduced efficacy of treatment and a higher incidence of recurrence. We therefore investigated the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on drug resistance in the lung cancer and head and neck cancer cell lines A549 and UMSCC-10B, respectively. Our results showed that CSC significantly increased the cellular efflux of doxorubicin and mitoxantrone. This was accompanied by membrane localization and increased expression of the multi-drug transporter ABCG2. The induced efflux of doxorubicin was reversed upon addition of the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Fumitremorgin C, confirming the role of ABCG2. Treatment with CSC increased the concentration of phosphorylated Akt, while addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked doxorubicin extrusion, suggesting that Akt activation is required for CSC-induced drug efflux. In addition, CSC was found to promote resistance to doxorubicin as determined by MTS assays. This CSC-induced doxurbicin-resistance was mitigated by mecamylamine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitor, suggesting that nicotine is at least partially responsible for the effect of CSC. Lastly, CSC increased the size of the side population (SP), which has been linked to a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. In summary, CSC promotes chemoresistance via Akt-mediated regulation of ABCG2 activity, and may also increase the proportion of cancer stem-like cells, contributing to tumor resilience. These findings underscore the importance of smoking cessation following a diagnosis of cancer, and elucidate the mechanisms of continued smoking that may be detrimental to treatment.

  8. IRF3 promotes adipose inflammation and insulin resistance and represses browning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Eguchi, Jun; Kang, Sona; Tenen, Danielle; Roh, Hyun Cheol; Kong, Xingxing; Kazak, Lawrence; Ahmad, Rasheed; Rosen, Evan D.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic inflammatory state that accompanies obesity is a major contributor to insulin resistance and other dysfunctional adaptations in adipose tissue. Cellular and secreted factors promote the inflammatory milieu of obesity, but the transcriptional pathways that drive these processes are not well described. Although the canonical inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB is considered to be the major driver of adipocyte inflammation, members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family may also play a role in this process. Here, we determined that IRF3 expression is upregulated in the adipocytes of obese mice and humans. Signaling through TLR3 and TLR4, which lie upstream of IRF3, induced insulin resistance in murine adipocytes, while IRF3 knockdown prevented insulin resistance. Furthermore, improved insulin sensitivity in IRF3-deficient mice was associated with reductions in intra-adipose and systemic inflammation in the high fat–fed state, enhanced browning of subcutaneous fat, and increased adipose expression of GLUT4. Taken together, the data indicate that IRF3 is a major transcriptional regulator of adipose inflammation and is involved in maintaining systemic glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:27400129

  9. Bacterial cell-to-cell signaling promotes the evolution of resistance to parasitic bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Pierre; Diggle, Stephen P; Friman, Ville-Petri

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of host-parasite interactions could be affected by intraspecies variation between different host and parasite genotypes. Here we studied how bacterial host cell-to-cell signaling affects the interaction with parasites using two bacteria-specific viruses (bacteriophages) and the host bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa that communicates by secreting and responding to quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules. We found that a QS-signaling proficient strain was able to evolve higher levels of resistance to phages during a short-term selection experiment. This was unlikely driven by demographic effects (mutation supply and encounter rates), as nonsignaling strains reached higher population densities in the absence of phages in our selective environment. Instead, the evolved nonsignaling strains suffered relatively higher growth reduction in the absence of the phage, which could have constrained the phage resistance evolution. Complementation experiments with synthetic signal molecules showed that the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) improved the growth of nonsignaling bacteria in the presence of a phage, while the activation of las and rhl quorum sensing systems had no effect. Together, these results suggest that QS-signaling can promote the evolution of phage resistance and that the loss of QS-signaling could be costly in the presence of phages. Phage-bacteria interactions could therefore indirectly shape the evolution of intraspecies social interactions and PQS-mediated virulence in P. aeruginosa.

  10. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca2+-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:27489497

  11. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, J.; Yuan, J.; Chandrakar, A.; Iacomini, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25low Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3+, CD25high, CD4+ Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3+CD25lowCD4+ T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance. PMID:26079467

  12. Use of antimicrobial growth promoters in food animals and Enterococcus faecium resistance to therapeutic antimicrobial drugs in Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, H. C.; Aarestrup, F. M.; Jensen, L. B.; Hammerum, A. M.; Bager, F.

    1999-01-01

    Supplementing animal feed with antimicrobial agents to enhance growth has been common practice for more than 30 years and is estimated to constitute more than half the total antimicrobial use worldwide. The potential public health consequences of this use have been debated; however, until recently, clear evidence of a health risk was not available. Accumulating evidence now indicates that the use of the glycopeptide avoparcin as a growth promoter has created in food animals a major reservoir of Enterococcus faecium, which contains the high level glycopeptide resistance determinant vanA, located on the Tn1546 transposon. Furthermore, glycopeptide-resistant strains, as well as resistance determinants, can be transmitted from animals to humans. Two antimicrobial classes expected to provide the future therapeutic options for treatment of infections with vancomycin-resistant enterococci have analogues among the growth promoters, and a huge animal reservoir of resistant E. faecium has already been created, posing a new public health problem. PMID:10341169

  13. Npc1 haploinsufficiency promotes weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, David; Millward, Veronica; Birdi, Amandip; Trouard, Theodore P; Heidenreich, Randall A; Garver, William S

    2011-01-15

    A recent population-based genome-wide association study has revealed that the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) gene is associated with early-onset and morbid adult obesity. Concurrently, our candidate gene-based mouse growth study performed using the BALB/cJ NPC1 mouse model (Npc1) with decreased Npc1 gene dosage independently supported these results by suggesting an Npc1 gene-diet interaction in relation to early-onset weight gain. To further investigate the Npc1 gene in relation to weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance, we interbred BALB/cJ Npc1(+/-) mice with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, the latter mouse strain commonly used to study aspects of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. This breeding produced a hybrid (BALB/cJ-C57BL/6J) Npc1(+/-) mouse model with increased susceptibility to weight gain and insulin resistance. The results from our study indicated that these Npc1(+/-) mice were susceptible to increased weight gain characterized by increased whole body and abdominal adiposity, adipocyte hypertrophy and hepatic steatosis in the absence of hyperphagia. Moreover, these Npc1(+/-) mice developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia and dyslipidemia marked by an increased concentration of cholesterol and triacylglycerol associated with low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The overall results are consistent with a unique Npc1 gene-diet interaction that promotes both weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance. Therefore, the NPC1 gene now represents a previously unrecognized gene involved in maintaining energy and metabolic homeostasis that will contribute to our understanding concerning the current global epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. The Host Immune Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae: Bridging Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-06

    caused by penicillin -resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in rabbits. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46: 1760- 1765. Takeuchi, O., Hoshino, K., and...2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae ...host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae : bridging innate and adaptive immunity Katherine Shi-Hui Lee Thesis directed by: Clifford M

  15. Upregulation of TrkB Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Anoikis Resistance in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Qiu, Haifeng; Yang, Tingting; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wan, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms governing the metastasis of endometrial carcinoma (EC) are poorly defined. Recent data support a role for the cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB in the progression of several human tumors. Here we present evidence for a direct role of TrkB in human EC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that TrkB and its secreted ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are more highly expressed in EC than in normal endometrium. High TrkB levels correlated with lymph node metastasis (p<0.05) and lymphovascular space involvement (p<0.05) in EC. Depletion of TrkB by stable shRNA-mediated knockdown decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of cancer cell lines in vitro and resulted in anoikis in suspended cells. Conversely, exogenous expression of TrkB increased cell migration and invasion and promoted anoikis resistance in suspension culture. Furthermore, over-expression of TrkB or stimulation by BDNF resulted in altered the expression of molecular mediators of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of the downstream regulator, Twist, blocked TrkB-induced EMT-like transformation. The use of in vivo models revealed decreased peritoneal dissemination in TrkB-depleted EC cells. Additionally, TrkB-depleted EC cells underwent mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and anoikis in vivo. Our data support a novel function for TrkB in promoting EMT and resistance to anoikis. Thus, TrkB may constitute a potential therapeutic target in human EC. PMID:23936232

  16. Efficacy of a new pharmacokinetically enhanced formulation of amoxicillin/clavulanate (2000/125 mg) in adults with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including penicillin-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    File, Thomas M; Garau, Javier; Jacobs, Michael R; Wynne, Brian; Twynholm, Monique; Berkowitz, Elchonon

    2005-02-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common respiratory illness, frequently caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae resistance to common antimicrobials has increased over recent years. A new pharmacokinetically enhanced formulation of amoxicillin/clavulanate (2000/125 mg) has been developed, designed to combat infections caused by S. pneumoniae, including penicillin-resistant (PRSP, penicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) >or=2mg/l) isolates, and those with elevated amoxicillin/clavulanic acid MICs, while maintaining coverage of beta-lactamase-producing pathogens. A pooled efficacy analysis of four randomized (1:1) and one non-comparative clinical trials of amoxicillin/clavulanate, 2000/125 mg, given twice daily, was conducted in adult patients with CAP. Comparator agents were conventional amoxicillin/clavulanate formulations. At follow-up (days 16-39), efficacy (eradication of the initial pathogen or clinical cure in patients for whom no repeat culture was performed) in patients with S. pneumoniae infection was 92.3% (274/297) for amoxicillin/clavulanate, 2000/125 mg and 85.2% (46/54) for comparators (P=0.11). Twenty-four of 25 PRSP-infected patients receiving amoxicillin/clavulanate, 2000/125 mg were treated successfully. Both amoxicillin/clavulanate, 2000/125 mg and comparators were well tolerated, with few patients withdrawing from the studies.

  17. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  18. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth.

    PubMed

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K; Vicente, João B; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-03-31

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed.

  19. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  20. An ABA-mimicking ligand that reduces water loss and promotes drought resistance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Minjie; Liu, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Xue, Xiaoqian; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Gao, Pan; Wang, Fuxing; Zeng, Liang; Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Yang; Deng, Pan; Zhong, Dafang; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric; Xu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the most important hormone for plants to resist drought and other abiotic stresses. ABA binds directly to the PYR/PYL family of ABA receptors, resulting in inhibition of type 2C phosphatases (PP2C) and activation of downstream ABA signaling. It is envisioned that intervention of ABA signaling by small molecules could help plants to overcome abiotic stresses such as drought, cold and soil salinity. However, chemical instability and rapid catabolism by plant enzymes limit the practical application of ABA itself. Here we report the identification of a small molecule ABA mimic (AM1) that acts as a potent activator of multiple members of the family of ABA receptors. In Arabidopsis, AM1 activates a gene network that is highly similar to that induced by ABA. Treatments with AM1 inhibit seed germination, prevent leaf water loss, and promote drought resistance. We solved the crystal structure of AM1 in complex with the PYL2 ABA receptor and the HAB1 PP2C, which revealed that AM1 mediates a gate-latch-lock interacting network, a structural feature that is conserved in the ABA-bound receptor/PP2C complex. Together, these results demonstrate that a single small molecule ABA mimic can activate multiple ABA receptors and protect plants from water loss and drought stress. Moreover, the AM1 complex crystal structure provides a structural basis for designing the next generation of ABA-mimicking small molecules. PMID:23835477

  1. TNF-α stimulates endothelial palmitic acid transcytosis and promotes insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Tao; Xing, Shasha; Wu, Yaogong; Bian, Fang; Wu, Guangjie; Li, Ye; Li, Juyi; Bai, Xiangli; Wu, Dan; Jia, Xiong; Wang, Ling; Zhu, Lin; Jin, Si

    2017-01-01

    Persistent elevation of plasma TNF-α is a marker of low grade systemic inflammation. Palmitic acid (PA) is the most abundant type of saturated fatty acid in human body. PA is bound with albumin in plasma and could not pass through endothelial barrier freely. Albumin-bound PA has to be transported across monolayer endothelial cells through intracellular transcytosis, but not intercellular diffusion. In the present study, we discovered that TNF-α might stimulate PA transcytosis across cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, which further impaired the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by cardiomyocytes and promoted insulin resistance. In this process, TNF-α-stimulated endothelial autophagy and NF-κB signaling crosstalk with each other and orchestrate the whole event, ultimately result in increased expression of fatty acid transporter protein 4 (FATP4) in endothelial cells and mediate the increased PA transcytosis across microvascular endothelial cells. Hopefully the present study discovered a novel missing link between low grade systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:28304381

  2. NADP(+)-IDH Mutations Promote Hypersuccinylation that Impairs Mitochondria Respiration and Induces Apoptosis Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; He, Xiadi; Ye, Dingwei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Hongxiu; Yao, Cuifang; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Jianong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Sha; Wu, Xiaohui; Liu, Lixia; Yang, Chen; Shi, Jiaqi; He, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jie; Qu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Fushen; Zhao, Jianyuan; Xu, Wei; Zhao, Shimin

    2015-11-19

    Elucidating the tumorigenic mechanism of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) is critical for determining how NADP(+)-IDH mutations cause cancer. Here we report that R-2HG induces cancerous metabolism and apoptosis resistance through promoting hypersuccinylation. By competitive inhibition of the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), R-2HG preferentially induced succinyl-CoA accumulation and hypersuccinylation in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation-bearing glioma samples and cells were hypersuccinylated in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation or SDH inactivation resulted in hypersuccinylation, causing respiration inhibition and inducing cancerous metabolism and mitochondrial depolarization. These mitochondrial dysfunctions induced BCL-2 accumulation at the mitochondrial membrane, leading to apoptosis resistance of hypersuccinylated cells. Relief of hypersuccinylation by overexpressing the desuccinylase SIRT5 or supplementing glycine rescued mitochondrial dysfunctions, reversed BCL-2 accumulation, and slowed the oncogenic growth of hypersuccinylated IDH1(R132C)-harboring HT1080 cells. Thus, R-2HG-induced hypersuccinylation contributes to the tumorigenicity of NADP(+)-IDH mutations, suggesting the potential of hypersuccinylation inhibition as an intervention for hypersuccinylation-related tumors.

  3. Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus from Human and Animal Origins: Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Characterization of a Vancomycin-Resistant Calf Isolate Carrying a vanA-Tn1546-Like Element

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Hernández, Beatriz; Tedim, Ana P.; Sánchez-Herrero, José Francisco; Librado, Pablo; Rozas, Julio; Muñoz, Gloria; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity of 41 Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates: 18 isolates obtained from animals and 23 human clinical isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the semiautomatic Wider system and genetic diversity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI. Animal isolates grouped separately in the PFGE analysis, but no statistical differences in antimicrobial resistance were found between the two groups. The LMG 17956 sequence type 28 (ST28) strain recovered from the feces of a calf exhibited high levels of resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC, ≥256 mg/liter). Its glycopeptide resistance mechanism was characterized by Southern blot hybridization and a primer-walking strategy, and finally its genome, determined by whole-genome sequencing, was compared with four closely related S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus genomes. Hybridization experiments demonstrated that a Tn1546-like element was integrated into the bacterial chromosome. In agreement with this finding, whole-genome sequencing confirmed a partial deletion of the vanY-vanZ region and partial duplication of the vanH gene. The comparative genomic analyses revealed that the LMG 17956 ST28 strain had acquired an unusually high number of transposable elements and had experienced extensive chromosomal rearrangements, as well as gene gain and loss events. In conclusion, S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates from animals seem to belong to lineages separate from those infecting humans. In addition, we report a glycopeptide-resistant isolate from a calf carrying a Tn1546-like element integrated into its chromosome. PMID:25605355

  4. Presence of the tet(O) gene in erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistant strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and linkage with either the mef(A) or the erm(A) gene.

    PubMed

    Giovanetti, Eleonora; Brenciani, Andrea; Lupidi, Remo; Roberts, Marilyn C; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2003-09-01

    Sixty-three recent Italian clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes resistant to both erythromycin (MICs >or=1 microg/ml) and tetracycline (MICs >or= 8 microg/ml) were genotyped for macrolide and tetracycline resistance genes. We found 19 isolates carrying the mef(A) and the tet(O) genes; 25 isolates carrying the erm(A) and tet(O) genes; and 2 isolates carrying the erm(A), tet(M), and tet(O) genes. The resistance of all erm(A)-containing isolates was inducible, but the isolates could be divided into two groups on the basis of erythromycin MICs of either >128 or 1 to 4 microg/ml. The remaining 17 isolates included 15 isolates carrying the erm(B) gene and 2 isolates carrying both the erm(B) and the mef(A) genes, with all 17 carrying the tet(M) gene. Of these, 12 carried Tn916-Tn1545-like conjugative transposons. Conjugal transfer experiments demonstrated that the tet(O) gene moved with and without the erm(A) gene and with the mef(A) gene. These studies, together with the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis experiments and hybridization assays with DNA probes specific for the tet(O), erm(A), and mef(A) genes, suggested a linkage of tet(O) with either erm(A) or mef(A) in erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistant S. pyogenes isolates. By amplification and sequencing experiments, we detected the tet(O) gene ca. 5.5 kb upstream from the mef(A) gene. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of the tet(O) gene in S. pyogenes and showing that it may be linked with another gene and can be moved by conjugation from one chromosome to another.

  5. Decline in antibiotic resistance and changes in the serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with acute otitis media; a 2001-2011 survey by the French Pneumococcal Network.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M; Varon, E; Lepoutre, A; Gravet, A; Baraduc, R; Brun, M; Chardon, H; Cremniter, J; Croizé, J; Dalmay, F; Demachy, M-C; Fosse, T; Grelaud, C; Hadou, T; Hamdad, F; Koeck, J-L; Luce, S; Mermond, S; Patry, I; Péchinot, A; Raymond, J; Ros, A; Segonds, C; Soullié, B; Tandé, D; Vergnaud, M; Vernet-Garnier, V; Wallet, F; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Lanotte, P

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in antibiotic resistance and circulating serotypes of pneumococci isolated from middle ear fluid of French children with AOM during the period 2001-2011, before and after the introduction of the PCV-7 (2003) and PCV-13 (2010) vaccines. Between 2001 and 2011 the French pneumococcal surveillance network analysed the antibiotic susceptibility of 6683 S. pneumoniae isolated from children with AOM, of which 1569 were serotyped. We observed a significant overall increase in antibiotic susceptibility. Respective resistance (I+R) rates in 2001 and 2011 were 76.9% and 57.3% for penicillin, 43.0% and 29.8% for amoxicillin, and 28.6% and 13.0% for cefotaxime. We also found a marked reduction in vaccine serotypes after PCV-7 implementation, from 63.0% in 2001 to 13.2% in 2011, while the incidence of the additional six serotypes included in PCV-13 increased during the same period, with a particularly high proportion of 19A isolates. The proportion of some non-PCV-13 serotypes also increased between 2001 and 2011, especially 15A and 23A. Before PCV-7 implementation, most (70.8%) penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to PCV-7 serotypes, whereas in 2011, 56.8% of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to serotype 19A. Between 2001 and 2011, antibiotic resistance among pneumococci responsible for AOM in France fell markedly, and PCV-7 serotypes were replaced by non-PCV-7 serotypes, especially 19A. We are continuing to assess the impact of PCV-13, introduced in France in 2010, on pneumococcal serotype circulation and antibiotic resistance.

  6. Terazosin activated Pgk1 and Hsp90 to promote stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinping; Zhao, Chunyue; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Tao; Li, Yizhou; Cao, Cheng; Ding, Yuehe; Dong, Mengqiu; Finci, Lorenzo; Wang, Jia-huai; Li, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Drugs that can protect against organ damage are urgently needed, especially for diseases such as sepsis and brain stroke. We have discovered that terazosin (TZ), a widely marketed alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist, alleviated organ damage and improved survival in rodent models of stroke and sepsis. Through combined studies of enzymology and X-ray crystallography, we have discovered that TZ binds to a novel target, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (Pgk1) and activates its enzymatic activity, probably through 1,3-diamino-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinoline's ability to promote ATP release from Pgk1. Mechanistically, the ATP generated from Pgk1 may enhance the chaperone activity of Hsp90, an ATPase known to associate with Pgk1. Upon activation, Hsp90 promotes multi-stress resistance. Our studies have demonstrated that TZ has a novel protein target, Pgk1, and has revealed its corresponding biological effect. As a clinical drug, TZ may be quickly translated into treatment of devastating diseases including stroke and sepsis. PMID:25383758

  7. Glucocorticoid-induced glucocorticoid-receptor expression and promoter usage is not linked to glucocorticoid resistance in childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Tissing, Wim J E; Meijerink, Jules P P; Brinkhof, Bas; Broekhuis, Mathilde J C; Menezes, Renee X; den Boer, Monique L; Pieters, Rob

    2006-08-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) resistance is an adverse prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but little is known about causes of GC resistance. Up-regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been suggested as an essential step to the induction of apoptosis in leukemic cells. In this study we investigated whether baseline mRNA expression levels of the 5 different GR promoter transcripts (1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1B, and 1C) or differences in the degree of regulation of the GR or GR promoter transcripts upon GC exposure are related to GC resistance. Therefore, mRNA levels of the 5 GR promoter transcripts and of the GR were measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; Taqman) technology in primary ALL cells prior to and after 3, 8, and 24 hours of prednisolone exposure. GR expression is induced upon GC exposure in primary ALL patient samples, which is opposite to what is found in tissues in which GCs do not induce apoptosis. GC resistance in childhood ALL cannot be attributed to an inability of resistant cells to up-regulate the expression of the GR upon GC exposure, nor to differences in GR promoter usage (at baseline and upon GC exposure).

  8. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Qiong; Kou, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chunming; Xing, Shaochen; Liu, Bao

    2011-10-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions, but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen. It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question. We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied. Surprisingly, induced expression of Pib by M. grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation, and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wild-type plants. Accordingly, the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5'-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type. In contrast, the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5'-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene, ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance. Taken together, our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M. grisea infection, and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  9. Six1 overexpression at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes promotes differentiation resistance and EMT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hanwen; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory discovered that SIX1 mRNA expression increased during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) toward a differentiation-resistant (HKc/DR) phenotype. In this study, we explored the role of Six1 at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation by overexpressing Six1 in HKc/HPV16. We found that Six1 overexpression in HKc/HPV16 increased cell proliferation and promoted cell migration and invasion by inducing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, the overexpression of Six1 in HKc/HPV16 resulted in resistance to serum and calcium-induced differentiation, which is the hallmark of the HKc/DR phenotype. Activation of MAPK in HKc/HPV16 overexpressing Six1 is linked to resistance to calcium-induced differentiation. In conclusion, this study determined that Six1 overexpression resulted in differentiation resistance and promoted EMT at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes. - Highlights: • Six1 expression increases during HPV16-mediated transformation. • Six1 overexpression causes differentiation resistance in HPV16-immortalized cells. • Six1 overexpression in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes activates MAPK. • Activation of MAPK promotes EMT and differentiation resistance. • Six1 overexpression reduces Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling.

  10. Conversion of M serotype 24 of Streptococcus pyogenes to M serotypes 5 and 18: effect on resistance to phagocytosis and adhesion to host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, H S; Liu, S; Dale, J B; Hasty, D L

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we utilized recombinant strains expressing the M5 and M18 proteins and M- mutants of group A streptococci to compare the abilities of these M proteins to confer resistance to phagocytosis and to mediate adhesion to host cells. The data indicate that the M5 and M18 proteins can confer resistance to phagocytosis, that fibrinogen is required for this resistance, and that these M proteins can mediate adhesion to HEp-2 cells. PMID:9169794

  11. Pyramiding, alternating or mixing: comparative performances of deployment strategies of nematode resistance genes to promote plant resistance efficiency and durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistant cultivars are key elements for pathogen control and pesticide reduction, but their repeated use may lead to the emergence of virulent pathogen populations, able to overcome the resistance. Increased research efforts, mainly based on theoretical studies, explore spatio-temporal deployment strategies of resistance genes in order to maximize their durability. We evaluated experimentally three of these strategies to control root-knot nematodes: cultivar mixtures, alternating and pyramiding resistance genes, under controlled and field conditions over a 3-years period, assessing the efficiency and the durability of resistance in a protected crop rotation system with pepper as summer crop and lettuce as winter crop. Results The choice of the resistance gene and the genetic background in which it is introgressed, affected the frequency of resistance breakdown. The pyramiding of two different resistance genes in one genotype suppressed the emergence of virulent isolates. Alternating different resistance genes in rotation was also efficient to decrease virulent populations in fields due to the specificity of the virulence and the trapping effect of resistant plants. Mixing resistant cultivars together appeared as a less efficient strategy to control nematodes. Conclusions This work provides experimental evidence that, in a cropping system with seasonal sequences of vegetable species, pyramiding or alternating resistance genes benefit yields in the long-term by increasing the durability of resistant cultivars and improving the long-term control of a soil-borne pest. To our knowledge, this result is the first one obtained for a plant-nematode interaction, which helps demonstrate the general applicability of such strategies for breeding and sustainable management of resistant cultivars against pathogens. PMID:24559060

  12. Genetic engineering of the Xa10 promoter for broad-spectrum and durable resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xuan; Tian, Dongsheng; Gu, Keyu; Zhou, Zhiyun; Yang, Xiaobei; Luo, Yanchang; White, Frank F; Yin, Zhongchao

    2015-09-01

    Many pathovars of plant pathogenic bacteria Xanthomonas species inject transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors into plant host cells to promote disease susceptibility or trigger disease resistance. The rice TAL effector-dependent disease resistance gene Xa10 confers narrow-spectrum race-specific resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal agent of bacterial blight disease in rice. To generate broad-spectrum and durable resistance to Xoo, we developed a modified Xa10 gene, designated as Xa10(E5) . Xa10(E5) has an EBE-amended promoter containing 5 tandemly arranged EBEs each responding specifically to a corresponding virulent or avirulent TAL effector and a stable transgenic rice line containing Xa10(E5) was generated in the cultivar Nipponbare. The Xa10(E5) gene was specifically induced by Xoo strains that harbour the corresponding TAL effectors and conferred TAL effector-dependent resistance to the pathogens at all developmental stages of rice. Further disease evaluation demonstrated that the Xa10(E5) gene in either Nipponbare or 9311 genetic backgrounds provided broad-spectrum disease resistance to 27 of the 28 Xoo strains collected from 11 countries. The development of Xa10(E5) and transgenic rice lines provides new genetic materials for molecular breeding of rice for broad-spectrum and durable disease resistance to bacterial blight.

  13. Plant defense gene promoter enhances the reliability of shiva-1 gene-induced resistance to soft rot disease in potato.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jung Yoon; Seo, Hyo Won; Yang, Moon Sik; Robb, E Jane; Nazar, Ross N; Lee, Shin Woo

    2004-11-01

    PAL5, a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plant defense gene that encodes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, is known to respond to a variety of environmental stresses including pathogen infection and wounding. A shiva-1 gene recombinant that encodes a small synthetic antibacterial peptide under the PAL5 gene promoter was transformed into potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and its ability to induce resistance to Erwinia carotovora was compared with a construct under the control of the constitutive and widely used cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. The shiva-1 peptide, an analog of natural cecropin B, was shown previously to have high bactericidal activity in vitro, but when expressed in vivo under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, the effects were very inconsistent. As observed previously, in the present studies a few transformants with the CaMV 35S promoter were highly resistant when assayed for susceptibility to soft rot disease. In marked contrast the majority of transformants with the PAL5 gene promoter were highly resistant. More-detailed analyses of the incorporated DNA indicated that most of the transformants with the CaMV 35S promoter contained multiple copies of the transforming DNA while all of the PAL5 recombinants contained single copies. The highly resistant CaMV 35S recombinant also was present as a single copy. The results indicate that, at least in this instance, a constitutive promoter may not be ideal for the effective expression of a foreign gene and suggest that multiple insertions may have negative consequences.

  14. Genome Sequence of Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens Strain 90-166, Which Triggers Induced Systemic Resistance and Plant Growth Promotion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kloepper, Joseph W; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-06-18

    The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 elicits induced systemic resistance against plant pathogens and herbivores and promotes plant growth under greenhouse and field conditions. Strain 90-166 secretes volatile compounds, siderophores, salicylic acid, and quorum-sensing autoinducers as bacterial determinants toward plant health. Herein, we present its draft genome sequence.

  15. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Huntington’s disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.—Chondrogianni, N., Georgila, K., Kourtis, N

  16. PmrD is required for modifications to escherichia coli endotoxin that promote antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Erica J; Herrera, Carmen M; Crofts, Alexander A; Trent, M Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In Salmonella enterica, PmrD is a connector protein that links the two-component systems PhoP-PhoQ and PmrA-PmrB. While Escherichia coli encodes a PmrD homolog, it is thought to be incapable of connecting PhoPQ and PmrAB in this organism due to functional divergence from the S. enterica protein. However, our laboratory previously observed that low concentrations of Mg(2+), a PhoPQ-activating signal, leads to the induction of PmrAB-dependent lipid A modifications in wild-type E. coli (C. M. Herrera, J. V. Hankins, and M. S. Trent, Mol Microbiol 76:1444-1460, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07150.x). These modifications include phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) and 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (l-Ara4N), which promote bacterial resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) when affixed to lipid A. Here, we demonstrate that pmrD is required for modification of the lipid A domain of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under low-Mg(2+) growth conditions. Further, RNA sequencing shows that E. coli pmrD influences the expression of pmrA and its downstream targets, including genes coding for the modification enzymes that transfer pEtN and l-Ara4N to the lipid A molecule. In line with these findings, a pmrD mutant is dramatically impaired in survival compared with the wild-type strain when exposed to the CAMP polymyxin B. Notably, we also reveal the presence of an unknown factor or system capable of activating pmrD to promote lipid A modification in the absence of the PhoPQ system. These results illuminate a more complex network of protein interactions surrounding activation of PhoPQ and PmrAB in E. coli than previously understood.

  17. A Small Amount of Dietary Carbohydrate Can Promote the HFD-Induced Insulin Resistance to a Maximal Level

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huailan; Gu, Haihua; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Bennett, Brian J.; He, Ling; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-01-01

    Both dietary fat and carbohydrates (Carbs) may play important roles in the development of insulin resistance. The main goal of this study was to further define the roles for fat and dietary carbs in insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed normal chow diet (CD) or HFD containing 0.1–25.5% carbs for 5 weeks, followed by evaluations of calorie consumption, body weight and fat gains, insulin sensitivity, intratissue insulin signaling, ectopic fat, and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle. The role of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the HFD-induced insulin resistance was determined in mice. The role of fat in insulin resistance was also examined in cultured cells. HFD with little carbs (0.1%) induced severe insulin resistance. Addition of 5% carbs to HFD dramatically elevated insulin resistance and 10% carbs in HFD was sufficient to induce a maximal level of insulin resistance. HFD with little carbs induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle and addition of carbs to HFD dramatically enhanced ectopic fat and oxidative stress. HFD increased hepatic expression of key gluconeogenic genes and the increase was most dramatic by HFD with little carbs, and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis prevented the HFD-induced insulin resistance. In cultured cells, development of insulin resistance induced by a pathological level of insulin was prevented in the absence of fat. Together, fat is essential for development of insulin resistance and dietary carb is not necessary for HFD-induced insulin resistance due to the presence of hepatic gluconeogenesis but a very small amount of it can promote HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level. PMID:25055153

  18. Distribution of macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and mef(A) among 160 penicillin-intermediate clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in southern France.

    PubMed

    Marchandin, H; Jean-Pierre, H; Jumas-Bilak, E; Isson, L; Drouillard, B; Darbas, H; Carrière, C

    2001-09-01

    Two prevalent mechanisms of macrolide resistance are currently described in pneumococci: production of rRNA methylase that modify 23S ribosomal RNA resulting in MLSB phenotype, and an active efflux system resulting in M-phenotype. These two mechanisms are mediated by erm(B) and mef(A) genes respectively. Several studies reported a predominance of mef(A) gene in United-States and Canada. In European countries, erm(B) determinant is prevalent and mef(A)-mediated erythromycin resistance was recently reported in about 10% of strains in Belgium and Italy. In order to evaluate implication of mef(A) gene in pneumococci erythromycin resistance, 160 clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with low-level of penicillin resistance and resistance to macrolides recovered between April 1999 and April 2000 were collected. These isolates were tested for their macrolide susceptibility by disc diffusion method, 155 showed the MLSB phenotype and 5 the M phenotype. Genotypic analysis was performed by erm(B) and mef(A) specific-mediated PCR: erm(B) gene was detected in 154 isolates, mef(A) gene in 5 isolates, and both genes in one strain. The phenotype seems to be well correlated to the genotyping result except for strain harboring both resistance determinants. Molecular typing of isolates harboring mef(A) gene performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after restriction by Smal shows these strains to be epidemiologically unrelated. Our results show the predominance of the erm(B) gene in erythromycin resistant S. pneumoniae isolates. mef(A)-mediated resistance is effective in Southern France (3.7%) but this rate is the lowest published from European countries.

  19. Recombination between Streptococcus suis ICESsu32457 and Streptococcus agalactiae ICESa2603 yields a hybrid ICE transferable to Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Marini, Emanuela; Palmieri, Claudio; Magi, Gloria; Facinelli, Bruna

    2015-07-09

    Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile genetic elements that reside in the chromosome but retain the ability to undergo excision and to transfer by conjugation. Genes involved in drug resistance, virulence, or niche adaptation are often found among backbone genes as cargo DNA. We recently characterized in Streptococcus suis an ICE (ICESsu32457) carrying resistance genes [tet(O/W/32/O), tet(40), erm(B), aphA, and aadE] in the 15K unstable genetic element, which is flanked by two ∼1.3kb direct repeats. Remarkably, ∼1.3-kb sequences are conserved in ICESa2603 of Streptococcus agalactiae 2603V/R, which carry heavy metal resistance genes cadC/cadA and mer. In matings between S. suis 32457 (donor) and S. agalactiae 2603V/R (recipient), transconjugants were obtained. PCR experiments, PFGE, and sequence analysis of transconjugants demonstrated a tandem array between ICESsu32457 and ICESa2603. Matings between tandem array-containing S. agalactiae 2603V/R (donor) and Streptococcus pyogenes RF12 (recipient) yielded a single transconjugant containing a hybrid ICE, here named ICESa2603/ICESsu32457. The hybrid formed by recombination of the left ∼1.3-kb sequence of ICESsu32457 and the ∼1.3-kb sequence of ICESa2603. Interestingly, the hybrid ICE was transferable between S. pyogenes strains, thus demonstrating that it behaves as a conventional ICE. These findings suggest that both tandem arrays and hybrid ICEs may contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance in streptococci, creating novel mobile elements capable of disseminating new combinations of antibiotic resistance genes.

  20. Salicylate functions as an efflux pump inducer and promotes the emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni mutants.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhangqi; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Qijing

    2011-10-01

    Salicylate, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compound, has been shown to increase the resistance of Campylobacter to antimicrobials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying salicylate-induced resistance has not yet been established. In this study, we determined how salicylate increases antibiotic resistance and evaluated its impact on the development of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter mutants. Transcriptional fusion assays, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and immunoblotting assays consistently demonstrated the induction of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump by salicylate. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays further showed that salicylate inhibits the binding of CmeR (a transcriptional repressor of the TetR family) to the promoter DNA of cmeABC, suggesting that salicylate inhibits the function of CmeR. The presence of salicylate in the culture medium not only decreased the susceptibility of Campylobacter to ciprofloxacin but also resulted in an approximately 70-fold increase in the observed frequency of emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants under selection with ciprofloxacin. Together, these results indicate that in Campylobacter, salicylate inhibits the binding of CmeR to the promoter DNA and induces expression of cmeABC, resulting in decreased susceptibility to antibiotics and in increased emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants under selection pressure.

  1. Long noncoding RNA CCAT1 acts as an oncogene and promotes chemoresistance in docetaxel-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Chu, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Longbang

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance remains one of the major obstacles in clinical treatment of lung adenocarcinoma (LAD). Indeed, docetaxel-resistant LAD cells present chemoresistance and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to promote tumorigenesis in many cancer types. Here, we showed that the lncRNA colon cancer-associated transcript-1 (CCAT1) was upregulated in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. Furthermore, downregulation of CCAT1 decreased chemoresistance, inhibited proliferation, enhanced apoptosis and reversed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype of docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. We also found that the oncogenic function of CCAT1 in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells depended on the sponging of let-7c. In turn, the sponging of let-7c by CCAT1 released Bcl-xl (a let-7c target), thereby promoting the acquisition of chemoresistance and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. Our data reveal a novel pathway underlying chemoresistance and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. PMID:27566568

  2. The hepatitis C virus modulates insulin signaling pathway in vitro promoting insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    del Campo, José A; García-Valdecasas, Marta; Rojas, Lourdes; Rojas, Ángela; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Insulin is critical for controlling energy functions including glucose and lipid metabolism. Insulin resistance seems to interact with hepatitis C promoting fibrosis progression and impairing sustained virological response to peginterferon and ribavirin. The main aim was to elucidate the direct effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection on insulin signaling both in vitro analyzing gene expression and protein abundance. Huh7.5 cells and JFH-1 viral particles were used for in vitro studies. Experiments were conducted by triplicate in control cells and infected cells. Genes and proteins involved in insulin signaling pathway were modified by HCV infection. Moreover, metformin treatment increased gene expression of PI3K, IRS1, MAP3K, AKT and PTEN more than >1.5 fold. PTP1B, encoding a tyrosin phosphatase, was found highly induced (>3 fold) in infected cells treated with metformin. However, PTP1B protein expression was reduced in metformin treated cells after JFH1 infection. Other proteins related to insulin pathway like Akt, PTEN and phosphorylated MTOR were also found down-regulated. Viral replication was inhibited in vitro by metformin. A strong effect of HCV infection on insulin pathway-related gene and protein expression was found in vitro. These results could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets in HCV infection and its co-morbidities.

  3. Exogenous l-Valine Promotes Phagocytosis to Kill Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin-hai; Liu, Shi-rao; Peng, Bo; Li, Dan; Cheng, Zhi-xue; Zhu, Jia-xin; Zhang, Song; Peng, Yu-ming; Li, Hui; Zhang, Tian-tuo; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria presents a severe threat to public health and causes extensive losses in livestock husbandry and aquaculture. Effective strategies to control such infections are in high demand. Enhancing host immunity is an ideal strategy with fewer side effects than antibiotics. To explore metabolite candidates, we applied a metabolomics approach to investigate the metabolic profiles of mice after Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. Compared with the mice that died from K. pneumoniae infection, mice that survived the infection displayed elevated levels of l-valine. Our analysis showed that l-valine increased macrophage phagocytosis, thereby reducing the load of pathogens; this effect was not only limited to K. pneumoniae but also included Escherichia coli clinical isolates in infected tissues. Two mechanisms are involved in this process: l-valine activating the PI3K/Akt1 pathway and promoting NO production through the inhibition of arginase activity. The NO precursor l-arginine is necessary for l-valine-stimulated macrophage phagocytosis. The valine-arginine combination therapy effectively killed K. pneumoniae and exerted similar effects in other Gram-negative (E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Our study extends the role of metabolism in innate immunity and develops the possibility of employing the metabolic modulator-mediated innate immunity as a therapy for bacterial infections. PMID:28321214

  4. The GATA Transcription Factor egl-27 Delays Aging by Promoting Stress Resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao; Kim, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    Stress is a fundamental aspect of aging, as accumulated damage from a lifetime of stress can limit lifespan and protective responses to stress can extend lifespan. In this study, we identify a conserved Caenorhabditis elegans GATA transcription factor, egl-27, that is involved in several stress responses and aging. We found that overexpression of egl-27 extends the lifespan of wild-type animals. Furthermore, egl-27 is required for the pro-longevity effects from impaired insulin/IGF-1 like signaling (IIS), as reduced egl-27 activity fully suppresses the longevity of worms that are mutant for the IIS receptor, daf-2. egl-27 expression is inhibited by daf-2 and activated by pro-longevity factors daf-16/FOXO and elt-3/GATA, suggesting that egl-27 acts at the intersection of IIS and GATA pathways to extend lifespan. Consistent with its role in IIS signaling, we found that egl-27 is involved in stress response pathways. egl-27 expression is induced in the presence of multiple stresses, its targets are significantly enriched for many types of stress genes, and altering levels of egl-27 itself affects survival to heat and oxidative stress. Finally, we found that egl-27 expression increases between young and old animals, suggesting that increased levels of egl-27 in aged animals may act to promote stress resistance. These results identify egl-27 as a novel factor that links stress and aging pathways. PMID:23271974

  5. Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Neonatal Infections in Portugal (2005–2015): Diversification and Emergence of a CC17/PI-2b Multidrug Resistant Sublineage

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Elisabete R.; Pedroso-Roussado, Cristiano; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário; Oliveira, Henrique

    2017-01-01

    The molecular characterization of 218 GBS isolates recovered from neonatal invasive infections in Portugal in 2005–2015 revealed the existence of a small number of genetically distinct lineages that were present over a significant time-span. Serotypes III and Ia were dominant in the population, together accounting for >80% of the isolates. Clonal complex 17 included 50% of all isolates, highlighting the importance of the hypervirulent genetic lineage represented by serotype III ST17/rib/PI-1+PI-2b. Serotype Ia was represented mainly by ST23, previously reported as dominant among invasive disease in non-pregnant adults in Portugal, but also by ST24, showing an increased frequency among late-onset disease. Overall erythromycin resistance was 16%, increasing during the study period (p < 0.001). Macrolide resistance was overrepresented among CC1 and CC19 isolates (p < 0.001 and p = 0.008, respectively). While representatives of the hypervirulent CC17 lineage were mostly susceptible to macrolides, we identified for the first time in Europe a recently emerging sublineage characterized by the loss of PI-1 (CC17/PI-2b), simultaneously resistant to macrolides, lincosamides, and tetracycline, also exhibiting high-level resistance to streptomycin and kanamycin. The stability and dominance of CC17 among neonatal invasive infections in the past decades indicates that it is extremely well adapted to its niche; however emerging resistance in this genetic background may have significant implications for the prevention and management of GBS disease.

  6. Arsenic transformation and plant growth promotion characteristics of As-resistant endophytic bacteria from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Yi; Han, Yong-He; Chen, Yanshan; Zhu, Ling-Jia; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    The ability of As-resistant endophytic bacteria in As transformation and plant growth promotion was determined. The endophytes were isolated from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) after growing for 60 d in a soil containing 200 mg kg(-1) arsenate (AsV). They were isolated in presence of 10 mM AsV from PV roots, stems, and leaflets, representing 4 phyla and 17 genera. All endophytes showed at least one plant growth promoting characteristics including IAA synthesis, siderophore production and P solubilization. The root endophytes had higher P solubilization ability than the leaflet (60.0 vs. 18.3 mg L(-1)). In presence of 10 mM AsV, 6 endophytes had greater growth than the control, suggesting As-stimulated growth. Furthermore, root endophytes were more resistant to AsV while the leaflet endophytes were more tolerant to arsenite (AsIII), which corresponded to the dominant As species in PV tissues. Bacterial As resistance was positively correlated to their ability in AsV reduction but not AsIII oxidation. The roles of those endophytes in promoting plant growth and As resistance in P. vittata warrant further investigation.

  7. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in France: Antimicrobial Resistance, Serotype, and Molecular Epidemiology Findings from a Monthly National Study in 2000 to 2002

    PubMed Central

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Pina, Patrick; Viguier, Florent; Picot, Franc; Courvalin, Patrice; Allouch, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A study of 257 French invasive pneumococci isolated between 2000 and 2002 showed high rates of nonsusceptibility to penicillin and macrolides (50%), contrasting with a low frequency of resistance to amoxicillin or levofloxacin (<1%) and tolerance to vancomycin (0%). The genetic homogeneity of some serogroups, including serogroup 1, enhanced the risk of epidemiological changes. PMID:15328146

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN3 promotes drug resistance and stem cell-like characteristics in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuqin; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Ni, Guantai; Luo, Qian; Wang, Man; Tao, Xiang; Xia, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    The current standard treatment for ovarian cancer is aggressive surgery followed by platinum-based combination chemotherapy. Recurrence and chemotherapeutic drug resistance are the two main factors that account for the high mortality of most ovarian cancers. Liposomal doxorubicin is primarily used for the treatment of ovarian cancer when the disease has progressed after platinum-based chemotherapy. However, relatively little is known about the genomic changes that contribute to both cisplatin and doxorubicin resistance in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) under the selective pressure of chemotherapy. Here, we found that protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN3 gene expression was substantially increased in both cisplatin and doxorubicin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Silencing of PTPN3 restored sensitivity to cisplatin and doxorubicin in resistant ovarian cancer cells. Down-regulation of PTPN3 also inhibited cell cycle progression, migration, stemness in vitro and the tumorigenicity of resistant ovarian cancer cells in vivo. Meanwhile, the expression of PTPN3 was found to be regulated by miR-199 in resistant ovarian cancer cells. These findings suggest that PTPN3 promotes tumorigenicity, stemness and drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and thus is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27833130

  9. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulates CD147 via Sp1 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Ma, Xiangdong; Yang, Hong; Hua, Wei; Chen, Biliang; Cai, Guoqing

    2017-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the highest mortality rate of all female reproductive malignancies. Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in malignant tumors. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein acts as an oncoprotein, regulates cell proliferation, and migration in breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on resistance to cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell lines. The mRNA and protein levels of hepatitis B X-interacting protein were detected using RT-PCR and Western blotting in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive tissues, cisplatin-resistant cell lines A2780/CP and SKOV3/CP, and cisplatin-sensitive cell lines A2780 and SKOV3. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured to evaluate cellular sensitivity to cisplatin in A2780/CP cells. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to determine the relationship between hepatitis B X-interacting protein and CD147. The in vivo function of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on tumor burden was assessed in cisplatin-resistant xenograft models. The results showed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was highly expressed in ovarian cancer of cisplatin-resistant tissues and cells. Notably, knockdown of hepatitis B X-interacting protein significantly reduced cell viability in A2780/CP compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein and cisplatin cooperated to induce apoptosis and increase the expression of c-caspase 3 as well as the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. We confirmed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein up-regulated CD147 at the protein expression and transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was able to activate the CD147 promoter through Sp1. In vivo, depletion of hepatitis B X-interacting protein decreased the tumor volume and weight induced by cisplatin. Taken together, these results indicate that hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulated CD147 via Sp1 in

  10. eis Promoter C14G and C15G Mutations Do Not Confer Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pholwat, Suporn; Stroup, Suzanne; Heysell, Scott; Ogarkov, Oleg; Zhdanova, Svetlana; Ramakrishnan, Girija; Houpt, Eric

    2016-12-01

    We studied the significance of particular eis mutations on Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance using a specialized transduction strategy. Recombinant strains harboring eis promoter mutations C14T, C12T, and G10A exhibited kanamycin resistance with MICs of 40, 10, and 20 μg/ml, respectively, while recombinant strains harboring C14G and C15G mutations were kanamycin susceptible (MIC, 2.5 to 5 μg/ml). Each of the eis mutants tested remained amikacin susceptible (MIC, 0.5 to 4 μg/ml). The identification of specific eis mutations is needed for accurate genotypic susceptibility testing for kanamycin.

  11. MDRO - Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards (Lack of) PPE Slips/Trips/Falls Stress Tuberculosis Universal Precautions Workplace Violence Use of Medical Lasers ... PRSP - Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR) TB is covered in HealthCare Wide Hazards ...

  12. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S

    2015-02-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.

  13. A Drought Resistance-Promoting Microbiome Is Selected by Root System under Desert Farming

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Ettoumi, Besma; Vigani, Gianpiero; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Abou-Hadid, Ayman F.; El-Behairy, Usama A.; Sorlini, Claudia; Cherif, Ameur; Zocchi, Graziano; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional agro-systems in arid areas are a bulwark for preserving soil stability and fertility, in the sight of “reverse desertification”. Nevertheless, the impact of desert farming practices on the diversity and abundance of the plant associated microbiome is poorly characterized, including its functional role in supporting plant development under drought stress. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the structure of the microbiome associated to the drought-sensitive pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L.) cultivated in a traditional Egyptian farm, focusing on microbe contribution to a crucial ecosystem service, i.e. plant growth under water deficit. The root system was dissected by sampling root/soil with a different degree of association to the plant: the endosphere, the rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil that were compared to the uncultivated soil. Bacterial community structure and diversity, determined by using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, differed according to the microhabitat, indicating a selective pressure determined by the plant activity. Similarly, culturable bacteria genera showed different distribution in the three root system fractions. Bacillus spp. (68% of the isolates) were mainly recovered from the endosphere, while rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil fractions were dominated by Klebsiella spp. (61% and 44% respectively). Most of the isolates (95%) presented in vitro multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) activities and stress resistance capabilities, but their distribution was different among the root system fractions analyzed, with enhanced abilities for Bacillus and the rhizobacteria strains. We show that the C. annuum rhizosphere under desert farming enriched populations of PGP bacteria capable of enhancing plant photosynthetic activity and biomass synthesis (up to 40%) under drought stress. Conclusions/Significance Crop cultivation provides critical ecosystem services in arid lands with the plant root

  14. Characterization of mal recombination plasmids cloned in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Stassi, D.L.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.; Lacks, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The malM locus of Streptococcus pneumoniae was cloned into one of the two PstI sites of the multicopy S. pneumoniae plasmid pMV158. To eliminate chromosomal transformants in the simultaneous selection for tetracycline resistance (coded by pMV158) and maltose utilization, the host cells contained a chromosomal deletion of the mal gene cluster. Two clones were isolated; one with a 3.3 kb insert (pLS70) which behaved like wild type with respect to maltose utilization, and another with a 2.9 kb insert (pLS69) which behaved as though it contained a down promoter mutation. Preliminary mapping of these clones by restriction analysis placed the 0.4kb deletion on a HindIII fragment in the interior of the chromosomal insert. The recombinant plasmids were able to transform over 50% of a recipient population to Mal/sup +/. Enzyme measurements of the clones indicated an overproduction of amylomaltase, constituting up to 10% of the total cellular protein, and supported the theory that the deletion in the pLS69 is in the promoter region. Protein analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed that the amylomaltase polypeptide was produced in large amounts in induced cells containing the pLS70. Another polypeptide, possibly a fragment of the phosphorylase or X protein of the mal gene cluster, was also produced to a similar extent.

  15. Relations between the occurrence of resistance to antimicrobial growth promoters among Enterococcus faecium isolated from broilers and broiler meat.

    PubMed

    Emborg, H-D; Andersen, J S; Seyfarth, A M; Andersen, S R; Boel, J; Wegener, H C

    2003-08-01

    From 1995 to 2001, Enterococcus faecium isolates were collected from broiler flocks at slaughter and broiler meat products at retail outlets and were tested for susceptibility to classes of antimicrobials used for growth promotion in broilers in Denmark, namely: evernimicin, glycopeptide, macrolide and streptogramin. By February 1998, all antimicrobial growth promoters (AGPs) were withdrawn from the Danish broiler production. The present study investigates, by logistic regression analyses, the (1) changes in the occurrence of AGP resistance among E. faecium from broilers and broiler meat from the fourth quarter of 1995 to the fourth quarter of 2001 and (2) relations between the occurrence of AGP resistance among E. faecium isolates from Danish broilers and AGP resistance among E. faecium isolates from the broiler meat of Danish and unknown origin collected in the same quarter within the year. In the present study, we showed that after the AGP withdrawal, a significant decline in resistance to avilamycin, erythromycin, vancomycin and virginiamycin was observed among E. faecium from broilers and broiler meat. In addition, a decline in the occurrence of AGP resistance among E. faecium from Danish broilers was associated with a decrease in the predicted probability of isolating an AGP-resistant E. faecium isolate from a randomly selected broiler meat product. In the analyses "relations between the occurrence of AGP resistance among E. faecium isolated from broilers and broiler meat collected in the same quarter" errors in the explanatory variable were expected. Therefore, a simulation study was performed to validate the results from logistic regression analyses. The results obtained by the two methods were similar.

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae Recovered from Outpatients with Respiratory Tract Infections in Germany from 1998 to 1999: Results of a National Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Simic, Smiljana; Al-Lahham, Adnan; Reinert, Susanne; Lemperle, Maria; Lütticken, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    Clinically significant pneumococcal isolates were prospectively collected from outpatients with respiratory tract infections by 19 different clinical microbiology laboratories in Germany. Resistance rates in a total of 961 isolates were as follows: penicillin, 6.6%; clarithromycin, 10.6%; tetracycline, 13.9%; and levofloxacin, 0.1%. Among 324 isolates from children, pneumococcal serotypes 19F (17.0%), 23F (13.0%), and 6B (11.7%) were the predominant types. PMID:11230456

  17. The animal food supplement sepiolite promotes a direct horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmids between bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Yubero, Elva; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-06-01

    Animal fodder is routinely complemented with antibiotics together with other food supplements to improve growth. For instance, sepiolite is currently used as a dietary coadjuvant in animal feed, as it increases animal growth parameters and improves meat and derived final product quality. This type of food additive has so far been considered innocuous for the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that sepiolite promotes the direct horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmids between bacterial species. The conditions needed for plasmid transfer (sepiolite and friction forces) occur in the digestive tracts of farm animals, which routinely receive sepiolite as a food additive. Furthermore, this effect may be aggravated by the use of antibiotics supplied as growth promoters.

  18. Substitutions in PBP2b from β-Lactam-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Have Different Effects on Enzymatic Activity and Drug Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Calvez, Philippe; Breukink, Eefjan; Roper, David I; Dib, Mélanie; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Zapun, André

    2017-02-17

    Pneumococcus resists β-lactams by expressing variants of its target enzymes, the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), with many amino acid substitutions. Up to 10% of the sequence can be modified. These altered PBPs have a much reduced reactivity with the drugs but retain their physiological activity of cross-linking the peptidoglycan, the major constituent of the bacterial cell wall. However, because β-lactams are chemical and structural mimics of the natural substrate, resistance mediated by altered PBPs raises the following paradox: how PBPs that react poorly with the drugs maintain a sufficient level of activity with the physiological substrate. This question is addressed for the first time in this study, which compares the peptidoglycan cross-linking activity of PBP2b from susceptible and resistant strains with their inhibition by different β-lactams. Unexpectedly, the enzymatic activity of the variants did not correlate with their antibiotic reactivity. This finding indicates that some of the numerous amino acid substitutions were selected to restore a viable level of enzymatic activity by a compensatory molecular mechanism.

  19. Antibiotic resistance and hypermutability of Escherichia coli O157 from feedlot cattle treated with growth-promoting agents.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Brigitte; Diarra, Moussa S; Giguère, Karine; Roy, Gabriel; Michaud, Sophie; Malouin, François

    2005-11-01

    In a longitudinal study (165 days), we investigated the effect of growth-promoting agents (monensin and trenbolone acetate-estradiol) and an antibiotic (oxytetracycline) on the incidence in feedlot steers of Escherichia coli O157, including antibiotic-resistant and hypermutable isolates. Eighty steers in 16 pens were treated with eight combinations of promoters, and each treatment was duplicated. Fecal samples were collected at nine different sampling times for detection of E. coli O157. Overall, 50 E. coli O157 isolates were detected in treated animals, and none were found in untreated animals. Compared with untreated controls, there was a significant association between the utilization of growth-promoting agents or antibiotics and the shedding of E. coli O157 at day 137 (P = 0.03), when a prevalence peak was observed and 50% of the isolates were detected. Multiplex PCR assays were conducted for some virulence genes. PCR results indicated that all except one isolate possessed at least the Shiga toxin gene stx2. MICs for 12 antibiotics were determined, and eight oxytetracycline-resistant E. coli O157 strains were identified. Antibiotic-resistant strains were considered a distinct subpopulation of E. coli O157 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing. Seven of these antibiotic-resistant strains were isolated early in the study (on or before day 25), and among them two were also hypermutable as determined by rifampin mutation frequencies. The proportion of hypermutable strains among E. coli O157 isolates remained relatively constant throughout the study period. These results indicate that the use of growth-promoting agents and antibiotics in beef production may increase the risk of environmental contamination by E. coli O157.

  20. Genomic analyses of metal resistance genes in three plant growth promoting bacteria of legume plants in Northwest mine tailings, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin; Hao, Xiuli; Herzberg, Martin; Luo, Yantao; Nies, Dietrich H; Wei, Gehong

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the diversity of metal resistance genetic determinant from microbes that survived at metal tailings in northwest of China, a highly elevated level of heavy metal containing region, genomic analyses was conducted using genome sequence of three native metal-resistant plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB). It shows that: Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 contains metal transporters from P-type ATPase, CDF (Cation Diffusion Facilitator), HupE/UreJ and CHR (chromate ion transporter) family involved in copper, zinc, nickel as well as chromate resistance and homeostasis. Meanwhile, the putative CopA/CueO system is expected to mediate copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 while ZntA transporter, assisted with putative CzcD, determines zinc tolerance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens CCNWGS0286. The greenhouse experiment provides the consistent evidence of the plant growth promoting effects of these microbes on their hosts by nitrogen fixation and/or indoleacetic acid (IAA) secretion, indicating a potential in-site phytoremediation usage in the mining tailing regions of China.

  1. Brachyury promotes tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer by targeting SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaichun; Ying, Mingzhen; Feng, Dan; Du, Jie; Chen, Shiyu; Dan, Bing; Wang, Cuihua; Wang, Yajie

    2016-12-01

    Tamoxifen is effective for treating estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancers. However, few molecular mediators of tamoxifen resistance have been elucidated. In the present study, we determine the underlying roles of Brachyury in tamoxifen resistance. Loss- and gain-of-function assay are utilized to confirm the oncogenic roles of Brachyury in breast cancer. Compared with the normal MCF10A cells, Brachyury is commonly overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines. Knockdown of Brachyury inhibits tamoxifen resistance, whereas overexpression of Brachyury enhances tamoxifen resistance as demonstrated increased cell viability and reduced cell apoptosis. Mechanistically, we demonstrate for the first time that Brachyury mediates tamoxifen resistance by regulating Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). Collectively, our data, as a proof of principle, indicate that Brachyury is a candidate marker for predicting the clinical efficacy of tamoxifen and targeting SIRT1 could overcome resistance to tamoxifen in breast cancer cells.

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from clinical cutaneous specimens in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Shoji; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Nakajima, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Amano, Ayako; Matsuzaki, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2016-10-01

    Ozenoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated topical quinolone, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against each 50 isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pyogenes according to the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The isolates used in this study were recovered from cutaneous specimens of Japanese adult and pediatric patients who visited hospitals in 2014. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes isolates from adult patients were ≤0.06, 4 and ≤0.06 μg/mL, respectively. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA and S. pyogenes isolates from pediatric patients were equal to those against the adult isolates. On the other hand, the MIC90s of ozenoxacin against the pediatric MRSA isolates was 0.12 μg/mL, and was 32 times lower than that against the adult isolates. The antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes was equal to or greater than those of 7 reference antimicrobial agents had been used for the treatment of skin infections. The MICs of ozenoxacin was highly correlated with those of nadifloxacin and levofloxacin in the 50 MRSA isolates (r(2) = 0.906 and 0.833, respectively). However, ozenoxacin kept the potent antimicrobial activity with the MIC ranging from 1 to 4 μg/mL even against MRSA low susceptible (MIC: >64 μg/mL) to nadifloxacin or levofloxacin. Ozenoxacin could represent the first-in-class non-fluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of various superficial skin infections caused by MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes.

  3. Highly variable penicillin resistance determinants PBP 2x, PBP 2b, and PBP 1a in isolates of two Streptococcus pneumoniae clonal groups, Poland 23F-16 and Poland 6B-20.

    PubMed

    Izdebski, Radoslaw; Rutschmann, Jens; Fiett, Janusz; Sadowy, Ewa; Gniadkowski, Marek; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2008-03-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in representatives of two Streptococcus pneumoniae clonal groups that are prevalent in Poland, Poland 23F-16 and Poland 6B-20, were investigated by PBP profile analysis, antibody reactivity pattern analysis, and DNA sequence analysis of the transpeptidase (TP) domain-encoding regions of the pbp2x, pbp2b, and pbp1a genes. The isolates differed in their MICs of beta-lactam antibiotics. The majority of the 6B isolates were intermediately susceptible to penicillin (penicillin MICs, 0.12 to 0.5 microg/ml), whereas all 23F isolates were penicillin resistant (MICs, >or=2 microg/ml). The 6B isolates investigated had the same sequence type (ST), determined by multilocus sequence typing, as the Poland 6B-20 reference strain (ST315), but in the 23F group, isolates with three distinct single-locus variants (SLVs) in the ddl gene (ST173, ST272, and ST1506) were included. None of the isolates showed an identical PBP profile after labeling with Bocillin FL and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and only one pair of 6B isolates and one pair of 23F isolates (ST173 and ST272) each contained an identical combination of PBP 2x, PBP 2b, and PBP 1a TP domains. Some 23F isolates contained PBP 3 with an apparently higher electrophoretic mobility, and this feature also did not correlate with their STs. The data document a highly variable pool of PBP genes as a result of multiple gene transfer and recombination events within and between different clonal groups.

  4. Overexpression of Poplar Pyrabactin Resistance-Like Abscisic Acid Receptors Promotes Abscisic Acid Sensitivity and Drought Resistance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingling; Yang, Lei; Liu, Xiaobing; Tang, Renjie; Wang, Yuan; Ge, Haiman; Wu, Mengting; Zhang, Jiang; Zhao, Fugeng; Luan, Sheng; Lan, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is an important environmental factor limiting productivity of plants, especially fast growing species with high water consumption like poplar. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that positively regulates seed dormancy and drought resistance. The PYR1 (Pyrabactin Resistance 1)/ PYRL (PYR-Like)/ RCAR (Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor) (PYR/PYL/RCAR) ABA receptor family has been identified and widely characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, their functions in poplars remain unknown. Here, we report that 2 of 14 PYR/PYL/RCAR orthologues in poplar (Populus trichocarpa) (PtPYRLs) function as a positive regulator of the ABA signal transduction pathway. The Arabidopsis transient expression and yeast two-hybrid assays showed the interaction among PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, a clade A protein phosphatase 2C, and a SnRK2, suggesting that a core signalling complex for ABA signaling pathway exists in poplars. Phenotypic analysis of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 transgenic Arabidopsis showed that these two genes positively regulated the ABA responses during the seed germination. More importantly, the overexpression of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 substantially improved ABA sensitivity and drought stress tolerance in transgenic plants. In summary, we comprehensively uncovered the properties of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, which might be good target genes to genetically engineer drought-Resistant plants.

  5. Overexpression of Poplar Pyrabactin Resistance-Like Abscisic Acid Receptors Promotes Abscisic Acid Sensitivity and Drought Resistance in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaobing; Tang, Renjie; Wang, Yuan; Ge, Haiman; Wu, Mengting; Zhang, Jiang; Zhao, Fugeng; Luan, Sheng; Lan, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is an important environmental factor limiting productivity of plants, especially fast growing species with high water consumption like poplar. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that positively regulates seed dormancy and drought resistance. The PYR1 (Pyrabactin Resistance 1)/ PYRL (PYR-Like)/ RCAR (Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor) (PYR/PYL/RCAR) ABA receptor family has been identified and widely characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, their functions in poplars remain unknown. Here, we report that 2 of 14 PYR/PYL/RCAR orthologues in poplar (Populus trichocarpa) (PtPYRLs) function as a positive regulator of the ABA signal transduction pathway. The Arabidopsis transient expression and yeast two-hybrid assays showed the interaction among PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, a clade A protein phosphatase 2C, and a SnRK2, suggesting that a core signalling complex for ABA signaling pathway exists in poplars. Phenotypic analysis of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 transgenic Arabidopsis showed that these two genes positively regulated the ABA responses during the seed germination. More importantly, the overexpression of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5 substantially improved ABA sensitivity and drought stress tolerance in transgenic plants. In summary, we comprehensively uncovered the properties of PtPYRL1 and PtPYRL5, which might be good target genes to genetically engineer drought-Resistant plants. PMID:27992471

  6. A Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance mechanism that subdues host defences and promotes virulence.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Mills, Grant; Sá-Pessoa, Joana; Dumigan, Amy; Frank, Christian G; Insua, José L; Ingram, Rebecca; Hobley, Laura; Bengoechea, José A

    2017-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of multidrug-resistant infections worldwide. Recent studies highlight the emergence of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae strains which show resistance to colistin, a last-line antibiotic, arising from mutational inactivation of the mgrB regulatory gene. However, the precise molecular resistance mechanisms of mgrB-associated colistin resistance and its impact on virulence remain unclear. Here, we constructed an mgrB gene K. pneumoniae mutant and performed characterisation of its lipid A structure, polymyxin and antimicrobial peptide resistance, virulence and inflammatory responses upon infection. Our data reveal that mgrB mutation induces PhoPQ-governed lipid A remodelling which confers not only resistance to polymyxins, but also enhances K. pneumoniae virulence by decreasing antimicrobial peptide susceptibility and attenuating early host defence response activation. Overall, our findings have important implications for patient management and antimicrobial stewardship, while also stressing antibiotic resistance development is not inexorably linked with subdued bacterial fitness and virulence.

  7. GLUT3 upregulation promotes metabolic reprogramming associated with antiangiogenic therapy resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Ruby; Jahangiri, Arman; Mascharak, Smita; Nguyen, Alan; Flanigan, Patrick M.; Yagnik, Garima; Wagner, Jeffrey R.; De Lay, Michael; Carrera, Diego; Castro, Brandyn A.; Hayes, Josie; Sidorov, Maxim; Garcia, Jose Luiz Izquierdo; Eriksson, Pia; Ronen, Sabrina; Phillips, Joanna; Koliwad, Suneil; Aghi, Manish K.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials revealed limited response duration of glioblastomas to VEGF-neutralizing antibody bevacizumab. Thriving in the devascularized microenvironment occurring after antiangiogenic therapy requires tumor cell adaptation to decreased glucose, with 50% less glucose identified in bevacizumab-treated xenografts. Compared with bevacizumab-responsive xenograft cells, resistant cells exhibited increased glucose uptake, glycolysis, 13C NMR pyruvate to lactate conversion, and survival in low glucose. Glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) was upregulated in bevacizumab-resistant versus sensitive xenografts and patient specimens in a HIF-1α–dependent manner. Resistant versus sensitive cell mitochondria in oxidative phosphorylation–selective conditions produced less ATP. Despite unchanged mitochondrial numbers, normoxic resistant cells had lower mitochondrial membrane potential than sensitive cells, confirming poorer mitochondrial health, but avoided the mitochondrial dysfunction of hypoxic sensitive cells. Thin-layer chromatography revealed increased triglycerides in bevacizumab-resistant versus sensitive xenografts, a change driven by mitochondrial stress. A glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor suppressing GLUT3 transcription caused greater cell death in bevacizumab-resistant than -responsive cells. Overexpressing GLUT3 in tumor cells recapitulated bevacizumab-resistant cell features: survival and proliferation in low glucose, increased glycolysis, impaired oxidative phosphorylation, and rapid in vivo proliferation only slowed by bevacizumab to that of untreated bevacizumab-responsive tumors. Targeting GLUT3 or the increased glycolysis reliance in resistant tumors could unlock the potential of antiangiogenic treatments. PMID:28138554

  8. Selective chemical inhibition of agr quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus promotes host defense with minimal impact on resistance.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O; Alexander, Susan M; Femling, Jon K; Gray, Brian M; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Horswill, Alexander R; Hall, Pamela R; Gresham, Hattie D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  9. Selective Chemical Inhibition of agr Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Host Defense with Minimal Impact on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O.; Alexander, Susan M.; Femling, Jon K.; Gray, Brian M.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Hall, Pamela R.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  10. Characterization of cadmium-resistant bacteria for its potential in promoting plant growth and cadmium accumulation in Sesbania bispinosa root.

    PubMed

    Kartik, V P; Jinal, H N; Amaresan, N

    2016-11-01

    The cadmium (Cd) resistant bacteria were isolated from soils of Damanganga river, Vapi, and identified 11 potential Cd resistant bacteria based on 16S rDNA sequences. The Cd resistant bacteria belonged to four different genera: Providencia spp., Morganella sp., Stenotrophomonas sp., and Bacillus spp. The assessment of plant growth-promoting (PGP) parameters revealed that the Cd tolerant bacteria showed one or more PGP properties. Further, a pot experiment was conducted to elucidate the effects of Cd resistant bacteria on the plant growth and the uptake of Cd by Sesbania bispinosa. The bacterized seedlings recorded 36.0-74.8% and 21.2-32.9% higher root and shoot lengths, respectively, in Cd amended soil compared with control. The Cd mobilization in the root of S. bispinosa by microbial inoculants ranged from 0.02 ± 0.01 to 1.11 ± 0.06 ppm. The enhanced concentrations of Cd accumulation in S. bispinosa roots correspond to the effect of the bacterial strains on metal mobilization in soil. The present observations showed that the Cd resistant strains protect the plants against the inhibitory effects of Cd, probably due to the production of PGP properties. The present results provided a new insight into the phytoremediation of Cd contaminated soil.

  11. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Results Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly

  12. GM trees with increased resistance to herbivores: trait efficiency and their potential to promote tree growth.

    PubMed

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E Petter

    2015-01-01

    Climate change, as well as a more intensive forestry, is expected to increase the risk of damage by pests and pathogens on trees, which can already be a severe problem in tree plantations. Recent development of biotechnology theoretically allows for resistance enhancement that could help reduce these risks but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of benefits and tradeoffs with pest resistant GM (genetically modified) trees. We synthesized the current knowledge on the effectiveness of GM forest trees with increased resistance to herbivores. There is ample evidence that induction of exogenous Bacillus thuringiensis genes reduce performance of target pests whereas upregulation of endogenous resistance traits e.g., phenolics, generates variable results. Our review identified very few studies estimating the realized benefits in tree growth of GM trees in the field. This is concerning as the realized benefit with insect resistant GM plants seems to be context-dependent and likely manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. Future studies of secondary pest species and resistance evolution in pest to GM trees should be prioritized. But most importantly we need more long-term field tests to evaluate the benefits and risks with pest resistant GM trees.

  13. Activation of Pim Kinases Is Sufficient to Promote Resistance to MET Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    An, Ningfei; Xiong, Ying; LaRue, Amanda C.; Kraft, Andrew S.; Cen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    MET blockade offers a new targeted therapy particularly in those cancers with MET amplification. However, the efficacy and the duration of the response to MET inhibitors are limited by the emergence of drug resistance. Here we report that resistance to small molecule inhibitors of MET can arise from increased expression of the pro-survival Pim protein kinases. This resistance mechanism was documented in non-small cell lung cancer and gastric cancer cells with MET amplification. Inhibition of Pim kinases enhanced cell death triggered by short-term treatment with MET inhibitors. Pim kinases control the translation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 at an internal ribosome entry site and this mechanism was identified as the basis for Pim-mediated resistance to MET inhibitors. Protein synthesis was increased in drug-resistant cells, secondary to a Pim-mediated increase in cap-independent translation. In cells rendered drug resistant by chronic treatment with MET inhibitors, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Pim kinases was sufficient to restore sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results rationalize Pim inhibition as a strategy to augment responses and blunt acquired resistance to MET inhibitors in cancer. PMID:26670562

  14. GM trees with increased resistance to herbivores: trait efficiency and their potential to promote tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E. Petter

    2015-01-01

    Climate change, as well as a more intensive forestry, is expected to increase the risk of damage by pests and pathogens on trees, which can already be a severe problem in tree plantations. Recent development of biotechnology theoretically allows for resistance enhancement that could help reduce these risks but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of benefits and tradeoffs with pest resistant GM (genetically modified) trees. We synthesized the current knowledge on the effectiveness of GM forest trees with increased resistance to herbivores. There is ample evidence that induction of exogenous Bacillus thuringiensis genes reduce performance of target pests whereas upregulation of endogenous resistance traits e.g., phenolics, generates variable results. Our review identified very few studies estimating the realized benefits in tree growth of GM trees in the field. This is concerning as the realized benefit with insect resistant GM plants seems to be context-dependent and likely manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. Future studies of secondary pest species and resistance evolution in pest to GM trees should be prioritized. But most importantly we need more long-term field tests to evaluate the benefits and risks with pest resistant GM trees. PMID:25983736

  15. Hypoxia promotes 786-O cells invasiveness and resistance to sorafenib via HIF-2α/COX-2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Xiong; Luo, Chun-Li; Wu, Xiao-Hou

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidences indicated that hypoxia-induced factors and COX-2 play a important role in tumorigenesis in various human cancer. Yet, the relationship between HIFs and COX-2 in human renal cancer remains unclear. The present study was to examine the role of HIFs and COX-2 in the invasiveness and the resistance to target agent in renal cancer cell line (786-O). In 786-O cells, hypoxia induced the increase in the protein expression of HIF1 and HIF2. We also demonstrate that hypoxia up-regulated the protein expression of COX-2 and Snail, but down-regulation of E-cadherin expression in 786-O cells promoted the invasiveness of 786-O cells and enhanced the resistance of 786-O cells to sorafenib. siRNA target to HIF1α, HIF2α and NS398, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, were used in this study. Only siRNA-HIF2α significantly suppressed the protein expression of HIF2 and COX-2, then decreased the invasive ability and resistance of 786-O cells to sorafenib under hypoxia. NS398 attenuated the increase in invasive cells number and the IC50 value of sorafenib induced by hypoxia. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that hypoxia promoted the invasiveness and resistance of 786-O cells to sorafenib via HIF2 and COX-2 and induced the activation of Snail/E-cadherin, suggesting that a signalling mechanism involving HIF2/COX2 modulates invasiveness and resistance to sorafenib in 786-O cells under hypoxia.

  16. Previous respiratory tract infections and antibiotic consumption in children with long- and short-term carriage of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, O.; Ekdahl, K.

    1998-01-01

    Previous respiratory tract infections (RTI) and antibiotics consumption as possible risk factors for extended duration of PRP carriage were investigated in 24 children (cases) with previous carriage of penicillin-resistant pneumococci (PRP) for a duration exceeding 120 days (median 168 days) and a control group of 53 children with a duration of PRP carriage less than 90 days (median 21 days). The cases had experienced 0.99 episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) per life-year compared to 0.79 episodes in the controls (P = 0.32). For antibiotic-treated RTI other than AOM, the corresponding numbers were 0.49 and 0.29 episodes per life-year, respectively (P = 0.01). No differences in antibiotic consumption in the 3 months preceding the carriage, nor during the carriage period were noted. Other factors than impaired host defence to respiratory tract pathogens or antibiotics consumption seem to be more important in determining the duration of PRP carriage. PMID:10030700

  17. Virulence Factors of Geminivirus Interact with MYC2 to Subvert Plant Resistance and Promote Vector Performance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Weldegergis, Berhane T.; Li, Jie; Jung, Choonkyun; Qu, Jing; Sun, Yanwei; Qian, Hongmei; Tee, ChuanSia; van Loon, Joop J.A.; Dicke, Marcel; Chua, Nam-Hai; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A pathogen may cause infected plants to promote the performance of its transmitting vector, which accelerates the spread of the pathogen. This positive effect of a pathogen on its vector via their shared host plant is termed indirect mutualism. For example, terpene biosynthesis is suppressed in begomovirus-infected plants, leading to reduced plant resistance and enhanced performance of the whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) that transmit these viruses. Although begomovirus-whitefly mutualism has been known, the underlying mechanism is still elusive. Here, we identified βC1 of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus, a monopartite begomovirus, as the viral genetic factor that suppresses plant terpene biosynthesis. βC1 directly interacts with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2 to compromise the activation of MYC2-regulated terpene synthase genes, thereby reducing whitefly resistance. MYC2 associates with the bipartite begomoviral protein BV1, suggesting that MYC2 is an evolutionarily conserved target of begomoviruses for the suppression of terpene-based resistance and the promotion of vector performance. Our findings describe how this viral pathogen regulates host plant metabolism to establish mutualism with its insect vector. PMID:25490915

  18. Imidacloprid Promotes High Fat Diet-Induced Adiposity and Insulin Resistance in Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide widely used in agriculture worldwide, has been reported to promote adipogenesis and cause insulin resistance in vitro. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of imidacloprid and its interaction with dietary fat in the development of adiposity and insulin resistance using male C57BL/6J mice. Imidacloprid (0.06, 0.6, or 6 mg/kg bw/day) was mixed in a low-fat (4% w/w) or high-fat (20% w/w) diet and given to mice ad libitum for 12 weeks. Imidacloprid significantly promoted high fat diet-induced body weight gain and adiposity. In addition, imidacloprid treatment with the high fat diet resulted in impaired glucose metabolism. Consistently, there were significant effects of imidacloprid on genes regulating lipid and glucose metabolisms, including the AMP-activated protein kinase-α (AMPKα) pathway in white adipose tissue and liver. These results suggest that imidacloprid may potentiate high fat diet-induced adiposity and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. PMID:27960282

  19. Imidacloprid Promotes High Fat Diet-Induced Adiposity and Insulin Resistance in Male C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Quancai; Xiao, Xiao; Kim, Yoo; Kim, Daeyoung; Yoon, Kyoon Sup; Clark, John M; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-12-14

    Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide widely used in agriculture worldwide, has been reported to promote adipogenesis and cause insulin resistance in vitro. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of imidacloprid and its interaction with dietary fat in the development of adiposity and insulin resistance using male C57BL/6J mice. Imidacloprid (0.06, 0.6, or 6 mg/kg bw/day) was mixed in a low-fat (4% w/w) or high-fat (20% w/w) diet and given to mice ad libitum for 12 weeks. Imidacloprid significantly promoted high fat diet-induced body weight gain and adiposity. In addition, imidacloprid treatment with the high fat diet resulted in impaired glucose metabolism. Consistently, there were significant effects of imidacloprid on genes regulating lipid and glucose metabolisms, including the AMP-activated protein kinase-α (AMPKα) pathway in white adipose tissue and liver. These results suggest that imidacloprid may potentiate high fat diet-induced adiposity and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice.

  20. NADPH oxidase-mediated redox signaling promotes oxidative stress resistance and longevity through memo-1 in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Collin Yvès; Hourihan, John M; Bland, Monet S; Obieglo, Carolin; Katic, Iskra; Moronetti Mazzeo, Lorenza E; Alcedo, Joy; Blackwell, T Keith; Hynes, Nancy E

    2017-01-01

    Transient increases in mitochondrially-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate an adaptive stress response to promote longevity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases produce ROS locally in response to various stimuli, and thereby regulate many cellular processes, but their role in aging remains unexplored. Here, we identified the C. elegans orthologue of mammalian mediator of ErbB2-driven cell motility, MEMO-1, as a protein that inhibits BLI-3/NADPH oxidase. MEMO-1 is complexed with RHO-1/RhoA/GTPase and loss of memo-1 results in an enhanced interaction of RHO-1 with BLI-3/NADPH oxidase, thereby stimulating ROS production that signal via p38 MAP kinase to the transcription factor SKN-1/NRF1,2,3 to promote stress resistance and longevity. Either loss of memo-1 or increasing BLI-3/NADPH oxidase activity by overexpression is sufficient to increase lifespan. Together, these findings demonstrate that NADPH oxidase-induced redox signaling initiates a transcriptional response that protects the cell and organism, and can promote both stress resistance and longevity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19493.001 PMID:28085666

  1. NADPH oxidase-mediated redox signaling promotes oxidative stress resistance and longevity through memo-1 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Collin Yvès; Hourihan, John M; Bland, Monet S; Obieglo, Carolin; Katic, Iskra; Moronetti Mazzeo, Lorenza E; Alcedo, Joy; Blackwell, T Keith; Hynes, Nancy E

    2017-01-13

    Transient increases in mitochondrially-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate an adaptive stress response to promote longevity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases produce ROS locally in response to various stimuli, and thereby regulate many cellular processes, but their role in aging remains unexplored. Here, we identified the C. elegans orthologue of mammalian mediator of ErbB2-driven cell motility, MEMO-1, as a protein that inhibits BLI-3/NADPH oxidase. MEMO-1 is complexed with RHO-1/RhoA/GTPase and loss of memo-1 results in an enhanced interaction of RHO-1 with BLI-3/NADPH oxidase, thereby stimulating ROS production that signal via p38 MAP kinase to the transcription factor SKN-1/NRF1,2,3 to promote stress resistance and longevity. Either loss of memo-1 or increasing BLI-3/NADPH oxidase activity by overexpression is sufficient to increase lifespan. Together, these findings demonstrate that NADPH oxidase-induced redox signaling initiates a transcriptional response that protects the cell and organism, and can promote both stress resistance and longevity.

  2. Bacterial Community Shift Drives Antibiotic Resistance Promotion during Drinking Water Chlorination.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuyu; Shi, Peng; Hu, Qing; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2015-10-20

    For comprehensive insights into the effects of chlorination, a widely used disinfection technology, on bacterial community and antibiotic resistome in drinking water, this study applied high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic approaches to investigate the changing patterns of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial community in a drinking water treatment and distribution system. At genus level, chlorination could effectively remove Methylophilus, Methylotenera, Limnobacter, and Polynucleobacter, while increase the relative abundance of Pseudomonas, Acidovorax, Sphingomonas, Pleomonas, and Undibacterium in the drinking water. A total of 151 ARGs within 15 types were detectable in the drinking water, and chlorination evidently increased their total relative abundance while reduced their diversity in the opportunistic bacteria (p < 0.05). Residual chlorine was identified as the key contributing factor driving the bacterial community shift and resistome alteration. As the dominant persistent ARGs in the treatment and distribution system, multidrug resistance genes (mainly encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division transportation system) and bacitracin resistance gene bacA were mainly carried by chlorine-resistant bacteria Pseudomonas and Acidovorax, which mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. The strong correlation between bacterial community shift and antibiotic resistome alteration observed in this study may shed new light on the mechanism behind the chlorination effects on antibiotic resistance.

  3. Fas (CD95) expression in myeloid cells promotes obesity-induced muscle insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wueest, Stephan; Mueller, Rouven; Blüher, Matthias; Item, Flurin; Chin, Annie S H; Wiedemann, Michael S F; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Kovtonyuk, Larisa; Chervonsky, Alexander V; Schoenle, Eugen J; Manz, Markus G; Konrad, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver has been implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Yet, the contribution of inflammatory cells to the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. In a large cohort of obese human individuals, blood monocyte Fas (CD95) expression correlated with systemic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. To test a causal role for myeloid cell Fas expression in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, we generated myeloid/haematopoietic cell-specific Fas-depleted mice. Myeloid/haematopoietic Fas deficiency prevented the development of glucose intolerance in high fat-fed mice, in ob/ob mice, and in mice acutely challenged by LPS. In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated preservation of muscle insulin responsiveness with no effect on adipose tissue or liver. Studies using neutralizing antibodies demonstrated a role for TNFα as mediator between myeloid Fas and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, supported by significant correlations between monocyte Fas expression and circulating TNFα in humans. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an unanticipated crosstalk between myeloid cells and skeletal muscle in the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24203314

  4. Interferon resistance promotes oncolysis by influenza virus NS1-deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Muster, Thomas; Rajtarova, Julia; Sachet, Monika; Unger, Hermann; Fleischhacker, Reinhard; Romirer, Ingrid; Grassauer, Andreas; Url, Angelika; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Wolff, Klaus; Pehamberger, Hubert; Bergmann, Michael

    2004-05-20

    NS1 protein of influenza virus is a virulence factor that counteracts Type I interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral response by the host. A recombinant influenza A virus that lacks the NS1 protein only replicates efficiently in systems that contain defective IFN pathways. We demonstrate that the conditional replication properties of NS1-modified influenza A virus mutants can be exploited for the virus-mediated oncolysis of IFN-resistant tumor cells. IFN resistance in analyzed tumor cell lines correlated with a reduced expression of STAT1. Addition of exogenous IFNalpha or supernatant of virus-infected endothelial cells inhibited viral oncolysis in IFN-sensitive but not in IFN-resistant cell lines. The oncolytic potential of NS1-modified influenza A virus mutants could be exploited in vivo in a SCID mouse model of a subcutaneously-implanted human IFN-resistant melanoma. The data indicate that IFN-resistant tumors are a suitable target for oncolysis induced by NS1-modified influenza virus mutants. STAT1 might