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Sample records for stress fracture management

  1. Lower limb stress fractures in sport: Optimising their management and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Greg A J; Wood, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    Stress fractures in sport are becoming increasing more common, comprising up to 10% of all of sporting injuries. Around 90% of such injuries are located in the lower limb. This articles aims to define the optimal management of lower limb stress fractures in the athlete, with a view to maximise return rates and minimise return times to sport. Treatment planning of this condition is specific to the location of the injury. However, there remains a clear division of stress fractures by “high” and “low” risk. “Low risk” stress fractures are those with a low probability of fracture propagation, delayed union, or non-union, and so can be managed reliably with rest and exercise limitation. These include stress fractures of the Postero-Medial Tibial Diaphysis, Metatarsal Shafts, Distal Fibula, Medial Femoral Neck, Femoral Shaft and Calcaneus. “High risk” stress fractures, in contrast, have increased rates of fracture propagation, displacement, delayed and non-union, and so require immediate cessation of activity, with orthopaedic referral, to assess the need for surgical intervention. These include stress fractures of the Anterior Tibial Diaphysis, Fifth Metatarsal Base, Medial Malleolus, Lateral Femoral Neck, Tarsal Navicular and Great Toe Sesamoids. In order to establish the optimal methods for managing these injuries, we present and review the current evidence which guides the treatment of stress fractures in athletes. From this, we note an increased role for surgical management of certain high risk stress fractures to improve return times and rates to sport. Following this, key recommendations are provided for the management of the common stress fracture types seen in the athlete. Five case reports are also presented to illustrate the application of sport-focussed lower limb stress fracture treatment in the clinical setting. PMID:28361017

  2. High-Risk Stress Fractures: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Kelly C; Ramey, Lindsay N

    2016-03-01

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes. They occur during periods of increased training without adequate rest, disrupting normal bone reparative mechanisms. There are a host of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including biochemical and biomechanical, that put athletes at risk. In most stress fractures, the diagnosis is primarily clinical, with imaging indicated at times, and management focused on symptom-free relative rest with advancement of activity as tolerated. Overall, stress fractures in athletes have an excellent prognosis for return to sport, with little risk of complication. There is a subset of injuries that have a greater risk of fracture progression, delayed healing, and nonunion and are generally more challenging to treat with nonoperative care. Specific locations of high-risk stress fracture include the femoral neck (tension side), patella, anterior tibia, medial malleolus, talus, tarsal navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and great toe sesamoids. These sites share a characteristic region of high tensile load and low blood flow. High-risk stress fractures require a more aggressive approach to evaluation, with imaging often necessary, to confirm early and accurate diagnosis and initiate immediate treatment. Treatment consists of nonweight-bearing immobilization, often with a prolonged period away from sport, and a more methodic and careful reintroduction to athletic activity. These stress fractures may require surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis and optimize outcomes in this subset of stress fractures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stress fracture of the second proximal phalanx of the foot in teenage athletes: Unrecognized location of stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Taketomi, Shuji; Funakoshi, Yusei; Tsuchiya, Kan; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Kimura, Seiji; Sadamasu, Aya; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-10-01

    Adolescent athletes are a high-risk population for stress fractures. We report four cases of stress fractures of the second proximal phalanx, which had not been previously diagnosed as the location of the stress fracture of the foot, in teenage athletes. All fractures were on the plantar side of the proximal phalangeal base, and the oblique images of the plain radiograph clearly depicted the fractures. Notably, three out of the four patients had histories of stress fracture of other locations. While three athletes with acute cases were able to make an early return to play with simple conservative management, the chronic case required surgical treatment for this rare injury. Although a rare injury, it is important that clinicians be aware of this type of stress fracture, as a timely diagnosis can avoid the need for surgical treatment and allow an early return to play.

  4. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  5. Altered-stress fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Branagan, P.T.

    Altered-stress fracturing is a concept whereby a hydraulic fracture in one well is reoriented by another hydraulic fracture in a nearby location. The application is in tight, naturally fractured, anisotropic reservoirs in which conventional hydraulic fractures parallel the highly permeable natural fractures and little production enhancement is achieved by conventional hydraulic fracturing. Altered-stress fracturing can modify the stress field so that hydraulic fractures propagate across the permeable natural fractures. A field test was conducted in which stress changes of 250 to 300 psi (1.7 to 2.1 MPa) were measured in an offset well 120 ft (37 m) away during relativelymore » small minifracs in a production well. These results show that stress-altered fracturing is possible at this site and others. Analytic and finite element calculations quantify the effects of layers, stresses, and crack size. Reservoir calculations show significant enhancement compared to conventional treatments. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  6. Taking a holistic approach to managing difficult stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy L; Best, Thomas M

    2016-09-09

    Stress fractures and other bony stress injuries occur along a spectrum of severity which can impact treatment and prognosis. When treating these injuries, it should be borne in mind that no two stress fractures behave exactly alike. Given that they are not a consistent injury, standardized treatment protocols can be challenging to develop. Treatment should be individualized to the patient or athlete, the causative activity, the anatomical site, and the severity of the injury. A holistic approach to the treatment of the most difficult stress fractures should be taken by orthopedists and sports medicine specialists. This approach is necessary to obtain optimal outcomes, minimize loss of fitness and time away from sports participation, and decrease the risk of recurrence.

  7. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Welck, M J; Hayes, T; Pastides, P; Khan, W; Rudge, B

    2017-08-01

    Stress fractures occur as a result of microscopic injuries sustained when bone is subjected to repeated submaximal stresses. Overtime, with repeated cycles of loading, accumulation of such injuries can lead to macro-structural failure and frank fracture. There are numerous stress fractures about the foot and ankle of which a trauma and orthopaedic surgeon should be aware. These include: metatarsal, tibia, calcaneus, navicular, fibula, talus, medial malleolus, sesamoid, cuneiform and cuboid. Awareness of these fractures is important as the diagnosis is frequently missed and appropriate treatment delayed. Late identification can be associated with protracted pain and disability, and may predispose to non-union and therefore necessitate operative intervention. This article outlines the epidemiology and risk factors, aetiology, presentation and management of the range of stress fractures in the foot and ankle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stress fractures about the tibia, foot, and ankle.

    PubMed

    Shindle, Michael K; Endo, Yoshimi; Warren, Russell F; Lane, Joseph M; Helfet, David L; Schwartz, Elliott N; Ellis, Scott J

    2012-03-01

    In competitive athletes, stress fractures of the tibia, foot, and ankle are common and lead to considerable delay in return to play. Factors such as bone vascularity, training regimen, and equipment can increase the risk of stress fracture. Management is based on the fracture site. In some athletes, metabolic workup and medication are warranted. High-risk fractures, including those of the anterior tibial diaphysis, navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and medial malleolus, present management challenges and may require surgery, especially in high-level athletes who need to return to play quickly. Noninvasive treatment modalities such as pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shock wave therapy may have some benefit but require additional research.

  9. An unusual stress fracture: Bilateral posterior longitudinal stress fracture of tibia.

    PubMed

    Malkoc, Melih; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Ormeci, Tugrul; Oltulu, Ismail; Isyar, Mehmet; Mahirogulları, Mahir

    2014-01-01

    Stress fractures (SF) occur when healthy bone is subjected to cyclic loading, which the normal carrying range capacity is exceeded. Usually, stress fractures occur at the metatarsal bones, calcaneus, proximal or distal tibia and tends to be unilateral. This article presents a 58-year-old male patient with bilateral posterior longitudinal tibial stress fractures. A 58 years old male suffering for persistent left calf pain and decreased walking distance for last one month and after imaging studies posterior longitudinal tibial stress fracture was detected on his left tibia. After six months the patient was admitted to our clinic with the same type of complaints in his right leg. All imaging modalities and blood counts were performed and as a result longitudinal posterior tibial stress fractures were detected on his right tibia. Treatment of tibial stress fracture includes rest and modified activity, followed by a graded return to activity commensurate with bony healing. We have applied the same treatment protocol and our results were acceptable but our follow up time short for this reason our study is restricted for separate stress fractures of the posterior tibia. Although the main localization of tibial stress fractures were unilateral, anterior and transverse pattern, rarely, like in our case, the unusual bilateral posterior localization and longitudinal pattern can be seen. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Lower thoracic rib stress fractures in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Gerrie, Brayden J; Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures of the first rib on the dominant throwing side are well-described in baseball pitchers; however, lower thoracic rib fractures are not commonly recognized. While common in other sports such as rowing, there is scant literature on these injuries in baseball. Intercostal muscle strains are commonly diagnosed in baseball pitchers and have a nearly identical presentation but also a highly variable healing time. The diagnosis of a rib stress fracture can predict a more protracted recovery. This case series presents two collegiate baseball pitchers on one team during the same season who were originally diagnosed with intercostal muscle strains, which following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were found to have actually sustained lower thoracic rib stress fractures. The first sustained a stress fracture of the posterior aspect of the right 8th rib on the dominant arm side, while the second presented with a left-sided 10th rib stress fracture on the nondominant arm side. In both cases, MRI was used to visualize the fractures as plain radiographs are insensitive and commonly negative early in patient presentation. Patients were treated with activity modification, and symptomatic management for 4-6 weeks with a graduated return to throwing and competition by 8-10 weeks. The repetitive high stresses incurred by pitching may cause either dominant or nondominant rib stress fractures and this should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic injuries in throwers. It is especially important that athletic trainers and team physicians consider this diagnosis, as rib fractures may have a protracted course and delayed return to play. Additionally, using the appropriate imaging techniques to establish an accurate diagnosis can help inform return-to-play decisions, which have important practical applications in baseball, such as roster management and eligibility.

  11. Epidemiology of metatarsal stress fractures versus tibial and femoral stress fractures during elite training.

    PubMed

    Finestone, Aharon; Milgrom, Charles; Wolf, Omer; Petrov, Kaloyan; Evans, Rachel; Moran, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The training of elite infantry recruits takes a year or more. Stress fractures are known to be endemic in their basic training and the clinical presentation of tibial, femoral, and metatarsal stress fractures are different. Stress fracture incidence during the subsequent progressively more demanding training is not known. The study hypothesis was that after an adaptation period, the incidence of stress fractures during the course of 1 year of elite infantry training would fall in spite of the increasingly demanding training. Seventy-six male elite infantry recruits were followed for the development of stress fractures during a progressively more difficult training program composed of basic training (1 to 14 weeks), advanced training (14 to 26 weeks), and unit training (26 to 52 weeks). Subjects were reviewed regularly and those with clinical suspicion of stress fracture were assessed using bone scan and X-rays. The incidence of stress fractures was 20% during basic training, 14% during advanced training and 23% during unit training. There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of tibial and femoral stress fractures versus metatarsal stress fractures before and after the completion of phase II training at week 26 (p=0.0001). Seventy-eight percent of the stress fractures during phases I and II training were either tibial or femoral, while 91% of the stress fractures in phase III training were metatarsal. Prior participation in ball sports (p=0.02) and greater tibial length (p=0.05) were protective factors for stress fracture. The study hypothesis that after a period of soldier adaptation, the incidence of stress fractures would decrease in spite of the increasingly demanding elite infantry training was found to be true for tibial and femoral fractures after 6 months of training but not for metatarsal stress fractures. Further studies are required to understand the mechanism of this difference but physicians and others treating stress fractures

  12. Stress fracture of ulna due to excessive push-ups.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Rastogi, Devarshi; Solanki, Bipin; Chowdhury, Buddhadev

    2014-01-01

    Stress fractures are most common in the weight-bearing bones of the lower extremities and spine, but are rarely found in non-weight-bearing bones of the body. Stress fracture of the ulna is extremely rare. We report a case of complete stress fracture of ulna caused due to excessive push ups in a young athlete. Conservative management was successful in healing of fracture and returning this patient back to his previous activity level. Physician should have high index of suspicion, whenever they encounter a young athlete complaining of forearm pain.

  13. Lower extremity and pelvic stress fractures in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Liong, S Y; Whitehouse, R W

    2012-01-01

    Stress fractures occur following excessive use and are commonly seen in athletes, in whom the lower limbs are frequently involved. Delayed diagnosis and management of these injuries can result in significant long-term damage and athlete morbidity. A high index of suspicion may facilitate diagnosis, but clinical presentation may be non-specific. In this regard, imaging in the form of plain radiograph, CT, MRI and bone scintigraphy may be of value. This article reviews the incidence, presentation, radiological findings and management options for athletes with stress fractures of the lower limb. PMID:22815414

  14. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle in athletes.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Stephanie W; Joyner, Patrick W; Almekinders, Louis C; Parekh, Selene G

    2014-11-01

    Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Clinical review. Level 5. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient.

  15. Stress fractures: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Matcuk, George R; Mahanty, Scott R; Skalski, Matthew R; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Stress fracture, in its most inclusive description, includes both fatigue and insufficiency fracture. Fatigue fractures, sometimes equated with the term "stress fractures," are most common in runners and other athletes and typically occur in the lower extremities. These fractures are the result of abnormal, cyclical loading on normal bone leading to local cortical resorption and fracture. Insufficiency fractures are common in elderly populations, secondary to osteoporosis, and are typically located in and around the pelvis. They are a result of normal or traumatic loading on abnormal bone. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the hip or knee may cause acute pain that may present in the emergency setting. Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of stress injury of the tibia related to activity and is a clinical syndrome encompassing a range of injuries from stress edema to frank-displaced fracture. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy is also a recently discovered entity that needs early recognition to prevent progression to a complete fracture. Imaging recommendations for evaluation of stress fractures include initial plain radiographs followed, if necessary, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is preferred over computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy. Radiographs are the first-line modality and may reveal linear sclerosis and periosteal reaction prior to the development of a frank fracture. MRI is highly sensitive with findings ranging from periosteal edema to bone marrow and intracortical signal abnormality. Additionally, a brief description of relevant clinical management of stress fractures is included.

  16. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  17. Update on stress fractures in female athletes: epidemiology, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Ting; Tenforde, Adam S; Fredericson, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Stress fractures are a common type of overuse injury in athletes. Females have unique risk factors such as the female athlete triad that contribute to stress fracture injuries. We review the current literature on risk factors for stress fractures, including the role of sports participation and nutrition factors. Discussion of the management of stress fractures is focused on radiographic criteria and anatomic location and how these contribute to return to play guidelines. We outline the current recommendations for evaluating and treatment of female athlete triad. Technologies that may aid in recovery from a stress fracture including use of anti-gravity treadmills are discussed. Prevention strategies may include early screening of female athlete triad, promoting early participation in activities that improve bone health, nutritional strategies, gait modification, and orthotics.

  18. First-rib stress fracture in two adolescent swimmers: a case report.

    PubMed

    Low, Sara; Kern, Michael; Atanda, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    First-rib stress fractures have been described in adolescent athletes in various sports, with only one prior case report of first-rib stress fractures in an adolescent female swimmer. There is a need for research on the cause, management, and prevention of these injuries as they lead to significant morbidity and critical time away from sport for these aspiring athletes. We aimed to describe first-rib stress fractures as a potential cause for non-specific atraumatic chronic shoulder pain in adolescent swimmers and to discuss the different presentations, unique risk factors, treatment, and potential injury prevention strategies of such fractures. We discussed two such cases which were successfully treated with activity modification with restriction of all overhead activity, gradually progressive physical therapy and a return to swimming protocol. First-rib stress fractures can vary in presentation and should be in the differential diagnosis in adolescent swimmers with chronic shoulder pain. These injuries can be successfully managed with rest from overhead activities and physical therapy. Gradual return to competitive swimming can be achieved even with non-union of a first-rib stress fracture. Emphasis on balanced strength training in different muscle groups and proper swimming technique is essential to prevent these injuries.

  19. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000553.htm Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that ...

  20. Stress fractures of the ribs and upper extremities: causation, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy L; Harris, Joshua D; Kaeding, Christopher C

    2013-08-01

    Stress fractures are common troublesome injuries in athletes and non-athletes. Historically, stress fractures have been thought to predominate in the lower extremities secondary to the repetitive stresses of impact loading. Stress injuries of the ribs and upper extremities are much less common and often unrecognized. Consequently, these injuries are often omitted from the differential diagnosis of rib or upper extremity pain. Given the infrequency of this diagnosis, few case reports or case series have reported on their precipitating activities and common locations. Appropriate evaluation for these injuries requires a thorough history and physical examination. Radiographs may be negative early, requiring bone scintigraphy or MRI to confirm the diagnosis. Nonoperative and operative treatment recommendations are made based on location, injury classification, and causative activity. An understanding of the most common locations of upper extremity stress fractures and their associated causative activities is essential for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment.

  1. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    PubMed Central

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E; Games, Kenneth E; Wasik, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. PMID:25848327

  2. Foot and Ankle Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Greaser, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of stress fractures in the general athletic population is less than 1%, but may be as high as 15% in runners. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle account for almost half of bone stress injuries in athletes. These injuries occur because of repetitive submaximal stresses on the bone resulting in microfractures, which may coalesce to form complete fractures. Advanced imaging such as MRI and triple-phase bone scans is used to evaluate patients with suspected stress fracture. Low-risk stress fractures are typically treated with rest and protected weight bearing. High-stress fractures more often require surgical treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Contribution of SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Stress Fracture of the Proximal Tibia.

    PubMed

    Okudan, Berna; Coşkun, Nazım; Arıcan, Pelin

    2018-02-01

    Stress fractures are injuries most commonly seen in the lower limbs and are usually caused by repetitive stress. While the distal and middle third of the tibia is the most frequent site for stress fractures (almost 50%), stress fractures of the proximal tibia is relatively rare and could be confused with other types of tibial fractures, thus altering management plans for the clinician. Early diagnosis of stress fractures is also important to avoid complications. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of stress fractures, especially bone scan. Combined with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) it is an important imaging technique for stress fractures in both upper and lower extremities, and is widely preferred over other imaging techniques. In this case, we present the case of a 39-year-old male patient diagnosed with stress fracture of the proximal tibia and demonstrate the contribution of CT scan fused with SPECT imaging in the early diagnosis of stress fracture prior to other imaging modalities.

  4. Bone stress in runners with tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey A; Willson, John D; Gries, Samantha R; Kernozek, Thomas W; Derrick, Timothy R

    2015-11-01

    Combinations of smaller bone geometry and greater applied loads may contribute to tibial stress fracture. We examined tibial bone stress, accounting for geometry and applied loads, in runners with stress fracture. 23 runners with a history of tibial stress fracture & 23 matched controls ran over a force platform while 3-D kinematic and kinetic data were collected. An elliptical model of the distal 1/3 tibia cross section was used to estimate stress at 4 locations (anterior, posterior, medial and lateral). Inner and outer radii for the model were obtained from 2 planar x-ray images. Bone stress differences were assessed using two-factor ANOVA (α=0.05). Key contributors to observed stress differences between groups were examined using stepwise regression. Runners with tibial stress fracture experienced greater anterior tension and posterior compression at the distal tibia. Location, but not group, differences in shear stress were observed. Stepwise regression revealed that anterior-posterior outer diameter of the tibia and the sagittal plane bending moment explained >80% of the variance in anterior and posterior bone stress. Runners with tibial stress fracture displayed greater stress anteriorly and posteriorly at the distal tibia. Elevated tibial stress was associated with smaller bone geometry and greater bending moments about the medial-lateral axis of the tibia. Future research needs to identify key running mechanics associated with the sagittal plane bending moment at the distal tibia as well as to identify ways to improve bone geometry in runners in order to better guide preventative and rehabilitative efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tarsal navicular stress fractures: radiographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, H.; Torg, J.S.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1983-09-01

    Tarsal navicular stress fractures are a potential source of disabling foot pain in physically active individuals. The diagnosis of tarsal navicular stress fracture requires a high index of clinical and radiographic suspicion because the fracture is only rarely evident on routine radiographs or standard tomograms. The radiographic diagnosis of a tarsal navicular stress fracture may require anatomic anteroposterior tomograms or a radionuclide bone scan with plantar views. Radiographic examinations of 23 fractures in 21 patients are evaluated.

  6. Stress fractures: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deepak S; Roth, Matt; Kapil, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes and military recruits. These injuries occur more commonly in lower extremities than in upper extremities. Stress fractures should be considered in patients who present with tenderness or edema after a recent increase in activity or repeated activity with limited rest. The differential diagnosis varies based on location, but commonly includes tendinopathy, compartment syndrome, and nerve or artery entrapment syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) can be distinguished from tibial stress fractures by diffuse tenderness along the length of the posteromedial tibial shaft and a lack of edema. When stress fracture is suspected, plain radiography should be obtained initially and, if negative, may be repeated after two to three weeks for greater accuracy. If an urgent diagnosis is needed, triple-phase bone scintigraphy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered. Both modalities have a similar sensitivity, but magnetic resonance imaging has greater specificity. Treatment of stress fractures consists of activity modification, including the use of nonweight-bearing crutches if needed for pain relief. Analgesics are appropriate to relieve pain, and pneumatic bracing can be used to facilitate healing. After the pain is resolved and the examination shows improvement, patients may gradually increase their level of activity. Surgical consultation may be appropriate for patients with stress fractures in high-risk locations, nonunion, or recurrent stress fractures. Prevention of stress fractures has been studied in military personnel, but more research is needed in other populations.

  7. Stress fracture risk factors in female football players and their clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Stuart J; Creaby, Mark W; Bryant, Adam L; Crossley, Kay M

    2007-01-01

    A stress fracture represents the inability of the skeleton to withstand repetitive bouts of mechanical loading, which results in structural fatigue, and resultant signs and symptoms of localised pain and tenderness. Reports of stress fractures in female football players are not prevalent; however, they are probably under‐reported and their importance lies in the morbidity that they cause in terms of time lost from participation. By considering risk factors for stress fractures in female football players it may be possible to reduce the impact of these troublesome injuries. Risk factors for stress fractures in female football players include intrinsic risk factors such as gender, endocrine, nutritional, physical fitness and neuromusculoskeletal factors, as well as extrinsic risk factors such as training programme, equipment and environmental factors. This paper discusses these risk factors and their implications in terms of developing prevention and management strategies for stress fractures in female football players. PMID:17584950

  8. Stress fracture risk factors in female football players and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Warden, Stuart J; Creaby, Mark W; Bryant, Adam L; Crossley, Kay M

    2007-08-01

    A stress fracture represents the inability of the skeleton to withstand repetitive bouts of mechanical loading, which results in structural fatigue, and resultant signs and symptoms of localised pain and tenderness. Reports of stress fractures in female football players are not prevalent; however, they are probably under-reported and their importance lies in the morbidity that they cause in terms of time lost from participation. By considering risk factors for stress fractures in female football players it may be possible to reduce the impact of these troublesome injuries. Risk factors for stress fractures in female football players include intrinsic risk factors such as gender, endocrine, nutritional, physical fitness and neuromusculoskeletal factors, as well as extrinsic risk factors such as training programme, equipment and environmental factors. This paper discusses these risk factors and their implications in terms of developing prevention and management strategies for stress fractures in female football players.

  9. Stress fracture of the pelvis and lower limbs including atypical femoral fractures-a review.

    PubMed

    Tins, Bernhard J; Garton, Mark; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N; Tyrrell, Prudencia N M; Lalam, Radhesh; Singh, Jaspreet

    2015-02-01

    Stress fractures, that is fatigue and insufficiency fractures, of the pelvis and lower limb come in many guises. Most doctors are familiar with typical sacral, tibial or metatarsal stress fractures. However, even common and typical presentations can pose diagnostic difficulties especially early after the onset of clinical symptoms. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of stress fractures and their reflection in the imaging appearances. The role of varying imaging modalities is laid out and typical findings are demonstrated. Emphasis is given to sometimes less well-appreciated fractures, which might be missed and can have devastating consequences for longer term patient outcomes. In particular, atypical femoral shaft fractures and their relationship to bisphosphonates are discussed. Migrating bone marrow oedema syndrome, transient osteoporosis and spontaneous osteonecrosis are reviewed as manifestations of stress fractures. Radiotherapy-related stress fractures are examined in more detail. An overview of typical sites of stress fractures in the pelvis and lower limbs and their particular clinical relevance concludes this review. Teaching Points • Stress fractures indicate bone fatigue or insufficiency or a combination of these. • Radiographic visibility of stress fractures is delayed by 2 to 3 weeks. • MRI is the most sensitive and specific modality for stress fractures. • Stress fractures are often multiple; the underlying cause should be evaluated. • Infratrochanteric lateral femoral fractures suggest an atypical femoral fracture (AFF); endocrinologist referral is advisable.

  10. kISMET: Stress and fracture characterization in a deep mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Dobson, P. F.; Daley, T. M.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Cook, P. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Rutqvist, J.; Siler, D.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y.; Guglielmi, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Marchesini, P.; Wang, H. F.; Haimson, B. C.; Sone, H.; Vigilante, P.; Roggenthen, W.; Doe, T.; Lee, M.; Mattson, E.; Huang, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Morris, J.; White, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Coblentz, D. D.; Heise, J.

    2016-12-01

    We are developing a community facility called kISMET (permeability (k) and Induced Seismicity Management for Energy Technologies) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. The purpose of kISMET is to investigate stress and the effects of rock fabric on hydraulic fracturing. Although findings from kISMET may have broad applications that inform stress and fracturing in anisotropic rock, results will be most applicable to improving control of hydraulic fracturing for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in crystalline rock. At the kISMET site on the 4850 ft (1480 m depth) level of SURF, we have drilled and cored an array of nearly vertical boreholes in Precambrian phyllite. The array consists of four 50-m deep monitoring boreholes surrounding one 100-m deep borehole forming a 6 m-wide five-spot pattern at a depth of 1530 m. Previous investigations of the stress field at SURF suggest that the principal stress s1 is nearly vertical. By aligning the kISMET boreholes approximately with σ1, fractures created in the center borehole should in theory be perpendicular to σ3, the least principal horizontal stress. But the phyllite at kISMET has a strong fabric (foliation) that could influence fracturing. Stress measurements and stimulation using hydraulic fracturing will be carried out in the center borehole using a straddle packer and high-pressure pump. We will use an impression packer and image logs after stress testing and stimulation to determine fracture orientation and extent at the center borehole. In order to study the control of stress, rock fabric, and stimulation approach on size, aperture, and orientation of hydraulic fractures, we will carefully monitor the stress measurements and stimulation. For example, we will use continuous active source seismic (CASSM) in two of the monitoring boreholes to measure changes in seismic-wave velocity as water fills the fracture. Second, near real-time electrical resistance tomography (ERT) will be used in

  11. Risk factors for stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Bennell, K; Matheson, G; Meeuwisse, W; Brukner, P

    1999-08-01

    Preventing stress fractures requires knowledge of the risk factors that predispose to this injury. The aetiology of stress fractures is multifactorial, but methodological limitations and expediency often lead to research study designs that evaluate individual risk factors. Intrinsic risk factors include mechanical factors such as bone density, skeletal alignment and body size and composition, physiological factors such as bone turnover rate, flexibility, and muscular strength and endurance, as well as hormonal and nutritional factors. Extrinsic risk factors include mechanical factors such as surface, footwear and external loading as well as physical training parameters. Psychological traits may also play a role in increasing stress fracture risk. Equally important to these types of analyses of individual risk factors is the integration of information to produce a composite picture of risk. The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise the existing literature by evaluating study design and quality, in order to provide a current synopsis of the known scientific information related to stress fracture risk factors. The literature is not fully complete with well conducted studies on this topic, but a great deal of information has accumulated over the past 20 years. Although stress fractures result from repeated loading, the exact contribution of training factors (volume, intensity, surface) has not been clearly established. From what we do know, menstrual disturbances, caloric restriction, lower bone density, muscle weakness and leg length differences are risk factors for stress fracture. Other time-honoured risk factors such as lower extremity alignment have not been shown to be causative even though anecdotal evidence indicates they are likely to play an important role in stress fracture pathogenesis.

  12. Stress fractures in elite cross-country athletes.

    PubMed

    Laker, Scott R; Saint-Phard, Deborah; Tyburski, Mark; Van Dorsten, Brent

    2007-04-01

    This retrospective and comparative survey investigates an unusual number of stress fractures seen within a Division I college cross-country team. An anonymous questionnaire-designed to observe factors known to increase stress fracture incidence-was distributed to members of the current and previous seasons' teams. Running surface, sleep hours, intake of calcium, and shoe type were among the factors investigated. Eleven lower extremity stress fractures were found in nine athletes. Athletes with stress fractures reported significantly fewer workouts per week on the new track. All other study parameters had no statistically significant effect on stress fractures in these athletes.

  13. Bilateral femoral neck stress fractures in military recruits with unilateral hip pain.

    PubMed

    Moo, Ing How; Lee, Y H D; Lim, K K; Mehta, K V

    2016-10-01

    Femoral neck stress fractures are rare and can be easily missed and failure to diagnose these injuries early can lead to avascular necrosis, malunion and osteoarthritis. It is important to have a high index of suspicion for femoral neck stress fractures in military recruits. We present three cases of bilateral femoral neck fractures in military recruits, all presenting with unilateral hip symptoms and signs. All the asymptomatic contralateral hips had femoral neck stress fractures diagnosed by screening MRI. Tension type and displaced femoral neck fractures were treated surgically. All the fractures managed healing without complications. Military recruits with unilateral groin pain should have an early referral for MRI hip to rule out femoral neck stress fractures and those military personnel with ipsilateral femoral neck fracture should have MRI of the contralateral hip. Two of the patients had vitamin D deficiency, of which one had elevated parathyroid hormones and low bone mineral density. Our case series highlights the significance of vitamin D deficiency among military recruits. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Management of ischiopubic stress fracture in patients with anorexia nervosa and excessive compulsive exercising

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Bazzani, Paola; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 28-year-old non-athlete female patient with anorexia nervosa who was diagnosed with an ischiopubic ramus stress fracture and treated successfully as an inpatient with a cognitive behaviour-based therapy. The patient's clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described, and a brief review of the relevant literature is included. The importance of this case report stems from the rarity of descriptions of this kind of injury in such patients, despite their inherent risk, and the originality of the treatment applied. This, in addition to the usual approach to medical management, exploited specific cognitive and behavioural procedures and strategies to address the patient's excessive compulsive exercising, promoting rest and movement avoidance in order to allow the fracture to heal, while simultaneously addressing the underlying psychopathology. PMID:25301426

  15. The Israeli elite infantry recruit: a model for understanding the biomechanics of stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C

    1989-01-01

    In a series of prospective studies among infantry recruits the biomechanics of stress fractures have been studied. In this recruit model bone geometry and the natural shock absorbers of the body have been found to be related to stress fracture morbidity. Using the technique of accelerometry in this model, it has been shown that in the fatigue state shock absorption decreases, resulting in an increase in the amplitude of vertical accelerations that propagate up the skeleton at heel strike. Experiments to study the possibility of lowering stress fracture morbidity in this model by means of viscoelastic orthotics have been successful only in the case of femoral and metatarsal stress fractures among certain subpopulations. Stress fracture management in this model has been improved by early detection and by treatment regimens according to a protocol that emphasizes limited rest periods to allow healing to take place rather than judging recovery by pain levels.

  16. Impact of Stress on Anomalous Transport in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Lei, Q.; Lee, S.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the subsurface. However, characterizing flow and transport through fractured media is challenging due to the large heterogeneity of fractured rock properties. In addition to these "static" challenges, geologic fractures are always under significant overburden stress, and changes in the stress state can lead to changes in the fracture's ability to conduct fluids. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through fractures in a fundamental way, the impact of confining stress on transport through fractured rock remains largely unexplored. The link between anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and confining stress has been shown only recently, at the level of a single rough fracture [1]. Here, we investigate the impact of confining stress on flow and transport through discrete fracture networks. We model geomechanical effects in 2D fractured rock by means of a finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM), which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, reactivation and propagation of cracks. We implement a joint constitutive model within the FEMDEM framework to simulate the effect of fracture roughness. We apply the model to a fracture network extracted from the geological map of an actual outcrop to obtain the aperture field at different stress conditions (Figure 1). We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed fracture networks. We observe that anomalous transport emerges in response to confining stress on the fracture networks, and show that this anomalous behavior can be linked to the stress state of the rock. Finally, we develop an effective transport model that captures the anomalous transport through stressed fractures. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and anomalous transport in discrete fractured networks. [1] P. K. Kang, S. Brown, and R. Juanes, Emergence of anomalous transport in stressed

  17. Outcomes of Surgical Treatment for Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures in Athletes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Zaira S; Raikin, Steven M; Harwood, Marc I; Bishop, Meghan E; Ciccotti, Michael G; Hammoud, Sommer

    2017-12-01

    Although most anterior tibial stress fractures heal with nonoperative treatment, some may require surgical management. To our knowledge, no systematic review has been conducted regarding surgical treatment strategies for the management of chronic anterior tibial stress fractures from which general conclusions can be drawn regarding optimal treatment in high-performance athletes. This systematic review was conducted to evaluate the surgical outcomes of anterior tibial stress fractures in high-performance athletes. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. In February 2017, a systematic review of the PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL databases was performed to identify studies that reported surgical outcomes for anterior tibial stress fractures. Articles meeting the inclusion criteria were screened, and reported outcome measures were documented. A total of 12 studies, published between 1984 and 2015, reporting outcomes for the surgical treatment of anterior tibial stress fractures were included in this review. All studies were retrospective case series. Collectively, surgical outcomes for 115 patients (74 males; 41 females) with 123 fractures were evaluated in this review. The overall mean follow-up was 23.3 months. The most common surgical treatment method reported in the literature was compression plating (n = 52) followed by drilling (n = 33). Symptom resolution was achieved in 108 of 123 surgically treated fractures (87.8%). There were 32 reports of complications, resulting in an overall complication rate of 27.8%. Subsequent tibial fractures were reported in 8 patients (7.0%). Moreover, a total of 17 patients (14.8%) underwent a subsequent procedure after their initial surgery. Following surgical treatment for anterior tibial stress fracture, 94.7% of patients were able to return to sports. The available literature indicates that surgical treatment of anterior tibial stress fractures is associated with a high rate of symptom resolution and return

  18. Transverse Stress Fracture of the Proximal Patella

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Kato, Ko; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Nakagawa, Shuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Among stress fractures associated with sports activities, patellar stress fracture is rare. Regarding patella stress fractures, so far only distal transverse or lateral longitudinal fractures have been reported, but there are no reports of transverse fractures occurring in the proximal patella. We describe an extremely rare case of transverse stress fracture of proximal patella in a 9-year-old athlete. A 9-year old boy, who participated in sports (sprints and Kendo) presented with left knee pain without any external injury. In plain radiographs, a fracture line was observed in the proximal 1/3 of the left patella, and a patella stress fracture was diagnosed. For treatment, because 7 months of conservative therapy showed no improvement, internal fixation was carried out using Acutrak screws, and bone union was thus achieved. Three months after the operation, he was able to return to his previous level of athletic sports activity. Regarding the mechanism of onset, it is believed that the causes are longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure. On the other hand, the contact region of the patella with the femur changes with the flexion angle of the knee. In the current case, the fracture occurred at a site where the patella was in contact with the femur at a flexion angle of >90°, so it is believed that it occurred as a clinical condition from being subjected to repeated longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure at a flexion angle of >90°, during the sports activities of sprints and Kendo. The nonunion of the transverse stress fracture of his proximal patella was successfully treated with internal fixation using Acutrak screws. PMID:26871789

  19. Stress fluctuations in fracture networks from theoretical and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, P.; Darcel, C.; Mas Ivars, D.; Le Goc, R.

    2017-12-01

    We analyze the spatial fluctuations of stress in a simple tridimensional model constituted by a population of disc-shaped fractures embedded in an elastic matrix with uniform and isotropic properties. The fluctuations arise from the classical stress enhancement at fracture tips and stress shadowing around fracture centers that are amplified or decreased by the interactions between close-by fractures. The distribution of local stresses is calculated at the elementary mesh scale with the 3DEC numerical program based on the distinct element method. As expected, the stress distributions vary with fracture density, the larger is the density, the wider is the distribution. For freely slipping fractures, it is mainly controlled by the percolation parameter p (i.e., the total volume of spheres surrounding fractures). For stresses smaller than the remote deviatoric stress, the distribution depends only on for the range of density that has been studied. For large stresses, the distribution decreases exponentially when increasing stress, with a characteristic stress that increases with entailing a widening of the stress distribution. We extend the analysis to fractures with plane resistance defined by an elastic shear stiffness ks and a slip Coulomb threshold. A consequence of the fracture plane resistance is to lower the stress perturbation in the surrounding matrix by a factor that depends on the ratio between ks and a fracture-matrix stiffness km mainly dependent on the ratio between Young modulus and fracture size. km is also the ratio between the remote shear stress and the displacement across the fracture plane in the case of freely slipping fractures. A complete analytical derivation of the expressions of the stress perturbations and of the fracture displacements is obtained and checked with numerical simulations. In the limit ks >> km, the stress perturbation tends to 0 and the stress state is spatially uniform. The analysis allows us to quantify the intensity of the

  20. Rare stress fracture: longitudinal fracture of the femur.

    PubMed

    Pérez González, M; Velázquez Fragua, P; López Miralles, E; Abad Moretón, M M

    42-year-old man with pain in the posterolateral region of the right knee that began while he was running. Initially, it was diagnosed by magnetic resonance (MR) as a possible aggressive process (osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma) but with computed tomography it was noted a cortical hypodense linear longitudinal image with a continuous, homogeneous and solid periosteal reaction without clear soft tissue mass that in this patient suggest a longitudinal distal femoral fatigue stress fracture. This type of fracture at this location is very rare. Stress fractures are entities that can be confused with an agressive process. MR iscurrently the most sensitive and specific imaging method for its diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluid Production Induced Stress Analysis Surrounding an Elliptic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Harshad Rajendra

    Hydraulic fracturing is an effective technique used in well stimulation to increase petroleum well production. A combination of multi-stage hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling has led to the recent boom in shale gas production which has changed the energy landscape of North America. During the fracking process, highly pressurized mixture of water and proppants (sand and chemicals) is injected into to a crack, which fractures the surrounding rock structure and proppants help in keeping the fracture open. Over a longer period, however, these fractures tend to close due to the difference between the compressive stress exerted by the reservoir on the fracture and the fluid pressure inside the fracture. During production, fluid pressure inside the fracture is reduced further which can accelerate the closure of a fracture. In this thesis, we study the stress distribution around a hydraulic fracture caused by fluid production. It is shown that fluid flow can induce a very high hoop stress near the fracture tip. As the pressure gradient increases stress concentration increases. If a fracture is very thin, the flow induced stress along the fracture decreases, but the stress concentration at the fracture tip increases and become unbounded for an infinitely thin fracture. The result from the present study can be used for studying the fracture closure problem, and ultimately this in turn can lead to the development of better proppants so that prolific well production can be sustained for a long period of time.

  2. Stress Fractures of the Pelvis and Legs in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Steve B.; Deren, Matthew E.; Matson, Andrew; Fadale, Paul D.; Monchik, Keith O.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes, often difficult to diagnose. A stress fracture is a fatigue-induced fracture of bone caused by repeated applications of stress over time. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed articles published from 1974 to January 2012. Results: Intrinsic and extrinsic factors may predict the risk of stress fractures in athletes, including bone health, training, nutrition, and biomechanical factors. Based on their location, stress fractures may be categorized as low- or high-risk, depending on the likelihood of the injury developing into a complete fracture. Treatment for these injuries varies substantially and must account for the risk level of the fractured bone, the stage of fracture development, and the needs of the patient. High-risk fractures include the anterior tibia, lateral femoral neck, patella, medial malleolus, and femoral head. Low-risk fractures include the posteromedial tibia, fibula, medial femoral shaft, and pelvis. Magnetic resonance is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis. Conclusions: These injuries can lead to substantial lost time from participation. Treatment will vary by fracture location, but most stress fractures will heal with rest and modified weightbearing. Some may require more aggressive intervention, such as prolonged nonweightbearing movement or surgery. Contributing factors should also be addressed prior to return to sports. PMID:24427386

  3. The effect of stress fracture interventions in a single elite infantry training unit (1983-2015).

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Finestone, Aharon S

    2017-10-01

    stopping specific running exercises and adding lower body strengthening exercises were associated with a decrease in stress fracture. 67% of recruits who sustained stress fractures and 69% who did not sustain stress fracture finished their military service as combat soldiers in the unit (p=0.87). There are no magic bullets to prevent stress fractures. Stress cannot be lowered beyond the level which compromises the training goals. It is a problem that can be managed by awareness that identifies and treats stress fractures while they are still in the micro stage and not in the more dangerous macro stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Training, Muscle Fatigue, and Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-15

    fractures in the lower appendicular skeleton of new recruits. During peacetime, stress fractures are by far the most co~m~n physical injury in the...research program is to study the etiology of the stress fracture lesion, and isolate any aspects of a physical regime which may exacerbate this...34 of remodelLig, to use the model to identify those areas of the cortex at greatest risk of failure, and the activities which accelerate the deleterious

  5. Surgical treatment of refractory tibial stress fractures in elite dancers: a case series.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ryan G; Dhotar, Herman S; Rose, Donald J; Egol, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    Treatment of tibial stress fractures in elite dancers is centered on rest and activity modification. Surgical intervention in refractory cases has important implications affecting the dancers' careers. Refractory tibial stress fractures in dancers can be treated successfully with drilling and bone grafting or intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 1992 and 2006, 1757 dancers were evaluated at a dance medicine clinic; 24 dancers (1.4%) had 31 tibial stress fractures. Of that subset, 7 (29.2%) elite dancers with 8 tibial stress fractures were treated operatively with either intramedullary nailing or drilling and bone grafting. Six of the patients were followed up closely until they were able to return to dance. One patient was available only for follow-up phone interview. Data concerning their preoperative treatment regimens, operative procedures, clinical union, radiographic union, and time until return to dance were recorded and analyzed. The mean age of the surgical patients at the time of stress fracture was 22.6 years. The mean duration of preoperative symptoms before surgical intervention was 25.8 months. Four of the dancers were male and 3 were female. All had failed nonoperative treatment regimens. Five patients (5 tibias) underwent drilling and bone grafting of the lesion, and 2 patients (3 tibias) with completed fractures or multiple refractory stress fractures underwent intramedullary nailing. Clinical union was achieved at a mean of 6 weeks and radiographic union at 5.1 months. Return to full dance activity was at an average of 6.5 months postoperatively. Surgical intervention for tibial stress fractures in dancers who have not responded to nonoperative management allowed for resolution of symptoms and return to dancing with minimal morbidity.

  6. Fracture of Rolled Homogeneous Steel Armor (Nucleation Threshold Stress).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    AD-AO81 618 ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND ABERD--ETC F/B 19/4 FRACTURE OF ROLLED HOMOGENEOUS STEEL ARMOR (NUCLEATION THRESHOL--ETC(U...ARBRL-MR-02984A QQ FRACTURE OF ROLLED HOMOGENEOUS STEEL ARMOR (NUCLEATION THRESHOLD STRESS) Gerald L Moss Lynn SeamanLy~ S, ,.DTIC S ELECTED January...nucleation stress, Crack threshold stress, Fracture, Fracture stress, Spallation, Armor, Rolled homogeneous steel armor M~ AS$TRACr (Vita ssf -- ebb

  7. Olecranon stress fracture in a weight lifter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P; Rao, S; Navadgi, B

    2001-01-01

    Stress fractures have been reported in the upper limb of sportspeople involved in upper limb dominated events. Olecranon stress fractures have been cited in baseball pitchers, javelin throwers, and gymnasts. The unusual case of a stress fracture of the olecranon in a young weight lifter is reported here. The minimally displaced stress fracture was treated with tension band and two Kirschner wires. The fracture healed in four months and the patient returned to light sports activity after six months. Key Words: weight lifter; olecranon; elbow; stress fracture PMID:11157469

  8. Anomalous Transport in Natural Fracture Networks Induced by Tectonic Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Lei, Q.; Lee, S.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the subsurface. However, characterizing flow and transport through fractured media is challenging due to the high uncertainty and large heterogeneity associated with fractured rock properties. In addition to these "static" challenges, geologic fractures are always under significant overburden stress, and changes in the stress state can lead to changes in the fracture's ability to conduct fluids. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through fractures in a fundamental way, the impact of confining stress on transportthrough fractured rock remains poorly understood. The link between anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and confining stress has been shown, only recently, at the level of a single rough fracture [1]. Here, we investigate the impact of geologic (tectonic) stress on flow and tracer transport through natural fracture networks. We model geomechanical effects in 2D fractured rock by means of a finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM) [2], which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, reactivation of pre-existing fractures, and propagation of new cracks, upon changes in the stress field. We apply the model to a fracture network extracted from the geological map of an actual rock outcrop to obtain the aperture field at different stress conditions. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed fracture networks. We observe that anomalous transport emerges in response to confining stress on the fracture network, and show that the stress state is a powerful determinant of transport behavior: (1) An anisotropic stress state induces preferential flow paths through shear dilation; (2) An increase in geologic stress increases aperture heterogeneity that induces late-time tailing of particle breakthrough curves. Finally, we develop an effective transport model that captures the anomalous transport through the stressed fracture

  9. Hygrothermomechanical fracture stress criteria for fiber composites with sense-parity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Ginty, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Hygrothermomechanical fracture stress criteria are developed and evaluated for unidirectional composites (plies) with sense-parity. These criteria explicity quantify the individual contributions of applied, hygral and thermal stresses as well as couplings among these stresses. The criteria are for maximum stress, maximum strain, internal friction, work-to-fracture and combined-stress fracture. Predicted results obtained indicate that first ply failure will occur at stress levels lower than those predicted using criteria currently available in the literature. Also, the contribution of the various stress couplings (predictable only by fracture criteria with sense-parity) is significant to first ply failure and attendant fracture modes.

  10. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  11. Epidemiology of stress fracture injuries among US high school athletes, 2005-2006 through 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Changstrom, Bradley G; Brou, Lina; Khodaee, Morteza; Braund, Cortney; Comstock, R Dawn

    2015-01-01

    High school athletes in the United States sustain millions of injuries annually, approximately 10% of which are fractures. However, there is no clear estimate of the number of stress fractures sustained by high school athletes annually despite reports that stress fractures account for 0.7% to 20% of injuries seen in sports medicine clinics. This suggests a high utilization of resources for a potentially preventable injury. In addition, stress fractures have been associated with low energy availability and disordered eating in young athletes, highlighting the importance of early recognition and intervention. To investigate stress fracture rates and patterns in a large national sample of US high school athletes. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Data from High School RIO (Reporting Information Online), a national sports injury surveillance study, were analyzed to describe rates and patterns of stress fracture injury sustained from 2005-2006 through 2012-2013, across sports and by sex. From 2005-2006 through 2012-2013, a total of 51,773 injuries were sustained during 25,268,873 athlete-exposures, of which 389 (0.8%) were stress fractures, resulting in an overall stress fracture rate of 1.54 per 100,000 athlete-exposures. Rates per 100,000 athlete-exposures were highest in girls' cross country (10.62), girls' gymnastics (7.43), and boys' cross country (5.42). In sex-comparable sports, girls sustained more stress fractures (63.3%) than did boys (36.7%) and had higher rates of stress fracture (2.22 vs 1.27; rate ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.38-2.23). The most commonly injured sites were the lower leg (40.3% of all stress fractures), foot (34.9%), and lower back/lumbar spine/pelvis (15.2%). Management was nonsurgical in 98.7% of the cases, and 65.3% of injuries resulted in ≥3 weeks of time loss, medical disqualification, or an end to the season before athletes could return to play. Although a rare injury, stress fractures cause considerable morbidity for high school athletes

  12. Influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress in tight reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongping; Wei, Xu; Zhang, Ye; Xing, Libo; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    Currently, hydraulic fracturing is an important way to develop low permeability reservoirs. The fractures produced during the fracturing process are the main influencing factors of changing in-situ stress. In this paper, the influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress is studied by establishing a mathematical model to describe the relationship between fracture length and in-situ stress. The results show that the growth rate gradually decreases after the fracture reaches a certain length with the increase of fracturing time; the continuous extension of the fracture is the main factor to change the in-situ stress. In order to reduce the impact on the subsequent fracture extension due to the changing of in-situ stress, controlling fracturing time and fracture length without affecting the stimulated reservoir effect is an important way. The results presented in this study can effectively reduce the impact of changing of in-situ stress on subsequent fracturing construction.

  13. Correlation Between Fracture Network Properties and Stress Variability in Geological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qinghua; Gao, Ke

    2018-05-01

    We quantitatively investigate the stress variability in fractured geological media under tectonic stresses. The fracture systems studied include synthetic fracture networks following power law length scaling and natural fracture patterns based on outcrop mapping. The stress field is derived from a finite-discrete element model, and its variability is analyzed using a set of mathematical formulations that honor the tensorial nature of stress data. We show that local stress perturbation, quantified by the Euclidean distance of a local stress tensor to the mean stress tensor, has a positive, linear correlation with local fracture intensity, defined as the total fracture length per unit area within a local sampling window. We also evaluate the stress dispersion of the entire stress field using the effective variance, that is, a scalar-valued measure of the overall stress variability. The results show that a well-connected fracture system under a critically stressed state exhibits strong local and global stress variabilities.

  14. Analysis of stress fractures in athletes based on our clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze stress fractures in athletes based on experience from our sports medicine clinic. METHODS: We investigated the association between stress fractures and age, sex, sports level, sports activity, and skeletal site in athletes seen at our sports medicine clinic between September 1991 and April 2009. Stress fractures of the pars interarticularis were excluded from this analysis. RESULTS: During this period (18 years and 8 mo), 14276 patients (9215 males and 5061 females) consulted our clinic because of sports-related injuries, and 263 patients (1.8%) [171 males (1.9%) and 92 females (1.8%)] sustained stress fractures. The average age of the patients with stress fractures was 20.2 years (range 10-46 years); 112 patients (42.6%) were 15-19 years of age and 90 (34.2%) were 20-24 years of age. Altogether, 90 patients (34.2%) were active at a high recreational level and 173 (65.8%) at a competitive level. The highest proportion of stress fractures was seen in basketball athletes (21.3%), followed by baseball (13.7%), track and field (11.4%), rowing (9.5%), soccer (8.4%), aerobics (5.3%), and classical ballet (4.9%). The most common sites of stress fractures in these patients were the tibia (44.1%), followed by the rib (14.1%), metatarsal bone (12.9%), ulnar olecranon (8.7%) and pelvis (8.4%). The sites of the stress fractures varied from sport to sport. The ulnar olecranon was the most common stress fracture site in baseball players, and the rib was the most common in rowers. Basketball and classical ballet athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and metatarsal bone. Track and field and soccer athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and pubic bone. Aerobics athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia. Middle and long distance female runners who sustained multiple stress fractures had the female athlete triad. CONCLUSION: The results of this analysis showed that stress fractures were seen in high

  15. The running athlete: stress fractures, osteitis pubis, and snapping hips.

    PubMed

    Henning, P Troy

    2014-03-01

    Pelvic stress fractures, osteitis pubis, and snapping hip syndrome account for a portion of the overuse injuries that can occur in the running athlete. PUBMED SEARCHES WERE PERFORMED FOR EACH ENTITY USING THE FOLLOWING KEYWORDS: snapping hip syndrome, coxa sultans, pelvic stress fracture, and osteitis pubis from 2008 to 2013. Topic reviews, case reports, case series, and randomized trials were included for review. Clinical review. Level 4. Collectively, 188 articles were identified. Of these, 58 were included in this review. Based on the available evidence, the majority of these overuse injuries can be managed non-operatively. Primary treatment should include removal from offending activity, normalizing regional muscle strength/length imbalances and nutritional deficiencies, and mitigating training errors through proper education of the athlete and training staff. C.

  16. Medial malleolar stress fracture secondary to chronic ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Andrew J L; Birks, Christopher L; Blackney, Mark C

    2008-07-01

    Medial malleolar stress fractures are uncommon even in the sporting population. We believe that stress fractures of the medial malleolus may be the end stage of chronic anteromedial ankle impingement in elite running and jumping athletes. We present five cases of elite athletes who presented to our institution with stress fractures of the medial malleolus over a 3-year period (2004 to 2007). In each case preoperative imaging revealed an anteromedial bony spur on the tibia. All fractures were internally fixed and at the same sitting had arthroscopic debridement of the bony spur. All fractures united without further intervention, average time to union was 10.2 (range, 6 to 16) weeks. At most recent review (average, 18 months; range, 8 to 37 months), all patients had resumed sporting activity to their previous level. No patient had suffered a recurrent fracture of the medial malleolus. We believe this region of impingement to be important in the development of the stress fracture and should be addressed at the time of fracture fixation.

  17. Stress Rupture Fracture Model and Microstructure Evolution for Waspaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhihao; Zhang, Maicang; Dong, Jianxin

    2013-07-01

    Stress rupture behavior and microstructure evolution of nickel-based superalloy Waspaloy specimens from tenon teeth of an as-received 60,000-hour service-exposed gas turbine disk were studied between 923 K and 1088 K (650 °C and 815 °C) under initial applied stresses varying from 150 to 840 MPa. Good microstructure stability and performance were verified for this turbine disk prior to stress rupture testing. Microstructure instability, such as the coarsening and dissolution of γ' precipitates at the varying test conditions, was observed to be increased with temperature and reduced stress. Little microstructure variation was observed at 923 K (650 °C). Only secondary γ' instability occurred at 973 K (700 °C). Four fracture mechanisms were obtained. Transgranular creep fracture was exhibited up to 923 K (650 °C) and at high stress. A mixed mode of transgranular and intergranular creep fracture occurred with reduced stress as a transition to intergranular creep fracture (ICF) at low stress. ICF was dominated by grain boundary sliding at low temperature and by the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities due to microstructure instability at high temperature. The fracture mechanism map and microstructure-related fracture model were constructed. Residual lifetime was also evaluated by the Larson-Miller parameter method.

  18. Bilateral femoral neck stress fractures in a fire academy student.

    PubMed

    Wright, Russell C; Salzman, Garrett A; Yacoubian, Stephan V; Yacoubian, Shahan V

    2010-10-11

    Unilateral femoral neck stress fractures are well documented in active patients; however, the risk of a subsequent contralateral stress fracture remains unknown in patients who continue to be active. This article describes a 24-year-old male fire academy student who sustained a left femoral neck stress fracture, followed approximately 11 months later by a right femoral neck stress fracture, both of which went on to completely displace. A review of the index radiographs of each hip from outside institutions revealed femoral neck stress fractures that went undiagnosed until they displaced. The patient was referred to our institution and underwent closed reduction and internal fixation using cannulated screws in both cases. A full endocrine evaluation was performed in the following weeks and proved unremarkable. Although it is difficult to extrapolate the results from 1 patient beyond the case studied, there is cause for concern in patients who remain active following femoral neck stress fractures. Our case highlights the significance of obtaining a complete and thorough medical history on physical examination and appropriately counseling patients regarding activity level. Until further research explores this possible relationship, physicians evaluating patients with a history of a stress fracture are encouraged to be vigilant of subsequent contralateral fractures and educate patients of this potentially avoidable injury. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Completed Ulnar Shaft Stress Fracture in a Fast-Pitch Softball Pitcher.

    PubMed

    Wiltfong, Roger E; Carruthers, Katherine H; Popp, James E

    2017-03-01

    Stress fractures of the upper extremity have been previously described in the literature, yet reports of isolated injury to the ulna diaphysis or olecranon are rare. The authors describe a case involving an 18-year-old fast-pitch softball pitcher. She presented with a long history of elbow and forearm pain, which was exacerbated during a long weekend of pitching. Her initial physician diagnosed her as having forearm tendinitis. She was treated with nonsurgical means including rest, anti-inflammatory medications, therapy, and kinesiology taping. She resumed pitching when allowed and subsequently had an acute event immediately ceasing pitching. She presented to an urgent care clinic that evening and was diagnosed as having a complete ulnar shaft fracture subsequently needing surgical management. This case illustrates the need for a high degree of suspicion for ulnar stress fractures in fast-pitch soft-ball pitchers with an insidious onset of unilateral forearm pain. Through early identification and intervention, physicians may be able to reduce the risk of injury progression and possibly eliminate the need for surgical management. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e360-e362.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Managing Complications of Calcaneus Fractures.

    PubMed

    Clare, Michael P; Crawford, William S

    2017-03-01

    Calcaneus fractures remain among the most complicated fractures for orthopedic surgeons to manage because of the complexity of various fracture patterns, the limited surrounding soft tissue envelope, and the prolonged rehabilitation issues impacting function after successful treatment. Despite this, appropriate management of complications associated with calcaneus fractures is critical for the complete care of this injury, whether treated operatively or nonoperatively. The authors present the common complications encountered with fractures of the calcaneus and management thereof. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Managing the Pediatric Facial Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Hollier, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Facial fracture management is often complex and demanding, particularly within the pediatric population. Although facial fractures in this group are uncommon relative to their incidence in adult counterparts, a thorough understanding of issues relevant to pediatric facial fracture management is critical to optimal long-term success. Here, we discuss several issues germane to pediatric facial fractures and review significant factors in their evaluation, diagnosis, and management. PMID:22110800

  2. Post-fracture management of patients with hip fracture: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Bruyere, O; Brandi, M-L; Burlet, N; Harvey, N; Lyritis, G; Minne, H; Boonen, S; Reginster, J-Y; Rizzoli, R; Akesson, K

    2008-10-01

    Hip fracture creates a worldwide morbidity, mortality and economic burden. After surgery, many patients experience long-term disability or die as a consequence of the fracture. A fracture is a major risk factor for a subsequent fracture, which may occur within a short interval. A literature search on post-fracture management of patients with hip fracture was performed on the Medline database. Key experts convened to develop a consensus document. Management of hip-fracture patients to optimize outcome after hospital discharge requires several stages of care co-ordinated by a multidisciplinary team from before admission through to discharge. Further studies that specifically assess prevention and post-fracture management of hip fracture are needed, as only one study to date has assessed an osteoporosis medication in patients with a recent hip fracture. Proper nutrition is vital to assist bone repair and prevent further falls, particularly in malnourished patients. Vitamin D, calcium and protein supplementation is associated with an increase in hip BMD and reduction in falls. Rehabilitation is essential to improve functional disabilities and survival rates. Fall prevention and functional recovery strategies should include patient education and training to improve balance and increase muscle strength and mobility. Appropriate management can prevent further fractures and it is critical that high-risk patients are identified and treated. To foster this process, clinical pathways have been established to support orthopaedic surgeons. Although hip fracture is generally associated with poor outcomes, appropriate management can ensure optimal recovery and survival, and should be prioritized after a hip fracture to avoid deterioration of health and prevent subsequent fracture.

  3. Women with previous stress fractures show reduced bone material strength

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Fink Eriksen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Bone fragility is determined by bone mass, bone architecture, and the material properties of bone. Microindentation has been introduced as a measurement method that reflects bone material properties. The pathogenesis of underlying stress fractures, in particular the role of impaired bone material properties, is still poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that impaired bone material strength might play a role in the development of stress fractures, we used microindentation in patients with stress fractures and in controls. Patients and methods — We measured bone material strength index (BMSi) by microindentation in 30 women with previous stress fractures and in 30 normal controls. Bone mineral density by DXA and levels of the bone markers C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTX) and N-terminal propeptide of type-1 procollagen (P1NP) were also determined. Results — Mean BMSi in stress fracture patients was significantly lower than in the controls (SD 72 (8.7) vs. 77 (7.2); p = 0.02). The fracture subjects also had a significantly lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than the controls (0.9 (0.02) vs. 1.0 (0.06); p = 0.03). Bone turnover—as reflected in serum levels of the bone marker CTX—was similar in both groups, while P1NP levels were significantly higher in the women with stress fractures (55 μg/L vs. 42 μg/L; p = 0.03). There was no correlation between BMSi and BMD or bone turnover. Interpretation — BMSi was inferior in patients with previous stress fracture, but was unrelated to BMD and bone turnover. The lower values of BMSi in patients with previous stress fracture combined with a lower BMD may contribute to the increased propensity to develop stress fractures in these patients. PMID:27321443

  4. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle, part 2: site-specific etiology, imaging, and treatment, and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Jacob C; Khurana, Bharti; Smith, Stacy E

    2017-09-01

    Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a commonly encountered problem among athletes and individuals participating in a wide range of activities. This illustrated review, the second of two parts, discusses site-specific etiological factors, imaging appearances, treatment options, and differential considerations of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. The imaging and clinical management of stress fractures of the foot and ankle are highly dependent on the specific location of the fracture, mechanical forces acting upon the injured site, vascular supply of the injured bone, and the proportion of trabecular to cortical bone at the site of injury. The most common stress fractures of the foot and ankle are low risk and include the posteromedial tibia, the calcaneus, and the second and third metatarsals. The distal fibula is a less common location, and stress fractures of the cuboid and cuneiforms are very rare, but are also considered low risk. In contrast, high-risk stress fractures are more prone to delayed union or nonunion and include the anterior tibial cortex, medial malleolus, navicular, base of the second metatarsal, proximal fifth metatarsal, hallux sesamoids, and the talus. Of these high-risk types, stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, the navicular, and the proximal tibial cortex may be predisposed to poor healing because of the watershed blood supply in these locations. The radiographic differential diagnosis of stress fracture includes osteoid osteoma, malignancy, and chronic osteomyelitis.

  5. Polyaxial stress-dependent permeability of a three-dimensional fractured rock layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qinghua; Wang, Xiaoguang; Xiang, Jiansheng; Latham, John-Paul

    2017-12-01

    A study about the influence of polyaxial (true-triaxial) stresses on the permeability of a three-dimensional (3D) fractured rock layer is presented. The 3D fracture system is constructed by extruding a two-dimensional (2D) outcrop pattern of a limestone bed that exhibits a ladder structure consisting of a "through-going" joint set abutted by later-stage short fractures. Geomechanical behaviour of the 3D fractured rock in response to in-situ stresses is modelled by the finite-discrete element method, which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, variation of stress fields, reactivation of pre-existing rough fractures and propagation of new cracks. A series of numerical simulations is designed to load the fractured rock using various polyaxial in-situ stresses and the stress-dependent flow properties are further calculated. The fractured layer tends to exhibit stronger flow localisation and higher equivalent permeability as the far-field stress ratio is increased and the stress field is rotated such that fractures are preferentially oriented for shearing. The shear dilation of pre-existing fractures has dominant effects on flow localisation in the system, while the propagation of new fractures has minor impacts. The role of the overburden stress suggests that the conventional 2D analysis that neglects the effect of the out-of-plane stress (perpendicular to the bedding interface) may provide indicative approximations but not fully capture the polyaxial stress-dependent fracture network behaviour. The results of this study have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous flow of geological fluids (e.g. groundwater, petroleum) in subsurface and upscaling permeability for large-scale assessments.

  6. Role of MRI in hip fractures, including stress fractures, occult fractures, avulsion fractures.

    PubMed

    Nachtrab, O; Cassar-Pullicino, V N; Lalam, R; Tins, B; Tyrrell, P N M; Singh, J

    2012-12-01

    MR imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of hip fractures in all age groups, in a large spectrum of patient groups spanning the elderly and sporting population. It allows a confident exclusion of fracture, differentiation of bony from soft tissue injury and an early confident detection of fractures. There is a spectrum of MR findings which in part is dictated by the type and cause of the fracture which the radiologist needs to be familiar with. Judicious but prompt utilisation of MR in patients with suspected hip fractures has a positive therapeutic impact with healthcare cost benefits as well as social care benefits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic predisposition for femoral neck stress fractures in military conscripts.

    PubMed

    Korvala, Johanna; Hartikka, Heini; Pihlajamäki, Harri; Solovieva, Svetlana; Ruohola, Juha-Petri; Sahi, Timo; Barral, Sandra; Ott, Jürg; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Männikkö, Minna

    2010-10-21

    Stress fractures are a significant problem among athletes and soldiers and may result in devastating complications or even permanent handicap. Genetic factors may increase the risk, but no major susceptibility genes have been identified. The purpose of this study was to search for possible genetic factors predisposing military conscripts to femoral neck stress fractures. Eight genes involved in bone metabolism or pathology (COL1A1, COL1A2, OPG, ESR1, VDR, CTR, LRP5, IL-6) were examined in 72 military conscripts with a femoral neck stress fracture and 120 controls. The risk of femoral neck stress fracture was significantly higher in subjects with low weight and body mass index (BMI). An interaction between the CTR (rs1801197) minor allele C and the VDR C-A haplotype was observed, and subjects lacking the C allele in CTR and/or the C-A haplotype in VDR had a 3-fold higher risk of stress fracture than subjects carrying both (OR = 3.22, 95% CI 1.38-7.49, p = 0.007). In addition, the LRP5 haplotype A-G-G-C alone and in combination with the VDR haplotype C-A was associated with stress fractures through reduced body weight and BMI. Our findings suggest that genetic factors play a role in the development of stress fractures in individuals subjected to heavy exercise and mechanical loading. The present results can be applied to the design of future studies that will further elucidate the genetics of stress fractures.

  8. Genetic predisposition for femoral neck stress fractures in military conscripts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stress fractures are a significant problem among athletes and soldiers and may result in devastating complications or even permanent handicap. Genetic factors may increase the risk, but no major susceptibility genes have been identified. The purpose of this study was to search for possible genetic factors predisposing military conscripts to femoral neck stress fractures. Results Eight genes involved in bone metabolism or pathology (COL1A1, COL1A2, OPG, ESR1, VDR, CTR, LRP5, IL-6) were examined in 72 military conscripts with a femoral neck stress fracture and 120 controls. The risk of femoral neck stress fracture was significantly higher in subjects with low weight and body mass index (BMI). An interaction between the CTR (rs1801197) minor allele C and the VDR C-A haplotype was observed, and subjects lacking the C allele in CTR and/or the C-A haplotype in VDR had a 3-fold higher risk of stress fracture than subjects carrying both (OR = 3.22, 95% CI 1.38-7.49, p = 0.007). In addition, the LRP5 haplotype A-G-G-C alone and in combination with the VDR haplotype C-A was associated with stress fractures through reduced body weight and BMI. Conclusions Our findings suggest that genetic factors play a role in the development of stress fractures in individuals subjected to heavy exercise and mechanical loading. The present results can be applied to the design of future studies that will further elucidate the genetics of stress fractures. PMID:20961463

  9. Bilateral femoral supracondylar stress fractures in a cross country runner.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kate; Fahey, Mark

    2008-08-01

    Several high-risk factors lead to stress fractures. They include excessive training in athletes leading to overuse injuries, nutritional deficiencies, and endocrine disorders. While stress fractures are common, bilateral stress fractures are rarely seen. Few cases have been reported of bilateral femoral stress fractures in young athletes. This article presents a case of a 14-year-old cross country runner with a bilateral femoral supracondylar stress fracture. He presented with bilateral supracondylar stress fractures from running. The patient followed a strict vegan diet, but his parents stated that, to their knowledge, he was getting adequate protein and calcium. Treatment consisted of decreased activity to pain-free levels with acetaminophen for pain. Low-impact conditioning such as swimming and bicycling was allowed. Hamstring and quadricep stretching was suggested. Nutritional consultation was obtained to ensure appropriate nutrition on a vegan diet. At 1-month follow-up, he was pain free and allowed to proceed with a gradual return to running activities. In this case, the onset of a new workout routine was intolerable for this patient's low bone density, causing insufficiency fractures. Appropriate vegan diets were not associated with stress fracture in our literature review. He may have had an inadequate diet prior to this injury. As in this case, full recovery can be made after this rest period, and the patient may return to his or her original activity safely. In young athletes, diet and nutrition must be kept in mind.

  10. Management of pediatric mandible fractures.

    PubMed

    Goth, Stephen; Sawatari, Yoh; Peleg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The pediatric mandible fracture is a rare occurrence when compared with the number of mandible fractures that occur within the adult population. Although the clinician who manages facial fractures may never encounter a pediatric mandible fracture, it is a unique injury that warrants a comprehensive discussion. Because of the unique anatomy, dentition, and growth of the pediatric patient, the management of a pediatric mandible fracture requires true diligence with a variance in treatment ranging from soft diet to open reduction and internal fixation. In addition to the variability in treatment, any trauma to the face of a child requires additional management factors including child abuse issues and long-term sequelae involving skeletal growth, which may affect facial symmetry and occlusion. The following is a review of the incidence, relevant anatomy, clinical and radiographic examination, and treatment modalities for specific fracture types of the pediatric mandible based on the clinical experience at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery program. In addition, a review of the literature regarding the management of the pediatric mandible fracture was performed to offer a more comprehensive overview of this unique subset of facial fractures.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in stress fractures and shin splints.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tohyama, Harukazu; Ito, Hirokazu; Minami, Akio

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine whether stress fractures and shin splints could be discriminated with MRI in the early phase. Twenty-two athletes, who had pain in the middle or distal part of their leg during or after sports activity, were evaluated with radiographs and MRI scans. Stress fractures were diagnosed when consecutive radiographs showed local periosteal reaction or a fracture line, and shin splints were diagnosed in all the other cases. In all eight patients with stress fractures, an abnormally wide high signal in the localized bone marrow was the most detectable in the coronal fat-suppressed MRI scan. In 11 patients with shin splints, the coronal fat-suppressed MRI scans showed a linear abnormally high signal along the medial posterior surface of the tibia, and in seven patients with shin splints, the MRI scans showed a linear abnormally high signal along the medial bone marrow. No MRI scans of shin splints showed an abnormally wide high signal in the bone marrow as observed on MRI scans of stress fractures. This study showed that fat-suppressed MRI is useful for discrimination between stress fracture and shin splints before radiographs show a detectable periosteal reaction in the tibia.

  12. Ultrasound-Diagnosed Tibia Stress Fracture: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Adae; Abid, Ayesha; Shadiack, Anthony; Monaco, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Stress fractures are a frequent cause of lower extremity pain in athletes, and especially in runners. Plain imaging has a low sensitivity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bone scan scintigraphy is the criterion standard, but expensive. We present the case of a young female distance runner with left shin pain. Plain radiography was unremarkable. Ultrasound showed focal hyperechoic elevation of the periosteum with irregularity over the distal tibia and increased flow on Doppler. These findings were consistent with a distal tibia stress fracture and confirmed by MRI. Examination of our case will highlight the utility of considering an ultrasound for diagnosis of tibial stress fracture.

  13. Ultrasound-Diagnosed Tibia Stress Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Amoako, Adae; Abid, Ayesha; Shadiack, Anthony; Monaco, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Stress fractures are a frequent cause of lower extremity pain in athletes, and especially in runners. Plain imaging has a low sensitivity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bone scan scintigraphy is the criterion standard, but expensive. We present the case of a young female distance runner with left shin pain. Plain radiography was unremarkable. Ultrasound showed focal hyperechoic elevation of the periosteum with irregularity over the distal tibia and increased flow on Doppler. These findings were consistent with a distal tibia stress fracture and confirmed by MRI. Examination of our case will highlight the utility of considering an ultrasound for diagnosis of tibial stress fracture. PMID:28469488

  14. Transverse Stress Fracture of the Proximal Patella: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Kato, Ko; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Nakagawa, Shuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-02-01

    Among stress fractures associated with sports activities, patellar stress fracture is rare. Regarding patella stress fractures, so far only distal transverse or lateral longitudinal fractures have been reported, but there are no reports of transverse fractures occurring in the proximal patella. We describe an extremely rare case of transverse stress fracture of proximal patella in a 9-year-old athlete.A 9-year old boy, who participated in sports (sprints and Kendo) presented with left knee pain without any external injury. In plain radiographs, a fracture line was observed in the proximal 1/3 of the left patella, and a patella stress fracture was diagnosed. For treatment, because 7 months of conservative therapy showed no improvement, internal fixation was carried out using Acutrak screws, and bone union was thus achieved. Three months after the operation, he was able to return to his previous level of athletic sports activity.Regarding the mechanism of onset, it is believed that the causes are longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure. On the other hand, the contact region of the patella with the femur changes with the flexion angle of the knee. In the current case, the fracture occurred at a site where the patella was in contact with the femur at a flexion angle of >90°, so it is believed that it occurred as a clinical condition from being subjected to repeated longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure at a flexion angle of >90°, during the sports activities of sprints and Kendo. The nonunion of the transverse stress fracture of his proximal patella was successfully treated with internal fixation using Acutrak screws.

  15. Proximal tibial stress fracture associated with mild osteoarthritis of the knee: case report.

    PubMed

    Curković, Marko; Kovac, Kristina; Curković, Bozidar; Babić-Naglić, Durda; Potocki, Kristina

    2011-03-01

    Stress fractures are considered as multifactorial overuse injuries occurring in 0.3%-0.8% of patients suffering from rheumatic diseases, with rheumatoid arthritis being the most common underlying condition. Stress fractures can be classified according to the condition of the bone affected as: 1) fatigue stress fractures occurring when normal bone is exposed to repeated abnormal stresses; and 2) insufficiency stress fractures that occur when normal stress is applied to bone weakened by an underlying condition. Stress fractures are rarely associated with severe forms of knee osteoarthritis, accompanied with malalignment and obesity. We present a patient with a proximal tibial stress fracture associated with mild knee osteoarthritis without associated malalignment or obesity. Stress fracture should be considered when a patient with osteoarthritis presents with sudden deterioration, severe localized tenderness to palpation and localized swelling or periosteal thickening at the pain site and elevated local temperature. The diagnosis of stress fractures in patients with rheumatic diseases may often be delayed because plain film radiographs may not reveal a stress fracture soon after the symptom onset; moreover, evidence of a fracture may never appear on plain radiographs. Triple phase nuclear bone scans and magnetic resonance imaging are more sensitive in the early clinical course than plain films for initial diagnosis.

  16. Tension band plating of a nonunion anterior tibial stress fracture in an athlete.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Jarrad A; Villacis, Diego; Kephart, Curtis J; Rick Hatch, George F

    2013-07-01

    The authors present a rare technique of tension band plating of the anterior tibia in the setting of a nonunion stress fracture. Surgical management with an intramedullary nail is a viable and proven option for treating such injuries. However, in treating elite athletes, legitimate concerns exist regarding the surgical disruption of the extensor mechanism and the risk of anterior knee pain associated with intramedullary nail use. The described surgical technique demonstrates the use of tension band plating as an effective treatment of delayed union and nonunion anterior tibial stress fractures in athletes without the potential risks of intramedullary nail insertion. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. The role of local stress perturbation on the simultaneous opening of orthogonal fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, Quinten; Hardebol, Nico; Barnhoorn, Auke; Bertotti, Giovanni; Drury, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Orthogonal fracture networks (ladder-like networks) are arrangements that are commonly observed in outcrop studies. They form a particularly dense and well connected network which can play an important role in the effective permeability of tight hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs. One issue is the extent to which both the long systematic and smaller cross fractures can be simultaneously critically stressed under a given stress condition. Fractures in an orthogonal network form by opening mode-I displacements in which the main component is separation of the two fracture walls. This opening is driven by effective tensile stresses as the smallest principle stress acting perpendicular to the fracture wall, which accords with linear elastic fracture mechanics. What has been well recognized in previous field and modelling studies is how both the systematic fractures and perpendicular cross fractures require the minimum principle stress to act perpendicular to the fracture wall. Thus, these networks either require a rotation of the regional stress field or local perturbations in stress field. Using a mechanical finite element modelling software, a geological case of layer perpendicular systematic mode I opening fractures is generated. New in our study is that we not only address tensile stresses at the boundary, but also address models using pore fluid pressure. The local stress in between systematic fractures is then assessed in order to derive the probability and orientation of micro crack propagation using the theory of sub critical crack growth and Griffith's theory. Under effective tensile conditions, the results indicate that in between critically spaced systematic fractures, local effective tensile stresses flip. Therefore the orientation of the least principle stress will rotate 90°, hence an orthogonal fracture is more likely to form. Our new findings for models with pore fluid pressures instead of boundary tension show that the magnitude of effective tension

  18. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    Hydraulic fracturing is a technique which is used to exploit geologic features and subsurface properties in an effort to increase production in low-permeability formations. The process of hydraulic fracturing provides a greater surface contact area between the producing formation and the wellbore and thus increases the amount of recoverable hydrocarbons from within the reservoir. The use of this stimulation technique has brought on massive applause from the industry due to its widespread success and effectiveness, however the dynamic processes that take part in the development of hydraulic fractures is a relatively new area of research with respect to the massive scale operations that are seen today. The process of hydraulic fracturing relies upon understanding and exploiting the in-situ stress distribution throughout the area of study. These in-situ stress conditions are responsible for directing fracture orientation and propagation paths throughout the period of injection. The relative magnitude of these principle stresses is key in developing a successful stimulation plan. In horizontal well plan development the interpretation of stress within the reservoir is required for determining the azimuth of the horizontal well path. These horizontal laterals are typically oriented in a manner such that the well path lies parallel to the minimum horizontal stress. This allows for vertical fractures to develop transversely to the wellbore, or normal to the least principle stress without the theoretical possibility of fractures overlapping, creating the most efficient use of the fluid energy during injection. The orientation and magnitude of these in-situ stress fields however can be dynamic, controlled by the subsequent fracture propagation and redistribution of the surrounding stresses. That is, that as the fracture propagates throughout the reservoir, the relative stress fields surrounding the fractures may see a shift and deviate from their original direction or

  19. Stress Fractures of the Foot.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Munier; Clutton, Juliet; Ridgewell, Mark; Lyons, Kathleen; Perera, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    Stress fractures of the foot and ankle may be more common among athletes than previously reported. A low threshold for investigation is warranted and further imaging may be appropriate if initial radiographs remain inconclusive. Most of these fractures can be treated conservatively with a period of non-weight-bearing mobilization followed by gradual return to activity. Early surgery augmented by bone graft may allow athletes to return to sports earlier. Risk of delayed union, nonunion, and recurrent fracture is high. Many of the patients may also have risk factors for injury that should be modified for a successful outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tension Band Plating for Chronic Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures in High-Performance Athletes.

    PubMed

    Zbeda, Robert M; Sculco, Peter K; Urch, Ekaterina Y; Lazaro, Lionel E; Borens, Olivier; Williams, Riley J; Lorich, Dean G; Wellman, David S; Helfet, David L

    2015-07-01

    Anterior tibial stress fractures are associated with high rates of delayed union and nonunion, which can be particularly devastating to a professional athlete who requires rapid return to competition. Current surgical treatment strategies include intramedullary nailing, which has satisfactory rates of fracture union but an associated risk of anterior knee pain. Anterior tension band plating is a biomechanically sound alternative treatment for these fractures. Tension band plating of chronic anterior tibial stress fractures leads to rapid healing and return to physical activity and avoids the anterior knee pain associated with intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 13 chronic anterior tibial stress fractures in 12 professional or collegiate athletes who underwent tension band plating after failing nonoperative management. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, injury history, and surgical details. Radiographs were used to assess time to osseous union. Follow-up notes and phone interviews were used to determine follow-up time, return to training time, and whether the patient was able to return to competition. Cases included 13 stress fractures in 12 patients (9 females, 3 males). Five patients were track-and-field athletes, 4 patients played basketball, 2 patients played volleyball, and 1 was a ballet dancer. Five patients were Division I collegiate athletes and 7 were professional or Olympic athletes. Average age at time of surgery was 23.6 years (range, 20-32 years). Osseous union occurred on average at 9.6 weeks (range, 5.3-16.9 weeks) after surgery. Patients returned to training on average at 11.1 weeks (range, 5.7-20 weeks). Ninety-two percent (12/13) eventually returned to preinjury competition levels. Thirty-eight percent (5/13) underwent removal of hardware for plate prominence. There was no incidence of infection or nonunion. Anterior tension band plating for chronic tibial stress

  1. Stress analysis of implant-bone fixation at different fracture angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzawati, B.; Daud, R.; Afendi, M.; Majid, MS Abdul; Zain, N. A. M.; Bajuri, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Internal fixation is a mechanism purposed to maintain and protect the reduction of a fracture. Understanding of the fixation stability is necessary to determine parameters influence the mechanical stability and the risk of implant failure. A static structural analysis on a bone fracture fixation was developed to simulate and analyse the biomechanics of a diaphysis shaft fracture with a compression plate and conventional screws. This study aims to determine a critical area of the implant to be fractured based on different implant material and angle of fracture (i.e. 0°, 30° and 45°). Several factors were shown to influence stability to implant after surgical. The stainless steel, (S. S) and Titanium, (Ti) screws experienced the highest stress at 30° fracture angle. The fracture angle had a most significant effect on the conventional screw as compared to the compression plate. The stress was significantly higher in S.S material as compared to Ti material, with concentrated on the 4th screw for all range of fracture angle. It was also noted that the screws closest to the intense concentration stress areas on the compression plate experienced increasing amounts of stress. The highest was observed at the screw thread-head junction.

  2. RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway: genetic associations with stress fracture period prevalence in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Varley, Ian; Hughes, David C; Greeves, Julie P; Stellingwerff, Trent; Ranson, Craig; Fraser, William D; Sale, Craig

    2015-02-01

    The RANK/RANKL/OPG signalling pathway is important in the regulation of bone turnover, with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within this pathway associated with bone phenotypic adaptations. To determine whether four SNPs associated with genes in the RANK/RANKL/OPG signalling pathway were associated with stress fracture injury in elite athletes. Radiologically confirmed stress fracture history was reported in 518 elite athletes, forming the Stress Fracture Elite Athlete (SFEA) cohort. Data were analysed for the whole group and were sub-stratified into male and cases of multiple stress fracture groups. Genotypes were determined using proprietary fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR assays. SNPs rs3018362 (RANK) and rs1021188 (RANKL) were associated with stress fracture injury (P<0.05). 8.1% of the stress fracture group and 2.8% of the non-stress fracture group were homozygote for the rare allele of rs1021188. Allele frequency, heterozygotes and homozygotes for the rare allele of rs3018362 were associated with stress fracture period prevalence (P<0.05). Analysis of the male only group showed 8.2% of rs1021188 rare allele homozygotes had suffered a stress fracture whilst 2.5% of the non-stress fracture group were homozygous. In cases of multiple stress fractures, homozygotes for the rare allele of rs1021188 and individuals possessing at least one copy of the rare allele of rs4355801 (OPG) were shown to be associated with stress fracture injury (P<0.05). The data support an association between SNPs in the RANK/RANKL/OPG signalling pathway and the development of stress fracture injury. The association of rs3018362 (RANK) and rs1021188 (RANKL) with stress fracture injury susceptibility supports their role in the maintenance of bone health and offers potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Return to sports after stress fractures of the tibial diaphysis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Robertson, G A J; Wood, A M

    2015-06-01

    This review aims to provide information on the time taken to resume sport following tibial diaphyseal stress fractures (TDSFs). A systematic search of Medline, EMBASE, CINHAL, Cochrane, Web of Science, PEDro, Sports Discus, Scopus and Google Scholar was performed using the keywords 'tibial', 'tibia', 'stress', 'fractures', 'athletes', 'sports', 'non-operative', 'conservative', 'operative' and 'return to sport'. Twenty-seven studies were included: 16 reported specifically on anterior TDSFs and 5 on posterior TDSFs. The general principles were to primarily attempt non-operative management for all TDSFs and to consider operative intervention for anterior TDSFs that remained symptomatic after 3-6 months. Anterior TDSFs showed a prolonged return to sport. The best time to return to sport and the optimal management modalities for TDSFs remain undefined. Management of TDSFs should include a full assessment of training methods, equipment and diet to modify pre-disposing factors. Future prospective studies should aim to establish the optimal treatment modalities for TDSFs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Stress Fractures of Tibia Treated with Ilizarov External Fixator.

    PubMed

    Górski, Radosław; Żarek, Sławomir; Modzelewski, Piotr; Górski, Ryszard; Małdyk, Paweł

    2016-08-30

    Stress fractures are the result of cyclic loading of the bone, which gradually becomes damaged. Most often they are treated by rest or plaster cast and, in rare cases, by internal fixation. There is little published data on initial reposition followed by stabilization with the Ilizarov apparatus in such fractures. Six patients were treated with an external fixator according to the Ilizarov method for a stress fracture of the tibia between 2007 and 2015. Three patients were initially treated conservatively. Due to increasing tibial deformation, they were qualified for surgical treatment with external stabilization. In the other patients, surgery was the first-line treatment. All patients demonstrated risk factors for a stress fracture. After the surgery, they fully loaded the operated limb. No patient developed malunion, nonunion, infection or venous thrombosis. The average time from the first operation to the removal of the external fixator was 19 weeks. Radiographic and clinical outcomes were satisfactory in all patients. 1. The Ilizarov method allows for successful stabilization of stress fractures of the tibia. 2. It may be a good alternative to internal stabilization, especially in patients with multiple comorbidities which affect bone quality and may impair soft tissue healing.

  5. Risk factors for stress fracture among young female cross-country runners.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Jennifer L; Bachrach, Laura K; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Nieves, Jeri; Greendale, Gail A; Sowers, Maryfran; Brown, Byron W; Matheson, Kim A; Crawford, Sybil L; Cobb, Kristin L

    2007-09-01

    To identify risk factors for stress fracture among young female distance runners. Participants were 127 competitive female distance runners, aged 18-26, who provided at least some follow-up data in a randomized trial among 150 runners of the effects of oral contraceptives on bone health. After completing a baseline questionnaire and undergoing bone densitometry, they were followed an average of 1.85 yr. Eighteen participants had at least one stress fracture during follow-up. Baseline characteristics associated (P<0.10) in multivariate analysis with stress fracture occurrence were one or more previous stress fractures (rate ratio [RR] [95% confidence interval]=6.42 (1.80-22.87), lower whole-body bone mineral content (RR=2.70 [1.26-5.88] per 1-SD [293.2 g] decrease), younger chronologic age (RR=1.42 [1.05-1.92] per 1-yr decrease), lower dietary calcium intake (RR=1.11 [0.98-1.25] per 100-mg decrease), and younger age at menarche (RR=1.92 [1.15-3.23] per 1-yr decrease). Although not statistically significant, a history of irregular menstrual periods was also associated with increased risk (RR=3.41 [0.69-16.91]). Training-related factors did not affect risk. The results of this and other studies indicate that risk factors for stress fracture among young female runners include previous stress fractures, lower bone mass, and, although not statistically significant in this study, menstrual irregularity. More study is needed of the associations between stress fracture and age, calcium intake, and age at menarche. Given the importance of stress fractures to runners, identifying preventive measures is of high priority.

  6. Thermal stress fracture of ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal stress failures of ceramic coatings are discussed in terms of fracture mechanics concepts. The effects of transient and residual stresses on single and multiple cycle failure mechanisms are considered. A specific example of a zirconia thermal barrier coating is presented and its endurance calculated using the proposed relationships.

  7. Interpretation and classification of bone scintigraphic findings in stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Zwas, S T; Elkanovitch, R; Frank, G

    1987-04-01

    A new system for classification of stress fractures identified by bone scintigraphy was developed and divided into four grades according to lesion dimension, bone extension, and tracer accumulation. The scintigraphic findings were evaluated for severity of lesions by extent of the visualized bone response, ranging from ill-defined cortical lesions with slightly increased activity (I) to well-defined intramedullary transcortical lesions with intensely increased activity (IV). Bone scintigraphies using [99mTc]MDP were obtained in 310 military recruits suspected of having stress fractures. In 235 patients, 391 stress fractures were diagnosed. Forty percent of the lesions were asymptomatic. Most of the lesions were in the tibiae (72%), and 87% of the patients had one or two lesions, while 13% had three to five lesions. Eighty-five percent of the lesions were classified as mild and showed early and more complete resolution on follow-up studies after treatment as compared to the severe grades. Furthermore, specific scintigraphic patterns have been introduced for distinguishing inflammatory shin-splints from stress fractures, allowing for their appropriate early treatment. Thus, early recognition of mild stress fracture scintigraphic patterns representing the beginning of pathologic bone response to stress enabled a prompt and effective treatment to prevent progression of lesions, protracted disability, and complications.

  8. A Discrete Fracture Network Model with Stress-Driven Nucleation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoine, E.; Darcel, C.; Munier, R.; Davy, P.

    2017-12-01

    The realism of Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models, beyond the bulk statistical properties, relies on the spatial organization of fractures, which is not issued by purely stochastic DFN models. The realism can be improved by injecting prior information in DFN from a better knowledge of the geological fracturing processes. We first develop a model using simple kinematic rules for mimicking the growth of fractures from nucleation to arrest, in order to evaluate the consequences of the DFN structure on the network connectivity and flow properties. The model generates fracture networks with power-law scaling distributions and a percentage of T-intersections that are consistent with field observations. Nevertheless, a larger complexity relying on the spatial variability of natural fractures positions cannot be explained by the random nucleation process. We propose to introduce a stress-driven nucleation in the timewise process of this kinematic model to study the correlations between nucleation, growth and existing fracture patterns. The method uses the stress field generated by existing fractures and remote stress as an input for a Monte-Carlo sampling of nuclei centers at each time step. Networks so generated are found to have correlations over a large range of scales, with a correlation dimension that varies with time and with the function that relates the nucleation probability to stress. A sensibility analysis of input parameters has been performed in 3D to quantify the influence of fractures and remote stress field orientations.

  9. Patterns of Fracture and Tidal Stresses Due to Nonsynchronous Rotation: Implications for Fracturing on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Helfenstein, P.

    1985-01-01

    Global lineaments on Europa were interpreted as fractures in an icy crust. A variety of lineament types were identified, which appear to form a systematic pattern on the surface. For a synchronously rotating body, the patterns of fractures observed could be produced by a combination of stresses due to orbital recession, orbital eccentricity, and internal contraction. However, it was recently suggested that the forced eccentricity of Europa's orbit may result in nonsynchronous rotation. The hypothesis that fractures in a thin icy crust may have formed in response to stresses resulting from nonsynchronous rotation is studied.

  10. Fractures in sport: Optimising their management and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Greg AJ; Wood, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Fractures in sport are a specialised cohort of fracture injuries, occurring in a high functioning population, in which the goals are rapid restoration of function and return to play with the minimal symptom profile possible. While the general principles of fracture management, namely accurate fracture reduction, appropriate immobilisation and timely rehabilitation, guide the treatment of these injuries, management of fractures in athletic populations can differ significantly from those in the general population, due to the need to facilitate a rapid return to high demand activities. However, despite fractures comprising up to 10% of all of sporting injuries, dedicated research into the management and outcome of sport-related fractures is limited. In order to assess the optimal methods of treating such injuries, and so allow optimisation of their outcome, the evidence for the management of each specific sport-related fracture type requires assessment and analysis. We present and review the current evidence directing management of fractures in athletes with an aim to promote valid innovative methods and optimise the outcome of such injuries. From this, key recommendations are provided for the management of the common fracture types seen in the athlete. Six case reports are also presented to illustrate the management planning and application of sport-focussed fracture management in the clinical setting. PMID:26716081

  11. Patterns of fracture and tidal stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation - Implications for fracturing on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    This study considers the global patterns of fracture that would result from nonsynchronous rotation of a tidally distorted planetary body. The incremental horizontal stresses in a thin elastic or viscous shell due to a small displacement of the axis of maximum tidal elongation are derived, and the resulting stress distributions are applied to interpret the observed pattern of fracture lineaments on Europa. The observed pattern of lineaments can be explained by nonsynchronous rotation if these features formed by tension fracturing and dike emplacement. Tension fracturing can occur for a small displacement of the tidal axis, so that the resulting lineaments may be consistent with other evidence suggesting a young age for the surface.

  12. Expected Time to Return to Athletic Participation After Stress Fracture in Division I Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy L; Jamieson, Marissa; Everson, Sonsecharae; Siegel, Courtney

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have documented expected time to return to athletic participation after stress fractures in elite athletes. Time to return to athletic participation after stress fractures would vary by site and severity of stress fracture. Retrospective cohort study. Level 3. All stress fractures diagnosed in a single Division I collegiate men's and women's track and field/cross-country team were recorded over a 3-year period. Site and severity of injury were graded based on Kaeding-Miller classification system for stress fractures. Time to return to full unrestricted athletic participation was recorded for each athlete and correlated with patient sex and site and severity grade of injury. Fifty-seven stress fractures were diagnosed in 38 athletes (mean age, 20.48 years; range, 18-23 years). Ten athletes sustained recurrent or multiple stress fractures. Thirty-seven injuries occurred in women and 20 in men. Thirty-three stress fractures occurred in the tibia, 10 occurred in the second through fourth metatarsals, 3 occurred in the fifth metatarsal, 6 in the tarsal bones (2 navicular), 2 in the femur, and 5 in the pelvis. There were 31 grade II stress fractures, 11 grade III stress fractures, and 2 grade V stress fractures (in the same patient). Mean time to return to unrestricted sport participation was 12.9 ± 5.2 weeks (range, 6-27 weeks). No significant differences in time to return were noted based on injury location or whether stress fracture was grade II or III. The expected time to return to full unrestricted athletic participation after diagnosis of a stress fracture is 12 to 13 weeks for all injury sites. Athletes with grade V (nonunion) stress fractures may require more time to return to sport.

  13. Sacral stress fracture after lumbar and lumbosacral fusion. How to manage it? A proposition based on three cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Scemama, C; D'astorg, H; Guigui, P

    2016-04-01

    Sacral fracture after lumbosacral instrumentation could be a source of prolonged pain and a late autonomy recovery in old patients. Diagnosis remains difficult and usually delayed. No clear consensus for efficient treatment of this complication has been defined. Aim of this study was to determine how to manage them. Three patients who sustained sacral fracture after instrumented lumbosacral fusion performed for degenerative disease of the spine are discussed. History, physical examinations' findings and radiographic features are presented. Pertinent literature was analyzed. All patients complained of unspecific low back and buttock pain a few weeks after index surgery. Diagnosis was done on CT-scan. We always choose revision surgery with good functional results. Sacral stress fracture has to be reminded behind unspecific buttock or low back pain. CT-scan seems to be the best radiological test to do the diagnosis. Surgical treatment is recommended when lumbar lordosis and pelvic incidence mismatched. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple stress fractures in a young female runner.

    PubMed

    Dusek, T; Pećina, M; Loncar-Dusek, M; Bojanic, I

    2004-01-01

    The effect of exercise on female's bone metabolism has received much attention in recent years. We report on unusual case of a female runner with low body mass and amenorrhea, who suffered 4 stress fractures. Three of the stress fractures occurred during her sports career, and the fourth occurred 7 years after the cessation of sports activities. It seems that exercise-induced amenorrhea together with food restriction in the young age may cause long-term consequences on bone metabolism.

  15. Innovations in the management of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Teasdall, Robert D; Webb, Lawrence X

    2003-08-01

    Hip fractures include fractures of the head, neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric regions. Head fractures commonly accompany dislocations. Neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures occur with greatest frequency in elderly patients with a low bone mineral density and are produced by low-energy mechanisms. Subtrochanteric fractures occur in a predominantly strong cortical osseous region that is exposed to large compressive stresses. Implants used to address these fractures must accommodate significant loads while the fractures consolidate. Complications secondary to hip fractures produce significant morbidity and include infection, nonunion, malunion, decubitus ulcers, fat emboli, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death.

  16. Spallation and fracture resulting from reflected and intersecting stress waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinslow, R.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of stress waves produced in solid by explosions or high-velocity impacts. These waves rebound from free surfaces in the form of tensile waves that are capable of causing internal fractures or spallation of the material. The high-speed framing camera is shown to be an important tool for observing the stress waves and fracture in transparent targets, and its photographs provide valuable information on the mechanics of fracture.

  17. Tibial stress fracture after computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Massai, F; Conteduca, F; Vadalà, A; Iorio, R; Basiglini, L; Ferretti, A

    2010-06-01

    A correct alignment of the tibial and femoral component is one of the most important factors determining favourable long-term results of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The accuracy provided by the use of the computer navigation systems has been widely described in the literature so that their use has become increasingly popular in recent years; however, unpredictable complications, such as displaced or stress femoral or tibial fractures, have been reported to occur a few weeks after the operation. We present a case of a stress tibial fracture that occurred after a TKA performed with the use of a computer navigation system. The stress fracture, which eventually healed without further complications, occurred at one of the pinhole sites used for the placement of the tibial trackers.

  18. Step test performance and risk of stress fractures among female army trainees.

    PubMed

    Cowan, David N; Bedno, Sheryl A; Urban, Nadia; Lee, Dara S; Niebuhr, David W

    2012-06-01

    Stress fractures and other musculoskeletal injuries are major sources of morbidity among female military trainees. Several risk factors have been postulated, particularly pre-existing fitness, usually assessed with post-entry run time for ≥ 1.0 mile. Physical fitness is not formally evaluated prior to Army entry. If a valid and simple test that identified women at increased risk of stress fracture were available and could be applied prior to entry, it would facilitate cost-benefit studies of deferral or interventions. These analyses were undertaken to determine if a 5-minute step test conducted before entry identified women at increased risk. A prospective study was conducted of weight-qualified women entering the Army in 2005-2006, with analyses completed in 2011. At the pre-entry examination, information was collected on age, BMI, smoking, race, and activity level. Everyone took the step test. All outpatient medical encounters were captured, and stress fractures and other musculoskeletal injuries identified. Women with stress fractures and those with other musculoskeletal injuries were evaluated separately. 1568 women were included in the study; 109 developed stress fractures and 803 other musculoskeletal injury. Women who failed the step test had a 76% higher stress fracture incidence and a 35% higher incidence of other musculoskeletal injuries. There was effect modification between age and test failure for stress fracture. A step test that can be administered before military entry identifies women with increased incidence of stress fracture and other musculoskeletal injury. This test could be used pre-entry to defer or target high-risk recruits for tailored fitness training before or after military entrance. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. kISMET: Stress analysis and intermediate-scale hydraulic fracturing at the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, P. F.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Wu, Y.; Cook, P. J.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Ulrich, C.; Siler, D. L.; Guglielmi, Y.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Rutqvist, J.; Daley, T. M.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Wang, H. F.; Lord, N.; Haimson, B. C.; Sone, H.; Vigilante, P.; Roggenthen, W.; Doe, T.; Lee, M.; Ingraham, M. D.; Huang, H.; Mattson, E.; Johnson, T. C.; Zhou, J.; Zoback, M. D.; Morris, J.; White, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Coblentz, D. D.; Heise, J.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, we established a field test facility at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), and in 2016 we carried out in situ hydraulic fracturing experiments to characterize the stress field, understand the effects of crystalline rock fabric on fracturing, and gain experience in monitoring using geophysical methods. The kISMET (permeability (k) and Induced Seismicity Management for Energy Technologies) project test site was established in the West Access Drift at the 4850 ft level, 1478 m below ground in phyllite of the Precambrian Poorman Formation. The kISMET team drilled and cored five near-vertical boreholes in a line on 3 m spacing, deviating the two outermost boreholes slightly to create a five-spot pattern around the test borehole centered in the test volume 40 m below the drift invert (floor) at a total depth of 1518 m. Laboratory measurements of core from the center test borehole showed P-wave velocity heterogeneity along each core indicating strong, fine-scale ( 1 cm or smaller) changes in the mechanical properties of the rock. Tensile strength ranges between 3‒7.5 MPa and 5‒12 MPa. Pre-fracturing numerical simulations with a discrete element code were carried out to predict fracture size and magnitude of microseismicity. Field measurements of the stress field were made using hydraulic fracturing, which produced remarkably uniformly oriented fractures suggesting rock fabric did not play a significant role in controlling fracture orientation. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and continuous active seismic source monitoring (CASSM) were deployed in the four monitoring boreholes, and passive seismic accelerometer-based measurements in the West Access Drift were carried out during the generation of a larger fracture (so-called stimulation test). ERT was not able to detect the fracture created, nor did the accelerometers in the drift, but microseismicity was detected for the first (deepest) hydraulic-fracturing stress measurement. Analytical

  20. Stress Analysis and Fracture in Nanolaminate Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2008-01-01

    A stress analysis is performed on a nanolaminate subjected to bending. A composite mechanics computer code that is based on constituent properties and nanoelement formulation is used to evaluate the nanolaminate stresses. The results indicate that the computer code is sufficient for the analysis. The results also show that when a stress concentration is present, the nanolaminate stresses exceed their corresponding matrix-dominated strengths and the nanofiber fracture strength.

  1. Management of Penile Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Imtiaz

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To study clinical features and treatment of patients diagnosed with fractured penis. Methods All patients diagnosed with penis fracture from March 2000-March 2007 were retrospectively studied. No invasive investigation was used for diagnosis. Results Surgical intervention was done in 52 patients while 5 patients were managed conservatively. The constant finding recorded in all cases was that penis fracture occurred in erect penises. Most fractures were observed in the 16-30 years age group (50.88%). Left lateral tear was present in 53.84% cases. One patient had gangrene of penile skin after surgery. Conclusion Penis Fracture is not so uncommon as reported. A trauma to erect penis is mandatory for fracture to occur. Surgical intervention is the preferred mode of treatment. PMID:22359706

  2. Acoustic Emission Based Surveillance System for Prediction of Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    aging are susceptible to such fractures in contexts of osteoporosis, diabetes, cerebral palsy, fibrous dysplasia and osteogenesis imperfecta . This...disease, or, healthy people who have excessive exercise regimes (soldiers and athletes) experience these fractures [2]. Stress fractures interrupt

  3. Medial tibial plateau morphology and stress fracture location: A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yukata, Kiminori; Yamanaka, Issei; Ueda, Yuzuru; Nakai, Sho; Ogasa, Hiroyoshi; Oishi, Yosuke; Hamawaki, Jun-Ichi

    2017-06-18

    To determine the location of medial tibial plateau stress fractures and its relationship with tibial plateau morphology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A retrospective review of patients with a diagnosis of stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau was performed for a 5-year period. Fourteen patients [three female and 11 male, with an average age of 36.4 years (range, 15-50 years)], who underwent knee MRI, were included. The appearance of the tibial plateau stress fracture and the geometry of the tibial plateau were reviewed and measured on MRI. Thirteen of 14 stress fractures were linear, and one of them stellated on MRI images. The location of fractures was classified into three types. Three fractures were located anteromedially (AM type), six posteromedially (PM type), and five posteriorly (P type) at the medial tibial plateau. In addition, tibial posterior slope at the medial tibial plateau tended to be larger when the fracture was located more posteriorly on MRI. We found that MRI showed three different localizations of medial tibial plateau stress fractures, which were associated with tibial posterior slope at the medial tibial plateau.

  4. Medial tibial plateau morphology and stress fracture location: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Yukata, Kiminori; Yamanaka, Issei; Ueda, Yuzuru; Nakai, Sho; Ogasa, Hiroyoshi; Oishi, Yosuke; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the location of medial tibial plateau stress fractures and its relationship with tibial plateau morphology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS A retrospective review of patients with a diagnosis of stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau was performed for a 5-year period. Fourteen patients [three female and 11 male, with an average age of 36.4 years (range, 15-50 years)], who underwent knee MRI, were included. The appearance of the tibial plateau stress fracture and the geometry of the tibial plateau were reviewed and measured on MRI. RESULTS Thirteen of 14 stress fractures were linear, and one of them stellated on MRI images. The location of fractures was classified into three types. Three fractures were located anteromedially (AM type), six posteromedially (PM type), and five posteriorly (P type) at the medial tibial plateau. In addition, tibial posterior slope at the medial tibial plateau tended to be larger when the fracture was located more posteriorly on MRI. CONCLUSION We found that MRI showed three different localizations of medial tibial plateau stress fractures, which were associated with tibial posterior slope at the medial tibial plateau. PMID:28660141

  5. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture under random loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1972-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the probability of stress-corrosion fracture of structures under random loadings. The formulation is based on the cumulative damage hypothesis and the experimentally determined stress-corrosion characteristics. Under both stationary and nonstationary random loadings, the mean value and the variance of the cumulative damage are obtained. The probability of stress-corrosion fracture is then evaluated using the principle of maximum entropy. It is shown that, under stationary random loadings, the standard deviation of the cumulative damage increases in proportion to the square root of time, while the coefficient of variation (dispersion) decreases in inversed proportion to the square root of time. Numerical examples are worked out to illustrate the general results.

  6. Regional flow simulation in fractured aquifers using stress-dependent parameters.

    PubMed

    Preisig, Giona; Joel Cornaton, Fabien; Perrochet, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    A model function relating effective stress to fracture permeability is developed from Hooke's law, implemented in the tensorial form of Darcy's law, and used to evaluate discharge rates and pressure distributions at regional scales. The model takes into account elastic and statistical fracture parameters, and is able to simulate real stress-dependent permeabilities from laboratory to field studies. This modeling approach gains in phenomenology in comparison to the classical ones because the permeability tensors may vary in both strength and principal directions according to effective stresses. Moreover this method allows evaluation of the fracture porosity changes, which are then translated into consolidation of the medium. © 2011, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  7. Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN...history of one stress fracture (n=25), or no stress fracture history (n=25). The discrepancies in these parameters between groups will help to...women (n=40 for each group ; n=240 total). This will serve to identify factors that contribute to the differences in stress fracture incidence due to race

  8. Chondromalacia of trochlear notch after healing of olecranon stress fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Chang; Chen, Shen-Kai; Wang, Chih-Wei; Chou, Pei-Hsi

    2006-05-01

    Chondromalacia of the trochlear notch and stress fracture of olecranon are uncommon injuries in the throwing athletes. We report an 18-year-old high school pitcher who had persistent postero-lateral elbow pain after a healed olecranon stress fracture of the right elbow. Diagnostic arthroscopy revealed chondromalacia of the trochlear notch. After treatment with arthroscopic drilling and abrasion chondroplasty, he returned to competitive pitching 1 year later postsurgery. This rare association between chondromalacia and stress fracture of the olecranon has not been reported previously in the literatures. Chondromalacia of the trochlear notch should be included as a differential diagnosis in evaluating athletes with persistent elbow pain after healed olecranon stress fractures.

  9. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture under random loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    Mathematical formulation is based on cumulative-damage hypothesis and experimentally-determined stress-corrosion characteristics. Under both stationary random loadings, mean value and variance of cumulative damage are obtained. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture is then evaluated, using principle of maximum entropy.

  10. The incidence and distribution of stress fractures in elite tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, J; Ghisi, J P

    2006-01-01

    Background Modern professional tennis involves powerful movements repeatedly subjecting the musculoskeletal system to heavy mechanical load. Thus tennis players are exposed to high risk of overuse injuries including stress fractures. Objective To determine the incidence and distribution of stress fractures in elite tennis players. Study design Retrospective cohort study. Methods The cohort study population consisted of 139 elite players (mean (SD) age, 20.0 (5.0) years; 48 female, 91 male). Stress fractures were identified and confirmed radiologically from medical records during a two year period. Injuries were analysed according to age, sex, site, severity, delay in diagnosis, and time needed to return to sports. Results 15 players sustained 18 stress fractures, corresponding to an overall case incidence of 12.9% (95% confidence interval (CI), 8.1 to 20.0). The tarsal navicular was most affected (n = 5; 27%), followed by the pars interarticularis (n = 3; 16%), the metatarsals (n = 3; 16%), the tibia (n = 2; 11%) and the lunate (n = 2; 11%). Magnetic resonance imaging showed a greater incidence of “high grade” lesions (94.4%). Stress fracture incidence was significantly higher in juniors (20.3% (95% CI, 11.4 to 33.2)) than in professional players (7.5% (2.8 to 15.6)) (p = 0.045). Conclusions There was a high absolute risk (12.9%) of stress fractures in elite tennis players over a two year period. Junior players were at highest risk. The lesions are a major cause of disruption both of training and of competition. Risk factors should therefore be identified and prevention emphasised. PMID:16632579

  11. Association of stressful life events with incident falls and fractures in older men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Howard A.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Marshall, Lynn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: small, retrospective studies suggest that major life events and/or sudden emotional stress may increase fall and fracture risk. The current study examines these associations prospectively. Methods: a total of 5,152 men aged ≥65 years in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study self-reported data on stressful life events for 1 year prior to study Visit 2. Incident falls and fractures were ascertained for 1 year after Visit 2. Fractures were centrally confirmed. Results: a total of 2,932 (56.9%) men reported ≥1 type of stressful life event. In men with complete stressful life event, fall and covariate data (n = 3,949), any stressful life event was associated with a 33% increased risk of incident fall [relative risk (RR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19–1.49] and 68% increased risk of multiple falls (RR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.40–2.01) in the year following Visit 2 after adjustment for age, education, Parkinson's disease, diabetes, stroke, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) impairment, chair stand time, walk speed, multiple past falls, depressive symptoms and antidepressant use. Risk increased with the number of types of stressful life events. Though any stressful life event was associated with a 58% increased age-adjusted risk for incident fracture, this association was attenuated and no longer statistically significant after additional adjustment for total hip bone mineral density, fracture after age 50, Parkinson's disease, stroke and IADL impairment. Conclusions: in this cohort of older men, stressful life events significantly increased risk of incident falls independent of other explanatory variables, but did not independently increase incident fracture risk. PMID:24002237

  12. Determination of In-Situ Stresses Around Underground Excavations by Means of Hydraulic Fracturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    inhomogeneous, precracked variable rock is suitable for hydraulic fracturing as a method of in-situ stress measurement. It was found that basically the Coeur...d’Alene quartzite is amenable to hydraulic fracturing testing. The rock has no consistent anisotropy, but is inhomogeneous with physical property...horizontal stress notwithstanding rock condition. Field stress measurements in the Coeur d’Alene mines using the hydraulic fracturing technique are recommended.

  13. Risk Stratification of Stress Fractures and Prediction of Return to Duty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    enrollment. In study Task 1 we aim to determine the sex- and race -ethnicity-specific bone traits that may contribute to stress fracture risk in military...SUBJECT TERMS bone microarchitecture, HRpQCT, race , gender, sex, bone mineral density, vBMD, bone geometry, stress fracture 16. SECURITY...sectional study aimed at identifying the bone properties that may be related to the well-known sex and race /ethnicity differences in risk for stress

  14. Identification of natural fractures and in situ stress at Rantau Dedap geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyanto, Andika; Sapiie, Benyamin; Idham Abdullah, Chalid; Permana Sidik, Ridwan

    2017-12-01

    Rantau Dedap Area is a geothermal field which is located in Great Sumatra Fault (GSF). The fault and fracture are main factor in the permeability of the geothermal system. However, not all faults and fractures have capability of to flow the fluids. Borehole image log is depiction of the borehole conditions, it is used to identify the natural fractures and drilling induced fracture. Both of them are used to identify the direction of the fracture, direction of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax), and geomechanics parameters. The natural fractures are the results of responses to stress on a rock and permeability which controlling factor in research area. Breakouts is found in this field as a trace of drilling induced fracture due to in situ stress work. Natural fractures are strongly clustered with true strike trending which first, second, and third major direction are N170°E - N180°E (N-S), N60°E - N70°E (NE-SW), and N310°E - N320°E (NW-SE), while the dominant dip is 80° -90°. Based on borehole breakout analysis, maximum horizontal stress orientation is identified in N162°E - N204°E (N-S) and N242°E (NE-SW) direction. It’s constantly similar with regional stress which is affected by GSF. Several parameters have been identified and analyzed are SHmax, SHmin, and Sy. It can be concluded that Rantau Dedap Geothermal Field is affected by strike-slip regime. The determination of in situ stress and natural fractures are important to study the pattern of permeability which is related to the fault in reservoir of this field.

  15. Stress-induced, time-dependent fracture closure at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Hickman, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    Time-dependent closure of fractures in quartz was measured in situ at 22-530??C temperature and 0.1-150 MPa water pressure. Unlike previous crack healing and rock permeability studies, in this study, fracture aperture is monitored directly and continuously using a windowed pressure vessel, a long-working-distance microscope, and reflected-light interferometry. Thus the fracture volume and geometry can be measured as a function of time, temperature, and water pressure. Relatively uniform closure occurs rapidly at temperatures and pressures where quartz becomes significantly soluble in water. During closure the aperture is reduced by as much as 80% in a few hours. We infer that this closure results from the dissolution of small particles or asperities that prop the fracture open. The driving force for closure via dissolution of the prop is the sum of three chemical potential terms: (1) the dissolution potential, proportional to the logarithm of the degree of undersaturation of the solution; (2) the coarsening potential, proportional to the radius of curvature of the prop; and (3) the pressure solution potential, proportional to the effective normal stress at the contact between propping particles and the fracture wall. Our observations suggest that closure is controlled by a pressure solution-like process. The aperture of dilatant fractures and microcracks in the Earth that are similar to those in our experiments, such as ones generated from thermal stressing or brittle failure during earthquake rupture and slip, will decrease rapidly with time, especially if the macroscopic stress is nonhydrostatic.

  16. Stress-induced, time-dependent fracture closure at hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, N. M.; Hickman, S. H.

    2004-02-01

    Time-dependent closure of fractures in quartz was measured in situ at 22-530°C temperature and 0.1-150 MPa water pressure. Unlike previous crack healing and rock permeability studies, in this study, fracture aperture is monitored directly and continuously using a windowed pressure vessel, a long-working-distance microscope, and reflected-light interferometry. Thus the fracture volume and geometry can be measured as a function of time, temperature, and water pressure. Relatively uniform closure occurs rapidly at temperatures and pressures where quartz becomes significantly soluble in water. During closure the aperture is reduced by as much as 80% in a few hours. We infer that this closure results from the dissolution of small particles or asperities that prop the fracture open. The driving force for closure via dissolution of the prop is the sum of three chemical potential terms: (1) the dissolution potential, proportional to the logarithm of the degree of undersaturation of the solution; (2) the coarsening potential, proportional to the radius of curvature of the prop; and (3) the pressure solution potential, proportional to the effective normal stress at the contact between propping particles and the fracture wall. Our observations suggest that closure is controlled by a pressure solution-like process. The aperture of dilatant fractures and microcracks in the Earth that are similar to those in our experiments, such as ones generated from thermal stressing or brittle failure during earthquake rupture and slip, will decrease rapidly with time, especially if the macroscopic stress is nonhydrostatic.

  17. Value of lateral blood pool imaging in patients with suspected stress fractures of the tibia.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Hosahalli K; Clarke, Susan E M; Centenara, Martin; Lucarelli, Amanda; Baron, Daniel; Fogelman, Ignac

    2011-03-01

    To critically evaluate the use of lateral blood pool imaging in athletes with lower limb pain and with a clinical suspicion of stress fracture. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians evaluated 3-phase bone scans using 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate performed in 50 consecutive patients referred from a specialist sports injury clinic for suspected tibial stress fracture. The vascularity to the tibia as seen on the blood pool (second phase) images in the anterior/posterior views was compared with the lateral/medial view assessments. Stress fractures were presumed to be present when on the delayed images (third phase) there was a focal or fusiform area of increased tracer uptake involving the tibial cortex. Shin splints which are a recognized cause of lower limb pain in athletes mimicking stress fracture were diagnosed if increased tracer uptake was seen extending along the posterior tibial surface with no significant focal or fusiform area of uptake within this. Inter-reviewer agreement for the assessment of vascularity was also assessed using Cohen's Kappa scores. Twenty-four stress fractures in 24 patients and 66 shin splints in 40 patients were diagnosed. In 18 patients stress fracture and shin splints coexisted. In 10 patients no tibial pathology was identified. Of the 24 patients diagnosed with stress fractures, lateral/medial blood pool imaging was superior in the assessment of blood pool activity (P < 0.001) identifying increased vascularity in 21 cases compared with the anterior/posterior views positive in only 11 cases. The inter-reviewer agreement was near perfect for lateral/medial views, κ = 0.86 while very good for anterior/posterior views, κ = 0.68. In patients with suspected tibial stress fractures, lateral views of the tibia provide the optimal method for evaluation of vascularity. Prospective studies with quantitative or semi-quantitative assessment of skeletal vascularity could provide supplementary information relating to the pathophysiology

  18. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    these runners. A "stiff’ runner will spend less time in contact with the ground (Farley and Gonzalez, 1996 ) and will attenuate less shock between the...leg and the head (McMahon et al., 1987). This is in agreement with the findings of Farley and Gonzalez ( 1996 ) who suggested lower extremity stiffness...Crossley, K. ( 1996 ) Stress fractures: a review of 180 cases. Clin. J. Sport Med. 6, 85-89. Brudvig, T., Grudger, T. and Obermeyer, L. (1983) Stress

  19. Distinct hip and rearfoot kinematics in female runners with a history of tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Milner, Clare E; Hamill, Joseph; Davis, Irene S

    2010-02-01

    Cross-sectional controlled laboratory study. To investigate the kinematics of the hip, knee, and rearfoot in the frontal and transverse planes in female distance runners with a history of tibial stress fracture. Tibial stress fractures are a common overuse injury in runners, accounting for up to half of all stress fractures. Abnormal kinematics of the lower extremity may contribute to abnormal musculoskeletal load distributions, leading to an increased risk of stress fractures. Thirty female runners with a history of tibial stress fracture were compared to 30 age-matched and weekly-running-distance-matched control subjects with no previous lower extremity bony injuries. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected using a motion capture system and a force platform, respectively, as subjects ran in the laboratory. Selected variables of interest were compared between the groups using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Peak hip adduction and peak rearfoot eversion angles were greater in the stress fracture group compared to the control group. Peak knee adduction and knee internal rotation angles and all joint angles at impact peak were similar between the groups. Runners with a previous tibial stress fracture exhibited greater peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles during the stance phase of running compared to healthy controls. A consequence of these mechanics may be altered load distribution within the lower extremity, predisposing individuals to stress fracture.

  20. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  1. [A boy with a painful knee: bone tumour or stress fracture?].

    PubMed

    Robben, Bart J; Jutte, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    The symptoms of a stress fracture are almost identical to those of most bone tumours. Even with the use of various imaging techniques, it can be difficult to establish the correct diagnosis. Although a primary bone tumour requires early treatment to improve its prognosis, the discriminative factor in the diagnosis of a stress fracture is its clinical development over time. A 10-year-old boy was referred to our outpatient clinic on the suspicion of a primary bone tumour in his right tibia. A case was once described in this journal in which a stress fracture had eventually led to an amputation. The suspicion of primary bone tumour often marks the start of a long and intense diagnostic course. A stress fracture is the major diagnostic pitfall when there is a suspicion of such a tumour. If doubts persist after a diagnostic work-up by imaging, consultation with the Bone Tumour Committee is indicated. The patient can also be quickly referred to a centre specialised in treating bone tumours, as was the case in this article.

  2. Management of pediatric mandibular fracture: a case series.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ravi M; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Singh, Chanchal; Chaudhry, Kalpna; Munshi, Autar K

    2014-09-01

    A pediatric mandibular fracture can cause a child severe pain and the parent or caregiver extreme worry. While the pattern of fractures and associated injuries in children is similar to adults, the incidence is low. Due to a number of factors, including the anatomical complexity of the developing mandible in a child, management of such fractures differs from that of adults and can greatly challenge the pediatric dentist. Various treatment modalities of managing mandibular fracture are available, such as closed/open cap splint with circummandibular wiring, arch-bar fixation, and cementation of the cap splint. This article reviews 19 cases in the management of pediatric facial fracture using varied treatment methods.

  3. Preventive osteopathic manipulative treatment and stress fracture incidence among collegiate cross-country athletes.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Lynn F; Janiski, Carrie; Balawender, Jenifer L; Feinstein, Adam

    2013-12-01

    Stress fractures are common among athletes, particularly distance runners, with many theories regarding the etiologic process of stress fractures and various studies identifying risk factors or suggesting preventive techniques. To our knowledge, no previous studies have discussed the possible causative effects of somatic dysfunction or the preventive capabilities of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). To apply a preventive OMT protocol for cross-country athletes to reduce the incidence of stress fractures. Cohort study. Examinations of cross-country athletes at an NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I university were performed by supervising physician-examiners and first- and second-year osteopathic medical students during several consecutive academic years. Athletes re-enrolled in the study each year they continued to be eligible. The intervention included osteopathic structural examination and OMT that focused on somatic dysfunction identified in the pelvis, sacrum, and lower extremities. More than 1800 participant examinations were performed on 124 male and female participants by 3 supervising physician-examiners and 141 osteopathic medical students over the course of 5 consecutive academic years (2004-2005 to 2008-2009). Data from these academic years were compared with data from the previous 8 academic years (1996-1997 to 2003-2004). An average of 20 new participants enrolled yearly. The number of annual stress fractures per team ranged from 0 to 6 for male participants and 1 to 6 for female participants. The cumulative annual incidence of stress fractures for male participants demonstrated a statistically significant decrease from 13.9% (20 of 144) before intervention to 1.0% (1 of 105) after intervention, resulting in a 98.7% relative reduction in stress-fracture diagnosis (P=.019). The cumulative annual incidence for female participants showed a minimal decrease from 12.9% (23 of 178) before intervention to 12.0% (17 of 142) after

  4. The impact of in-situ stress and outcrop-based fracture geometry on hydraulic aperture and upscaled permeability in fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamidreza M.

    2016-10-01

    Aperture has a controlling impact on porosity and permeability and is a source of uncertainty in modeling of naturally fractured reservoirs. This uncertainty results from difficulties in accurately quantifying aperture in the subsurface and from a limited fundamental understanding of the mechanical and diagenetic processes that control aperture. In the absence of cement bridges and high pore pressure, fractures in the subsurface are generally considered to be closed. However, experimental work, outcrop analyses and subsurface data show that some fractures remain open, and that aperture varies even along a single fracture. However, most fracture flow models consider constant apertures for fractures. We create a stress-dependent heterogeneous aperture by combining Finite Element modeling of discrete fracture networks with an empirical aperture model. Using a modeling approach that considers fractures explicitly, we quantify equivalent permeability, i.e. combined matrix and stress-dependent fracture flow. Fracture networks extracted from a large outcropping pavement form the basis of these models. The results show that the angle between fracture strike and σ1 has a controlling impact on aperture and permeability, where hydraulic opening is maximum for an angle of 15°. At this angle, the fracture experiences a minor amount of shear displacement that allows the fracture to remain open even when fluid pressure is lower than the local normal stress. Averaging the heterogeneous aperture to scale up permeability probably results in an underestimation of flow, indicating the need to incorporate full aperture distributions rather than simplified aperture models in reservoir-scale flow models.

  5. On Subsurface Fracture Opening and Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Mechanistic understanding of fracture opening and closure in geologic media is of significant importance to nature resource extraction and waste management, such as geothermal energy extraction, oil/gas production, radioactive waste disposal, and carbon sequestration and storage). A dynamic model for subsurface fracture opening and closure has been formulated. The model explicitly accounts for the stress concentration around individual aperture channels and the stress-activated mineral dissolution and precipitation. A preliminary model analysis has demonstrated the importance of the stress-activated dissolution mechanism in the evolution of fracture aperture in a stressed geologic medium. The model provides a reasonable explanation for some key features of fracture opening and closure observed in laboratory experiments, including a spontaneous switch from a net permeability reduction to a net permeability increase with no changes in a limestone fracture experiment.

  6. Fracture toughness and the effects of stress state on fracture of nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Michal, Gary M.; Locci, Ivan; Rigney, Joseph D.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of stress state on the fracture behavior of Ni3Al, Ni3Al + B, and NiAl were determined using either notched or fatigue-precracked bend bars tested to failure at room temperature, in addition to testing specimens in tension under superposed hydrostatic pressure. Although Ni3Al is observed to fail in a macroscopically brittle intergranular manner in tension tests conducted at room temperature, the fracture toughnesses presently obtained on Ni3Al exceeded 20 MPam, and R-curve behavior was exhibited. In situ monitoring of the fracture experiments was utilized to aid in interpreting the source(s) of the high toughness in Ni3Al, while SEM fractography was utilized to determine the operative fracture modes. The superposition by hydrostatic pressure during tensile testing of NiAl specimens was observed to produce increased ductility without changing the fracture mode.

  7. Direct Imaging of Natural Fractures and Stress Compartments Stimulated by Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacazette, A.; Vermilye, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    This contribution will present results from passive seismic studies of hydraulic fracture treatments in North American and Asian basins. One of the key data types is a comparatively new surface-based seismic imaging product - "Tomographic Fracture Images®" (TFI®). The procedure is an extension of Seismic Emission Tomography (SET), which is well-established and widely used. Conventional microseismic results - microearthquake hypocenter locations, magnitudes, and focal mechanism solutions - are also obtained from the data via a branch of the processing workflow. TFI is accomplished by summing the individual time steps in a multidimensional SET hypervolume over extended periods of time, such as an entire frac stage. The dimensions of a SET hypervolume are the X, Y, and Z coordinates of the voxels, the time step (typically on the order of 100 milliseconds), and the seismic activity value. The resulting summed volume is skeletonized to produce images of the main fracture surfaces, which are known to occupy the maximum activity surfaces of the high activity clouds from theory, field studies, and experiments. The orientation vs. area of the resulting TFIs can be analyzed in detail and compared with independent data sets such as volumetric structural attributes from reflection seismic data and borehole fracture data. We find that the primary effect of hydraulic fracturing is to stimulate preexisting natural fracture networks and faults. The combination of TFIs with hypocenter distributions and microearthquake focal mechanisms provides detailed information on subsurface stress compartmentalization. Faults are directly imaged which allows discrimination of fault planes from auxiliary planes of focal mechanism solutions. Examples that will be shown include simultaneous movement on a thrust fault and tear fault and examples of radically different stress compartments (e.g. extensional vs. wrench faulting) stimulated during a single hydraulic fracture treatment. The figure

  8. Stress fractures in athletes. How to spot this underdiagnosed injury.

    PubMed

    Sallis, R E; Jones, K

    1991-05-01

    Stress fractures are an increasingly common injury in competitive athletes, especially runners. Amenorrheic athletes are at particularly high risk. A radionuclide bone scan should be considered when the index of suspicion for stress fracture is high. Plain radiographs are of little use in establishing the diagnosis in the early stages of the injury. Early diagnosis and prompt institution of conservative therapy allow for a favorable outcome in most cases. Avoidance of or reduced participation in the inciting activity is important for pain control. Certain stress fractures, such as those involving the femoral neck, should be monitored closely and treated aggressively with internal fixation when conservative measures fail. Runners who have exercise-induced amenorrhea should be advised to decrease their training intensity to a level where menses resume. Cyclic therapy with conjugated estrogens and progesterone should also be considered, as should daily calcium supplementation.

  9. The prehospital management of pelvic fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Caroline; Porter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic fractures are one of the potentially life‐threatening injuries that should be identified during the primary survey in patients sustaining major trauma. Early suspicion, identification and management of a pelvic fracture at the prehospital stage is essential to reduce the risk of death as a result of hypovolaemia and to allow appropriate triage of the patient. The assessment and management of pelvic fractures in the prehospital environment is reviewed here. It is advocated that the pelvis should not be examined by palpation or springing, and that the patient should not be log rolled. Pelvic immobilisation should be used routinely if there is any suspicion of pelvic fracture based on the mechanism of injury, symptoms and clinical findings. PMID:17251627

  10. Differentiating Stress Fracture From Periostitis.

    PubMed

    Martire, J R

    1994-10-01

    In brief Even in the age of high-technology MRI and CT, the triple-phase bone scan (TPBS) remains an exceptionally useful and accurate tool in evaluating athletic injuries. This is perhaps best seen in active people with overuse injuries of the tibia, femur, or humerus when plain films are negative but bone pain persists. Differentiating periostitis from stress fracture requires analyzing distinctive TPBS appearances and patterns.

  11. Predicting Fluid Flow in Stressed Fractures: A Quantitative Evaluation of Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihmann, S. A.; Healy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable estimation of fracture stability in the subsurface is crucial to the success of exploration and production in the petroleum industry, and also for wider applications to earthquake mechanics, hydrogeology and waste disposal. Previous work suggests that fracture stability is related to fluid flow in crystalline basement rocks through shear or tensile instabilities of fractures. Our preliminary scoping analysis compares the fracture stability of 60 partly open (apertures 1.5-3 cm) and electrically conductive (low acoustic amplitudes relative to matrix) fractures from a 16 m section of a producing zone in a basement well in Bayoot field, Yemen, to a non-producing zone in the same well (also 16 m). We determine the Critically Stressed Fractures (CSF; Barton et al., 1995) and dilatation tendency (Td; Ferrill et al., 1999). We find that: 1. CSF (Fig. 1) is a poor predictor of high fluid flow in the inflow zone; 88% of the fractures are predicted to be NOT critically stressed and yet they all occur within a zone of high fluid flow rate 2. Td (Fig. 2) is also a poor predictor of high fluid flow in the inflow zone; 67% of the fractures have a LOW Td(< 0.6) 3. For the non-producing zone CSF is a very reliable predictor (100% are not critically stressed) whereas the values of Tdare consistent with their location in non-producing interval (81% are < 0.6) (Fig. 3 & 4). In summary, neither method correlates well with the observed abundance of hydraulically conductive fractures within the producing zone. Within the non-producing zone CSF and Td make reasonably accurate predictions. Fractures may be filled or partially filled with drilling mud or a lower density and electrically conductive fill such as clay in the producing zone and therefore appear (partly) open. In situ stress, fluid pressure, rock properties (friction, strength) and fracture orientation data used as inputs for the CSF and Td calculations are all subject to uncertainty. Our results suggest that scope

  12. Anterior tibial stress fractures treated with anterior tension band plating in high-performance athletes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Alexandre Santa; de Hollanda, João Paris Buarque; Duarte, Aires; Hungria Neto, José Soares

    2013-06-01

    The non-surgical treatment of anterior tibial cortex stress fractures requires long periods of abstention from sports activities and often results in non-union. Many different surgical techniques have already been previously described to treat these fractures, but there is no consensus on the best treatment. We describe the outcome of treatment using anterior tibial tension band plating in three high-performance athletes (4 legs) with anterior tibial cortex stress fractures. Tibial osteosynthesis with a 3.5-mm locking compression plate in the anterolateral aspect of the tibia was performed in all patients diagnosed with anterior tibial stress fracture after September 2010 at Santa Casa Hospital. All of the fractures were consolidated within a period of 3 months after surgery, allowing for an early return to pre-injury levels of competitive sports activity. There were no infection, non-union, malunion or anterior knee pain complications. Anterior tibial tension band plating leads to prompt fracture consolidation and is a good alternative for the treatment of anterior tibial cortex stress fractures. Bone grafts were shown to be unnecessary.

  13. Management of Hip Fractures in Lateral Position without a Fracture Table.

    PubMed

    Pahlavanhosseini, Hamid; Valizadeh, Sima; Banadaky, Seyyed Hossein Saeed; Karbasi, Mohammad H Akhavan; Abrisham, Seyed Mohammad J; Fallahzadeh, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    Hip fracture Management in supine position on a fracture table with biplane fluoroscopic views has some difficulties which leads to prolongation of surgery and increasing x- rays' dosage. The purpose of this study was to report the results and complications of hip fracture management in lateral position on a conventional operating table with just anteroposterior fluoroscopic view. 40 hip fractures (31 trochanteric and 9 femoral neck fractures) were operated in lateral position between Feb 2006 and Oct 2012. Age, gender, fracture classification, operation time, intra-operation blood loss, reduction quality, and complications were extracted from patients' medical records. The mean follow-up time was 30.78±22.73 months (range 4-83). The mean operation time was 76.50 ± 16.88 min (range 50 - 120 min).The mean intra-operative blood loss was 628.75 ± 275.00 ml (range 250-1300ml). Anatomic and acceptable reduction was observed in 95%of cases. The most important complications were malunion (one case in trochanteric group), avascular necrosis of femoral head and nonunion (each one case in femoral neck group). It sounds that reduction and fixation of hip fractures in lateral position with fluoroscopy in just anteroposterior view for small rural hospitals may be executable and probably safe.

  14. Management of Hip Fractures in Lateral Position without a Fracture Table

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanhosseini, Hamid; Valizadeh, Sima; Banadaky, Seyyed Hossein Saeed; Karbasi, Mohammad H Akhavan; Abrisham, Seyed Mohammad J; Fallahzadeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hip fracture Management in supine position on a fracture table with biplane fluoroscopic views has some difficulties which leads to prolongation of surgery and increasing x- rays' dosage. The purpose of this study was to report the results and complications of hip fracture management in lateral position on a conventional operating table with just anteroposterior fluoroscopic view. Methods: 40 hip fractures (31 trochanteric and 9 femoral neck fractures) were operated in lateral position between Feb 2006 and Oct 2012. Age, gender, fracture classification, operation time, intra-operation blood loss, reduction quality, and complications were extracted from patients' medical records. The mean follow-up time was 30.78±22.73 months (range 4-83). Results: The mean operation time was 76.50 ± 16.88 min (range 50 - 120 min).The mean intra-operative blood loss was 628.75 ± 275.00 ml (range 250-1300ml). Anatomic and acceptable reduction was observed in 95%of cases. The most important complications were malunion (one case in trochanteric group), avascular necrosis of femoral head and nonunion (each one case in femoral neck group). Conclusions: It sounds that reduction and fixation of hip fractures in lateral position with fluoroscopy in just anteroposterior view for small rural hospitals may be executable and probably safe. PMID:25386577

  15. Stress fracture and premenstrual syndrome in Japanese adolescent athletes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Takashi; Imoto, Yoko; Nagasawa, Hiroyo; Takeshita, Atsuko; Shiina, Masami

    2016-10-18

    To investigate the relationship between the occurrence of stress fracture and premenstrual syndrome (PMS)/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in Japanese adolescent athletes. Cross-sectional study. Osaka, Japan. A school-based survey on menstruation and school life was conducted using a sample of 1818 Japanese female students who belonged to two public high schools in Japan. Among them, we recruited 394 athletes who had regular menstrual cycles (25-38 days) and completed a questionnaire about their premenstrual symptoms and their competitive career. Premenstrual symptoms and the occurrence of stress fracture. The prevalences of moderate-to-severe PMS and PMDD were 8.9% and 1.3%, respectively, which were the same as in collegiate athletes in a previous study. Premenstrual symptoms disturbed 'Work efficiency or productivity, home responsibilities', 'Relationships with coworkers or family' and 'Athletic performance in training or competition' more severely than menstrual pain (p=0.031, p=0.004 and p<0.001, respectively). 66 athletes (16.8%) reported having experienced a stress fracture. The severity of 'Overeating or food cravings', 'Physical symptoms' and 'Performance in training or competition' in athletes with previous stress fractures were much higher than in those without a history of stress fractures (p=0.015, p=0.008 and p=0.006, respectively). In terms of premenstrual symptoms, 'Physical symptoms' was associated with an increased risk of stress fractures in athletes (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.62). The results from this study indicated that premenstrual symptoms may affect athletic performance and has the risk of stress fractures in adolescent athletes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Greater Polar Moment of Inertia at the Tibia in Athletes Who Develop Stress Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Weidauer, Lee A.; Binkley, Teresa; Vukovich, Matt; Specker, Bonny

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several previous investigations have determined potential risk factors for stress fractures in athletes and military personnel. Purpose: To determine factors associated with the development of stress fractures in female athletes. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 88 female athletes (cross-country, n = 29; soccer, n = 15; swimming, n = 9; track and field, n = 14; volleyball, n = 12; and basketball, n = 9) aged 18 to 24 years were recruited to participate in a longitudinal bone study and had their left distal tibia at the 4%, 20%, and 66% sites scanned by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Patients included 23 athletes who developed stress fractures during the following year (cases). Whole body, hip, and spine scans were obtained using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Analysis of covariance was used to determine differences in bone parameters between cases and controls after adjusting for height, lower leg length, lean mass, fat mass, and sport. Results: No differences were observed between cases and controls in any of the DXA measurements. Cases had significantly greater unadjusted trabecular bone mineral content (BMC), greater polar moment of inertia (PMI) at the 20% site, and greater cortical BMC at the 66% site; however, after adjusting for covariates, the differences became nonsignificant. When analyses were repeated using all individuals who had ever had a stress fracture as cases (n = 31) and after controlling for covariates, periosteal circumference was greater in the cases than the controls (71.1 ± 0.7 vs 69.4 ± 0.5 mm, respectively; P = .04). Conclusion: A history of stress fractures is associated with larger bones. These findings are important because larger bones were previously reported to be protective against fractures and stress fractures, but study findings indicate that may not always be true. One explanation could be that individuals who sustain stress fractures have

  17. Greater Polar Moment of Inertia at the Tibia in Athletes Who Develop Stress Fractures.

    PubMed

    Weidauer, Lee A; Binkley, Teresa; Vukovich, Matt; Specker, Bonny

    2014-07-01

    Several previous investigations have determined potential risk factors for stress fractures in athletes and military personnel. To determine factors associated with the development of stress fractures in female athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 88 female athletes (cross-country, n = 29; soccer, n = 15; swimming, n = 9; track and field, n = 14; volleyball, n = 12; and basketball, n = 9) aged 18 to 24 years were recruited to participate in a longitudinal bone study and had their left distal tibia at the 4%, 20%, and 66% sites scanned by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Patients included 23 athletes who developed stress fractures during the following year (cases). Whole body, hip, and spine scans were obtained using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Analysis of covariance was used to determine differences in bone parameters between cases and controls after adjusting for height, lower leg length, lean mass, fat mass, and sport. No differences were observed between cases and controls in any of the DXA measurements. Cases had significantly greater unadjusted trabecular bone mineral content (BMC), greater polar moment of inertia (PMI) at the 20% site, and greater cortical BMC at the 66% site; however, after adjusting for covariates, the differences became nonsignificant. When analyses were repeated using all individuals who had ever had a stress fracture as cases (n = 31) and after controlling for covariates, periosteal circumference was greater in the cases than the controls (71.1 ± 0.7 vs 69.4 ± 0.5 mm, respectively; P = .04). A history of stress fractures is associated with larger bones. These findings are important because larger bones were previously reported to be protective against fractures and stress fractures, but study findings indicate that may not always be true. One explanation could be that individuals who sustain stress fractures have greater loading that results in greater periosteal circumference

  18. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings

    DOE PAGES

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this paper is to (i) review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock; (ii) describe estimation of fractured rock stress-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data; and (iii) discuss observations of temperature and chemically mediated fracture closure and its effect on fractured rock permeability. The field data that are reviewed include in situ block experiments, excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, borehole injection experiments, depth (and stress) dependent permeability, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock-mass heating experiment. Data show how the stress-permeability relationship of fractured rock very much depends on localmore » in situ conditions, such as fracture shear offset and fracture infilling by mineral precipitation. Field and laboratory experiments involving temperature have shown significant temperature-driven fracture closure even under constant stress. Such temperature-driven fracture closure has been described as thermal overclosure and relates to better fitting of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures, or is attributed to chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution (and compaction) of stressed fracture surface asperities. Back-calculated stress-permeability relationships from field data may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely thermal-mechanical and chemically mediated changes is difficult to isolate. Therefore, it is concluded that further laboratory and in situ experiments are needed to increase the knowledge of the true mechanisms behind thermally driven fracture closure, and to further assess the importance of chemical-mechanical coupling for the long-term evolution of fractured rock permeability.« less

  19. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.

    The purpose of this paper is to (i) review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock; (ii) describe estimation of fractured rock stress-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data; and (iii) discuss observations of temperature and chemically mediated fracture closure and its effect on fractured rock permeability. The field data that are reviewed include in situ block experiments, excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, borehole injection experiments, depth (and stress) dependent permeability, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock-mass heating experiment. Data show how the stress-permeability relationship of fractured rock very much depends on localmore » in situ conditions, such as fracture shear offset and fracture infilling by mineral precipitation. Field and laboratory experiments involving temperature have shown significant temperature-driven fracture closure even under constant stress. Such temperature-driven fracture closure has been described as thermal overclosure and relates to better fitting of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures, or is attributed to chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution (and compaction) of stressed fracture surface asperities. Back-calculated stress-permeability relationships from field data may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely thermal-mechanical and chemically mediated changes is difficult to isolate. Therefore, it is concluded that further laboratory and in situ experiments are needed to increase the knowledge of the true mechanisms behind thermally driven fracture closure, and to further assess the importance of chemical-mechanical coupling for the long-term evolution of fractured rock permeability.« less

  20. Couple stresses and the fracture of rock.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Colin; Coman, Ciprian D; Aldazabal, Javier

    2015-03-28

    An assessment is made here of the role played by the micropolar continuum theory on the cracked Brazilian disc test used for determining rock fracture toughness. By analytically solving the corresponding mixed boundary-value problems and employing singular-perturbation arguments, we provide closed-form expressions for the energy release rate and the corresponding stress-intensity factors for both mode I and mode II loading. These theoretical results are augmented by a set of fracture toughness experiments on both sandstone and marble rocks. It is further shown that the morphology of the fracturing process in our centrally pre-cracked circular samples correlates very well with discrete element simulations. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal stresses, differential subsidence, and flexure at oceanic fracture zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, Pal; Haxby, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Geosat geoid undulations over four Pacific fracture zones have been analyzed. After correcting for the isostatic thermal edge effect, the amplitudes of the residuals are shown to be proportional to the age offset. The shape of the residuals seems to broaden with increasing age. Both geoid anomalies and available ship bathymetry data suggest that slip must sometimes occur on the main fracture zone or secondary faults. Existing models for flexure at fracture zones cannot explain the observed anomalies. A combination model accounting for slip and including flexure from thermal stresses and differential subsidence is presented. This model accounts for lateral variations in flexural rigidity from brittle and ductile yielding due to both thermal and flexural stresses and explains both the amplitudes and the shape of the anomalies along each fracture zone. The best fitting models have mechanical plate thicknesses that are described by the depth to the 600-700 C isotherms.

  2. Rehabilitation and return to running after lower limb stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Liem, Brian C; Truswell, Hallie J; Harrast, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb stress fractures are common injuries in runners. In terms of treatment, much of the medical literature has focused primarily on rest and cessation of running, but little has been written about the rehabilitation and functional progression of runners following a lower limb stress fracture. This article reviews the scientific evidence behind common rehabilitation concepts used for runners recovering from these injuries and also discusses sport-specific training modalities such as deep water running and antigravity treadmill training. Overall this article is intended to be a practical resource for clinicians to guide runners in functional rehabilitation and return to running following lower limb stress injury.

  3. Management of civilian ballistic fractures.

    PubMed

    Seng, V S; Masquelet, A C

    2013-12-01

    The management of ballistic fractures, which are open fractures, has often been studied in wartime and has benefited from the principles of military surgery with debridement and lavage, and the use of external fixation for bone stabilization. In civilian practice, bone stabilization of these fractures is different and is not performed by external fixation. Fifteen civilian ballistic fractures, Gustilo II or IIIa, two associated with nerve damage and none with vascular damage, were reviewed. After debridement and lavage, ten internal fixations and five conservative treatments were used. No superficial or deep surgical site infection was noted. Fourteen of the 15 fractures (93%) healed without reoperation. Eleven of the 15 patients (73%) regained normal function. Ballistic fractures have a bad reputation due to their many complications, including infections. In civilian practice, the use of internal fixation is not responsible for excessive morbidity, provided debridement and lavage are performed. Civilian ballistic fractures, when they are caused by low-velocity firearms, differ from military ballistic fractures. Although the principle of surgical debridement and lavage remains the same, bone stabilization is different and is similar to conventional open fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Inelastic and Dynamic Fracture and Stress Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Large deformation inelastic stress analysis and inelastic and dynamic crack propagation research work is summarized. The salient topics of interest in engine structure analysis that are discussed herein include: (1) a path-independent integral (T) in inelastic fracture mechanics, (2) analysis of dynamic crack propagation, (3) generalization of constitutive relations of inelasticity for finite deformations , (4) complementary energy approaches in inelastic analyses, and (5) objectivity of time integration schemes in inelastic stress analysis.

  5. Fracture and Stress Evolution on Europa: New Insights Into Fracture Interpretation and Ice Thickness Estimates Using Fracture Mechanics Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    The work completed during the funding period has provided many important insights into fracturing behavior in Europa's ice shell. It has been determined that fracturing through time is likely to have been controlled by the effects of nonsynchronous rotation stresses and that as much as 720 deg of said rotation may have occurred during the visible geologic history. It has been determined that there are at least two distinct styles of strike-slip faulting and that their mutual evolutionary styles are likely to have been different, with one involving a significant dilational component during shear motion. It has been determined that secondary fracturing in perturbed stress fields adjacent to older structures such as faults is a prevalent process on Europa. It has been determined that cycloidal ridges are likely to experience shear stresses along the existing segment portions as they propagate, which affects propagation direction and ultimately induces tailcracking at the segment tip than then initiates a new cycle of cycloid segment growth. Finally, it has been established that mechanical methods (e.g., flexure analysis) can be used to determine the elastic thickness of the ice shell, which, although probably only several km thick, is likely to be spatially variable, being thinner under bands but thicker under ridged plains terrain.

  6. The association of novel polymorphisms with stress fracture injury in Elite Athletes: Further insights from the SFEA cohort.

    PubMed

    Varley, Ian; Hughes, David C; Greeves, Julie P; Stellingwerff, Trent; Ranson, Craig; Fraser, William D; Sale, Craig

    2018-06-01

    To determine, in conjunction with a wider investigation, whether 11 genetic variants in the vicinity of vitamin D, collagen and Wnt signalling pathways were associated with stress fracture injury in the Stress Fracture Elite Athlete (SFEA) cohort. Genotype-phenotype association study. Self-reported stress fracture history and demographic data were recorded in 518 elite athletes, 449 male and 69 female (mean age 24.2±5.5 years) from the SFEA cohort. Elite athletes were assigned to two groups based on history of stress fracture injury. Data were analysed for the whole cohort and sub-stratified in to male only and multiple stress fracture cases. Genotype was determined using a proprietary fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay. SOST SNP rs1877632 and VDR SNPs rs10735810 and rs731236 were associated with stress fracture (p<0.05). In the whole cohort, rs1877632 heterozygotes and homozygotes of the rare allele combined made up 59% of stress fracture sufferers in comparison to 46% in the non-stress fracture group (p=0.05). In the multiple stress fracture cohort, homozygotes of the rare allele of rs10735810 and rs731236 showed an association with stress fracture when compared to those homozygotes for the common allele combined with heterozygotes (p=0.03; p=0.01). No significant associations were shown in the other SNPs analysed (p>0.05). These data suggest an important role for SOST SNP rs1877632 and VDR SNPs rs10735810 and rs731236 in the pathophysiology of stress fracture. This might be due to the role of the SNPs in the regulation of bone remodelling and adaptation to mechanical loading, with potential implications for the prevention and treatment of stress fracture injuries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. In situ stress and fracture permeability along the Stillwater fault zone, Dixie Valley Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, S.H.; Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D.; Morin, R.; Sass, J.; Benoit, R.

    1997-01-01

    Borehole televiewer and hydrologic logging and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements were carried out in a 2.7-km-deep geothermal production well (73B-7) drilled into the Stillwater fault zone. Precision temperature and spinner flowmeter logs were also acquired in well 73B-7, with and without simultaneously injecting water into the well. Localized perturbations to well-bore temperature and flow were used to identify hydraulically conductive fractures. Comparison of these data with fracture orientations from the televiewer log indicates that permeable fractures within and adjacent to the Stillwater fault zone are critically stressed, potentially active shear planes in the current west-northwest extensional stress regime at Dixie Valley.

  8. Case report: multifocal subchondral stress fractures of the femoral heads and tibial condyles in a young military recruit.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-03-01

    Subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head may be either of the insufficiency-type with poor quality bone or the fatigue-type with normal quality bone but subject to high repetitive stresses. Unlike osteonecrosis, multiple site involvement rarely has been reported for subchondral stress fractures. We describe a case of multifocal subchondral stress fractures involving femoral heads and medial tibial condyles bilaterally within 2 weeks. A 27-year-old military recruit began having left knee pain after 2 weeks of basic training, without any injury. Subsequently, right knee, right hip, and left hip pain developed sequentially within 2 weeks. The diagnosis of multifocal subchondral stress fracture was confirmed by plain radiographs and MR images. Nonoperative treatment of the subchondral stress fractures of both medial tibial condyles and the left uncollapsed femoral head resulted in resolution of symptoms. The collapsed right femoral head was treated with a fibular strut allograft to restore congruity and healed without further collapse. There has been one case report in which an insufficiency-type subchondral stress fracture of the femoral head and medial femoral condyle occurred within a 2-year interval. Because the incidence of bilateral subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head is low and multifocal involvement has not been reported, multifocal subchondral stress fractures can be confused with multifocal osteonecrosis. Our case shows that subchondral stress fractures can occur in multiple sites almost simultaneously.

  9. Bilateral stress fracture of the fibulae and periostitis of the tibiae.

    PubMed

    Tsuchie, Hiroyuki; Okada, Kyoji; Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Chida, Shuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    This study describes a unique case of bilateral stress fractures of the fibulae and provides a literature review. A 16-year-old female badminton player presented with pain around the bilateral distal lateral legs. She had mild bilateral varus deformity at the knee joint, and the bilateral ankles showed valgus deformity in standing posture. Radiographs and computed tomography showed periosteal reactions on the bilateral distal fibulae. Technetium-99m bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake in the bilateral distal fibulae and the bilateral middle third of the tibiae. A diagnosis of bilateral distal fibular stress fractures was made. She was advised to stop playing badminton until the symptoms disappeared. Varus deformity of the knee and valgus deformity of the ankle may have influenced the mechanism underlying bilateral symmetric stress fractures. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Stress fracture as a complication of autogenous bone graft harvest from the distal tibia.

    PubMed

    Chou, Loretta B; Mann, Roger A; Coughlin, Michael J; McPeake, William T; Mizel, Mark S

    2007-02-01

    Autogenous bone graft from the distal tibia provides cancellous bone graft for foot and ankle operations, and it has osteogenic and osteoconductive properties. The site is in close proximity to the foot and ankle, and published retrospective studies show low morbidity from the procedure. One-hundred autografts were obtained from the distal tibia between 2000 and 2003. In four cases the distal tibial bone graft harvest resulted in a stress fracture. There were three women and one man. The average time of diagnosis of the stress fracture from the operation was 1.8 months. All stress fractures healed with a short course (average 2.4 months) of cast immobilization. This study demonstrated that a stress fracture from the donor site of autogenous bone graft of the distal tibia occurs and can be successfully treated nonoperatively.

  11. Repeated Stress Fractures in an Amenorrheic Marathoner: A Case Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, John R.; Nilson, Karen L.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a case conference by 2 experts on the relationship between a 26-year-old marathoner's amenorrhea and her sustained unusual stress fractures in 4 ribs (plus previous similar fractures of the calcaneal, navicular, metatarsal, and tibial bones). The experts conclude that she suffers many manifestations of overtraining. (SM)

  12. Manubrial stress fractures diagnosed on MRI: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jonathan C; Demertzis, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to widely-reported sternal insufficiency fractures, stress fractures of the sternum from overuse are extremely rare. Of the 5 cases of sternal stress fracture published in the English-language medical literature, 3 were in the sternal body and only 2 were in the manubrium. We describe two cases of manubrial stress fracture related to golf and weightlifting, and present the first report of the MR findings of this injury. In each of these cases, the onset of pain was atraumatic, insidious, and associated with increased frequency of athletic activity. Imaging was obtained because of clinical diagnostic uncertainty. On MRI, each patient had a sagittally oriented stress fracture of the lateral manubrium adjacent to the first rib synchondrosis. Both patients had resolution of pain after a period of rest, with subsequent successful return to their respective activities. One patient had a follow-up MRI, which showed resolution of the manubrial marrow edema and fracture line. Based on the sternal anatomy and MR findings, we hypothesize that this rare injury might be caused by repetitive torque of the muscle forces on the first costal cartilage and manubrium, and propose that MRI might be an effective means of diagnosing manubrial stress fracture.

  13. Management of vertebral compression fracture in general practice: BEACH program.

    PubMed

    Megale, Rodrigo Z; Pollack, Allan; Britt, Helena; Latimer, Jane; Naganathan, Vasi; McLachlan, Andrew J; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2017-01-01

    The pain associated with vertebral compression fractures can cause significant loss of function and quality of life for older adults. Despite this, there is little consensus on how best to manage this condition. To describe usual care provided by general practitioners (GPs) in Australia for the management of vertebral compression fractures. Data from the Bettering the Evaluation And Care of Health (BEACH) program collected between April 2005 and March 2015 was used for this study. Each year, a random sample of approximately 1,000 GPs each recorded information on 100 consecutive encounters. We selected those encounters at which vertebral compression fracture was managed. Analyses of management options were limited to encounters with patients aged 50 years or over. i) patient demographics; ii) diagnoses/problems managed; iii) the management provided for vertebral compression fracture during the encounter. Robust 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for the cluster survey design, were used to assess significant differences between group means. Vertebral compression fractures were managed in 211 (0.022%; 95% CI: 0.018-0.025) of the 977,300 BEACH encounters recorded April 2005- March 2015. That provides a national annual estimate of 26,000 (95% CI: 22,000-29,000) encounters at which vertebral fractures were managed. At encounters with patients aged 50 years or over (those at higher risk of primary osteoporosis), prescription of analgesics was the most common management action, particularly opioids analgesics (47.1 per 100 vertebral fractures; 95% CI: 38.4-55.7). Prescriptions of paracetamol (8.2; 95% CI: 4-12.4) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (4.1; 95% CI: 1.1-7.1) were less frequent. Non-pharmacological treatment was provided at a rate of 22.4 per 100 vertebral fractures (95% CI: 14.6-30.1). At least one referral (to hospital, specialist, allied health care or other) was given for 12.3 per 100 vertebral fractures (95% CI: 7.8-16.8). The prescription of oral

  14. Principles of management of thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-yang

    2012-05-01

    There is little consensus on treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, which are one of the most controversial areas in spine surgery. The great variations in clinical decision making may come from differences in evaluation of spine stability with these fractures. Few high-quality studies concerning optimal treatment of thoracolumbar fractures have been conducted. This article reviews the conflicting results and recommendations for management of thoracolumbar fractures of currently published reports. Specifically, it addresses issues regarding evaluation of stability, indications for operative treatment, timing of surgery, surgical approach, and fusion length. © 2012 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy in a Mounted Police Officer: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Drew A; Almansoori, Khaled

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Objective To present a unique case of L5 radiculopathy caused by a sacral stress fracture without neurologic compression. Methods We present our case and its clinical evolution and review the available literature on similar pathologies. Results Relief of the unusual mechanical loading causing sacral stress fracture led to rapid resolution of radiculopathy. Conclusion L5 radiculopathy can be caused by a sacral stress fracture and can be relieved by simple mechanical treatment of the fracture.

  16. Update on mandibular condylar fracture management.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joshua P; Sawhney, Raja

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the mandibular condyle have provided a lasting source of controversy in the field of facial trauma. Concerns regarding facial nerve injury as well as reasonable functional outcomes with closed management led to a reluctance to treat with an open operative intervention. This article reviews how incorporating new technologies and surgical methods have changed the treatment paradigm. Multiple large studies and meta-analyses continue to demonstrate superior outcomes for condylar fractures when managed surgically. Innovations, including endoscopic techniques, three-dimensional miniplates, and angled drills provide increased options in the treatment of condylar fractures. The literature on pediatric condylar fractures is limited and continues to favor a more conservative approach. There continues to be mounting evidence in radiographic, quality of life, and functional outcome studies to support open reduction with internal fixation for the treatment of condylar fractures in patients with malocclusion, significant displacement, or dislocation of the temporomandibular joint. The utilization of three-dimensional trapezoidal miniplates has shown improved outcomes and theoretically enhanced biomechanical properties when compared with traditional fixation with single or double miniplates. Endoscopic-assisted techniques can decrease surgical morbidity, but are technically challenging, require skilled assistants, and utilize specialized equipment.

  17. Understanding the etiology of the posteromedial tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Burr, David B; Finestone, Aharon S; Voloshin, Arkady

    2015-09-01

    Previous human in vivo tibial strain measurements from surface strain gauges during vigorous activities were found to be below the threshold value of repetitive cyclical loading at 2500 microstrain in tension necessary to reduce the fatigue life of bone, based on ex vivo studies. Therefore it has been hypothesized that an intermediate bone remodeling response might play a role in the development of tibial stress fractures. In young adults tibial stress fractures are usually oblique, suggesting that they are the result of failure under shear strain. Strains were measured using surface mounted unstacked 45° rosette strain gauges on the posterior aspect of the flat medial cortex just below the tibial midshaft, in a 48year old male subject while performing vertical jumps, staircase jumps and running up and down stadium stairs. Shear strains approaching 5000 microstrain were recorded during stair jumping and vertical standing jumps. Shear strains above 1250 microstrain were recorded during runs up and down stadium steps. Based on predictions from ex vivo studies, stair and vertical jumping tibial shear strain in the test subject was high enough to potentially produce tibial stress fracture subsequent to repetitive cyclic loading without necessarily requiring an intermediate remodeling response to microdamage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary intake and stress fractures among elite male combat recruits.

    PubMed

    Moran, Daniel S; Heled, Yuval; Arbel, Yael; Israeli, Eran; Finestone, Aharon S; Evans, Rachel K; Yanovich, Ran

    2012-03-13

    Appropriate and sufficient dietary intake is one of the main requirements for maintaining fitness and health. Inadequate energy intake may have a negative impact on physical performance which may result in injuries among physically active populations. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a possible relationship between dietary intake and stress fracture occurrence among combat recruits during basic training (BT). Data was collected from 74 combat recruits (18.2 ± 0.6 yrs) in the Israeli Defense Forces. Data analyses included changes in anthropometric measures, dietary intake, blood iron and calcium levels. Measurements were taken on entry to 4-month BT and at the end of BT. The occurrence of stress reaction injury was followed prospectively during the entire 6-month training period. Twelve recruits were diagnosed with stress fracture in the tibia or femur (SF group). Sixty two recruits completed BT without stress fractures (NSF). Calcium and vitamin D intakes reported on induction day were lower in the SF group compared to the NSF group-38.9% for calcium (589 ± 92 and 964 ± 373 mg·d-1, respectively, p < 0.001), and-25.1% for vitamin D (117.9 ± 34.3 and 157.4 ± 93.3 IU·d-1, respectively, p < 0.001). During BT calcium and vitamin D intake continued to be at the same low values for the SF group but decreased for the NSF group and no significant differences were found between these two groups. The development of stress fractures in young recruits during combat BT was associated with dietary deficiency before induction and during BT of mainly vitamin D and calcium. For the purpose of intervention, the fact that the main deficiency is before induction will need special consideration.

  19. Determining the minimum in situ stress from hydraulic fracturing through perforations

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.

    Hydraulic fracture stress measurements have been performed through perforations at depths from 1310 to 2470 m at the US Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment site. The results of over sixty stress tests conducted through perforations have shown that small-volume hydraulic fractures generally provide an accurate, reproducible measurement of the minimum in situ stress. However, unusual behavior can occur in some tests and techniques to evaluate the behavior are suggested. Unclear instantaneous shut-in pressures, which are found on occasional tests, are difficult to evaluate, but the problem appears to be a complex stress state; reprocessing the data using log-log or othermore » functions does not necessarily provide the correct stress value. The possible error in such tests should be assessed from the original pressure-time data and not the reprocessing techniques. Stress results show that the stress distribution is dependent on lithology at this site; mudstones, shales and other nonreservoir rocks generally have a near-lithostatic stress, while sandstones have a considerably lower minimum stress value. 30 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  20. Stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphysis in an elite junior badminton player.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, K T; Batt, M E

    1997-01-01

    An elite junior badminton player presented with a chronic painful dominant shoulder after an intense training course. An acute stress fracture to the proximal humeral epiphysis was found. Two-plane radiography will identify abnormalities of the growth plate but comparative films of the unaffected side may also be required to differentiate subtle changes. Rest with subsequent rehabilitation is the appropriate management of these injuries although ideally they should be subjected to primary prevention. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9298564

  1. Immediate effects of modified landing pattern on a probabilistic tibial stress fracture model in runners.

    PubMed

    Chen, T L; An, W W; Chan, Z Y S; Au, I P H; Zhang, Z H; Cheung, R T H

    2016-03-01

    Tibial stress fracture is a common injury in runners. This condition has been associated with increased impact loading. Since vertical loading rates are related to the landing pattern, many heelstrike runners attempt to modify their footfalls for a lower risk of tibial stress fracture. Such effect of modified landing pattern remains unknown. This study examined the immediate effects of landing pattern modification on the probability of tibial stress fracture. Fourteen experienced heelstrike runners ran on an instrumented treadmill and they were given augmented feedback for landing pattern switch. We measured their running kinematics and kinetics during different landing patterns. Ankle joint contact force and peak tibial strains were estimated using computational models. We used an established mathematical model to determine the effect of landing pattern on stress fracture probability. Heelstrike runners experienced greater impact loading immediately after landing pattern switch (P<0.004). There was an increase in the longitudinal ankle joint contact force when they landed with forefoot (P=0.003). However, there was no significant difference in both peak tibial strains and the risk of tibial stress fracture in runners with different landing patterns (P>0.986). Immediate transitioning of the landing pattern in heelstrike runners may not offer timely protection against tibial stress fracture, despite a reduction of impact loading. Long-term effects of landing pattern switch remains unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fatigue Stress Fracture of the Talar Body: An Uncommon Cause of Ankle Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Kim, Jong Pil; Moon, Han Sol

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue stress fractures of the talus are rare and usually involve the head of the talus in military recruits. We report an uncommon cause of ankle pain due to a fatigue stress fracture of the body of the talus in a 32-year-old male social soccer player. Healing was achieved after weightbearing suppression for 6 weeks. Although rare, a stress fracture of the body of the talus should be considered in an athlete with a gradual onset of chronic ankle pain. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scan are useful tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationships among in-situ stress, fractures and faults, and fluid flow: Monterey formation, Santa Maria Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkbeiner, T.; Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    We used borehole televiewer (BHTV) data from four wells within the onshore and offshore Santa Maria basin, California, to investigate the relationships among fracture distribution, orientation, and variation with depth and in-situ stress. Our analysis of stress-induced well-bore breakouts shows a uniform northeast maximum horizontal stress (SH max) orientation in each well. This direction is consistent with the SH max direction determined from well-bore breakouts in other wells in this region, the northwest trend of active fold axes, and kinematic inversion of nearby earthquake focal plane mechanisms. In contrast to the uniformity of the stress field, fracture orientation, dip, and frequency vary considerably from well to well and within each well. With depth, fractures can be divided into distinct subsets on the basis of fracture frequency and orientation, which correlate with changes of lithology and physical properties. Although factors such as tectonic history, diagenesis, and structural variations obviously have influenced fracture distribution, integration of the in-situ stress and fracture data sets indicates that many of the fractures, faults, and bedding planes are active, small-scale strike-slip and reverse faults in the current northeast-trending transpressive stress field. In fact, we observed local breakout rotations in the wells, providing kinematic evidence for recent shear motion along fracture and bedding-parallel planes. Only in the onshore well do steeply dipping fractures strike parallel to SHmax. Drill-stem tests from two of the offshore wells indicate that formation permeability is greatly enhanced in sections of the wells where fractures are favorably oriented for shear failure in the modern stress field. Thus, relatively small-scale active faults provide important conduits along which fluids migrate.

  4. Stress fractures of the ribs in elite competitive rowers: a report of nine cases.

    PubMed

    Dragoni, S; Giombini, A; Di Cesare, A; Ripani, M; Magliani, G

    2007-10-01

    The objective was to report the clinical and imaging patterns of nine cases of stress fractures of the rib diagnosed in Italian Olympic rowers. Nine patients with stress fractures of the rib detected from 103 (8.7%) Italian team rowers competing between May 2000 and May 2006 were identified based on the database of a sports medicine institute. All athletes were male. They were aged between 17 and 31 years (mean: 24.4). Patient weight, fracture location, rowing side and imaging methods employed were noted. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical examination and Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy. Eight of the 9 fractures were located anterolaterally between the fourth and ninth rib. In 1 of the 5 athletes with standard radiographs, a fracture line was visible and in 4 there was callus formation. In 2 athletes sonography was performed, which detected discontinuity of the rib surface and callus formation (1 case each). Stress fractures of the ribs are relatively common in competitive rowers. They are characterized by increasing lateral chest pain and typical scintigraphic, radiographic and sonographic findings.

  5. In-situ stress and fracture permeability in a fault-hosted geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, Stephen; Barton, Colleen; Zoback, Mark; Morin, Roger; Sass, John; Benoit, Richard; ,

    1997-01-01

    As part of a study relating fractured rock hydrology to in-situ stress and recent deformation within the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, borehole televiewer logging and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements were conducted in a 2.7-km-deep geothermal production well (73B-7) drilled into the Stillwater fault zone. Borehole televiewer logs from well 73B-7 show numerous drilling-induced tensile fractures, indicating that the direction of the minimum horizontal principal stress, Shmin, is S57 ??E. As the Stillwater fault at this location dips S50 ??E at approximately 3??, it is nearly at the optimal orientation for normal faulting in the current stress field. Analysis of the hydraulic fracturing data shows that the magnitude of Shmin is 24.1 and 25.9 MPa at 1.7 and 2.5 km, respectively. In addition, analysis of a hydraulic fracturing test from a shallow well 1.5 km northeast of 73B-7 indicates that the magnitude of Shmin is 5.6 MPa at 0.4 km depth. Coulomb failure analysis shows that the magnitude of Shmin in these wells is close to that predicted for incipient normal faulting on the Stillwater and subparallel faults, using coefficients of friction of 0.6-1.0 and estimates of the in-situ fluid pressure and overburden stress. Spinner flowmeter and temperature logs were also acquired in well 73B-7 and were used to identify hydraulically conductive fractures. Comparison of these stress and hydrologic data with fracture orientations from the televiewer log indicates that hydraulically conductive fractures within and adjacent to the Stillwater fault zone are critically stressed, potentially active normal faults in the current west-northwest extensional stress regime at Dixie Valley.

  6. Management of Complications of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Mathews, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Treating a fracture of the distal radius may require the surgeon to make a difficult decision between surgical treatment and nonsurgical management. The use of surgical fixation has recently increased owing to complications associated with conservative treatment. However, conservative action may be necessary depending on certain patient factors. The treating surgeon must be aware of the possible complications associated with distal radius fracture treatments to prevent their occurrence. Prevention can be achieved with a proper understanding of the mechanism of these complications. This article discusses the most recent evidence on how to manage and prevent complications following a fracture of the distal radius. PMID:25934197

  7. PATIENT-SPECIFIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CHRONIC CONTACT STRESS EXPOSURE AFTER INTRA-ARTICULAR FRACTURE OF THE TIBIAL PLAFOND

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wendy; Anderson, Donald D.; Goldsworthy, Jane K.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Brown, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of altered contact mechanics in the pathogenesis of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) following intra-articular fracture remains poorly understood. One proposed etiology is that residual incongruities lead to altered joint contact stresses that, over time, predispose to PTOA. Prevailing joint contact stresses following surgical fracture reduction were quantified in this study using patient-specific contact finite element (FE) analysis. FE models were created for 11 ankle pairs from tibial plafond fracture patients. Both (reduced) fractured ankles and their intact contralaterals were modeled. A sequence of 13 loading instances was used to simulate the stance phase of gait. Contact stresses were summed across loadings in the simulation, weighted by resident time in the gait cycle. This chronic exposure measure, a metric of degeneration propensity, was then compared between intact and fractured ankle pairs. Intact ankles had lower peak contact stress exposures that were more uniform, and centrally located. The series-average peak contact stress elevation for fractured ankles was 38% (p=0.0015; peak elevation was 82%). Fractured ankles had less area with low contact stress exposure than intacts, and a greater area with high exposure. Chronic contact stress overexposures (stresses exceeding a damage threshold) ranged from near zero to a high of 18 times the matched intact value. The patient-specific FE models utilized in this study represent substantial progress towards elucidating the relationship between altered contact stresses and the outcome of patients treated for intra-articular fractures. PMID:18404662

  8. Effective-stress-law behavior of Austin chalk rocks for deformation and fracture conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W.

    Austin chalk core has been tested to determine the effective law for deformation of the matrix material and the stress-sensitive conductivity of the natural fractures. For deformation behavior, two samples provided data on the variations of the poroelastic parameter, {alpha}, for Austin chalk, giving values around 0.4. The effective-stress-law behavior of a Saratoga limestone sample was also measured for the purpose of obtaining a comparison with a somewhat more porous carbonate rock. {alpha} for this rock was found to be near 0.9. The low {alpha} for the Austin chalk suggests that stresses in the reservoir, or around the wellbore, willmore » not change much with changes in pore pressure, as the contribution of the fluid pressure is small. Three natural fractures from the Austin chalk were tested, but two of the fractures were very tight and probably do not contribute much to production. The third sample was highly conductive and showed some stress sensitivity with a factor of three reduction in conductivity over a net stress increase of 3000 psi. Natural fractures also showed a propensity for permanent damage when net stressed exceeded about 3000 psi. This damage was irreversible and significantly affected conductivity. {alpha} was difficult to determine and most tests were inconclusive, although the results from one sample suggested that {alpha} was near unity.« less

  9. Crack-jump mechanism of microvein formation and its implications for stress cyclicity during extension fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Riccardo; Hancock, Paul L.

    1998-11-01

    It is well accepted and documented that faulting is produced by the cyclic behaviour of a stress field. Some extension fractures, such as veins characterised by the crack-seal mechanism, have also been presumed to result from repeated stress cycles. In the present note, some commonly observed field phenomena and relationships such as hackle marks and vein and joint spacing, are employed to argue that a stress field can also display cyclic behaviour during extensional fracturing. Indeed, the requirement of critical stress conditions for the occurrence of extensional failure events does not accord with the presence of contemporaneously open nearby parallel fractures. Therefore, because after each fracture event there is stress release within the surrounding volume of rock, high density sets of parallel extensional fractures also strongly support the idea that rocks undergo stress cyclicity during jointing and veining. A comparison with seismological data from earthquakes with dipole mechanical solutions, confirms that this process presently occurs at depth in the Earth crust. Furthermore, in order to explain dense sets of hair-like closely spaced microveins, a crack-jump mechanism is introduced here as an alternative to the crack-seal mechanism. We also propose that as a consequence of medium-scale stress cyclicity during brittle deformation, the re-fracturing of a rock mass occurs in either one or the other of these two possible ways depending on the ratio between the elastic parameters of the sealing material and those of the host rock. The crack-jump mechanism occurs when the former is stronger.

  10. Stress corrosion-controlled rates of mode I fracture propagation in calcareous bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Surface bedrock on natural rock slopes is subject to constant and cyclic environmental stresses (wind, water, wave, ice, seismic or gravitational). Studies indicate that these stresses range up to several hundred kPa, generally too low to cause macroscopic changes in intact rock, although clear evidence of fracture generation, crack propagation and weathering of bedrock illustrates the effect of environmental stresses at the Earth's surface. We suggest that material degradation and its extent, is likely to be controlled by the rate of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion is a fluid-material reaction, where fluids preferentially react with strained atomic bonds at the tip of developing fractures. Stress corrosion in ferrous and siliceous materials is often accepted as the fracture propagation and degradation rate-controlling process where materials are subject to stresses and fluids. Although evidence for chemical weathering in propagating bedrock fractures is clear in natural environments, the physical system and quantification of stress corrosion in natural rocks is yet to be addressed. Here, we present preliminary data on the relationship between stresses at levels commonly present on natural rock slopes, and material damage resulting from stress corrosion under constant or cyclic tensile loading. We undertake single notch three-point bending tests (SNBT) on fresh calcareous bedrock specimens (1100x100x100mm) over a two-month period. Two beams containing an artificial notch are stressed to 75% of their ultimate strength, and a constant supply of weak acid is applied at the notch tip to enhance chemical reactions. A third, unloaded, beam is also exposed to weak acid in order to elucidate the contribution of stress corrosion cracking to the material degradation. Stresses at the tip of propagating cracks affect the kinetics of the chemical reaction in the specimen exposed to both loading and corrosion, leading to an increase in degradation, and greater

  11. Virtual stress testing of fracture stability in soldiers with severely comminuted tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Petfield, Joseph L; Hayeck, Garry T; Kopperdahl, David L; Nesti, Leon J; Keaveny, Tony M; Hsu, Joseph R

    2017-04-01

    Virtual stress testing (VST) provides a non-invasive estimate of the strength of a healing bone through a biomechanical analysis of a patient's computed tomography (CT) scan. We asked whether VST could improve management of patients who had a tibia fracture treated with external fixation. In a retrospective case-control study of 65 soldier-patients who had tibia fractures treated with an external fixator, we performed VST utilizing CT scans acquired prior to fixator removal. The strength of the healing bone and the amount of tissue damage after application of an overload were computed for various virtual loading cases. Logistic regression identified computed outcomes with the strongest association to clinical events related to nonunion within 2 months after fixator removal. Clinical events (n = 9) were associated with a low tibial strength for compression loading (p < 0.05, AUC = 0.74) or a low proportion of failed cortical bone tissue for torsional loading (p < 0.005, AUC = 0.84). Using post-hoc thresholds of a compressive strength of four times body-weight and a proportional of failed cortical bone tissue of 5%, the test identified all nine patients who failed clinically (100% sensitivity; 40.9% positive predictive value) and over three fourths of those (43 of 56) who progressed to successful healing (76.8% specificity; 100% negative predictive value). In this study, VST identified all patients who progressed to full, uneventful union after fixator removal; thus, we conclude that this new test has the potential to provide a quantitative, objective means of identifying tibia-fracture patients who can safely resume weight bearing. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:805-811, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The impact of different aperture distribution models and critical stress criteria on equivalent permeability in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamidreza M.

    2016-05-01

    Predicting equivalent permeability in fractured reservoirs requires an understanding of the fracture network geometry and apertures. There are different methods for defining aperture, based on outcrop observations (power law scaling), fundamental mechanics (sublinear length-aperture scaling), and experiments (Barton-Bandis conductive shearing). Each method predicts heterogeneous apertures, even along single fractures (i.e., intrafracture variations), but most fractured reservoir models imply constant apertures for single fractures. We compare the relative differences in aperture and permeability predicted by three aperture methods, where permeability is modeled in explicit fracture networks with coupled fracture-matrix flow. Aperture varies along single fractures, and geomechanical relations are used to identify which fractures are critically stressed. The aperture models are applied to real-world large-scale fracture networks. (Sub)linear length scaling predicts the largest average aperture and equivalent permeability. Barton-Bandis aperture is smaller, predicting on average a sixfold increase compared to matrix permeability. Application of critical stress criteria results in a decrease in the fraction of open fractures. For the applied stress conditions, Coulomb predicts that 50% of the network is critically stressed, compared to 80% for Barton-Bandis peak shear. The impact of the fracture network on equivalent permeability depends on the matrix hydraulic properties, as in a low-permeable matrix, intrafracture connectivity, i.e., the opening along a single fracture, controls equivalent permeability, whereas for a more permeable matrix, absolute apertures have a larger impact. Quantification of fracture flow regimes using only the ratio of fracture versus matrix permeability is insufficient, as these regimes also depend on aperture variations within fractures.

  13. Management of Simple Clavicle Fractures by Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, Hayk; Gendelberg, David; Hennrikus, William

    2017-05-01

    The clavicle is the most commonly fractured bone. Children with simple fractures are often referred to orthopedic surgeons by primary care physician to ensure adequate care. The objective of this study was to show that simple clavicle fractures have excellent outcomes and are within the scope of primary care physician's practice. We performed a retrospective chart review of 16 adolescents with simple clavicle fractures treated with a sling. Primary outcomes were bony union, pain, and function. The patients with simple clavicle fractures had excellent outcomes with no complications or complaints of pain or restriction of their activities of daily living. The outcomes are similar whether treated by an orthopedic surgeon or a primary care physician. The cost to society and the patient is less when the primary care physician manages the fracture. Therefore, primary care physicians should manage simple clavicle fractures.

  14. Permeability, Fracture Clusters, and Stress State:Implications for Mine-based Studies of EcoHydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, E. J.; Boutt, D. F.; Murdoch, L.; Hisz, D. B.; Ebenhack, J.; Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Wang, H. F.

    2011-12-01

    Mine-based ecohydrology studies provide unique access to deep flow systems at multiple crustal depths. Mass and energy transfer in such deep flow systems is typically dominated by localized flow through discrete features such as fractures and faults, of which only a small percentage contribute to both local and regional flow systems. Predicting which fractures are contributing to flow and transport in these networks has proven extremely difficult. Researchers working at deeper crustal levels (Barton et al., 1995) have successfully predicted fracture network permeability using relationships between fracture aperture (i.e. transmissivity) and in-situ stress. Observations suggest that compared to porous media, fractured rocks have flow systems that operate across large spatial scales and may contain clusters that are hydraulically isolated. . This point is important as these flow systems can house fluids and microbes in isolated clusters and are minimally impacted by the presence of a mine. One example of this is the the former Homestake gold mine in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, which is being considered as a location for an underground science laboratory. Mine workings cover several km2 in plan and extend to a depth 2.4 km. The area is dominantly Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, forming regional-scale folds with plunge axes oriented ~40o to the SSE. Prior analysis of the hydrogeology of the area indicates that permeability is strongly dependent on effective stress; an increase in permeability with decreasing depth appears to be an important factor controlling the development of a shallow ground water flow systems. In this contribution we examine a set of factors contributing to permeability distribution at the site with a specific focus on: 1) refining permeability-depth models for fractured rock to include the influence of both normal and shear fracture deformation on permeability-depth trends, 2) promote the development and testing of a stress

  15. Factors associated with recurrent fifth metatarsal stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-tai; Park, Young-uk; Jegal, Hyuk; Kim, Ki-chun; Young, Ki-won; Kim, Jin-su

    2013-12-01

    Many surgeons agree that fifth metatarsal stress fractures have a tendency toward delayed union, nonunion, and possibly refracture. Difficulty healing seems to be correlated with fracture classification. However, refracture sometimes occurs after low-grade fracture, even long after apparent resolution. The records of 168 consecutive cases of fifth metatarsal stress fracture (163 patients) treated by modified tension band wiring from March 2002 to June 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Mean length of follow-up was 23.6 months (range, 10-112 months). Forty-nine cases classified as Torg III were bone grafted initially also. All enrolled patients were elite athletes. Eleven patients experienced nonunion and 18 refracture. The 11 nonunion cases were bone grafted. The 157 patients (excluding nonunion cases) were allocated to either a refracture group or a union group. Clinical features, such as age, weight, fracture classification, time to union, and reinjury history, were compared. Radiological parameters representing cavus deformity and fifth metatarsal head protrusion were compared to evaluate the influence of structural abnormalities. Mean group weights were significantly different (P = .041), but mean ages (P = .879), fracture grades (P = .216, P = .962), and time from surgery to rehabilitation (P = .539) were similar. No significant intergroup differences were found for talocalcaneal (TC) angle (P = .470), calcaneal pitch (CP) angle (P = .847), or talo-first metatarsal (T-MT1) angle (P = .407) on lateral radiographs; for fifth metatarsal lateral deviation (MT5-LD) angle (P = .623) on anteroposterior (AP) radiographs; or for MT5-LD angle (P = .065) on the 30-degree medial oblique radiographs. However, the mean fourth-fifth intermetatarsal (IMA4-5) angle on AP radiographs was significantly greater in the refracture group, and for Torg II cases, mean weight (P = .042), IMA4-5 angle on AP radiographs (P = .014), and MT5-LD angle (P = .043) on 30-degree medial

  16. Excess Stress Fractures, Musculoskeletal Injuries, and Health Care Utilization Among Unfit and Overweight Female Army Trainees.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Margot R; Garvin, Nadia U; Boivin, Michael R; Cowan, David N

    2017-02-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are prevalent among military trainees and certain occupations. Fitness and body mass index (BMI) have been associated with musculoskeletal conditions, including stress fractures. The incidence of, and excess health care utilization for, stress fracture and non-stress fracture overuse musculoskeletal injuries during the first 6 months of service is higher among unfit female recruits. Those who exceeded body fat limits are at a greater risk of incident stress fractures, injuries, or health care utilization compared with weight-qualified recruits. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All applicants to the United States Army were required to take a preaccession fitness test during the study period (February 2005-September 2006). The test included a 5-minute step test scored as pass or fail. BMI was recorded at application. There were 2 distinct comparisons made in this study: (1) between weight-qualified physically fit and unfit women and (2) between weight-qualified physically fit women and those who exceeded body fat limits. We compared the incidence of, and excess health care utilization for, musculoskeletal injuries, including stress fractures and physical therapy visits, during the first 183 days of military service. Among the weight-qualified women, unfit participants had a higher non-stress fracture injury incidence and related excess health care utilization rate compared with fit women, with rate ratios of 1.32 (95% CI, 1.14-1.53) and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.10-1.27), respectively. Among fit women, compared with the weight-qualified participants, those exceeding body fat limits had higher rate ratios for non-stress fracture injury incidence and related excess health care utilization of 1.27 (95% CI, 1.07-1.50) and 1.20 (95% CI, 1.11-1.31), respectively. Weight-qualified women who were unfit had a higher incidence of stress fractures and related excess health care utilization compared with fit women, with rate ratios of 1.62 (95% CI, 1

  17. Stress Management: Job Stress

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Job stress can be all-consuming — but it doesn't have to be. Address your triggers, keep perspective and ... stress triggers, it's often helpful to improve time management skills — especially if you tend to feel overwhelmed ...

  18. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Stress Fractures in Military Personnel: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dao, Dyda; Sodhi, Sukhmani; Tabasinejad, Rasam; Peterson, Devin; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Bhandari, Mohit; Farrokhyar, Forough

    2015-08-01

    Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels have been associated with stress fractures in various physically active populations such as the military. To examine the association between serum 25(OH)D levels and stress fractures in the military. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified through searching multiple databases and manually screening reference lists. Two reviewers independently selected the included studies by applying the eligibility criteria to the title, abstract, and/or full text of the articles yielded in the search. Two reviewers also independently conducted the methodological quality assessment and data extraction. A random-effects model was used to calculate the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI in serum 25(OH)D levels between stress fracture cases and controls. Nine observational studies on lower extremity stress fractures were eligible, and 1 was excluded due to inadequate data. A total of 2634 military personnel (age, 18-30 years; 44% male) with 761 cases (16% male) and 1873 controls (61% male) from 8 studies were included in the analysis. Three of the 8 studies measured serum 25(OH)D levels at the time of stress fracture diagnosis, and the 5 remaining studies measured serum 25(OH)D levels at the time of entry into basic training. The mean serum 25(OH)D level was lower in stress fracture cases than in controls at the time of entry into basic training (MD, -2.63 ng/mL; 95% CI, -5.80 to 0.54; P = .10; I(2) = 65%) and at the time of stress fracture diagnosis (MD, -2.26 ng/mL; 95% CI, -3.89 to -0.63; P = .007; I(2) = 42%). Despite the inherent limitations of the included studies, the study results suggest some association between low serum 25(OH)D levels and lower extremity stress fractures in military personnel. Given the rigorous training of military personnel, implementing strategies to ensure sufficient 25(OH)D levels may be beneficial for reducing the risk of stress fractures. © 2014 The Author(s).

  19. Manage Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En español Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... and Health Effects What are the signs of stress? When people are under stress, they may feel: ...

  20. Short-term effects of teriparatide versus placebo on bone biomarkers, structure, and fracture healing in women with lower-extremity stress fractures: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Almirol, Ellen A; Chi, Lisa Y; Khurana, Bharti; Hurwitz, Shelley; Bluman, Eric M; Chiodo, Christopher; Matzkin, Elizabeth; Baima, Jennifer; LeBoff, Meryl S

    2016-09-01

    In this pilot, placebo-controlled study, we evaluated whether brief administration of teriparatide (TPTD) in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures would increase markers of bone formation in advance of bone resorption, improve bone structure, and hasten fracture healing according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Premenopausal women with acute lower-extremity stress fractures were randomized to injection of TPTD 20-µg subcutaneous (s.c.) (n = 6) or placebo s.c. (n = 7) for 8 weeks. Biomarkers for bone formation N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) and osteocalcin (OC) and resorption collagen type-1 cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX) and collagen type 1 cross-linked N-telopeptide (NTX) were measured at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. The area between the percent change of P1NP and CTX over study duration is defined as the anabolic window. To assess structural changes, peripheral quantitative computed topography (pQCT) was measured at baseline, 8 and 12 weeks at the unaffected tibia and distal radius. The MRI of the affected bone assessed stress fracture healing at baseline and 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of treatment, bone biomarkers P1NP and OC increased more in the TPTD- versus placebo-treated group (both p ≤ 0.01), resulting in a marked anabolic window (p ≤ 0.05). Results from pQCT demonstrated that TPTD-treated women showed a larger cortical area and thickness compared to placebo at the weight bearing tibial site, while placebo-treated women had a greater total tibia and cortical density. No changes at the radial sites were observed between groups. According to MRI, 83.3% of the TPTD- and 57.1% of the placebo-treated group had improved or healed stress fractures (p = 0.18). In this randomized, pilot study, brief administration of TPTD showed anabolic effects that TPTD may help hasten fracture healing in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures. Larger prospective studies are warranted to determine

  1. The Epidemiology of Stress Fractures in Collegiate Student-Athletes, 2004-2005 Through 2013-2014 Academic Years.

    PubMed

    Rizzone, Katherine H; Ackerman, Kathryn E; Roos, Karen G; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-10-01

    Stress fractures are injuries caused by cumulative, repetitive stress that leads to abnormal bone remodeling. Specific populations, including female athletes and endurance athletes, are at higher risk than the general athletic population. Whereas more than 460 000 individuals participate in collegiate athletics in the United States, no large study has been conducted to determine the incidence of stress fractures in collegiate athletes.   To assess the incidence of stress fractures in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and investigate rates and patterns overall and by sport.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   National Collegiate Athletic Association institutions.   National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes.   Data were analyzed from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program for the academic years 2004-2005 through 2013-2014. We calculated rates and rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).   A total of 671 stress fractures were reported over 11 778 145 athlete-exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 5.70 per 100 000 AEs. The sports with the highest rates of stress fractures were women's cross-country ( 28.59/100  000 AEs), women's gymnastics ( 25.58/100  000 AEs), and women's outdoor track ( 22.26/100  000 AEs). Among sex-comparable sports (baseball/softball, basketball, cross-country, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor track, and outdoor track), stress fracture rates were higher in women (9.13/100 000 AEs) than in men (4.44/100 000 AEs; RR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.71, 2.47). Overall, stress fracture rates for these NCAA athletes were higher in the preseason (7.30/100 000 AEs) than in the regular season (5.12/100 000 AEs; RR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.22, 1.67). The metatarsals (n = 254, 37.9%), tibia (n = 147, 21.9%), and lower back/lumbar spine/pelvis (n = 81, 12.1%) were the most common locations of injury. Overall, 21.5% (n = 144) of stress fractures were

  2. Induced stress changes and associated fracture development as a result of deglaciation on the Zugspitzplatt, SE Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Kupp, Jan; Geisenhof, Benedikt; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Bedrock stresses in alpine regions result from the combined effects of exhumation, tectonics, topography, inelastic strain (e.g. fault displacement and fracture formation), and external loading. Gravitational loading by glacial ice can significantly affect near-surface stress magnitudes, although the nature of this effect and it's impact on stress distributions and bedrock fracturing is strongly dependent on the stress history of the bedrock landscape. We assess the effects of recent (post-Little Ice Age , ~1850 AD) and future deglaciation on bedrock stresses in the region of the Zugspitzplatt, a glaciated plateau surrounded by 1500 m high bedrock walls in SE Germany. We address this by undertaking a 2-D elasto-plastic finite element method analysis of stress changes and fracture propagation due to repeated glacial - interglacial cycles. Our model is initialised with upper crustal stresses in equilibrium with bedrock strength and regional tectonics, and we then simulate two cycles of major Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation in order to dissipate stress concentrations and incorporate path-dependent effects of glacial loading on the landscape. We then simulate a final glacial cycle, and remove 1 m of bedrock to approximate glacial erosion across the topography. Finally, ice levels are reduced in accordance with known late-glacial and recent ice retreat, allowing us to compare relative stress changes and predicted patterns of fracture propagation to observed fracture distributions on the Zugspitzplatt. Model results compare favourably to observed fracture patterns, and indicate the plateau is likely to be undergoing N-S extension as a result of deglaciation, with a strong reduction of horizontal stress magnitudes beneath the present-day Schneeferner glacier. As each glacial cycle has a similar effect on the plateau, it is likely that surficial stresses are slightly tensile, and each cycle of deglaciation produces additional sub-vertical tensile fractures, which

  3. Stress Management

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress basics Stress is a normal psychological and physical reaction to the demands of life. ... some people's alarm systems rarely shut off. Stress management gives you a range of tools to reset ...

  4. Management of orbital fractures: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Jennings R; Pemberton, John D; Bonilla-Velez, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Many specialists encounter and treat orbital fractures. The management of these fractures is often challenging due to the impact that they can have on vision. Acute treatment involves a thorough clinical examination and management of concomitant ocular injuries. The clinical and radiographic findings for each individual patient must then be analyzed for the need for surgical intervention. Deformity and vision impairment can occur from these injuries, and while surgery is intended to prevent these problems, it can also create them. Therefore, surgical approach and implant selection should be carefully considered. Accurate anatomic reconstruction requires complete assessment of fracture margins and proper implant contouring and positioning. The implementation of new technologies for implant shaping and intraoperative assessment of reconstruction will hopefully lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:26604678

  5. Effect of Stress Triaxiality on the Flow and Fracture of Mg Alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondori, Babak; Benzerga, A. Amine

    2014-07-01

    The microscopic damage mechanisms operating in a hot-rolled magnesium alloy AZ31B are investigated under both uniaxial and controlled triaxial loadings. Their connection to macroscopic fracture strains and fracture mode (normal vs shear) is elucidated using postmortem fractography, interrupted tests, and microscopic analysis. The fracture locus (strain-to-failure vs stress triaxiality) exhibits a maximum at moderate triaxiality, and the strain-to-failure is found to be greater in notched specimens than in initially smooth ones. A transition from twinning-induced fracture under uniaxial loading to microvoid coalescence fracture under triaxial loading is evidenced. It is argued that this transition accounts in part for the observed greater ductility in notched bars. The evolution of plastic anisotropy with stress triaxiality is also investigated. It is inferred that anisotropic plasticity at a macroscopic scale suffices to account for the observed transition in the fracture mode from flat (triaxial loading) to shear-like (uniaxial loading). Damage is found to initiate at second-phase particles and deformation twins. Fracture surfaces of broken specimens exhibit granular morphology, coarse splits, twin-sized crack traces, as well as shallow and deep dimples, in proportions that depend on the overall stress triaxiality and fracture mode. An important finding is that AZ31B has a greater tolerance to ductile damage accumulation than has been believed thus far, based on the fracture behavior in uniaxial specimens. Another finding, common to both tension and compression, is the increase in volumetric strain, the microscopic origins of which remain to be elucidated.

  6. Use of non-fault fractures in stress tensor reconstruction using the Mohr Circle with the Win-tensor program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Damien

    2016-04-01

    Paleostress inversion of geological fault-slip data is usually done using the directional part of the applied stress tensor on a slip plane and comparing it with the observed slip lines. However, this method do not fully exploit the brittle data sets as those are composed of shear and tension fractures, in addition to faults. Brittle deformation can be decomposed in two steps. An initial fracture/failure in previously intact rock generate extension/tensile fractures or shear fractures, both without visible opening or displacement. This first step may or not be followed by fracture opening to form tension joints, frictional shearing to form shear faults, or a combination of opening and shearing which produces hybrid fractures. Fractured rock outcrop contain information of the stress conditions that acted during both brittle deformation steps. The purpose here is to investigate how the fracture pattern generated during the initial fracture/failure step might be used in paleostress reconstruction. Each fracture is represented on the Mohr Circle by its resolved normal and shear stress magnitudes. We consider the typical domains on the Mohr circle where the different types de fractures nucleate (tension, hybrid, shear and compression fractures), as well the domain which contain reactivated fractures (faults reactivating an initial fracture plane). In function of the fracture type defined in the field, a "distance" is computed on the Mohr circle between each point and its expected corresponding nucleation/reactivation domain. This "Mohr Distance" is then used as function to minimize during the inversion. We implemented this new function in the Win-Tensor program, and tested it with natural and synthetic data sets from different stress regimes. It can be used alone using only the Mohr Distance on each plane (function F10), or combined with the angular misfit between observed striae and resolved shear directions (composite function F11). When used alone (F10), only the 3

  7. Evaluation and management of pediatric proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-02-01

    In the pediatric population, sports participation, falls, and motor vehicle accidents can result in proximal humerus fractures. Because the proximal humeral growth plate is responsible for up to 80% of the growth of the humerus, the remodeling of these fractures in children is tremendous. Most of these injuries can be treated with a sling or hanging arm cast, although older children with decreased remodeling capacity may require surgery. Special considerations should be taken for management of proximal humerus fractures that occur in the context of Little League shoulder, lesser tuerosity avulsion fractures, fracture-dislocations, birth fractures, and fractures associated with cysts. Most pediatric patients with proximal humerus fractures have favorable results, and complications are infrequent. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  8. Characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almrabat, Abdulhadi M.

    The thesis presents the results of a study of the characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks. A new laboratory High Pressure and High Temperature (HPHT) triaxial testing system was developed to characterize the seismic properties of sandstone under different levels of effective stress confinement and changes in pore-fluid composition. An intact and fractured of Berea sandstones core samples were used in the experimental studies. The laboratory test results were used to develop analytical models for stress-level and pore-fluid dependent seismic velocity of sandstones. Models for stress-dependent P and S-wave seismic velocities of sandstone were then developed based on the assumption that stress-dependencies come from the nonlinear elastic response of micro-fractures contained in the sample under normal and shear loading. The contact shear stiffness was assumed to increase linearly with the normal stress across a micro-fracture, while the contact normal stiffness was assumed to vary as a power law with the micro-fracture normal stress. Both nonlinear fracture normal and shear contact models were validated by experimental data available in the literature. To test the dependency of seismic velocity of sandstone on changes in pore-fluid composition, another series of tests were conducted where P and S-wave velocities were monitored during injection of supercritical CO 2 in samples of Berea sandstone initially saturated with saline water and under constant confining stress. Changes in seismic wave velocity were measured at different levels of supercritical CO2 saturation as the initial saline water as pore-fluid was displaced by supercritical CO 2. It was found that the P- iv wave velocity significantly decreased while the S-wave velocity remained almost constant as the sample supercritical CO2 saturation increased. The dependency of the seismic velocity on changes on pore fluid composition during

  9. Acute changes in foot strike pattern and cadence affect running parameters associated with tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jennifer R; Silder, Amy; Montgomery, Kate L; Fredericson, Michael; Delp, Scott L

    2018-05-18

    Tibial stress fractures are a common and debilitating injury that occur in distance runners. Runners may be able to decrease tibial stress fracture risk by adopting a running pattern that reduces biomechanical parameters associated with a history of tibial stress fracture. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that converting to a forefoot striking pattern or increasing cadence without focusing on changing foot strike type would reduce injury risk parameters in recreational runners. Running kinematics, ground reaction forces and tibial accelerations were recorded from seventeen healthy, habitual rearfoot striking runners while running in their natural running pattern and after two acute retraining conditions: (1) converting to forefoot striking without focusing on cadence and (2) increasing cadence without focusing on foot strike. We found that converting to forefoot striking decreased two risk factors for tibial stress fracture: average and peak loading rates. Increasing cadence decreased one risk factor: peak hip adduction angle. Our results demonstrate that acute adaptation to forefoot striking reduces different injury risk parameters than acute adaptation to increased cadence and suggest that both modifications may reduce the risk of tibial stress fractures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilateral periprosthetic tibial stress fracture after total knee arthroplasty: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Guzelali; Azboy, Ibrahim; Yilmaz, Baris

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures around the knee after total knee arthroplasty can be seen in the femur, tibia and patella. The tibial fractures are rare cases. Our case with bilateral tibial stress fracture developed after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the first of its kind in the literature. 75-year-old male patient with bilateral knee osteoarthritis had not benefited from conservative treatment methods previously applied. Left TKA was applied. In the second month postoperatively, periprosthetic tibial fracture was identified and osteosynthesis was implemented with locked tibia proximal plate-screw. Bone union in 12 weeks was observed in his follow-ups. After 15 months of his first operation, TKA was applied to the right knee. Postoperatively in the second month, as in the first operation, periprosthetic tibial fracture was detected. Osteosynthesis with locking plate-screw was applied and union in 12 weeks was observed in his follow-up. He was seen mobilized independently and without support in the last control of the case made in the 24th month after the second operation. The number of TKA applications is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of periprosthetic fractures should also be expected to increase in these cases. Periprosthetic tibial fractures after TKA are rarely seen. The treatment of periprosthetic fractures around the knee after TKA can be difficult. In the case of persistent pain in the upper end of the tibia after the surgery, stress fracture should be considered. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Marrow changes in anorexia nervosa masking the presence of stress fractures on MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Tins, Bernhard; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor

    2006-11-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) usually have abnormal bone and bone marrow metabolism resulting in osteopenia and serous bone marrow change. There is an increased risk of stress/insufficiency fractures and these can be the first presentation of AN. This case report describes a patient with previously undiagnosed AN who presented with foot pain. The serous bone marrow changes of AN were found to mask the MR imaging features of stress fractures, as both had low T1w and high T2w and STIR signal intensities. Contrast enhancement was not helpful but actually masked fractures. Scintigraphy was helpful. The radiologist might be the first clinician to raise the possibility of AN and should be aware of the difficulties in diagnosing stress fractures in bones with underlying serous bone marrow change. In this severe case of AN even the heel fat pad and the fat pad in Kager's triangle had undergone serous change.

  12. Management of distal humeral coronal shear fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yari, Shahram S; Bowers, Nathan L; Craig, Miguel A; Reichel, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the distal humerus are rare, complex fractures that can be technically challenging to manage. They usually result from a low-energy fall and direct compression of the distal humerus by the radial head in a hyper-extended or semi-flexed elbow or from spontaneous reduction of a posterolateral subluxation or dislocation. Due to the small number of soft tissue attachments at this site, almost all of these fractures are displaced. The incidence of distal humeral coronal shear fractures is higher among women because of the higher rate of osteoporosis in women and the difference in carrying angle between men and women. Distal humeral coronal shear fractures may occur in isolation, may be part of a complex elbow injury, or may be associated with injuries proximal or distal to the elbow. An associated lateral collateral ligament injury is seen in up to 40% and an associated radial head fracture is seen in up to 30% of these fractures. Given the complex nature of distal humeral coronal shear fractures, there is preference for operative management. Operative fixation leads to stable anatomic reduction, restores articular congruity, and allows initiation of early range-of-motion movements in the majority of cases. Several surgical exposure and fixation techniques are available to reconstruct the articular surface following distal humeral coronal shear fractures. The lateral extensile approach and fixation with countersunk headless compression screws placed in an anterior-to-posterior fashion are commonly used. We have found a two-incision approach (direct anterior and lateral) that results in less soft tissue dissection and better outcomes than the lateral extensile approach in our experience. Stiffness, pain, articular incongruity, arthritis, and ulnohumeral instability may result if reduction is non-anatomic or if fixation fails. PMID:25984515

  13. Distribution of stress drop, stiffness, and fracture energy over earthquake rupture zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Joe B.; McGarr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Using information provided by slip models and the methodology of McGarr and Fletcher (2002), we map static stress drop, stiffness (k = ????/u, where ???? is static stress drop and u is slip), and fracture energy over the slip surface to investigate the earthquake rupture process and energy budget. For the 1994 M6.7 Northridge, 1992 M7.3 Landers, and 1995 M6.9 Kobe earthquakes, the distributions of static stress drop show strong heterogeneity, emphasizing the importance of asperities in the rupture process. Average values of static stress drop are 17, 11, and 4 Mpa for Northridge, Landers, and Kobe, respectively. These values are substantially higher than estimates based on simple crack models, suggesting that the failure process involves the rupture of asperities within the larger fault zone. Stress drop as a function of depth for the Northridge and Landers earthquakes suggests that stress drops are limited by crustal strength. For these two earthquakes, regions of high slip are surrounded by high values of stiffness. Particularly for the Northridge earthquake, the prominent patch of high slip in the central part of the fault is bordered by a ring of high stiffness and is consistent with expectations based on the failure of an asperity loaded at its edge due to exterior slip. Stiffness within an asperity is inversely related to its dimensions. Estimates of fracture energy, based on static stress drop, slip, and rupture speed, were used to investigate the nature of slip weakening at four locations near the hypocenter of the Kobe earthquake for comparison with independent results based on a dynamic model of this earthquake. One subfault updip and to the NE of the hypocenter has a fracture energy of 1.1 MJ/m2 and a slip-weakening distance, Dc, of 0.66 m. Right triangles, whose base and height are Dc and the dynamic stress drop, respectively, approximately overlie the slip-dependent stress given by Ide and Takeo (1997) for the same locations near the hypocenter. The

  14. Effect of Random Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Geometry in Fractured Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Shijie; Zhao, Haiyang; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Geng, Yudi; Tao, Shan; Zhang, Guangqing; Chen, Mian

    2018-02-01

    Natural fractures have a significant influence on the propagation geometry of hydraulic fractures in fractured reservoirs. True triaxial volumetric fracturing experiments, in which random natural fractures are created by placing cement blocks of different dimensions in a cuboid mold and filling the mold with additional cement to create the final test specimen, were used to study the factors that influence the hydraulic fracture propagation geometry. These factors include the presence of natural fractures around the wellbore, the dimension and volumetric density of random natural fractures and the horizontal differential stress. The results show that volumetric fractures preferentially formed when natural fractures occurred around the wellbore, the natural fractures are medium to long and have a volumetric density of 6-9%, and the stress difference is less than 11 MPa. The volumetric fracture geometries are mainly major multi-branch fractures with fracture networks or major multi-branch fractures (2-4 fractures). The angles between the major fractures and the maximum horizontal in situ stress are 30°-45°, and fracture networks are located at the intersections of major multi-branch fractures. Short natural fractures rarely led to the formation of fracture networks. Thus, the interaction between hydraulic fractures and short natural fractures has little engineering significance. The conclusions are important for field applications and for gaining a deeper understanding of the formation process of volumetric fractures.

  15. Dynamic Stress Testing Is Unnecessary for Unimalleolar Supination-External Rotation Ankle Fractures with Minimal Fracture Displacement on Lateral Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Nortunen, Simo; Leskelä, Hannu-Ville; Haapasalo, Heidi; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Pakarinen, Harri

    2017-03-15

    This study aimed to identify factors from standard radiographs that contributed to the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with isolated supination-external rotation fractures of the lateral malleolus (OTA/AO 44-B). Non-stress radiographs of the mortise and lateral views, without medial clear space widening or incongruity, were prospectively collected for 286 consecutive patients (mean age, 45 years [range, 16 to 85 years]), including 144 female patients (mean age, 50 years [range, 17 to 85 years]) and 142 male patients (mean age, 40 years [range, 16 to 84 years]) from 2 trauma centers. The radiographs were analyzed for fracture morphology by 2 orthopaedic surgeons, who were blinded to each other's measurements and to the results of external rotation stress radiographs (the reference for stability). Factors significantly associated with ankle mortise stability were tested in multiple logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed for continuous variables to determine optimal thresholds. A sensitivity of >90% was used as the criterion for an optimal threshold. According to external rotation stress radiographs, 217 patients (75.9%) had a stable injury, defined as that with a medial clear space of <5 mm. Independent factors that predicted stable ankle mortise were female sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4 to 4.6]), a posterior diastasis of <2 mm (corresponding with a sensitivity of 0.94 and specificity of 0.39) on lateral radiographs (OR, 10.8 [95% CI, 3.7 to 31.5]), and only 2 fracture fragments (OR, 7.3 [95% CI, 2.1 to 26.3]). When the posterior diastasis was <2 mm and only 2 fracture fragments were present, the probability of a stable ankle mortise was 0.98 for 48 female patients (16.8%) and 0.94 for 37 male patients (12.9%). Patients with noncomminuted lateral malleolar fractures (85 patients [29.7%]) could be diagnosed with a stable ankle mortise without further stress testing, when the fracture

  16. A mechanical model of metatarsal stress fracture during distance running.

    PubMed

    Gross, T S; Bunch, R P

    1989-01-01

    A model of metatarsal mechanics has been proposed as a link between the high incidence of second and third metatarsal stress fractures and the large stresses measured beneath the second and third metatarsal heads during distance running. Eight discrete piezoelectric vertical stress transducers were used to record the forefoot stresses of 21 male distance runners. Based upon load bearing area estimates derived from footprints, plantar forces were estimated. Highest force was estimated beneath the second and first metatarsal head (341.1 N and 279.1 N, respectively). Considering the toe as a hinged cantilever and the metatarsal as a proximally attached rigid cantilever allowed estimation of metatarsal midshaft bending strain, shear, and axial forces. Bending strain was estimated to be greatest in the second metatarsal (6662 mu epsilon), a value 6.9 times greater than estimated first metatarsal strain. Predicted third, fourth, and fifth metatarsal strains ranged between 4832 and 5241 mu epsilon. Shear force estimates were also greatest in the second metatarsal (203.0 N). Axial forces were highest in the first metatarsal (593.2 N) due to large hallux forces in relationship to the remaining toes. Although a first order model, these data highlight the structural demands placed upon the second metatarsal, a location of high metatarsal stress fracture incidence during distance running.

  17. Effects of shot-peening residual stresses on the fracture and crack-growth properties of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1974-01-01

    The fracture strength and cyclic crack-growth properties of surface-flawed, shot-peened D6AC steel plate were investigated. For short crack lengths (up to 1.5 mm) simple linear elastic fracture mechanics - based only on applied loading - did not predict the fracture strengths. Also, Paris' Law for cyclic crack growth did not correlate the crack-growth behavior. To investigate the effect of shot-peening, additional fracture and crack-growth tests were performed on material which was precompressed to remove the residual stresses left by the shot-peening. Both tests and analysis show that shot-peening residual stresses influence the fracture and crack-growth properties of the material. This report presents the analytical method of compensating for residual stresses and the fracture and cyclic crack-growth test results and predictions.

  18. Quality of Postoperative Pain Management After Maxillofacial Fracture Repair.

    PubMed

    Peisker, Andre; Meissner, Winfried; Raschke, Gregor F; Fahmy, Mina D; Guentsch, Arndt; Schiller, Juliane; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Effective pain management is an essential component in the perioperative care of surgical patients. However, postoperative pain after maxillofacial fracture repair and its optimal therapy has not been described in detail. In a prospective cohort study, 95 adults rated their pain on the first postoperative day after maxillofacial fracture repair using the questionnaire of the Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management (QUIPS) project. Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management allowed for a standardized assessment of patients' characteristics and pain-related parameters. Overall, the mean maximal pain and pain on activity (numeric rating scales) were significantly higher in patients with mandibular fractures than in patients with midface fractures (P = 0.002 and P = 0.045, respectively). In patients with mandibular fractures, a longer duration of surgery was significantly associated with higher satisfaction with pain intensity (P = 0.015), but was more frequently associated with postoperative vomiting (P = 0.023). A shorter duration of surgery and an absence of preoperative pain counseling in these patients were significantly correlated to desire for more pain medication (P = 0.049 and P = 0.004, respectively). Patients with mandibular fractures that received opioids in the recovery room had significantly higher strain-related pain (P = 0.017). In patients with midface fractures, a longer duration of surgery showed significantly higher levels of decreased mobility (P = 0.003). Patients receiving midazolam for premedication had significantly less minimal pain (P = 0.021). Patients with mandibular fractures seem to have more postoperative pain than patients with midface fractures. Monitoring of postsurgical pain and a procedure-specific pain-treatment protocol should be performed in clinical routine.

  19. Comparison of stress fractures of male and female recruits during basic training in the Israeli anti-aircraft forces.

    PubMed

    Gam, Arnon; Goldstein, Liav; Karmon, Yuval; Mintser, Igor; Grotto, Itamar; Guri, Alex; Goldberg, Avishay; Ohana, Nissim; Onn, Erez; Levi, Yehezkel; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

    2005-08-01

    In military basic training, stress fractures are a common orthopedic problem. Female recruits have a significantly higher incidence of stress fractures than do male recruits. Because the Israeli Defense Forces opened traditionally male roles in combat units to female recruits, their high risk for stress fractures is of concern. To compare the prevalence of stress fractures during Israeli Defense Forces anti-aircraft basic training among otherwise healthy young male and female recruits, in terms of anatomic distribution and severity. Ten mixed gender batteries, including 375 male recruits and 138 female recruits, carried out basic training in the Israeli anti-aircraft corps between November 1999 and January 2003. Each battery was monitored prospectively for 10 weeks of a basic training course. During that time, recruits who were suspected of having an overuse injury went through a protocol that included an orthopedic specialist physical examination followed by a radionuclide technetium bone scan, which was assessed by consultant nuclear medicine experts. The assessment included the anatomic site and the severity of the fractures, labeled as either high severity or low severity. Stress fractures were significantly more common among female recruits than among male recruits. A total of 42 male (11.2%) and 33 female (23.91%) recruits had positive bone scans for stress fractures (female:male relative ratio, 2.13; p < 0.001). Pelvic, femur, and tibia fractures were significantly more common among female recruits than among male recruits (p < 0.005). Female recruits had significantly more severe fractures in the tibia (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the severity of stress fractures in the femur or metatarsals between male and female recruits, as assessed by radionuclide uptake. We recommend that different training programs be assigned according to gender, in which female recruits would have a lower level of target strain or a more moderate

  20. Complex and open fractures: a straightforward approach to management in the cat.

    PubMed

    Corr, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Cats often present with traumatic injuries of the limbs, including complex and open fractures, frequently as a result of road traffic accidents. On initial assessment, complex and open fractures may appear to require expertise beyond the experience of the general practitioner and, in some cases, referral to a specialist may be indicated or amputation should be considered. Many cases, however, can be managed using straightforward principles. This review describes a logical and practical approach to treating such injuries. It discusses general principles of fracture management, highlights the treatment of open fractures, and describes the use of external skeletal fixation for stabilisation of both open and complex fractures. Most fractures can be stabilised using equipment and expertise available in general practice if the basic principles of fracture fixation are understood and rigorously applied. Many textbooks and journal articles have been published on the management of fractures in companion animals, presenting case studies, case series and original biomechanical research. The simple strategy for managing complex injuries that is provided in this review is based on the published literature and the author's clinical experience.

  1. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased risk of stress fracture during Royal Marine recruit training.

    PubMed

    Davey, T; Lanham-New, S A; Shaw, A M; Hale, B; Cobley, R; Berry, J L; Roch, M; Allsopp, A J; Fallowfield, J L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate vitamin D status and stress fracture risk during Royal Marine military training. Poor vitamin D status was associated with an increased risk of stress fracture. Vitamin D supplementation may help to reduce stress fracture risk in male military recruits with low vitamin D status. Stress fracture is a common overuse injury in military recruits, including Royal Marine (RM) training in the UK. RM training is recognised as one of the most arduous basic training programmes in the world. Associations have been reported between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and risk of stress fracture, but the threshold of 25(OH)D for this effect remains unclear. We aimed to determine if serum 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with stress fracture risk during RM training. We prospectively followed 1082 RM recruits (males aged 16-32 years) through the 32-week RM training programme. Troops started training between September and July. Height, body weight and aerobic fitness were assessed at week 1. Venous blood samples were drawn at weeks 1, 15 and 32. Serum samples were analysed for 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Seventy-eight recruits (7.2 %) suffered a total of 92 stress fractures. Recruits with a baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration below 50 nmol L(-1) had a higher incidence of stress fracture than recruits with 25(OH)D concentration above this threshold (χ(2) (1) = 3.564, p = 0.042; odds ratio 1.6 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.6)). Baseline serum 25(OH)D varied from 47.0 ± 23.7 nmol L(-1) in February, to 97.3 ± 24.6 nmol L(-1) in July (overall mean 69.2 ± 29.2 nmol L(-1), n = 1016). There were weak inverse correlations between serum 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations at week 15 (r = -0.209, p < 0.001) and week 32 (r = -0.214, p < 0.001), but not at baseline. Baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration below 50 nmol L(-1) was associated with an increased risk of stress fracture. Further

  2. Assessment and management of fracture risk in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lyell, Veronica; Henderson, Emily; Devine, Mark; Gregson, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with substantially increased fracture risk, particularly hip fracture, which can occur relatively early in the course of PD. Despite this, current national clinical guidelines for PD fail to adequately address fracture risk assessment or the management of bone health. We appraise the evidence supporting bone health management in PD and propose a PD-specific algorithm for the fracture risk assessment and the management of bone health in patients with PD and related movement disorders. The algorithm considers (i) calcium and vitamin D replacement and maintenance, (ii) quantification of prior falls and fractures, (iii) calculation of 10-year major osteoporotic and hip fracture risks using Qfracture, (iv) application of fracture risk thresholds, which if fracture risk is high (v) prompts anti-resorptive treatment, with or without dual X-ray absorptiometry, and if low (vi) prompts re-assessment with FRAX and application of National Osteoporosis Guidelines Group (NOGG) guidance. A range of anti-resorptive agents are now available to treat osteoporosis; we review their use from the specific perspective of a clinician managing a patient population with PD. In conclusion, our current evidence base supports updating of guidelines globally concerning the management of PD, which presently fail to adequately address bone health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Management of dental implant fractures. A case history.

    PubMed

    Al Quran, Firas A M; Rashan, Bashar A; Al-Dwairi, Ziad N

    2009-01-01

    The widespread use of endosseous osseointegrated implants to replace missing natural teeth increases the chances of implant complications and failures, despite the high initial success rate reported in the literature. Implant fracture is one possible complication that results in ultimate failure of the dental implant. Such a complication poses a management crisis even for the most experienced clinician. This article reports on a case of implant fracture, its possible causes, and how the case was managed.

  4. Proximal tibia stress fracture with Osteoarthritis of knee - Radiological and functional analysis of one stage TKA with long stem.

    PubMed

    Soundarrajan, Dhanasekaran; Rajkumar, Natesan; Dhanasekararaja, Palanisamy; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan

    2018-01-01

    Proximal tibia stress fractures with knee osteoarthritis pose a challenging situation. We evaluated the radiological and functional outcome of one-stage total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and long stem for patients with varied grades of knee arthritis and proximal tibia stress fractures.  Methods: We analysed 20 patients from April 2012 to March 2017 with proximal tibia stress fractures associated with knee osteoarthritis of varied grades. Out of 20 patients, five were acute fresh fractures. The mean age was 64 years (range, 52-78) which includes three men and 17 women. Previous surgery in the same limb, rheumatoid arthritis, valgus deformity were excluded. All patients were treated with posterior stabilised TKA with long stem, of which, four patients had screw augmentation for medial tibial bone defect and two patients with malunited fracture at stress fracture site required osteotomy, plating and bone grafting. Two patients had two level stress fracture of tibia in the same leg. The mean follow-up period was 28 (range, 6-60) months. The mean tibiofemoral angle improved from 18.27° varus to 1.8° valgus. The mean knee society score improved from 21.9 (range, -10 to 45) to 82.8 (range, 15-99) [p < 0.05]. The mean Knee Society functional score improved from 15.5 (range, -10 to 40) to 76.8 (range, 10-100) [p < 0.05]. All fractures got united at the last follow-up. One patient had infection and wound dehiscence at six months for which debridement done and had poor functional outcome. TKA with long stem gives excellent outcome, irrespective of severity of arthritis associated with stress fracture. By restoring limb alignment and bypassing the fracture site, it facilitates fracture healing. Early detection and prompt intervention is necessary to prevent the progression to recalcitrant non-union or malunion. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2018.

  5. Calcaneal stress fracture: an adverse event following total hip and total knee arthroplasty: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takaaki; Miki, Takahito; Nishiyama, Akihiro

    2014-01-15

    Stress fractures have been reported to occur in the pubis, femoral neck, proximal part of the tibia, and fabella during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. However, to our knowledge, calcaneal stress fractures after total hip or total knee arthroplasty have not been reported in the English-language literature. Most orthopaedic surgeons are not familiar with calcaneal stress fractures that may occur in elderly patients after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, imaging findings, and bone mineral content of the proximal part of the femur and the distal end of the radius in five patients who had a calcaneal stress fracture after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. All patients were women with a mean age of 76.8 years. All fractures occurred in the calcaneus on the same side as the arthroplasty. The fracture appeared at a mean of 10.2 weeks postoperatively. All patients reported heel pain on walking. Swelling and local heat were found in four and three patients, respectively. Pain was elicited by squeezing the calcaneus in all patients. Early radiographs had normal findings in two patients, and an irregular sclerotic line appeared later in the radiographs of all patients. All fractures were treated conservatively. Four fractures healed uneventfully, but one fracture displaced. All patients had osteoporosis. Calcaneal stress fractures during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty may not be as rare as previously thought. Because clinical symptoms of the fracture appear insidiously and radiographic findings are absent or subtle in the early stage, a high index of suspicion is needed for orthopaedic surgeons to make the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging or repeated radiographs may be necessary to make the correct diagnosis when no abnormality is apparent on the initial radiograph.

  6. Survey of Current Practice Patterns in the Management of Frontal Sinus Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kevin J.; Chang, Bora; Woodard, Charles R.; Powers, David B.; Marcus, Jeffrey R.; Puscas, Liana

    2017-01-01

    The management of frontal sinus fractures has evolved in the endoscopic era. The development of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has been incorporated into management algorithms proposed by otolaryngologists, but the extent of its influence on plastic surgeons and oral and maxillofacial surgeons is heretofore unknown. A cross-sectional survey was performed to assess the practice pattern variations in frontal sinus fracture management across multiple surgical disciplines. A total of 298 surveys were reviewed. 33.5% were facial plastic surgeons with otolaryngology training, 25.8% general otolaryngologists, 25.5% plastic surgeons, and 15.1% oral and maxillofacial surgeons. 74.8% of respondents practiced in an academic setting. 61.7% felt endoscopic sinus surgery changed their management of frontal sinus fractures. 91.8% of respondents favored observation for uncomplicated, nondisplaced frontal sinus outflow tract fractures. 36.4% favored observation and 35.9% favored endoscopic sinus surgery for uncomplicated, displaced frontal sinus outflow tract fractures. For complicated, displaced frontal sinus outflow tract fractures, obliteration was more frequently favored by plastic surgeons and oral and maxillofacial surgeons than those with otolaryngology training. The utility of FESS in managing frontal sinus fractures appears to be recognized across multiple surgical disciplines. PMID:28523084

  7. Macro-mesoscopic Fracture and Strength Character of Pre-cracked Granite Under Stress Relaxation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junfeng; Yang, Haiqing; Xiao, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2018-05-01

    The fracture characters are important index to study the strength and deformation behavior of rock mass in rock engineering. In order to investigate the influencing mechanism of loading conditions on the strength and macro-mesoscopic fracture character of rock material, pre-cracked granite specimens are prepared to conduct a series of uniaxial compression experiments. For parts of the experiments, stress relaxation tests of different durations are also conducted during the uniaxial loading process. Furthermore, the stereomicroscope is adopted to observe the microstructure of the crack surfaces of the specimens. The experimental results indicate that the crack surfaces show several typical fracture characters in accordance with loading conditions. In detail, some cleavage fracture can be observed under conventional uniaxial compression and the fractured surface is relatively rough, whereas as stress relaxation tests are attached, relative slip trace appears between the crack faces and some shear fracture starts to come into being. Besides, the crack faces tend to become smoother and typical terrace structures can be observed in local areas. Combining the macroscopic failure pattern of the specimens, it can be deduced that the duration time for the stress relaxation test contributes to the improvement of the elastic-plastic strain range as well as the axial peak strength for the studied material. Moreover, the derived conclusion is also consistent with the experimental and analytical solution for the pre-peak stage of the rock material. The present work may provide some primary understanding about the strength character and fracture mechanism of hard rock under different engineering environments.

  8. The management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Kline, Alex J

    2008-07-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have higher complication rates following both open and closed management of ankle fractures. Diabetic patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy have higher complication rates than both diabetic patients without these comorbidities and nondiabetic patients. Unstable ankle fractures in diabetic patients without neuropathy or vasculopathy are best treated with open reduction and internal fixation with use of standard techniques. Patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy are at increased risk for both soft-tissue and osseous complications, including delayed union and nonunion. Careful soft-tissue management as well as stable, rigid internal fixation are crucial to obtaining a good outcome. Prolonged non-weight-bearing and subsequently protected weight-bearing are recommended following both operative and nonoperative management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

  9. Hydrologic effects of stress-relief fracturing in an Appalachian Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyrick, Granville G.; Borchers, James W.

    1981-01-01

    being formed from stress relief. As stress-relief fractures have been described in other valleys of the Appalachian Plateaus, the same aquifer conditions may exist in those valleys.

  10. Contemporary management of traumatic fractures of the frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Guy, W Marshall; Brissett, Anthony E

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses the classic and contemporary management strategies for treating frontal sinus fractures. The goals of management of frontal sinus fractures are to create a safe sinus by minimizing the likelihood of early and late complications while preserving the function of the sinus and maintaining the cosmetic appearance of the upper face. The assessment and classification of patients with frontal sinus injuries, their management, and the treatment of complications are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dependency of the injection induced seismicity b-value on the stress state of existing fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuhira, Y.; Fehler, M. C.; Ito, T.; Asanuma, H.; Häring, M. O.

    2017-12-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter distribution of earthquake is a power law relationship and it holds for laboratory scale earthquakes (acoustic emission) to subduction zone earthquakes as well as induced seismicity. The gradient of the power law is known as the b-value, which can be considered the ratio of the number of the larger earthquakes to small ones. Larger earthquakes are often observed in low b-value regions, or alternatively a b-value reduction has been observed before some main shocks. Some authors have argued that b-value is negatively correlated with differential stress level. Therefore, a b-value anomaly found in time-space analysis may be used for detection of an area of stress concentration and used for earthquake prediction or hazard risk assessment. In the field of induced seismicity where b-value reduction has also been observed, the physical mechanism of b-value reduction has not been understood well. Since induced seismicity related with fluid injection usually occurs at depths around 1000 5000 m, a significant tectonic mechanism to cause a stress concentration during a short time of hydraulic stimulation might not be expected. We used borehole analysis and focal mechanism information to investigate the stress state on the existing fractures that caused induced seismicity. Then we divide the catalog into the groups with varying normalized shear stress threshold and estimated the b-value. We found that b-value for the events that occurred along higher shear stress fractures were significantly lower (figure 1a) than those from the moderate/lower shear stress fractures (figure 1b). Thus, b-value dependency on the shear stress can be observed for induced seismicity on a reservoir scale. Therefore, we propose that the reason for the observed b-value reductions in induced seismicity on a reservoir scale is the events that occur along higher shear stress fractures. Supposing that the earthquakes occurs along well-orientated fractures, the b-value dependence on

  12. [Stress fractures in disabled athletes' preparation for the paralympic games in Athens, 2004: an assessment].

    PubMed

    Laboute, E; Druvert, J C; Pailler, D; Piera, J-B

    2008-03-01

    To identify stress fracture frequency and the associated risk factors in disabled female athletes preparing the Paralympic Games in Athens in 2004. The study is focused on four athletes (including one with a vision impairment) among the 31 women selected to participate in the Paralympic Games. The medical records of selected athletes not having been able to participate in the Games due to a stress fracture were analyzed. One case of stress fracture to the first metatarsal was reported of one below-knee amputee and an additional case to the second metatarsal of one hemiplegic athlete. Two of three athletes with physical disability were unable to participate in the Games because of stress fracture occurring during the preparatory phase. Among four athletes selected to take part in the Paralympic Games. If morphological predispositions are inherent to the sportswomen, the main favouring factor to be retained is their running asymmetry. Training programmes must therefore take this characteristic into account and must not offer heavy-load repetitive exercise (such as endurance or jogging) at the expense of technique. Over-intense training exposes the disabled athlete to this type of pathology and is likely to affect his chances of competing.

  13. Management of Hangman's Fractures: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Hamadi; Schroeder, Gregory D; Shi, Weilong J; Kepler, Christopher K; Kurd, Mark F; Fleischman, Andrew N; Kandziora, Frank; Chapman, Jens R; Benneker, Lorin M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis, is a common cervical spine fracture; however, to date there is limited data available to guide the treatment of these injuries. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based analysis of the literature and clinical outcomes associated with the surgical and nonsurgical management of hangman's fractures. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed (MEDLINE) and Scopus (EMBASE, MEDLINE, COMPENDEX) for all articles describing the treatment of hangman's fractures in 2 or more patients. Risk of nonunion, mortality, complications, and treatment failure (defined as the need for surgery in the nonsurgically managed patients and the need for revision surgery for any reason in the surgically managed patients) was compared for operative and nonoperative treatment methods using a generalized linear mixed model and odds ratio analysis. Overall, 25 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in our quantitative analysis. Bony union was the principal outcome measure used to assess successful treatment. All studies included documented fracture union and were included in statistical analyses. The overall union rate for 131 fractures treated nonsurgically was 94.14% [95% confidence interval (CI), 76.15-98.78]. The overall union rate for 417 fractures treated surgically was 99.35% (95% CI, 96.81-99.87). Chance of nonunion was lower in those patients treated surgically (odds ratio, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.02-0.71). There was not a significant difference in mortality between patients treated surgically (0.16%; 95% CI, 0.01%-2.89%) and nonsurgically (1.04%; 95% CI, 0.08%-11.4%) (odds ratio, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.01-2.11). Treatment failure was less likely in the surgical treatment group (0.12%; 95% CI, 0.01%-2.45%) than the nonsurgical treatment group (0.71%; 95% CI, 0.28%-15.75%) (odds ratio 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-0.56). Hangman's fractures are common injuries, and surgical treatment leads to an increase in the rate of

  14. Results of the multiwell experiment in situ stresses, natural fractures, and other geological controls on reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, John C.; Warpinski, Norman R.; Teufel, Lawrence W.; Branagan, Paul T.; Sattler, Allan R.; Northrop, David A.

    Hundreds of millions of cubic meters of natural gas are locked up in low-permeability, natural gas reservoirs. The Multiwell Experiment (MWX) was designed to characterize such reservoirs, typical of much of the western United States, and to assess and develop a technology for the production of this unconventional resource. Flow-rate tests of the MWX reservoirs indicate a system permeability that is several orders of magnitude higher than laboratory permeability measurements made on matrix-rock sandstones. This enhanced permeability is caused by natural fractures. The single set of fractures present in the reservoirs provides a significant permeability anisotropy that is aligned with the maximum in situ horizontal stress. Hydraulic fractures therefore form parallel to the natural fractures and are consequently an inefficient mechanism for stimulation. Successful stimulation may be possible by perturbing the local stress field with a large hydraulic fracture in one well so that a second hydraulic fracture in an offset well propagates transverse to the natural fracture permeability trend.

  15. The effects of shot-peening residual stresses on the fracture and crack growth properties of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1973-01-01

    The fracture strength and cyclic crack-growth properties of surface-flawed, shot-peened D6AC steel plate were investigated. For short crack lengths (up to 1.5mm) simple linear elastic fracture mechanics - based only on applied loading - did not predict the fracture strengths. Also, Paris' Law for cyclic crack growth did not correlate the crack-growth behavior. To investigate the effect of shot-peening, additional fracture and crack-growth tests were performed on material which was precompressed to remove the residual stresses left by the shot-peening. Both tests and analysis show that the shot-peening residual stresses influence the fracture and crack-growth properties of the material. The analytical method of compensating for residual stresses and the fracture and cyclic crack-growth test results and predictions are presented.

  16. Stress Management: Positive Thinking

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Positive thinking helps with stress management and can even improve your health. Practice overcoming negative self-talk ... with optimism is a key part of effective stress management. And effective stress management is associated with ...

  17. Pore Pressure and Stress Distributions Around a Hydraulic Fracture in Heterogeneous Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qian; Ghassemi, Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    One of the most significant characteristics of unconventional petroleum bearing formations is their heterogeneity, which affects the stress distribution, hydraulic fracture propagation and also fluid flow. This study focuses on the stress and pore pressure redistributions during hydraulic stimulation in a heterogeneous poroelastic rock. Lognormal random distributions of Young's modulus and permeability are generated to simulate the heterogeneous distributions of material properties. A 3D fully coupled poroelastic model based on the finite element method is presented utilizing a displacement-pressure formulation. In order to verify the model, numerical results are compared with analytical solutions showing excellent agreements. The effects of heterogeneities on stress and pore pressure distributions around a penny-shaped fracture in poroelastic rock are then analyzed. Results indicate that the stress and pore pressure distributions are more complex in a heterogeneous reservoir than in a homogeneous one. The spatial extent of stress reorientation during hydraulic stimulations is a function of time and is continuously changing due to the diffusion of pore pressure in the heterogeneous system. In contrast to the stress distributions in homogeneous media, irregular distributions of stresses and pore pressure are observed. Due to the change of material properties, shear stresses and nonuniform deformations are generated. The induced shear stresses in heterogeneous rock cause the initial horizontal principal stresses to rotate out of horizontal planes.

  18. Effect of Stress State on Fracture Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2018-02-01

    Present article comprehensively explores the influence of specimen thickness on the quantitative estimates of different ductile fractographic features in two dimensions, correlating tensile properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel tested under ambient temperature where the initial crystallographic texture, inclusion content, and their distribution are kept unaltered. It has been investigated that the changes in tensile fracture morphology of these steels are directly attributable to the resulting stress-state history under tension for given specimen dimensions.

  19. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether the condylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, the state of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, the co-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;an appropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function ofthe uninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, and complication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may cause long-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facial height, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great caution should be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture. PMID:22872830

  20. The cumulative effect of bisphosphonates and statins on stress fractures. Is it a failure of steroid biosynthesis? Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dzugan, Sergey S; Dzugan, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis related fractures pose a significant economic and healthcare problem. There is a growing concern about increased numbers of stress or low energy fractures after bisphosphonates therapy. A 65-year-old woman is presented with a stress fracture of the left femur. From our point of view, this fracture was associated with a long-term statin and bisphosphonate therapy. We did not find a similar presentation in medical literature.

  1. Comparative biomechanical evaluation of mono-cortical osteosynthesis systems for condylar fractures using photoelastic stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Panos; Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Alexandridis, Constantinos; Shetty, Vivek; Caputo, Angelo

    2012-10-01

    Fractures of the condyle account for 20-30% of all mandibular fractures, and are therefore one of the most common facial injuries. Precise evaluation of the mechanical stresses that develop in a fractured mandible is essential, particularly for the testing of systems currently used for stabilisation of the condylar fragment. Photoelastic stress analysis can be used to visualise alterations in the strain that is induced in the mandible by a fracture, and in the osteosynthesis materials used to stabilise it. This method, used on currently used osteosynthesis materials, showed that stabilisation of a subcondylar fracture with a single miniplate does not provide enough stability, whereas the use of two miniplates - properly positioned - offers sufficient stability in all loading conditions. A microplate may be used as a tension-resisting plate with equally good results. Copyright © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Information on stress conditions in the oceanic crust from oval fractures in a deep borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Oval images etched into the wall of a deep borehole were detected in DSDP Hole 504B, eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, from analysis of an acoustic televiewer log. A systematic inspection of these ovals has identified intriguing consistencies in appearance that cannot be explained satisfactorily by a random, coincidental distribution of pillow lavas. As an alternative hypothesis, Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is used to account for the generation and orientation of similarly curved, stress-induced fractures. Consequently, these oval features can be interpreted as fractures and related directly to stress conditions in the oceanic crust at this site. The azimuth of the oval center corresponds to the orientation of maximum horizontal principal stress (SH), and the oval width, which spans approximately 180?? of the borehole, is aligned with the azimuth of minimum horizontal principal stress (Sh). The oval height is controlled by the fracture angle and thus is a function of the coefficient of internal friction of the rock. -from Author

  3. Fundamental differences in axial and appendicular bone density in stress fractured and uninjured Royal Marine recruits--a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Davey, Trish; Lanham-New, Susan A; Shaw, Anneliese M; Cobley, Rosalyn; Allsopp, Adrian J; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Arnett, Timothy R; Taylor, Pat; Cooper, Cyrus; Fallowfield, Joanne L

    2015-04-01

    Stress fracture is a common overuse injury within military training, resulting in significant economic losses to the military worldwide. Studies to date have failed to fully identify the bone density and bone structural differences between stress fractured personnel and controls due to inadequate adjustment for key confounding factors; namely age, body size and physical fitness; and poor sample size. The aim of this study was to investigate bone differences between male Royal Marine recruits who suffered a stress fracture during the 32 weeks of training and uninjured control recruits, matched for age, body weight, height and aerobic fitness. A total of 1090 recruits were followed through training and 78 recruits suffered at least one stress fracture. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at the lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN) and whole body (WB) using Dual X-ray Absorptiometry in 62 matched pairs; tibial bone parameters were measured using peripheral Quantitative Computer Tomography in 51 matched pairs. Serum C-terminal peptide concentration was measured as a marker of bone resorption at baseline, week-15 and week-32. ANCOVA was used to determine differences between stress fractured recruits and controls. BMD at the LS, WB and FN sites was consistently lower in the stress fracture group (P<0.001). Structural differences between the stress fracture recruits and controls were evident in all slices of the tibia, with the most prominent differences seen at the 38% tibial slice. There was a negative correlation between the bone cross-sectional area and BMD at the 38% tibial slice. There was no difference in serum CTx concentration between stress fracture recruits and matched controls at any stage of training. These results show evidence of fundamental differences in bone mass and structure in stress fracture recruits, and provide useful data on bone risk factor profiles for stress fracture within a healthy military population. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published

  4. Fabrication and Probabilistic Fracture Strength Prediction of High-Aspect-Ratio Single Crystal Silicon Carbide Microspecimens With Stress Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Evans, Laura J.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Sharpe, William N., Jr.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Trapp, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Single crystal silicon carbide micro-sized tensile specimens were fabricated with deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) in order to investigate the effect of stress concentration on the room-temperature fracture strength. The fracture strength was defined as the level of stress at the highest stressed location in the structure at the instant of specimen rupture. Specimens with an elliptical hole, a circular hole, and without a hole (and hence with no stress concentration) were made. The average fracture strength of specimens with a higher stress concentration was larger than the average fracture strength of specimens with a lower stress concentration. Average strength of elliptical-hole, circular-hole, and without-hole specimens was 1.53, 1.26, and 0.66 GPa, respectively. Significant scatter in strength was observed with the Weibull modulus ranging between 2 and 6. No fractographic examination was performed but it was assumed that the strength controlling flaws originated from etching grooves along the specimen side-walls. The increase of observed fracture strength with increasing stress concentration was compared to predictions made with the Weibull stress-integral formulation by using the NASA CARES/Life code. In the analysis isotropic material and fracture behavior was assumed - hence it was not a completely rigorous analysis. However, even with these assumptions good correlation was achieved for the circular-hole specimen data when using the specimen data without stress concentration as a baseline. Strength was over predicted for the elliptical-hole specimen data. Significant specimen-to-specimen dimensional variation existed in the elliptical-hole specimens due to variations in the nickel mask used in the etching. To simulate the additional effect of the dimensional variability on the probabilistic strength response for the single crystal specimens the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) was used with CARES/Life.

  5. Do stress fractures induce hypertrophy of the grafted fibula? A report of three cases received free vascularized fibular graft treatment for tibial defects.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yong; Sun, Hong-Tao; Fan, Yue-Guang; Li, Fei-Meng; Lin, Zhou-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    The presence of large segmental defects of the diaphyseal bone is challenging for orthopedic surgeons. Free vascularized fibular grafting (FVFG) is considered to be a reliable reconstructive procedure. Stress fractures are a common complication following this surgery, and hypertrophy is the main physiological change of the grafted fibula. The exact mechanism of hypertrophy is not completely known. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have examined the possible relationship between stress fractures and hypertrophy. We herein report three cases of patients underwent FVFG. Two of them developed stress fractures and significant hypertrophy, while the remaining patient developed neither stress fractures nor significant hypertrophy. This phenomenon indicates that a relationship may exist between stress fractures and hypertrophy of the grafted fibula, specifically, that the presence of a stress fracture may initiate the process of hypertrophy.

  6. Two-View Gravity Stress Imaging Protocol for Nondisplaced Type II Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures: Introducing the Gravity Stress Cross-Table Lateral View.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C; Gervais, Samuel J

    Assessing ankle stability in nondisplaced Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation type II injuries requires stress imaging. Gravity stress mortise imaging is routinely used as an alternative to manual stress imaging to assess deltoid integrity with the goal of differentiating type II from type IV injuries in cases without a posterior or medial fracture. A type II injury with a nondisplaced fibula fracture is typically treated with cast immobilization, and a type IV injury is considered unstable and often requires operative repair. The present case series (two patients) highlights a standardized 2-view gravity stress imaging protocol and introduces the gravity stress cross-table lateral view. The gravity stress cross-table lateral view provides a more thorough evaluation of the posterior malleolus owing to the slight external rotation and posteriorly directed stress. External rotation also creates less bony overlap between the tibia and fibula, allowing for better visualization of the fibula fracture. Gravity stress imaging confirmed medial-sided injury in both cases, confirming the presence of supination external rotation type IV or bimalleolar equivalent fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed, and both patients achieved radiographic union. No further treatment was required at 21 and 33 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Weightbearing vs Gravity Stress Radiographs for Stability Evaluation of Supination-External Rotation Fractures of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Angela; Krause, Fabian; Weber, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Isolated lateral malleolar fractures may result from a supination-external rotation (SER) injury of the ankle. Stable fractures maintain tibiotalar congruence due to competent medial restraints and can be treated nonoperatively with excellent functional results and long-term prognosis. Stability might be assessed with either stress radiographs or weightbearing radiographs. A consecutive series of patients with closed SER fractures (presumed AO 44-B1) were prospectively enrolled from 2008 to 2015. Patients with clearly unstable fractures (medial clear space more than 7 mm) on the initial nonweightbearing radiograph were excluded and operated on. All other patients were examined with a gravity stress and a weightbearing anteroposterior radiograph. Borderline instability of the fracture was assumed when the medial clear space was 4 to 7 mm. Those were treated nonoperatively. Of 104 patients with isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type, 14 patients were treated operatively because of clear instability (displacement) on the initial radiographs. Of the nonoperative patients, 44 patients demonstrated borderline instability on the gravity stress but stability on the weightbearing radiograph ("gravity borderline"); the remaining 46 were stable in both tests ("gravity stable"). At an average follow-up of 23 months, no significant differences were seen in the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot score (92 points gravity-borderline group vs 93 points gravity-unstable group), the Foot Functional Index score (11 vs 10 points), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical component (86 vs 85 points), and SF-36 mental component (84 vs 81 points). Radiographically, all fractures had healed with anatomic congruity of the ankle. Weightbearing radiographs provided a reliable basis to decide about stability and nonoperative treatment in isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type with excellent clinical and radiographic outcome at short-term follow-up. Gravity

  8. HYDRAULIC FRACTURING IN PORUS AND NONPORUS ROCK AND ITS POTENTIAL FOR DETERMINING IN-SITU STRESSES AT GREAT DEPTH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The process of Hydraulic Fracturing as a method of determining in-situ stresses in brittle elastic formations at great depth is analyzed both...theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it is found that in attempting to relate the recorded hydraulic fracturing pressures to tectonic stresses...at great depth. The experimental results show that hydraulic fracturing occurred when the internal pressure achieved a critical value that could

  9. [Arthroscopy-guided fracture management. Ankle joint and calcaneus].

    PubMed

    Schoepp, C; Rixen, D

    2013-04-01

    Arthroscopic fracture management of the ankle and calcaneus requires a differentiated approach. The aim is to minimize surgical soft tissue damage and to visualize anatomical fracture reduction arthroscopically. Moreover, additional cartilage damage can be detected and treated. The arthroscopic approach is limited by deep impressions of the joint surface needing cancellous bone grafting, by multiple fracture lines on the articular side and by high-grade soft tissue damage. An alternative to the minimally invasive arthroscopic approach is open arthroscopic reduction in conventional osteosynthesis. This facilitates correct assessment of surgical reduction of complex calcaneal fractures, otherwise remaining non-anatomical reduction might not be fluoroscopically detected during surgery.

  10. Principles of pediatric mandibular fracture management.

    PubMed

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Izaddoost, Shayan; Hatef, Daniel A; Hollier, Larry

    2009-03-01

    Mandible fractures are commonplace in today's craniofacial practice; however, managing the infrequent, operative pediatric mandible injury requires a thorough knowledge base and thoughtful approach. Not only do these patients demonstrate variable anatomy due to differing stages of dental eruption, but condylar disruption may translate into long-term growth disturbance. In addition, patient immaturity often complicates cooperation, and both fixation strategies and postoperative planning must take this into account. As a supplement to the authors' video presentation, the present article focuses on repair of the symphyseal fracture and bilateral condylar injuries in the pediatric patient.

  11. Stress Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jones & Bartlett Publishers; 2014. Seaward BL. Managing Stress: Principles and Strategies for Health and Well-Being. 7th ed. Sudbury, Mass.: Jones & Bartlett Publishers; 2012. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Stress management. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  12. Females have a greater incidence of stress fractures than males in both military and athletic populations: a systemic review.

    PubMed

    Wentz, Laurel; Liu, Pei-Yang; Haymes, Emily; Ilich, Jasminka Z

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review incidence of stress fractures in military and athlete populations and identify factors explaining causes and differences in the incidence among genders. Searches were conducted using several major databases. The studies were included if they were original studies including both male and female subjects and their aim was to identify incidence rates and risk factors contributing to the development of stress fractures. Of several thousand studies, 11 focusing on military populations and 10 on athletes are discussed. In both populations, females had higher incidence of stress fractures, with incidence of approximately 3% and approximately 9.2% for males and females, respectively, in military populations and approximately 6.5% and approximately 9.7%, respectively, in athletes. Factors possibly explaining why females are more susceptible to stress fractures include bone anatomy, lower aerobic capacity, smaller muscle, and poor diet. However, both female recruits and athletes with normal weight and bone health are less likely to develop stress fractures, showing that gender is less important than the overall physical shape/condition.

  13. Ground reaction forces and bone parameters in females with tibial stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim; Crossley, Kay; Jayarajan, Jyotsna; Walton, Elizabeth; Warden, Stuart; Kiss, Z Stephen; Wrigley, Tim

    2004-03-01

    Tibial stress fracture is a common overuse running injury that results from the interplay of repetitive mechanical loading and bone strength. This research project aimed to determine whether female runners with a history of tibial stress fracture (TSF) differ in ground reaction force (GRF) parameters during running, regional bone density, and tibial bone geometry from those who have never sustained a stress fracture (NSF). Thirty-six female running athletes (13 TSF; 23 NSF) ranging in age from 18 to 44 yr were recruited for this cross-sectional study. The groups were well matched for demographic, training, and menstrual parameters. A force platform measured selected GRF parameters (peak and time to peak for vertical impact and active forces, and horizontal braking and propulsive forces) during overground running at 4.0 m.s.(-1). Lumbar spine, proximal femur, and distal tibial bone mineral density were assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Tibial bone geometry (cross-sectional dimensions and areas, and second moments of area) was calculated from a computerized tomography scan at the junction of the middle and distal thirds. There were no significant differences between the groups for any of the GRF, bone density, or tibial bone geometric parameters (P > 0.05). Both TSF and NSF subjects had bone density levels that were average or above average compared with a young adult reference range. Factor analysis followed by discriminant function analysis did not find any combinations of variables that differentiated between TSF and NSF groups. These findings do not support a role for GRF, bone density, or tibial bone geometry in the development of tibial stress fractures, suggesting that other risk factors were more important in this cohort of female runners.

  14. Integrated In Situ Stress Estimation by Hydraulic Fracturing, Borehole Observations and Numerical Analysis at the EXP-1 Borehole in Pohang, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hanna; Xie, Linmao; Min, Ki-Bok; Bae, Seongho; Stephansson, Ove

    2017-12-01

    It is desirable to combine the stress measurement data produced by different methods to obtain a more reliable estimation of in situ stress. We present a regional case study of integrated in situ stress estimation by hydraulic fracturing, observations of borehole breakouts and drilling-induced fractures, and numerical modeling of a 1 km-deep borehole (EXP-1) in Pohang, South Korea. Prior to measuring the stress, World Stress Map (WSM) and modern field data in the Korean Peninsula are used to construct a best estimate stress model in this area. Then, new stress data from hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations is added to determine magnitude and orientation of horizontal stresses. Minimum horizontal principal stress is estimated from the shut-in pressure of the hydraulic fracturing measurement at a depth of about 700 m. The horizontal stress ratios ( S Hmax/ S hmin) derived from hydraulic fracturing, borehole breakout, and drilling-induced fractures are 1.4, 1.2, and 1.1-1.4, respectively, and the average orientations of the maximum horizontal stresses derived by field methods are N138°E, N122°E, and N136°E, respectively. The results of hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations are integrated with a result of numerical modeling to produce a final rock stress model. The results of the integration give in situ stress ratios of 1.3/1.0/0.8 ( S Hmax/ S V/ S hmin) with an average azimuth of S Hmax in the orientation range of N130°E-N136°E. It is found that the orientation of S Hmax is deviated by more than 40° clockwise compared to directions reported for the WSM in southeastern Korean peninsula.

  15. Stress Management: Spirituality

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Taking the path less traveled by exploring your spirituality can lead to a clearer life purpose, better personal relationships and enhanced stress management skills. By Mayo Clinic Staff Some stress relief ...

  16. Diagnosis and Management of Common Foot Fractures.

    PubMed

    Bica, David; Sprouse, Ryan A; Armen, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Foot fractures are among the most common foot injuries evaluated by primary care physicians. They most often involve the metatarsals and toes. Patients typically present with varying signs and symptoms, the most common being pain and trouble with ambulation. Diagnosis requires radiographic evaluation, although emerging evidence demonstrates that ultrasonography may be just as accurate. Management is determined by the location of the fracture and its effect on balance and weight bearing. Metatarsal shaft fractures are initially treated with a posterior splint and avoidance of weight-bearing activities; subsequent treatment consists of a short leg walking cast or boot for four to six weeks. Proximal fifth metatarsal fractures have different treatments depending on the location of the fracture. A fifth metatarsal tuberosity avulsion fracture can be treated acutely with a compressive dressing, then the patient can be transitioned to a short leg walking boot for two weeks, with progressive mobility as tolerated after initial immobilization. A Jones fracture has a higher risk of nonunion and requires at least six to eight weeks in a short leg non-weight-bearing cast; healing time can be as long as 10 to 12 weeks. Great toe fractures are treated with a short leg walking boot or cast with toe plate for two to three weeks, then a rigid-sole shoe for an additional three to four weeks. Lesser toe fractures can be treated with buddy taping and a rigid-sole shoe for four to six weeks.

  17. Treatment of stress fracture of the olecranon in throwing athletes with internal fixation through a small incision

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The present study is a report of retrospective case series of stress fracture of the olecranon. Six patients presented posterior elbow pain in throwing in baseball and softball, but fracture was not diagnosed in radiographs. We detected stress fracture of the olecranon using computed tomographic (CT) scan and treated the patient with internal fixation with a headless cannulated double threaded screw through a small skin incision. All patients returned to competitive level without elbow complaints after the operation. When throwing athletes present with unusual posterior elbow pain and no significant findings on radiographs, a CT scan examination should be performed. We recommend surgical treatment of internal fixation with a screw through a small skin incision, as a good option for stress fracture of the olecranon in order to allow early return to sports activity in competitive athletes. PMID:23241173

  18. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Lorenz, J.C.

    This project was a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the Harvey E. Yates Company (Heyco), Roswell, NM, conducted under the auspices of Department of Energy's Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project applied Sandia perspectives on the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology for the stimulation and production of low permeability gas reservoirs to low permeability oil reservoirs, such as those typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Delaware Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report details the results and analyses obtained in 1990 from core, logs, stress, and other data taken from three additional development wells. An overallmore » summary gives results from all five wells studied in this project in 1989--1990. Most of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones.« less

  19. Predisposing Risk Factors and Stress Fractures in Division I Cross Country Runners.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Kaci L; Knight, Kathy B; Bass, Martha A; Valliant, Melinda W

    2017-11-11

    The purpose of this study was to explore factors associated with increased stress fractures in collegiate cross country runners. Participants in this study were 42 male and female cross country runners at a Division I university. Each athlete completed a questionnaire regarding smoking status, vitamin/mineral intake, previous stress fracture history, birth control usage, menstrual status, and demographic information. Nutritional assessment via a 3-day food record and measurements of whole body, lumbar spine, and hip bone mineral densities (BMD) were also conducted on each athlete. Results indicated that 40% of the female and 35% of the male runners reported a history of stress fracture, and that all of these did not meet the recommended daily energy intake or adequate intakes for calcium or Vitamin D required for their amount of training. Two-tailed t-test found statistically higher incidences of lumbar spine BMD in males and females whose daily calcium and Vitamin D intakes were below minimum requirements as well as for women whose caloric intake was below the required level. When data on the lumbar spine was evaluated, 31% of participants (31.8% of the male and 30% of the female runners) were identified as having osteopenia and 4.8% with osteoporosis. Results warrant a need for future longitudinal studies.

  20. Comprehensive approach to the management of the patient with multiple rib fractures: a review and introduction of a bundled rib fracture management protocol.

    PubMed

    Witt, Cordelie E; Bulger, Eileen M

    2017-01-01

    Rib fractures are common among patients sustaining blunt trauma, and are markers of severe bodily and solid organ injury. They are associated with high morbidity and mortality, including multiple pulmonary complications, and can lead to chronic pain and disability. Clinical and radiographic scoring systems have been developed at several institutions to predict risk of complications. Clinical strategies to reduce morbidity have been studied, including multimodal pain management, catheter-based analgesia, pulmonary hygiene, and operative stabilization. In this article, we review risk factors for morbidity and complications, intervention strategies, and discuss experience with bundled clinical pathways for rib fractures. In addition, we introduce the multidisciplinary rib fracture management protocol used at our level I trauma center.

  1. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach.

    PubMed

    Yassa, Rafik; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Hujazi, Ihab; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Dunkow, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context of hip fractures.The aim of this study was to evaluate the management protocols available in the current literature for the commonly encountered coagulopathy-inducing agents.We reviewed the current literature, identified the reversal agents used in coagulopathy management and assessed the evidence to determine the optimal timing, doses and routes of administration.Warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKA) can be reversed effectively using vitamin K with a dose in the range of 2 mg to 10 mg intravenously to correct coagulopathy.The role of fresh frozen plasma is not clear from the current evidence while prothrombin complex remains a reliable and safe method for immediate reversal of VKA-induced coagulopathy in hip fracture surgery or failed vitamin K treatment reversal.The literature suggests that surgery should not be delayed in patients on classical antiplatelet medications (aspirin or clopidogrel), but spinal or regional anaesthetic methods should be avoided for the latter. However, evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:394-402. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160083.

  2. Stress Management: Yoga

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Is yoga right for you? It is if you want to fight stress, get fit and stay healthy. By ... particular, may be a good choice for stress management. Hatha is one of the most common styles ...

  3. Plate Versus Intramedullary Nail Fixation of Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Markolf, Keith L; Cheung, Edward; Joshi, Nirav B; Boguszewski, Daniel V; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2016-06-01

    Anterior midtibial stress fractures are an important clinical problem for patients engaged in high-intensity military activities or athletic training activities. When nonoperative treatment has failed, intramedullary (IM) nail and plate fixation are 2 surgical options used to arrest the progression of a fatigue fracture and allow bone healing. A plate will be more effective than an IM nail in preventing the opening of a simulated anterior midtibial stress fracture from tibial bending. Controlled laboratory study. Fresh-frozen human tibias were loaded by applying a pure bending moment in the sagittal plane. Thin transverse saw cuts, 50% and 75% of the depth of the anterior tibial cortex, were created at the midtibia to simulate a fatigue fracture. An extensometer spanning the defect was used to measure the fracture opening displacement (FOD) before and after the application of IM nail and plate fixation constructs. IM nails were tested without locking screws, with a proximal screw only, and with proximal and distal screws. Plates were tested with unlocked bicortical screws (standard compression plate) and locked bicortical screws; both plate constructs were tested with the plate edge placed 1 mm from the anterior tibial crest (anterior location) and 5 mm posterior to the crest. For the 75% saw cut depth, the mean FOD values for all IM nail constructs were 13% to 17% less than those for the saw cut alone; the use of locking screws had no significant effect on the FOD. The mean FOD values for all plate constructs were significantly less than those for all IM nail constructs. The mean FOD values for all plates were 28% to 46% less than those for the saw cut alone. Anterior plate placement significantly decreased mean FOD values for both compression and locked plate constructs, but the mean percentage reductions for locked and unlocked plates were not significantly different from each other for either plate placement. The percentage FOD reductions for all plate

  4. Estimation of In Situ Stresses with Hydro-Fracturing Tests and a Statistical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hikweon; Ong, See Hong

    2018-03-01

    At great depths, where borehole-based field stress measurements such as hydraulic fracturing are challenging due to difficult downhole conditions or prohibitive costs, in situ stresses can be indirectly estimated using wellbore failures such as borehole breakouts and/or drilling-induced tensile failures detected by an image log. As part of such efforts, a statistical method has been developed in which borehole breakouts detected on an image log are used for this purpose (Song et al. in Proceedings on the 7th international symposium on in situ rock stress, 2016; Song and Chang in J Geophys Res Solid Earth 122:4033-4052, 2017). The method employs a grid-searching algorithm in which the least and maximum horizontal principal stresses ( S h and S H) are varied, and the corresponding simulated depth-related breakout width distribution as a function of the breakout angle ( θ B = 90° - half of breakout width) is compared to that observed along the borehole to determine a set of S h and S H having the lowest misfit between them. An important advantage of the method is that S h and S H can be estimated simultaneously in vertical wells. To validate the statistical approach, the method is applied to a vertical hole where a set of field hydraulic fracturing tests have been carried out. The stress estimations using the proposed method were found to be in good agreement with the results interpreted from the hydraulic fracturing test measurements.

  5. Proximal Humerus Fractures: Evaluation and Management in the Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal humerus fractures are common in the elderly. The evaluation and management of these injuries is often controversial. The purpose of this study is to review recent evidence and provide updated recommendations for treating proximal humerus fractures in the elderly. Methods: A literature review of peer-reviewed publications related to the evaluation and management of proximal humerus fractures in the elderly was performed. There was a focus on randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews published within the last 5 years. Results: The incidence of proximal humerus fractures is increasing. It is a common osteoporotic fracture. Bone density is a predictor of reduction quality and can be readily assessed with anteroposterior views of the shoulder. Social independence is a predictor of outcome, whereas age is not. Many fractures are minimally displaced and respond acceptably to nonoperative management. Displaced and severe fractures are most frequently treated operatively with intramedullary nails, locking plates, percutaneous techniques, or arthroplasty. Discussion: Evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews is insufficient to recommend a treatment; however, most techniques have acceptable or good outcomes. Evaluation should include an assessment of the patient’s bone quality, social independence, and surgical risk factors. With internal fixation, special attention should be paid to medial comminution, varus angulation, and restoration of the calcar. With arthroplasty, attention should be paid to anatomic restoration of the tuberosities and proper placement of the prosthesis. Conclusion: A majority of minimally displaced fractures can be treated conservatively with early physical therapy. Treatment for displaced fractures should consider the patient’s level of independence, bone quality, and surgical risk factors. Fixation with percutaneous techniques, intramedullary nails, locking plates, and arthroplasty are all

  6. Management of penile fracture and its outcome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zafar Iqbal

    2013-11-01

    To describe the management and outcome of patients with penile fracture. Case series. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, from March 2008 to March 2011. Sixteen patients presenting with clinical findings / history of penile fracture were included in this study. Diagnosis was made on the basis of history and clinical findings. Surgical exploration and repair was done on the same day. In all patients, a subcoronal circumferential degloving incision was made. Rent location and dimensions management and postoperative complication were noted. Postoperatively, erection was suppressed for 4 - 5 days. All patients were discharged with advice of avoidance of sex for about 8 weeks. Patients were followed-upto 6 months. Majority of the patients (87.5%) were married and 13 (81.25%) were aged 18 - 45 years. The typical findings recorded in 100.0% patients were erection at time of fracture, detumescence, swelling and ecchymosis. Audible crackling sound and pain was present in 13 (81.25%) patients. Ten (62.5%) patients had rent in the proximal part of penile shaft and right lateral tear was present in 11 (68.75%) patients. Blood clots were evacuated and closure of rent was done with vicryl 2/0 (interrupted stitches). 100.0% patients had uneventful recovery with only 3 (18.75%) patients developed right chordae of erect penis after treatment. All (100.0%) patients were potent and without any problem of erection. Penile fracture is under-reported. A trauma to erect penis is essential to cause fracture. Surgical exploration and repair is the treatment of choice.

  7. Bone Geometry as a Predictor of Tissue Fragility and Stress Fracture Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    eferences ........................................................................ 11 A ppendices ...School of Medicine, New York NY Stress fractures occur among persons with normal bones, no acute injury, and are most common among elite runners and

  8. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperaturemore » (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  9. Proximal tibia stress fracture with Osteoarthritis of knee − Radiological and functional analysis of one stage TKA with long stem

    PubMed Central

    Soundarrajan, Dhanasekaran; Rajkumar, Natesan; Dhanasekararaja, Palanisamy; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal tibia stress fractures with knee osteoarthritis pose a challenging situation. We evaluated the radiological and functional outcome of one-stage total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and long stem for patients with varied grades of knee arthritis and proximal tibia stress fractures.  Methods: We analysed 20 patients from April 2012 to March 2017 with proximal tibia stress fractures associated with knee osteoarthritis of varied grades. Out of 20 patients, five were acute fresh fractures. The mean age was 64 years (range, 52–78) which includes three men and 17 women. Previous surgery in the same limb, rheumatoid arthritis, valgus deformity were excluded. All patients were treated with posterior stabilised TKA with long stem, of which, four patients had screw augmentation for medial tibial bone defect and two patients with malunited fracture at stress fracture site required osteotomy, plating and bone grafting. Two patients had two level stress fracture of tibia in the same leg. Results: The mean follow-up period was 28 (range, 6–60) months. The mean tibiofemoral angle improved from 18.27° varus to 1.8° valgus. The mean knee society score improved from 21.9 (range, −10 to 45) to 82.8 (range, 15–99) [p < 0.05]. The mean Knee Society functional score improved from 15.5 (range, −10 to 40) to 76.8 (range, 10–100) [p < 0.05]. All fractures got united at the last follow-up. One patient had infection and wound dehiscence at six months for which debridement done and had poor functional outcome. Conclusion: TKA with long stem gives excellent outcome, irrespective of severity of arthritis associated with stress fracture. By restoring limb alignment and bypassing the fracture site, it facilitates fracture healing. Early detection and prompt intervention is necessary to prevent the progression to recalcitrant non-union or malunion. PMID:29667926

  10. Stability-based classification for ankle fracture management and the syndesmosis injury in ankle fractures due to a supination external rotation mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Harri

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this thesis was to confirm the utility of stability-based ankle fracture classification in choosing between non-operative and operative treatment of ankle fractures, to determine how many ankle fractures are amenable to non-operative treatment, to assess the roles of the exploration and anatomical repair of the AITFL in the outcome of patients with SER ankle fractures, to establish the sensitivities, specificities and interobserver reliabilities of the hook and intraoperative stress tests for diagnosing syndesmosis instability in SER ankle fractures, and to determine whether transfixation of unstable syndesmosis is necessary in SER ankle fractures. The utility of stability based fracture classification to choose between non-operative and operative treatment was assessed in a retrospective study (1) of 253 ankle fractures in skeletally mature patients, 160 of whom were included in the study to obtain an epidemiological profile in a population of 130,000. Outcome was assessed after a minimum follow-up of two years. The role of AITFL repairs was assessed in a retrospective study (2) of 288 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures; the AITFL was explored and repaired in one group (n=165), and a similar operative method was used but the AITFL was not explored in another group (n=123). Outcome was measured with a minimum follow-up of two years. Interobserver reliability of clinical syndesomosis tests (study 3) and the role of syndesmosis transfixation (study 4) were assessed in a prospective study of 140 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures. The stability of the distal tibiofibular joint was evaluated by the hook and ER stress tests. Clinical tests were carried out by the main surgeon and assistant, separately, after which a 7.5-Nm standardized ER stress test for both ankles was performed; if it was positive, the patient was randomized to either syndesmosis transfixation (13 patients) or no fixation (11 patients) treatment groups. The

  11. Return to sports after ankle fractures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Del Buono, Angelo; Smith, Rebecca; Coco, Manuela; Woolley, Laurence; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to provide information on the time athletes will take to resume sports activity following ankle fractures. We systematically searched Medline (PubMED), EMBASE, CINHAL, Cochrane, Sports Discus and Google scholar databases using the combined keywords 'ankle fractures', 'ankle injuries', 'athletes', 'sports', 'return to sport', 'recovery', 'operative fixation', 'pinning', 'return to activity' to identify articles published in English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and Italian. Seven retrospective studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Of the 793 patients, 469 (59%) were males and 324 (41%) were females, and of the 356 ankle fractures we obtained information on, 338 were acute and 18 stress fractures. The general principles were to undertake open reduction and internal fixation of acute fractures, and manage stress fractures conservatively unless a thin fracture line was visible on radiographs. The best timing to return to sports after an acute ankle fracture is still undefined, given the heterogeneity of the outcome measures and results. The time to return to sports after an acute stress injury ranged from 3 to 51 weeks. When facing athletes with ankle fractures, associated injuries have to be assessed and addressed to improve current treatment lines and satisfy future expectancies. The best timing to return to sports after an ankle fracture has not been established yet. The ideas of the return to activity parameter and surgeon databases including sports-related information could induce research to progress.

  12. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials. [stress analysis in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics in aircraft design and in the study of fatigue crack propagation in aircraft structures are discussed. NASA-Langley research to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to predict the maximum load that can be carried by a cracked part and to deal with aircraft design problems are reported. Achievements include: (1) improved stress intensity solutions for laboratory specimens; (2) fracture criterion for practical materials; (3) crack propagation predictions that account for mean stress and high maximum stress effects; (4) crack propagation predictions for variable amplitude loading; and (5) the prediction of crack growth and residual stress in built-up structural assemblies. These capabilities are incorporated into a first generation computerized analysis that allows for damage tolerance and tradeoffs with other disciplines to produce efficient designs that meet current airworthiness requirements.

  13. Stress Memory in Fluid-Filled Fractures - Insights From Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dura-Gomez, I.; Talwani, P.

    2007-05-01

    Detailed studies of reservoir and injection induced seismicity provide an opportunity to study the characteristics of the fractures associated with fluid-induced seismicity. In 1996, we noted that the first three series of earthquakes with M greater or equal than 5.0 in the vicinity of the Koyna reservoir, occurred only when the reservoir levels had exceeded the previous maxima. In subsequent years, three more similar episodes were noted in the vicinity of the Koyna and the nearby Warna reservoir, without a single repetition in the epicentral location. This behavior was similar to Kaiser effect observed in the laboratory. A similar behavior has been observed in many cases of injection induced seismicity. At the Denver arsenal well in the 1960s and the Soultz, France, hot rock site in the 1990s, among others, seismicity only occurred when the differential pressure, (downhole well borehole pressure excess over the ambient natural pressure) reached a threshold value. These threshold values differed for different wells and depths. The seismicity stopped when the differential pressure was lowered below the threshold value. These observations show that the stress memory (associated with Kaiser effect) observed in the laboratory with small samples, is also displayed in nature where the volume of rocks is from hundreds to thousands of cu.km. The fluid-filled seismogenic fractures near the reservoirs and bore wells, associated with fluid-induced seismicity, seems to behave like a finely tuned, sensitive system that "remember" the largest stress perturbation they have been subjected to. Here we present these observations of stress memory in fluid-filled fractures associated with induced seismicity and suggest possible causes.

  14. The Diagnosis, Management and Complications Associated with Fractures of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    J.R, Barnett; MA, Ahmad; W, Khan; A., O’ Gorman

    2017-01-01

    Fractures of the talus are uncommon injuries that can have devastating consequences. The blood supply to the talus is tenuous and injuries are associated with a higher incidence of avascular necrosis and malunion. Talar neck fractures are the most common fractures. This review looks at the different types of fractures of the talus, particularly focusing on talar neck fractures. The diagnosis and management are discussed as well as the complications. PMID:28694883

  15. An integrated workflow for stress and flow modelling using outcrop-derived discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdom, K.; Nick, H. M.; Bertotti, G.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is often controlled by subseismic-scale fracture networks. Although the fracture network can be partly sampled in the direct vicinity of wells, the inter-well scale network is poorly constrained in fractured reservoir models. Outcrop analogues can provide data for populating domains of the reservoir model where no direct measurements are available. However, extracting relevant statistics from large outcrops representative of inter-well scale fracture networks remains challenging. Recent advances in outcrop imaging provide high-resolution datasets that can cover areas of several hundred by several hundred meters, i.e. the domain between adjacent wells, but even then, data from the high-resolution models is often upscaled to reservoir flow grids, resulting in loss of accuracy. We present a workflow that uses photorealistic georeferenced outcrop models to construct geomechanical and fluid flow models containing thousands of discrete fractures covering sufficiently large areas, that does not require upscaling to model permeability. This workflow seamlessly integrates geomechanical Finite Element models with flow models that take into account stress-sensitive fracture permeability and matrix flow to determine the full permeability tensor. The applicability of this workflow is illustrated using an outcropping carbonate pavement in the Potiguar basin in Brazil, from which 1082 fractures are digitised. The permeability tensor for a range of matrix permeabilities shows that conventional upscaling to effective grid properties leads to potential underestimation of the true permeability and the orientation of principal permeabilities. The presented workflow yields the full permeability tensor model of discrete fracture networks with stress-induced apertures, instead of relying on effective properties as most conventional flow models do.

  16. Management of patellar fracture with titanium cable cerclage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Li; Xue, Jian-Li; Gao, Zong-Qiang; Lan, Bin-Shang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Early rehabilitation after surgery for patellar fracture is challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcome of titanium cable cerclage for patellar fracture in early functional activity. We reviewed a series of 24 patients treated at our hospital with titanium cable. Functional exercises were started early. Patients were followed up for at least 12 months. Fifteen were males and 9 were females. Fracture occurred in the right knee in 13 patients and in the left knee in 11 patients. The most common mode of injury involves a tumble. None of the patients presented with any postoperative complications. The management resulted in satisfactory outcomes. Titanium cable cerclage offers a new strategy in treating patellar fracture. PMID:29095314

  17. Effectiveness of various isometric exercises at improving bone strength in cortical regions prone to distal tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Florio, C S

    2018-06-01

    A computational model was used to compare the local bone strengthening effectiveness of various isometric exercises that may reduce the likelihood of distal tibial stress fractures. The developed model predicts local endosteal and periosteal cortical accretion and resorption based on relative local and global measures of the tibial stress state and its surface variation. Using a multisegment 3-dimensional leg model, tibia shape adaptations due to 33 combinations of hip, knee, and ankle joint angles and the direction of a single or sequential series of generated isometric resultant forces were predicted. The maximum stress at a common fracture-prone region in each optimized geometry was compared under likely stress fracture-inducing midstance jogging conditions. No direct correlations were found between stress reductions over an initially uniform circular hollow cylindrical geometry under these critical design conditions and the exercise-based sets of active muscles, joint angles, or individual muscle force and local stress magnitudes. Additionally, typically favorable increases in cross-sectional geometric measures did not guarantee stress decreases at these locations. Instead, tibial stress distributions under the exercise conditions best predicted strengthening ability. Exercises producing larger anterior distal stresses created optimized tibia shapes that better resisted the high midstance jogging bending stresses. Bent leg configurations generating anteriorly directed or inferiorly directed resultant forces created favorable adaptations. None of the studied loads produced by a straight leg was significantly advantageous. These predictions and the insight gained can provide preliminary guidance in the screening and development of targeted bone strengthening techniques for those susceptible to distal tibial stress fractures. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers

    PubMed Central

    Albisetti, Walter; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2009-01-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients’ activities and a return to dancing without pain. PMID:19415273

  19. Geriatric hip fracture management: keys to providing a successful program.

    PubMed

    Basu, N; Natour, M; Mounasamy, V; Kates, S L

    2016-10-01

    Hip fractures are a common event in older adults and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality and costs. This review examines the necessary elements required to implement a successful geriatric fracture program and identifies some of the barriers faced when implementing a successful program. The Geriatric Fracture Center (GFC) is a treatment model that standardizes the approach to the geriatric fracture patient. It is based on five principles: surgical fracture management; early operative intervention; medical co-management with geriatricians; patient-centered, standard order sets to employ best practices; and early discharge planning with a focus on early functional rehabilitation. Implementing a geriatric fracture program begins with an assessment of the hospital's data on hip fractures and standard care metrics such as length of stay, complications, time to surgery, readmission rates and costs. Business planning is essential along with the medical planning process. To successfully develop and implement such a program, strong physician leadership is necessary to articulate both a short- and long-term plan for implementation. Good communication is essential-those organizing a geriatric fracture program must be able to implement standardized plans of care working with all members of the healthcare team and must also be able to foster relationships both within the hospital and with other institutions in the community. Finally, a program of continual quality improvement must be undertaken to ensure that performance outcomes are improving patient care.

  20. The Role of Active Fractures on Borehole Breakout Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, D.; Kohl, T.; Schoenball, M.; Müller, B.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of georeservoirs are strongly related to the stress field and their interpretation is a major target in geotechnical management. Borehole breakouts are direct indicators of the stress field as they develop due to the concentration of the highest compressional stress toward the minimum horizontal stress direction. However, the interaction with fractures might create local perturbations. Such weakened zones are often observed by localized anomalies of the borehole breakout orientation. We examined high-quality acoustic borehole televiewer (UBI) logs run in the entire granite sections at the deep well GPK4 at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. The borehole is moderately inclined (15° - 35°) in its middle section. Detailed analysis of 1221 borehole elongation pairs in the vicinity of 1871 natural fractures observed in GPK4 well is used to infer the role of fractures on the borehole breakouts shape and orientation. Patterns of borehole breakout orientation in the vicinity of active fractures suggest that the wavelength of the borehole breakout orientation anomalies in this granite rock depend on the scale of the fracture while the rotation amplitude and direction is strongly influenced by the fracture orientation. In the upper and middle part of the well even a linear trend between fracture and breakout orientations could be established. In addition to the rotation, breakouts typically are found to be asymmetrically formed in zones of high fracture density. We find that major faults tend to create a systematic rotation of borehole breakout orientation with long spatial wavelength while abrupt changes are often observed around small fractures. The finding suggest that the borehole breakout heterogeneities are not merely governed by the principal stress heterogeneities, but that the effect of mechanical heterogeneities like elastic moduli changes, rock strength anisotropy and fracturing must be taken into account. Thus, one has to be careful to infer the

  1. Hydraulic fracturing stress measurement in underground salt rock mines at Upper Kama Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsova, EV; Skulkin, AA

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports the experimental results on hydraulic fracturing in-situ stress measurements in potash mines of Uralkali. The selected HF procedure, as well as locations and designs of measuring points are substantiated. From the evidence of 78 HF stress measurement tests at eight measuring points, it has been found that the in-situ stress field is nonequicomponent, with the vertical stresses having value close to the estimates obtained with respect to the overlying rock weight while the horizontal stresses exceed the gravity stresses by 2–3 times.

  2. Evolution of stress and strain during 3D folding: application to orthogonal fracture systems in folded turbidites, SW Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, J. E.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Lechmann, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    We present field data and numerical modeling results which show the evolution of stress and strain patterns during 3D folding resulting in an orthogonal fracture system. The field area is located near Almograve, SW Portugal. The area is part of the Mira Formation which itself is part of the South Portuguese Zone (SPZ). The structural development of the SPZ is characterized by southwest vergent folding and thrust displacement. The metamorphism in the SPZ increases from diagenetic conditions in the southwest to greenschist-facies conditions to the northeast. The Mira Formation is composed of turbiditic layers of Carboniferous age with low sandstone to shale ratio. The data was gathered at three outcrops which show structures similar to chocolate tablet structures in the folded sandstone layers. Chocolate tablet structures are generated under simultaneous extension in two directions and show two fracture systems of the same age which are perpendicular to each other. However, the Mira Formation is located in a convergent area. Also, the outcrops near Almograve show two fracture systems of different age. The fractures orthogonal to the fold axis and the bedding are crosscut by fractures parallel to the fold axis and orthogonal to the bedding. Our hypothesis for the evolution of the observed fracture systems is as follows; the older fractures which are now orthogonal to the fold axis and to the bedding plane were generated during compression while the layers were still approximately horizontal. They are parallel to σ1(i.e. mode 1 fractures). The second and younger fracture family was generated in a phase where there is local extension in the fold limbs. These fractures are orthogonal to the far-field σ1, parallel to the fold axis and perpendicular to the bedding. The shortening direction is constant during the entire folding process. We test our hypothesis with numerical modeling. We use 2D and 3D finite element codes with a mixed formulation for incompressible flow

  3. Current Management of Penile Fracture: An Up-to-Date Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Garaffa, Giulio; Castiglione, Fabio; Ralph, David J

    2018-04-01

    Because of the low incidence of penile fracture, many aspects of the diagnostic process and of the surgical and functional outcomes are rarely reported. To systematically review the current literature on the surgical management of penile fracture, focusing on etiology, diagnosis, functional outcomes, and postoperative complications. The present review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) declaration standards for systematic reviews. A systematic search for the terms penile fracture, fracture of penis, trauma of penis, rupture of corpora cavernosa, and immediate management of penile fracture was been carried out in the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, SCOPUS, and Science Citation Index databases. Etiology of penile fracture, clinical presentation, types of radiologic investigations and their accuracy, surgical approach, suture material used for tunica repair, timing of surgical exploration, intraoperative findings, surgical complications, and functional outcomes. The total number of patients analyzed was 438, and the patients' an average age was 36 years. The most frequent reported cause of penile fracture was sexual intercourse (80% of cases). The most common finding at examination was a penile hematoma (97.5%). Although operator dependent, in experienced hands, ultrasonography was found to be a useful tool in confirming the location of the albuginea tear and identifying the presence of any concomitant urethral injury, helping the surgeon to choose the best surgical approach. Early surgical repair of a penile fracture was found to be a safe procedure, although long-term complications are not uncommon. Tertiary referral centers that managed a larger number of cases seemed to obtain more satisfactory long-term results with a significantly smaller number of complications. A low incidence of postoperative complications and full satisfactory functional outcomes are reported when early repair is

  4. Tibial plateau fracture following gracilis-semitendinosus anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: The tibial tunnel stress-riser.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, R O; Cohen, D; Barton-Hanson, N

    2006-06-01

    Tibial plateau fractures following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are extremely rare. This is the first reported case of a tibial plateau fracture following four-strand gracilis-semitendinosus autograft ACL reconstruction. The tibial tunnel alone may behave as a stress riser which can significantly reduce bone strength.

  5. Nutritional factors that influence change in bone density and stress fracture risk among young female cross-country runners.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W; Melsop, Kathryn; Curtis, Meredith; Kelsey, Jennifer L; Bachrach, Laura K; Greendale, Gail; Sowers, Mary Fran; Sainani, Kristin L

    2010-08-01

    To identify nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns associated with stress fracture risk and changes in bone density among young female distance runners. Two-year, prospective cohort study. Observational data were collected in the course of a multicenter randomized trial of the effect of oral contraceptives on bone health. One hundred and twenty-five female competitive distance runners ages 18-26 years. Dietary variables were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Bone mineral density and content (BMD/BMC) of the spine, hip, and total body were measured annually by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Stress fractures were recorded on monthly calendars, and had to be confirmed by radiograph, bone scan, or magnetic resonance imaging. Seventeen participants had at least one stress fracture during follow-up. Higher intakes of calcium, skim milk, and dairy products were associated with lower rates of stress fracture. Each additional cup of skim milk consumed per day was associated with a 62% reduction in stress fracture incidence (P < .05); and a dietary pattern of high dairy and low fat intake was associated with a 68% reduction (P < .05). Higher intakes of skim milk, dairy foods, calcium, animal protein, and potassium were associated with significant (P < .05) gains in whole-body BMD and BMC. Higher intakes of calcium, vitamin D, skim milk, dairy foods, potassium, and a dietary pattern of high dairy and low fat were associated with significant gains in hip BMD. In young female runners, low-fat dairy products and the major nutrients in milk (calcium, vitamin D, and protein) were associated with greater bone gains and a lower stress fracture rate. Potassium intake was also associated with greater gains in hip and whole-body BMD. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of concentrated bone marrow aspirate in operative treatment of fifth metatarsal stress fractures; a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Weel, Hanneke; Mallee, Wouter H; van Dijk, C Niek; Blankevoort, Leendert; Goedegebuure, Simon; Goslings, J Carel; Kennedy, John G; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2015-08-20

    Fifth metatarsal (MT-V) stress fractures often exhibit delayed union and are high-risk fractures for non-union. Surgical treatment, currently considered as the gold standard, does not give optimal results, with a mean time to fracture union of 12-18 weeks. In recent studies, the use of bone marrow cells has been introduced to accelerate healing of fractures with union problems. The aim of this randomized trial is to determine if operative treatment of MT-V stress fractures with use of concentrated blood and bone marrow aspirate (cB + cBMA) is more effective than surgery alone. We hypothesize that using cB + cBMA in the operative treatment of MT-V stress fractures will lead to an earlier fracture union. A prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted in an academic medical center in the Netherlands. Ethics approval is received. 50 patients will be randomized to either operative treatment with cB + cBMA, harvested from the iliac crest, or operative treatment without cB + cBMA but with a sham-treatment of the iliac crest. The fracture fixation is the same in both groups, as is the post-operative care.. Follow up will be one year. The primary outcome measure is time to union in weeks on X-ray. Secondary outcome measures are time to resumption of work and sports, functional outcomes (SF-36, FAOS, FAAM), complication rate, composition of osteoprogenitors in cB + cBMA and cost-effectiveness. Furthermore, a bone biopsy is taken from every stress fracture and analysed histologically to determine the stage of the stress fracture. The difference in primary endpoint between the two groups is analysed using student's t-test or equivalent. This trial will likely provide level-I evidence on the effectiveness of cB + cBMA in the operative treatment of MT-V stress fractures. Netherlands Trial Register (reg.nr NTR4377 ).

  7. Hydraulic fracture orientation and production/injection induced reservoir stress changes in diatomite waterfloods

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.A.; Conant, R.A.; Golich, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes the (preliminary) findings from extensive field studies of hydraulic fracture orientation in diatomite waterfloods and related efforts to monitor the induced surface subsidence. Included are case studies from the Belridge and Lost Hills diatomite reservoirs. The primary purpose of the paper is to document a large volume of tiltmeter hydraulic fracture orientation data that demonstrates waterflood-induced fracture reorientation--a phenomenon not previously considered in waterflood development planning. Also included is a brief overview of three possible mechanisms for the observed waterflood fracture reorientation. A discussion section details efforts to isolate the operative mechanism(s) from the most extensive casemore » study, as well as suggesting a possible strategy for detecting and possibly mitigating some of the adverse effects of production/injection induced reservoir stress changes--reservoir compaction and surface subsidence as well as fracture reorientation.« less

  8. Managing type II and type IV Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation ankle fractures: current orthopaedic practice.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, D D; Mahadevan, D; Chandrasenan, J; Pugh, H

    2010-11-01

    Differentiating supination external rotation (SER) type II and IV ankle injuries is challenging in the absence of a medial malleolar fracture or talar shift on radiographs. The accurate differentiation between a stable SER-II from an unstable SER-IV injury would allow implementation of the appropriate management plan from diagnosis. The aim of this study was to ascertain the practice of orthopaedic surgeons in dealing with these injuries. A postal survey was undertaken on 216 orthopaedic consultants from three regions. In the presence of medial-sided clinical signs (tenderness, swelling, ecchymosis), 22% of consultants would perform surgical fixation. 53% would choose non-operative treatment and the majority would monitor these fractures through serial radiographs. The remaining 25% of consultants would perform an examination under anaesthesia (EUA; 15%), request stress radiographs (9%) or an MRI scan (1%). Without medial-sided signs, 85% would advocate non-operative treatment and, of these, 74% would perform weekly radiographs. Interestingly, 6% would perform immediate surgical fixation. Stress radiographs (6%) and EUAs (2%) were advocated in the remaining group of consultants. Foot and ankle surgeons utilised stress radiographs more frequently and were more likely to proceed to surgical fixation should talar shift be demonstrated. Clinical practice is varied amongst the orthopaedic community. This may lead to unnecessary surgery in SER-II injuries and delay in diagnosis and operative management of SER-IV injuries. We have highlighted the various investigative modalities available that may be used in conjunction with clinical signs to make a more accurate diagnosis.

  9. Impact of Injury Mechanisms on Patterns and Management of Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, S Travis; Adkinson, Joshua M; Garza, Ramon; Gilstrap, Jarom; Miller, Nathan F; Eid, Sherrine M; Murphy, Robert X

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms causing facial fractures have evolved over time and may be predictive of the types of injuries sustained. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanisms of injury on the type and management of facial fractures at our Level 1 Trauma Center. The authors performed an Institutional Review Board-approved review of our network's trauma registry from 2006 to 2010, documenting age, sex, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, facial fracture patterns (nasal, maxillary/malar, orbital, mandible), and reconstructions. Mechanism rates were compared using a Pearson χ2 test. The database identified 23,318 patients, including 1686 patients with facial fractures and a subset of 1505 patients sustaining 2094 fractures by motor vehicle collision (MVC), fall, or assault. Nasal fractures were the most common injuries sustained by all mechanisms. MVCs were most likely to cause nasal and malar/maxillary fractures (P < 0.01). Falls were the least likely and assaults the most likely to cause mandible fractures (P < 0.001), the most common injury leading to surgical intervention (P < 0.001). Although not statistically significant, fractures sustained in MVCs were the most likely overall to undergo surgical intervention. Age, number of fractures, and alcohol level were statistically significant variables associated with operative management. Age and number of fractures sustained were associated with operative intervention. Although there is a statistically significant correlation between mechanism of injury and type of facial fracture sustained, none of the mechanisms evaluated herein are statistically associated with surgical intervention. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, III.

  10. Worksite Stress Management Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivancevich, John M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents a framework used for viewing stress and organizational stress interventions. Reviews the stress management intervention literature in the context of this framework. Provides examples of corporations committed to stress management programs. Identifies future needs appropriate for organizational psychologists to address. (Author/JS)

  11. Effect of Crack Tip Stress Concentration Factor on Fracture Resistance in Vacuum Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-20

    indicate: (1) in all alloys, the fracture resistance is highest for blunt-notches (smaller Kt), and is lowest for fatigue -sharpened precracked...paths are transgranular and the fracture mode is ductile void coalescence in all cases, irrespective of the stress concentration factor. 20-01-2015...because of corrosion and/or various loading conditions such as fatigue , fretting, abrasion, etc. Also, the geometry of the structure may cause an

  12. [Stable ankle joint fractures. Indication for surgical or conservative management?].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Schulze, W; Muhr, G

    1999-06-01

    In German literature, ankle joint fractures are mostly classified in three groups according to Weber. In cases of the type A, the fracture line runs below, in cases of type B at height of the syndesmotic ligaments. C-type fractures are typically seen above this region. However, this practical and simple classification allows no inferences at accompanying injuries which in turn influence the functional outcome. We observed isolated fractures of the lateral malleolus in more than 60% of all type B-fractures, as soon as in the majority the type A-fractures. Since isolated medial ankle fractures occur very rarely, careful exclusion of further injuries is advisable here. In order to differentiate stable ones from unstable type B ankle injuries, we carry out a manual stress test, if there is less than 2 mm fracture dislocation and a congruent ankle mortise. In this manner we could find that stable lateral ankle fractures are characterized with a combination of an intact dorsal syndesmotic and medial ligament. Stable type B and undisplaced type A fractures were treated conservatively with an ankle brace (Aircast?). Unstable ankle injuries were treated by ORIF. Conservative treatment for undisplaced medial malleolar fractures is recommended, if x-rays showed less than 2 mm dislocation which allows a tibio-talare impingement. Biomechanical investigations could prove a significant increase in ankle joint stability, when an axial load of 300 N was applied to various horizontal loads. The talus does not follow automatically a displaced fibular fracture. The dorsal syndesmotic and the medial deltoid ligaments control ankle joint stability.

  13. Cyclic Strain Resistance, Stress Response, Fatigue Life, and Fracture Behavior of High Strength Low Alloy Steel 300 M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Tammana, Deepthi; Poorgangi, Behrang; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2014-05-01

    The focus of this technical manuscript is a record of the specific role of microstructure and test specimen orientation on cyclic stress response, cyclic strain resistance, and cyclic stress versus strain response, deformation and fracture behavior of alloy steel 300 M. The cyclic strain amplitude-controlled fatigue properties of this ultra-high strength alloy steel revealed a linear trend for the variation of log elastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure, and log plastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure for both longitudinal and transverse orientations. Test specimens of the longitudinal orientation showed only a marginal improvement over the transverse orientation at equivalent values of plastic strain amplitude. Cyclic stress response revealed a combination of initial hardening for the first few cycles followed by gradual softening for a large portion of fatigue life before culminating in rapid softening prior to catastrophic failure by fracture. Fracture characteristics of test specimens of this alloy steel were different at both the macroscopic and fine microscopic levels over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. Both macroscopic and fine microscopic observations revealed fracture to be a combination of both brittle and ductile mechanisms. The underlying mechanisms governing stress response, deformation characteristics, fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the competing and mutually interactive influences of test specimen orientation, intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents, cyclic strain amplitude, and response stress.

  14. Principles of managing Vancouver type B periprosthetic fractures around cemented polished tapered femoral stems.

    PubMed

    Quah, Conal; Porteous, Matthew; Stephen, Arthur

    2017-05-01

    The management of periprosthetic fractures around total hip replacements is a complex and challenging problem. Getting it right first time is an important factor in reducing the morbidity, mortality and financial burden associated with these injuries. Understanding and applying the basic principles of fracture management helps increase the chance of successful treatment. Based on these principles, we suggest a treatment algorithm for managing periprosthetic fractures around polished tapered femoral stems.

  15. Nonlinear Fluid Migration Patterns in Fractured Reservoirs due to Stress-Pressure Coupling induced Changes in Reservoir Permeabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.; Geiger, S.; Main, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Sustainable storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) requires a thorough understanding of injection induced pressure build-up and its effects on the storage formation's integrity, since it determines the cap rock's sealing properties as well as the total storable amount of carbon dioxide. Fractures are abundant in the subsurface and difficult to detect due to their subseismic characteristic. If present in the cap during injection, they can be primary pathways for CO2 leakage. The North Sea is considered as Europe's most important carbon dioxide storage area. However, almost all of the potential storage formations have been exposed to post-glacial lithospheric flexure, possibly causing the generation of new fracture networks in the overburden whilst rebounding. Drawing upon, fast carbon dioxide uprise can be facilitated due to opening of fractures caused by changes in the stress field over time. The overall effective permeability, and hence possible leakage rates, of a fractured storage formation is highly sensitive to the fracture aperture which itself depends on the far field and in situ stress field. For this reason, our in-house general purpose reservoir simulator Complex System Modeling Platform (CSMP++) has been expanded, which is particularly designed to simulate multiphase flow on fractured porous media. It combines finite element (FE) and finite volume (FV) methods on mixed-dimensional hybrid-element meshes. The unstructured FE-FV based scheme allows us to model complex geological structures, such as fractures, at great detail. The simulator uses a compositional model for NaCl-H2O-CO2-systems for compressible fluids for computing thermophysical properties as a function of formation pressure and temperature. A fixed stress-split sequential procedure is being used to calculate coupled fluid flow and geomechanics. Numerical proof of concept studies will be presented showing the impact of fracture opening and closure on fluid migration patterns due to coupled stress

  16. Surgical management of coracoid fractures: technical tricks and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brian W; Jacobson, Aaron R; Anavian, Jack; Cole, Peter A

    2014-05-01

    The coracoid process plays a pivotal role in the foundation of the coracoacromial arch and in cases of displaced fractures; surgical management may be warranted to avoid functional compromise or impingement. A direct approach through Langer's lines allows for easy exposure and direct visualization for an anatomic reduction of simple fractures through the shaft or base of the coracoid. An anterior approach for fractures that extend into the superior glenoid fossa allows for direct exposure to obtain an anatomic articular reduction and indirect reduction of the coracoid fracture. In cases where a complex glenoid or scapula neck/body fracture is being addressed simultaneously either a posterior Judet approach can be used with an indirect reduction method or a separate anterior approach must be combined to address it if not in continuity with the superior scapular segment. Implant selection, primarily interfragmentary screws or a buttress plate, should be based on the size of the fragment, the degree of comminution, and the degree of articular involvement to ensure adequate stabilization. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe a stepwise approach to the surgical management of displaced coracoid fractures, describe surgical tips and techniques, and to present the clinical outcomes in 22 patients after surgical treatment with this approach.

  17. Worksite stress management interventions.

    PubMed

    Ivancevich, J M; Matteson, M T; Freedman, S M; Phillips, J S

    1990-02-01

    Despite the general agreement that stress plays a role in everyday life, there continues to be substantial controversy about how stress can be managed at the worksite. During the last decade, our knowledge of stress management interventions has increased substantially. Despite this improvement, deficiencies in the literature exist. In this article, we offer a framework that may be used for viewing organizational stress interventions, briefly review some of the stress management intervention literature in the context of this framework, and identify future needs that may be particularly appropriate for organizational psychologists to address.

  18. Influence of natural fractures on hydraulic fracture propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W.; Warpinski, N.R.

    Hydraulic fracturing has become a valuable technique for the stimulation of oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs in a variety of reservoir rocks. In many applications, only short fractures are needed for economic production. In low-permeability reservoirs, however, long penetrating fractures are generally needed, and in this case, natural fractures can be the cause of many adverse effects during a fracture treatment. Natural fractures can influence the overall geometry and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracture by: (1) arresting the vertical or lateral growth, (2) reducing total fracture length via fluid leakoff, (3) limiting proppant transport and placement, and (4) enhancing themore » creation of multiple or secondary fractures rather than a single planar hydraulic fracture. The result may range from negligible to catastrophic depending on the values of the ancillary treatment and reservoir parameters, such as the treating pressure, in-situ stresses, pore pressure, orientations of the natural fractures relative to principal in-situ stresses, spacing and distribution of the natural fractures, permeability, etc. Field observations from mineback experiments at DOE's Nevada Test Site and the multiwell experiment in Colorado, laboratory tests, and analyses of these data are integrated to describe the complex fracture behavior found and to provide guidelines for predicting when this complex fracturing will occur.« less

  19. Influence of natural fractures on hydraulic fracture propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W.; Warpinski, N.R.

    Hydraulic fracturing has become a valuable technique for the stimulation of oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs in a variety of reservoir rocks. In many applications, only short fractures are needed for economic production. In low-permeability reservoirs, however, long penetrating fractures are generally needed, and in this case, natural fractures can be the cause of many adverse effects during a fracture treatment. Natural fractures can influence the overall geometry and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracture by: (1) arresting the vertical or lateral growth, (2) reducing total fracture length via fluid leakoff, (3) limiting proppant transport and placement, and (4) enhancing themore » creation of multiple or secondary fractures rather than a single planar hydraulic fracture. The result may range from negligible to catastrophic depending on the values of the ancillary treatment and reservoir parameters, such as the treating pressure, in-situ stresses, pore pressure, orientations of the natural fractures relative to principle in-situ stresses, spacing and distribution of the natural fractures, permeability, etc. Field observations from mineback experiments at DOE's Nevada Test Site and the multiwell experiment in Colorado, laboratory tests, and analyses of these data are integrated to describe the complex fracture behavior found to an provide guidelines for predicting when this complex fracturing occurs.« less

  20. Range limitation in hip internal rotation and fifth metatarsal stress fractures (Jones fracture) in professional football players.

    PubMed

    Saita, Yoshitomo; Nagao, Masashi; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Yohei; Kobayashi, Keiji; Nakajima, Hiroki; Takazawa, Yuji; Kaneko, Kazuo; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2017-04-25

    To identify unknown risk factors associated with fifth metatarsal stress fracture (Jones fracture). A case-controlled study was conducted among male Japanese professional football (soccer) players with (N = 20) and without (N = 40) a history of Jones fracture. Injury history and physical examination data were reviewed, and the two groups were compared. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression controlling for age, leg dominance and body mass index were used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to describe the association between physical examination data and the presence or absence of Jones fractures. From 2000 to 2014, among 162 professional football club players, 22 (13.6%; 21 Asians and one Caucasian) had a history of Jones fracture. Thirteen out of 22 (60%) had a Jones fracture in their non-dominant leg. The mean range of hip internal rotation (HIR) was restricted in players with a history of Jones fracture [25.9° ± 7.5°, mean ± standard deviation (SD)] compared to those without (40.4° ± 11.1°, P < 0.0001). Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that HIR limitation increased the risk of a Jones fracture (OR = 3.03, 95% CI 1.45-6.33, P = 0.003). Subgroup analysis using data prior to Jones fracture revealed a causal relationship, such that players with a restriction of HIR were at high risk of developing a Jones fracture [Crude OR (95% CI) = 6.66 (1.90-23.29), P = 0.003, Adjusted OR = 9.91 (2.28-43.10), P = 0.002]. In addition, right HIR range limitation increased the risks of developing a Jones fracture in the ipsilateral and the contralateral feet [OR = 3.11 (1.35-7.16) and 2.24 (1.22-4.12), respectively]. Similarly, left HIR range limitation increased the risks in the ipsilateral or the contralateral feet [OR (95% CI) = 4.88 (1.56-15.28) and 2.77 (1.08-7.08), respectively]. The restriction of HIR was associated with an increased risk of developing a Jones fracture. Since the HIR range is a

  1. Analysis of foot structure in athletes sustaining proximal fifth metatarsal stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Nyska, Meir; Ben-Sira, David; Mann, Gideon; Segal, Ofer; Maoz, Guy; Ayalon, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    In the past, several studies provided anecdotal descriptions of high-arched feet in individuals sustaining proximal fifth metatarsal stress fractures. This relationship has never been supported by scientific evidence. Our objective was to examine whether athletes who sustained this injury had an exceptional static foot structure or dynamic loading pattern. Ten injured professional soccer players who regained full professional activity following a unilateral proximal fifth metatarsal stress fracture and ten control soccer players were examined. Independent variables included static evaluation of foot and arch structure, followed by dynamic plantar foot pressure evaluation. Each variable was compared between injured, contra-lateral uninjured, and control feet. Static measurements of foot and arch structure did not reveal differences among the groups. However, plantar pressure evaluation revealed relative unloading of the fourth metatarsal in injured and uninjured limbs of injured athletes compared with control, while the fifth metatarsal revealed pressure reduction only in the injured limbs of injured athletes. Athletes who sustained proximal fifth metatarsal stress fracture were not characterized by an exceptional static foot structure. Dynamically, lateral metatarsal unloading during stance may either play a role in the pathogenesis of the injury, or alternately represent an adaptive process. Footwear fabrication for previously injured athletes should not categorically address cushioning properties designed for high-arch feet, but rather focus on individual dynamic evaluation of forefoot loading, with less attention applied to static foot and arch characteristics.

  2. Stress Management: Massage

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Massage can be a powerful tool to help you take charge of your health and well-being. See if ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/massage/art-20045743 . Mayo Clinic Footer ...

  3. Peri-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction femur fracture: a biomechanical analysis of the femoral tunnel as a stress riser.

    PubMed

    Han, Yung; Sardar, Zeeshan; McGrail, Scott; Steffen, Thomas; Martineau, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen case reports of distal femur fractures as post-operative complications after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been described in the literature. The femoral tunnel has been suggested as a potential stress riser for fracture formation. Additionally, double bundle ACL reconstructions may compound this risk. This is the first biomechanical study to examine the significance of a stress riser effect of the femoral tunnel(s) after ACL reconstruction. The hypotheses tested in this study are that the femoral tunnel acts as a stress riser for fracture and that this effect increases with the size of the tunnel (8 mm vs. 10 mm) and with the number of tunnels (1 vs. 2). Femoral tunnels simulating single bundle (SB) hamstring graft (8 mm), bone-patellar tendon-bone graft (10 mm), and double bundle (DB) ACL reconstruction (7, 6 mm) were drilled in fourth-generation saw bones. These three experimental groups and a control group consisting of native saw bones without tunnels were loaded to failure. All fractures occurred through the tunnels in the DB group, whereas fractures did not consistently occur through the tunnels in the SB groups. The mean fracture load was 6,145N ± 471N in the native group, 5,691N ± 198N in the 8 mm SB group, 5,702N ± 282N in the 10 mm SB group, and 4,744N ± 418N in the DB group. The mean fracture load for the DB group was significantly lower when compared to the native, 8 mm SB, and 10 mm SB groups independently (P value = 0.0016, 0.0060, and 0.0038, respectively). The mean fracture loads for neither SB groups were not significantly different from the native group. An anatomically placed femoral tunnel in single bundle ACL reconstruction in our experimental model was not a significant stress riser to fracture, whereas the two femoral tunnels in double bundle ACL reconstruction significantly decreased load to failure. The results support the sparsity of reported peri-ACL reconstruction femur fractures in single femoral

  4. Surgical Management of Rib Fractures: Strategies and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    de Jong, M B; Kokke, M C; Hietbrink, F; Leenen, L P H

    2014-06-01

    Rib fractures can cause significant problems in trauma patients, often resulting in pain and difficulty with respiration. To prevent pulmonary complications and decrease the morbidity and mortality rates of patients with rib fractures, currently there is a trend to provide surgical management of patients with flail chest. However, the indications for rib fracture fixation require further specification. Past and current strategies are described according to a review of the medical literature. A systematic review was performed including current indications for rib fracture fixation. MEDLINE (2000-2013) was searched, as well as Embase (2000-2013) and Cochrane Databases, using the keywords rib, fracture, fixation, plate, repair, and surgery. Three retrospective studies were found that described different techniques for rib fracture fixation. The results demonstrated a reduced number of ventilation days, decreased long-term morbidity and pain, and satisfactory rehabilitation after surgical treatment. In addition to flail chest, age, Injury Severity Score, and the number of rib fractures were important predictive factors for morbidity and mortality. Surgical rib fracture fixation might be indicated in a broader range of cases than is currently performed. Prospective randomized trials are needed for further confirmation. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  5. Caprock integrity susceptibility to permeable fracture creation

    DOE PAGES

    Frash, Luke; Carey, James William; Ickes, Timothy Lee; ...

    2017-07-14

    Caprock leakage is of crucial concern for environmentally and economically sustainable development of carbon dioxide sequestration and utilization operations. One potential leakage pathway is through fractures or faults that penetrate the caprock. In this study, we investigate the permeability induced by fracturing initially intact Marcellus shale outcrop specimens at stressed conditions using a triaxial direct-shear method. Measurements of induced permeability, fracture geometry, displacement, and applied stresses were all obtained at stressed conditions to investigate the coupled processes of fracturing and fluid flow as may occur in the subsurface. Fracture geometry was directly observed at stressed conditions using X-ray radiography video.more » Numerical simulation was performed to evaluate the stress distribution developed in the experiments. Our experiments show that permeability induced by fracturing is strongly dependent on the stresses at which the fractures are created, the magnitude of shearing displacement, and the duration of flow. The strongest permeability contrast was observed when comparing specimens fractured at low stress to others fractured at higher stress. Measureable fracture permeability decreased by up to 7 orders of magnitude over a corresponding triaxial confining stress range of 3.5 MPa to 30 MPa. These results show that increasing stress, depth, and time are all significant permeability inhibitors that may limit potential leakage through fractured caprock.« less

  6. Caprock integrity susceptibility to permeable fracture creation

    SciTech Connect

    Frash, Luke; Carey, James William; Ickes, Timothy Lee

    Caprock leakage is of crucial concern for environmentally and economically sustainable development of carbon dioxide sequestration and utilization operations. One potential leakage pathway is through fractures or faults that penetrate the caprock. In this study, we investigate the permeability induced by fracturing initially intact Marcellus shale outcrop specimens at stressed conditions using a triaxial direct-shear method. Measurements of induced permeability, fracture geometry, displacement, and applied stresses were all obtained at stressed conditions to investigate the coupled processes of fracturing and fluid flow as may occur in the subsurface. Fracture geometry was directly observed at stressed conditions using X-ray radiography video.more » Numerical simulation was performed to evaluate the stress distribution developed in the experiments. Our experiments show that permeability induced by fracturing is strongly dependent on the stresses at which the fractures are created, the magnitude of shearing displacement, and the duration of flow. The strongest permeability contrast was observed when comparing specimens fractured at low stress to others fractured at higher stress. Measureable fracture permeability decreased by up to 7 orders of magnitude over a corresponding triaxial confining stress range of 3.5 MPa to 30 MPa. These results show that increasing stress, depth, and time are all significant permeability inhibitors that may limit potential leakage through fractured caprock.« less

  7. Section modulus is the optimum geometric predictor for stress fractures and medial tibial stress syndrome in both male and female athletes.

    PubMed

    Franklyn, Melanie; Oakes, Barry; Field, Bruce; Wells, Peter; Morgan, David

    2008-06-01

    Various tibial dimensions and geometric parameters have been linked to stress fractures in athletes and military recruits, but many mechanical parameters have still not been investigated. Sedentary people, athletes with medial tibial stress syndrome, and athletes with stress fractures have smaller tibial geometric dimensions and parameters than do uninjured athletes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Using a total of 88 subjects, male and female patients with either a tibial stress fracture or medial tibial stress syndrome were compared with both uninjured aerobically active controls and uninjured sedentary controls. Tibial scout radiographs and cross-sectional computed tomography images of all subjects were scanned at the junction of the midthird and distal third of the tibia. Tibial dimensions were measured directly from the films; other parameters were calculated numerically. Uninjured exercising men have a greater tibial cortical cross-sectional area than do their sedentary and injured counterparts, resulting in a greater value of some other cross-sectional geometric parameters, particularly the section modulus. However, for women, the cross-sectional areas are either not different or only marginally different, and there are few tibial dimensions or geometric parameters that distinguish the uninjured exercisers from the sedentary and injured subjects. In women, the main difference between the groups was the distribution of cortical bone about the centroid as a result of the different values of section modulus. Last, medial tibial stress syndrome subjects had smaller tibial cross-sectional dimensions than did their uninjured exercising counterparts, suggesting that medial tibial stress syndrome is not just a soft-tissue injury but also a bony injury. The results show that in men, the cross-sectional area and the section modulus are the key parameters in the tibia to distinguish exercise and injury status, whereas for women, it is the section modulus only.

  8. The pediatric mandible: II. Management of traumatic injury or fracture.

    PubMed

    Smartt, James M; Low, David W; Bartlett, Scott P

    2005-08-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the changing epidemiology of mandibular fractures in children and adolescents. 2. Discuss the appropriate use of internal fixation in the treatment of pediatric mandibular fractures. 3. Describe the difficulties posed by the deciduous dentition in the use of interdental wiring. 4. Understand reasons why techniques specific to adult fractures may not be applicable to the growing mandible. 5. Understand the etiology and epidemiology of pediatric mandibular fractures. 6. Understand the reasons for conservative (closed) versus aggressive (open) treatment of mandibular injury. Fractures of the pediatric mandible are complicated by the anatomic complexity of the developing mandible, particularly by the presence of tooth buds and the eruption of deciduous and permanent teeth. Traditional methods of fracture reduction and fixation employed in adults have little applicability in the pediatric population. The authors describe the surgical techniques that have been used at their institution and those that can be used safely in the pediatric setting. In most cases, "conservative" management is the preferred option, especially in the treatment of condylar fractures. In cases requiring surgical intervention, interdental wiring, drop wires in combination with circummandibular wires, and acrylic splints are suited well to specific phases of dental maturation. Open reduction and internal fixation using monocortical screws and microplates or resorbable plates and screws are acceptable techniques in the pediatric patient, but they require special safeguards. Algorithms are presented to simplify management of these complicated injuries.

  9. Effect of far-field stresses and residual stresses incorporation in predicting fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced yttria stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahato, Neelima; Nisar, Ambreen; Mohapatra, Pratyasha; Rawat, Siddharth; Ariharan, S.; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-10-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a potential thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications (>1000 °C). YSZ reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was processed via spark plasma sintering to produce dense, crack-free homogeneous sample and avoid any degradation of MWNTs when sintered using conventional routes. Despite porosity, the addition of MWNT has a profound effect in improving the damage tolerance of YSZ by allowing the retention of tetragonal phase. However, at some instances, the crack lengths in the MWNT reinforced YSZ matrices have been found to be longer than the standalone counterparts. Therefore, it becomes inappropriate to apply Anstis equation to calculate fracture toughness values. In this regard, a combined analytical cum numerical method is used to estimate the theoretical fracture toughness and quantitatively analyze the mechanics of matrix cracking in the reinforced composite matrices incorporating the effects of various factors (such as far-field stresses, volume fraction of MWNTs, change in the modulus and Poisson's ratio values along with the increase in porosity, and bridging and phase transformation mechanism) affecting the fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites. The results suggest that the incorporation of far-field stresses cannot be ignored in estimating the theoretical fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites.

  10. Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, M. J.; Stolken, J. S.; Vignes, R. M.; Norton, M. A.; Yang, S.; Cooke, J. D.; Guss, G. M.; Adams, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO2 lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO2 laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work we present the results of 351 nm, 3ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO2 laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1~40s square pulse CO2 laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25kW/cm2 with a 1-3mm 1/e2 diameter beam (Tmax~1500-3000K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for Tmax>=2000K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO2 laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

  11. Biomechanical Factors in the Etiology of Tibial Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    stiffness in these runners. A “stiff” runner will spend less time in contact with the ground (Farley and Gonzalez, 1996 ) and will attenuate less shock...between the leg and the head (McMahon et al., 1987). This is in agreement with the findings of Farley and Gonzalez ( 1996 ) who suggested lower...Army Natick Research and Development Laboratories. Brukner, P., Bradshaw, C., Khan, K., White, S. and Crossley, K. ( 1996 ) Stress fractures: a

  12. Faulting, fracturing and in situ stress prediction in the Ahnet Basin, Algeria — a finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, Fred; Badsi, Madjid; van Wees, Jan-Diederik

    2000-05-01

    Many low-efficiency hydrocarbon reservoirs are productive largely because effective reservoir permeability is controlled by faults and natural fractures. Accurate and low-cost information on basic fault and fracture properties, orientation in particular, is critical in reducing well costs and increasing well recoveries. This paper describes how we used an advanced numerical modelling technique, the finite element method (FEM), to compute site-specific in situ stresses and rock deformation and to predict fracture attributes as a function of material properties, structural position and tectonic stress. Presented are the numerical results of two-dimensional, plane-strain end-member FEM models of a hydrocarbon-bearing fault-propagation-fold structure. Interpretation of the modelling results remains qualitative because of the intrinsic limitations of numerical modelling; however, it still allows comparisons with (the little available) geological and geophysical data. In all models, the weak mechanical strength and flow properties of a thick shale layer (the main seal) leads to a decoupling of the structural deformation of the shallower sediments from the underlying sediments and basement, and results in flexural slip across the shale layer. All models predict rock fracturing to initiate at the surface and to expand with depth under increasing horizontal tectonic compression. The stress regime for the formation of new fractures changes from compressional to shear with depth. If pre-existing fractures exist, only (sub)horizontal fractures are predicted to open, thus defining the principal orientation of effective reservoir permeability. In models that do not include a blind thrust fault in the basement, flexural amplification of the initial fold structure generates additional fracturing in the crest of the anticline controlled by the material properties of the rocks. The folding-induced fracturing expands laterally along the stratigraphic boundaries under enhanced

  13. Bone geometry, strength, and muscle size in runners with a history of stress fracture.

    PubMed

    Popp, Kristin L; Hughes, Julie M; Smock, Amanda J; Novotny, Susan A; Stovitz, Steven D; Koehler, Scott M; Petit, Moira A

    2009-12-01

    Our primary aim was to explore differences in estimates of tibial bone strength, in female runners with and without a history of stress fractures. Our secondary aim was to explore differences in bone geometry, volumetric density, and muscle size that may explain bone strength outcomes. A total of 39 competitive distance runners aged 18-35 yr, with (SFX, n = 19) or without (NSFX, n = 20) a history of stress fracture were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (XCT 3000; Orthometrix, White Plains, NY) was used to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, mg x mm(-3)), bone area (ToA, mm(2)), and estimated compressive bone strength (bone strength index (BSI) = ToA x total volumetric density (ToD(2))) at the distal tibia (4%). Total (ToA, mm(2)) and cortical (CoA, mm(2)) bone area, cortical vBMD, and estimated bending strength (strength-strain index (SSIp), mm(3)) were measured at the 15%, 25%, 33%, 45%, 50%, and 66% sites. Muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) was measured at the 50% and 66% sites. Participants in the SFX group had significantly smaller (7%-8%) CoA at the 45%, 50%, and 66% sites (P stress fracture. However, the lower strength was appropriate for the smaller muscle size, suggesting that interventions to reduce stress fracture risk might be aimed at improving muscle size and strength.

  14. An Innovative Approach for Management of Vertical Coronal Fracture in Molar: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Ambica; Kavitha, M.; Ravishankar, P.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike anterior teeth, acute exogenous trauma is an infrequent cause of posterior coronal vertical tooth fractures. Endodontic and restorative management of such fractures is a great challenge for the clinician. Newer advancements in adhesive techniques can provide successful intracoronal splinting of such teeth to reinforce the remaining tooth structure. This paper describes the diagnosis and management of a case of complicated vertical coronal fracture in mandibular first molar induced by a traffic accident. PMID:22567453

  15. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry derived structural geometry for stress fracture prediction in male U.S. Marine Corps recruits.

    PubMed

    Beck, T J; Ruff, C B; Mourtada, F A; Shaffer, R A; Maxwell-Williams, K; Kao, G L; Sartoris, D J; Brodine, S

    1996-05-01

    A total of 626 U.S. male Marine Corps recruits underwent anthropometric measurements and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans of the femoral midshaft and the distal third of the tibia prior to a 12 week physical training program. Conventionally obtained frontal plane DXA scan data were used to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) as well as to derive the cross-sectional area, moment of inertia, section modulus, and bone width in the femur, tibia, and fibula. During training, 23 recruits (3.7%) presented with a total of 27 radiologically confirmed stress fractures in various locations in the lower extremity. After excluding 16 cases of shin splints, periostitis, and other stress reactions that did not meet fracture definition criteria, we compared anthropometric and bone structural geometry measurements between fracture cases and the remaining 587 normals. There was no significant difference in age (p = 0.8), femur length (p = 0.2), pelvic width (p = 0.08), and knee width at the femoral condyles (p = 0.06), but fracture cases were shorter (p = 0.01), lighter (p = 0.0006), and smaller in most anthropometric girth dimensions (p < 0.04). Fracture case bone cross-sectional areas (p < 0.001), moments of inertia (p < 0.001), section moduli (p < 0.001), and widths (p < 0.001) as well as BMD (p < 0.03) were significantly smaller in the tibia and femur. After correcting for body weight differences, the tibia cross-sectional area (p = 0.03), section modulus (p = 0.05), and width (p = 0.03) remained significantly smaller in fracture subjects. We conclude that both small body weight and small diaphyseal dimensions relative to body weight are factors predisposing to the development of stress fractures in this population. These results suggest that bone structural geometry measurements derived from DXA data may provide a simple noninvasive methodology for assessing the risk of stress fracture.

  16. Management of a midroot and complicated crown fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sheikh-Nezami, M; Mokhber, N; Shamsian, Kh; Saket, S

    2009-05-01

    This case report illustrates the management of a permanent right central maxillary incisor with midroot fracture and complicated crown fracture, which was treated by cervical pulpotomy and fixation of the fragments. After 4-month follow-up, radiography showed healing with interproximal bone and connective tissue at the fracture line at midroot. After 3 years, the tooth was still functional without any clinical sign and symptom.

  17. Intrapartum sacral stress fracture due to pregnancy-related osteoporosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Aydoğ, Ece

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) and hip pain frequently occur during pregnancy and postpartum period. Although pelvic and mechanic lesions of the soft tissues are most responsible for the etiology, sacral fracture is also one of the rare causes. A 32-year-old primigravid patient presented with LBP and right hip pain which started 3 days after vaginal delivery. Although direct radiographic examination was normal, magnetic resonance imaging of the sacrum revealed sacral stress fracture. Lumbar spine and femoral bone mineral density showed osteoporosis as a risk factor. There were no other risk factors such as trauma, excessive weight gain, and strenuous physical activity. It is considered that the patient had sacral fatigue and insufficiency fracture in intrapartum period. The patient's symptoms subsided in 3 months after physical therapy and rest. In conclusion, sacral fractures during pregnancy and postpartum period, especially resulting from childbirth, are very rare. To date, there are two cases in the literature. In cases who even do not have risk factors related to vaginal delivery such as high birth weight infant and the use of forceps, exc., sacral fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of LBP and hip pain started soon after child birth. Pregnancy-related osteoporosis may lead to fracture during vaginal delivery.

  18. Assessment and management of rib fracture pain in geriatric population: an ode to old age.

    PubMed

    Wardhan, Richa

    2013-10-01

    Pain management for traumatic rib fractures has been described in literature, but there is paucity of data when it comes to acute pain management in the elderly, let alone pain resulting from traumatic rib fractures. This article focuses on challenges of assessment of pain in elderly patients and the various options available for pain management including utilization of nerve blocks. Nerve blocks are instrumental in treating rib fracture pain along with utilization of opioids and nonopioids thus formulating a multimodal approach to pain management. The goal is to devise a proper pain management regimen for geriatric patients with rib fractures to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with it. Developing institutional protocols is one step forward towards quality care for such patients.

  19. Fatigue-type stress fractures of the lower limb associated with fibrous cortical defects/non-ossifying fibromas in the skeletally immature.

    PubMed

    Shimal, A; Davies, A M; James, S L J; Grimer, R J

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the association of a fatigue-type stress fracture and a fibrous cortical defect/non-ossifying fibroma (FCD/NOF) of the lower limb long bones in skeletally immature patients. The patient database of a specialist orthopaedic oncology centre was searched to determine the number of skeletally immature patients (stress fracture. The diagnosis was established by a combination of typical imaging findings of a fatigue-type stress fracture, the absence of aggressive features suggestive of a sarcoma (e.g., interrupted periosteal reaction, cortical breach, and a soft-tissue mass) together with evidence of consolidation or healing on follow-up radiographs and resolution of symptoms over the subsequent weeks. The database was also used to determine the number of skeletally immature cases (stress fracture and a FCD or NOF) were reviewed. Six percent of patients (five cases) referred to an orthopaedic oncology unit, who were subsequently shown to have a stress fracture of the lower limb long bones, were found to have a related FCD/NOF. All had been referred with a suggested diagnosis of a bone sarcoma and/or osteomyelitis. The possibility of a stress fracture had been raised in only one case. Four cases involved the proximal tibia and one the distal femur. Radiographs revealed that both lesions arose in the posteromedial cortex in all but one of the cases. The radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features were considered typical of the overlapping pathological features of the lesions. A sarcoma could be effectively excluded in the absence of true

  20. Association of stressful life events with accelerated bone loss in older men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Howard A.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Cauley, Jane A.; Taylor, Brent C.; Schousboe, John T.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Introduction Prior studies suggest that stressful life events may increase adverse health outcomes, including falls and possibly fractures. The current study builds on these findings and examines whether stressful life events are associated with increased bone loss. Methods 4388 men aged ≥65 years in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study completed total hip bone mineral density (BMD) measures at baseline and visit 2, approximately 4.6 years later, and self-reported stressful life events data mid-way between baseline and visit 2, and at visit 2. We used linear regression to model the association of stressful life events with concurrent annualized total hip BMD loss, and log binomial regression or Poisson regression to model risk of concurrent accelerated BMD loss (>1 SD more than mean annualized change). Results 75.3% of men reported ≥1 type of stressful life event, including 43.3% with ≥2 types of stressful life events. Mean annualized BMD loss was −0.36% (SD 0.88) and 13.9% of men were categorized with accelerated BMD loss (about 5.7% or more total loss). Rate of annualized BMD loss increased with the number of types of stressful life events after adjustment for age (p<0.001), but not after multivariable adjustment (p=0.07). Multivariable-adjusted risk of accelerated BMD loss increased with the number of types of stressful life events (RR, 1.10 [95% CI, 1.04–1.16]) per increase of 1 type of stressful life event). Fracture risk was not significantly different between stressful life event-accelerated bone loss subgroups (p=0.08). Conclusions In these older men, stressful life events were associated with a small, dose-related increase in risk of concurrent accelerated hip bone loss. Low frequency of fractures limited assessment of whether rapid bone loss mediates any association of stressful life events with incident fractures. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and to investigate the mechanism that may underlie this association

  1. A retrospective cohort study on the influence of UV index and race/ethnicity on risk of stress and lower limb fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low vitamin D status increases the risk of stress fractures. As ultraviolet (UV) light is required for vitamin D synthesis, low UV light availability is thought to increase the risk of vitamin D insufficiency and poor bone health. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if individuals with low UV intensity at their home of record (HOR) or those with darker complexions are at increased risk of developing stress fractures and lower limb fractures during U.S. Army Basic Combat Training (BCT). Methods This was a retrospective cohort study using the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center data repository. All Basic trainees were identified from January 1997 to January 2007. Cases were recruits diagnosed with stress fractures and lower limb fractures during BCT. The recruit’s home of record (HOR) was identified from the Defense Manpower Data Center database. The average annual UV intensity at the recruits’ HOR was determined using a U.S National Weather Service database and recruits were stratified into low (≤3.9); moderate (4.0-5.4), and high (≥5.5) UV index regions. Race was determined from self-reports. Results The dataset had 421,461 men and 90,141women. Compared to men, women had greater risk of developing stress fractures (odds ratio (OR) = 4.5, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 4.4-4.7, p < 0.01). Contrary to the hypothesized effect, male and female recruits from low UV index areas had a slightly lower risk of stress fractures (male OR (low UV/high UV) = 0.92, 95%CI = 0.87-0.97; females OR = 0.89, 95%CI = 0.84-0.95, p < 0.01) and were at similar risk for lower limb fractures (male OR = 0.98, 95%CI = 0.89-1.07; female OR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.80-1.09) than recruits from high UV index areas. Blacks had lower risk of stress and lower limb fractures than non-blacks, and there was no indication that Blacks from low UV areas were at increased risk for bone injuries. Conclusions The UV index at

  2. A retrospective cohort study on the influence of UV index and race/ethnicity on risk of stress and lower limb fractures.

    PubMed

    Montain, Scott J; McGraw, Susan M; Ely, Matthew R; Grier, Tyson L; Knapik, Joseph J

    2013-04-12

    Low vitamin D status increases the risk of stress fractures. As ultraviolet (UV) light is required for vitamin D synthesis, low UV light availability is thought to increase the risk of vitamin D insufficiency and poor bone health. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if individuals with low UV intensity at their home of record (HOR) or those with darker complexions are at increased risk of developing stress fractures and lower limb fractures during U.S. Army Basic Combat Training (BCT). This was a retrospective cohort study using the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center data repository. All Basic trainees were identified from January 1997 to January 2007. Cases were recruits diagnosed with stress fractures and lower limb fractures during BCT. The recruit's home of record (HOR) was identified from the Defense Manpower Data Center database. The average annual UV intensity at the recruits' HOR was determined using a U.S National Weather Service database and recruits were stratified into low (≤3.9); moderate (4.0-5.4), and high (≥5.5) UV index regions. Race was determined from self-reports. The dataset had 421,461 men and 90,141 women. Compared to men, women had greater risk of developing stress fractures (odds ratio (OR) = 4.5, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 4.4-4.7, p < 0.01). Contrary to the hypothesized effect, male and female recruits from low UV index areas had a slightly lower risk of stress fractures (male OR (low UV/high UV) = 0.92, 95%CI = 0.87-0.97; females OR = 0.89, 95%CI = 0.84-0.95, p < 0.01) and were at similar risk for lower limb fractures (male OR = 0.98, 95%CI = 0.89-1.07; female OR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.80-1.09) than recruits from high UV index areas. Blacks had lower risk of stress and lower limb fractures than non-blacks, and there was no indication that Blacks from low UV areas were at increased risk for bone injuries. The UV index at home of record is not associated with stress

  3. Are Elite Female Soccer Athletes at Risk for Disordered Eating Attitudes, Menstrual Dysfunction, and Stress Fractures?

    PubMed

    Prather, Heidi; Hunt, Devyani; McKeon, Kathryn; Simpson, Scott; Meyer, E Blair; Yemm, Ted; Brophy, Robert

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of stress fractures, menstrual dysfunction and disordered eating attitudes in elite female soccer athletes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Female soccer athletes were recruited from a national level youth soccer club, an NCAA Division I university team, and a women's professional team. Two hundred twenty female soccer athletes with a mean age of 16.4 ± 4 years and BMI of 20.8 ± 2 kg/m(2) completed the study, representing all athletes from the included teams. One-time surveys completed by the athletes. Height and weight were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each athlete. Athletes reported age of menarche, history of missing 3 or more menses within a 12-month period and stress fracture. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to assess the athlete's body perception and attitudes toward eating. Of the 220 soccer athletes, 3 athletes (1.6%) had a low BMI for their age, and 19 (8.6%) reported stress fractures of the lower extremity. Among athletes who had reached menarche, the average onset was 13 + 1 year; menstrual dysfunction were present in 21 (19.3%). On the EAT-26, 1 player scored in the high risk range (>20) and 17 (7.7%) scored in the intermediate risk range (10-19) for eating disorders. Athletes with an EAT-26 score ≥ 10 points had a significantly higher prevalence of menstrual dysfunction in the past year compared to athletes with an EAT-26 score of less than 10 (P = .02). Elite female soccer athletes are susceptible to stress fractures and menstrual dysfunction and have delayed onset of menarche despite normal BMI and appropriate body perception and attitudes towards eating. Further studies are needed to better understand stress fracture risk in female soccer athletes and in other team sports to determine how these findings relate to long-term bone health in this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Conservative management of fractures of the third metatarsal bone in the racing greyhound.

    PubMed

    Guilliard, M J

    2013-10-01

    To assess (2006 to 2012) conservative management for treatment of fractures of the third metatarsal bone (MT3) in racing greyhounds. All racing greyhounds with MT3 fractures seen prospectively between 2006 and 2012 were included. Fracture morphology, type of conservative management, outcome and the time to a return to racing were recorded. Outcome was assessed either by communication with the trainer or by accessing the website of the Greyhound Board of Great Britain to find the complete racing history of the dog. Eighteen cases were evaluated. Six had a support dressing and 12 had no external dressings, treatment consisting of kennel rest alone. Two dogs were retired from racing at the time of injury, two dogs sustained other injuries and the remainder (n=14) returned to successful racing with no loss of form. Conservative management for MT3 fractures consisting of a programme of exercise restriction carries an excellent prognosis for a return to previous racing form. External support dressings do not appear to be necessary either for the welfare of the dog or for fracture management. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. Fracture mechanics correlation of boron/aluminum coupons containing stress risers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adsit, N. R.; Waszczak, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of boron/aluminum near stress risers has been studied and reported. This effort was directed toward defining the tensile behavior of both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The material used was 5.6-mil boron in 6061 aluminum, consolidated using conventional diffusion bonding techniques. Mechanical properties are reported for both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum, which serve as control data for the fracture mechanics predictions. Three different flawed specimen types were studied. In each case the series of specimens remained geometrically similar to eliminate variations in finite size correction factors. The fracture data from these tests were reduced using two techniques. They both used conventional LEFM methods, but the existence of a characteristic flaw was assumed in one case and not the other. Both the data and the physical behavior of the specimens support the characteristic flaw hypothesis. Cracks were observed growing slowly in the (0/ plus or minus 45) laminates, until a critical crack length was reached at which time catastrophic failure occurred.

  6. Effect of a redesigned fracture management pathway and 'virtual' fracture clinic on ED performance.

    PubMed

    Vardy, J; Jenkins, P J; Clark, K; Chekroud, M; Begbie, K; Anthony, I; Rymaszewski, L A; Ireland, A J

    2014-06-13

    Collaboration between the orthopaedic and emergency medicine (ED) services has resulted in standardised treatment pathways, leaflet supported discharge and a virtual fracture clinic review. Patients with minor, stable fractures are discharged with no further follow-up arranged. We aimed to examine the time taken to assess and treat these patients in the ED along with the rate of unplanned reattendance. A retrospective study was undertaken that covered 1 year before the change and 1 year after. Prospectively collected administrative data from the electronic patient record system were analysed and compared before and after the change. An ED and orthopaedic unit, serving a population of 300 000, in a publicly funded health system. 2840 patients treated with referral to a traditional fracture clinic and 3374 patients managed according to the newly redesigned protocol. Time for assessment and treatment of patients with orthopaedic injuries not requiring immediate operative management, and 7-day unplanned reattendance. Where plaster backslabs were replaced with removable splints, the consultation time was reduced. There was no change in treatment time for other injuries treated by the new discharge protocol. There was no increase in unplanned ED attendance, related to the injury, within 7 days (p=0.149). There was a decrease in patients reattending the ED due to a missed fracture clinic appointment. This process did not require any new time resources from the ED staff. This process brought significant benefits to the ED as treatment pathways were agreed. The pathway reduced unnecessary reattendance of patients at face-to-face fracture clinics for a review of stable, self-limiting injuries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Challenges of Fracture Management for Adults With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; DeFroda, Steven F; Sindhu, Kunal; Cruz, Aristides I; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is caused by qualitative or quantitative defects in type I collagen. Although often considered a disease with primarily pediatric manifestations, more than 25% of lifetime fractures are reported to occur in adulthood. General care of adults with osteogenesis imperfecta involves measures to preserve bone density, regular monitoring of hearing and dentition, and maintenance of muscle strength through physical therapy. Surgical stabilization of fractures in these patients can be challenging because of low bone mineral density, preexisting skeletal deformities, or obstruction by instrumentation from previous surgeries. Additionally, unique perioperative considerations exist when operatively managing fractures in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. To date, there is little high-quality literature to help guide the optimal treatment of fractures in adult patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e17-e22.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Imaging of upper extremity stress fractures in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark W

    2006-07-01

    Although it is much less common than injuries in the lower extremities, an upper extremity stress injury can have a significant impact on an athlete. If an accurate and timely diagnosis is to be made, the clinician must have a high index of suspicion of a stress fracture in any athlete who is involved in a throwing, weightlifting, or upper extremity weight-bearing sport and presents with chronic pain in the upper extremity. Imaging should play an integral role in the work-up of these patients; if initial radiographs are unrevealing, further cross-sectional imaging should be strongly considered. Although a three-phase bone scan is highly sensitive in this regard, MRI has become the study of choice at most centers.

  9. Femoral neck stress fracture in a female athlete: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Daniel; Pajaczkowski, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic rehabilitation of a master's-level athlete with proximal femoral stress fracture and provide a brief discussion of stress fracture pathology. Clinical Features A 41-year-old female master's-level endurance athlete presented with chronic groin pain later diagnosed and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging as a stress fracture of the femoral neck. After diagnosis, the patient was referred to a doctor of chiropractic at week 1 of the non–weight-bearing physical rehabilitation process. At that time, the patient presented with sharp and constant groin pain rated 6/10 on a numeric rating scale. Intervention and Outcome This patient avoided weight-bearing activity for 8 weeks while cross-training and was able to return to her sport after this period. The patient was progressed through a series of non–weight-bearing strengthening exercises for the lower extremity. Myofascial release therapy was performed on the gluteal, hip flexor, and groin muscle groups to improve range of motion. Motion palpation testing the lumbar and sacroiliac joints was performed during each session, and manipulative therapy was performed when necessary. The patient was seen once a week for 8 weeks. Reevaluation was performed at week 8; at that time, the patient reported no groin pain (0/10). The patient was discharged from care and referred back to the supervising physician for clearance to return to sporting activities. One month after discharge, she reported that she was pain free and had fully returned to sport activities. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the importance of a through clinical history, physical examination, and magnetic resonance imaging in the accurate diagnosis of a patient with chronic groin pain and that chiropractic care can contribute to rehabilitation programs for these injuries. PMID:23843760

  10. Fracture Mechanisms For SiC Fibers And SiC/SiC Composites Under Stress-Rupture Conditions at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, Hee Mann; Hurst, Janet B.; Viterna, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The successful application of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites as high-temperature structural materials depends strongly on maximizing the fracture or rupture life of the load-bearing fiber and matrix constituents. Using high-temperature data measured under stress-rupture test conditions, this study examines in a mechanistic manner the effects of various intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the creep and fracture behavior of a variety of SiC fiber types. It is shown that although some fiber types fracture during a large primary creep stage, the fiber creep rate just prior to fracture plays a key role in determining fiber rupture time (Monkman-Grant theory). If it is assumed that SiC matrices rupture in a similar manner as fibers with the same microstructures, one can develop simple mechanistic models to analyze and optimize the stress-rupture behavior of SiC/SiC composites for applied stresses that are initially below matrix cracking.

  11. [Finite element analysis of the maxillary central incisor with crown lengthening surgery and post-core restoration in management of crown-root fracture].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Min; Hu, Wen-jie; Rong, Qi-guo

    2015-12-18

    To construct the finite element models of maxillary central incisor and the simulations with crown lengthening surgery and post-core restoration in management of different crown-root fracture types, to investigate the stress intensity and distributions of these models mentioned above, and to analyze the indications of crown lengthening from the point of view of mechanics. An extracted maxillary central incisor and alveolar bone plaster model were scanned by Micro-CT and dental impression scanner (3shape D700) respectively. Then the 3D finite element models of the maxillary central incisor and 9 simulations with crown lengthening surgery and post-core restoration were constructed by Mimics 10.0, Geomagic studio 9.0 and ANSYS 14.0 software. The oblique static force (100 N) was applied to the palatal surface (the junctional area of the incisal 1/3 and middle 1/3), at 45 degrees to the longitudinal axis, then the von Mises stress of dentin, periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, post and core, as well as the periodontal ligament area, were calculated. A total of 10 high-precision three-dimensional finite element models of maxillary central incisor were established. The von Mises stress of models: post>dentin>alveolar bone>core>periodontal ligament, and the von Mises stress increased linearly with the augmentation of fracture degree (besides the core). The periodontal ligament area of the crown lengthening was reduced by 12% to 33%. The von Mises stress of periodontal ligament of the B2L2c, B2L3c, B3L1c, B3L2c, B3L3c models exceeded their threshold limit value, respectively. The maxillary central incisors with the labial fracture greater than three-quarter crown length and the palatal fracture deeper than 1 mm below the alveolar crest are not the ideal indications of the crown lengthening surgery.

  12. [Latest trends in the surgical management of mandibular condyle fractures in France, 2005-2012].

    PubMed

    Trost, O; Péron, J-M

    2013-12-01

    The surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures is commonly performed. We had for aim to present the latest trends in the surgical management of condylar fractures in France, between 2005 and 2012. A survey was performed among the 49 members of the French college of oral and maxillofacial surgeons between January and September 2012, with a questionnaire sent by email. We analyzed the therapeutic management, the surgical indications; the techniques used according to the fracture, and the postoperative treatment protocols. The data was compared to that of a similar study performed in 2005. The overall reply rate was 86%. Low subcondylar fractures were operated on in all institutions (100%), compared to 76% in 2005. The most popular technique was the high submandibular approach with intraoral miniplate fixation osteosynthesis. High subcondylar and diacapitular fractures were operated on in respectively 82% and 35% of the cases compared to 29% and 10% in 2005 with various surgical techniques and postoperative management. French maxillofacial surgeons operated on more mandibular condylar fractures in 2012 than in 2005. As observed in 2005, the lower and the more dislocated the fractures were, the more they were operated on. The high submandibular approach has become the most popular approach. The use of miniplates for bone fixation has become common. Diacapitular fractures were usually treated functionally. The postoperative management varied greatly from one team to the other. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Compression Fracture of CFRP Laminates Containing Stress Intensifications.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Christian; Schütt, Martin; Liebig, Wilfried V; Philipkowski, Timo; Kürten, Jonas; Schulte, Karl; Fiedler, Bodo

    2017-09-05

    For brittle fracture behaviour of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) under compression, several approaches exist, which describe different mechanisms during failure, especially at stress intensifications. The failure process is not only initiated by the buckling fibres, but a shear driven fibre compressive failure beneficiaries or initiates the formation of fibres into a kink-band. Starting from this kink-band further damage can be detected, which leads to the final failure. The subject of this work is an experimental investigation on the influence of ply thickness and stacking sequence in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates containing stress intensifications under compression loading. Different effects that influence the compression failure and the role the stacking sequence has on damage development and the resulting compressive strength are identified and discussed. The influence of stress intensifications is investigated in detail at a hole in open hole compression (OHC) tests. A proposed interrupted test approach allows identifying the mechanisms of damage initiation and propagation from the free edge of the hole by causing a distinct damage state and examine it at a precise instant of time during fracture process. Compression after impact (CAI) tests are executed in order to compare the OHC results to a different type of stress intensifications. Unnotched compression tests are carried out for comparison as a reference. With this approach, a more detailed description of the failure mechanisms during the sudden compression failure of CFRP is achieved. By microscopic examination of single plies from various specimens, the different effects that influence the compression failure are identified. First damage of fibres occurs always in 0°-ply. Fibre shear failure leads to local microbuckling and the formation and growth of a kink-band as final failure mechanisms. The formation of a kink-band and finally steady state kinking is shifted to higher compressive strains

  14. Compression Fracture of CFRP Laminates Containing Stress Intensifications

    PubMed Central

    Schütt, Martin; Philipkowski, Timo; Kürten, Jonas; Schulte, Karl

    2017-01-01

    For brittle fracture behaviour of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) under compression, several approaches exist, which describe different mechanisms during failure, especially at stress intensifications. The failure process is not only initiated by the buckling fibres, but a shear driven fibre compressive failure beneficiaries or initiates the formation of fibres into a kink-band. Starting from this kink-band further damage can be detected, which leads to the final failure. The subject of this work is an experimental investigation on the influence of ply thickness and stacking sequence in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates containing stress intensifications under compression loading. Different effects that influence the compression failure and the role the stacking sequence has on damage development and the resulting compressive strength are identified and discussed. The influence of stress intensifications is investigated in detail at a hole in open hole compression (OHC) tests. A proposed interrupted test approach allows identifying the mechanisms of damage initiation and propagation from the free edge of the hole by causing a distinct damage state and examine it at a precise instant of time during fracture process. Compression after impact (CAI) tests are executed in order to compare the OHC results to a different type of stress intensifications. Unnotched compression tests are carried out for comparison as a reference. With this approach, a more detailed description of the failure mechanisms during the sudden compression failure of CFRP is achieved. By microscopic examination of single plies from various specimens, the different effects that influence the compression failure are identified. First damage of fibres occurs always in 0°-ply. Fibre shear failure leads to local microbuckling and the formation and growth of a kink-band as final failure mechanisms. The formation of a kink-band and finally steady state kinking is shifted to higher compressive strains

  15. [Effect of axial stress stimulation on tibial and fibular open fractures healing after Taylor space stent fixation].

    PubMed

    Ge, Qihang; Wan, Chunyou; Liu, Yabei; Ji, Xu; Ma, Jihai; Cao, Haikun; Yong, Wei; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Ningning

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effect of axial stress stimulation on tibial and fibular open fractures healing after Taylor space stent fixation. The data of 45 cases with tibial and fibular open fractures treated by Taylor space stent fixation who meet the selection criteria between January 2015 and June 2016 were retrospectively analysed. The patients were divided into trial group (23 cases) and control group (22 cases) according to whether the axial stress stimulation was performed after operation. There was no significant difference in gender, age, affected side, cause of injury, type of fracture, and interval time from injury to operation between 2 groups ( P >0.05). The axial stress stimulation was performed in trial group after operation. The axial load sharing ratio was tested, and when the value was less than 10%, the external fixator was removed. The fracture healing time, full weight-bearing time, and external fixator removal time were recorded and compared. After 6 months of external fixator removal, the function of the limb was assessed by Johner-Wruhs criteria for evaluation of final effectiveness of treatment of tibial shaft fractures. There were 2 and 3 cases of needle foreign body reaction in trial group and control group, respectively, and healed after symptomatic anti allergic treatment. All the patients were followed up 8-12 months with an average of 10 months. All the fractures reached clinical healing, no complication such as delayed union, nonunion, or osteomyelitis occurred. The fracture healing time, full weight-bearing time, and external fixator removal time in trial group were significantly shorter than those in control group ( P <0.05). After 6 months of external fixator removal, the function of the limb was excellent in 13 cases, good in 6 cases, fair in 3 cases, and poor in 1 case in trial group, with an excellent and good rate of 82.6%; and was excellent in 5 cases, good in 10 cases, fair in 4 cases, and poor in 3 cases in control group, with an

  16. A Review of Techniques Used in the Management of Growing Skull Fractures.

    PubMed

    Vezina, Noemie; Al-Halabi, Becher; Shash, Hani; Dudley, Roy R; Gilardino, Mirko S

    2017-05-01

    Growing skull fractures (GSFs) are rare complications of pediatric head trauma that comprise skull fractures associated with an underlying dural tear and an intact arachnoid membrane. They are often misdiagnosed, and delay in management can lead to progression of the disease along with its neurological sequelae. Multiple clinical reports and qualitative reviews on this entity exist. To our knowledge, this represents the largest clinical review reporting on established techniques in the management of these fractures. A literature search was performed on the databases Embase, Medline, Cochrane, and PubMed from their inception until February 2015 using the terms "Growing," "Skull," "Fracture," and their equivalent terms. Studies included were case series with 5 or more patients describing GSFs and their management. Twenty-two articles reporting 440 patients were included in the analysis. The mean age at trauma was 8.8 months, with the mean at presentation of 21.9 months and 57.8% of the patients being males. Most commonly, a combined dura-cranioplasty was done in 61.6% of the patients. A range of autoplastic and alloplastic materials were used in both of these techniques. Improvement from preoperative clinical status in seizures and neurological deficits was noted in 18 (12.7%) and 11 (7.05%) of the patients, respectively, following operative repair and medical management. Early recognition is crucial in the management and treatment of GSF. Children at risk for developing GSF should be monitored clinically for up to 3 months following the initial insult. The surgical treatment depends on the size of the fracture and the age of the patient. A summary of the presentation, management, associated outcomes, complications, and recommendations discussed in the literature are reported within.

  17. Managing Leadership Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Vidula; Campbell, Michael; McDowell-Larsen, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Everyone experiences stress, and leaders face the additional stress brought about by the unique demands of leadership: having to make decisions with limited information, to manage conflict, to do more with less ...and faster! The consequences of stress can include health problems and deteriorating relationships. Knowing what signs of stress to…

  18. Outcome of low profile mesh plate in management of comminuted displaced fracture patella.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mohamed S; Halawa, Abdelsamie M; Adawy, Adel

    2017-06-01

    To assess the clinical results of using mesh plate in management of displaced comminuted fracture patella. Between January 2014 and October 2015, nine patients with closed displaced comminuted fracture patella were fixed using mesh plate and 2mm mini screws. All fractures united after an average of 10 weeks. At final follow-up of an average 19.6 months, average postoperative Lysholm score was 89.1±4.9, and average Postoperative Böstman scale was 27.2±3.1. No hardware related complications were recorded. Low profile mesh plate is a good option in management of comminuted fracture patella with good clinical outcome. This new surgical technique may be particularly useful in comminuted fractures when patellectomy would otherwise be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing Stress. Project Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muto, Donna; Wilk, Jan

    One of eight papers from Project Seed, this paper describes a stress management project undertaken with high school sophomores. Managing Stress is described as an interactive workshop that offers young people an opportunity to examine specific areas of stress in their lives and to learn effective ways to deal with them. The program described…

  20. Penile fracture seems more likely during sex under stressful situations.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Andrew C

    2011-12-01

    The unusual event of penile fracture occurs when there is a disruption of the tunica albuginea surrounding engorged erectile tissue during aggressive sexual behavior. There is often an audible crack and rapid detumescence with subcutaneous hemorrhage that follows. Medical literature has described the etiology and treatment of penile fracture. We report the remarkably unusual social situations of a series of patients who sustained this unique injury. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 16 patients whose injury was severe enough to require surgical repair at the University of Maryland between 2007 and 2011. Particular attention was paid to the intake interview in the emergency department and the postoperative chart notes by the attending urologist to ascertain out-of-the-ordinary social situations in which the injury was sustained. The occurrence of penile fracture is sufficiently rare that the author was able to interact personally with most of the patients. The patients were remarkably forthcoming with the personal social dynamics of the sexual encounter. Half of these penile fracture patients sustained the injury during an extramarital affair. Only three patients sustained the injury in a bedroom; the remainder was in out-of-the-ordinary locations for sexual intercourse, e.g., cars, elevator, the workplace, and public restrooms. Penile fracture patients appear to be a unique population of men who are having sexual intercourse under stressful situations. Extramarital affairs and out-of-the-ordinary locations appear common in patients sustaining this relatively rare injury. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. Biomechanical modeling of acetabular component polyethylene stresses, fracture risk, and wear rate following press-fit implantation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kevin L; Rundell, Steve; Liepins, Imants; Laurent, Ryan; Markel, David; Kurtz, Steven M

    2009-11-01

    Press-fit implantation may result in acetabular component deformation between the ischial-ilial columns ("pinching"). The biomechanical and clinical consequences of liner pinching due to press-fit implantation have not been well studied. We compared the effects of pinching on the polyethylene fracture risk, potential wear rate, and stresses for two different thickness liners using computational methods. Line-to-line ("no pinch") reaming and 2 mm underreaming press fit ("pinch") conditions were examined for Trident cups with X3 polyethylene liner wall thicknesses of 5.9 mm (36E) and 3.8 mm (40E). Press-fit cup deformations were measured from a foam block configuration. A hybrid material model, calibrated to experimentally determined stress-strain behavior of sequentially annealed polyethylene, was applied to the computational model. Molecular chain stretch did not exceed the fracture threshold in any cases. Nominal shell pinch of 0.28 mm was estimated to increase the volumetric wear rate by 70% for both cups and peak contact stresses by 140 and 170% for the 5.9 and 3.8 mm-thick liners, respectively. Although pinching increases liner stresses, polyethylene fracture is highly unlikely, and the volumetric wear rates are likely to be low compared to conventional polyethylene. (c) 2009 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Principles of management and results of treating the fractured femur during and after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Nelson V; Mitchell, Philip A; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-01-01

    The management of fractures of the femur during and after total hip arthroplasty can be difficult, and treatment can be fraught with complications. The ideal scenario would be one in which these fractures are prevented. It is important that the surgeon has a through understanding of the principles of managing these fractures and has access to a variety of fixation and prosthetic devices and allograft bone when necessary in order to provide the best treatment. Because periprosthetic fractures range from the very simple (requiring no surgical intervention) to the complex (requiring major revision), a classification system of these fractures aids in understanding both the principles of management and results of treatment.

  3. Finite element method for analysis of stresses arising in the skull after external loading in cranio-orbital fractures.

    PubMed

    Wanyura, Hubert; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Bossak, Maciej; Samolczyk-Wanyura, Danuta; Stopa, Zygmunt

    2012-01-01

    The craniofacial skeleton remains not fully recognised as far as its mechanical resistance properties are concerned. Heretofore, the only available information on the mechanism of cranial bone fractures came from clinical observations, since the clinical evaluation in a living individual is practically impossible. It seems crucial to implement computer methods of virtual research into clinical practice. Such methods, which have long been used in the technical sciences, may either confirm or disprove previous observations. The aim of the study was to identify the areas of stress concentrations caused by external loads, which can lead to cranio-orbital fractures (COF), by the finite element method (FEM). For numerical analysis, a three-dimensional commercially available geometrical model of the skull was used which was imported into software of FEM. Computations were performed with ANSYS 12.1 Static Structural module. The loads were applied laterally to the frontal squama, the zygomatic process and partly to the upper orbital rim to locate dangerous concentration of stresses potentially resulting in COF. Changes in the area of force application revealed differences in values, quality and the extent of the stress distribution. Depending on the area of force application the following parameters would change: the value and area of stresses characteristic of COF. The distribution of stresses obtained in this study allowed definition of both the locations most vulnerable to fracture and sites from which fractures may originate or propagate.

  4. In situ stress, natural fracture distribution, and borehole elongation in the Auburn Geothermal Well, Auburn, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, Stephen H.; Healy, John H.; Zoback, Mark D.

    1985-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements and a borehole televiewer survey were conducted in a 1.6‐km‐deep well at Auburn, New York. This well, which was drilled at the outer margin of the Appalachian Fold and Thrust Belt in the Appalachian Plateau, penetrates approximately 1540 m of lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and terminates 60 m into the Precambrian marble basement. Analysis of the hydraulic fracturing tests indicates that the minimum horizontal principal stress increases in a nearly linear fashion from 9.9±0.2 MPa at 593 m to 30.6±0.4 MPa at 1482 m. The magnitude of the maximum horizontal principal stress increases in a less regular fashion from 13.8±1.2 MPa to 49.0±2.0 MPa over the same depth range. The magnitudes of the horizontal principal stresses relative to the calculated overburden stress are somewhat lower than is the norm for this region and are indicative of a strike‐slip faulting regime that, at some depths, is transitional to normal faulting. As expected from the relative aseismicity of central New York State, however, analysis of the magnitudes of the horizontal principal stresses indicates, at least to a depth of 1.5 km, that frictional failure on favorably oriented preexisting fault planes is unlikely. Orientations of the hydraulic fractures at 593 and 919 m indicate that the azimuth of the maximum horizontal principal stress at Auburn is N83°E±15°, in agreement with other stress field indicators for this region. The borehole televiewer log revealed a considerable number of planar features in the Auburn well, the great majority of which are subhorizontal (dips < 5°) and are thought to be bedding plane washouts or drill bit scour marks. In addition, a smaller number of distinct natural fractures were observed on the borehole televiewer log. Of these, the distinct steeply dipping natural fractures in the lower half of the sedimentary section at Auburn tend to strike approximately east‐west, while those in the upper part of the

  5. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, Bruno; Ozaki, Norimasa; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Faenov, Anatoly; Habara, Hideaki; Harmand, Marion; Hartley, Nicholas; Ilnitsky, Denis; Inogamov, Nail; Inubushi, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Katayama, Tetsuo; Koyama, Takahisa; Koenig, Michel; Krygier, Andrew; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; McBride, Emma; Migdal, Kirill Petrovich; Morard, Guillaume; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Okuchi, Takuo; Pikuz, Tatiana; Purevjav, Narangoo; Sakata, Osami; Sano, Yasuhisa; Sato, Tomoko; Sekine, Toshimori; Seto, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Tanaka, Kazuo; Tange, Yoshinori; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Umeda, Yuhei; Vinci, Tommaso; Yabashi, Makina; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2017-06-01

    The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power optical laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of [Formula: see text] ~2 × 10 8 to 3.5 × 10 8 s -1 . A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathway to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions.

  6. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress

    DOE PAGES

    Albertazzi, Bruno; Ozaki, Norimasa; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; ...

    2017-06-02

    The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power opticalmore » laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of Embedded Image ~2 × 10 8 to 3.5 × 10 8 s -1. A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathway to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions.« less

  7. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress

    PubMed Central

    Albertazzi, Bruno; Ozaki, Norimasa; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Faenov, Anatoly; Habara, Hideaki; Harmand, Marion; Hartley, Nicholas; Ilnitsky, Denis; Inogamov, Nail; Inubushi, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Katayama, Tetsuo; Koyama, Takahisa; Koenig, Michel; Krygier, Andrew; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; McBride, Emma; Migdal, Kirill Petrovich; Morard, Guillaume; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Okuchi, Takuo; Pikuz, Tatiana; Purevjav, Narangoo; Sakata, Osami; Sano, Yasuhisa; Sato, Tomoko; Sekine, Toshimori; Seto, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Tanaka, Kazuo; Tange, Yoshinori; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Umeda, Yuhei; Vinci, Tommaso; Yabashi, Makina; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power optical laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of ε. ~2 × 108 to 3.5 × 108 s−1. A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathway to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions. PMID:28630909

  8. Expedited patient-specific assessment of contact stress exposure in the ankle joint following definitive articular fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Kern, Andrew M; Anderson, Donald D

    2015-09-18

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85 ± 0.64 MPa and 22.5 ± 11.5mm(2). As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proximal femoral fractures: Principles of management and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravi; Banerjee, Sumit

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the principles involved in the management of proximal femoral fractures as reported in the literature. A medical literature search in the MEDLINE (PubMed) and Cochrane database was undertaken to review strategies and principles in proximal femoral fracture treatment. Randomized control trials and meta analysis were given preference while case reports/small series were rejected. Early anatomical reduction and surgical fixation remains the best option to reduce the risk of complications like non-union and avascular necrosis in treating fracture neck femurs. Cancellous screws continue to be the preferred treatment for fixation of neck femur fractures in younger population until the benefit of using sliding hip screws is validated by large multicentric studies. In the geriatric age group, early prosthetic replacement brings down the mortality and morbidity associated with neck femur fractures. Sliding hip screw (DHS) is the best available option for stable inter trochanteric fractures. The use of intramedullary nails e.g. PFN is beneficial in treating inter trochanteric fractures with comminution and loss of lateral buttress. Intramedullary implants have been proven to have increased success rates in subtrochanteric fractures and should be preferred over extramedullary plate fixation systems.

  10. Surgical management of fractured orthodontic mini- implant- a case report.

    PubMed

    Desai, Manthan; Jain, Anoop; Sumra, Nida

    2015-01-01

    The idea of absolute anchorage has always been an elusive goal for clinicians. Orthodontic mini-implants or temporary anchorage devices allow tooth movements previously thought to be impossible or difficult. Although extensive literature exists on use of temporary anchorage devices, their failures have been hardly focused upon, especially implant fracture. The following case report describes successful management of fractured orthodontic mini-implant.

  11. Modelling the graphite fracture mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquemoud, C.; Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-07-01

    In order to define a design criterion for graphite components, it is important to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the graphite fracture, to include them in a more effective modelling. In a first step, a large panel of experiments have been realised in order to build up an important database; results of tensile tests, 3 and 4 point bending tests on smooth and notched specimens have been analysed and have demonstrated an important geometry related effects on the behavior up to fracture. Then, first simulations with an elastic or an elastoplastic bilinear constitutive law have not made it possiblemore » to simulate the experimental fracture stress variations with the specimen geometry, the fracture mechanisms of the graphite being at the microstructural scale. That is the reason why a specific F.E. model of the graphite structure has been developed in which every graphite grain has been meshed independently, the crack initiation along the basal plane of the particles as well as the crack propagation and coalescence have been modelled too. This specific model has been used to test two different approaches for fracture initiation: a critical stress criterion and two criteria of fracture mechanic type. They are all based on crystallographic considerations as a global critical stress criterion gave unsatisfactory results. The criteria of fracture mechanic type being extremely unstable and unable to represent the graphite global behaviour up to the final collapse, the critical stress criterion has been preferred to predict the results of the large range of available experiments, on both smooth and notched specimens. In so doing, the experimental observations have been correctly simulated: the geometry related effects on the experimental fracture stress dispersion, the specimen volume effects on the macroscopic fracture stress and the crack propagation at a constant stress intensity factor. In addition, the parameters of the criterion have been related to

  12. Discrete element analysis is a valid method for computing joint contact stress in the hip before and after acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Kevin C; Thomas-Aitken, Holly D; Rudert, M James; Kern, Andrew M; Willey, Michael C; Anderson, Donald D; Goetz, Jessica E

    2018-01-23

    Evaluation of abnormalities in joint contact stress that develop after inaccurate reduction of an acetabular fracture may provide a potential means for predicting the risk of developing post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a computational technique for calculating intra-articular contact stress distributions in a fraction of the time required to obtain the same information using the more commonly employed finite element analysis technique. The goal of this work was to validate the accuracy of DEA-computed contact stress against physical measurements of contact stress made in cadaveric hips using Tekscan sensors. Four static loading tests in a variety of poses from heel-strike to toe-off were performed in two different cadaveric hip specimens with the acetabulum intact and again with an intentionally malreduced posterior wall acetabular fracture. DEA-computed contact stress was compared on a point-by-point basis to stress measured from the physical experiments. There was good agreement between computed and measured contact stress over the entire contact area (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.99). DEA-computed peak contact stress was within an average of 0.5 MPa (range 0.2-0.8 MPa) of the Tekscan peak stress for intact hips, and within an average of 0.6 MPa (range 0-1.6 MPa) for fractured cases. DEA-computed contact areas were within an average of 33% of the Tekscan-measured areas (range: 1.4-60%). These results indicate that the DEA methodology is a valid method for accurately estimating contact stress in both intact and fractured hips. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceived stress and dietary choices: The moderating role of stress management.

    PubMed

    Errisuriz, Vanessa L; Pasch, Keryn E; Perry, Cheryl L

    2016-08-01

    Many college students exhibit unhealthy eating behaviors, consuming large quantities of high-fat foods and few fruits and vegetables. Perceived stress has been linked to daily dietary choices among college students; however, this work has been conducted among predominantly white, female populations. The role of perceived stress management in moderating this relationship is unclear. This study investigated the relationship between perceived stress and dietary choices among a diverse sample of male and female college freshmen and assessed whether perceived ability to manage stress moderated this relationship. 613 students from a large, public university completed an online survey which assessed past week consumption of various foods and beverages (e.g. soda, fast food, fruits, vegetables), as well as perceived stress and ability to manage stress. Hierarchical linear regression examined the association between perceived stress and past week dietary choices, and the moderating effect of perceived ability to manage stress, controlling for demographic variables. Perceived stress was positively associated with past week soda, coffee, energy drink, salty snack, frozen food, and fast food consumption (p<0.05). Perceived stress management moderated the relationship between stress and sweet snack consumption. Individuals who reported low ability to manage stress consumed greater amounts. Findings indicate greater stress is associated with poor dietary choices among college freshmen. The relationship between stress and sweet snack consumption was exacerbated among those who reported low ability to manage stress. It may be important for college nutrition education programs to focus on the relationship between stress and diet and promote effective stress management techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ankle stress test for predicting the need for surgical fixation of isolated fibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Egol, Kenneth A; Amirtharajah, Mohana; Amirtharage, Mohana; Tejwani, Nirmal C; Capla, Edward L; Koval, Kenneth J

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the prevalence of medial ankle widening among patients with an isolated fibular fracture and to determine the functional outcome of nonoperative treatment despite a diagnosis of a supination-external rotation stage-IV injury based on stress radiography. One hundred and one patients with evidence of an isolated fibular fracture and an intact mortise seen on a standard ankle trauma radiograph series were evaluated with stress radiographs. Clinical signs were recorded at the time of presentation. A positive stress test was defined as > or =4 mm of widening of the medial clear space. Patients with a negative stress test were treated nonoperatively, those with a positive stress test and clinical signs of medial injury were treated surgically, and those with a positive stress test and no signs of medial injury were treated according to the preference of the surgeon and patient. The patients were followed prospectively with radiographs and ankle outcome scores. Sixty-six (65%) of the 101 patients had a positive stress radiograph. Thirty-six of them had signs of medial injury, and thirty had no medial injury. With regard to predicting a positive stress radiograph, medial tenderness had a sensitivity of 56% and a specificity of 80%, swelling had a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of 71%, and ecchymosis had a sensitivity of 26% and a specificity of 91%. Of the subset of patients without signs of medial injury, twenty were treated nonoperatively (group I) and ten were treated operatively (group II). Two of the twenty patients in group I had evidence of persistent widening of the medial clear space at the time of the latest follow-up (mean, 7.4 months); only one of those patients was symptomatic. The average American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was 94 points in group I and 93 points in group II. We found a high rate of positive stress radiographs for patients who presented with an isolated fibular fracture and

  15. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  16. Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollak, Ave

    This guide is intended for use in conducting a three-session course that will help employees in the manufacturing and service industries acquire necessary stress management skills. The instructional materials presented are designed to help students learn to accomplish the following: recognize good and bad stress and understand the physical,…

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Vertebral Compression Fractures.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Jason; Davis, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are the most common complication of osteoporosis, affecting more than 700,000 Americans annually. Fracture risk increases with age, with four in 10 white women older than 50 years experiencing a hip, spine, or vertebral fracture in their lifetime. VCFs can lead to chronic pain, disfigurement, height loss, impaired activities of daily living, increased risk of pressure sores, pneumonia, and psychological distress. Patients with an acute VCF may report abrupt onset of back pain with position changes, coughing, sneezing, or lifting. Physical examination findings are often normal, but can demonstrate kyphosis and midline spine tenderness. More than two-thirds of patients are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. Acute VCFs may be treated with analgesics such as acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, narcotics, and calcitonin. Physicians must be mindful of medication adverse effects in older patients. Other conservative therapeutic options include limited bed rest, bracing, physical therapy, nerve root blocks, and epidural injections. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation, including vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, is controversial, but can be considered in patients with inadequate pain relief with nonsurgical care or when persistent pain substantially affects quality of life. Family physicians can help prevent vertebral fractures through management of risk factors and the treatment of osteoporosis.

  18. Relationships between fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Sanderson, D. J.; Rotevatn, A.

    2018-01-01

    Fracture systems comprise many fractures that may be grouped into sets based on their orientation, type and relative age. The fractures are often arranged in a network that involves fracture branches that interact with one another. Interacting fractures are termed geometrically coupled when they share an intersection line and/or kinematically coupled when the displacements, stresses and strains of one fracture influences those of the other. Fracture interactions are characterised in terms of the following. 1) Fracture type: for example, whether they have opening (e.g., joints, veins, dykes), closing (stylolites, compaction bands), shearing (e.g., faults, deformation bands) or mixed-mode displacements. 2) Geometry (e.g., relative orientations) and topology (the arrangement of the fractures, including their connectivity). 3) Chronology: the relative ages of the fractures. 4) Kinematics: the displacement distributions of the interacting fractures. It is also suggested that interaction can be characterised in terms of mechanics, e.g., the effects of the interaction on the stress field. It is insufficient to describe only the components of a fracture network, with fuller understanding coming from determining the interactions between the different components of the network.

  19. On the link between stress field and small-scale hydraulic fracture growth in anisotropic rock derived from microseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, Valentin Samuel; Doetsch, Joseph; Maurer, Hansruedi; Krietsch, Hannes; Amann, Florian; Evans, Keith Frederick; Nejati, Morteza; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Valley, Benoît; Obermann, Anne Christine; Wiemer, Stefan; Giardini, Domenico

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the stress field at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) underground rock laboratory, a series of hydrofracturing and overcoring tests were performed. Hydrofracturing was accompanied by seismic monitoring using a network of highly sensitive piezosensors and accelerometers that were able to record small seismic events associated with metre-sized fractures. Due to potential discrepancies between the hydrofracture orientation and stress field estimates from overcoring, it was essential to obtain high-precision hypocentre locations that reliably illuminate fracture growth. Absolute locations were improved using a transverse isotropic P-wave velocity model and by applying joint hypocentre determination that allowed for the computation of station corrections. We further exploited the high degree of waveform similarity of events by applying cluster analysis and relative relocation. Resulting clouds of absolute and relative located seismicity showed a consistent east-west strike and 70° dip for all hydrofractures. The fracture growth direction from microseismicity is consistent with the principal stress orientations from the overcoring stress tests, provided that an anisotropic elastic model for the rock mass is used in the data inversions. The σ1 stress is significantly larger than the other two principal stresses and has a reasonably well-defined orientation that is subparallel to the fracture plane; σ2 and σ3 are almost equal in magnitude and thus lie on a circle defined by the standard errors of the solutions. The poles of the microseismicity planes also lie on this circle towards the north. Analysis of P-wave polarizations suggested double-couple focal mechanisms with both thrust and normal faulting mechanisms present, whereas strike-slip and thrust mechanisms would be expected from the overcoring-derived stress solution. The reasons for these discrepancies can be explained by pressure leak-off, but possibly may also involve stress field rotation around the

  20. Role of MRI in the diagnosis and management of patients with clinical scaphoid fracture.

    PubMed

    Tibrewal, Saket; Jayakumar, Prakash; Vaidya, Sujit; Ang, Swee Chai

    2012-01-01

    The American College of Radiologists (ACR) recognises the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the investigation of choice in patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture but normal plain radiographs. The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in the UK produces no similar guidelines, as evidenced by the inconsistent management of such cases in hospitals around the UK. In discussion with our musculoskeletal radiologists, we implemented new guidelines to standardise management of our patients and now report our findings. A consecutive series of 137 patients referred to the orthopaedic department with clinically suspected scaphoid fracture but normal series of plain radiographs were prospectively followed up over a two-year period. We implemented the use of early MRI for these patients and determined its incidence of detected scaphoid injury in addition to other occult injuries. We then prospectively examined results of these findings on patient management. Thirty-seven (27%) MRI examinations were normal with no evidence of a bony or soft-tissue injury. Soft-tissue injury was diagnosed in 59 patients (43.4%). Of those, 46 were triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears (33.8%) and 18 were intercarpal ligament injuries (13.2 %). Bone marrow oedema with no distinct fracture was discovered in 55 cases (40.4%). In 17 (12.5%) cases, this involved only the scaphoid. In the remainder, it also involved the other carpal bones or distal radius. Fracture(s) were diagnosed on 30 examinations (22.0%). MRI should be regarded as the gold standard investigation for patients in whom a scaphoid fracture is suspected clinically. It allows the diagnosis of occult bony and soft-tissue injuries that can present clinically as a scaphoid fracture; it also helps exclude patients with no fracture. We believe that there is a need to implement national guidelines for managing occult scaphoid fractures.

  1. Analysis of Pediatric Maxillofacial Fractures Requiring Operative Treatment: Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Allred, Lindsay J; Crantford, John C; Reynolds, Michael F; David, Lisa R

    2015-11-01

    Maxillofacial fractures in pediatric trauma patients require significant force and frequently are associated with concomitant injuries. The anatomic and developmental differences between the adult and child that impact patterns of injury also affect management and outcomes. The aim of this study was to analyze fracture location, mechanism, concomitant injuries as well as methods of surgical treatment and outcomes, to improve management of this patient population. A retrospective review was conducted of pediatric patients with maxillofacial fractures presenting to a level-1 trauma center during an 8-year span. Only patients requiring surgical intervention, 204, were included in this study. Data pertaining to the location of injury, mechanism, associated injuries, surgical treatment, outcomes, and complications were analyzed. The most common fracture location was the mandible (36.3%), then the nasal bone (35.3%), followed by the tripod fracture (10.8%). A total of 30.7% of patients were involved in motor vehicle accidents, with the next most common mechanisms being sports (24.4%), and assault (13.7%). A total of 46% of the patients sustained concomitant injuries, with the majority involving cerebral trauma (14.7%) or the extremities (9.3%). Total 75.4% of all fractures, excluding the nose, were treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Our complication rate was 11.2%. Pediatric craniofacial trauma remains a frequent presentation to the emergency department of trauma centers. Facial fracture patterns and mechanism of trauma observed in the pediatric population presenting to this facility are consistent with incidences reported in the literature. Knowledge of treatment options and potential complications is an important tool in the management of the pediatric trauma patient.

  2. Stress Management: Social Support

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Having close friends and family has far-reaching benefits for your health. Here's how to build and maintain these ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/social-support/art-20044445 . Mayo Clinic ...

  3. HSTRESS: A computer program to calculate the height of a hydraulic fracture in a multi-layered stress medium

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.

    A computer code for calculating hydraulic fracture height and width in a stressed-layer medium has been modified for easy use on a personal computer. HSTRESS allows for up to 51 layers having different thicknesses, stresses and fracture toughnesses. The code can calculate fracture height versus pressure or pressure versus fracture height, depending on the design model in which the data will be used. At any pressure/height, a width profile is calculated and an equivalent width factor and flow resistance factor are determined. This program is written in FORTRAN. Graphics use PLOT88 software by Plotworks, Inc., but the graphics software mustmore » be obtained by the user because of licensing restrictions. A version without graphics can also be run. This code is available through the National Energy Software Center (NESC), operated by Argonne National Laboratory. 14 refs., 21 figs.« less

  4. Outcome of nonoperative management of displaced oblique spiral fractures of the fifth metatarsal shaft.

    PubMed

    Aynardi, Michael; Pedowitz, David I; Saffel, Heather; Piper, Christine; Raikin, Steven M

    2013-12-01

    Nonoperative management has been the preferred treatment for displaced oblique spiral fractures of the fifth metatarsal shaft; yet a paucity of literature supports this claim. The purpose of this investigation was to report the incidence and long-term outcome in the largest cohort of these fractures reported to date. From 2006 through 2010, 2990 patients sustaining closed metatarsal fractures were seen and treated. Displaced, oblique, spiral fractures of the distal shaft of the fifth metatarsal were identified and follow-up was conducted. Only patients who were initially treated with nonoperative management were included. Patients were seen at 6 and 12 weeks, and a minimum 2-year follow-up was conducted. In addition, demographic information was obtained, and the Short Form-12 (SF-12) and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) were administered. Average follow-up was 3.5 years. In all, 142 acute fractures were managed for an incidence of 4.8% of all metatarsal fractures. There were 117 females and 25 males, average age was 55. FAAM activities of daily living subscale scores averaged 95.5 (±5.7), while FAAM sports subscales were 92.7 (±9.1). SF-12 physical and mental scores averaged 51.4 (±4.9) and 50.3 (±4.6), respectively. There were 2 delayed unions, 1 asymptomatic nonunion treated nonoperatively, and 2 painful nonunions that required open reduction internal fixation with bone grafting. This large cohort described the relative incidence and functional outcomes of displaced oblique fracture of shaft of the fifth metatarsal bone treated nonoperatively. Nonoperative management of these fractures resulted in excellent, long-term functional outcomes. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  5. Measurement of fracture stress for 6000-series extruded aluminum alloy tube using multiaxial tube expansion testing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Keisuke; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Ilinich, Andrey; Luckey, George

    2018-05-01

    A servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine with an optical 3D digital image correlation system (DIC) is used to measure the multiaxial deformation behavior of an extruded aluminum alloy tube for a strain range from initial yield to fracture. The outer diameter of the test sample is 50.8 mm and wall thickness 2.8 mm. Nine linear stress paths are applied to the specimens: σɸ (axial true stress component) : σθ (circumferential true stress component) = 1:0, 4:1, 2:1, 4:3, 1:1, 3:4, 1:2, 1:4, and 0:1. The equivalent strain rate is approximately 5 × 10-4 s-1 constant. The forming limit curve (FLC) and forming limit stress curve (FLSC) are also measured. Moreover, the average true stress components inside a localized necking area are determined for each specimen from the thickness strain data for the localized necking area and the geometry of the fracture surface.

  6. Proximal femoral fractures: Principles of management and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravi; Banerjee, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to review the principles involved in the management of proximal femoral fractures as reported in the literature. Methods: A medical literature search in the MEDLINE (PubMed) and Cochrane database was undertaken to review strategies and principles in proximal femoral fracture treatment. Randomized control trials and meta analysis were given preference while case reports/small series were rejected. Results and conclusions: Early anatomical reduction and surgical fixation remains the best option to reduce the risk of complications like non-union and avascular necrosis in treating fracture neck femurs. Cancellous screws continue to be the preferred treatment for fixation of neck femur fractures in younger population until the benefit of using sliding hip screws is validated by large multicentric studies. In the geriatric age group, early prosthetic replacement brings down the mortality and morbidity associated with neck femur fractures. Sliding hip screw (DHS) is the best available option for stable inter trochanteric fractures. The use of intramedullary nails e.g. PFN is beneficial in treating inter trochanteric fractures with comminution and loss of lateral buttress. Intramedullary implants have been proven to have increased success rates in subtrochanteric fractures and should be preferred over extramedullary plate fixation systems. PMID:25983451

  7. Correlation of stress-wave-emission characteristics with fracture aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartbower, C. E.; Reuter, W. G.; Morais, C. F.; Crimmins, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    A study to correlate stress wave emission characteristics with fracture in welded and unwelded aluminum alloys tested at room and cryogenic temperature is reported. The stress wave emission characteristics investigated were those which serve to presage crack instability; viz., a marked increase in:(1) signal amplitude; (2) signal repetition rate; and (3) the slope of cumulative count plotted versus load. The alloys were 7075-T73, 2219-T87 and 2014-T651, welded with MIG and TIG using 2319 and 4043 filler wire. The testing was done with both unnotched and part-through-crack (PTC) tension specimens and with 18-in.-dia subscale pressure vessels. In the latter testing, a real time, acoustic emission, triangulation system was used to locate the source of each stress wave emission. With such a system, multiple emissions from a given location were correlated with defects found by conventional nondestructive inspection.

  8. Experimental Investigation on the Basic Law of the Fracture Spatial Morphology for Water Pressure Blasting in a Drillhole Under True Triaxial Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bingxiang; Li, Pengfeng

    2015-07-01

    The present literature on the morphology of water pressure blasting fractures in drillholes is not sufficient and does not take triaxial confining stress into account. Because the spatial morphology of water pressure blasting fractures in drillholes is not clear, the operations lack an exact basis. Using a large true triaxial water pressure blasting experimental system and an acoustic emission 3-D positioning system, water pressure blasting experiments on cement mortar test blocks (300 mm × 300 mm × 300 mm) were conducted to study the associated basic law of the fracture spatial morphology. The experimental results show that water pressure blasting does not always generate bubble pulsation. After water pressure blasting under true triaxial stress, a crushed compressive zone and a blasting fracture zone are formed from the inside, with the blasting section of the naked drillhole as the center, to the outside. The shape of the outer edges of the two zones is ellipsoidal. The range of the blasting fracture is large in the radial direction of the drillhole, where the surrounding pressure is large, i.e., the range of the blasting fracture in the drillhole radial cross-section is approximately ellipsoidal. The rock near the drillhole wall is affected by a tensile stress wave caused by the test block boundary reflection, resulting in more flake fractures appearing in the fracturing crack surface in the drillhole axial direction and parallel to the boundary surface. The flake fracture is thin, presenting a small-range flake fracture. The spatial morphology of the water pressure blasting fracture in the drillhole along the axial direction is similar to a wide-mouth Chinese bottle: the crack extent is large near the drillhole orifice, gradually narrows inward along the drillhole axial direction, and then increases into an approximate ellipsoid in the internal naked blasting section. Based on the causes of the crack generation, the blasting cracks are divided into three

  9. Osteoporosis management and fractures in the Métis of Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Jandoc, Racquel; Jembere, Nathaniel; Khan, Saba; Russell, Storm J; Allard, Yvon; Cadarette, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Half of Métis citizens, compared to less than 10 % of the general population of Ontario, reside in northern regions, with little access to bone mineral density (BMD) testing. Métis citizens had lower sex-specific and age-standardized rates of BMD testing, yet similar rates of fracture (both sexes) and pharmacotherapy (women only). To examine osteoporosis management and common osteoporosis-related fractures among Métis citizens compared to the general population of older adults residing in Ontario. We linked healthcare (medical and pharmacy) utilization and administrative (demographic) databases with the Métis Nation of Ontario citizenship registry to estimate osteoporosis management (bone mineral density [BMD] testing, pharmacotherapy) and fractures (hip, humerus, radius/ulna) among adults aged ≥50 years, from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2011. Pharmacotherapy data were limited to residents aged ≥65 years. Sex-specific and age-standardized rates were compared between the Métis and the general population. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare rates of BMD testing after controlling for differences in age and region of residence between the Métis and the general population. We studied 4219 Métis citizens (55 % men), and 140 (3 %) experienced a fracture. Half of Métis citizens, compared to less than 10 % of the general population of Ontario, resided in northern regions. We identified significantly lower sex-specific and age-standardized rates of BMD testing among Métis compared to the general population, yet found little difference in fracture rates (both sexes) or pharmacotherapy (women only). Differences in BMD testing disappeared after adjusting for region of residence among women yet remained significant among men. Despite finding significantly lower rates of osteoporosis management among men, Métis men and women were found to have similar age-standardized fracture rates to the general population.

  10. Quantifying Discrete Fracture Network Connectivity in Hydraulic Fracturing Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbancic, T.; Ardakani, E. P.; Baig, A.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracture stimulations generally result in microseismicity that is associated with the activation or extension of pre-existing microfractures and discontinuities. Microseismic events acquired under 3D downhole sensor coverage provide accurate event locations outlining hydraulic fracture growth. Combined with source characteristics, these events provide a high quality input for seismic moment tensor inversion and eventually constructing the representative discrete fracture network (DFN). In this study, we investigate the strain and stress state, identified fracture orientation, and DFN connectivity and performance for example stages in a multistage perf and plug completion in a North American shale play. We use topology, the familiar concept in many areas of structural geology, to further describe the relationships between the activated fractures and their effectiveness in enhancing permeability. We explore how local perturbations of stress state lead to the activation of different fractures sets and how that effects the DFN interaction and complexity. In particular, we observe that a more heterogeneous stress state shows a higher percentage of sub-horizontal fractures or bedding plane slips. Based on topology, the fractures are evenly distributed from the injection point, with decreasing numbers of connections by distance. The dimensionless measure of connection per branch and connection per line are used for quantifying the DFN connectivity. In order to connect the concept of connectivity back to productive volume and stimulation efficiency, the connectivity is compared with the character of deformation in the reservoir as deduced from the collective behavior of microseismicity using robustly determined source parameters.

  11. Elastic stress transmission and transformation (ESTT) by confined liquid: A new mechanics for fracture in elastic lithosphere of the earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Xing-Wang; Peters, Stephen; Liang, Guang-He; Zhang, Bao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Tectonic stress alters local stress fields in the surrounding country rocks and therefore synchronously varies the local effective tensile tangential stress and the nature and geometry of the liquid-driven fractures.

  12. Current concepts in the management of pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N.; Kumar, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect (PFUDD) may be associated with disabling complications, such as recurrent stricture, urinary incontinence, and erectile dysfunction. In this article we review the current concepts in the evaluation and surgical management of PFUDD, including redo urethroplasty. Materials and Methods: A PubMed™ search was performed using the keywords “pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect, anastomotic urethroplasty, pelvic fracture urethral stricture, pelvic fracture urethral injuries, and redo-urethroplasty.” The search was limited to papers published from 1980 to March 2010 with special focus on those published in the last 15 years. The relevant articles were reviewed with regard to etiology, role of imaging, and the techniques of urethroplasty. Results: Pelvic fracture due to accidents was the most common etiology of PFUDD that usually involved the membranous urethra. Modern cross-sectional imaging, such as sonourethrography and magnetic resonance imaging help assess stricture pathology better, but their precise role in PFUDD management remains undefined. Surgical treatment with perineal anastomotic urethroplasty yields a success rate of more than 90% in most studies. The most important complication of surgical reconstruction is restenosis, occurring in less than 10% cases, most of which can be corrected by a redo anastomotic urethroplasty. The most common complication associated with this condition is erectile dysfunction. Urinary incontinence is a much rarer complication of this surgery in the present day. Conclusions: Anastomotic urethroplasty remains the cornerstone in the management of PFUDD, even in previously failed repairs. Newer innovations are needed to address the problem of erectile dysfunction associated with this condition. PMID:22022064

  13. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Lorenz, J.C.

    This project was a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the Harvey E. Yates Company (Heyco), Roswell, NM, conducted under the auspices of Department of Energy`s Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project applied Sandia perspectives on the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology for the stimulation and production of low permeability gas reservoirs to low permeability oil reservoirs, such as those typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Delaware Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report details the results and analyses obtained in 1990 from core, logs, stress, and other data taken from three additional development wells. An overallmore » summary gives results from all five wells studied in this project in 1989--1990. Most of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones.« less

  14. Diagnosis and management of hook of hamate fractures.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Assaf; Bishop, Allen T; Suchyta, Marissa A; Moran, Steven L

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time to diagnosis and management of hook of hamate fractures in an era of advanced imaging. We performed a retrospective study of 51 patients treated for hook of hamate fractures. Patients were sent a quickDASH questionnaire regarding the outcomes of their treatment. Hook of hamate fractures were diagnosed with advanced imaging at a median of 27 days. Clinical findings of hook of hamate tenderness had better sensitivity than carpal tunnel-view radiographs. Nonunion occurred in 24% of patients with non-operative treatment and did not occur in the operative group. Both treatment groups achieved good clinical results, with a grip strength of 80% compared with the non-injured hand and a median quickDASH score of 2. Advanced imaging improved the time to diagnosis and treatment compared to historical case series. Nonunion is common in patients treated non-operatively. IV.

  15. Diabetic calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Sagray, Bryan A; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Calcaneal fractures among the diabetic population are severe and complex injuries that warrant careful evaluation in an effort to carry out adequate conservative or surgical management. The complication rates associated with diabetic fracture management are increased and may include poor wound healing, deep infection, malunion, and Charcot neuroarthropathy, each of which can pose a risk for limb loss. The significant surgery-associated morbidity accompanying diabetic calcaneal fractures has led to improved methods of calcaneal fracture management. This article reviews the overall management of diabetic calcaneal fractures, complications, and outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in early diagnosis of metatarsal bone stress fractures: a pilot study of 37 patients.

    PubMed

    Banal, Frédéric; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Foltz, Violaine; Goldcher, Alain; Etchepare, Fabien; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Koeger, Anne-Claude; Bourgeois, Pierre; Fautrel, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    To date, early diagnosis of stress fractures depends on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bone scan scintigraphy, as radiographs are usually normal at onset of symptoms. These examinations are expensive or invasive, time-consuming, and poorly accessible. A recent report has shown the ability of ultrasonography (US) to detect early stress fractures. Our objective was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of US versus dedicated MRI (0.2 Tesla), taken as the gold standard, in early diagnosis of metatarsal bone stress fractures. A case-control study from November 2006 to December 2007 was performed. All consecutive patients with mechanical pain and swelling of the metatarsal region for less than 3 months and with normal radiographs were included. US and dedicated MRI examinations of the metatarsal bones were performed the same day by experienced rheumatologists with expertise in US and MRI. Reading was undertaken blind to the clinical assessment and MRI/US results. Forty-one feet were analyzed on US and dedicated MRI from 37 patients (28 women, 9 men, mean age 52.7 +/- 14.1 yrs). MRI detected 13 fractures in 12 patients. Sensitivity of US was 83%, specificity 76%, positive predictive value 59%, and negative predictive value 92%. Positive likehood ratio was 3.45, negative likehood ratio 0.22. In cases of normal radiographs, US is indicated in the diagnosis of metatarsal bone stress fractures, as it is a low cost, noninvasive, rapid, and easy technique with good sensitivity and specificity. From these data, we propose a new imaging algorithm including US.

  17. Stress inversion using borehole images and geometry evolution of the fractures in the Rittershoffen EGS project (Alsace, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzola, Jérôme; Valley, Benoît; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Genter, Albert; Hehn, Régis

    2017-04-01

    In the Upper Rhine Graben, several deep geothermal projects based on the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) exploit local geothermal reservoirs. The principle underlying this technology consists of increasing the hydraulic performances of the reservoir by stimulating natural fractures using different methods, in order to extract hot water with commercially flow rates. In this domain, the knowledge of the in-situ stress state is of central importance to predict the response of the rock mass to stimulations. Here we characterized the stress tensor from Ultrasonic Borehole Imager (UBI) in the open hole section of the EGS doublet located in Rittershoffen, France (in the Upper Rhine Graben). Interestingly extensive logging programs were leaded at different key moments of the development of the injection well using hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation (Baujard et al., 2017)1. The time lapse UBI dataset consists of images of the injection well before, shortly and lastly after the stimulation. The geometry of the induced fractures in compression (breakouts) picked on the UBI images are used to determine the orientation of the in-situ stress tensor. The magnitude of the principal stresses is deduced from the drilling data. The magnitude of the maximum horizontal principal stress is evaluated using an inversion method with three failure criteria (Mohr-Coulomb, Mogi-Coulomb and modified Hoek-Brown criterion) and under the assumption of a vertical or a deviated well. Moreover, the characteristic of the dataset enables the analysis of the evolution of the borehole fracturing, as the deepening or widening of the induced fractures. The correlation of the UBI image allows firstly to determine the tool trajectory and to adapt the post and pre-stimulation images. It secondly leads to the estimation of a complete displacement field which characterizes the deformation induced by the stimulations. Even if the variable image quality deeply conditions the comparison, the considered

  18. Stress Management: A Rational Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Cecil

    This workbook was designed for use as the primary resource tool during a l-day participatory stress management seminar in which participants identify stressful situations, conduct analyses, and develop approaches to manage the stressful situations more effectively. Small group warm-up activities designed to introduce participants, encourage…

  19. A historical perspective with current opinion on the management of atrophic mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime; Cunningham, Larry L; Van Sickels, Joseph E

    2017-12-01

    The management of atrophic mandibular fractures has been a challenge for maxillofacial surgeons for decades. During the past 70 years, various techniques for treating edentulous mandibular fractures have been advocated. These techniques have been praised, criticized, abandoned, improved, and used in combination with other methods. Although some of the principles of management outlined before the end of World War II are still valid in today's technological era, other concepts did not survive the test of time. The aim of this paper is to examine the evolution of treatment modalities for the management of atrophic mandibular fractures that have been employed over the years. Debates and discussions generated by this topic are included. Current techniques and treatment philosophies with thoughts for future therapies are provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments in intact and pre-fractured rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.D.; Rummel, F.; Jung, R.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments were conducted to investigate two factors which could influence the use of the hydrofrac technique for in-situ stress determinations; the possible dependence of the breakdown pressure upon the rate of borehole pressurization, and the influence of pre-existing cracks on the orientation of generated fractures. The experiments have shown that while the rate of borehole pressurization has a marked effect on breakdown pressures, the pressure at which hydraulic fractures initiate (and thus tensile strength) is independent of the rate of borehole pressurization when the effect of fluid penetration is negligible. Thus, the experiments indicate that use of breakdown pressures rather than fracture initiation pressures may lead to an erroneous estimate of tectonic stresses. A conceptual model is proposed to explain anomalously high breakdown pressures observed when fracturing with high viscosity fluids. In this model, initial fracture propagation is presumed to be stable due to large differences between the borehole pressure and that within the fracture. In samples which contained pre-existing fractures which were 'leaky' to water, we found it possible to generate hydraulic fractures oriented parallel to the direction of maximum compression if high viscosity drilling mud was used as the fracturing fluid. ?? 1977.

  1. Multidisciplinary approach in the management of a complicated crown root fracture.

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Kim, J E; Kim, R J

    2013-06-01

    This article describes the management of a complicated crown root fracture. A young patient presented with a crown root fracture of the maxillary left central incisor with an oblique subgingival fracture line. A multidisciplinary treatment approach including endodontic treatment, orthodontic extrusion, surgical extraction and intra-alveolar repositioning was used to gain sufficient crown length of the fractured maxillary incisor. The coronally repositioned maxillary left central incisor was stabilised by sutures and a resin wire splint. A resin core was built up followed by fabrication of an all-ceramic crown. Clinical and radiographic follow-up of the maxillary left central incisor after 24 months showed no signs of bone resorption or pathology and good aesthetics and functions were maintained.

  2. Bone strength estimates relative to vertical ground reaction force discriminates women runners with stress fracture history.

    PubMed

    Popp, Kristin L; McDermott, William; Hughes, Julie M; Baxter, Stephanie A; Stovitz, Steven D; Petit, Moira A

    2017-01-01

    To determine differences in bone geometry, estimates of bone strength, muscle size and bone strength relative to load, in women runners with and without a history of stress fracture. We recruited 32 competitive distance runners aged 18-35, with (SFX, n=16) or without (NSFX, n=16) a history of stress fracture for this case-control study. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, mg/mm 3 ), total (ToA) and cortical (CtA) bone areas (mm 2 ), and estimated compressive bone strength (bone strength index; BSI, mg/mm 4 ) at the distal tibia. ToA, CtA, cortical vBMD, and estimated strength (section modulus; Zp, mm 3 and strength strain index; SSIp, mm 3 ) were measured at six cortical sites along the tibia. Mean active peak vertical (pkZ) ground reaction forces (GRFs), assessed from a fatigue run on an instrumented treadmill, were used in conjunction with pQCT measurements to estimate bone strength relative to load (mm 2 /N∗kg -1 ) at all cortical sites. SSIp and Zp were 9-11% lower in the SFX group at mid-shaft of the tibia, while ToA and vBMD did not differ between groups at any measurement site. The SFX group had 11-17% lower bone strength relative to mean pkZ GRFs (p<0.05). These findings indicate that estimated bone strength at the mid-tibia and mean pkZ GRFs are lower in runners with a history of stress fracture. Bone strength relative to load is also lower in this same region suggesting that strength deficits in the middle 1/3 of the tibia and altered gait biomechanics may predispose an individual to stress fracture. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Management of mandibular body fractures in pediatric patients: a case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    John, Baby; John, Reena R; Stalin, A; Elango, Indumathi

    2010-10-01

    Mandibular fractures are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults, which may be due to the child's protected anatomic features and infrequent exposure of children to alcohol related traffic accidents. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A case of a 4.5-year-old boy with fractured body of mandible managed by closed reduction using open occlusal acrylic splint and circum mandibular wiring is presented. This article also provides a review of literature regarding the management of mandibular body fracture in young children.

  4. Management of mandibular body fractures in pediatric patients: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    John, Baby; John, Reena R.; Stalin, A.; Elango, Indumathi

    2010-01-01

    Mandibular fractures are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults, which may be due to the child's protected anatomic features and infrequent exposure of children to alcohol related traffic accidents. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A case of a 4.5-year-old boy with fractured body of mandible managed by closed reduction using open occlusal acrylic splint and circum mandibular wiring is presented. This article also provides a review of literature regarding the management of mandibular body fracture in young children. PMID:22114443

  5. Prevention of lower extremity stress fractures: a controlled trial of a shock absorbent insole.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, L I; Dziados, J E; Jones, B H; Brundage, J F; Harris, J M; Sullivan, R; Gill, P

    1988-01-01

    A prospective controlled trial was carried out to determine the usefulness of a viscoelastic polymer insole in prevention of stress fractures and stress reactions of the lower extremities. The subjects were 3,025 US Marine recruits who were followed for 12 weeks of training at Parris Island, South Carolina. Polymer and standard mesh insoles were systematically distributed in boots that were issued to members of odd and even numbered platoons. The most important finding was that an elastic polymer insole with good shock absorbency properties did not prevent stress reactions of bone during a 12-week period of vigorous physical training. To control for the confounding effects of running in running shoes, which occurred for about one and one-half hours per week for the first five weeks, we also examined the association of age of shoes and cost of shoes with injury incidence. A slight trend of increasing stress injuries by increasing age of shoes was observed. However, this trend did not account for the similarity of rates in the two insole groups. In addition, we observed a strong trend of decreasing stress injury rate by history of increasing physical activity, as well as a higher stress injury rate in White compared to Black recruits. The results of the trial were not altered after controlling for these factors. This prospective study confirms previous clinical reports of the association of stress fractures with physical activity history. The clinical application of a shock absorbing insole as a preventive for lower extremity stress reactions is not supported in these uniformly trained recruits. The findings are relevant to civilian populations. PMID:3056045

  6. Delayed presentation is no barrier to satisfactory outcome in the management of open tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Robert U; Mehta, Janak A; Cripps, Robin

    2004-04-01

    The management of open tibial fractures is a challenge to all orthopaedic trauma surgeons. The major goals are fracture union, uncomplicated soft tissue healing and return to pre-injury level of function. The geographical isolation and vastness of the Northern Territory of Australia complicates the management of these injuries by adding a significant delay to treatment. Forty-five patients sustained 48 open tibial fractures over the 30-month period of the study. Twelve received primary surgical treatment within 6h of injury but 33 were treated more than 6h after injury. The mean time to treatment in this latter group was 12h 15min (median 9h 45min, range 6-37h). The majority of injuries were high energy, with 23 patients having multiple injuries and 29 fractures (60%) being classified as AO C3 with 35 (73%) having Gustilo III soft tissue injuries. There was a mean time to union of 7.5 months and an overall complication rate of 42.2%. Thirteen patients (29%) required additional (late) surgical procedures subsequent to definitive fracture and soft tissue management. The zone of injury infection rate was 12.5%. The high incidence of open tibial fractures places a large financial burden on the state. However, despite the absence of a plastic surgical service and delays in presentation, satisfactory outcomes can be obtained by the application of the established surgical principles of thorough debridement, soft tissue management and fracture stabilisation.

  7. Decline in bone mineral density with stress fractures in a woman on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate. A case report.

    PubMed

    Harkins, G J; Davis, G D; Dettori, J; Hibbert, M L; Hoyt, R A

    1999-03-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is a popular contraceptive among young, physically active women. However, its administration has been linked to a relative decrease in estrogen levels. Since bone resorption is accelerated during hypoestrogenic states, there has been growing concern about the potential development of osteoporosis and fractures with the use of this contraceptive method. A physically active, 33-year-old woman demonstrated a 12.4% drop in femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD), 6.4% drop in lumbar BMD and 0.8% drop in total BMD with the subsequent development of a tibial stress fracture while on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate. Bone mineralization rapidly improved, and the stress fracture resolved with discontinuation of the medication. The long-term effects of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate on bone mineralization in physically active women should be evaluated more thoroughly.

  8. [Mechanics analysis of fracture of orthodontic wires].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeping; Sun, Xiaoye; Zhang, Longqi

    2003-03-01

    Fracture problem of orthodontic wires was discussed in this paper. The calculation formulae of bending stress and tensile stress were obtained. All main factors that affect bending stress and tensile stress of orthodontic wires were analyzed and discussed. It was concluded that the main causes of fracture of orthodontic wires were fatigue and static disruption. Some improving proposals for preventing fracture of orthodontic wires were put forward.

  9. Multiple Tibial Insufficiency Fractures in the Same Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Defoort, Saartje; Mertens, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Stress fractures were first described by Briethaupt in 1855. Since then, there have been many discussions in the literature concerning stress fractures, which have been described in both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing bones. Currently, the tibia is the most frequent location, but multiple stress fractures in the same tibia are rare. This paper presents an unusual case of a 60-year-old woman with multiple tibial stress fractures of spontaneous onset. PMID:23569673

  10. The interaction of projectiles with tissues and the management of ballistic fractures.

    PubMed

    Clasper, J

    2001-02-01

    Wounds to the limbs are the commonest injuries seen during armed conflict and injury results from the transfer of energy from the missile to the tissues. There are a number of factors that determine the transfer of energy, and thus the extent of wounding. These include the velocity of the missile, its shape and stability, and the tissue through which the missile passes. Many of the wounds involve bone, and because of the interaction of missiles with bone, significant fractures can occur. In many previous conflicts amputation was considered the treatment of choice for many limb injuries, but with recent advances in the management of severe open fractures, many of these limbs are now salvageable. Whilst the basic principles of the initial débridement remain unchanged, techniques of fracture stabilisation and definitive soft tissue cover have changed, and it is necessary to consider these in relation to military fractures. Definitive soft tissue closure can be safely delayed until evacuation further down the medical chain, but stabilisation of the fracture must be considered at the time of initial surgery. Many of the advances in fracture management may be unsuitable for use in a military environment due to logistical constraints. In addition it is likely that wound infection will be more common with military injuries, and this will influence the treatment. This paper considers the interaction of missiles with soft tissue and bone, and discusses possible methods of fracture stabilisation in the military environment.

  11. Managing Time and Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffstutter, Sandra; Smith, Stuart C.

    Chapter 14 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter offers many practical suggestions for managing time and reducing stress. The primary challenge is to unblock the route to effective time/stress management by recognizing unproductive values and attitudes (such as overreliance on the Protestant work ethic or the appearance of…

  12. Stress-Shielding Effect of Nitinol Swan-Like Memory Compressive Connector on Fracture Healing of Upper Limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Q. G.; Liu, X. W.; Xu, S. G.; Li, M.; Zhang, C. C.

    2009-08-01

    In this article, the stress-shielding effect of a Nitinol swan-like memory compressive connector (SMC) is evaluated. Patients with fracture healing of an upper limb after SMC internal fixation or stainless steel plate fixation were randomly selected and observed comparatively. With the informed consent of the SMC group, minimal cortical bone under the swan-body and swan-neck was harvested; and in the steel plate fixation group, minimal cortical bone under the steel plate and opposite side to the steel plate was also harvested for observation. Main outcome measurements were taken such as osteocyte morphology, Harversian canal histological observation under light microscope; radiographic observation of fracture healing, and computed tomography quantitative scanning of cortical bone. As a conclusion, SMC has a lesser stress-shielding effect to fixed bone than steel plate. Finally, the mechanism of the lesser stress-shielding effect of SMC is discussed.

  13. A conservative approach to pediatric mandibular fracture management: outcome and advantages.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Kalra, Namita

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric mandibular fractures are rare and their treatment remains controversial. Management is extremely complicated in mixed dentition as it is inherently dynamic and unstable. Treatment options include soft diet, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch bars, circummandibular wiring, or stents. Alternative options include open reduction and internal fixation through either an intraoral or extraoral approach. This case report describes and evaluates the conservative technique of acrylic splint in the treatment of pediatric mandible fracture in a 12-year-old female child. The patient with isolated mandibular fracture was treated with acrylic splint and interdental wiring followed by evaluation of clinical and radiographic healing as well as the somatosensory status. Patient demonstrated clinical union to her pre-injury occlusion by three to four weeks. Panoramic finding supported the finding of clinical examination throughout the study. High osteogenic potential of the pediatric mandible allowed conservative management to be successful in this case.

  14. Management of genitourinary injuries in patients with pelvic fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Weems, W L

    1979-01-01

    Associated injuries frequently occur in patients who sustain fractures of the pelvis. Hemorrhage from intrapelvic vessels, rupture of the urinary bladder and avulsion of the membranous urethra in males are among the integral risks in this trauma. Non-operative methods of managing hemorrhage have gained favor in recent experience. The case records of 282 male patients with pelvic fractures were reviewed to evaluate experience with lower genitourinary injuries. Early recognition is important in bladder injuries, and surgical repair is advised, except in selected patients who may be managed by catheter drainage alone. Delayed complications of bladder injury are rare. Membranous urethral injuries entail a high risk of chronic stricture disease and sexual impotence. The rationale of early repair versus delayed repair of these injuries is discussed. The results in this series show advantage for delayed repair. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:453943

  15. Pressure vessel fracture, fatigue, and life management: PVP-Volume 233

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, S.; Milella, P.P.; Pennell, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers relating to the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping, with special emphasis on the effects of aging. The papers are organized in the following five areas: (1) pressure vessel life management; (2) fracture characterization using local and dual-parameter approaches; (3) stratification and thermal fatigue; (4) creep, fatigue, and fracture; and (5) integrated approach to integrity assessment of pressure components. Separate abstracts were prepared for 39 papers in this conference.

  16. Stress Management for Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, James H.

    Stress management for school children has had various degrees of success. School officials need information about stress and how to deal with it. The purpose of this book is to provide information useful in inauguration of such programs where they do not exist. While stress management should begin in the home and include nutrition, physical…

  17. Recent Advances and Developments in Knee Surgery: Principles of Periprosthetic Knee Fracture Management

    PubMed Central

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; Khan, Wasim; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    The management of distal femoral, tibial and patellar fractures after total knee arthroplasty can be complex. The incidence of these fractures is increasing as the number of total knee arthroplasties being performed and patient longevity is increasing. There is a wide range of treatment options including revision arthroplasty for loose implants. This review article discusses the epidemiology, risk factors, classification and treatment of these fractures. PMID:22888380

  18. Management of unstable distal third clavicle fractures: clinical and radiological outcomes of the arthroscopy-assisted conoid ligament reconstruction and fracture cerclage with sutures.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2017-04-01

    Surgical treatment is indicated for the management of Neer type IIB fractures of the distal third of the clavicle. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and radiological outcomes, in cases of unstable distal third clavicle fractures managed by means of an arthroscopy-assisted conoid ligament reconstruction and fracture cerclage with sutures. Nine patients with unstable distal third clavicle fractures (Neer type IIB) managed arthroscopically by means of a conoid ligament reconstruction and fracture cerclage with sutures, between 2008 and 2012, were included. The QoL was evaluated at the last follow-up visit, by means of the Health Survey questionnaire (SF36), the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, the constant score, and a Global Satisfaction scale (from 0 to 10). The mean time from fracture fixation until radiological union, the development of hardware loosening, nonunion, infections, and hardware skin discomfort were evaluated. The mean age was 36 [21-48] years old. The mean [range] time from surgery until the last follow-up visit was 49 [46-52] months. Values of the questionnaires assessed at the last follow-up visit were: (1) physical SF36 score (50.72 ± 6.88); (2) mental SF36 score (50.92 ± 11.65); (3) VAS for pain (1.86 ± 1.35); (4) DASH questionnaire (11.97 ± 7.03); (5) constant score (89.67 ± 8.55), and (6) Global Satisfaction (8.17 ± 0.98). The mean time elapsed from fracture fixation to radiological union was 8.41 ± 3.26 months. Hardware loosening was observed in none of the patients. Nonunion was observed in 11.11% (1/9) of the patients. Hardware skin discomfort was observed in 11.11% (1/9) of the patients. Patients with unstable distal third clavicle fractures managed by means of an arthroscopy-assisted conoid ligament reconstruction and fracture cerclage with sutures may have good clinical and radiological outcomes, with no need for a second

  19. Management of mandibular fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Myall, Robert W T

    2009-05-01

    To guide surgeons treating mandibular fractures in children, this article first reviews the growth of the mandible, describes how injury can affect such growth, and explains how to harness the process of growth to good effect. This information is important in making therapeutic decisions about the management of such injuries. The article then reviews the various opinions regarding diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Then, as a counterpoint, the author presents his own approach developed over 30 years as a pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

  20. Conservative Management of Odontoid Peg Fractures, long term follow up.

    PubMed

    Osman, Aheed; Alageli, Nabil A; Short, D J; Masri, W S El

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to look at the long-term effects of conservative management of odontoid peg fractures. We reviewed 48 consecutive patients with type II (32) and 16 type III, odontoid peg fractures. The clinical & radiological outcomes were assessed over an average period of follow up of 8 years. Union rate was determined and we discussed several factors that may affect it. Patients were treated conservatively with an average period of bed rest of 4 weeks followed by bracing for an average of 9 weeks. Bony union was established in 25 of 32 (78%) type II fractures. Of 7 cases of no bony union 4 were stable probably with fibrous union. 3 remained unstable. In 13 of 16(83%) type III fractures bony union was established. 2 of the 3 with no bony union were considered stable. Osseous non-union was higher in patients with displacement of >5 mm, but there is no correlation between union and age, gender or angulation of the fracture in both types.

  1. A Comparison of Three Different Methods of Fixation in the Management of Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Panteliadis, Pavlos; Musbahi, Omar; Muthian, Senthil; Goyal, Shivam; Montgomery, Alexander Sheriff; Ranganathan, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Management of thoracolumbar fractures remains controversial in the literature. The primary aims of this study were to assess different levels of fixation with respect to radiological outcomes in terms of fracture reduction and future loss of correction. This is a single center, retrospective study. Fifty-five patients presenting with thoracolumbar fractures between January 2012 and December 2015 were analyzed in the study. The levels of fixation were divided in 3 groups, 1 vertebra above and 1 below the fracture (1/1), 2 above and 2 below (2/2), and 2 above and 1 below (2/1). The most common mechanism was high fall injury and the most common vertebra L1. Burst fractures were the ones with the highest incidence. The 2/2 fixation achieved the best reduction of the fracture but with no statistical significance. The correction is maintained better by the 2/2 fixation but there is no statistical difference compared to the other fixations. Insertion of screws at the fracture level did not improve outcomes. The data of this study identified a trend towards better radiological outcomes for fracture reduction and maintenance of the correction in the 2/2 fixations. However these results are not statistically significant. Future multicenter prospective clinical trials are needed in order to agree on the ideal management and method of fixation for thoracolumbar fractures.

  2. Early Versus Late Weight-Bearing Protocols for Surgically Managed Posterior Wall Acetabular Fractures.

    PubMed

    Heare, Austin; Kramer, Nicholas; Salib, Christopher; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2017-07-01

    Despite overall improved outcomes with open reduction and internal fixation of acetabular fractures, posterior wall fractures show disproportionately poor results. The effect of weight bearing on outcomes of fracture management has been investigated in many lower extremity fractures, but evidence-based recommendations in posterior wall acetabular fractures are lacking. The authors systematically reviewed the current literature to determine if a difference in outcome exists between early and late postoperative weight-bearing protocols for surgically managed posterior wall acetabular fractures. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for posterior wall acetabular fracture studies that included weight-bearing protocols and Merle d'Aubigné functional scores. Twelve studies were identified. Each study was classified as either early or late weight bearing. Early weight bearing was defined as full, unrestricted weight bearing at or before 12 weeks postoperatively. Late weight bearing was defined as restricted weight bearing for greater than 12 weeks postoperatively. The 2 categories were then compared by functional score using a 2-tailed t test and by complication rate using chi-square analysis. Six studies (152 fractures) were placed in the early weight-bearing category. Six studies (302 fractures) were placed in the late weight-bearing category. No significant difference in Merle d'Aubigné functional scores was found between the 2 groups. No difference was found regarding heterotopic ossification, avascular necrosis, superficial infections, total infections, or osteoarthritis. This systematic review found no difference in functional outcome scores or complication rates between early and late weight-bearing protocols for surgically treated posterior wall fractures. [Orthopedics. 2017: 40(4):e652-e657.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Stress fracture of the second metacarpal bone in a badminton player.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Koji; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Ikuo; Uemoto, Harunobu; Hiranaka, Takafumi; Tsuji, Mitsuo; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2008-07-18

    We present a rare case of stress fracture of the second metacarpal bone. A 14-year-old girl felt pain on the dorsal aspect of the right wrist without any history of major trauma, when she played a smash during a game of badminton. On the radiographs, periosteal reaction was detected on the ulnar aspect of the base of the second metacarpal bone. She was treated conservatively and she returned to the original activity level.

  4. Proximal tibial fracture following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery: a biomechanical analysis of the tibial tunnel as a stress riser.

    PubMed

    Aldebeyan, Wassim; Liddell, Antony; Steffen, Thomas; Beckman, Lorne; Martineau, Paul A

    2017-08-01

    This is the first biomechanical study to examine the potential stress riser effect of the tibial tunnel or tunnels after ACL reconstruction surgery. In keeping with literature, the primary hypothesis tested in this study was that the tibial tunnel acts as a stress riser for fracture propagation. Secondary hypotheses were that the stress riser effect increases with the size of the tunnel (8 vs. 10 mm), the orientation of the tunnel [standard (STT) vs. modified transtibial (MTT)], and with the number of tunnels (1 vs. 2). Tibial tunnels simulating both single bundle hamstring graft (8 mm) and bone-patellar tendon-bone graft (10 mm) either STT or MTT position, as well as tunnels simulating double bundle (DB) ACL reconstruction (7, 6 mm), were drilled in fourth-generation saw bones. These five experimental groups and a control group consisting of native saw bones without tunnels were loaded to failure on a Materials Testing System to simulate tibial plateau fracture. There were no statistically significant differences in peak load to failure between any of the groups, including the control group. The fracture occurred through the tibial tunnel in 100 % of the MTT tunnels (8 and 10 mm) and 80 % of the DB tunnels specimens; however, the fractures never (0 %) occurred through the tibial tunnel of the standard tunnels (8 or 10 mm) (P = 0.032). In the biomechanical model, the tibial tunnel does not appear to be a stress riser for fracture propagation, despite suggestions to the contrary in the literature. Use of a standard, more vertical tunnel decreases the risk of ACL graft compromise in the event of a fracture. This may help to inform surgical decision making on ACL reconstruction technique.

  5. Malpractice in distal radius fracture management: an analysis of closed claims.

    PubMed

    DeNoble, Peter H; Marshall, Astrid C; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis W; Glickel, Steven Z

    2014-08-01

    Distal radius fractures comprise the majority of hand- and wrist-related malpractice claims. We hypothesized that a majority of lawsuits would be for malunions resulting from nonsurgical treatment. Additional goals of this study were to quantify costs associated with claims, determine independent risk factors for making an indemnity payment, and illustrate trends over time. Seventy closed malpractice claims filed for alleged negligent treatment of distal radius fractures by orthopedic surgeons insured by the largest medical professional liability insurer in New York State (NYS) from 1981 to 2005 were reviewed. We separately reviewed defendants' personal closed malpractice claim histories from 1975 to 2011. Overall incidence of malpractice claims among distal radius fractures treated in NYS was calculated using the NYS Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database and the 2008 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons census data. The overall incidence of malpractice claims for distal radius fracture management was low. Malunion was the most common complaint across claims regardless of treatment type. Claims for surgically treated fractures increased over time. A majority of claims documented poor doctor-patient relationships. Male plaintiffs in this group were significantly older than males treated for distal radius fractures in NYS. Most defendants had a history of multiple malpractice suits, all were male, and only a small percentage were fellowship-trained in hand surgery. Defendants lacking American Board of Orthopedic Surgery certification were significantly more likely to make indemnity payments. Thirty-eight of 70 cases resulted in an indemnity payment. Malunion and poor doctor-patient relationships are the major features of malpractice litigation involving distal radius fracture management. Older defendant age and lack of American Board of Orthopedic Surgery certification increase the likelihood of making an indemnity payment. Economic and

  6. Management of complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alan; Barnes, Esther S

    2009-01-01

    The management of complications resulting from the open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures is discussed in detail. The initial radiographic findings of the most common postsurgical complications of ankle fracture reduction are briefly discussed, namely lateral, medial, and posterior malleolar malunion or nonunion, syndesmotic widening, degenerative changes, and septic arthritis with or without concomitant osteomyelitis. Emphasis is placed on the management of these complications, with a review of the treatment options proposed in the literature, a detailed discussion of the authors' recommendations, and an inclusion of different case presentations.

  7. Fractures of the Fifth Metatarsal

    MedlinePlus

    ... overlooked when they occur with an ankle sprain. Jones fracture. Jones fractures occur in a small area of the ... therefore more prone to difficulties in healing. A Jones fracture can be either a stress fracture (a ...

  8. 3D Numerical Modeling of the Propagation of Hydraulic Fracture at Its Intersection with Natural (Pre-existing) Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ali Naghi; Goshtasbi, Kamran; Ahangari, Kaveh; Jin, Yan; Bahmani, Aram

    2017-02-01

    A variety of 3D numerical models were developed based on hydraulic fracture experiments to simulate the propagation of hydraulic fracture at its intersection with natural (pre-existing) fracture. Since the interaction between hydraulic and pre-existing fractures is a key condition that causes complex fracture patterns, the extended finite element method was employed in ABAQUS software to simulate the problem. The propagation of hydraulic fracture in a fractured medium was modeled in two horizontal differential stresses (Δ σ) of 5e6 and 10e6 Pa considering different strike and dip angles of pre-existing fracture. The rate of energy release was calculated in the directions of hydraulic and pre-existing fractures (G_{{frac}} /G_{{rock}}) at their intersection point to determine the fracture behavior. Opening and crossing were two dominant fracture behaviors during the hydraulic and pre-existing fracture interaction at low and high differential stress conditions, respectively. The results of numerical studies were compared with those of experimental models, showing a good agreement between the two to validate the accuracy of the models. Besides the horizontal differential stress, strike and dip angles of the natural (pre-existing) fracture, the key finding of this research was the significant effect of the energy release rate on the propagation behavior of the hydraulic fracture. This effect was more prominent under the influence of strike and dip angles, as well as differential stress. The obtained results can be used to predict and interpret the generation of complex hydraulic fracture patterns in field conditions.

  9. The generalized fracture criteria based on the multi-parameter representation of the crack tip stress field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, L. V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper is devoted to the multi-parameter asymptotic description of the stress field near the crack tip of a finite crack in an infinite isotropic elastic plane medium subject to 1) tensile stress; 2) in-plane shear; 3) mixed mode loading for a wide range of mode-mixity situations (Mode I and Mode II). The multi-parameter series expansion of stress tensor components containing higher-order terms is obtained. All the coefficients of the multiparameter series expansion of the stress field are given. The main focus is on the discussion of the influence of considering the higher-order terms of the Williams expansion. The analysis of the higher-order terms in the stress field is performed. It is shown that the larger the distance from the crack tip, the more terms it is necessary to keep in the asymptotic series expansion. Therefore, it can be concluded that several more higher-order terms of the Williams expansion should be used for the stress field description when the distance from the crack tip is not small enough. The crack propagation direction angle is calculated. Two fracture criteria, the maximum tangential stress criterion and the strain energy density criterion, are used. The multi-parameter form of the two commonly used fracture criteria is introduced and tested. Thirty and more terms of the Williams series expansion for the near-crack-tip stress field enable the angle to be calculated more precisely.

  10. Rib stress fractures among rowers: definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors and effectiveness of injury prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Lisa K; Hume, Patria A; Nolte, Volker

    2011-11-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) can have serious effects on rowing training and performance and accordingly represent an important topic for sports medicine practitioners. Therefore, the aim of this review is to outline the definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors, injury management and injury prevention strategies for RSF in rowers. To this end, nine relevant books, 140 journal articles, the proceedings of five conferences and two unpublished presentations were reviewed after searches of electronic databases using the keywords 'rowing', 'rib', 'stress fracture', 'injury', 'mechanics' and 'kinetics'. The review showed that RSF is an incomplete fracture occurring from an imbalance between the rate of bone resorption and the rate of bone formation. RSF occurs in 8.1-16.4% of elite rowers, 2% of university rowers and 1% of junior elite rowers. Approximately 86% of rowing RSF cases with known locations occur in ribs four to eight, mostly along the anterolateral/lateral rib cage. Elite rowers are more likely to experience RSF than nonelite rowers. Injury occurrence is equal among sweep rowers and scullers, but the regional location of the injury differs. The mechanism of injury is multifactorial with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors contributing. Posterior-directed resultant forces arising from the forward directed force vector through the arms to the oar handle in combination with the force vector induced by the scapula retractors during mid-drive, or repetitive stress from the external obliques and rectus abdominis in the 'finish' position, may be responsible for RSF. Joint hypomobility, vertebral malalignment or low bone mineral density may be associated with RSF. Case studies have shown increased risk associated with amenorrhoea, low bone density or poor technique, in combination with increases in training volume. Training volume alone may have less effect on injury than other factors. Large differences in seat and handle

  11. Stress and depression in students: the mediating role of stress management self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sawatzky, Richard G; Ratner, Pamela A; Richardson, Chris G; Washburn, Cheryl; Sudmant, Walter; Mirwaldt, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health issues appears to be increasing. Stress that leads to depression may be mediated if people believe that they have the wherewithal to manage it. The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which the relationship between adverse stress and depression is mediated by university students' perceived ability to manage their stress. Students were sampled randomly at a Canadian university in 2006 (n = 2,147) and 2008 (n = 2,292). Data about students' stress (1 item), depression (4 items), stress management self-efficacy (4 items), and their demographics were obtained via the online National College Health Assessment survey and analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and latent variable mediation modeling. Greater stress management self-efficacy was associated with lower depression scores for students whose stress impeded their academic performance, irrespective of their gender and age (total Rdepression = 41%). The relationship between stress and depression was mediated partially by stress management self-efficacy (37% to 55% mediation, depending on the severity of stress). Identifying students with limited stress management self-efficacy and providing them with appropriate supportive services may help them to manage stress and prevent depression.

  12. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closed reduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixation during the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment of condylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objective of this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open or closed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages, and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle. PMID:22872831

  13. Alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke and bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenying; Li, Li; Wang, Liang; Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Su, Hua

    2014-11-01

    Bone fracture at the acute stage of stroke exacerbates stroke injury by increasing neuroinflammation. We hypothesize that activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7 nAchR) attenuates neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, and reduces brain injury in mice with bone fracture and stroke. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) was performed in C57BL/6J mice followed by tibia fracture 1 day later. Mice were treated with 0.8 mg/kg PHA 568487 (PHA, α-7 nAchR-specific agonist), 6 mg/kg methyllycaconitine (α-7 nAchR antagonist), or saline 1 and 2 days after pMCAO. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Neuronal injury, CD68(+) , M1 (pro-inflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory) microglia/macrophages, phosphorylated p65 component of nuclear factor kappa b in microglia/macrophages, oxidative and anti-oxidant gene expression were quantified. Compared to saline-treated mice, PHA-treated mice performed better in behavioral tests, had fewer apoptotic neurons (NeuN(+) TUNEL(+) ), fewer CD68(+) and M1 macrophages, and more M2 macrophages. PHA increased anti-oxidant gene expression and decreased oxidative stress and phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa b p65. Methyllycaconitine had the opposite effects. Our data indicate that α-7 nAchR agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, which are associated with reduced brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke plus tibia fracture. Bone fracture at the acute stage of stroke exacerbates neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury, and our study has shown that the α-7 nAchR agonist, PHA (PHA 568487), attenuates neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury in mice with stroke and bone fracture. Hence, PHA could provide an opportunity to develop a new strategy to reduce brain injury in patients suffering from stroke and bone fracture. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Multiwell fracturing experiments. [Nitrogen foam fracture treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.

    The objective of the Multiwell fracturing experiments is to test and develop the technology for the efficient stimulation of tight, lenticular gas sands. This requires basic understanding of: (1) fracture behavior and geometry in this complex lithologic environment, and (2) subsequent production into the created fracture. The intricate interplay of the hydraulic fracture with the lens geometry, the internal reservoir characteristics (fractures, reservoir breaks, etc.), the in situ stresses, and the mechanical defects (fracture, bedding, etc.) need to be defined in order to develop a successful stimulation program. The stimulation phase of the Multiwell Experiment is concerned with: (1) determiningmore » important rock/reservoir properties that influence or control fracture geometry and behavior, (2) designing fracture treatments to achieve a desired size and objectives, and (3) conducting post-treatment analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Background statement, project description, results and evaluation of future plans are presented. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  15. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  16. "Shin splint" syndrome and tibial stress fracture in the same patient diagnosed by means of (99m)Tc-HMDP SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Justo Serrano; Grande, Maria Luz Domínguez; Torre, Jose Rafael Infante; Madrid, Juan Ignacio Rayo; Barquero, Carmen Durán; Bernardo, Lucía García; Sánchez, Román Sánchez

    2013-04-01

    We show a patient who presented leg pain triggered by intense exercise. The most likely diagnosis was a possible tibial stress fracture or a "shin splint" syndrome (soleus enthesopathy). We performed a bone scintigraphy including SPECT/CT that revealed the presence of the two concomitant pathologies. SPECT/CT identified the hot spot superimposed with bone lesion in the tibial stress fracture and only remodeling activity without evidence of cortical lesions in the enthesopathy processes.

  17. Stress: Neurobiology, consequences and management

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Rinwa, Puneet; Kaur, Gurleen; Machawal, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    Stress, both physical and psychological, is attracting increasing attention among neuroresearchers. In the last 20 decades, there has been a surge of interest in the research of stress-induced manifestations and this approach has resulted in the development of more appropriate animal models for stress-associated pathologies and its therapeutic management. These stress models are an easy and convenient method for inducing both psychological and physical stress. To understand the behavioral changes underlying major depression, molecular and cellular studies are required. Dysregulation of the stress system may lead to disturbances in growth and development, and may this may further lead to the development of various other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the different types of stress and their neurobiology, including the different neurotransmitters affected. There are various complications associated with stress and their management through various pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques. The use of herbs in the treatment of stress-related problems is practiced in both Indian and Western societies, and it has a vast market in terms of anti-stress medications and treatments. Non-pharmacological techniques such as meditation and yoga are nowadays becoming very popular as a stress-relieving therapy because of their greater effectiveness and no associated side effects. Therefore, this review highlights the changes under stress and stressor and their impact on different animal models in understanding the mechanisms of stress along with their effective and safe management. PMID:23833514

  18. Association between Global Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Hip Fracture in Postmenopausal Women: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuman; Feskanich, Diane; Willett, Walter C.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Wu, Tianying

    2014-01-01

    Human studies suggest that oxidative stress is a risk factor for osteoporosis, but its relationship with fracture risk is poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between biomarkers of oxidative stress and hip fracture in postmenopausal women. We conducted a prospective study in the Nurses’ Health Study among 996 women aged 60 years or older at baseline blood collection in 1989–1990. Plasma fluorescent oxidation products (FlOPs) were measured at three excitation/emission wavelengths (360/420 nm named as FlOP_360; 320/420 nm named as FlOP_320 and 400/475 nm named as FlOP_400). FlOPs are generated from many different pathways (lipid, protein and DNA) and reflect a global oxidation burden. FlOP assay is 10–100 times more sensitive than measurement of malondialdehyde. We used Cox proportional hazards regression model to investigate the association between baseline plasma FlOPs and risk of hip fracture, adjusting for multiple hip fracture risk factors such as age, history of osteoporosis, history of hypertension, prior fracture and smoking status. Forty four hip fractures (4.4%) were identified during the follow-up (Maximum = 23 years). In the multivariable model, the hazard ratios (HR) of hip fracture in the second and third tertiles of FlOP_320 were 2.11 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.88–5.10) and 2.67 (95% CI = 1.14–6.27), respectively, in comparison with the lowest tertile, and the risk increased linearly with increasing FlOP_320 (P for trend = 0.021). Neither FlOP_360 nor FlOP_400 was significantly associated with risk of hip fracture (Tertile 3 versus tertile 1: HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.32–1.54, P for trend = 0.386 for FlOP_360; and HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.40–1.96, P for trend = 0.900 for FlOP_400). In this prospective study, higher plasma FlOP_320 was an independent risk factor for hip fracture. Our results need further confirmation. PMID:24957524

  19. Association between global biomarkers of oxidative stress and hip fracture in postmenopausal women: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuman; Feskanich, Diane; Willett, Walter C; Eliassen, A Heather; Wu, Tianying

    2014-12-01

    Human studies suggest that oxidative stress is a risk factor for osteoporosis, but its relationship with fracture risk is poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between biomarkers of oxidative stress and hip fracture in postmenopausal women. We conducted a prospective study in the Nurses' Health Study among 996 women aged 60 years or older at baseline blood collection in 1989-1990. Plasma fluorescent oxidation products (FlOPs) were measured at three excitation/emission wavelengths (360/420 nm named as FlOP_360; 320/420 nm named as FlOP_320; and 400/475 nm named as FlOP_400). FlOPs are generated from many different pathways (lipid, protein, and DNA) and reflect a global oxidation burden. FlOP assay is 10-100 times more sensitive than measurement of malondialdehyde. We used Cox proportional hazards regression model to investigate the association between baseline plasma FlOPs and the risk of hip fracture, adjusting for multiple hip fracture risk factors such as age, history of osteoporosis, history of hypertension, prior fracture, and smoking status. Forty-four hip fractures (4.4%) were identified during the follow-up (maximum = 23 years). In the multivariable model, the hazard ratios (HRs) of hip fracture in the second and third tertiles of FlOP_320 were 2.11 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.88-5.10) and 2.67 (95% CI = 1.14-6.27), respectively, in comparison with the lowest tertile, and the risk increased linearly with increasing FlOP_320 (p for trend = 0.021). Neither FlOP_360 nor FlOP_400 was significantly associated with risk of hip fracture (tertile 3 versus tertile 1: HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.32-1.54, p for trend = 0.386 for FlOP_360; and HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.40-1.96, p for trend = 0.900 for FlOP_400). In this prospective study, higher plasma FlOP_320 was an independent risk factor for hip fracture. Our results need further confirmation. © 2014 American Society for Bone

  20. Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly: an evidence-based narrative review of management.

    PubMed

    Pal, D; Sell, P; Grevitt, M

    2011-02-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding the optimal management of elderly patients with type II odontoid fractures. There is uncertainty regarding the consequences of non-union. The best treatment remains unclear because of the morbidity associated with prolonged cervical immobilisation versus the risks of surgical intervention. The objective of the study was to evaluate the published literature and determine the current evidence for the management of type II odontoid fractures in elderly. A search of the English language literature from January 1970 to date was performed using Medline and the following keywords: odontoid, fractures, cervical spine and elderly. The search was supplemented by cross-referencing between articles. Case reports and review articles were excluded although some were referred to in the discussion. Studies in patients aged 65 years with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were selected. One-hundred twenty-six articles were reviewed. No class I study was identified. There were two class II studies and the remaining were class III. Significant variability was found in the literature regarding mortality and morbidity rates in patients treated with and without halo vest immobilisation. In recent years several authors have claimed satisfactory results with anterior odontoid screw fixation while others have argued that this may lead to increased complications in this age group. Lately, the posterior cervical (Goel-Harms) construct has also gained popularity amongst surgeons. There is insufficient evidence to establish a standard or guideline for odontoid fracture management in elderly. While most authors agree that cervical immobilisation yields satisfactory results for type I and III fractures in the elderly, the optimal management for type II fractures remain unsolved. A prospective randomised controlled trial is recommended.

  1. Proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Webb, Lawrence X

    2002-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal femur include fractures of the head, neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric regions. Head fractures commonly accompany dislocations. Neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures occur with greatest frequency in elderly patients with a low bone mineral density and are produced by low-energy mechanisms. Subtrochanteric fractures occur in a predominantly strong cortical osseous region which is exposed to large compressive stresses. Implants used to address these fractures must be able to accommodate significant loads while the fractures consolidate. Complications secondary to these injuries produce significant morbidity and include infection, nonunion, malunion, decubitus ulcers, fat emboli, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death.

  2. Nuclear Graphite - Fracture Behavior and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Battiste, Rick; Strizak, Joe P

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for the graphite fracture mechanism is reviewed and discussed. The roles of certain microstructural features in the graphite fracture process are reported. The Burchell fracture model is described and its derivation reported. The successful application of the fracture model to uniaxial tensile data from several graphites with widely ranging structure and texture is reported. The extension of the model to multiaxial loading scenarios using two criteria is discussed. Initially, multiaxial strength data for H-451 graphite were modeled using the fracture model and the Principle of Independent Action. The predicted 4th stress quadrant failure envelope was satisfactory but the 1stmore » quadrant predictions were not conservative and thus were unsatisfactory. Multiaxial strength data from the 1st and 4th stress quadrant for NBG-18 graphite are reported. To improve the conservatism of the predicted 1st quadrant failure envelope for NBG-18 the Shetty criterion has been applied to obtain the equivalent critical stress intensity factor, KIc (Equi), for each applied biaxial stress ratio. The equivalent KIc value is used in the Burchell fracture model to predict the failure envelope. The predicted 1st stress quadrant failure envelope is conservative and thus more satisfactory than achieved previously using the fracture model combined with the Principle of Independent Action.« less

  3. Mandible Fractures.

    PubMed

    Pickrell, Brent B; Serebrakian, Arman T; Maricevich, Renata S

    2017-05-01

    Mandible fractures account for a significant portion of maxillofacial injuries and the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of these fractures remain challenging despite improved imaging technology and fixation techniques. Understanding appropriate surgical management can prevent complications such as malocclusion, pain, and revision procedures. Depending on the type and location of the fractures, various open and closed surgical reduction techniques can be utilized. In this article, the authors review the diagnostic evaluation, treatment options, and common complications of mandible fractures. Special considerations are described for pediatric and atrophic mandibles.

  4. Tibial stress injuries: decisive diagnosis and treatment of 'shin splints'.

    PubMed

    Couture, Christopher J; Karlson, Kristine A

    2002-06-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called 'shin splints,' often result when bone remodeling processes adapt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who care for athletic patients need a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are implications for appropriate diagnosis, management, and prevention.

  5. Managment of frontal sinus fracture: obliteration sinus with cancellous bone graft.

    PubMed

    Muminagic, Sahib; Masic, Tarik; Babajic, Emina; Asotic, Mithat

    2011-01-01

    Frontal sinus fractures make up about 2-15% of all facial fractures.This is relatively low frequency of occurrence, but it has a large potential of complication and may involve not only the frontal sinuse but more importantly the brain and the eyes. The management depends of the complexity. If anterior wall is fractured with grossly involved nasofrontal duct (NFD) in the injury it is paramount to occlude NFD. Very often, sinus obliteration is done at the same time. In our expirience autogenous cancellous bone graft is considered to be the best grafting material. It has the less short - or long-term complications and the donor site morbidity is insignificant.

  6. Managing flowback and produced water from hydraulic fracturing under stochastic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Sun, A. Y.; Duncan, I. J.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    A large volume of wastewater is being generated from hydraulic fracturing in shale gas plays, including flowback and produced water. The produced wastewater in terms of its quantity and quality has become one of the main environmental problems facing shale gas industries worldwide. Cost-effective planning and management of flowback and produced water is highly desirable. Careful choice of treatment, disposal, and reuse options can lower costs and reduce potential environmental impacts. To handle the recourse issue in decision-making, a two-stage stochastic management model is developed to provide optimal alternatives for fracturing wastewater management. The proposed model is capable of prompting corrective actions to allow decision makers to adjust the pre-defined management strategies. By using this two-stage model, potential penalties arising from decision infeasibility can be minimized. The applicability of the proposed model is demonstrated using a representative synthetic example, in which tradeoffs between economic and environmental goals are quantified. This approach can generate informed defensible decisions for shale gas wastewater management. In addition, probabilistic and non-probabilistic uncertainties are effectively addressed.

  7. Acute Pelvic Fractures: II. Principles of Management.

    PubMed

    Tile

    1996-05-01

    The past two decades have seen many advances in pelvic-trauma surgery. Provisional fixation of unstable pelvic-ring disruptions and open-book fractures with a pelvic clamp or an external frame with a supracondylar pin has proved markedly beneficial in the resuscitative phase of management. In the completely unstable pelvis, external clamps and frames can act only as provisional fixation and should be combined with skeletal traction. The traction pin is usually used only until a definitive form of stabilization can be applied to keep the pelvic ring in a reduced position. If the patient is too ill to allow operative intervention, the traction pin can remain in place with the external frame as definitive treatment. Symphyseal disruptions and medial ramus fractures should be plated at the time of laparotomy. Lateral ramus fractures can usually be controlled with external frames. A role has been suggested for percutaneous retrograde fixation of the superior pubic ramus; however, the benefits to be gained may not be enough to outweigh the serious risks of penetrating the hip, and this technique should therefore be used only by surgeons trained in its performance. The techniques for posterior fixation are becoming more standardized, but all still carry significant risks, especially to neurologic structures.

  8. Management of tibial fractures using a circular external fixator in two calves.

    PubMed

    Aithal, Hari Prasad; Kinjavdekar, Prakash; Amarpal; Pawde, Abhijit Motiram; Singh, Gaj Raj; Setia, Harish Chandra

    2010-07-01

    To report the repair of tibial diaphyseal fractures in 2 calves using a circular external skeletal fixator (CEF). Clinical report. Crossbred calves (n=2; age: 6 months; weight: 55 and 60 kg). Mid-diaphyseal tibial fractures were repaired by the use of a 4-ring CEF (made of aluminum rings with 2 mm K-wires) alone in 1 calf and in combination with hemicerclage wiring in 1 calf. Both calves had good weight bearing with moderate lameness postoperatively. Fracture healing occurred by day 60 in 1 calf and by day 30 in calf 2. The CEF was well maintained and tolerated by both calves through fracture healing. Joint mobility and limb usage improved gradually after CEF removal. CEF provided a stable fixation of tibial fractures and healing within 60 days and functional recovery within 90 days. CEF can be safely and successfully used for the management of selected tibial fractures in calves.

  9. Management of displaced comminuted patellar fracture with titanium cable cerclage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Yueping, Ouyang; Wen, Yuan

    2010-08-01

    Management of a displaced comminuted patellar fracture is challenging. Tension band wiring and lag screw fixation are not suitable for such a fracture pattern. Stainless steel wiring with various configurations has been the mainstay of treatment. However, issues of loss of fixation and breakage of wire have not been resolved yet. Partial or total patellectomy is the last resort with a detrimental effect on quadriceps power. Braided titanium cable is stronger in tensile strength and better in fatigue resistance than the stainless steel monofilament wire, and the tension of fixation could be controlled by a graded instrument in its application. We used titanium cable to treat 21 consecutive patients with displaced comminuted patellar fracture. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 24 months (12 to 32 months). The mean score at the final follow-up was 27 points (25 to 30) using the Böstman method. There was no complication except breakage of one cable at the sixth week after the operation and the fracture had united despite the breakage. This technique is simple and effective for these difficult fractures and avoided prolonged immobilisation of the knee. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric nasoorbitoethmoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Liau, James Y; Woodlief, Justin; van Aalst, John A

    2011-09-01

    The pediatric craniofacial trauma literature largely focuses on the management of mandible fractures, with very little information focusing on pediatric midface fractures, specifically nasoorbitethmoid (NOE) fractures. Because the diagnosis and surgical treatment plan for adult NOE fractures is well established in the literature, the treatment algorithms for NOE are essentially a transfer of adult practices to pediatric patients. This article reviews the differences between the pediatric and adult facial skeleton and the pathology and presentation of NOE fractures in the pediatric craniomaxillofacial skeleton. It also presents the effects of NOE fractures on the growth and development of the pediatric facial skeleton and describes the current surgical management for NOE fractures.

  11. Mandible Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Pickrell, Brent B.; Serebrakian, Arman T.; Maricevich, Renata S.

    2017-01-01

    Mandible fractures account for a significant portion of maxillofacial injuries and the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of these fractures remain challenging despite improved imaging technology and fixation techniques. Understanding appropriate surgical management can prevent complications such as malocclusion, pain, and revision procedures. Depending on the type and location of the fractures, various open and closed surgical reduction techniques can be utilized. In this article, the authors review the diagnostic evaluation, treatment options, and common complications of mandible fractures. Special considerations are described for pediatric and atrophic mandibles. PMID:28496390

  12. [Distal clavicle fractures. Classifications and management].

    PubMed

    Ockert, Ben; Wiedemann, E; Haasters, F

    2015-05-01

    Fractures of the distal third of the clavicle represent 10-30% of all clavicle fractures . Frequently, these fractures result in instability due to a combination of bony and ligamentous injury. Thus, assessment of the stability is essential for adequate treatment of these fractures. This article presents a review of the different classification systems for distal clavicle fractures with respect to anatomical and functional factors to allow for comprehensive assessment of stability. Furthermore, the different treatment options for each fracture type are analyzed. Fractures to the distal third of the clavicle without instability can be treated conservatively with satisfactory outcome. In contrast, instability may result in symptomatic non-union under conservative treatment; therefore, distal clavicle fractures with instability should be treated operatively with respect to the functional demands of the patient. Operative treatment with locked plating in combination with coracoclavicular fixation results in excellent functional results. Arthroscopically assisted fracture fixation may be beneficial in terms of a minimally invasive approach as well as assessment and treatment of associated glenohumeral lesions.

  13. A new "virtual" patient pathway for the management of radial head and neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Prem R; Bhattacharyya, Rahul; Jenkins, Paul J; Anthony, Iain; Rymaszewski, Lech A

    2014-03-01

    Minimally displaced radial head and neck fractures are common and the outcome with conservative treatment is generally excellent. A new protocol was introduced to manage patients with these suspected fractures at a major urban hospital. Simple, undisplaced fractures without other associated injuries or instability were discharged with structured advice but no further face-to-face review. Patients with more complex injuries were reviewed at a "virtual clinic." The aim of this study was to examine the outcome of this process in terms of patient flow, satisfaction, reattendance, and reintervention. The 202 eligible patients, who presented during a 1-year period from October 2011 to October 2012, were identified retrospectively from a prospectively collected administrative database. Mason type III and IV fractures were excluded. A questionnaire was administered by mail or phone call to assess satisfaction with the process, information received, and function. Twenty (10%) patients required face-to-face review in a clinic, whereas 182 (90%) were managed with direct discharge; 155 patients responded to the survey (77%). The overall satisfaction rate was 96% in the suspected fracture group and 87% in the definite fracture group (P = .08). Satisfaction with the information provided was 95%. Two (1%) required late surgical intervention. In this study, patients with suspected Mason I or II fractures were managed with limited face-to-face follow-up with high satisfaction rates. The reintervention rate was extremely low. This process has significant benefits to patients, who have fewer hospital visits, and to orthopaedic departments, which have more time to devote to complex cases. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Torsion fracture of carbon nanocoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Taiichiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Ue, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Kazuki; Umeda, Yoshito

    2012-10-01

    We fix a carbon nanocoil (CNC) on a substrate in a focused ion beam instrument and then fracture the CNC with a tensile load. Using the CNC spring index, we estimate the maximum to average stress ratio on the fractured surface to range from 1.3 to 1.7, indicating stress concentration on the coil wire inner edge. Scanning electron microscopy confirms a hollow region on the inner edge of all fractured surfaces.

  15. Effects of Stretch Shortening Cycle Exercise Fatigue on Stress Fracture Injury Risk during Landing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, C. Roger; Dufek, Janet S.; Bates, Barry T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in landing performance during fatigue that could result in increased stress fracture injury risk. Five participants performed nonfatigued and fatigued drop landings (0.60 m), while ground reaction force (GRF), electromyographic (EMG) activity, and kinematics were recorded. Fatigue was defined as a…

  16. Orthogeriatric co-management improves the outcome of long-term care residents with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Gosch, M; Hoffmann-Weltin, Y; Roth, T; Blauth, M; Nicholas, J A; Kammerlander, C

    2016-10-01

    Fragility fractures are a major health care problem worldwide. Both hip and non-hip fractures are associated with excess mortality in the years following the fracture. Residents of long-term nursing homes represent a special high-risk group for poor outcomes. Orthogeriatric co-management models of care have shown in multiple studies to have medical as well as economic advantages, but their impact on this high-risk group has not been well studied. We studied the outcome of long-term care residents with hip and non-hip fractures admitted to a geriatric fracture center. The study design is a single center, prospective cohort study at a level-I trauma center in Austria running a geriatric fracture center. The cohort included all fragility fracture patients aged over 70 admitted from a long-term care residence from May 2009 to November 2011. The data set consisted of 265 patients; the mean age was 86.8 ± 6.7 years, and 80 % were female. The mean follow-up after the index fracture was 789 days, with a range from 1 to 1842 days. Basic clinical and demographic data were collected at hospital admission. Functional status and mobility were assessed during follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. Additional outcome data regarding readmissions for new fractures were obtained from the hospital information database; mortality was crosschecked with the death registry from the governmental institute of epidemiology. 187 (70.6 %) patients died during the follow-up period, with 78 patients (29.4 %) dying in the first year. The mean life expectancy after the index fracture was 527 (±431) days. Differences in mortality rates between hip and non-hip fracture patients were not statistically significant. Compared to reported mortality rates in the literature, hip fracture patients in this orthogeriatric-comanaged cohort had a significantly reduced one-year mortality [OR of 0.57 (95 % CI 0.31-0.85)]. After adjustment for confounders, only older age (OR 1.091; p = 0.013; CI 1

  17. Treatment of inherently unstable open or infected fractures by open wound management and external skeletal fixation.

    PubMed

    Ness, M G

    2006-02-01

    To assess the use of external skeletal fixation with open wound management for the treatment of inherently unstable open or infected fractures in dogs. A retrospective review of 10 cases. Fracture stabilisation and wound management required only a single anaesthetic, and despite the challenging nature of these injuries, the final outcome was acceptable or good in every case. However, minor complications associated with the fixator pins were quite common, and two dogs developed complications which required additional surgery. Open management of wounds, even when bone was exposed, proved to be an effective technique, and external skeletal fixators were usually effective at maintaining stability throughout an inevitably extended fracture healing period.

  18. Fracture of the fabella.

    PubMed

    Woo, C C

    1988-10-01

    A very rare case of traumatic avulsion fracture of the fabella in a middle-age lady, presented as intermittent posterolateral localized knee pain accentuated by compression against the lateral femoral condyle and by active and passive knee extension, is illustrated. The accumulated chronic microtrauma of the osteoarthritic fabello femoral joint in this lady especially during the whip-kick of daily breaststroke swimming for over 30 yr, may precipitate a fabella stress fracture. Radiographs reveal bilateral fabellae with a left bipartite fabella as a stress fracture traversing it without displacement; this later became a completely displaced bipartite avulsion fracture after accidental knee hyperextension. Conservative treatment consisted of anti-inflammatory/analgesic cream, cryotherapy, TENS, strapping and avoiding knee hyperextension.

  19. Edge Fracture in Complex Fluids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Ewan J; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2017-07-14

    We study theoretically the edge fracture instability in sheared complex fluids, by means of linear stability analysis and direct nonlinear simulations. We derive an exact analytical expression for the onset of edge fracture in terms of the shear-rate derivative of the fluid's second normal stress difference, the shear-rate derivative of the shear stress, the jump in shear stress across the interface between the fluid and the outside medium (usually air), the surface tension of that interface, and the rheometer gap size. We provide a full mechanistic understanding of the edge fracture instability, carefully validated against our simulations. These findings, which are robust with respect to choice of rheological constitutive model, also suggest a possible route to mitigating edge fracture, potentially allowing experimentalists to achieve and accurately measure flows stronger than hitherto possible.

  20. Management of pediatric mandibular fracture using orthodontic vacuum-formed thermoplastic splint: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sanu, O O; Ayodele, Aos; Akeredolu, M O

    2017-05-01

    Fractures of the mandible are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults. The anatomic features of children are protected. Children have a higher adaptation to maxillofacial fractures compared to adults. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures in children differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and the developing dentition. A case of a 6-year-old boy with fractured mandibular symphysis managed by closed reduction using a vacuum formed thermoplastic splint and circummandibular wiring is presented. This article also provides a review of the literature regarding the management of mandibular fracture in young children.

  1. Patient reported health related quality of life early outcomes at 12 months after surgically managed tibial plafond fracture.

    PubMed

    Bonato, Luke J; Edwards, Elton R; Gosling, Cameron McR; Hau, Raphael; Hofstee, Dirk Jan; Shuen, Alex; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2017-04-01

    Tibial plafond fractures represent a small but complex subset of fractures of the lower limb. The aim of this study was to describe the health related quality of life, pain and return to work outcomes 12 months following surgically managed tibial plafond fracture. The Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry (VOTOR) database was used to identify patients with tibial plafond fractures. All patients captured by VOTOR with a tibial plafond fracture between September 2003 and July 2009, were identified consecutively and comprised the initial cohort. The radiographs of all identified patients were classified using the AO/OTA fracture classification. A review of the included patient's medical records was performed. Data were collected on the injury event, management and complications. Outcomes at 12 months were prospectively collected by telephone interview and included return to work, a numerical rating scale for assessment of pain and the Short Form 12 (SF-12). There were 98 unilateral tibial plafond fractures; 91 fractures were managed operatively, 4 non-operatively and 3 underwent amputation. The 91 operatively managed patients were the focus of this study. A two-stage management approach, involving temporary external fixation, followed by definitive open reduction and internal fixation, was the most common operative treatment. The follow-up rate at 12 months was 70%. 57% had returned to work by 12 months post-injury, the median (IQR) pain score was 2 (0-5) and 27% reported moderate to severe persistent pain. Mean PCS-12 scores were significantly lower than Australian norms (p=0.99), 38.2 for males and 37.5 for females. The presence of persistent pain, loss of physical health and a low return to work rate highlights the profound impact of tibial plafond fractures on patients' lives. Although this study looked at the early 12 month results, it is expected these outcomes will continue to improve over time. Further studies, with larger patient numbers, must focus

  2. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density andmore » packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.« less

  3. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing.

  4. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  5. Fractures, stress and fluid flow prior to stimulation of well 27-15, Desert Peak, Nevada, EGS project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    A suite of geophysical logs has been acquired for structural, fluid flow and stress analysis of well 27-15 in the Desert Peak Geothermal Field, Nevada, in preparation for stimulation and development of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Advanced Logic Technologies Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) and Schlumberger Formation MicroScanner (FMS) image logs reveal extensive drilling-induced tensile fractures, showing that the current minimum compressive horizontal stress, Shmin, in the vicinity of well 27-15 is oriented along an azimuth of 114±17°. This orientation is consistent with the dip direction of recently active normal faults mapped at the surface and with extensive sets of fractures and some formation boundaries seen in the BHTV and FMS logs. Temperature and spinner flowmeter surveys reveal several minor flowing fractures that are well oriented for normal slip, although over-all permeability in the well is quite low. These results indicate that well 27-15 is a viable candidate for EGS stimulation and complements research by other investigators including cuttings analysis, a reflection seismic survey, pressure transient and tracer testing, and micro-seismic monitoring.

  6. Outcomes of a disease-management program for patients with recent osteoporotic fracture.

    PubMed

    Che, M; Ettinger, B; Liang, J; Pressman, A R; Johnston, J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of a disease-management program designed to increase rates of bone-mineral-density (BMD) testing and initiation of osteoporosis medication among patients with a recent osteoporotic fracture. We identified 744 consecutive patients aged>or=55 years who were seen at either of 2 of 14 Kaiser Permanente medical facilities in Northern California (KPNC) after sustaining a fracture of the hip, spine, wrist, or humerus between April 2003 and May 2004. These patients were invited to participate in a study of the Fragile Fracture Management Program, whose protocol used fracture-risk assessment tools to determine treatment recommendations. Postfracture care of study participants was compared with usual postfracture care received by osteoporotic-fracture patients at 12 other KPNC facilities. Of the 744 patients who were invited to participate in the study, 293 (39%) agreed to participate, and 169 (23%) completed the evaluation. Of these 169 patients (127 women, 42 men), 65 (51%) of the women and 7 (17%) of the men qualified for drug treatment; of these 72 patients, 6 (86%) of the men and 41 (63%) of the women accepted the offered treatment. At the two study locations, rates of care (BMD testing or prescribing osteoporosis medication) were about twice as high as rates of usual postfracture care observed at 12 other medical centers in KPNC. Compared with patients who received usual care for osteoporotic fracture, patients participating in a postfracture disease management program had substantially higher rates of medical attention given for osteoporosis; however, the overall yield of the program was low. This low uptake rate was related to factors not previously appreciated: many patients refused participation in the program; a high proportion of younger women-and men of all ages-did not qualify for treatment; and treatment was refused by one in three study-qualified women and by one in seven study-qualified men. Additional

  7. Participation in ball sports may represent a prehabilitation strategy to prevent future stress fractures and promote bone health in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Tenforde, Adam Sebastian; Sainani, Kristin Lynn; Carter Sayres, Lauren; Milgrom, Charles; Fredericson, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Sports participation has many benefits for the young athlete, including improved bone health. However, a subset of athletes may attain suboptimal bone health and be at increased risk for stress fractures. This risk is greater for female than for male athletes. In healthy children, high-impact physical activity has been shown to improve bone health during growth and development. We offer our perspective on the importance of promoting high-impact, multidirectional loading activities, including ball sports, as a method of enhancing bone quality and fracture prevention based on collective research. Ball sports have been associated with greater bone mineral density and enhanced bone geometric properties compared with participation in repetitive, low-impact sports such as distance running or nonimpact sports such as swimming. Runners and infantry who participated in ball sports during childhood were at decreased risk of future stress fractures. Gender-specific differences, including the coexistence of female athlete triad, may negate the benefits of previous ball sports on fracture prevention. Ball sports involve multidirectional loading with high ground reaction forces that may result in stiffer and more fracture-resistant bones. Encouraging young athletes to participate in ball sports may optimize bone health in the setting of adequate nutrition and in female athletes, eumenorrhea. Future research to determine timing, frequency, and type of loading activity could result in a primary prevention program for stress fracture injuries and improved life-long bone health. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Facial Fracture Management in Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Abdurrazaq Olanrewaju; Soyele, Olujide Oladele; Godwin, Ndubuizi Ugochukwu; Ibikunle, Adebayo Aremu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Facial fracture is gradually become a public health problem in our community due to the attendant morbidity and mortality. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the pattern of facial fracture in Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital. This cross-sectional study was undertaken to provide information regarding gender, age, etiology, and diagnosis of patients with maxillofacial fractures. Materials and Methods: A 1-year review of patients diagnosed and treated for facial fractures in Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital between January 2011 and December 2011. The diagnosis was based on radiographic data and clinical examination. The main analysis outcome measures were etiology, age, gender, site, and treatment. Data were organized and presented by means of descriptive statistics and Pearson's Chi-square test. The level of significance adopted was 5%. Results: A total of 40 patients were treated in this period. Over 95% were male, 81% were caused by road traffic crash (RTC) and 86.4% were in the 21-30 years group. Most patients (52%) had mandibular fractures, and the most common site was the body. Most patients with midfacial fractures had fractures of the zygomaticomaxillary region (36%), while fractures of the parasymphyseal region were more common in the mandible 156 (31%). The most common treatment for jaw fractures was mandibulomaxillary fixation (MMF). Stable zygomatic complex fractures were reduced (elevated) intraorally, and unstable ones were supported by antral packs. Conclusions: This study highlights facial fractures secondary to RTC as a serious public health problem in our environment. Preventive strategies remain the cheapest way to reduce direct and indirect costs of the sequelae of RTC. It also bring to the fore the necessity to shift to open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of fractures. PMID:24741422

  9. Stress Wave Source Characterization: Impact, Fracture, and Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaskey, Gregory Christofer

    Rapidly varying forces, such as those associated with impact, rapid crack propagation, and fault rupture, are sources of stress waves which propagate through a solid body. This dissertation investigates how properties of a stress wave source can be identified or constrained using measurements recorded at an array of sensor sites located far from the source. This methodology is often called the method of acoustic emission and is useful for structural health monitoring and the noninvasive study of material behavior such as friction and fracture. In this dissertation, laboratory measurements of 1--300 mm wavelength stress waves are obtained by means of piezoelectric sensors which detect high frequency (10 kHz--3MHz) motions of a specimen's surface, picometers to nanometers in amplitude. Then, stress wave source characterization techniques are used to study ball impact, drying shrinkage cracking in concrete, and the micromechanics of stick-slip friction of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and rock/rock interfaces. In order to quantitatively relate recorded signals obtained with an array of sensors to a particular stress wave source, wave propagation effects and sensor distortions must be accounted for. This is achieved by modeling the physics of wave propagation and transduction as linear transfer functions. Wave propagation effects are precisely modeled by an elastodynamic Green's function, sensor distortion is characterized by an instrument response function, and the stress wave source is represented with a force moment tensor. These transfer function models are verified though calibration experiments which employ two different mechanical calibration sources: ball impact and glass capillary fracture. The suitability of the ball impact source model, based on Hertzian contact theory, is experimentally validated for small (˜1 mm) balls impacting massive plates composed of four different materials: aluminum, steel, glass, and PMMA. Using this transfer function approach

  10. Institutional Preventive Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, James C.

    1987-01-01

    Stress is an inevitable characteristic of academic life, but colleges and universities can introduce stress management activities at the organizational level to avert excessive tension. Preventive actions are described, including flexible work schedules and social supports. (Author/MSE)

  11. Biomechanical analysis of a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy bone fracture plate shows less stress shielding compared to a standard clinical metal plate.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Bougherara, Habiba; Aziz, Mina S R; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-09-01

    Femur fracture at the tip of a total hip replacement (THR), commonly known as Vancouver B1 fracture, is mainly treated using rigid metallic bone plates which may result in "stress shielding" leading to bone resorption and implant loosening. To minimize stress shielding, a new carbon fiber (CF)/Flax/Epoxy composite plate has been developed and biomechanically compared to a standard clinical metal plate. For fatigue tests, experiments were done using six artificial femurs cyclically loaded through the femoral head in axial compression for four stages: Stage 1 (intact), stage 2 (after THR insertion), stage 3 (after plate fixation of a simulated Vancouver B1 femoral midshaft fracture gap), and stage 4 (after fracture gap healing). For fracture fixation, one group was fitted with the new CF/Flax/Epoxy plate (n = 3), whereas another group was repaired with a standard clinical metal plate (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) (n = 3). In addition to axial stiffness measurements, infrared thermography technique was used to capture the femur and plate surface stresses during the testing. Moreover, finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to evaluate the composite plate's axial stiffness and surface stress field. Experimental results showed that the CF/Flax/Epoxy plated femur had comparable axial stiffness (fractured = 645 ± 67 N/mm; healed = 1731 ± 109 N/mm) to the metal-plated femur (fractured = 658 ± 69 N/mm; healed = 1751 ± 39 N/mm) (p = 1.00). However, the bone beneath the CF/Flax/Epoxy plate was the only area that had a significantly higher average surface stress (fractured = 2.10 ± 0.66 MPa; healed = 1.89 ± 0.39 MPa) compared to bone beneath the metal plate (fractured = 1.18 ± 0.93 MPa; healed = 0.71 ± 0.24 MPa) (p < 0.05). FEA bone surface stresses yielded peak of 13 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 1), 16 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 2), 85 MPa for composite and 129

  12. A case report of a completely displaced stress fracture of the femoral shaft in a middle-aged male athlete - A precursor of things to come?

    PubMed

    Larsen, Peter; Elsoe, Rasmus; Rathleff, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Displaced stress fractures of the femoral shaft are very uncommon. The proportion of middle-aged and older age groups participating in long-distance running, triathlon and other high intensity sports is increasing. As a consequence stress fracture of the femoral shaft may be on the rise in the future. The patient was 43 years old male caucasian triathlete. The authors met the patient after he was admitted with a displaced femoral shaft fracture. The fracture occurred during running at the national championship in ½ Ironman. The patient reported that his symptoms had gradually developed over the last month before the fracture with pain localized anterior to the thigh. The patient interpreted the symptoms as local muscle damage. A clinical examination was conducted by a physiotherapist and the symptoms were interpreted as a simple muscle injury in the quadriceps. When presented with a patient with non-traumatic, diffuse anterior thigh pain in an individual of this age, who is participating in high-level endurance running; clinicians should consider the possibility that the cause of the symptoms may be a femoral shaft stress fracture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Distal Fibula Fractures in National Football League Athletes.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Mack, Christina; Franke, Kristina; Barnes, Ronnie P; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the frequency of distal fibula fractures in elite athletes and the significant potential impact on the athletes' season and future careers, little data exist characterizing the epidemiology of these injuries or, more importantly, return to competition. To (1) evaluate the incidence of acute distal fibula fractures in National Football League (NFL) athletes, including isolated distal fibula and combined ankle fracture patterns; (2) analyze distal fibula fracture rates in NFL athletes by position, type of play, and contact type; (3) determine the rates of distal fibula fracture surgery in NFL athletes; and (4) report the days missed due to distal fibula fractures in NFL athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. A retrospective review of distal fibula fractures reported to the NFL from 2000 to 2014 was performed using the NFL Injury Surveillance System. All distal fibula fractures were included, along with isolated and combined fracture patterns. Stress fractures and proximal fibula fractures were excluded. Epidemiological data and rates of surgery were determined. Return to sport was calculated and stratified by injury pattern and management. Overall, 237 distal fibula fractures in NFL athletes from 2000 to 2014 were included; 197 (83%) were isolated distal fibula fractures. A mean of 16 distal fibula fractures occurred each year (median, 16 per year). Fractures occurred most frequently on running (38%) and passing (24%) plays, but the frequency was next highest on kickoffs (16%), despite the relative infrequency of kickoffs during the average game compared with other play types. Surgery was reported for more than half of all distal fibula fractures (n = 128, 54%). Overall, patients who underwent surgery missed significantly more days (mean, 123.8 days) than players who did not undergo surgery (mean, 75.3 days) ( P < .001). Players with isolated distal fibula fractures had significantly fewer days missed (mean, 93.6 days) compared with those with combined

  14. Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2018 Conference Snapshot Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress When you're feeling anxious or stressed, the ... every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact. Stress Relief Kits Feeling stressed? Get an ADAA stress ...

  15. Fractography applied to investigations of cores, outcrops, and fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, B.

    1995-11-01

    Fractography focuses investigations on the topography of fracture surfaces. This topography is composed of fractographic features produced by changing stress magnitudes and directions along the advancing crack tip. Fractographic features commonly useful in core and outcrop analysis include the origin, twist hackle, inclusion hackle, and rib marks. These structures develop during brittle failure by Mode I loading at the crack tip and act together to form a hackle plume. Fractographic components throughout the plume record the dynamic history of fracture development. Components show, to the limit of visual scale, the principal stress directions, as well as relative stress magnitudes andmore » propagation velocities, that existed at the advancing fracture front. This information contributes to more meaningful conclusions in fracture investigations. In core studies, fractography aids identification of induced and natural fractures. Induced fractures and fractographic features show distinct geometry with that of the core and reflect the effects of the core boundary, in-situ stresses, drilling stresses, and rock anisotropies. Certain drilling- and coring-induced fractures possess orientations and fractographic features that suggest the direction of minimum in-situ stress and that this direction may change abruptly within the drilled volume of rock. Cored natural fractures generally originated away from the bit and possess fractographic features that bear no geometerical relationship to core parameters. Abrupt changes of natural fracture strike and development of twist hackle suggest locally complex paleostress distributions. A combined knowledge of in-situ stress and natural fracture trends is useful in predicting reservoir permeability. In outcrop, fractographic features, including abutting relationships between joints, more readily depict order of development, intrastratum distribution of fracturing stress, and size for joints in any set.« less

  16. Stress transfer and matrix-cohesive fracture mechanism in microfibrillated cellulose-gelatin nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Quero, Franck; Padilla, Cristina; Campos, Vanessa; Luengo, Jorge; Caballero, Leonardo; Melo, Francisco; Li, Qiang; Eichhorn, Stephen J; Enrione, Javier

    2018-09-01

    Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) obtained from eucalyptus was embedded in gelatin from two sources; namely bovine and salmon gelatin. Raman spectroscopy revealed that stress is transferred more efficiently from bovine gelatin to the MFC when compared to salmon gelatin. Young's modulus, tensile strength, strain at failure and work of fracture of the nanocomposite films were improved by ∼67, 131, 43 y 243% respectively when using salmon gelatin as matrix material instead of bovine gelatin. Imaging of the tensile fracture surface of the MFC-gelatin nanocomposites revealed that crack formation occurs predominantly within bovine and salmon gelatin matrices rather than within the MFC or at the MFC/gelatin interface. This suggests that the mechanical failure mechanism in these nanocomposite materials is predominantly governed by a matrix-cohesive fracture mechanism. Both strength and flexibility are desirable properties for composite coatings made from gelatin-based materials, and so the findings of this study could assist in their utilization in the food and pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of Mason type 1 radial head fractures: a regional survey and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Samer S S; Moideen, Abdul Nazeer; Kotwal, Rahul; Mohanty, Khitish

    2014-10-01

    Despite being the most common fracture around the elbow, the management of Mason type 1 radial head fractures lacks a clear protocol in literature. The aims of this study were to assess our practice of managing this injury and to create guidance for the management of these fractures based on literature review. We designed a survey investigating the practice of orthopaedic surgeons in the management of Mason type 1 fracture. The literature review was carried out looking for the best practice guidelines. Forty-nine surgeons (out of 56) responded, and mean duration of immobilisation was 11.69 days with the collar and cuff sling as the preferred method. 65.3% offered physiotherapy service to their patients. 20.4% recommended plain radiographic imaging follow-up. Mean duration of follow-up was 43.9 days. Decision to discharge the patient was mostly (77.6%) dependent on clinical improvement at time of last examination. 4.1% of treatment decisions were evidence based. We observed a wide variation in the management of this common injury. Based on the current literature, the best protocol for the management of type 1 radial head fractures should be joint aspiration, followed by immobilisation in a broad arm sling for 2 days. At the first outpatient visit, assessment of the collateral stability should be performed. Patients with stable elbows should be encouraged to stretch these beyond the painful range. Patients can be discharged at this stage with an advice to come back for a clinical and radiographic assessment if there is no improvement at 6 weeks.

  18. An Experimental Investigation into Failure and Localization Phenomena in the Extension to Shear Fracture Transition in Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choens, R. C., II; Chester, F. M.; Bauer, S. J.; Flint, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-pressure assisted fracturing can produce mesh and other large, interconnected and complex networks consisting of both extension and shear fractures in various metamorphic, magmatic and tectonic systems. Presently, rock failure criteria for tensile and low-mean compressive stress conditions is poorly defined, although there is accumulating evidence that the transition from extension to shear fracture with increasing mean stress is continuous. We report on the results of experiments designed to document failure criteria, fracture mode, and localization phenomena for several rock types (sandstone, limestone, chalk and marble). Experiments were conducted in triaxial extension using a necked (dogbone) geometry to achieve mixed tension and compression stress states with local component-strain measurements in the failure region. The failure envelope for all rock types is similar, but are poorly described using Griffith or modified Griffith (Coulomb or other) failure criteria. Notably, the mode of fracture changes systematically from pure extension to shear with increase in compressive mean stress and display a continuous change in fracture orientation with respect to principal stress axes. Differential stress and inelastic strain show a systematic increase with increasing mean stress, whereas the axial stress decreases before increasing with increasing mean stress. The stress and strain data are used to analyze elastic and plastic strains leading to failure and compare the experimental results to predictions for localization using constitutive models incorporating on bifurcation theory. Although models are able to describe the stability behavior and onset of localization qualitatively, the models are unable to predict fracture type or orientation. Constitutive models using single or multiple yield surfaces are unable to predict the experimental results, reflecting the difficulty in capturing the changing micromechanisms from extension to shear failure. Sandia

  19. Long-Term Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, James L.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques enabling faculty to decrease stress to more reasonable and productive levels are discussed, including management of chemical stressors, physical activities, relaxation, coping strategies for disappointment, emotional support, assertiveness, and time management. (MSE)

  20. Strain-dependent partial slip on rock fractures under seismic-frequency torsion: Seismic-Frequency Fracture Partial Slip

    DOE PAGES

    Saltiel, Seth; Bonner, Brian P.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2017-05-05

    Measurements of nonlinear modulus and attenuation of fractures provide the opportunity to probe their mechanical state. We have adapted a low-frequency torsional apparatus to explore the seismic signature of fractures under low normal stress, simulating low effective stress environments such as shallow or high pore pressure reservoirs. We report strain-dependent modulus and attenuation for fractured samples of Duperow dolomite (a carbon sequestration target reservoir in Montana), Blue Canyon Dome rhyolite (a geothermal analog reservoir in New Mexico), and Montello granite (a deep basement disposal analog from Wisconsin). We use a simple single effective asperity partial slip model to fit ourmore » measured stress-strain curves, and solve for the friction coefficient, contact radius, and full slip condition. These observations have the potential to develop into new field techniques for measuring differences in frictional properties during reservoir engineering manipulations and estimate the stress conditions where reservoir fractures and faults begin to fully slip.« less

  1. Strain-dependent partial slip on rock fractures under seismic-frequency torsion: Seismic-Frequency Fracture Partial Slip

    SciTech Connect

    Saltiel, Seth; Bonner, Brian P.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    Measurements of nonlinear modulus and attenuation of fractures provide the opportunity to probe their mechanical state. We have adapted a low-frequency torsional apparatus to explore the seismic signature of fractures under low normal stress, simulating low effective stress environments such as shallow or high pore pressure reservoirs. We report strain-dependent modulus and attenuation for fractured samples of Duperow dolomite (a carbon sequestration target reservoir in Montana), Blue Canyon Dome rhyolite (a geothermal analog reservoir in New Mexico), and Montello granite (a deep basement disposal analog from Wisconsin). We use a simple single effective asperity partial slip model to fit ourmore » measured stress-strain curves, and solve for the friction coefficient, contact radius, and full slip condition. These observations have the potential to develop into new field techniques for measuring differences in frictional properties during reservoir engineering manipulations and estimate the stress conditions where reservoir fractures and faults begin to fully slip.« less

  2. Hydraulic Fracturing of Soils; A Literature Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    best case, or worst case. The study reported herein is an overview of one such test or technique, hydraulic fracturing , which is defined as the...formation of cracks, in soil by the application of hydraulic pressure greater than the minor principal stress at that point. Hydraulic fracturing , as a... hydraulic fracturing as a means for determination of lateral stresses, the technique can still be used for determining in situ total stress and permeability at a point in a cohesive soil.

  3. Modified Thomas splint-cast combination for the management of limb fractures in small equids.

    PubMed

    Ladefoged, Søren; Grulke, Sigrid; Busoni, Valeria; Serteyn, Didier; Salciccia, Alexandra; Verwilghen, Denis

    2017-04-01

    To describe the management and outcome of limb fractures in small domestic equids treated with a modified Thomas splint-cast combination (MTSCC). Retrospective case series. Client owned horses and donkeys. Medical records, including radiographs, were reviewed for details of animals diagnosed with a limb fracture and treated by external coaptation using a MTSCC (2001-2012). Follow-up >6 months after discharge was obtained via telephone consultation with owners or veterinarians. Nine horses and 4 donkeys were identified with fractures of the tibial diaphysis (n = 4), ulna (n = 3), distal metatarsus (n = 2), proximal metacarpus (n = 1), radial diaphysis (n = 1), calcaneus (n = 1), and distal femoral physis (n = 1). Follow-up was available for 12 equids, of which 8 (67%) recovered from the fracture and became pasture sound. Six equids developed obvious external deformation of the affected limb. Selected small equids with long bone fractures, and without athletic expectations, can be managed with external coaptation using an MTSCC. The owner should be informed that the treatment is considered a salvage procedure. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Management of acute unstable distal clavicle fracture with a modified coracoclavicular stabilization technique using a bidirectional coracoclavicular loop system.

    PubMed

    Kanchanatawan, Wichan; Wongthongsalee, Ponrachai

    2016-02-01

    Fracture of the distal clavicle is not uncommon. Despite the vast literature available for the management of this fracture, there is no consensus regarding the gold standard treatment for this fracture. To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes and complications of acute unstable distal clavicle fracture when treated by a modified coracoclavicular stabilization technique using a bidirectional coracoclavicular loop system. Thirty-nine patients (32 males, 7 females) with acute unstable distal clavicle fractures treated by modified coracoclavicular stabilization using the surgical technique of bidirectional coracoclavicular (CC) loops seated behind the coracoacromial (CA) ligament were retrospectively reviewed. Mean follow-up time was 35.7 months (range 24-47 months). The outcomes measured included union rate, union time, CC distances when compared to the patients' uninjured shoulders, and the Constant and ASES shoulder scores, which were evaluated 6 months after surgery. All fractures displayed clinical union within 13 weeks postoperatively. The mean union time was 9.2 weeks (range 7-13 weeks). At the time of union, the CC distances on the affected shoulders were on average 0.9 mm (range 0-1.6 mm) longer than the unaffected shoulders. At 6 months after surgery, the Constant and ASES scores were on average 93.4 (72-100) and 91.5 (75-100), respectively. No complications related to the fixation loops, musculocutaneous nerve injuries, or fractures of coracoid or clavicle were recorded. One case of surgical wound dehiscence was observed due to superficial infection. Enlargement of the clavicle drill hole without migration of the buttons was observed in 9 out of 16 cases at a follow-up time of at least 30 months after the original operation. Modified CC stabilization using bidirectional CC loops seated behind the CA ligament is a simple surgical technique that naturally restores stability to the distal clavicle fracture. It also produces predictable outcomes, a high

  5. Central Japan's Atera Active Fault's Wide-Fractured Zone: An Examination of the Structure and In-situ Crustal Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, R.; Omura, K.; Matsuda, T.; Mizuochi, Y.; Uehara, D.; Chiba, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Yamamoto, T.

    2001-12-01

    In-situ downhole measurements and coring within and around an active fault zone are needed to better understand the structure and material properties of fault rocks as well as the physical state of active faults and intra-plate crust. Particularly, the relationship between the stress concentration state and the heterogeneous strength of an earthquake fault zone is important to estimate earthquake occurrence mechanisms which correspond to the prediction of an earthquake. It is necessary to compare some active faults in different conditions of the chrysalis stage and their relation to subsequent earthquake occurrence. To better understand such conditions, "Active Fault Zone Drilling Project" has been conducted in the central part of Japan by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention. The Nojima fault which appeared on the surface by the 1995 Great Kobe earthquake (M=7.2) and the Neodani fault created by the 1981 Nobi earthquake, the greatest inland earthquake M=8.0 in Japan, have been drilled through the fault fracture zones. During these past four years, a similar experiment and research at the Atera fault, of which some parts seem to have been dislocated by the 1586 Tensyo earthquake, has been undertaken. The features of the Atera fault are as follows: (1) total length is about 70 km, (2) general trend is NW45_Kwith a left-lateral strike slip, (3) slip rate is estimated as 3-5 m/1000 yrs. and the average recurrence time as 1700 yrs., (4) seismicity is very low at present, and (5) lithologies around the fault are basically granitic rocks and rhyolite. We have conducted integrated investigations by surface geophysical survey and drilling around the Atera fault. Six boreholes have been drilled from the depth of 400 m to 630 m. Four of these boreholes are located on a line crossing the fracture zone of the Atera fault. Resistivity and gravity structures inferred from surface geophysical surveys were compared with the physical properties

  6. Evidence for initiation of frictional partial slip as the mechanism behind nonlinear stress-strain hysteresis in rock fractures under seismic-frequency torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, S.; Bonner, B. P.; Delbridge, B. G.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    We have adapted a low-frequency (0.1 - 64 Hz) torsional apparatus to explore the pure shear behavior of rock fractures under low normal stresses, simulating low effective stress environments - shallow depths and/or under high pore pressures. The instrument is unique in this ability to measure under very low confinement as well as to probe partial slip on the outside of asperities, before full slip nucleation occurs. Using a sinusoidal oscillation around this condition, we can probe the stress-strain constitutive relation at a range of strain amplitudes and the rate-dependence of the initiation of asperity slip. We find different, nonlinear, stress-strain constitutive relations for dolomite, rhyolite, and granite fractured samples, but all show softening at high strain amplitudes (above microstrain or micron-scale displacement). All measured samples exhibit qualitatively similar time-series hysteresis loops and frequency-dependence. The low frequency stress-strain loops stiffen at the high strain static end of the sinusoidal oscillation. This shape is determined by harmonic generation in the strain, while the stress signal has low power in harmonics, confirming that the driver and electronics are not the source of this nonlinearity. We also observe that this stiffening cusp does not occur as frequency increases above 8 Hz (opposite to normal dispersion seen at higher normal stresses). We monitor the fracture surface wear with repeated cycles to show the extent of slip on mapped asperities. These observations suggest that a rate dependent, healing, process causes the nonlinear responce of fracture faces under low normal stress to periodic shear. We propose that static friction at the low strain-rate part of the cycle, when given enough time at low oscillation frequencies, causes this stiffening cusp shape in the hysteretic stress-strain curve. An analytic model with idealized contact area is used to constrain the rate-state friction constitutive model parameters

  7. Managing workplace stress in community pharmacy organisations: lessons from a review of the wider stress management and prevention literature.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sally; Johnson, Sheena; Hassell, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Workplace stress in community pharmacy is increasing internationally due, in part, to pharmacists' expanding roles and escalating workloads. Whilst the business case for preventing and managing workplace stress by employers is strong, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of organisational stress management interventions in community pharmacy settings. To identify and synthesise existing evidence for the effectiveness of organisational solutions to workplace stress from the wider organisational literature which may be adaptable to community pharmacies. A secondary synthesis of existing reviews. Publications were identified through keyword searches of electronic databases and the internet; inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied; data about setting, intervention, method of evaluation, effectiveness and conclusions (including factors for success) were extracted and synthesised. Eighteen reviews of the stress management and prevention literature were identified